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Sample records for advanced ground-based detectors

  1. The potential of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors to detect generic deviations from general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narikawa, Tatsuya; Tagoshi, Hideyuki

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the potential of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA to detect generic deviations of gravitational waveforms from the predictions of general relativity. We use the parameterized post-Einsteinian formalism to characterize the deviations, and assess what magnitude of deviations are detectable by using an approximate decision scheme based on Bayesian statistics. We find that there exist detectable regions of the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters for different binary masses from the observation of a single gravitational wave event. The regions are not excluded by currently existing binary pulsar observations for the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters at higher post-Newtonian order. We also find that neglect of orbital eccentricity or tidal deformation effects do not cause a significant bias on the detectable region of generic deviations from general relativity.

  2. Advanced technologies for future ground-based, laser-interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Giles; Hild, Stefan; Pitkin, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We present a review of modern optical techniques being used and developed for the field of gravitational wave detection. We describe the current state-of-the-art of gravitational waves detector technologies with regard to optical layouts, suspensions and test masses. We discuss the dominant sources and noise in each of these subsystems and the developments that will help mitigate them for future generations of detectors. We very briefly summarise some of the novel astrophysics that will be possible with these upgraded detectors. PMID:25705087

  3. Ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational wave is predicted by Einstein’s general relativity, which conveys the information of source objects in the universe. The detection of the gravitational wave is the direct test of the theory and will be used as new tool to investigate dynamical nature of the universe. However, the effect of the gravitational wave is too tiny to be easily detected. From the first attempt utilizing resonant antenna in the 1960s, efforts of improving antenna sensitivity were continued by applying cryogenic techniques until approaching the quantum limit of sensitivity. However, by the year 2000, resonant antenna had given the way to interferometers. Large projects involving interferometers started in the 1990s, and achieved successful operations by 2010 with an accumulated extensive number of technical inventions and improvements. In this memorial year 2015, we enter the new phase of gravitational-wave detection by the forthcoming operation of the second-generation interferometers. The main focus in this paper is on how advanced techniques have been developed step by step according to scaling the arm length of the interferometer up and the history of fighting against technical noise, thermal noise, and quantum noise is presented along with the current projects, LIGO, Virgo, GEO-HF and KAGRA.

  4. Advanced far infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > {lambda} > 50 {mu}m are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide.

  5. Detectability and Parameter Estimation of Gravitational Waves from Cosmic String with Ground-Based Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuzurihara, Hirotaka; Kanda, Nobuyuki

    Cosmic string is one dimensional topological defects which might be formed at the phase transition in the early universe. Gravitational Wave (GW) waveform and its power spectrum from structure in closed cosmic string loop that is called as "cusp" are theoretically predicted. Cosmic string is thought to be described with two characteristic parameters: string tension μ and initial loop size α. We demonstrate numerical simulation for GWs from closed comic string loops to study detectability and parameter decision with ground-based detectors, such as KAGRA, advanced LIGO, advanced Virgo and LIGO-India. We employ characteristic parameters 10 - 13 < Gμ < 10 - 7 and 10 - 16 < α < 10 - 1, assuming uniform distribution of cosmic string in isotropic direction, at time epochs of loop forming and GW emission according to the universe model. We calculate waveform numerically in time domain of each GW from these distributed cosmic strings, and superpose waveforms to generate continuously observational signal on the ground-based GW detectors, including detector responses. We consider data analysis for stochastic background type gravitational wave signatures in the observation.

  6. Millikelvin cryocooler for space- and ground-based detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, J.; Hardy, G.; Hepburn, I.; Milward, S.; Coker, P.; Theobald, C.

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes the design of a continuously operating millikelvin cryocooler (mKCC) and its origins. It takes heritage from the double adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (dADR) which was built for the European Space Agency (ESA). The compact design is based on a tandem configuration continuous ADR which alternately cycles two dADRs. The mKCC is a single module (dimensions 355 x 56 x120 mm) which operates from a 4 K bath (liquid or cryocooler) and provides an interface to the user which is settable from < 100 mK to 4 K. Predicted maximum cooling power at 100 mK is 7μW. It will use only single crystal tungsten magnetoresistive heat switches (the first ADR cooler to do so) and the measured thermal performance of these heat switches is presented. The mKCC uses ten shielded 2 Tesla superconducting magnets capable of ramping to full field in 20 - 30 seconds. This has been demonstrated in the lab and the results are given for the successful performance of a prototype Chromium Potassium Alum (CPA) pill using one of these magnets. The mKCC has been designed to be fully automated and user friendly with the aim of expanding the use of millikelvin cryogenics and providing a good testing and operating platform for detector systems.

  7. Instruments, Detectors and the Future of Astronomy with Large Ground Based Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Douglas A.; Amico, Paola; Baade, Dietrich; Barden, Sam; Campbell, Randall; Finger, Gert; Gilmore, Kirk; Gredel, Roland; Hickson, Paul; Howell, Steve; Hubin, Norbert; Kaufer, Andreas; Kohley, Ralf; MacQueen, Philip; Markelov, Sergej; Merrill, Mike; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakaya, Hidehiko; O'Donoghue, Darragh; Oliva, Tino; Richichi, Andrea; Salmon, Derrick; Schmidt, Ricardo; Su, Hongjun; Tulloch, Simon; García Vargas, Maria Luisa; Wagner, R. Mark; Wiecha, Olivier; Ye, Binxun

    2005-01-01

    Results of a survey of instrumentation and detector systems, either currently deployed or planned for use at telescopes larger than 3.5 m, in ground based observatories world-wide, are presented. This survey revealed a number of instrumentation design trends at optical, near, and mid-infrared wavelengths. Some of the most prominent trends include the development of vastly larger optical detector systems (> 109 pixels) than anything built to date, and the frequent use of mosaics of near-infrared detectors - something that was quite rare only a decade ago in astronomy. Some future science applications for detectors are then explored, in an attempt to build a bridge between current detectors and what will be needed to support the research ambitions of astronomers in the future.

  8. AQUARIUS, the next generation mid-IR detector for ground-based astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Derek; Finger, Gert; Jakob, Gerd; Eschbaumer, Siegfried; Mehrgan, Leander; Meyer, Manfred; Steigmeier, Joerg

    2012-07-01

    ESO has recently funded the development of the AQUARIUS detector at Raytheon Vision Systems, a new mega-pixel Si:As Impurity Band Conduction array for use in ground based astronomical applications at wavelengths between 3 - 28 μm. The array has been designed to have low noise, low dark current, switchable gain and be read out at very high frame rates. It has 64 individual outputs capable of pixel read rates of 3MHz, implying continuous data-rates in excess of 300 Mbytes/second. It is scheduled for deployment into the VISIR instrument at the VLT in 2012, for next generation VLTI instruments and base-lined for METIS, the mid-IR candidate instrument for the E-ELT. A new mid-IR test facility has been developed for AQUARIUS detector development which includes a low thermal background cryostat, high speed cryogenic pre-amplification and high speed data acquisition and detector operation at 5K. We report on all the major performance aspects of this new detector including conversion gain, read noise, dark generation rate, linearity, well capacity, pixel operability, low frequency noise, persistence and electrical cross-talk. We describe the many possible readout modes of this detector and their application. We also report on external issues with the operation of these detectors at such low temperatures. Finally we report on the electronic developments required to operate such a detector at the required high data rates and in a typical mid-IR instrument.

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Predictions for the rates of compact binary coalescences observable by ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Aoudia, S.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Aronsson, M.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D. E.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th S.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, K.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bigotta, S.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Blomberg, A.; Boccara, C.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Boyle, M.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Corda, C.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coulon, J. P.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dari, A.; Das, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Davis, A.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; del Prete, M.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Devanka, P.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dueck, J.; Dumas, J. C.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J. D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hall, P.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Krause, T.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kullman, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubiński, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mackowski, J. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Mak, C.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIvor, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Merill, L.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mino, Y.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreau, J.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Morioka, T.; Mors, K.; Mosca, S.; Moscatelli, V.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; MowLowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Pardi, S.; Pareja, M.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabaste, O.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radke, T.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Röver, C.; Rogstad, S.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de la Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santostasi, G.; Saraf, S.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Stein, A. J.; Stein, L. C.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Trummer, J.; Tseng, K.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vaishnav, B.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P. P.; Yvert, M.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2010-09-01

    We present an up-to-date, comprehensive summary of the rates for all types of compact binary coalescence sources detectable by the initial and advanced versions of the ground-based gravitational-wave detectors LIGO and Virgo. Astrophysical estimates for compact-binary coalescence rates depend on a number of assumptions and unknown model parameters and are still uncertain. The most confident among these estimates are the rate predictions for coalescing binary neutron stars which are based on extrapolations from observed binary pulsars in our galaxy. These yield a likely coalescence rate of 100 Myr-1 per Milky Way Equivalent Galaxy (MWEG), although the rate could plausibly range from 1 Myr-1 MWEG-1 to 1000 Myr-1 MWEG-1 (Kalogera et al 2004 Astrophys. J. 601 L179; Kalogera et al 2004 Astrophys. J. 614 L137 (erratum)). We convert coalescence rates into detection rates based on data from the LIGO S5 and Virgo VSR2 science runs and projected sensitivities for our advanced detectors. Using the detector sensitivities derived from these data, we find a likely detection rate of 0.02 per year for Initial LIGO-Virgo interferometers, with a plausible range between 2 × 10-4 and 0.2 per year. The likely binary neutron-star detection rate for the Advanced LIGO-Virgo network increases to 40 events per year, with a range between 0.4 and 400 per year.

  10. Statistical analysis of ground based magnetic field measurements with the field line resonance detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, F.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Constantinescu, O. D.; Mann, I. R.; Milling, D. K.; Motschmann, U.; Rae, I. J.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper we introduce the field line resonance detector (FLRD), a wave telescope technique which has been specially adapted to estimate the spectral energy density of field line resonance (FLR) phase structures in a superposed wave field. The field line resonance detector is able to detect and correctly characterize several superposed FLR structures of a wave field and therefore constitutes a new and powerful tool in ULF pulsation studies. In our work we derive the technique from the classical wave telescope beamformer and present a statistical analysis of one year of ground based magnetometer data from the Canadian magnetometer network CANOPUS, now known as CARISMA. The statistical analysis shows that the FLRD is capable of detecting and characterizing superposed or hidden FLR structures in most of the detected ULF pulsation events; the one year statistical database is therefore extraordinarily comprehensive. The results of this analysis confirm the results of previous FLR characterizations and furthermore allow a detailed generalized dispersion analysis of FLRs.

  11. Geospace Science from Ground-based Magnetometer Arrays: Advances in Sensors, Data Collection, and Data Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Chi, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Networks of ground-based magnetometers now provide the basis for the diagnosis of magnetic disturbances associated with solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling on a truly global scale. Advances in sensor and digitisation technologies offer increases in sensitivity in fluxgate, induction coil, and new micro-sensor technologies - including the promise of hybrid sensors. Similarly, advances in remote connectivity provide the capacity for truly real-time monitoring of global dynamics at cadences sufficient for monitoring and in many cases resolving system level spatio-temporal ambiguities especially in combination with conjugate satellite measurements. A wide variety of the plasmaphysical processes active in driving geospace dynamics can be monitored based on the response of the electrical current system, including those associated with changes in global convection, magnetospheric substorms and nightside tail flows, as well as due to solar wind changes in both dynamic pressure and in response to rotations of the direction of the IMF. Significantly, any changes to the dynamical system must be communicated by the propagation of long-period Alfven and/or compressional waves. These wave populations hence provide diagnostics for not only the energy transport by the wave fields themselves, but also provide a mechanism for diagnosing the structure of the background plasma medium through which the waves propagate. Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves are especially significant in offering a monitor for mass density profiles, often invisible to particle detectors because of their very low energy, through the application of a variety of magneto-seismology and cross-phase techniques. Renewed scientific interest in the plasma waves associated with near-Earth substorm dynamics, including magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at substorm onset and their relation to magnetotail flows, as well the importance of global scale ultra-low frequency waves for the energisation, transport

  12. AQUARIUS: the next generation mid-IR detector for ground-based astronomy, an update.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Derek; Finger, Gert; Jakob, Gerd; Beckmann, Udo

    2014-07-01

    ESO has already published data from a preliminary laboratory analysis on the new mid-IR detector, AQUARIUS, at the previous SPIE conference of 2012, held in Amsterdam2. This data analysis indicated that this new mid-IR Si:As IBC detector, from Raytheon Vision Systems, was an excellent astronomical detector when compared to previous generations of this detector type, specifically in terms of stability, read noise and cosmetic quality. Since that time, the detector has been deployed into the VISIR1 instrument at the VLT, with very mixed performance results, especially when used with the telescope secondary mirror, to chop between two areas of sky to do background subtraction and at the same time when many frames are co-added to improve the signal to noise performance. This is the typical mode of operation for a mid-IR instrument on a ground based telescope. Preliminary astronomical data analysis indicated that the new detector was a factor of two to three times less sensitive in terms of its signal to noise per unit time performance when directly compared to the old DRS detector that AQUARIUS was designed to replace. To determine the reason for this loss of sensitivity, the instrument was removed from the telescope and not offered to the ESO user community. A detector testing campaign was then initiated in our laboratory to determine the reasons for this loss of sensitivity, assuming that it was an issue with the new detector itself. This paper reports on our latest laboratory measurements to determine the reasons for this loss of sensitivity. We specifically report on indirect measurements made to measure the quantum efficiency of the detector, which can be difficult to measure directly. We also report on a little known source of noise, called Excess Low Frequency Noise (ELFN). Detailed analysis and testing has confirmed that this ELFN is the reason for the loss of instrument sensitivity. This has been proven by a re-commissioning phase at the telescope with the

  13. Impact of particles on the Planck HFI detectors: Ground-based measurements and physical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, A.; Ade, P.; Atik, Y.; Benoit, A.; Bréele, E.; Bock, J. J.; Camus, P.; Chabot, M.; Charra, M.; Crill, B. P.; Coron, N.; Coulais, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Fauvet, L.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Guillaudin, O.; Holmes, W.; Jones, W. C.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Macías-Pérez, J.; Martinez, M.; Miniussi, A.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pelissier, A.; Piat, M.; Puget, J.-L.; Renault, C.; Rosset, C.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Spencer, L. D.; Sudiwala, R.

    2014-09-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) surveyed the sky continuously from August 2009 to January 2012. Its noise and sensitivity performance were excellent (from 11 to 40 aW Hz-1), but the rate of cosmic-ray impacts on the HFI detectors was unexpectedly higher than in other instruments. Furthermore, collisions of cosmic rays with the focal plane produced transient signals in the data (glitches) with a wide range of characteristics and a rate of about one glitch per second. A study of cosmic-ray impacts on the HFI detector modules has been undertaken to categorize and characterize the glitches, to correct the HFI time-ordered data, and understand the residual effects on Planck maps and data products. This paper evaluates the physical origins of glitches observed by the HFI detectors. To better understand the glitches observed by HFI in flight, several ground-based experiments were conducted with flight-spare HFI bolometer modules. The experiments were conducted between 2010 and 2013 with HFI test bolometers in different configurations using varying particles and impact energies. The bolometer modules were exposed to 23 MeV protons from the Orsay IPN Tandem accelerator, and to 241Am and 244Cm α-particle and 55Fe radioactive X-ray sources. The calibration data from the HFI ground-based preflight tests were used to further characterize the glitches and compare glitch rates with statistical expectations under laboratory conditions. Test results provide strong evidence that the dominant family of glitches observed in flight are due to cosmic-ray absorption by the silicon die substrate on which the HFI detectors reside. Glitch energy is propagated to the thermistor by ballistic phonons, while thermal diffusion also contributes. The average ratio between the energy absorbed, per glitch, in the silicon die and thatabsorbed in the bolometer is equal to 650. We discuss the implications of these results for future satellite missions, especially those in the far

  14. Ground-based gravitational wave interferometric detectors of the first and second generation: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losurdo, Giovanni

    2012-06-01

    The era of first-generation gravitational wave interferometric detectors is ending. No signals have been detected so far. However, remarkable results have been achieved: the design sensitivity has been approached (and in some cases even exceeded) together with the achievement of robustness and reliability; a world-wide network of detectors has been established; the data collected so far has allowed upper limits to be put on several types of sources; some second-generation technologies have been tested on these detectors. The scenario for the next few years is very exciting. The projects to upgrade LIGO and Virgo to second-generation interferometers, capable of increasing the detection rate by a factor of ˜1000, have been funded. The construction of Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo has started. GEO600 has started the upgrade to GEO HF, introducing light squeezing for the first time on a large detector. LCGT has been partly funded and the construction of the vacuum system is underway. There is a possibility that the third Advanced LIGO interferometer will be constructed in India. So, a powerful worldwide network could be in operation by the end of the decade. In this paper, we review the results achieved so far and the perspectives for the advanced detectors.

  15. Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. G.; Howell, E. J.; Ju, L.; Zhao, C.

    2012-02-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Detectors: 1. Gravitational waves D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao and E. J. Howell; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair and E. J. Howell; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao, H. Miao, E. J. Howell, and P. Barriga; 4. Gravitational wave data analysis B. S. Sathyaprakash and B. F. Schutz; 5. Network analysis L. Wen and B. F. Schutz; Part II. Current Laser Interferometer Detectors: Three Case Studies: 6. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory P. Fritschel; 7. The VIRGO detector S. Braccini; 8. GEO 600 H. Lück and H. Grote; Part III. Technology for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: 9. Lasers for high optical power interferometers B. Willke and M. Frede; 10. Thermal noise, suspensions and test masses L. Ju, G. Harry and B. Lee; 11. Vibration isolation: Part 1. Seismic isolation for advanced LIGO B. Lantz; Part 2. Passive isolation J-C. Dumas; 12. Interferometer sensing and control P. Barriga; 13. Stabilizing interferometers against high optical power effects C. Zhao, L. Ju, S. Gras and D. G. Blair; Part IV. Technology for Third Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors: 14. Cryogenic interferometers J. Degallaix; 15. Quantum theory of laser-interferometer GW detectors H. Miao and Y. Chen; 16. ET. A third generation observatory M. Punturo and H. Lück; Index.

  16. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-29

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  17. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  18. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-29

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity. PMID:27517762

  19. Estimating the parameters of nonspinning binary black holes using ground-based gravitational-wave detectors: Statistical errors

    SciTech Connect

    Ajith, P.; Bose, Sukanta

    2009-04-15

    We assess the statistical errors in estimating the parameters of nonspinning black hole binaries using ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. While past assessments were based on partial information provided by only the inspiral and/or ring-down pieces of the coalescence signal, the recent progress in analytical and numerical relativity enables us to make more accurate projections using complete inspiral-merger-ring-down waveforms. We employ the Fisher information-matrix formalism to estimate how accurately the source parameters will be measurable using a single interferometric detector as well as a network of interferometers. Those estimates are further vetted by full-fledged Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the parameter accuracies of the complete waveform are, in general, significantly better than those of just the inspiral waveform in the case of binaries with total mass M > or approx. 20M{sub {center_dot}}. In particular, for the case of the Advanced LIGO detector, parameter estimation is the most accurate in the M=100-200M{sub {center_dot}} range. For an M=100M{sub {center_dot}} system, the errors in measuring the total mass and the symmetric mass-ratio are reduced by an order of magnitude or more compared to inspiral waveforms. Furthermore, for binaries located at a fixed luminosity distance d{sub L}, and observed with the Advanced LIGO-Advanced Virgo network, the sky-position error is expected to vary widely across the sky: For M=100M{sub {center_dot}} systems at d{sub L}=1 Gpc, this variation ranges mostly from about a hundredth of a square degree to about a square degree, with an average value of nearly a tenth of a square degree. This is more than 40 times better than the average sky-position accuracy of inspiral waveforms at this mass range. For the mass parameters as well as the sky position, this improvement in accuracy is due partly to the increased signal-to-noise ratio and partly to the information about these parameters harnessed through

  20. Estimating detection rates of compact binary inspirals with networks of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Naoki

    2014-07-01

    In a recent paper, Schutz proposed an analytical approximation for simplifying the treatment of the polarization angle and conveniently evaluating relative detection rates of compact binary inspirals for various networks of ground-based interferometers. We derive relative event rates by strictly handling the polarization angle, and we quantitatively examine the validity of Schutz's approximation. The associated error of the approximation is rigorously shown to be less than 1.02%, irrespective of the details of the detector networks.

  1. Radar volume reflectivity estimation using an array of ground-based rainfall drop size detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, John; Merceret, Francis; Kasparis, Takis; Roy, D.; Muller, Brad; Jones, W. Linwood

    2000-08-01

    Rainfall drop size distribution (DSD) measurements made by single disdrometers at isolated ground sites have traditionally been used to estimate the transformation between weather radar reflectivity Z and rainfall rate R. Despite the immense disparity in sampling geometries, the resulting Z-R relation obtained by these single point measurements has historically been important in the study of applied radar meteorology. Simultaneous DSD measurements made at several ground sites within a microscale area may be used to improve the estimate of radar reflectivity in the air volume surrounding the disdrometer array. By applying the equations of motion for non-interacting hydrometers, a volume estimate of Z is obtained from the array of ground based disdrometers by first calculating a 3D drop size distribution. The 3D-DSD model assumes that only gravity and terminal velocity due to atmospheric drag within the sampling volume influence hydrometer dynamics. The sampling volume is characterized by wind velocities, which are input parameters to the 3D-DSD model, composed of vertical and horizontal components. Reflectivity data from four consecutive WSR-88D volume scans, acquired during a thunderstorm near Melbourne, FL on June 1, 1997, are compared to data processed using the 3D-DSD model and data form three ground based disdrometers of a microscale array.

  2. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization using Ground-Based Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Frazin, Richard; Barrett, Harrison; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gladysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jerome; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Perrin, Marshall; Poyneer, Lisa; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry; Soummer, Remi

    2012-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We provide a formal comparison of techniques through a blind data challenge and evaluate performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012.

  3. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization using Ground-based Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter; Frazin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012

  4. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization Using Ground-based Coronagraphs

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Peter R.; Poyneer, Lisa; Barrett, Harrison; Frazin, Richard; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gładysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jérôme; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Pearson, Iain; Perrin, Marshall; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012. PMID:26347393

  5. New advanced netted ground based and topside radio diagnostics for Space Weather Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothkaehl, Hanna; Krankowski, Andrzej; Morawski, Marek; Atamaniuk, Barbara; Zakharenkova, Irina; Cherniak, Iurii

    2014-05-01

    To give a more detailed and complete understanding of physical plasma processes that govern the solar-terrestrial space, and to develop qualitative and quantitative models of the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling, it is necessary to design and build the next generation of instruments for space diagnostics and monitoring. Novel ground- based wide-area sensor networks, such as the LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) radar facility, comprising wide band, and vector-sensing radio receivers and multi-spacecraft plasma diagnostics should help solve outstanding problems of space physics and describe long-term environmental changes. The LOw Frequency ARray - LOFAR - is a new fully digital radio telescope designed for frequencies between 30 MHz and 240 MHz located in Europe. The three new LOFAR stations will be installed until summer 2015 in Poland. The LOFAR facilities in Poland will be distributed among three sites: Lazy (East of Krakow), Borowiec near Poznan and Baldy near Olsztyn. All they will be connected via PIONIER dedicated links to Poznan. Each site will host one LOFAR station (96 high-band+96 low-band antennas). They will most time work as a part of European network, however, when less charged, they can operate as a national network The new digital radio frequency analyzer (RFA) on board the low-orbiting RELEC satellite was designed to monitor and investigate the ionospheric plasma properties. This two-point ground-based and topside ionosphere-located space plasma diagnostic can be a useful new tool for monitoring and diagnosing turbulent plasma properties. The RFA on board the RELEC satellite is the first in a series of experiments which is planned to be launched into the near-Earth environment. In order to improve and validate the large scales and small scales ionospheric structures we will used the GPS observations collected at IGS/EPN network employed to reconstruct diurnal variations of TEC using all satellite passes over individual GPS stations and the

  6. Detecting small debris using a ground-based photon counting detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Baron, M.H.

    1993-05-01

    We describe a sensitive technique for detecting small space debris that exploits a fast photon-counting imager. Microchannel plate detectors using crossed delay-line readout can achieve a resolution of 2048 {times} 2048 spatial pixels and a maximum count rate of about 10{sup 6} photons per second. A baseline debris-tracking system might couple this detector to a 16-cm aperture telescope. The detector yields x, y, and time information for each detected photon. When visualized in (x, y, t) space, photons from a fast-moving orbital object appear on a straight line. They can be distinguished from diffuse background photons, randomly scattered in the space, and star photons, which fall on a line with sidereal velocity. By searching for this unique signature, we can detect and track small debris objects. At dawn and dusk, a spherical object of 1.3 cm diameter at 400 km will reflect sunlight for an apparent magnitude of V {approx} 16. The baseline system would detect about 16 photons from this object as it crosses a 1 degree field of view in about 1 second. The Ene in (x, y, t) space will be significant in a diffuse background of {approximately} 10{sup 6} photons. We discuss the data processing scheme and line detection algorithm. The advantages of this technique are that one can (1) detect cm-size debris objects with a small telescope, and (2) detect debris moving with any direction and velocity. In this paper, we describe the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system, the preparation for a field test for such a system, and the development and optimization of the data analysis algorithm. Detection sensitivity would currently be constrained by the capability of the data acquisition and the data processing systems, but further improvements could alleviate these bottlenecks.

  7. Detecting small debris using a ground-based photon counting detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Baron, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a sensitive technique for detecting small space debris that exploits a fast photon-counting imager. Microchannel plate detectors using crossed delay-line readout can achieve a resolution of 2048 [times] 2048 spatial pixels and a maximum count rate of about 10[sup 6] photons per second. A baseline debris-tracking system might couple this detector to a 16-cm aperture telescope. The detector yields x, y, and time information for each detected photon. When visualized in (x, y, t) space, photons from a fast-moving orbital object appear on a straight line. They can be distinguished from diffuse background photons, randomly scattered in the space, and star photons, which fall on a line with sidereal velocity. By searching for this unique signature, we can detect and track small debris objects. At dawn and dusk, a spherical object of 1.3 cm diameter at 400 km will reflect sunlight for an apparent magnitude of V [approx] 16. The baseline system would detect about 16 photons from this object as it crosses a 1 degree field of view in about 1 second. The Ene in (x, y, t) space will be significant in a diffuse background of [approximately] 10[sup 6] photons. We discuss the data processing scheme and line detection algorithm. The advantages of this technique are that one can (1) detect cm-size debris objects with a small telescope, and (2) detect debris moving with any direction and velocity. In this paper, we describe the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system, the preparation for a field test for such a system, and the development and optimization of the data analysis algorithm. Detection sensitivity would currently be constrained by the capability of the data acquisition and the data processing systems, but further improvements could alleviate these bottlenecks.

  8. Tragaldabas: a muon ground-based detector for the study of the solar activity; first observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Blanco, Juan

    2016-04-01

    A new RPC-based cosmic ray detector, TRAGALDABAS (acronym of "TRAsGo for the AnaLysis of the nuclear matter Decay, the Atmosphere, the earth's B-field And the Solar activity") has been installed at the Univ. of Santiago de Compostela, Spain (N:42°52'34",W:8°33'37"). The detector, in its present layout, consists of three 1.8 m2 planes of three 1mm-gap glass RPCs. Each plane is readout with 120 pads with grounded guard electrodes between them to minimize the crosstalk noise. The main performances of the detectors are: an arrival time resolution of about ~300 ps, a tracking angular resolution below 3°, a detection efficiency close to 1, and a solid angle acceptance of ~5 srad. TRAGALDABAS will be able to monitor the cosmic ray low energy component strongly modulated by solar activity by mean the observation of secondary muons from the interaction between cosmic rays and atmospheric molecules. Its cadence and its angular resolution will allow to study in detail, small variations in cosmic ray anisotropy. These variations can be a key parameter to understand the effect of solar disturbances on the propagation of cosmic ray in the inner heliosphere and, maybe, provide a new tool for space weather analysis. In this work first TRAGALDABAS observations of solar events are shown

  9. Effect of eccentricity on searches for gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries in ground-based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Duncan A.; Zimmerman, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Inspiralling compact binaries are expected to circularize before their gravitational-wave signals reach the sensitive frequency band of ground-based detectors. Current searches for gravitational waves from compact binaries using the LIGO and Virgo detectors therefore use circular templates to construct matched filters. Binary formation models have been proposed which suggest that some systems detectable by the LIGO-Virgo network may have non-negligible eccentricity. We investigate the ability of the restricted 3.5 post-Newtonian order TaylorF2 template bank, used by LIGO and Virgo to search for gravitational waves from compact binaries with masses M≤35M⊙, to detect binaries with nonzero eccentricity. We model the gravitational waves from eccentric binaries using the x-model post-Newtonian formalism proposed by Hinder et al. [I. Hinder, F. Hermann, P. Laguna, and D. Shoemaker, arXiv:0806.1037v1]. We find that small residual eccentricities (e0≲0.05 at 40 Hz) do not significantly affect the ability of current LIGO searches to detect gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries with total mass 2M⊙

  10. Advanced detectors and signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greve, D. W.; Rasky, P. H. L.; Kryder, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    Continued progress is reported toward development of a silicon on garnet technology which would allow fabrication of advanced detection and signal processing circuits on bubble memories. The first integrated detectors and propagation patterns have been designed and incorporated on a new mask set. In addition, annealing studies on spacer layers are performed. Based on those studies, a new double layer spacer is proposed which should reduce contamination of the silicon originating in the substrate. Finally, the magnetic sensitivity of uncontaminated detectors from the last lot of wafers is measured. The measured sensitivity is lower than anticipated but still higher than present magnetoresistive detectors.

  11. Advanced Radiation Detector Development

    SciTech Connect

    The University of Michigan

    1998-07-01

    Since our last progress report, the project at The University of Michigan has continued to concentrate on the development of gamma ray spectrometers fabricated from cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). This material is capable of providing energy resolution that is superior to that of scintillation detectors, while avoiding the necessity for cooling associated with germanium systems. In our past reports, we have described one approach (the coplanar grid electrode) that we have used to partially overcome some of the major limitations on charge collection that is found in samples of CZT. This approach largely eliminates the effect of hole motion in the formation of the output signal, and therefore leads to pulses that depend only on the motion of a single carrier (electrons). Since electrons move much more readily through CZT than do holes, much better energy resolution can be achieved under these conditions. In our past reports, we have described a 1 cm cube CZT spectrometer fitted with coplanar grids that achieved an energy resolution of 1.8% from the entire volume of the crystal. This still represents, to our knowledge, the best energy resolution ever demonstrated in a CZT detector of this size.

  12. Report on Advanced Detector Development

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Jewell

    2012-09-01

    Neutron, gamma and charged particle detection improvements are key to supporting many of the foreseen measurements and systems envisioned in the R&D programs and the future fuel cycle requirements, such as basic nuclear physics and data, modeling and simulation, reactor instrumentation, criticality safety, materials management and safeguards. This task will focus on the developmental needs of the FCR&D experimental programs, such as elastic/inelastic scattering, total cross sections and fission neutron spectra measurements, and will leverage a number of existing neutron detector development efforts and programs, such as those at LANL, PNNL, INL, and IAC as well as those at many universities, some of whom are funded under NE grants and contracts. Novel materials and fabrication processes combined with state-of-the-art electronics and computing provide new opportunities for revolutionary detector systems that will be able to meet the high precision needs of the program. This work will be closely coordinated with the Nuclear Data Crosscut. The Advanced Detector Development effort is a broadly-focused activity that supports the development of improved nuclear data measurements and improved detection of nuclear reactions and reactor conditions. This work supports the design and construction of large-scale, multiple component detectors to provide nuclear reaction data of unprecedented quality and precision. Examples include the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the DANCE detector at LANL. This work also supports the fabrication and end-user application of novel scintillator materials detection and monitoring.

  13. Advanced UV Detectors and Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankove, Jacques I.; Torvik, John

    1998-01-01

    Gallium Nitride (GaN) with its wide energy bandgap of 3.4 eV holds excellent promise for solar blind UV detectors. We have successfully designed, fabricated and tested GaN p-i-n detectors and detector arrays. The detectors have a peak responsivity of 0.14A/W at 363 nm (3.42 eV) at room temperature. This corresponds to an internal quantum efficiency of 56%. The responsivity decreases by several orders of magnitude to 0.008 A/W at 400 nm (3.10 eV) giving the excellent visible rejection ratio needed for solar-blind applications.

  14. Parameter estimation of eccentric inspiraling compact binaries using an enhanced post circular model for ground-based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baosan; Cao, Zhoujian; Wang, Yan; Yeh, Hsien-Chi

    2015-08-01

    Inspiraling compact binaries have been identified as one of the most promising sources for gravitational-wave detection. These binaries are always expected to have been circularized by the gravitational radiation when they enter the detector's frequency band. However, recent studies indicate that some binaries may still possess a significant eccentricity. In light of the enhanced post-circular waveform model for eccentric binaries in the frequency domain, we do a systematic study of the possible signal-to-noise ratio loss if one uses quasicircular waveform templates to analyze the eccentric signal, and revisit the problem of parameter estimation of gravitational-wave chirp signals from eccentric compact binaries. We confirm previous results from other researchers that the resulting signal-to-noise ratio loss becomes larger than 5% for eccentricity bigger than 0.1 and the resulting parameter estimation bias is more than 0.1%. We study the parameter estimation accuracy for such a waveform with different initial eccentricities from 0.1 to 0.4 by using the Fisher matrix method. As expected, the eccentricity improves the parameter estimation accuracy significantly by breaking degeneracies between different parameters. Particularly, we find that the eccentricity errors improve by 2 orders of magnitude from 10-2 to 10-4 when eccentricity grows from 0.1 to 0.4, and the estimated errors of the chirp mass are about 10-3 for a binary black hole using the Advanced LIGO detector. For the Einstein Telescope detector, the estimated accuracy of parameters will be 2 orders of magnitude higher.

  15. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  16. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  17. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art (SOA) instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  18. Established Designs For Advanced Ground Based Astronomical Telescopes In The 1-meter To 4-meter Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Anthony B.; Barentine, J.; Legters, S.

    2012-01-01

    The same technology and analytic approaches that led to cost-effective unmitigated successes for the spaceborne Kepler and WISE telescopes are now being applied to meter-class to 4-meter-class ground telescopes, providing affordable solutions to ground astronomy, with advanced features as needed for the application. The range of optical and mechanical performance standards and features that can be supplied for ground astronomy shall be described. Both classical RC designs, as well as unobscured designs are well represented in the IOS design library, allowing heritage designs for both night time and day time operations, the latter even in the proximity of the sun. In addition to discussing this library of mature features, we will also describe a process for working with astronomers early in the definition process to provide the best-value solution. Solutions can include remote operation and astronomical data acquisition and transmission.

  19. Polarimetric analysis of radar backscatter from ground-based scatterometers and wheat biomass monitoring with advanced synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Tong, Ling; Li, Yuxia; Chen, Yan; Tan, Longfei; Guo, Caizheng

    2016-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the scattering measurements for an entire wheat growth cycle by ground-based scatterometers at a frequency of 5.3 GHz. Since wheat ears are related to wheat growth and yield, the radar backscatter of wheat was analyzed at two different periods, i.e., with and without wheat ears. Simultaneously, parameters such as wheat and soil characteristics as well as volume scattering and soil scattering were analyzed for the two periods during the entire growth cycle. Wheat ears have been demonstrated to have a great influence on radar backscatter; therefore, a modified version of water-cloud model used for retrieving biomass should consider the effect of wheat ears. This work presents two retrieval models based on the water-cloud model and adopts the advanced integral equation model to simulate the soil backscatter before the heading stage and the backscatter from the layer under wheat ears after the heading stage. The research results showed that the biomass retrieved from the advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) images to agree well with the data measured in situ after setting the modified water-cloud model for the growth stages with ears. Furthermore, it was concluded that wheat ears should form an essential component of theoretical modeling as they influence the final yield.

  20. Polarimetric analysis of radar backscatter from ground-based scatterometers and wheat biomass monitoring with advanced synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Tong, Ling; Li, Yuxia; Chen, Yan; Tan, Longfei; Guo, Caizheng

    2016-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the scattering measurements for an entire wheat growth cycle by ground-based scatterometers at a frequency of 5.3 GHz. Since wheat ears are related to wheat growth and yield, the radar backscatter of wheat was analyzed at two different periods, i.e., with and without wheat ears. Simultaneously, parameters such as wheat and soil characteristics as well as volume scattering and soil scattering were analyzed for the two periods during the entire growth cycle. Wheat ears have been demonstrated to have a great influence on radar backscatter; therefore, a modified version of water-cloud model used for retrieving biomass should consider the effect of wheat ears. This work presents two retrieval models based on the water-cloud model and adopts the advanced integral equation model to simulate the soil backscatter before the heading stage and the backscatter from the layer under wheat ears after the heading stage. The research results showed that the biomass retrieved from the advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) images to agree well with the data measured in situ after setting the modified water-cloud model for the growth stages with ears. Furthermore, it was concluded that wheat ears should form an essential component of theoretical modeling as they influence the final yield.

  1. A study of the first solar proton event of current solar cycle recorded by satellites and ground based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerontidou, M.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Plainaki, C.; Belov, A.; Eroshenko, E.; Yanke, V.; Laurenza, M.; Storini, M.

    2013-09-01

    On 2012, May 17 the GOES satellites recorded a great and simultaneous increase on proton flux in different energy channels thereby producing a solar proton event (SPE). These protons had enough energy to be recorded by the ground based worldwide network of neutron monitors thereby producing the first ground level enhancement of solar cosmic rays (GLE71) of the current solar cycle. In this work a combined study of the this solar proton event, as it is recorded by GOES satellites as well as by the ground based network of Neutron monitors is presented. On 2012, May 17 at 02:10 UTC the GOES spacecraft recorded a fast rise in the flux of solar protons, followed by a slower decay, which was still ongoing on 18 May 2012. Several solar proton events stronger than that of 17 May 2012 were detected by GOES in January and March 2012. This event of 17 May extended to much higher energies than those earlier ones, but was weaker at lower energies. Through this research an attempt to understand the reason for these differences is performed. Additionally, a first attempt to derive the characteristics of this recent proton event, by applying an updated version of the NMBANGLE PPOLA model, already used for modeling past GLEs (e.g. GLE70 ) is presented. The special characteristics of this event with respect to the result of NMBANGLE POLLA model can provide useful information not only about the solar source that triggered this SPE, but also its special impact at interplanetary space.

  2. Advances in pyroelectric infrared detectors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beerman, H. P.; Schwarz, F.; Weiner, S.

    1972-01-01

    Recent improvements in the pyroelectric detector have been due to the development of locked-in polarization, further reduction of the FET leakage current, and reduction of short circuit noise. The pyroelectric detector has been successfully employed in these typical applications: (1) thermograph using a single detector and X-Y scanner, (2) focal plane reticle scanner, (3) linear array thermal imaging system, (4) pyroelectric image tube, (5) radiometers (vertical temperature profile radiometer, carbon dioxide sensor), (6) high speed spectrometer, and (7) laser detector.

  3. Development of a Ground-Based Analog to the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, Nathaniel J.; Scott-Pandorf, M. M.; Caldwell, E.; DeWitt, J.K.; Fincke, R.; Peters, B.T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA and Wyle engineers constructed a Horizontal Exercise Fixture (HEF) that was patented in 2006. Recently modifications were made to HEF with the goal of creating a device that mimics squat exercise on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and can be used by bed rest subjects who must remain supine during exercise. This project posed several engineering challenges, such as how best to reproduce the hip motions (we used a sled that allowed hip motion in the sagittal plane), how to counterweight the pelvis against gravity (we used a pulley and free-weight mechanism), and how to apply large loads (body weight plus squat load) to the shoulders while simultaneously supporting the back against gravity (we tested a standard and a safety bar that allowed movement in the subject s z-axis, both of which used a retractable plate for back support). METHODS An evaluation of the HEF was conducted with human subjects (3F, 3M), who performed sets of squat exercises of increasing load from 10-repetition maximum (RM) up to 1-RM. Three pelvic counterweight loads were tested along with each of the two back-support squat bars. Data collection included 3-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF), muscle activation (EMG), body motion (video-based motion capture), and subjective comments. These data were compared with previous ground-based ARED study data. RESULTS All subjects in the evaluation were able to perform low- to high-loading squats on the HEF. Four of the 6 subjects preferred a pelvic counterweight equivalent to 60 percent of their body weight. Four subjects preferred the standard squat bar, whereas 2 female subjects preferred the safety bar. EMG data showed muscle activation in the legs and low back typical of squat motion. GRF trajectories and eccentric-concentric loading ratios were similar to ARED. CONCLUSION: Squat exercise performed on HEF approximated squat exercise on ARED.

  4. Ground based infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic instrumentation has been developed for ground-based measurements of astrophysical objects in the intermediate infrared. A conventional Michelson interferometer is limited for astronomical applications in the intermediate infrared by quantum noise fluctuations in the radiation form the source and/or background incident on the detector, and the multiplex advantage is no longer available. One feasible approach to recovering the multiplex advantage is post-dispersion. The infrared signal after passing through telescope and interferometer, is dispersed by a low resolution grating spectrometer onto an array of detectors. The feasibility of the post-dispersion system has been demonstrated with observations of astrophysical objects in the 5 and 10 micrometer atmospheric windows from ground-based telescopes. During FY87/88 the post-disperser was used at the Kitt Peak 4-meter telescope and McMath telescope with facility Fourier transform spectrometers. Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, and Venus were observed. On Jupiter, the resolution at 12 micrometer was 0.01/cm, considerably higher than had been acheived previously. The spectrum contains Jovian ethane and acetylene emission. Construction was begun on the large cryogenic grating spectrometer.

  5. Beyond Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: Beating the Quantum Limit with Squeezed States of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsotti, Lisa

    2013-04-01

    After two decades of technology development, the first direct observation of gravitational waves appears to be imminent. Ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors world-wide are about to come back on-line after a major upgrade aimed to significantly improve their sensitivity. As these advanced detectors become a reality, the gravitational wave community is looking at new ways of further expanding their astrophysical reach. The quantum nature of light imposes a fundamental limit to the sensitivity that gravitational wave detectors can achieve, due to statistical fluctuations in the arrival time of photons at the interferometer output (shot noise) and the recoil of the mirrors due to radiation pressure noise. In this talk I will show how mature technology can be used to push interferometric precision measurement beyond the standard quantum limit by means of squeezed states of light, and current ideas on how to integrate this technology into the Advanced detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO).

  6. Remote Sensing Observatory Validation of Surface Soil Moisture Using Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer E, Common Land Model, and Ground Based Data: Case Study in SMEX03 Little River Region, Georgia, U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal soil moisture estimation may be characterized by inter-comparisons among remotely sensed measurements, ground-based measurements, and land surface models. In this study, we compared soil moisture from Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer E (AMSR-E), ground-based measurements, and Soil-Vege...

  7. Advanced Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Detector Arrays for CMB Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James

    2014-01-01

    We are developing high-sensitivity millimeter-wave detector arrays for measuring the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This development is directed to advance the technology readiness of the Inflation Probe mission in NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program. The Inflation Probe is a fourth-generation CMB satellite that will measure the polarization of the CMB to astrophysical limits, characterizing the inflationary polarization signal, mapping large-scale structure based on polarization induced by gravitational lensing, and mapping Galactic magnetic fields through measurements of polarized dust emission. The inflationary polarization signal is produced by a background of gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation, an exponential expansion of space-time in the early universe, with an amplitude that depends on the physical mechanism producing inflation. The inflationary polarization signal may be distinguished by its unique 'B-mode' vector properties from polarization from the density variations that predominantly source CMB temperature anisotropy. Mission concepts for the Inflation Probe are being developed in the US, Europe and Japan. The arrays are based on planar antennas that provide integral beam collimation, polarization analysis, and spectral band definition in a compact lithographed format that eliminates discrete fore-optics such as lenses and feedhorns. The antennas are coupled to transition-edge superconducting bolometers, read out with multiplexed SQUID current amplifiers. The superconducting sensors and readouts developed in this program share common technologies with NASA X-ray and FIR detector applications. Our program targets developments required for space observations, and we discuss our technical progress over the past two years and plans for future development. We are incorporating arrays into active sub-orbital and ground-based experiments, which advance technology readiness while producing state of the art CMB

  8. Acceptances for space-based and ground-based fluorescence detectors, and inference of the neutrino-nucleon cross-section above 1019eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Irimia, Andrei; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2006-04-01

    Detection of ultrahigh energy neutrinos will be useful for unraveling the dynamics of the most violent sources in the cosmos and for revealing the neutrino cross-section at extreme energy. If there exists a Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz’min (GZK) suppression of cosmic-ray events above EGZK˜5×1019eV, as predicted by theory, then the only messengers of energies beyond EGZK are neutrinos. Cosmic neutrino fluxes can initiate air-showers through interaction in the atmosphere, or in the Earth. Neutrino trajectories will be downgoing to nearly horizontal in the former case, and “Earth-skimming” in the latter case. Thus it is important to know the acceptances (event rate/flux) of proposed air-shower experiments for detecting both types of neutrino-initiated events. We calculate these acceptances for fluorescence detectors, both space-based as with the EUSO and OWL proposals, and ground-based, as with Auger, HiRes and Telescope Array. The neutrino cross-section σνNCC is unknown at energies above 5.2×1013eV. Although the popular QCD extrapolation of lower-energy physics offers the cross-section value of 0.54×10-31(Eν/1020eV)0.36cm2, new physics could raise or lower this value. Therefore, we present the acceptances of horizontal (HAS) and upgoing (UAS) air-showers as a function of σνNCC over the range 10-34 to 10-30cm2. The dependences of acceptances on neutrino energy, shower-threshold energy, shower length, and shower column density are also studied. We introduce a cloud layer, and study its effect on rates as viewed from space and from the ground. For UAS, we present acceptances for events over land (rock), and over the ocean (water). Acceptances over water are larger by about an order of magnitude, thus favoring space-based detectors. We revisit the idea of Kusenko and Weiler [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 161101 (2002)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.88.161101] to infer σνNCC at Eν≳1020 from the ratio of HAS-to-UAS events, and obtain favorable results. Included in

  9. Acceptances for space-based and ground-based fluorescence detectors, and inference of the neutrino-nucleon cross-section above 10{sup 19} eV

    SciTech Connect

    Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Irimia, Andrei; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2006-04-15

    Detection of ultrahigh energy neutrinos will be useful for unraveling the dynamics of the most violent sources in the cosmos and for revealing the neutrino cross-section at extreme energy. If there exists a Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) suppression of cosmic-ray events above E{sub GZK}{approx}5x10{sup 19} eV, as predicted by theory, then the only messengers of energies beyond E{sub GZK} are neutrinos. Cosmic neutrino fluxes can initiate air-showers through interaction in the atmosphere, or in the Earth. Neutrino trajectories will be downgoing to nearly horizontal in the former case, and 'Earth-skimming' in the latter case. Thus it is important to know the acceptances (event rate/flux) of proposed air-shower experiments for detecting both types of neutrino-initiated events. We calculate these acceptances for fluorescence detectors, both space-based as with the EUSO and OWL proposals, and ground-based, as with Auger, HiRes and Telescope Array. The neutrino cross-section {sigma}{sub {nu}}{sub N}{sup CC} is unknown at energies above 5.2x10{sup 13} eV. Although the popular QCD extrapolation of lower-energy physics offers the cross-section value of 0.54x10{sup -31}(E{sub {nu}}/10{sup 20} eV){sup 0.36} cm{sup 2}, new physics could raise or lower this value. Therefore, we present the acceptances of horizontal (HAS) and upgoing (UAS) air-showers as a function of {sigma}{sub {nu}}{sub N}{sup CC} over the range 10{sup -34} to 10{sup -30} cm{sup 2}. The dependences of acceptances on neutrino energy, shower-threshold energy, shower length, and shower column density are also studied. We introduce a cloud layer, and study its effect on rates as viewed from space and from the ground. For UAS, we present acceptances for events over land (rock), and over the ocean (water). Acceptances over water are larger by about an order of magnitude, thus favoring space-based detectors. We revisit the idea of Kusenko and Weiler [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 161101 (2002)] to infer {sigma}{sub {nu

  10. Advancements in the calibration and validation of Earth-observation satellite sensors using automated ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Anderson, N. J.; Thome, K.; McCorkel, J.; Wenny, B. N.

    2015-12-01

    Vicarious radiometric calibration is an independent process that is used to monitor the health of Earth-observing systems. This includes both the sensor itself, as well as any onboard radiometric calibration systems. Typical methods include ground-based in situ measurements, cross calibration, lunar observations, and pseudo-invariant sites. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona has traditionally used the reflectance-based approach for the in-flight calibration of Earth-observing sensors. This requires personnel to be at a test site for a given overpass, and the increasing number of satellites on orbit make it difficult and expensive to deploy teams to collect field data. In response to this, an automated site has been developed to collect data during all clear-sky conditions. The Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS) is located at Railroad Valley, Nevada, and it is currently being used to calibrate and validate the surface reflectance products of such sensors as Landsat 7 ETM+, Landsat 8 OLI, Terra and Aqua MODIS, Suomi NPP VIIRS, the RapidEye constellation of satellites, and more recently, Sentinel-2A MSI. An effort is also underway to create a network of instrumented test sites, and RadCaTS is currently one of four sites used in the Radiometric Calibration Network (RadCalNet) working group. This work presents the evolution of RadCaTS, current vicarious calibration results, and insight into the efforts to create a global network of instrumented sites.

  11. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Choi, S. K.; Coughlin, K. P.; Crowley, K. T.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Duff, S. M.; Dunkley, J.; Dünner, R.; van Engelen, A.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Hasselfield, M.; Hills, F.; Hilton, G. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Hloẑek, R.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Huffenberger, K.; Hughes, J. P.; Irwin, K. D.; Koopman, B. J.; Kosowsky, A. B.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Munson, C.; Nati, F.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Page, L. A.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Sehgal, N.; Sherwin, B. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Simon, S. M.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Thornton, R.; Van Lanen, J.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies—imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution—will enable precision cosmological constraints and also a wide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the Advanced ACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the Advanced ACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  12. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, S.W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies-imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution-will enable precision cosmological constraints and also awide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the AdvancedACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the AdvancedACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  13. Stabilized high-power laser system for the gravitational wave detector advanced LIGO.

    PubMed

    Kwee, P; Bogan, C; Danzmann, K; Frede, M; Kim, H; King, P; Pöld, J; Puncken, O; Savage, R L; Seifert, F; Wessels, P; Winkelmann, L; Willke, B

    2012-05-01

    An ultra-stable, high-power cw Nd:YAG laser system, developed for the ground-based gravitational wave detector Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory), was comprehensively characterized. Laser power, frequency, beam pointing and beam quality were simultaneously stabilized using different active and passive schemes. The output beam, the performance of the stabilization, and the cross-coupling between different stabilization feedback control loops were characterized and found to fulfill most design requirements. The employed stabilization schemes and the achieved performance are of relevance to many high-precision optical experiments.

  14. Advanced features of SCD's uncooled detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraenkel, A.; Mizrahi, U.; Bykov, L.; Adin, A.; Malkinson, E.; Zabar, Y.; Seter, D.; Gebil, Y.; Kopolovich, Z.

    2006-03-01

    SCD has recently presented an uncooled detector product line based on the high-end VOx bolometer technology. The first FPA launched, BIRD, is a 384×288 (or 320×240) configurable format with 25 μm pitch. Typical NETD values for these FPAs range at 50 mK with an F/1 aperture and 60 Hz frame rate. These detectors also exhibit a relatively fast thermal time constant of approximately 10 ms. In this paper we elaborate on the special advanced features that were incorporated within the ROIC and supporting algorithms. In this framework we have addressed two important issues: the power consumption and the time span between shutter activations. Minimum power consumption is a critical issue for many un-cooled applications. SCD has addressed this by introducing the "power-save" concept accompanied with flexible dilution architecture. The paper will present recent results exhibiting the various advantages. One of the limiting factors on the performance of uncooled detectors is their vulnerability to ambient drift. Usually, even minor temperature fluctuations are manifested as high residual non-uniformity (RNU) or fixed pattern noise (FPN). As a result frequent shutter operations must be applied, with the risk of blocking the scenery in critical time frames. The challenge is thus twofold: to increase the time span between shutter corrections and achieve better control of its activation. For this purpose BIRD provides two complementing mechanisms: A real-time (frame-by-frame) ambient drift compensation accompanied by an RNU prediction mechanism. The paper will discuss these features in detail and present illustrative system implementations.

  15. Advanced features of SCD's uncooled detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraenkel, A.; Mizrahi, U.; Bykov, L.; Adin, A.; Malkinson, E.; Zabar, Y.; Seter, D.; Gebil, Y.; Kopolovich, Z.

    2005-09-01

    SCD has recently presented an un-cooled detector product line based on the high-end VOx bolometer technology1. The first PFA launched, BIRD, is a 384x288 (or 320x240) configurable format with 25μm pitch. Typical NETD values for these FPAs range at 50mK with an F/1 aperture and 60 Hz frame rate. These detectors also exhibit a relatively fast thermal time constant of approximately 10 msec. In this paper we elaborate on the special advanced features that were incorporated within the ROIC and supporting algorithms. In this framework we have addressed two important issues: the power consumption and the time span between shutter activations. Minimum power consumption is a critical issue for many un-cooled applications. SCD has addressed this by introducing the "Power-Save" concept accompanied with flexible dilution architecture. The paper will present recent results exhibiting the various advantages. One of the limiting factors on the performance of un-cooled detectors is their vulnerability to ambient drift. Usually, even minor temperature fluctuations are manifested as high residual non-uniformity (RNU) or fixed pattern noise (FPN). As a result frequent shutter operations must be applied, with the risk of blocking the scenery in critical time frames. The challenge is thus twofold: increase the time span between shutter corrections and achieve better control of its activation. For this purpose BIRD provides two complementing mechanisms: A real-time (frame-by-frame) ambient drift compensation accompanied by an RNU prediction mechanism. The paper will discuss these features in detail and present illustrative system implementations.

  16. LOCALIZATION OF SHORT DURATION GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENTS WITH THE EARLY ADVANCED LIGO AND VIRGO DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Katsavounidis, Erik; Vedovato, Gabriele; Klimenko, Sergey

    2015-02-20

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors will begin collecting science data in 2015. With first detections expected to follow, it is important to quantify how well generic gravitational-wave transients can be localized on the sky. This is crucial for correctly identifying electromagnetic counterparts as well as understanding gravitational-wave physics and source populations. We present a study of sky localization capabilities for two search and parameter estimation algorithms: coherent WaveBurst, a constrained likelihood algorithm operating in close to real-time, and LALInferenceBurst, a Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithm developed to recover generic transient signals with latency of a few hours. Furthermore, we focus on the first few years of the advanced detector era, when we expect to only have two (2015) and later three (2016) operational detectors, all below design sensitivity. These detector configurations can produce significantly different sky localizations, which we quantify in detail. We observe a clear improvement in localization of the average detected signal when progressing from two-detector to three-detector networks, as expected. Although localization depends on the waveform morphology, approximately 50% of detected signals would be imaged after observing 100-200 deg{sup 2} in 2015 and 60-110 deg{sup 2} in 2016, although knowledge of the waveform can reduce this to as little as 22 deg{sup 2}. This is the first comprehensive study on sky localization capabilities for generic transients of the early network of advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors, including the early LIGO-only two-detector configuration.

  17. Ground-Based Cloud and Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observations for the Project: High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Advancing Climate Prediction, HD(CP)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsikko, A.; Ebell, K.; Ulrich, U.; Schween, J. H.; Bohn, B.; Görsdorf, U.; Leinweber, R.; Päschke, E.; Baars, H.; Seifert, P.; Klein Baltink, H.

    2014-12-01

    The German research initiative ''High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction, HD(CP)2'' aims for an improved representation of clouds and precipitation in climate models. Model development and its evaluation require comprehensive observational datasets. A specific work package was established to create uniform and documented observational datasets for the HD(CP)2 data base. Datasets included ground-based remote-sensing (Doppler lidars, ceilometers, microwave radiometers, and cloud radars) and in-situ (meteorological and radiation sensors) measurements. Four supersites (Jülich ObservatorY for Cloud Evolution (JOYCE), Lindenberg Meteorological Observatory - Richard Assmann Observatory (RAO), and Leipzig Aerosol and Cloud Remote Observations System (LACROS) in Germany, and Cabauw experimental site for atmospheric research (Cesar) in the Netherlands) are finalizing the operational procedures to provide quality controlled (and calibrated if possible) remote-sensing and in-situ observations, retrievals on atmospheric boundary layer state (e.g. winds, mixing layer height, humidity and temperature), and cloud macro and micro physical properties with uncertainty estimations or at least quality flags. During the project new processing and retrieval methods were developed if no commonly agreed or satisfying methods were available. Especially, large progress was made concerning uncertainty estimation and automated quality control. Additionally, the data from JOYCE are used in a radiative closure studies under cloudy conditions to evaluate retrievals of cloud properties. The current status of work progress will be presented.

  18. Focal Plane Detectors for the Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, A. N.; Williams, D. A.; Byrum, K.; Drake, G.; Horan, D.; Smith, A.; Wagner, R. G.; Falcone, A.; Funk, S.; Tajima, H.; Mukherjee, R.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a concept for the next generation observatory in ground-based very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Design goals are ten times better sensitivity, higher angular resolution, and a lower energy threshold than existing Cherenkov telescopes. Simulations show that a substantial improvement in angular resolution may be achieved if the pixel diameter is reduced to the order of 0.05 deg, i.e. two to three times smaller than the pixel diameter of current Cherenkov telescope cameras. At these dimensions, photon detectors with smaller physical dimensions can be attractive alternatives to the classical photomultiplier tube (PMT). Furthermore, the operation of an experiment with the size of AGIS requires photon detectors that are among other things more reliable, more durable, and possibly higher efficiency photon detectors. Alternative photon detectors we are considering for AGIS include both silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMTs). Here we present results from laboratory testing of MAPMTs and SiPMs along with results from the first incorporation of these devices into cameras on test bed Cherenkov telescopes.

  19. Finite mirror effects in advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, Andrew P.; Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Tsang, David; Bondarescu, Mihai

    2008-02-15

    Thermal noise is expected to be the dominant source of noise in the most sensitive frequency band of second-generation, ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. Reshaping the beam to a flatter, wider profile which probes more of the mirror surface reduces this noise. The 'Mesa' beam shape has been proposed for this purpose and was subsequently generalized to a family of hyperboloidal beams with two parameters: twist angle {alpha} and beam width D. Varying {alpha} allows a continuous transition from the nearly flat ({alpha}=0) to the nearly concentric ({alpha}={pi}) Mesa beam configurations. We analytically prove that in the limit D{yields}{infinity} hyperboloidal beams become Gaussians. The ideal beam choice for reducing thermal noise is the widest possible beam that satisfies the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) diffraction loss design constraint of 1 part per million (ppm) per bounce for a mirror radius of 17 cm. In the past the diffraction loss has often been calculated using the clipping approximation that, in general, underestimates the diffraction loss. We develop a code using pseudospectral methods to compute the diffraction loss directly from the propagator. We find that the diffraction loss is not a strictly monotonic function of beam width, but has local minima that occur due to finite mirror effects and leads to natural choices of D. For an {alpha}={pi} Mesa beam a local minimum occurs at D=10.67 cm and leads to a diffraction loss of 1.4 ppm. We then compute the thermal noise for the entire hyperboloidal family. We find that if one requires a diffraction loss of strictly 1 ppm, the {alpha}=0.91{pi} hyperboloidal beam is optimal, leading to the coating thermal noise (the dominant source of noise for fused-silica mirrors) being lower by about 10% than for a Mesa beam while other types of thermal noise decrease as well. We then develop an iterative process that reconstructs the mirror to specifically account for finite

  20. Selecting gravitational wave events for EM follow-up in the advanced detector era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Min-A.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Gravitational wave sources with emissions in the frequency band detectable by ground-based instruments may have electromagnetic (EM) counterparts. The EM counterpart could help confirm the existence of the gravitational wave signature and provide complementary information regarding the source event. However, observable emissions are transient, requiring rapid communication between observing partners and members of the LSC (LIGO Scientific Collaboration) and Virgo in order to be captured. During the past year, we developed and began testing software known as the VOEvent Approval Processor that oversees the selection of events and generation of alerts to be sent to GCN for distribution. This talk will cover how VOEvent Approval Processor has been tested, thus far, and what kind of work is still to be done for its use in the advanced detector era. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the U.S. National Science Foundation through Grants PHY-1068549 and PHY-1404121.

  1. Advances in Detector Technology for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCreight, Craig; Cheng, P. L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Progress in semiconductor materials and processing technology has allowed the development of infrared detector arrays with unprecedented sensitivity, for imaging and spectroscopic applications in astronomy. The earlier discrete-detector approach has been replaced by large-element (up to 1024 x 1024 pixel), multiplexed devices. Progress has been made against a number of key limiting factors, such as quantum efficiency, noise, spectral response, linearity, and dark current. Future developments will focus on the need for even larger arrays, which operate at higher temperatures.

  2. Advances in solid state photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renker, D.; Lorenz, E.

    2009-04-01

    Semiconductor photodiodes were developed in the early `Forties approximately at the time when the photomultiplier tube became a commercial product (RCA 1939). Only in recent years, with the invention of the Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes, have the semiconductor photo detectors reached sensitivity comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes. The evolution started in the `Sixties with the p-i-n (PIN) photodiode, a very successful device, which is still used in many detectors for high energy physics and a large number of other applications like radiation detection and medical imaging. The next step was the development of the avalanche photodiode (APD) leading to a substantial reduction of noise but not yet achieving single photon response. The weakest light flashes that can be detected by the PIN diode need to contain several hundreds of photons. An improvement of the sensitivity by 2 orders of magnitude was achieved by the development of the avalanche photodiode, a device with internal gain. At the end of the millennium, the semiconductor detectors evolved with the Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode into highly sensitive devices, which have an internal gain comparable to the gain of photomultiplier tubes and a response to single photons. A review of the semiconductor photo detector design and development, the properties and problems, some applications and a speculative outlook on the future evolution will be presented.

  3. Ground based automated telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Thompson, W.

    1980-01-01

    Recommendation that a ground-based automated telescope of the 2-meter class be built for remote multiuser use as a natural facility. Experience dictates that a primary consideration is a time shared multitasking operating system with virtual memory overlayed with a real time priority interrupt. The primary user facility is a remote terminal networked to the single computer. Many users must have simultaneous time shared access to the computer for program development. The telescope should be rapid slewing, and hence a light weight construction. Automation allows for the closed loop pointing error correction independent of extreme accuracy of the mount.

  4. Advanced digital detectors for neutron imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Neutron interrogation provides unique information valuable for Nonproliferation & Materials Control and other important applications including medicine, airport security, protein crystallography, and corrosion detection. Neutrons probe deep inside massive objects to detect small defects and chemical composition, even through high atomic number materials such as lead. However, current detectors are bulky gas-filled tubes or scintillator/PM tubes, which severely limit many applications. Therefore this project was undertaken to develop new semiconductor radiation detection materials to develop the first direct digital imaging detectors for neutrons. The approach relied on new discovery and characterization of new solid-state sensor materials which convert neutrons directly to electronic signals via reactions BlO(n,a)Li7 and Li6(n,a)T.

  5. Infrared detectors: Advances, challenges and new technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Amir; Andersson, Jan Y.

    2013-12-01

    Human knowledge of infrared (IR) radiation is about 200 years old. However it was in the late 20th century that we developed a wide range of smart technologies for detection and started to take advantage for our benefit. Today IR detector technology is in its 3rd generation and comes with challenging demands. Based on the propagation of IR radiation through free space it is divided into different transmission windows. The most interesting for thermal imaging are the mid-wave IR (MWIR) and the long-wave IR (LW IR). Infrared detectors for thermal imaging have a number of applications in industry, security, search & rescue, surveillance, medicine, research, meteorology, climatology and astronomy. Currently high-performance IR imaging technology is mainly based on epitaxially grown structures of the small-bandgap bulk alloy mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT), indium antimonide (InSb) and GaAs based quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs), depending on the application and wavelength range. However, they operate at low temperatures requiring costly and bulky cryogenic systems. In addition there is always a need for better performance, which generates possibilities for developing new technologies. Some emerging technologies are quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs), type-II strained layer super-lattice, and QDIPs with type-II band alignment. In this report a brief review of the current and new technologies for high performance IR detectors, will be presented.

  6. Ground-based IRCM testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Derek; Owen, Mark

    2010-04-01

    Recent advances in the ability to perform comprehensive ground based Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) testing have the capability to fill the Test and Evaluation (T&E) gaps for existing and future weapons system acquisition. IRCM testing has historically been dominated and in a manner limited by expensive live fire testing requirements. While live fire testing is a vital part of IRCM T&E, next generation technological developments now enable closed-loop, ground-based IRCM testing to provide valuable complementary test data at a much lower cost. The high cost and limited assets that have prevented live fire and flight testing from providing a thorough hardware based data set required for previous T&E analysis is no longer an issue. In the past, traditional physics based digital system model (DSM) analysis has been utilized to augment the IRCM data sets to make them statistically significant. While DSM is a useful tool in the development of IRCM systems, the newly developed installed system testing utilizing a hardware-in-the-loop construct provides for an enhanced level of fidelity and assurance that the systems will meet the warfighter's needs. The goal of the newly developed test technologies is to develop a statistical significant data set utilizing hardware-in-the-loop at a significantly lower cost than historical methods.

  7. Design concepts for the Cherenkov Telescope Array CTA: an advanced facility for ground-based high-energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Actis, M.; Agnetta, G.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A.; Aleksić, J.; Aliu, E.; Allan, D.; Allekotte, I.; Antico, F.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Aravantinos, A.; Arlen, T.; Arnaldi, H.; Artmann, S.; Asano, K.; Asorey, H.; Bähr, J.; Bais, A.; Baixeras, C.; Bajtlik, S.; Balis, D.; Bamba, A.; Barbier, C.; Barceló, M.; Barnacka, A.; Barnstedt, J.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Basso, S.; Bastieri, D.; Bauer, C.; Becerra, J.; Becherini, Y.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, J.; Beckmann, V.; Bednarek, W.; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Belluso, M.; Benallou, M.; Benbow, W.; Berdugo, J.; Berger, K.; Bernardino, T.; Bernlöhr, K.; Biland, A.; Billotta, S.; Bird, T.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Blake, S.; Blanch, O.; Bobkov, A. A.; Bogacz, L.; Bogdan, M.; Boisson, C.; Boix, J.; Bolmont, J.; Bonanno, G.; Bonardi, A.; Bonev, T.; Borkowski, J.; Botner, O.; Bottani, A.; Bourgeat, M.; Boutonnet, C.; Bouvier, A.; Brau-Nogué, S.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Briggs, M. S.; Brun, P.; Brunetti, L.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Bühler, R.; Bulik, T.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Byrum, K.; Cailles, M.; Cameron, R.; Canestrari, R.; Cantu, S.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Carr, J.; Carton, P. H.; Casiraghi, M.; Castarede, H.; Catalano, O.; Cavazzani, S.; Cazaux, S.; Cerruti, B.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chiang, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cieślar, M.; Ciesielska, M.; Cillis, A.; Clerc, C.; Colin, P.; Colomé, J.; Compin, M.; Conconi, P.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Contreras, J. L.; Coppi, P.; Corlier, M.; Corona, P.; Corpace, O.; Corti, D.; Cortina, J.; Costantini, H.; Cotter, G.; Courty, B.; Couturier, S.; Covino, S.; Croston, J.; Cusumano, G.; Daniel, M. K.; Dazzi, F.; Angelis, A. De; de Cea Del Pozo, E.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; de Jager, O.; de La Calle Pérez, I.; de La Vega, G.; de Lotto, B.; de Naurois, M.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; de Souza, V.; Decerprit, B.; Deil, C.; Delagnes, E.; Deleglise, G.; Delgado, C.; Dettlaff, T.; di Paolo, A.; di Pierro, F.; Díaz, C.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, H.; Digel, S. W.; Dimitrov, D.; Disset, G.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Doert, M.; Domainko, W.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Dournaux, J.-L.; Dravins, D.; Drury, L.; Dubois, F.; Dubois, R.; Dubus, G.; Dufour, C.; Durand, D.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edy, E.; Egberts, K.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Elles, S.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Enomoto, R.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Errando, M.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcone, A. D.; Farakos, K.; Farnier, C.; Federici, S.; Feinstein, F.; Ferenc, D.; Fillin-Martino, E.; Fink, D.; Finley, C.; Finley, J. P.; Firpo, R.; Florin, D.; Föhr, C.; Fokitis, E.; Font, Ll.; Fontaine, G.; Fontana, A.; Förster, A.; Fortson, L.; Fouque, N.; Fransson, C.; Fraser, G. W.; Fresnillo, L.; Fruck, C.; Fujita, Y.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Gäbele, W.; Gabici, S.; Gadola, A.; Galante, N.; Gallant, Y.; García, B.; García López, R. J.; Garrido, D.; Garrido, L.; Gascón, D.; Gasq, C.; Gaug, M.; Gaweda, J.; Geffroy, N.; Ghag, C.; Ghedina, A.; Ghigo, M.; Gianakaki, E.; Giarrusso, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giro, E.; Giubilato, P.; Glanzman, T.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Gochna, M.; Golev, V.; Gómez Berisso, M.; González, A.; González, F.; Grañena, F.; Graciani, R.; Granot, J.; Gredig, R.; Green, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grimm, O.; Grube, J.; Grudzińska, M.; Grygorczuk, J.; Guarino, V.; Guglielmi, L.; Guilloux, F.; Gunji, S.; Gyuk, G.; Hadasch, D.; Haefner, D.; Hagiwara, R.; Hahn, J.; Hallgren, A.; Hara, S.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Hassan, T.; Haubold, T.; Hauser, M.; Hayashida, M.; Heller, R.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Herrero, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, D.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Horns, D.; Hrupec, D.; Huan, H.; Huber, B.; Huet, J.-M.; Hughes, G.; Hultquist, K.; Humensky, T. B.; Huppert, J.-F.; Ibarra, A.; Illa, J. M.; Ingjald, J.; Inoue, Y.; Inoue, S.; Ioka, K.; Jablonski, C.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janiak, M.; Jean, P.; Jensen, H.; Jogler, T.; Jung, I.; Kaaret, P.; Kabuki, S.; Kakuwa, J.; Kalkuhl, C.; Kankanyan, R.; Kapala, M.; Karastergiou, A.; Karczewski, M.; Karkar, S.; Karlsson, N.; Kasperek, J.; Katagiri, H.; Katarzyński, K.; Kawanaka, N.; Kȩdziora, B.; Kendziorra, E.; Khélifi, B.; Kieda, D.; Kifune, T.; Kihm, T.; Klepser, S.; Kluźniak, W.; Knapp, J.; Knappy, A. R.; Kneiske, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Köck, F.; Kodani, K.; Kohri, K.; Kokkotas, K.; Komin, N.; Konopelko, A.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Kostka, P.; Kotuła, J.; Kowal, G.; Kozioł, J.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Kretzschmann, A.; Kubo, H.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, N.; La Parola, V.; La Rosa, G.; López, A.; Lamanna, G.; Laporte, P.; Lavalley, C.; Le Flour, T.; Le Padellec, A.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lessio, L.; Lieunard, B.; Lindfors, E.; Liolios, A.; Lohse, T.; Lombardi, S.; Lopatin, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lubiński, P.; Luz, O.; Lyard, E.; Maccarone, M. C.; Maccarone, T.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; Maltezos, S.; Małkiewicz, P.; Mañá, C.; Manalaysay, A.; Maneva, G.; Mangano, A.; Manigot, P.; Marín, J.; Mariotti, M.; Markoff, S.; Martínez, G.; Martínez, M.; Mastichiadis, A.; Matsumoto, H.; Mattiazzo, S.; Mazin, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; McCubbin, N.; McHardy, I.; Medina, C.; Melkumyan, D.; Mendes, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meucci, M.; Michałowski, J.; Micolon, P.; Mineo, T.; Mirabal, N.; Mirabel, F.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Mizuno, T.; Moal, B.; Moderski, R.; Molinari, E.; Monteiro, I.; Moralejo, A.; Morello, C.; Mori, K.; Motta, G.; Mottez, F.; Moulin, E.; Mukherjee, R.; Munar, P.; Muraishi, H.; Murase, K.; Murphy, A. Stj.; Nagataki, S.; Naito, T.; Nakamori, T.; Nakayama, K.; Naumann, C.; Naumann, D.; Nayman, P.; Nedbal, D.; Niedźwiecki, A.; Niemiec, J.; Nikolaidis, A.; Nishijima, K.; Nolan, S. J.; Nowak, N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Ochoa, I.; Ohira, Y.; Ohishi, M.; Ohka, H.; Okumura, A.; Olivetto, C.; Ong, R. A.; Orito, R.; Orr, M.; Osborne, J. P.; Ostrowski, M.; Otero, L.; Otte, A. N.; Ovcharov, E.; Oya, I.; Oziȩbło, A.; Paiano, S.; Pallota, J.; Panazol, J. L.; Paneque, D.; Panter, M.; Paoletti, R.; Papyan, G.; Paredes, J. M.; Pareschi, G.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pepato, A.; Persic, M.; Petrucci, P. O.; Peyaud, B.; Piechocki, W.; Pita, S.; Pivato, G.; Płatos, Ł.; Platzer, R.; Pogosyan, L.; Pohl, M.; Pojmański, G.; Ponz, J. D.; Potter, W.; Prandini, E.; Preece, R.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quel, E.; Quirrenbach, A.; Rajda, P.; Rando, R.; Rataj, M.; Raue, M.; Reimann, C.; Reimann, O.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Renner, S.; Reymond, J.-M.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Ribordy, M.; Rico, J.; Rieger, F.; Ringegni, P.; Ripken, J.; Ristori, P.; Rivoire, S.; Rob, L.; Rodriguez, S.; Roeser, U.; Romano, P.; Romero, G. E.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rovero, A. C.; Roy, F.; Royer, S.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Ruppel, J.; Russo, F.; Ryde, F.; Sacco, B.; Saggion, A.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, K.; Saito, T.; Sakaki, N.; Salazar, E.; Salini, A.; Sánchez, F.; Sánchez Conde, M. Á.; Santangelo, A.; Santos, E. M.; Sanuy, A.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Sarkar, S.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Scarcioffolo, M.; Schanz, T.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schmidt, T.; Schmoll, J.; Schroedter, M.; Schultz, C.; Schultze, J.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schweizer, T.; Seiradakis, J.; Selmane, S.; Seweryn, K.; Shayduk, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Shibata, T.; Sikora, M.; Silk, J.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Skole, C.; Smith, N.; Sobczyńska, D.; Sofo Haro, M.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spiga, D.; Spyrou, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Starling, R. L. C.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steiner, S.; Stergioulas, N.; Sternberger, R.; Stinzing, F.; Stodulski, M.; Straumann, U.; Suárez, A.; Suchenek, M.; Sugawara, R.; Sulanke, K. H.; Sun, S.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutcliffe, P.; Szanecki, M.; Szepieniec, T.; Szostek, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Talbot, R. G.; Tam, P. H.; Tanaka, M.; Tanimori, T.; Tavani, M.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tchernin, C.; Tejedor, L. A.; Telezhinsky, I.; Temnikov, P.; Tenzer, C.; Terada, Y.; Terrier, R.; Teshima, M.; Testa, V.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tluczykont, M.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tokanai, F.; Tokarz, M.; Toma, K.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Totani, T.; Toussenel, F.; Vallania, P.; Vallejo, G.; van der Walt, J.; van Eldik, C.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vankov, H.; Vasileiadis, G.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vegas, I.; Venter, L.; Vercellone, S.; Veyssiere, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Videla, M.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Vlahakis, N.; Vlahos, L.; Vogler, P.; Vollhardt, A.; Volpe, F.; von Gunten, H. P.; Vorobiov, S.; Wagner, S.; Wagner, R. M.; Wagner, B.; Wakely, S. P.; Walter, P.; Walter, R.; Warwick, R.; Wawer, P.; Wawrzaszek, R.; Webb, N.; Wegner, P.; Weinstein, A.; Weitzel, Q.; Welsing, R.; Wetteskind, H.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Williams, D. A.; Winde, M.; Wischnewski, R.; Wiśniewski, Ł.; Wolczko, A.; Wood, M.; Xiong, Q.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamaoka, K.; Yamazaki, R.; Yanagita, S.; Yoffo, B.; Yonetani, M.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshikoshi, T.; Zabalza, V.; Zagdański, A.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A.; Zech, A.; Ziȩtara, K.; Ziółkowski, P.; Zitelli, V.; Zychowski, P.

    2011-12-01

    Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has had a major breakthrough with the impressive results obtained using systems of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has a huge potential in astrophysics, particle physics and cosmology. CTA is an international initiative to build the next generation instrument, with a factor of 5-10 improvement in sensitivity in the 100 GeV-10 TeV range and the extension to energies well below 100 GeV and above 100 TeV. CTA will consist of two arrays (one in the north, one in the south) for full sky coverage and will be operated as open observatory. The design of CTA is based on currently available technology. This document reports on the status and presents the major design concepts of CTA.

  8. Design Concepts for the Cherenkov Telescope Array CTA: An Advanced Facility for Ground-Based High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Actis, M

    2012-04-17

    Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has had a major breakthrough with the impressive results obtained using systems of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has a huge potential in astrophysics, particle physics and cosmology. CTA is an international initiative to build the next generation instrument, with a factor of 5-10 improvement in sensitivity in the 100 GeV-10 TeV range and the extension to energies well below 100 GeV and above 100 TeV. CTA will consist of two arrays (one in the north, one in the south) for full sky coverage and will be operated as open observatory. The design of CTA is based on currently available technology. This document reports on the status and presents the major design concepts of CTA.

  9. Enhancing the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N; Ullmann, J. L.; et al

    2015-05-28

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  10. Enhancing the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  11. Advanced radiation detector development: Advanced semiconductor detector development: Development of a oom-temperature, gamma ray detector using gallium arsenide to develop an electrode detector

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    The advanced detector development project at the University of Michigan has completed the first full year of its current funding. Our general goals are the development of radiation detectors and spectrometers that are capable of portable room temperature operation. Over the past 12 months, we have worked primarily in the development of semiconductor spectrometers with {open_quotes}single carrier{close_quotes} response that offer the promise of room temperature operation and good energy resolution in gamma ray spectroscopy. We have also begun a small scale effort at investigating the properties of a small non-spectroscopic detector system with directional characteristics that will allow identification of the approximate direction in which gamma rays are incident. These activities have made use of the extensive clean room facilities at the University of Michigan for semiconductor device fabrication, and also the radiation measurement capabilities provided in our laboratory in the Phoenix Building on the North Campus. In addition to our laboratory based activities, Professor Knoll has also been a participant in several Department of Energy review activities held in the Forrestal Building and at the Germantown site. The most recent of these has been service on a DOE review panel chaired by Dr. Hap Lamonds that is reviewing the detector development programs supported through the Office of Arms Control and International Security.

  12. Noise Performance of the Advanced LIGO Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Evan; LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Advanced LIGO has completed a four-month search for gravitational wave events using two 4-km laser interferometers separated by a 3000 km baseline. These instruments can sense spacetime strain to better than 10-23 /Hz 1 / 2 in their most sensitive frequency band (80 Hz to 400 Hz). The interferometers' sensitivity is limited by a variety of noise sources, including thermal fluctuations of the test masses and their suspensions, quantum and classical fluctuations of the laser light used to interrogate the test masses, residual environmental disturbances, and noises arising from the sensing and control of the interferometers' length and angular degrees of freedom. We present a budget of these noise sources as they appeared during the first observing run, and discuss ongoing improvements as we look forward to Advanced LIGO achieving full design sensitivity. LIGO was constructed by the California Institute of Technology and Massachusetts Institute of Technology with funding from the National Science Foundation and operates under cooperative agreement PHY-0757058.

  13. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Reifarth, R.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Rundberg, R.S.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Fowler, M.M.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.; Kaeppeler, F.; Heil, M.; Chamberlin, E.P.

    2003-08-26

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 159-element 4{pi} barium fluoride array designed to study neutron capture on small quantities, 1 mg or less, of radioactive nuclides. It is being built on a 20 m neutron flight path which views the 'upper tier' water moderator at the Manuel J. Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The detector design is based on Monte Carlo calculations which have suggested ways to minimize backgrounds due to neutron scattering events. A data acquisition system based on fast transient digitizers is being implemented.

  14. Detector for advanced neutron capture experiments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J. L.; Reifarth, R.; Haight, Robert C.; Hunt, L. F.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Strottman, D.; Kaeppeler, F.; Heil, M.; Chamberlin, E. P.

    2002-01-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 159-element 4x barium fluoride array designed to study neutron capture on small quantities, 1 mg or less, of radioactive nuclides. It is being built on a 20 m neutron flight path which views the 'upper tier' water moderator at the Manuel J. Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The detector design is based on Monte Carlo calculations which have suggested ways to minimize backgrounds due to neutron scattering events. A data acquisition system based on fast transient digitizers is bcing implemented

  15. Advanced Two-Dimensional Thermal Neutron Detectors for Scattering Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, J.; Harder, J.; Mahler, G.J.; Makowiecki, D.S.; Mead, J.A.; Radeka, V.; Schaknowski, N.A.; Smith, G.C.; Yu, B.

    2002-11-18

    Advances in neutron scattering studies will be given a large boost with the advent of new spallation and reactor sources at present under consideration or construction. An important element for future experiments is a commensurate improvement in neutron detection techniques. At Brookhaven, a development program is under way for greatly increasing the angular coverage, rate capability and resolution of detectors for scattering studies. For example, a curved detector with angular coverage of 120{sup o} by 15{sup o} has recently been developed for protein crystallography at a spallation source. Based on neutron detection using {sup 3}He, the detector has the following major, new attributes: eight identical proportional wire segments operating in parallel, a single gas volume with seamless readout at segment boundaries, parallax errors eliminated in the horizontal plane by the detector's appropriate radius of curvature, high-throughput front-end electronics, position decoding based on high performance digital signal processing. The detector has a global rate capability greater than 1 million per second, position resolution less than 1.5 mm FWHM, timing resolution about 1 {micro}s, efficiency of 50% and 90% at 1{angstrom} and 4 {angstrom} respectively, and an active area 1.5 m x 20 cm.

  16. The Suitability of Hybrid Waveforms for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Ilana; Pfeiffer, H.; Nissanke, S.; Mroue, A.

    2013-01-01

    General relativity predicts that the coalescence of two compact objects, such as black holes, will produce gravitational radiation; i.e., ripples in the curvature of space-time. Detectors like Advanced LIGO (the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-wave Observatory) are expected to measure such events within the next few years. In order to be able to characterize the gravitational waves they measure, these detectors require accurate waveform models, which can be constructed by fusing an analytical post-Newtonian inspiral waveform with a numerical relativity late-inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform. Numerical relativity, though the most accurate model, is computationally expensive: the longest simulations to date taking several months to run. Post-Newtonian theory, an analytic approximation to General Relativity, is easy to compute but becomes increasingly inaccurate near merger. Because of this trade-off, it is important to determine the optimal length of the numerical waveform, while maintaining the necessary accuracy for gravitational wave detectors. We present a study of the sufficient accuracy of post-Newtonian and numerical relativity waveforms for the most demanding usage case: parameter estimation of strong sources in advanced gravitational wave detectors. We perform a comprehensive analysis of errors that enter such “hybrid waveforms” in the case of equal-mass and unequal mass non-spinning binaries. We also explore the possibility of using these hybrid waveforms as a detection template bank for Advanced LIGO. Accurate hybrids play an important role in investigating the efficiency of gravitational wave search pipelines, as with NINJA (Numerical INJection Analysis); and also in constructing analytical models that span the entire parameter space of binary black hole mass ratios and spins, as with NRAR (Numerical Relativity and Analytic Relativity).

  17. Aspects of suspension design for the development of advanced gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rahul

    The Institute for Gravitational Research in the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the Albert Einstein Institute in Hannover, Golm and the University of Cardiff has been actively involved in the research for the development of instruments and data analysis techniques to detect gravitational waves. This includes construction of a long ground based interferometer in Germany called GEO 600 (upgraded to GEO-HF) having an arm length 600 m and strong involvement in the larger detectors of the LIGO (Laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory) project in USA having arm lengths of 4 km (Operated by MIT, Boston and CALTECH, Pasadena). An upgrade to LIGO called Advanced LIGO (aLIGO) is currently under construction with significant input from the University of Glasgow. Thermal noise is one of the most significant noise sources affecting the sensitivity of the detector at a range of frequencies. Thermal noise arises due to the random fluctuations of atoms and molecules in the materials of the test mass mirrors and suspension elements, and is related to mechanical loss in these materials. The work presented in chapter 3 of this thesis is devoted to the analysis of aspects of mechanical loss and thermal noise in the final stages of the GEO suspension. The work in chapter 4 focuses on the theory of photoelasticty and birefringence techniques. A study of mechanical and thermal stress induced in fused silica has been discussed in chapter 5 of this thesis. To understand the working of photoelastic techniques learned in chapter 4, a study of mechanical stress was undertaken by applying a load on the sample to induce temporary birefringence. A study of thermal stress in fused silica welds has also been presented in chapter 5.

  18. Ground-Based Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringuette, R. A.; Cannady, N.; Case, G. L.; Cherry, M. L.; Granger, D.; Isbert, J.; Stewart, M.

    2010-10-01

    First seen from space by the BATSE gamma ray telescope in the 1990s, Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes (TGFs) consist of extremely fast bursts of high energy (up to 40 MeV) gamma rays correlated with intense lightning from thunderstorms. Spacecraft experiments are sensitive to very large events, but ground-based detectors closer to the thunderstorms may provide data on the intensity spectrum of smaller events. Four detectors consisting of NaI scintillators viewed by photomultipliers have been placed on rooftops at LSU's Baton Rouge campus to monitor TGFs. The setup and design of the ground-based experiment will be discussed.

  19. Coordinated Observations of Ion-Neutral Dynamics from a Ground-based Scanning Doppler Imager (SDI) and an Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar (AMISR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C.; Kosch, M.; Nicolls, M. J.; Conde, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    Interactions between the plasma and neutral components of the upper atmosphere result in a diverse set of phenomena that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Investigating these interactions requires essentially simultaneous measurements of (spatially resolved) ion and neutral parameters at a time resolution comparable to the time-scales of the underlying driving forces. Two instruments that are ideally suited to such investigations are the Scanning Doppler Imager (SDI) and the Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar (AMISR). The SDI is capable of resolving small-scale neutral horizontal flow structures and temperature fields across a wide field-of-view, with a temporal resolution of around 4 minutes. The AMISR allows for 'volumetric' ionospheric imaging by sampling along multiple range resolved beams simultaneously, with integration times at least comparable to the SDI. Here we present initial results from a campaign of coordinated observations between an AMISR and SDI located at Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. This study focuses on the observed signatures of ion-neutral coupling at E and F-region altitudes, in particular the directly measured local ion-neutral velocity difference (required for calculating frictional heating rates) and estimates of the ion-neutral collision frequency from measurements taken along the local geomagnetic field-aligned direction. These observations are placed in the context of the large-scale neutral and ion flows.

  20. Ground-Based Telescope Parametric Cost Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Rowell, Ginger Holmes

    2004-01-01

    A parametric cost model for ground-based telescopes is developed using multi-variable statistical analysis, The model includes both engineering and performance parameters. While diameter continues to be the dominant cost driver, other significant factors include primary mirror radius of curvature and diffraction limited wavelength. The model includes an explicit factor for primary mirror segmentation and/or duplication (i.e.. multi-telescope phased-array systems). Additionally, single variable models based on aperture diameter are derived. This analysis indicates that recent mirror technology advances have indeed reduced the historical telescope cost curve.

  1. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  2. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  3. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  4. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  5. Advanced Si IR detectors using molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Jones, E. W.; George, T.; Ksendzov, A.; Huberman, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) long wavelength infrared (LWIR) detectors have been fabricated by MBE. The SiGe/Si HIP detector offers a tailorable spectral response in the long wavelength infrared regime by varying the SiGe/Si heterojunction barrier. Degenerately doped p(+) SiGe layers were grown using elemental boron, as the dopant source allows a low growth temperature. Good crystalline quality was achieved for boron-doped SiGe due to the reduced growth temperature. The dark current density of the boron-doped HIP detectors was found to be thermionic emission limited. HIP detectors with a 0.066 eV were fabricated and characterized using activation energy analysis, corresponding to a 18 micron cutoff wavelength. Photoresponse of the detectors at wavelengths ranging from 2 to 12 microns has been characterized with corresponding quantum efficiencies of 5 - 0.1 percent.

  6. Development of an advanced antineutrino detector for reactor monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, T.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Ho, A.; Jonkmans, G.; Kogler, L.; Reyna, D.; Sur, B.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the development of a compact antineutrino detector for the purpose of nuclear reactor monitoring, improving upon a previously successful design. This paper will describe the design improvements of the detector which increases the antineutrino detection efficiency threefold over the previous effort. There are two main design improvements over previous generations of detectors for nuclear reactor monitoring: dual-ended optical readout and single volume detection mass. The dual-ended optical readout eliminates the need for fiducialization and increases the uniformity of the detector's optical response. The containment of the detection mass in a single active volume provides more target mass per detector footprint, a key design criteria for operating within a nuclear power plant. This technology could allow for real-time monitoring of the evolution of a nuclear reactor core, independent of reactor operator declarations of fuel inventories, and may be of interest to the safeguards community.

  7. Advanced Ge detectors for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, Larry S.

    1991-01-01

    Externally segmented coaxial detectors are fabricated for high efficiency in detecting gamma rays from cosmic sources with good sensitivities. The external background is reduced by enclosing the Ge detector array inside a thick active shield. The outer electrode of the coaxial detectors is subdivided into five segments, and internal beta activity is rejected by operating the segmented detector in a multisegment mode. The multisegment mode requires that events be detected in two or more segments before they are recorded. The full-energy-peak (FEP) efficiency of the unit is tested as a function of the incident gamma-ray energy and of the discriminator threshold of the segments. Measurements of beta-rejection and FEP efficiency are compared with Monte Carlo calculations, and good agreement is noted.

  8. Advanced radiation detector development: Advanced semiconductor detector development: Development of a room-temperature, gamma ray detector using gallium arsenide to develop an electrode detector. Annual progress report, September 30, 1994--September 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    The advanced detector development project at the University of Michigan has completed the first full year of its current funding. The general goals are the development of radiation detectors and spectrometers that are capable of portable room temperature operation. Over the past 12 months, the authors have worked primarily in the development of semiconductor spectrometers with ``single carrier`` response that offer the promise of room temperature operation and good energy resolution in gamma ray spectroscopy. They have also begun a small scale effort at investigating the properties of a small non-spectroscopic detector system with directional characteristics that will allow identification of the approximate direction in which gamma rays are incident. These activities have made use of the extensive clean room facilities at the University of Michigan for semiconductor device fabrication, and also the radiation measurement capabilities provided in the laboratory in the Phoenix Building on the North Campus.

  9. Recent advances in processing and characterization of edgeless detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Kalliopuska, J.; Eränen, S.; Virolainen, T.

    2012-02-01

    During past five years VTT has actively developed edgeless detector fabrication process. The straightforward and high yield process relies on ion-implantation to activate the edges of the detector. A recent fabrication process was performed at VTT to provide p-on-n edgeless detectors. The layout contained DC- and AC-coupled strip detector and pixel detectors for Medipix/Timepix readouts. The fabricated detector thicknesses were 50, 100 and 150 μm. Electrical characterization was done for 5 × 5 mm2 edgeless diodes on wafer level. All measured electrical parameters showed a dramatic dependence on the diode thickness. Leakage current was measured below 10 nA/cm2 at full depletion. Calculation using a theoretical approximation indicates the diode surface generation current of less than 300 pA. The breakdown voltages were measured to be above 140 V and increased as a function of diode thickness. Reverse bias of 10 V is enough to fully deplete designed edgeless diodes. Leakage current dependence of temperature was investigated for both p-on-n and previous n-on-n edgeless detectors and results show that the leakage current doubles for every 8.5 degree Celsius rise in temperature. TCAD device simulations reveal that breakdown occurs at the lateral p-n junction where the electric field reaches its highest value. Thick edgeless diodes have wider bulk space that allows electric potential to drop and causes smaller curvature of the equipotential lines. This releases the accumulation of electric field at the corner of anode and increases the breakdown voltage. A good match of the simulated and the measured capacitance-voltage curves enables identification of proper parameters used in the simulation.

  10. Advanced Silicon Detectors for High Energy Astrophysics Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, George

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the development of silicon detectors for high energy astrophysics missions is presented. The topics include: 1) Background: Motivation for Event-Driven CCD; 2) Report of Grant Activity; 3) Packaged EDCCD; 4) Measured X-ray Energy Resolution of the Gen1 EDCCDs Operated in "Conventional Mode"; and 5) EDCCD Gen 1.5-Lot 1 Planning.

  11. Advances in Inorganic Scintillation Detectors for Geophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Julie L. Champlin; Carlos M. Grodsinsky; William D. Sekela

    1998-12-31

    The ability to distinguish between geological formations and the change from one formation to another is crucial to the oil exploration and well logging industry. These changes are distinguished by the use of gamma-ray measurements, which detect the radioactive isotope combinations of potassium, thorium, and uranium present in the rock and fluid of these geological formations. A gamma radiation detector consisting of a sodium iodide crystal optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube is used for making these measurements. Because of the harsh environment seen while down hole, these detectors must be rugged in order to survive and perform under the conditions of extreme temperature, shock, and vibration. The two main geophysical applications designed for are wireline and measurement-while-drilling (MWD) environments. Three major product designs that fall under these environmental survival and performance criteria are discussed.

  12. Pi of the Sky preparations towards advanced gravitational detector era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZadroŻny, Adam; Opiela, Rafał; Obara, Łukasz; Sokołowski, Marcin

    2014-11-01

    Pi of the Sky telescope have taken part in gravitational wave EM follow-up project, runned by LSC-Virgo Collaboration, in its initial run in 2009-2010. Since than gravitational wave detectors are being upgraded and become operation in 2015, when the next science run is planned. The paper focuses on Pi of the Sky preparations to LSC-Virgo EM Follow-up project of gravitational wave transient candidates in 2015+ and on Pi of the Sky results of previous science run 2009-2010.

  13. Advanced Microstructured Semiconductor Neutron Detectors: Design, Fabrication, and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinger, Steven Lawrence

    The microstructured semiconductor neutron detector (MSND) was investigated and previous designs were improved and optimized. In the present work, fabrication techniques have been refined and improved to produce three-dimensional microstructured semiconductor neutron detectors with reduced leakage current, reduced capacitance, highly anisotropic deep etched trenches, and increased signal-to-noise ratios. As a result of these improvements, new MSND detection systems function with better gamma-ray discrimination and are easier to fabricate than previous designs. In addition to the microstructured diode fabrication improvement, a superior batch processing backfill-method for 6LiF neutron reactive material, resulting in a nearly-solid backfill, was developed. This method incorporates a LiF nano-sizing process and a centrifugal batch process for backfilling the nanoparticle LiF material. To better transition the MSND detector to commercialization, the fabrication process was studied and enhanced to better facilitate low cost and batch process MSND production. The research and development of the MSND technology described in this work includes fabrication of variant microstructured diode designs, which have been simulated through MSND physics models to predict performance and neutron detection efficiency, and testing the operational performance of these designs in regards to neutron detection efficiency, gamma-ray rejection, and silicon fabrication methodology. The highest thermal-neutron detection efficiency reported to date for a solid-state semiconductor detector is presented in this work. MSNDs show excellent neutron to gamma-ray (n/γ) rejection ratios, which are on the order of 106, without significant loss in thermal-neutron detection efficiency. Individually, the MSND is intrinsically highly sensitive to thermal neutrons, but not extrinsically sensitive because of their small size. To improve upon this, individual MSNDs were tiled together into a 6x6-element array

  14. Advances in Performance of Microchannel Plate Detectors for HEDP Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ming Wu, Craig Kruschwitz, Ken Moy, Greg Rochau

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, a team from NSTec and SNL has built a unique capability to develop microchannel plate (MCP)?based framing x-ray cameras for HEDP diagnostics. At the SNL Z facility, multistrip MCP detectors to record up to eight channels are employed in 2-D, sub-nanosecond time-resolved imaging and time- and space-resolved spectroscopy diagnostics. Progressively more stringent technical temporal resolution and response uniformity requirements have necessitated a systematic design approach based on iterative modeling of the MCP using inputs from electrical circuit characterization. An inherently large exponential dependence in MCP gain, V{sup 11.5}, has mandated a firm understanding of the applied voltage pulse shape propagating across the strip. We pioneered direct measurements of the propagating waveform using a Picoprobe{reg_sign} and developed a Monte Carlo code to simulate MCP response to compare against test measurements. This scheme is shown in Figure 1. The simulation detailed a physical model of the cascade and amplification process of the MCP that includes energy conservation for the secondary electrons, the effects of elastic scattering of low-energy electrons from the channel wall, and gain saturation mechanisms from wall charging and space charge. Our model can simulate MCP response for both static and pulsed voltage waveforms. Using this design approach, we began to characterize the newly developed second-generation detector (H-CA-65) by using a Manson x-ray source to evaluate the following DC characteristics: MCP sensitivity as a function of bias voltage, flat-field uniformity and spatial resolution, and variation of spatial resolution and sensitivity as a function of phosphor bias voltage. Dynamic performance and temporal response were obtained by using an NSTec short-pulse laser to measure optical gate profiles, saturation, and dynamic range. These data were processed and combined to obtain the gain variation and gate profiles for any position along

  15. Mechanical Design and Development of TES Bolometer Detector Arrays for the Advanced ACTPol Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Jonathan T.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Devlin, Mark J.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio M.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling 5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150 mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline pro le leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at the detector array stack assemblies. This experiment will also make use of extensive hardware and software previously developed for ACT, which will be modi ed to incorporate the new AdvACT instruments. Therefore, we discuss the integration of all AdvACT arrays with pre-existing ACTPol infrastructure.

  16. Cokriging with ground-based radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, P. M.; Webster, R.; Curran, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The formulas for cokriging and a coherent coregionalization model are presented. The model is applied to design sampling strategies for surveys using a ground-based radiometer. Results indicate that cokriging based on measured radiation is nine times as efficient as kriging the cover alone. It is concluded that cokriging in conjunction with ground-based radiometry provides an economical and operational technique for using reflectance to estimate the earth surface properties.

  17. GW150914: The Advanced LIGO Detectors in the Era of First Discoveries.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerboni Baiardi, L; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R T; De Rosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Haris, K; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; 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Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; 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Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-04-01

    Following a major upgrade, the two advanced detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) held their first observation run between September 2015 and January 2016. With a strain sensitivity of 10^{-23}/sqrt[Hz] at 100 Hz, the product of observable volume and measurement time exceeded that of all previous runs within the first 16 days of coincident observation. On September 14, 2015, the Advanced LIGO detectors observed a transient gravitational-wave signal determined to be the coalescence of two black holes [B. P. Abbott et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016)], launching the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. The event, GW150914, was observed with a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 24 in coincidence by the two detectors. Here, we present the main features of the detectors that enabled this observation. At full sensitivity, the Advanced LIGO detectors are designed to deliver another factor of 3 improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio for binary black hole systems similar in mass to GW150914. PMID:27081966

  18. GW150914: The Advanced LIGO Detectors in the Era of First Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Haris, K.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. 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J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Following a major upgrade, the two advanced detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) held their first observation run between September 2015 and January 2016. With a strain sensitivity of 10-23/√{Hz } at 100 Hz, the product of observable volume and measurement time exceeded that of all previous runs within the first 16 days of coincident observation. On September 14, 2015, the Advanced LIGO detectors observed a transient gravitational-wave signal determined to be the coalescence of two black holes [B. P. Abbott et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016)], launching the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. The event, GW150914, was observed with a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 24 in coincidence by the two detectors. Here, we present the main features of the detectors that enabled this observation. At full sensitivity, the Advanced LIGO detectors are designed to deliver another factor of 3 improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio for binary black hole systems similar in mass to GW150914.

  19. GW150914: The Advanced LIGO Detectors in the Era of First Discoveries.

    PubMed

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Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-04-01

    Following a major upgrade, the two advanced detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) held their first observation run between September 2015 and January 2016. With a strain sensitivity of 10^{-23}/sqrt[Hz] at 100 Hz, the product of observable volume and measurement time exceeded that of all previous runs within the first 16 days of coincident observation. On September 14, 2015, the Advanced LIGO detectors observed a transient gravitational-wave signal determined to be the coalescence of two black holes [B. P. Abbott et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016)], launching the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. The event, GW150914, was observed with a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 24 in coincidence by the two detectors. Here, we present the main features of the detectors that enabled this observation. At full sensitivity, the Advanced LIGO detectors are designed to deliver another factor of 3 improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio for binary black hole systems similar in mass to GW150914.

  20. Further advancements for large area-detector based computed tomography system

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A. W.; Keating, S. C.; Claytor, T. N.

    2001-01-01

    We present advancements made to a large area-detector based system for industrial x-ray computed tomography. Past performance improvements in data acquisition speeds were made by use of high-resolution large area, flat-panel amorphous-silicon (a-Si) detectors. The detectors have proven, over several years, to be a robust alternative to CCD-optics and image intensifier CT systems. These detectors also provide the advantage of area detection as compared with the single slice geometry of linear array systems. New advancements in this system include parallel processing of sinogram reconstructions, improved visualization software and migration to frame-rate a-Si detectors. Parallel processing provides significant speed improvements for data reconstruction, and is implemented for parallel-beam, fan-beam and Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction algorithms. Reconstruction times are reduced by an order of magnitude by use of a cluster of ten or more equal-speed computers. Advancements in data visualization are made through interactive software, which allows interrogation of the full three-dimensional dataset. Inspection examples presented in this paper include an electromechanical device, a nonliving biological specimen and a press-cast plastic specimen. We also present a commonplace item for the benefit of the layperson.

  1. Displacement noise from back scattering and specular reflection of input optics in advanced gravitational wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Canuel, B; Genin, E; Vajente, G; Marque, J

    2013-05-01

    The second generation of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors are currently being built and installed. They are designed to be better in strain sensitivity by about a factor 10 with respect to the first generation. Light originating from the laser and following unintended paths, called stray light, has been a major problem during the commissioning of all of the first generation detectors. Indeed, stray light carries information about the phase of the emitting object. Therefore, in the next generation all the optics will be suspended in the vacuum in order to mitigate their associated stray light displacement noise. Despite this additional precaution, the challenging target sensitivity at low frequency which is partially limited by quantum radiation pressure combined with up-conversion effects, requires more detailed investigation. In this paper, we turn our attention to stray light originating from auxiliary optical benches. We use a dedicated formalism to compute the re-coupling of back-reflected and back-scattered light. We show, in particular, how much care should be taken in designing and setting requirements for the input bench optics.

  2. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  3. Advanced Detector and Waveform Digitizer for Water Vapor DIAL Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Luck, William S., Jr.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of atmospheric water vapor has become a major requirement for understanding moist-air processes. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is a technique best suited for the measurement of atmospheric water vapor. NASA Langley Research Center is continually developing improved DIAL systems. One aspect of current development is focused on the enhancement of a DIAL receiver by applying state-of-the-art technology in building a new compact detection system that will be placed directly on the DIAL receiver telescope. The newly developed detection system has the capability of being digitally interfaced with a simple personal computer, using a discrete input/output interface. This has the potential of transmitting digital data over relatively long distances instead of analog signals, which greatly reduces measurement noise. In this paper, we discuss some results from the new compact water vapor DIAL detection system which includes a silicon based avalanche photodiode (APD) detector, a 14-bit, 10-MHz waveform digitizer, a microcontroller and other auxiliary electronics. All of which are contained on a small printed-circuit-board. This will significantly reduce the weight and volume over the current CAMAC system and eventually will be used in a water vapor DIAL system on an unpiloted atmospheric vehicle (UAV) aircraft, or alternatively on an orbiting spacecraft.

  4. Seismic Attenuation Technology for the Advanced Virgo Gravitational Wave Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beker, M. G.; Blom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Bulten, H. J.; Hennes, E.; Rabeling, D. S.

    The current interferometric gravitational wave detectors are being upgraded to what are termed 'second generation' devices. Sensitivities will be increased by an order of magnitude and these new instruments are expected to uncover the field of gravitational astronomy. A main challenge in this endeavor is the mitigation of noise induced by seismic motion. Detailed studies with Virgo show that seismic noise can be reinjected into the dark fringe signal. For example, laser beam jitter and backscattered light limit the sensitivity of the interferometer. Here, we focus on seismic attenuators based on compact inverted pendulums in combination with geometric anti-prings to obtain 40 dB of attenuation above 4 Hz in six degrees of freedom. Low frequency resonances (< 0.5 Hz) are damped by using a control system based on input from LVDTs and geophones. Such systems are under development for the seismic attenuation of optical benches operated both in air and vacuum. The design and realization of the seismic attenuation system for the Virgo external injection bench, including its control scheme, will be discussed and stand-alone performance presented.

  5. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  6. Advanced Fluorescence Protein-Based Synapse-Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojin; Oh, Won Chan; Seong, Jihye; Kim, Jinhyun

    2016-01-01

    The complex information-processing capabilities of the central nervous system emerge from intricate patterns of synaptic input-output relationships among various neuronal circuit components. Understanding these capabilities thus requires a precise description of the individual synapses that comprise neural networks. Recent advances in fluorescent protein engineering, along with developments in light-favoring tissue clearing and optical imaging techniques, have rendered light microscopy (LM) a potent candidate for large-scale analyses of synapses, their properties, and their connectivity. Optically imaging newly engineered fluorescent proteins (FPs) tagged to synaptic proteins or microstructures enables the efficient, fine-resolution illumination of synaptic anatomy and function in large neural circuits. Here we review the latest progress in fluorescent protein-based molecular tools for imaging individual synapses and synaptic connectivity. We also identify associated technologies in gene delivery, tissue processing, and computational image analysis that will play a crucial role in bridging the gap between synapse- and system-level neuroscience. PMID:27445785

  7. Advanced Fluorescence Protein-Based Synapse-Detectors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hojin; Oh, Won Chan; Seong, Jihye; Kim, Jinhyun

    2016-01-01

    The complex information-processing capabilities of the central nervous system emerge from intricate patterns of synaptic input-output relationships among various neuronal circuit components. Understanding these capabilities thus requires a precise description of the individual synapses that comprise neural networks. Recent advances in fluorescent protein engineering, along with developments in light-favoring tissue clearing and optical imaging techniques, have rendered light microscopy (LM) a potent candidate for large-scale analyses of synapses, their properties, and their connectivity. Optically imaging newly engineered fluorescent proteins (FPs) tagged to synaptic proteins or microstructures enables the efficient, fine-resolution illumination of synaptic anatomy and function in large neural circuits. Here we review the latest progress in fluorescent protein-based molecular tools for imaging individual synapses and synaptic connectivity. We also identify associated technologies in gene delivery, tissue processing, and computational image analysis that will play a crucial role in bridging the gap between synapse- and system-level neuroscience. PMID:27445785

  8. The VO and Ground-Based Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huchra, John

    The era of extremely large public databases in astronomy is upon us. such databases are opening the field to new research and new researchers. However it is important to be sure the resources are available to properly archive ground-based astronomical data and include the necessary quality checks and calibrations. A Virtual Observatory without proper archives will have limited usefulness. This also implies that with limited resources not all data can or should be archived. NASA already has a very good handle on US space-based astronomical data. Agencies and organizations that operate astronomical facilities particularly ground based observatories need to plan and budget for these activities now. We should not underestimate the effort required to produce high quality data products that will be useful for the broader community. Currently the best way to ""fill"" archives is with data ftom surveys. That will continue to be the case for most ground based observatories.

  9. MODELING ATMOSPHERIC EMISSION FOR CMB GROUND-BASED OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Errard, J.; Borrill, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Chinone, Y.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Elleflot, T.; Baccigalupi, C.; Fabbian, G.; Boettger, D.; Chapman, S.; Cukierman, A.; Delabrouille, J.; Ducout, A.; Feeney, S.; Feng, C.; and others

    2015-08-10

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3D-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the polarbear-i project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.

  10. The GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: detector spectral response effects on thermal emissive band calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Francis; Cao, Changyong; Wu, Xiangqian

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) will be aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) to supply data needed for operational weather forecasts and long-term climate variability studies, which depend on high quality data. Unlike the heritage operational GOES systems that have two or four detectors per band, ABI has hundreds of detectors per channel requiring calibration coefficients for each one. This increase in number of detectors poses new challenges for next generation sensors as each detector has a unique spectral response function (SRF) even though only one averaged SRF per band is used operationally to calibrate each detector. This simplified processing increases computational efficiency. Using measured system-level SRF data from pre-launch testing, we have the opportunity to characterize the calibration impact using measured SRFs, both per detector and as an average of detector-level SRFs similar to the operational version. We calculated the spectral response impacts for the thermal emissive bands (TEB) theoretically, by simulating the ABI response viewing an ideal blackbody and practically, with the measured ABI response to an external reference blackbody from the pre-launch TEB calibration test. The impacts from the practical case match the theoretical results using an ideal blackbody. The observed brightness temperature trends show structure across the array with magnitudes as large as 0.1 K for and 12 (9.61 µm), and 0.25 K for band 14 (11.2 µm) for a 300 K blackbody. The trends in the raw ABI signal viewing the blackbody support the spectral response measurements results, since they show similar trends in bands 12 (9.61µm), and 14 (11.2 µm), meaning that the spectral effects dominate the response differences between detectors for these bands. We further validated these effects using the radiometric bias calculated between calibrations using the external blackbody and

  11. Silicon carbide optics for space and ground based astronomical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, Joseph; Sampath, Deepak; Wainer, Chris; Schwartz, Jay; Peton, Craig; Mix, Steve; Heller, Court

    2012-09-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) optical materials are being applied widely for both space based and ground based optical telescopes. The material provides a superior weight to stiffness ratio, which is an important metric for the design and fabrication of lightweight space telescopes. The material also has superior thermal properties with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, and a high thermal conductivity. The thermal properties advantages are important for both space based and ground based systems, which typically need to operate under stressing thermal conditions. The paper will review L-3 Integrated Optical Systems - SSG’s (L-3 SSG) work in developing SiC optics and SiC optical systems for astronomical observing systems. L-3 SSG has been fielding SiC optical components and systems for over 25 years. Space systems described will emphasize the recently launched Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) developed for JHU-APL and NASA-GSFC. Review of ground based applications of SiC will include supporting L-3 IOS-Brashear’s current contract to provide the 0.65 meter diameter, aspheric SiC secondary mirror for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST).

  12. Method for detection and reconstruction of gravitational wave transients with networks of advanced detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, S.; Vedovato, G.; Drago, M.; Salemi, F.; Tiwari, V.; Prodi, G. A.; Lazzaro, C.; Ackley, K.; Tiwari, S.; Da Silva, C. F.; Mitselmakher, G.

    2016-02-01

    We present a method for detection and reconstruction of the gravitational wave (GW) transients with the networks of advanced detectors. Originally designed to search for transients with the initial GW detectors, it uses significantly improved algorithms, which enhance both the low-latency searches with rapid localization of GW events for the electromagnetic follow-up and high confidence detection of a broad range of the transient GW sources. In this paper, we present the analytic framework of the method. Following a short description of the core analysis algorithms, we introduce a novel approach to the reconstruction of the GW polarization from a pattern of detector responses to a GW signal. This polarization pattern is a unique signature of an arbitrary GW signal that can be measured independently from the other source parameters. The polarization measurements enable rapid reconstruction of the GW waveforms, sky localization, and helps identification of the source origin.

  13. Low-latency analysis pipeline for compact binary coalescences in the advanced gravitational wave detector era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, T.; Buskulic, D.; Germain, V.; Guidi, G. M.; Marion, F.; Montani, M.; Mours, B.; Piergiovanni, F.; Wang, G.

    2016-09-01

    The multi-band template analysis (MBTA) pipeline is a low-latency coincident analysis pipeline for the detection of gravitational waves (GWs) from compact binary coalescences. MBTA runs with a low computational cost, and can identify candidate GW events online with a sub-minute latency. The low computational running cost of MBTA also makes it useful for data quality studies. Events detected by MBTA online can be used to alert astronomical partners for electromagnetic follow-up. We outline the current status of MBTA and give details of recent pipeline upgrades and validation tests that were performed in preparation for the first advanced detector observing period. The MBTA pipeline is ready for the outset of the advanced detector era and the exciting prospects it will bring.

  14. MSFC Skylab ground-based astronomy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Ground-Based Astronomy Program (SGAP) was conducted to enhance the data base of solar physics obtained during the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) mission flown in conjunction with the Skylab orbital station. Leading solar physicists from various observatories obtained data from the ground at the same time that orbital data were being acquired by ATM. The acquisition of corollary solar data from the ground simultaneously with the ATM orbital observations helped to provide a broader basis for understanding solar physics by increasing spectral coverage and by the use of additional sophisticated instruments of various types. This report briefly describes the individual tasks and the associated instrumentation selected for this ground-based program and contains as appendices, the final reports from the Principal Investigators.

  15. Statistical Studies of Ground-Based Optical Lightning Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, C. R.; Nemzek, R. J.; Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    Most extensive optical studies of lightning have been conducted from orbit, and the statistics of events collected from earth are relatively poorly documented. The time signatures of optical power measured in the presence of clouds are inevitably affected by scattering,which can distort the signatures by extending and delaying the amplitude profile in time. We have deployed two all-sky photodiode detectors, one in New Mexico and one in Oklahoma, which are gathering data alongside electric field change monitors as part of the LANL EDOTX Great Plains Array. Preliminary results show that the photodiode is sensitive to approximately 50% or more of RF events detected at ranges of up to 30 km, and still has some sensitivity at ranges in excess of 60 km (distances determined by the EDOTX field-change array). The shapes of events within this range were assessed, with focus on rise time, width, peak power, and their correlation to corresponding electric field signatures, and these are being compared with published on-orbit and ground-based data. Initial findings suggest a mean characteristic width (ratio of total detected optical energy to peak power) of 291 +/- 12 microseconds and a mean delay between the RF signal peak and optical peak of 121 +/- 17 microseconds. These values fall between prior ground-based measurements of direct return stroke emissions, and scattering-dominated on-orbit measurements. This work will promote better understanding of the correspondence between radio and optical measurements of lightning.

  16. Current trends in ground based solar magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosain, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    Continuous observations of the sun, over more than a century, have led to several important discoveries in solar astronomy. These include the discovery of the solar magnetism and its cyclic modulation, active region formation and decay and their role in energetic phenomena such as fares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), fine structure and dynamics of the sunspots and small-scale organization of the magnetic flux in the form of flux tubes and so forth. In this article we give a brief overview of advancements in solar observational techniques in recent decades and the results obtained from the such observations. These include techniques to achieve high angular resolution, high spectral and polarimetric sensitivity and innovative new detectors. A wide range of spatial, temporal and spectral domains exploited by solar astronomers to understand the solar phenomena are discussed. Many new upcoming telescopes and instruments that are designed to address different aspects of solar physics problems are briefly described. Finally, we discuss the advantages of observing from the ground and how they can complement space-based observations.

  17. Technology assessment for the advanced life detector. Final technical report, May 1987-January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, W.D.; George, D.T.

    1988-01-29

    This report summarizes an assessment of technology available to develop a noninvasive life detector for use on the battlefield. The detectors determine if casualties wearing chemical protective overgarments are alive or dead without further exposing either the casualties or the aidmen to the contaminated environment. Seven technology approaches sponsored by the Department of Defense (comprising 11 devices), four technologies identified in a market survey, and one device described in a Broad Agency Announcement proposal were examined as candidate Advanced Life Detectors. The technologies and instruments surveyed included three transmitter-receiver technologies, an electrocardiogram (ECG) technology, pacemaker-transmitter/receiver, dry electrode heart rate monitor, five microwave technologies, flash reflectance oximetry, an ultrasound technology, a streaming potential technology, a dry electrode ECG monitor coupled to a microphone, a statometric technique for determining heart rate and blood pressure, and a vital-signs monitor that determines heart rate and blood pressure using blood pressure cuff and microphones incorporated into the cuff. Analysis of the state-of-the-art of each device indicates that none of them are advanced enough to fulfill all the requirements of the draft Joint Services Operational Requirement. Three of the devices identified are recommended for further evaluation.

  18. Advanced combined iodine dispenser and detector. [for microorganism annihilation in potable water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, J. B.; Schubert, F. H.; Jensen, F. C.; Powell, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    A total weight of 1.23 kg (2.7 lb), a total volume of 1213 cu m (74 cu in), and an average power consumption of 5.5W was achieved in the advanced combined iodine dispenser/detector by integrating the detector with the iodine source, arranging all iodinator components within a compact package and lowering the parasitic power to the detector and electronics circuits. These achievements surpassed the design goals of 1.36 kg (3.0 lb), 1671 cu m (102 cu in) and 8W. The reliability and maintainability were improved by reducing the detector lamp power, using an interchangeable lamp concept, making the electronic circuit boards easily accessible, providing redundant water seals and improving the accessibility to the iodine accumulator for refilling. The system was designed to iodinate (to 5 ppm iodine) the fuel cell water generated during 27 seven-day orbiter missions (equivalent to 18,500 kg (40,700 lb) of water) before the unit must be recharged with iodine crystals.

  19. Development of an ultrahigh-performance infrared detector platform for advanced spectroscopic sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Manish; Wicks, Gary; Marshall, Andrew; Craig, Adam; Golding, Terry; Hossain, Khalid; McEwan, Ken; Howle, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Laser-based stand-off sensing of threat agents (e.g. explosives, toxic industrial chemicals or chemical warfare agents), by detection of distinct infrared spectral absorption signature of these materials, has made significant advances recently. This is due in part to the availability of infrared and terahertz laser sources with significantly improved power and tunability. However, there is a pressing need for a versatile, high performance infrared sensor that can complement and enhance the recent advances achieved in laser technology. This work presents new, high performance infrared detectors based on III-V barrier diodes. Unipolar barrier diodes, such as the nBn, have been very successful in the MWIR using InAs(Sb)-based materials, and in the MWIR and LWIR using type-II InAsSb/InAs superlattice-based materials. This work addresses the extension of the barrier diode architecture into the SWIR region, using GaSb-based and InAs-based materials. The program has resulted in detectors with unmatched performance in the 2-3 μm spectral range. Temperature dependent characterization has shown dark currents to be diffusion limited and equal to, or within a factor of 5, of the Rule 07 expression for Auger-limited HgCdTe detectors. Furthermore, D* values are superior to those of existing detectors in the 2-3 μm band. Of particular significance to spectroscopic sensing systems is the ability to have near-background limited performance at operation temperatures compatible with robust and reliable solid state thermoelectric coolers.

  20. Detectability of eccentric compact binary coalescences with advanced gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, M.; Meyers, P.; Thrane, E.; Luo, J.; Christensen, N.

    2015-03-01

    Compact binary coalescences are a promising source of gravitational waves for second-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors such as advanced LIGO and advanced Virgo. While most binaries are expected to possess circular orbits, some may be eccentric, for example, if they are formed through dynamical capture. Eccentric orbits can create difficulty for matched filtering searches due to the challenges of creating effective template banks to detect these signals. In previous work, we showed how seedless clustering can be used to detect low-mass (Mtotal≤10 M⊙) compact binary coalescences for both spinning and eccentric systems, assuming a circular post-Newtonian expansion. Here, we describe a parametrization that is designed to maximize sensitivity to low-eccentricity (0 ≤ɛ ≤0.6 ) systems, derived from the analytic equations. We show that this parametrization provides a robust and computationally efficient method for detecting eccentric low-mass compact binaries. Based on these results, we conclude that advanced detectors will have a chance of detecting eccentric binaries if optimistic models prove true. However, a null observation is unlikely to firmly rule out models of eccentric binary populations.

  1. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager: Dark Current and Noise Characterization and Anomalous Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The dark current and noise characteristics of the Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager measured during ground calibration at MIT Lincoln Laboratory are presented. Data were collected for the nominal focal plane operating temperature of 220 K as well as supplemental operating temperatures (215 and 225 K). Dark current baseline values are provided, and noise characterization includes the evaluation of white, coherent, low frequency, and high frequency components. Finally, anomalous detectors, characterized by unusual dark current, noise, gain, or cross-talk properties are investigated.

  2. Application of Pixel-cell Detector Technology for Advanced Neutron Beam Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Daniel M.

    2011-01-11

    Application of Pixel-Cell Detector Technology for Advanced Neutron Beam Monitors Specifications of currently available neutron beam detectors limit their usefulness at intense neutron beams of large-scale national user facilities used for the advanced study of materials. A large number of neutron-scattering experiments require beam monitors to operate in an intense neutron beam flux of >10E+7 neutrons per second per square centimeter. For instance, a 4 cm x 4 cm intense beam flux of 6.25 x 10E+7 n/s/cm2 at the Spallation Neutron Source will put a flux of 1.00 x 10E+9 n/s at the beam monitor. Currently available beam monitors with a typical efficiency of 1 x 10E-4 will need to be replaced in less than two years of operation due to wire and gas degradation issues. There is also a need at some instruments for beam position information that are beyond the capabilities of currently available He-3 and BF3 neutron beam monitors. ORDELA, Inc.’s research under USDOE SBIR Grant (DE-FG02-07ER84844) studied the feasibility of using pixel-cell technology for developing a new generation of stable, long-life neutron beam monitors. The research effort has led to the development and commercialization of advanced neutron beam detectors that will directly benefit the Spallation Neutron Source and other intense neutron sources such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor. A prototypical Pixel-Cell Neutron Beam Monitor was designed and constructed during this research effort. This prototype beam monitor was exposed to an intense neutron beam at the HFIR SNS HB-2 test beam site. Initial measurements on efficiency, uniformity across the detector, and position resolution yielded excellent results. The development and test results have provided the required data to initiate the fabrication and commercialization of this next generation of neutron-detector systems. ORDELA, Inc. has (1) identified low-cost design and fabrication strategies, (2) developed and built pixel-cell detectors and

  3. Observing Gravitational Waves from Core-Collapse Supernovae in the Advanced Detector Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossan, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    The next galactic core-collapse supernova (CCSN) has already exploded, and its electromagnetic (EM) waves, neutrinos, and gravitational waves (GWs) may arrive at any moment. We present an extensive study on the potential sensitivity of prospective detection scenarios for GWs from CCSN sources within 5Mpc, using realistic noise at the predicted sensitivity of the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors for 2015, 2017, and 2019. We make statements on the detectability of the core collapse event for sources within the galaxy and Large Magellanic Cloud, for which there will be an associated neutrino burst, and consider the exclusion of extreme post-core collapse emission models for more distant SNe with an associated EM signature. Given a detection of GW from core collapse, we discuss the potential to infer the CCSN explosion mechanism.

  4. Observing gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae in the advanced detector era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossan, S. E.; Sutton, P.; Stuver, A.; Zanolin, M.; Gill, K.; Ott, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    The next galactic core-collapse supernova (CCSN) has already exploded, and its electromagnetic (EM) waves, neutrinos, and gravitational waves (GWs) may arrive at any moment. We present an extensive study on the potential sensitivity of prospective detection scenarios for GWs from CCSNe within 5 Mpc, using realistic noise at the predicted sensitivity of the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors for 2015, 2017, and 2019. We quantify the detectability of GWs from CCSNe within the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud, for which there will be an observed neutrino burst. We also consider extreme GW emission scenarios for more distant CCSNe with an associated EM signature. We find that a three-detector network at design sensitivity will be able to detect neutrino-driven CCSN explosions out to ˜5.5 kpc , while rapidly rotating core collapse will be detectable out to the Large Magellanic Cloud at 50 kpc. Of the phenomenological models for extreme GW emission scenarios considered in this study, such as long-lived bar-mode instabilities and disk fragmentation instabilities, all models considered will be detectable out to M31 at 0.77 Mpc, while the most extreme models will be detectable out to M82 at 3.52 Mpc and beyond.

  5. Sensitivity of the Advanced LIGO detectors at the beginning of gravitational wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, D. V.; Hall, E. D.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R. X.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Aston, S. M.; Austin, L.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barbet, M.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Batch, J. C.; Bell, A. S.; Belopolski, I.; Bergman, J.; Betzwieser, J.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Black, E.; Blair, C. D.; Bogan, C.; Bork, R.; Bridges, D. O.; Brooks, A. F.; Celerier, C.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Cook, D.; Countryman, S. T.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Damjanic, M.; Dannenberg, R.; Danzmann, K.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Driggers, J. C.; Dwyer, S. E.; Effler, A.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fair, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Foley, S.; Frede, M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, R.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Grote, H.; Guido, C. J.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Heefner, J.; Heintze, M. C.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Hoak, D.; Hough, J.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jones, R.; Kandhasamy, S.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kells, W.; Kijbunchoo, N.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kokeyama, K.; Korth, W. Z.; Kuehn, G.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Le Roux, A.; Levine, B. M.; Lewis, J. B.; Lhuillier, V.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lormand, M.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lundgren, A. P.; MacDonald, T.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Merilh, E. L.; Meyer, M. S.; Meyers, P. M.; Miller, J.; Mittleman, R.; Moreno, G.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O'Dell, J.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Palamos, J. R.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Patrick, Z.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Phelps, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I.; Poeld, J.; Principe, M.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Raab, F. J.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Ramet, C. R.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Robertson, N. A.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Ryan, K.; Sadecki, T.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Savage, R. L.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schultz, B.; Schwinberg, P.; Sellers, D.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sigg, D.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Sorazu, B.; Staley, A.; Stein, A. J.; Stochino, A.; Strain, K. A.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vargas, M.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Waldman, S. J.; Walker, M.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Weaver, B.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Weßels, P.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Wipf, C. C.; Worden, J.; Wu, G.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Zhang, L.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-06-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) consists of two widely separated 4 km laser interferometers designed to detect gravitational waves from distant astrophysical sources in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 10 kHz. The first observation run of the Advanced LIGO detectors started in September 2015 and ended in January 2016. A strain sensitivity of better than 10-23/√{Hz } was achieved around 100 Hz. Understanding both the fundamental and the technical noise sources was critical for increasing the astrophysical strain sensitivity. The average distance at which coalescing binary black hole systems with individual masses of 30 M⊙ could be detected above a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 8 was 1.3 Gpc, and the range for binary neutron star inspirals was about 75 Mpc. With respect to the initial detectors, the observable volume of the Universe increased by a factor 69 and 43, respectively. These improvements helped Advanced LIGO to detect the gravitational wave signal from the binary black hole coalescence, known as GW150914.

  6. THEMIS Ground Based Observatory System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, S. E.; Mende, S. B.; Angelopoulos, V.; Rachelson, W.; Donovan, E.; Jackel, B.; Greffen, M.; Russell, C. T.; Pierce, D. R.; Dearborn, D. J.; Rowe, K.; Connors, M.

    2008-12-01

    The comprehensive THEMIS approach to solving the substorm problem calls for monitoring the nightside auroral oval with low-cost, robust white-light imagers and magnetometers that can deliver high time resolution data (0.33 and 2 Hz, respectively). A network of 20 Ground-Based Observatories (GBOs) are deployed across Canada and Alaska to support the collection of data from these instruments. Here we describe the system design of the observatory, with emphasis on how the design meets the environmental and data-collection requirements. We also review the design of the All Sky Imager (ASI), discuss how it was built to survive Arctic deployments, and summarize the optical characterizations performed to qualify the design to meet THEMIS mission requirements.

  7. Revolutionary visible and infrared sensor detectors for the most advanced astronomical AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Guieu, Sylvain; Downing, Mark; Jorden, Paul; Rothman, Johan; de Borniol, Eric D.; Balard, Philippe; Stadler, Eric; Guillaume, Christian; Boutolleau, David; Coussement, Jérome; Kolb, Johann; Hubin, Norbert; Derelle, Sophie; Robert, Clélia; Tanchon, Julien; Trollier, Thierry; Ravex, Alain; Zins, Gérard; Kern, Pierre; Moulin, Thibaut; Rochat, Sylvain; Delpoulbé, Alain; Lebouqun, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-07-01

    We report in this paper decisive advance on the detector development for the astronomical applications that require very fast operation. Since the CCD220 and OCAM2 major success, new detector developments started in Europe either for visible and IR wavelengths. Funded by ESO and the FP7 Opticon European network, the NGSD CMOS device is fully dedicated to Natural and Laser Guide Star AO for the E-ELT with strong ESO involvement. The NGSD will be a 880x840 pixels CMOS detector with a readout noise of 3 e (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate and providing digital outputs. A camera development, based on this CMOS device and also funded by the Opticon European network, is ongoing. Another major AO wavefront sensing detector development concerns IR detectors based on Avalanche Photodiode (e- APD) arrays within the RAPID project. Developed by the SOFRADIR and CEA/LETI manufacturers, the latter offers a 320x255 8 outputs 30 microns IR array, sensitive from 0.4 to 3 microns, with less than 2 e readout noise at 1600 fps. A rectangular window can also be programmed to speed up even more the frame rate when the full frame readout is not required. The high QE response, in the range of 70%, is almost flat over this wavelength range. Advanced packaging with miniature cryostat using pulse tube cryocoolers was developed in the frame of this programme in order to allow use on this detector in any type of environment. The characterization results of this device are presented here. Readout noise as low as 1.7 e at 1600 fps has been measured with a 3 microns wavelength cut-off chip and a multiplication gain of 14 obtained with a limited photodiode polarization of 8V. This device also exhibits excellent linearity, lower than 1%. The pulse tube cooling allows smart and easy cooling down to 55 K. Vibrations investigations using centroiding and FFT measurements were performed proving that the miniature pulse tube does not induce measurable vibrations to the optical bench, allowing use of this

  8. Modelling an advanced ManPAD with dual band detectors and a rosette scanning seeker head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchenall, Richard P.; Richardson, Mark A.; Butters, Brian; Walmsley, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Man Portable Air Defence Systems (ManPADs) have been a favoured anti aircraft weapon since their appearance on the military proliferation scene in the mid 1960s. Since this introduction there has been a 'cat and mouse' game of Missile Countermeasures (CMs) and the aircraft protection counter counter measures (CCMs) as missile designers attempt to defeat the aircraft platform protection equipment. Magnesium Teflon Viton (MTV) flares protected the target aircraft until the missile engineers discovered the art of flare rejection using techniques including track memory and track angle bias. These early CCMs relied upon CCM triggering techniques such as the rise rate method which would just sense a sudden increase in target energy and assume that a flare CM had been released by the target aircraft. This was not as reliable as was first thought as aspect changes (bringing another engine into the field of view) or glint from the sun could inadvertently trigger a CCM when not needed. The introduction of dual band detectors in the 1980s saw a major advance in CCM capability allowing comparisons between two distinct IR bands to be made thus allowing the recognition of an MTV flare to occur with minimal false alarms. The development of the rosette scan seeker in the 1980s complemented this advancement allowing the scene in the missile field of view (FOV) to be scanned by a much smaller (1/25) instantaneous FOV (IFOV) with the spectral comparisons being made at each scan point. This took the ManPAD from a basic IR energy detector to a pseudo imaging system capable of analysing individual elements of its overall FOV allowing more complex and robust CCM to be developed. This paper continues the work published in [1,2] and describes the method used to model an advanced ManPAD with a rosette scanning seeker head and robust CCMs similar to the Raytheon Stinger RMP.

  9. Inverted pendulum as low-frequency pre-isolation for advanced gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamori, A.; Raffai, P.; Márka, S.; DeSalvo, R.; Sannibale, V.; Tariq, H.; Bertolini, A.; Cella, G.; Viboud, N.; Numata, K.; Takahashi, R.; Fukushima, M.

    2007-11-01

    We have developed advanced seismic attenuation systems for Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors. The design consists of an Inverted Pendulum (IP) holding stages of Geometrical Anti-Spring Filters (GASF) and pendula, which isolate the test mass suspension from ground noise. The ultra-low-frequency IP suppresses the horizontal seismic noise, while the GASF suppresses the vertical ground vibrations. The three legs of the IP are supported by cylindrical maraging steel flexural joints. The IP can be tuned to very low frequencies by carefully adjusting its load. As a best result, we have achieved an ultra low, ˜12 mHz pendulum frequency for the system prototype made for Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory). The measured quality factor, Q, of this IP, ranging from Q˜2500 (at 0.45 Hz) to Q˜2 (at 12 mHz), is compatible with structural damping, and is proportional to the square of the pendulum frequency. Tunable counterweights allow for precise center-of-percussion tuning to achieve the required attenuation up to the first leg internal resonance (˜60 Hz for advanced LIGO prototype). All measurements are in good agreement with our analytical models. We therefore expect good attenuation in the low-frequency region, from ˜0.1to ˜50 Hz, covering the micro-seismic peak. The extremely soft IP requires minimal control force, which simplifies any needed actuation.

  10. Examining auroral downward current region processes using ground based data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, Robert Gregory

    observed 7 distinct periods of NEIAL activity. These times correspond to (a) when the polar cap boundary of the auroral arcs passed through the magnetic zenith and (b) when small-scale filamentary dark structure was present in the magnetic zenith. These observations are consistent with NEIALs occurring within the same auroral morphology which is known to contain broad-band extremely low frequency (BBELF) wave activity. By comparing the densities at which NEIALs have been observed by previous studies, it is found that NEIALs occur at densities roughly between 5 and 30 x1010 m-3. The observations presented in this dissertation support the hypothesis that NEIALs and BBELF are differently observed aspects of the same auroral phenomenon. It is a goal of this thesis to connect these ground-based observations with previous in situ measurements and identify DCRs from the ground. A relation between NEIALs and the in situ signature of BBELF wave activity, provides a link between the in situ measurements and the ground-based observations. There are no actual ground-based/in situ conjugate events in this study. The focus here is to compare the optical observations to the morphology and auroral context of DCRs as measured in situ by previous studies. The use of ground-based observational techniques for observing DCR processes has many implications. These include identifying and following the temporal and spatial evolution of DCRs as well as being able to identify regions of potential ion outflow on a large spatial and temporal scale using ground based optical observations.

  11. Applications of Gas Imaging Micro-Well Detectors to an Advanced Compton Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloser, P. F.; Hunter, S. D.; Ryan, J. M.; McConnell, M. L.; Miller, R. S.; Jackson, T. N.; Bai, B.; Jung, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a concept for an Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) based on the use of pixelized gas micro-well detectors to form a three-dimensional electron track imager. A micro-well detector consists of an array of individual micro-patterned proportional counters opposite a planar drift electrode. When combined with thin film transistor array readouts, large gas volumes may be imaged with very good spatial and energy resolution at reasonable cost. The third dimension is determined by timing the drift of the ionization electrons. The primary advantage of this approach is the excellent tracking of the Compton recoil electron that is possible in a gas volume. Such good electron tracking allows us to reduce the point spread function of a single incident photon dramatically, greatly improving the imaging capability and sensitivity. The polarization sensitivity, which relies on events with large Compton scattering angles, is particularly enhanced. We describe a possible ACT implementation of this technique, in which the gas tracking volume is surrounded by a CsI calorimeter, and present our plans to build and test a small prototype over the next three years.

  12. Development of an advanced combined iodine dispenser/detector. [for spacecraft water supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, J. B.; Jensen, F. C.; Winkler, H. E.; Schubert, F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Injection of iodine into water is widely used to control microbial growth. An entirely automated device for I2 injection has been developed for spacecraft application. Transfer of I2 into the water from a concentrated form is controlled electrochemically via feedback from an integrated photometric I2 level detector. All components are contained within a package weighing only 1.23 kg (2.7 lb) dry, which occupies only 1213 cu cm (74 cu in) of space, and which has the capacity to iodinate 10,900 kg (24,000 lb) of water of 5 ppm. These features exceed design specifications. The device performed satisfactorily during extended testing at variable water flow rates and temperatures. Designed to meet specifications of the Shuttle Orbiter, the device will find application in the regenerative water systems of advanced spacecraft.

  13. Optimizing the regimes of the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detector for multiple source types

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrashov, I. S.; Simakov, D. A.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Danilishin, S. L.

    2008-09-15

    We developed algorithms which allow us to find regimes of the signal-recycled Fabry-Perot-Michelson interferometer [for example, the Advanced Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO)], optimized concurrently for two (binary inspirals + bursts) and three (binary inspirals + bursts + millisecond pulsars) types of gravitational wave sources. We show that there exists a relatively large area in the interferometer parameters space where the detector sensitivity to the first two kinds of sources differs only by a few percent from the maximal ones for each kind of source. In particular, there exists a specific regime where this difference is {approx_equal}0.5% for both of them. Furthermore, we show that even more multipurpose regimes are also possible that provide significant sensitivity gain for millisecond pulsars with only minor sensitivity degradation for binary inspirals and bursts.

  14. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments: A 4{pi} BaF2 Detector for Neutron Capture Measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Reifarth, R.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Alpizar, A.; Hatarik, R.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Kronenberg, A.; Rundberg, R.S.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Folden, C.M.; Hoffman, D.C.; Greife, U.; Schwantes, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.

    2005-05-24

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 162-element 4{pi} BaF2 array designed to make neutron capture cross-section measurements on rare or radioactive targets with masses as little as one milligram. Accurate capture cross sections are needed in many research areas, including stellar nucleosynthesis, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, waste transmutation, and other applied programs. These cross sections are difficult to calculate accurately and must be measured. The design and initial performance results of DANCE is discussed.

  15. Advances in the growth of alkaline-earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Neal, John S; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Beck, P; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystal-growth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  16. Advances in the growth of alkaline-Earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, J. S.; Cherepy, N. J.; Beck, P. R.; Payne, S. A.; Burger, A.; Rowe, E.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-09-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystalgrowth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  17. Ground based research in microgravity materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Rathz, Tom

    1994-01-01

    The core activities performed during this time period have been concerned with tracking the TEMPEST experiments on the shuttle with drops of Zr, Ni, and Nb alloys. In particular a lot of Zr drops are being made to better define the recalescence characteristics of that system so that accurate comparisons of the drop tube results with Tempest can be made. A new liner, with minimal reflectivity characteristics, has been inserted into the drop tube in order to improve the recalescence measurements of the falling drops. The first installation to make the geometric measurements to ensure a proper fit has been made. The stovepipe sections are currently in the shop at MSFC being painted with low reflectivity black paint. Work has also continued on setting up the MEL apparatus obtained from Oak Ridge in the down stairs laboratory at the Drop Tube Facilities. Some ground-based experiments on the same metals as are being processed on TEMPEST are planned for the MEL. The flight schedules for the KC-135 experiments are still to be determined in the near future.

  18. Ground Based Studies of the Outer Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, Laurence M.

    2005-01-01

    This report covers progress to date under this grant on our continuing program to conduct ground based studies of the outer solar system planets and satellites, with emphasis on spectroscopy and atmospheric phenomena. The research continues under our new PAST grant, NNG04G131G beginning 5/1/2004. The original period of performance of the subject grant was 3/1/2001 to 2/28/2004, but was extended one year at no cost. Although there is some overlap in the scientific projects conducted during the extended year with those of the new grant, this report is confined to the portion of the work funded under NAG5-10435. The primary goals for this grant period were a comparative study of outer planet thermospheres/ionospheres near solar maximum, extended to the mid-IR, and the investigation of molecular dimers in outer solar system atmospheres. This project supports NASA's planned space missions, Jupiter Polar Orbiter, outer Planet Microprobes, and the recent Cassini flyby of Jupiter. It also supports the OSS strategic plan themes, The Exploration of the Solar System and The Sun-Earth Connection/ Understanding comparative planetary space environments.

  19. Ground based observations of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, M. Q.; Harrison, A. W.

    1980-06-01

    The results of ground based measurements of stratospheric NO2, using four different established methods based on twilight sky observations in the spectral region 437.0-451.0 nm and made at two locations: Primrose Lake and at Priddis, Alberta, Canada, during March and April 1979 are presented. It is shown that the four methods differ from one another on the basis of: (a) whether or not stratospheric ozone is taken into account, (b) whether a continuous NO2 absorption spectrum or just the absorption at a few discrete wavelengths is used for analysis, and (c) the assumed altitude distribution of NO2 concentration. Further, two different independently developed altitude distribution models are employed in obtaining the NO2 vertical column abundance and its effective altitude from a set of slant column abundances measured in the twilight sky at different solar zenith angles in the range of 85 to 96 deg. Finally, a comparison shows that the use of one or the other of these two models alone could introduce a difference of as much as 30% in the derived vertical column abundance.

  20. Development of a Compact, Ground-Based Ozone DIAL System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyba, T. H.; Zenker, T.; McCray, C. L.; Lee, H. R.; Thomas, B.; Elivert, R.; Higdon, N. Scott; Richter, D. A.; Fishman, J.

    1998-01-01

    We are developing a portable, eye-safe, ground-based ozone lidar instrument specialized for ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements in the troposphere. This prototype instrument is intended to operate at remote field sites and to serve as the basic unit for future monitoring projects requiring multi-instrument networks, such as that proposed for the Global Tropospheric Ozone Project (GTOP). GTOP is currently being formulated by a scientific panel of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project to meet its goal to better understand the processes that control the global distribution of tropospheric ozone. In order for the lidar to be widely deployed in networks, it must be fairly easy to use and maintain as well as being cost-competitive with ground station launching ozone sondes which operate several times a day. To achieve these goals, emphasis is placed upon the incorporation of: (1) all-solid state transmitters which can reliably produce 20-40 mJ pulses; (2) a highly efficient, narrow-bandpass receiver; (3) dual analog and photon-counting detector channels; and (4) flexible, user-friendly control software.

  1. Jovian thundercloud research with ground-based telescope and spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yukihiro; Nakajima, Kensuke; Takeuchi, Satoru; Sugiyama, Ko-Ichiro; Sato, Mitsuteru; Fukuhara, Tetsuya; Sato, Soga; Yair, Yoav; Aplin, Karen; Fischer, Georg

    2010-05-01

    The latest observational and theoretical studies suggest that thunderstorms, i.e., strong moist convective clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere are very important not only as an essential ingredient of meteorology of Jupiter, which determines the large scale structures such as belt/zone and big ovals, but also as a potentially very useful tool for probing the water abundance of the deep atmosphere, which is crucial to constrain the behavior of volatiles in early solar system. Here we suggest a very simple high-speed imaging unit onboard Jovian orbiter, Optical Lightning Detector, OLD, optimized for detecting optical emissions from lightning discharge in Jupiter. OLD consists of radiation-tolerant CMOS sensors and two H Balmer Alpha line (656.3nm) filters. In normal sampling mode the frame intervals is 29ms with a full frame format of 512x512 pixels and in high-speed sampling mode the interval could be reduced down to 0.1ms by concentrating a limited area of 30x30 pixels. Weight, size and power consumption are about 1kg, 16x7x5.5 cm (sensor) and 16x12x4 cm (circuit), and 4W, respectively, though they can be reduced according to the spacecraft resources. Also we plan to investigate the optical flashes using a ground-based middle-sized telescope, which will be built by Hokkaido University, with narrow-band high speed imaging unit. Observational strategy with such optical lightning detectors and spectral imagers, which enable us to estimate the horizontal motion and altitude of clouds, will be introduced.

  2. Advancements in the development of a directional-position sensing fast neutron detector using acoustically tensioned metastable fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, Brian C.; Webster, Jeffrey A.; Grimes, Thomas F.; Fischer, Kevin F.; Hagen, Alex R.; Taleyakhan, Rusi P.

    2015-06-01

    Advancements in the development of a direction and position sensing fast neutron detector which utilizes the directional acoustic tensioned metastable fluid detector (D-ATMFD) are described. The resulting D-ATMFD sensor is capable of determining the direction of neutron radiation with a single compact detector versus use of arrays of detectors in conventional directional systems. Directional neutron detection and source positioning offer enhanced detection speeds in comparison to traditional proximity searching; including enabling determination of the neutron source shape, size, and strength in near real time. This paper discusses advancements that provide the accuracy and precision of ascertaining directionality and source localization information utilizing enhanced signal processing-cum-signal analysis, refined computational algorithms, and on-demand enlargement capability of the detector sensitive volume. These advancements were accomplished utilizing experimentation and theoretical modeling. Benchmarking and qualifications studies were successfully conducted with random and fission based special nuclear material (SNM) neutron sources (239Pu-Be and 252Cf). These results of assessments have indicated that the D-ATMFD compares well in technical performance with banks of competing directional fast neutron detector technologies under development worldwide, but it does so with a single detector unit, an unlimited field of view, and at a significant reduction in both cost and size while remaining completely blind to common background (e.g., beta-gamma) radiation. Rapid and direct SNM neutron source imaging with two D-ATMFD sensors was experimentally demonstrated, and furthermore, validated via multidimensional nuclear particle transport simulations utilizing MCNP-PoliMi. Characterization of a scaled D-ATMFD based radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a cost-effective and efficient 3He sensor replacement was performed utilizing MCNP-PoliMi simulations, the results of which

  3. Movable Ground Based Recovery System for Reuseable Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver, George L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A reusable space flight launch system is configured to eliminate complex descent and landing systems from the space flight hardware and move them to maneuverable ground based systems. Precision landing of the reusable space flight hardware is enabled using a simple, light weight aerodynamic device on board the flight hardware such as a parachute, and one or more translating ground based vehicles such as a hovercraft that include active speed, orientation and directional control. The ground based vehicle maneuvers itself into position beneath the descending flight hardware, matching its speed and direction and captures the flight hardware. The ground based vehicle will contain propulsion, command and GN&C functionality as well as space flight hardware landing cushioning and retaining hardware. The ground based vehicle propulsion system enables longitudinal and transverse maneuverability independent of its physical heading.

  4. Ground-based testing and demonstrations of starshades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harness, Anthony; Warwick, Steve; Shipley, Ann; Cash, Webster

    2016-07-01

    The direct detection and characterization of an Earth-like exoplanet is of the highest scientific priority and a leading technology that will enable such discovery is the starshade external occulter. We report on the latest results in ground-based efforts for demonstrating and advancing the technology of starshades. Using the McMath- Pierce Solar Telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory, we are able to track stars as they move across the night sky and stabilize a beam of starlight behind a starshade. This has allowed us to conduct the first astronomical observations achieving high-contrast with starshades. In our latest efforts, we have extended the separation between the starshade and telescope to reach an inner working angle of 10 arcseconds at a flight-like Fresnel number and resolution. In this report, we detail the development of a closed-loop feedback system to further stabilize the beam at the extended baseline and provide results on the contrast achieved. We conclude by laying out future work to design a dedicated siderostat-starshade facility for future testing of and observations with starshades. Our main result: we achieved a broadband contrast ratio of 3:2 x 10-5 at 15 arcseconds IWA, while at a flight-like Fresnel number and resolution.

  5. Ground-Based Research within NASA's Materials Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ground-based research in Materials Science for NASA's Microgravity program serves several purposes, and includes approximately four Principal Investigators for every one in the flight program. While exact classification is difficult. the ground program falls roughly into the following categories: (1) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Theoretical Studies; (2) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Bringing to Maturity New Research; (3) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Enabling Characterization; (4) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Thermophysical Property Determination; (5) Radiation Shielding; (6) Preliminary In Situ Resource Utilization; (7) Biomaterials; (8) Nanostructured Materials; (9) Materials Science for Advanced Space Propulsion. It must be noted that while the first four categories are aimed at using long duration low gravity conditions, the other categories pertain more to more recent NASA initiatives in materials science. These new initiatives address NASA's future materials science needs in the realms of crew health and safety, and exploration, and have been included in the most recent NASA Research Announcements (NRA). A description of each of these nine categories will be given together with examples of the kinds of research being undertaken.

  6. Intrinsic selection biases of ground-based gravitational wave searches for high-mass black hole-black hole mergers

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shaughnessy, R.; Vaishnav, B.; Healy, J.; Shoemaker, D.

    2010-11-15

    The next generation of ground-based gravitational wave detectors may detect a few mergers of comparable-mass M{approx_equal}100-1000M{sub {center_dot}}[''intermediate-mass'' (IMBH)] spinning black holes. Black hole spin is known to have a significant impact on the orbit, merger signal, and post-merger ringdown of any binary with non-negligible spin. In particular, the detection volume for spinning binaries depends significantly on the component black hole spins. We provide a fit to the single-detector and isotropic-network detection volume versus (total) mass and arbitrary spin for equal-mass binaries. Our analysis assumes matched filtering to all significant available waveform power (up to l=6 available for fitting, but only l{<=}4 significant) estimated by an array of 64 numerical simulations with component spins as large as S{sub 1,2}/M{sup 2{<=}}0.8. We provide a spin-dependent estimate of our uncertainty, up to S{sub 1,2}/M{sup 2{<=}}1. For the initial (advanced) LIGO detector, our fits are reliable for M(set-membership sign)[100,500]M{sub {center_dot}} (M(set-membership sign)[100,1600]M{sub {center_dot}}). In the online version of this article, we also provide fits assuming incomplete information, such as the neglect of higher-order harmonics. We briefly discuss how a strong selection bias towards aligned spins influences the interpretation of future gravitational wave detections of IMBH-IMBH mergers.

  7. Quantum Well and Quantum Dot Modeling for Advanced Infrared Detectors and Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David; Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Hill, C. J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the modeling of Quantum Well Infrared Detectors (QWIP) and Quantum Dot Infrared Detectors (QDIP) in the development of Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). The QWIP Detector being developed is a dual band detector. It is capable of running on two bands Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) and Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR). The same large-format dual-band FPA technology can be applied to Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (QDIP) with no modification, once QDIP exceeds QWIP in single device performance. Details of the devices are reviewed.

  8. Low Power Ground-Based Laser Illumination for Electric Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.; Oleson, Steven R.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of low power, ground-based laser powered electric propulsion systems is presented. A review of available and near-term laser, photovoltaic, and adaptive optic systems indicates that approximately 5-kW of ground-based laser power can be delivered at an equivalent one-sun intensity to an orbit of approximately 2000 km. Laser illumination at the proper wavelength can double photovoltaic array conversion efficiencies compared to efficiencies obtained with solar illumination at the same intensity, allowing a reduction in array mass. The reduced array mass allows extra propellant to be carried with no penalty in total spacecraft mass. The extra propellant mass can extend the satellite life in orbit, allowing additional revenue to be generated. A trade study using realistic cost estimates and conservative ground station viewing capability was performed to estimate the number of communication satellites which must be illuminated to make a proliferated system of laser ground stations economically attractive. The required number of satellites is typically below that of proposed communication satellite constellations, indicating that low power ground-based laser beaming may be commercially viable. However, near-term advances in low specific mass solar arrays and high energy density batteries for LEO applications would render the ground-based laser system impracticable.

  9. Space transfer with ground-based laser/electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Stavnes, Mark; Oleson, Steve; Bozek, John

    1993-01-01

    A new method of providing power to space vehicles consists of using ground-based lasers to beam power to photovoltaic receivers in space. This can be used as a power source for electrically propelled orbital transfer vehicles.

  10. Ground-based tests of JEM-EUSO components at the Telescope Array site, "EUSO-TA"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    We are conducting tests of optical and electronics components of JEMEUSO at the Telescope Array site in Utah with a ground-based "EUSO-TA" detector. The tests will include an engineering validation of the detector, cross-calibration of EUSO-TA with the TA fluorescence detector and observations of air shower events. Also, the proximity of the TA's Electron Light Source will allow for convenient use of this calibration device. In this paper, we report initial results obtained with the EUSO-TA telescope.

  11. Low frequency gravitational wave detection with ground-based atom interferometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaibi, W.; Geiger, R.; Canuel, B.; Bertoldi, A.; Landragin, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below a few hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows us to reduce the Newtonian noise (NN), which limits all ground based GW detectors below a few hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of a factor of 2 could be achieved and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a tenfold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below 1 ×10-19/√{Hz } in the 0.3 -3 Hz frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity of 3 ×10-23/√{Hz } at 2 Hz . Our proposed configuration could extend the observation window of current detectors by a decade and fill the gap between ground-based and space-based instruments.

  12. Challenges and Opportunities for Ground-based Helioseismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    I summarize the current status of ground-based helioseismic observations, in particular the two operational networks GONG and BiSON. I then discuss requirements for continued and future ground-based observations based on key science drivers, finishing with a discussion of SPRING, a proposed future high-spatial-resolution network that would provide helioseismic data and a broad range of synoptic data products.

  13. Advanced far infrared blocked impurity band detectors based on germanium liquid phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C S

    1998-05-01

    This research has shown that epilayers with residual impurity concentrations of 5 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} can be grown by producing the purest Pb available in the world. These epilayers have extremely low minority acceptor concentrations, which is ideal for fabrication of IR absorbing layers. The Pb LPE growth of Ge also has the advantageous property of gettering Cu from the epilayer and the substrate. Epilayers have been grown with intentional Sb doping for IR absorption on lightly doped substrates. This research has proven that properly working Ge BIB detectors can be fabricated from the liquid phase as long as pure enough solvents are available. The detectors have responded at proper wavelengths when reversed biased even though the response did not quite reach minimum wavenumbers. Optimization of the Sb doping concentration should further decrease the photoionization energy of these detectors. Ge BIB detectors have been fabricated that respond to 60 cm{sup {minus}1} with low responsivity. Through reduction of the minority residual impurities, detector performance has reached responsivities of 1 A/W. These detectors have exhibited quantum efficiency and NEP values that rival conventional photoconductors and are expected to provide a much more sensitive tool for new scientific discoveries in a number of fields, including solid state studies, astronomy, and cosmology.

  14. Advanced far infrared blocked impurity band detectors based on germanium liquid phase epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    This research has shown that epilayers with residual impurity concentrations of 5 x 10(sup 13) cm(exp -3) can be grown by producing the purest Pb available in the world. These epilayers have extremely low minority acceptor concentrations, which is ideal for fabrication of IR absorbing layers. The Pb LPE growth of Ge also has the advantageous property of gettering Cu from the epilayer and the substrate. Epilayers have been grown with intentional Sb doping for IR absorption on lightly doped substrates. This research has proven that properly working Ge BIB detectors can be fabricated from the liquid phase as long as pure enough solvents are available. The detectors have responded at reach minimum wavenumbers. Optimization of the Sb doping concentration should further decrease the photoionization energy of these detectors. Ge BIB detectors have been fabricated that respond to 60 cm(exp -1) with low responsivity. Through reduction of the minority residual impurities, detector performance has reached responsivities of 1 A/W. These detectors have exhibited quantum efficiency and NEP values that rival conventional photoconductors and are expected to provide a much more sensitive tool for new scientific discoveries in a number of fields, including solid state studies, astronomy, and cosmology.

  15. Ground-based visual guidance in autonomous UAV landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Shen, Lincheng; Cong, Yirui; Zhou, Dianle; Zhang, Daibing

    2013-12-01

    Visual guidance has attracted more and more attention in the navigation field thanks to its accuracy and robustness. This paper presents a ground-based visual guidance system for the autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) landing. The system consists of two cameras and pan-tilt units (PTU) that mounted on both sides of the runway. In this system, computer vision is adopted for UAV detection and tracking. To be more specific, triangulation, a geometric method in binocular vision, is employed to calculate the 3D coordinates of the UAV in order to provide landing guidance parameters and finally achieve autonomous UAV landing. The 3D positioning principles adopted in ground-based measurement are simulated and verified. The results show that the accuracy can be achieved and relevant requirements are satisfied by ground-based visual guidance.

  16. Ground-based and satellite observations of substorm onset features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T.; Cheng, C. Z.; Chiang, C.; Tam, S. W.; Chen, A. B.; Hsu, R.; Su, H.

    2009-12-01

    We present the ground-based and satellite observations of substorm onset events. In the observations from Ground Based Observatories (GBO) and the ISUAL/FORMOSAT-2 satellite, we find structures which consist of periodic bright spots on the auroral arc prior to the substorm expansion phase onset. The intensity of arc grows exponentially before breakup with a linear growth rate of ~O(1-3)sec-1. Under the arc, the negative H-bay associated with the substorm is evident in the ground-based magnetometer data. From ISUAL observations, the first auroral brightening is identified roughly at the beginning of the negative H-bay. The auroral arc is breaks up before dispersionless particle injections are observed at geosynchronous orbit. Based on analysis of these observations, we suggest that this event can be a support of the scenario of substorm onset which is caused by a kinetic ballooning instability which is localized at ~ -10RE.

  17. Ground Base Skylab Electron Beam Welds in Tantalum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of ground-based (left) and Skylab (right) electron beam welds in pure tantalum (Ta) (10X magnification). Residual votices left behind in the ground-based sample after the electron beam passed were frozen into the grain structure. These occurred because of the rapid cooling rate at the high temperature. Although the thermal characteristics and electron beam travel speeds were comparable for the skylab sample, the residual vortices were erased in the grain structure. This may have been due to the fact that final grain size of the solidified material was smaller in the Skylab sample compared to the ground-based sample. The Skylab sample was processed in the M512 Materials Processing Facility (MPF) during Skylab SL-2 Mission. Principal Investigator was Richard Poorman.

  18. A Preliminary Assessment of Phase Separator Ground-Based and Reduced-Gravity Testing for ALS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Nancy Rabel

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation of phase separator ground-based and reduced-gravity testing for Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems is shown. The topics include: 1) Multiphase Flow Technology Program; 2) Types of Separators; 3) MOBI Phase Separators; 4) Experiment set-up; and 5) Preliminary comparison/results.

  19. Symmetrical Josephson vortex interferometer as an advanced ballistic single-shot detector

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviev, I. I.; Klenov, N. V.; Bakurskiy, S. V.; Pankratov, A. L.; Kuzmin, L. S.

    2014-11-17

    We consider a ballistic detector formed in an interferometer manner which operational principle relies on Josephson vortex scattering at a measurement potential. We propose an approach to symmetrize the detector scheme and explore arising advantages in the signal-to-noise ratio and in the back-action on a measured object by means of recently presented numerical and analytical methods for modeling of a soliton scattering dynamics in the presence of thermal fluctuations. The obtained characteristics for experimentally relevant parameters reveal practical applicability of the considered schemes including possibility of coupling with standard digital rapid single flux quantum circuits.

  20. Synergy benefit in temperature, humiditiy and cloud property profiling by integrating ground based and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebell, K.; Orlandi, E.; Hünerbein, A.; Crewell, S.; Löhnert, U.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate, highly vertically resolved temperature, humidity and cloud property profiles are needed for many applications. They are essential for climate monitoring, a better process understanding and the subsequent improvement of parameterizations in numerical weather prediction and climate models. In order to provide such profiles with a high temporal resolution, multiple wavelength active and passive remote sensing techniques available at ground based observatories, e.g. the Atmospheric Radiation Measruement (ARM) Program and Cloudnet facilities, need to be exploited. In particular, the Integrated Profiling Technique (IPT, Löhnert et al., 2008) has been successfully applied to simultaneously derive profiles of temperature, humidity and liquid water by a Bayesian based retrieval using a combination of ground based microwave radiometer, cloud radar and a priori information. Within the project ICOS (Integrating Cloud Observations from Ground and Space - a Way to Combine Time and Space Information), we develop a flexible IPT, which allows for the combination of a variety of ground based measurements from cloud radar, microwave radiometer (MWR) and IR spectrometer as well as satellite based information from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard of METEOSAT. As ground based observations are mainly sensitive to the lower parts of the troposphere, the satellite measurements provide complementary information and are thus expected to improve the estimates of the thermodynamic and cloud property profiles, i. e. hydrometeor content and effective radius, considerably. In addition to the SEVIRI IR measurements, which are provided with a high repetition time, information from polar orbiting satellites could be included. In paticular, the potential of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) and Microwave Sounding Unit (MHS) in the retrieval is investigated. In order to understand the improvement by integrating the measurements of the above

  1. InAs/GaSb type II superlattices for advanced 2nd and 3rd generation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Martin; Rehm, Robert; Schmitz, Johannes; Fleissner, Joachim; Rutz, Frank; Kirste, Lutz; Scheibner, Ralf; Wendler, Joachim; Ziegler, Johann

    2010-01-01

    InAs/GaSb short-period superlattices (SL) based on GaSb, InAs and AlSb have proven their great potential for high performance infrared detectors. Lots of interest is currently focused on the development of short-period InAs/GaSb SLs for advanced 2nd and 3rd generation infrared detectors between 3 - 30 μm. For the fabrication of mono- and bispectral thermal imaging systems in the mid-wavelength infrared region (MWIR) a manufacturable technology for high responsivity thermal imaging systems has been developed. InAs/GaSb short-period superlattices can be fabricated with up to 1000 periods in the intrinsic region without revealing diffusion limited behavior. This enables the fabrication of InAs/GaSb SL camera systems with high responsivity comparable to state of the art CdHgTe and InSb detectors. The material system is also ideally suited for the fabrication of dual-color MWIR/MWIR InAs/GaSb SL camera systems with high quantum efficiency for missile approach warning systems with simultaneous and spatially coincident detection in both spectral channels.

  2. Ground Based Investigation of Electrostatic Accelerometer in HUST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Y.; Zhou, Z.

    2013-12-01

    High-precision electrostatic accelerometers with six degrees of freedom (DOF) acceleration measurement were successfully used in CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions which to measure the Earth's gravity field. In our group, space inertial sensor based on the capacitance transducer and electrostatic control technique has been investigated for test of equivalence principle (TEPO), searching non-Newtonian force in micrometer range, and satellite Earth's field recovery. The significant techniques of capacitive position sensor with the noise level at 2×10-7pF/Hz1/2 and the μV/Hz1/2 level electrostatic actuator are carried out and all the six servo loop controls by using a discrete PID algorithm are realized in a FPGA device. For testing on ground, in order to compensate one g earth's gravity, the fiber torsion pendulum facility is adopt to measure the parameters of the electrostatic controlled inertial sensor such as the resolution, and the electrostatic stiffness, the cross couple between different DOFs. A short distance and a simple double capsule equipment the valid duration about 0.5 second is set up in our lab for the free fall tests of the engineering model which can directly verify the function of six DOF control. Meanwhile, high voltage suspension method is also realized and preliminary results show that the horizontal axis of acceleration noise is about 10-8m/s2/Hz1/2 level which limited mainly by the seismic noise. Reference: [1] Fen Gao, Ze-Bing Zhou, Jun Luo, Feasibility for Testing the Equivalence Principle with Optical Readout in Space, Chin. Phys. Lett. 28(8) (2011) 080401. [2] Z. Zhu, Z. B. Zhou, L. Cai, Y. Z. Bai, J. Luo, Electrostatic gravity gradiometer design for the advanced GOCE mission, Adv. Sp. Res. 51 (2013) 2269-2276. [3] Z B Zhou, L Liu, H B Tu, Y Z Bai, J Luo, Seismic noise limit for ground-based performance measurements of an inertial sensor using a torsion balance, Class. Quantum Grav. 27 (2010) 175012. [4] H B Tu, Y Z Bai, Z B Zhou, L Liu, L

  3. Ground-Based Sensing System for Weed Mapping in Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A ground-based weed mapping system was developed to measure weed intensity and distribution in a cotton field. The weed mapping system includes WeedSeeker® PhD600 sensor modules to indicate the presence of weeds between rows, a GPS receiver to provide spatial information, and a data acquisition and ...

  4. Challenges and Rewards in Ground-Based Observing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Kevin P.

    2016-05-01

    DKIST will be largest ground-based project in solar physics, and will offer access and data to the whole community. In pursuit of exciting science, many users may have their first encounters with high-resolution, ground-based solar observations. New facilities, space or ground-based, all bring particular signatures in their data. While tools or processed datasets might serve to minimize such non-solar signatures, it is nonetheless important for users to understand the impacts on observation planning, the nature of the corrections applied, and any residual effects on their data.In this talk I will review some of the instrumental and atmospheric signatures that are important for ground-based observing, in particular in planning for the potential capabilities of the DKIST Data Center. These techniques include image warping, local PSF deconvolution, atmospheric dispersion correction, and scattered light removal. I will present examples of data sets afflicted by such problems as well as some of the algorithms used in characterizing and removing these contributions. This will demonstrate how even with the challenges of observing through a turbulent atmosphere, it is possible to achieve dramatic scientific results.

  5. Preliminary design document: Ground based testbed for avionics systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The design and interface requirements for an avionics Ground Based Test bed (GBT) to support Heavy Lift Cargo Vehicles (HLCV) is presented. It also contains data on the vehicle subsystem configurations that are to be supported during their early, pre-PDR developmental phases. Several emerging technologies are also identified for support. A Preliminary Specification Tree is also presented.

  6. Arrays of Bolometric Detectors for Submillimeter Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Moseley, S. H.; Freund, M.; Allen, C.; Harper, A.; Loewenstein, R.; Dowell, C. D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large format two dimensional arrays of bolometric detectors are required for many millimeter and submillimeter applications. We describe the development and testing of such arrays and the plans for using them in both a ground-based and airborne instrument.

  7. Oversampling advances in millimeter-wave scan imaging using inexpensive neon indicator lamp detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanon, Assaf; Kopeika, Natan S.; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Abramovich, Amir; Rozban, Daniel; Joseph, Hezi; Aharon, Avihai; Belenky, Alex; Gefen, Michael; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, much effort has been invested to develop room temperature inexpensive, but sensitive, millimeter wave (MMW) and terahertz (THz) detectors that can be used as pixels in focal plane arrays, which is important for real-time imaging. A new 18×2 neon indicator lamp MMW/THz scanner was developed. The components of the camera include horizontally shifted two-column glow discharge detectors in a scanning array. The detectors, costing about 50 cents each, are wired to a preprocessing card, a VLSI board, and a motor for scanner movement. A description of the VLSI Verilog programmable hardware of the new scanner, the physical architecture, the software user interface, and imaging results at 97 GHz are presented. At this stage, the emphasis is focused on the lamp exposure time and spatial resolution when the scanning is performed horizontally. In the future it is planned to expose all pixels simultaneously for real-time imaging. New software capabilities allow the application of digital image enhancement algorithms. Fast scanning permits obtaining images in 1 to 5 s. Oversampling yields a sharper edge response and a higher signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. Advances in CMOS Solid-state Photomultipliers for Scintillation Detector Applications

    PubMed Central

    Christian, James F.; Stapels, Christopher J.; Johnson, Erik B.; McClish, Mickel; Dokhale, Purushotthom; Shah, Kanai S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmistha; Chapman, Eric; Augustine, Frank L.

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state photomultipliers (SSPMs) are a compact, lightweight, potentially low-cost alternative to a photomultiplier tube for a variety of scintillation detector applications, including digital-dosimeter and medical-imaging applications. Manufacturing SSPMs with a commercial CMOS process provides the ability for rapid prototyping, and facilitates production to reduce the cost. RMD designs CMOS SSPM devices that are fabricated by commercial foundries. This work describes the characterization and performance of these devices for scintillation detector applications. This work also describes the terms contributing to device noise in terms of the excess noise of the SSPM, the binomial statistics governing the number of pixels triggered by a scintillation event, and the background, or thermal, count rate. The fluctuations associated with these terms limit the resolution of the signal pulse amplitude. We explore the use of pixel-level signal conditioning, and characterize the performance of a prototype SSPM device that preserves the digital nature of the signal. In addition, we explore designs of position-sensitive SSPM detectors for medical imaging applications, and characterize their performance. PMID:25540471

  9. The Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager: Diffraction limited imaging at visible wavelengths with large ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crass, Jonathan; Mackay, Craig; King, David; Rebolo-López, Rafael; Labadie, Lucas; Puga, Marta; Oscoz, Alejandro; González Escalera, Victor; Pérez Garrido, Antonio; López, Roberto; Pérez-Prieto, Jorge; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis; Velasco, Sergio; Villó, Isidro

    2015-01-01

    One of the continuing challenges facing astronomers today is the need to obtain ever higher resolution images of the sky. Whether studying nearby crowded fields or distant objects, with increased resolution comes the ability to probe systems in more detail and advance our understanding of the Universe. Obtaining these high-resolution images at visible wavelengths however has previously been limited to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) due to atmospheric effects limiting the spatial resolution of ground-based telescopes to a fraction of their potential. With HST now having a finite lifespan, it is prudent to investigate other techniques capable of providing these kind of observations from the ground. Maintaining this capability is one of the goals of the Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI).Achieving the highest resolutions requires the largest telescope apertures, however, this comes at the cost of increased atmospheric distortion. To overcome these atmospheric effects, there are two main techniques employed today: adaptive optics (AO) and lucky imaging. These techniques individually are unable to provide diffraction limited imaging in the visible on large ground-based telescopes; AO currently only works at infrared wavelengths while lucky imaging reduces in effectiveness on telescopes greater than 2.5 metres in diameter. The limitations of both techniques can be overcome by combing them together to provide diffraction limited imaging at visible wavelengths on the ground.The Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager is being developed as a European collaboration and combines AO and lucky imaging in a dedicated instrument for the first time. Initially for use on the 4.2 metre William Herschel Telescope, AOLI uses a low-order adaptive optics system to reduce the effects of atmospheric turbulence before imaging with a lucky imaging based science detector. The AO system employs a novel type of wavefront sensor, the non-linear Curvature Wavefront Sensor (nlCWFS) which provides

  10. Backscatter tolerant squeezed light source for advanced gravitational-wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Chua, Sheon S Y; Stefszky, Michael S; Mow-Lowry, Conor M; Buchler, Ben C; Dwyer, Sheila; Shaddock, Daniel A; Lam, Ping Koy; McClelland, David E

    2011-12-01

    We report on the performance of a dual-wavelength resonant, traveling-wave optical parametric oscillator to generate squeezed light for application in advanced gravitational-wave interferometers. Shot noise suppression of 8.6±0.8 dB was measured across the detection band of interest to Advanced LIGO, and controlled squeezing measured over 5900 s. Our results also demonstrate that the traveling-wave design has excellent intracavity backscattered light suppression of 47 dB and incident backscattered light suppression of 41 dB, which is a crucial design issue for application in advanced interferometers. PMID:22139282

  11. Advanced IR detector design at SCD: from D3C to ABCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesher, Ofer; Klipstein, Philip C.; Weiss, Eliezer

    2004-07-01

    Over the past 27 years, SCD has developed and manufactured more than 30 types of Infrared Detector, both with support from the Israeli MOD and in cooperation with institutions and companies such as the Technion, Soreq NRC, RICOR and RAFAEL. SCD's current production line includes Hg1-xCdxTe (MCT) devices with up to 480x6 elements operating in Time Delay and Integration (TDI) mode and InSb Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) with up to 640x512 elements, all available in various configurations including fully integrated Detector-Dewar-Cooler (DDC) packages. Such DDCs have been designed to range from the very small to the very large. At one end the Piccolo DDC is a small, low weight and power detector, ideal for compact low cost imagers such as handheld IR cameras. At the other end, we manufacture a very long (2048x16) bi-directional TDI InSb detector designed for "whiskbroom scanning" systems. This device consists of four modules precisely butted on a single substrate, with each 512x16 module connected to a single signal processor. In 2003, SCD announced its new breakthrough Digital Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC) technology: Digital DDC or D3C. This readout system, with excellent performance and increased flexibility is the first in a series of new imaging solutions that SCD is developing to meet future demands of noise and power reduction, combined with greater wavelength selectivity. To continue along this path we have also been developing our new ABCS (Antimonide Based Compound Semiconductor) technology, which we first reported in 2002. The ABCS program, combining SCD's existing strengths in InSb FPA systems with new concepts in bandgap engineering and smart structure design, is aimed at multispectral IR detectors operating at higher temperatures. This review discusses some of the key trends at SCD as described above. After surveying the performance of SCD's current InSb technology, SCD's evolution towards the next generations will be described, including the

  12. Up-conversion detectors at 1550 nm for quantum communication: review and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, M.; Alibart, O.; Doutre, F.; Tascu, S.; de Micheli, M. P.; Ostrowsky, D. B.; Thyagarajan, K.; Tanzilli, S.

    Up-conversion, or hybrid, detectors have been investigated in quantum communication experiments to replace Indium-Gallium-Arsenide avalanche photodiodes (InGaAs-APD) for the detection of infrared and telecom single photons. Those detectors are based on the supposedly noise-free process of frequency up-conversion, also called sum-frequency generation (SFG), using a second order (χ^2) non-linear crystal. Powered by an intense pump laser, this process permits transposing with a certain probability the single photons at telecom wavelengths to the visible range where silicon APDs (Si-APD) operate with a much better performance than InGaAs detectors. To date, the literature reports up-conversion detectors having efficiency and noise figures comparable to that of the best commercially available IngaAs-APDs. However, in all of these previous realizations, a pump-induced noise is always observed which was initially expected to be as low as the dark count level of the Si-APDs. Although this additional noise represents a problem for the detection, up-conversion detectors have advantageously replaced InGaAs-APDs in various long-distance quantum cryptography schemes since they offer a continuous regime operation mode instead of a gated mode necessary for InGaAs-APDs, and the possibility of much higher counting rates. Despite attempted explanations, no detailed nor conclusive study of this noise has been reported. The aim of this paper is to offer a definitive explanation for this noise. We first give a review of the state of the art by describing already demonstrated up-conversion detectors. We discuss these realizations especially regarding the choices made for the material, in bulk or guided configurations, the single photon wavelengths, and the pump scheme. Then we describe an original device made of waveguides integrated on periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN)or on single-domain lithium niobate aimed at investigating the origin of the additional pump-induced noise

  13. Advanced Photon Counting Imaging Detectors with 100ps Timing for Astronomical and Space Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Welsh, B.; Rabin, M.; Bloch, J.

    In recent years EAG has implemented a variety of high-resolution, large format, photon-counting MCP detectors in space instrumentation for satellite FUSE, GALEX, IMAGE, SOHO, HST-COS, rocket, and shuttle payloads. Our scheme of choice has been delay line readouts encoding photon event position centroids, by determination of the difference in arrival time of the event charge at the two ends of a distributed resistive-capacitive (RC) delay line. Our most commonly used delay line configuration is the cross delay line (XDL). In its simplest form the delay-line encoding electronics consists of a fast amplifier for each end of the delay line, followed by time-to-digital converters (TDC's). We have achieved resolutions of < 25 μm in tests over 65 mm x 65 mm (3k x3k resolution elements) with excellent linearity. Using high speed TDC's, we have been able to encode event positions for random photon rates of ~1 MHz, while time tagging events using the MCP output signal to better than 100 ps. The unique ability to record photon X,Y,T high fidelity information has advantages over "frame driven" recording devices for some important applications. For example we have built open face and sealed tube cross delay line detectors used for biological fluorescence lifetime imaging, observation of flare stars, orbital satellites and space debris with the GALEX satellite, and time resolved imaging of the Crab Pulsar with a telescope as small as 1m. Although microchannel plate delay line detectors meet many of the imaging and timing demands of various applications, they have limitations. The relatively high gain (107) reduces lifetime and local counting rate, and the fixed delay (10's of ns) makes multiple simultaneous event recording problematic. To overcome these limitations we have begun development of cross strip readout anodes for microchannel plate detectors. The cross strip (XS) anode is a coarse (~0.5 mm) multi-layer metal and ceramic pattern of crossed fingers on an alumina

  14. A Wide Range Neutron Detector for Space Nuclear Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nassif, Eduardo; Sismonda, Miguel; Matatagui, Emilio; Pretorius, Stephan

    2007-01-30

    We propose here a versatile and innovative solution for monitoring and controlling a space-based nuclear reactor that is based on technology already proved in ground based reactors. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) allows for a reduction in the complexity of space based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. A ground model, predecessor of the proposed system, has been installed and is operating at the OPAL (Open Pool Advanced Light Water Research Reactor) in Australia, providing long term functional data. A space compatible Engineering Qualification Model of the WRND has been developed, manufactured and verified satisfactorily by analysis, and is currently under environmental testing.

  15. Combinatorial Screening of Advanced Scintillators for High Resolution X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shifan; Tao, Dejie; Lynch, Michael; Yuan, Xianglong; Li, Yiqun

    2008-05-12

    The lack of efficient scintillators is a major problem for developing powerful x-ray detectors that are widely used in homeland security, industrial and scientific research. Intematix has developed and applied a high throughput screening process and corresponding crystal growth technology to significantly speed up the discovery process for new efficient scintillators. As a result, Intematix has invented and fabricated three new scintillators both in powder and bulk forms, which possess promising properties such as better radiation hardness and better matching for silicon diode.

  16. Lunar Seismic Detector to Advance the Search for Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galitzki, Nicholas B.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of small seismic signals on the Moon are needed to study lunar internal structure and to detect possible signals from Strange Quark m&er transit events. The immediate objective is to create a prototype seismic detector using a tunnel diode oscillator with a variable capacitor attached to a proof mass. The device is designed to operate effectively on the Moon, which requires a low power consumption to operate through lunar night, while preserving sensitivity. The goal is capacitance resolution of better than 1 part in 10' and power consumption of less than 1 watt.

  17. High resolution images of Venus from ground-based radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, R. F.; Slade, M. A.; Robinett, L.; Brokl, S.; Downs, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    The Goldstone Deep Space Station ground-based synthetic aperture radar system has been used to obtain radar images of Venus with resolutions of close to 1.3 km. Observations were made at 12.5 cm wavelength using circular polarization. From 12 days of observations during the 1986 inferior conjunction, three images have been selected for initial processing. The images show remarkable surface features including craters, ridges, and regions of high Fresnel reflectivity in the plains region.

  18. The Validation of Ground Based Ozone Measurements over Korea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, K. H.; Kim, J. H.; Herman, J. R.; Haffner, D. P.; Kim, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Validation of Ground Based Ozone Measurements over KoreaKorea will launch GEMS instrument in 2018 onboard the Geostationary Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite to monitor tropospheric gas concentrations in both high temporal and spatial resolution. In order to utilize information from satellite, it is crucial to carry out validation of satellite data with respect to ground-based measurements because satellite retrievals suffer from large error. The purpose of this study is to examine the performance of total ozone measurements from Pandora, Brewer, and Dobson which will be used for validation of GEMS ozone product. Because single version of the satellite retrieval algorithm is used to process the entire data set for a given satellite instrument and satellite instrument characteristics are typically changing slowly, it is assumed that sudden jumps or large drifts in ground-satellite total ozone measurements difference for individual sites are commonly related to problems with ground-based measurements. Thereby, satellite measurements can be used to estimate the performance of the ground-based measurement network as well as to identify potential problems residing in individual station. As a reference of satellite ozone measurements, we have selected ozone data derived from OMI-TOMS V8.5 algorithm because it is a very robust algorithm that has well studied about various error sources such as the effects of aerosols and clouds, variation in shape of ozone profiles with season, latitude, and total ozone. For the future validation of GEMS measurements, Korea has planned to use Pandora measurement that has been started operating since 2012. However, Pandora measurements reported to have unusual high total column ozone in the presence of clouds from the comparison of Pandora with OMI total ozone during DISCOVERY-AQ campaign. In this study, we will analyze the Pandora measurements associated with cloud and introduce the statistical technique, Kalman Filter, to correct the

  19. Ground-Based Calibration Of A Microwave Landing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiriazes, John J.; Scott, Marshall M., Jr.; Willis, Alfred D.; Erdogan, Temel; Reyes, Rolando

    1996-01-01

    System of microwave instrumentation and data-processing equipment developed to enable ground-based calibration of microwave scanning-beam landing system (MSBLS) at distances of about 500 to 1,000 ft from MSBLS transmitting antenna. Ensures accuracy of MSBLS near touchdown point, without having to resort to expense and complex logistics of aircraft-based testing. Modified versions prove useful in calibrating aircraft instrument landing systems.

  20. Coordinated ground-based and geosynchronous satellite-based measurements of auroral pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Suszcynsky, David M.; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Thomsen, Michelle F.; McComas, David J.; Belian, Richard D.

    1996-09-01

    We describe a technique that uses a ground-based all-sky video camera and geosynchronous satellite-based plasma and energetic particle detectors to study ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling as it relates to the aurora. The video camera system was deployed in Eagle, Alaska for a seven month period at the foot of the magnetic field line that threads geosynchronous satellite 1989-046. Since 1989-046 corotates with the earth, its footprint remains nearly fixed in the vicinity of Eagle, allowing for routine continuous monitoring of an auroral field line at its intersections with the ground and with geosynchronous orbit. As an example of the utility of this technique, we present coordinated ground-based and satellite based observations during periods of auroral pulsations and compare this data to the predictions of both the relaxation oscillator theory and flow cyclotron maser theory for the generation of pulsating aurorae. The observed plasma and energetic particle characteristics at geosynchronous orbit during pulsating aurorae displays are found to be in agreement with the predictions of both theories lending further support that a cyclotron resonance mechanism is responsible for auroral pulsations.

  1. Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-05-20

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than ±10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  2. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  3. DETECTION OF IMBHs WITH GROUND-BASED GRAVITATIONAL WAVE OBSERVATORIES: A BIOGRAPHY OF A BINARY OF BLACK HOLES, FROM BIRTH TO DEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Santamaria, LucIa E-mail: Lucia.Santamaria@aei.mpg.d

    2010-10-20

    Even though the existence of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs; black holes with masses ranging between 10{sup 2} M{sub sun} and 10{sup 4} M{sub sun}) has not yet been corroborated observationally, these objects are of high interest for astrophysics. Our understanding of the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes, as well as galaxy evolution modeling and cosmography would dramatically change if an IMBH were to be observed. From the point of view of traditional photon-based astronomy, which relies on the monitoring of innermost stellar kinematics, the direct detection of an IMBH seems to be rather far in the future. However, the prospect of the detection and characterization of an IMBH has good chances in lower frequency gravitational-wave (GW) astrophysics using ground-based detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), Virgo, and the future Einstein Telescope (ET). We present an analysis of the signal of a system of a binary of IMBHs based on a waveform model obtained with numerical relativity simulations coupled with post-Newtonian calculations at the highest available order. IMBH binaries with total masses between 200 and 20,000 M{sub sun} would produce significant signal-to-noise ratios in Advanced LIGO and Virgo and the ET. We have computed the expected event rate of IMBH binary coalescences for different configurations of the binary, finding interesting values that depend on the spin of the IMBHs. The prospects for IMBH detection and characterization with ground-based GW observatories would not only provide us with a robust test of general relativity, but would also corroborate the existence of these systems. Such detections should allow astrophysicists to probe the stellar environments of IMBHs and their formation processes.

  4. Absolute calibration of neutron detectors on the C-2U advanced beam-driven FRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, R. M.; Clary, R.; Korepanov, S.; Jauregui, F.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Valentine, T.; Smirnov, A.

    2016-11-01

    In the C-2U fusion energy experiment, high power neutral beam injection creates a large fast ion population that sustains a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The diagnosis of the fast ion pressure in these high-performance plasmas is therefore critical, and the measurement of the flux of neutrons from the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction is well suited to the task. Here we describe the absolute, in situ calibration of scintillation neutron detectors via two independent methods: firing deuterium beams into a high density gas target and calibration with a 2 × 107 n/s AmBe source. The practical issues of each method are discussed and the resulting calibration factors are shown to be in good agreement. Finally, the calibration factor is applied to C-2U experimental data where the measured neutron rate is found to exceed the classical expectation.

  5. The Urey Instrument: An Advanced In Situ Organic and Oxidant Detector for Mars Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrey, Andrew D.; Chalmers, John H.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Amashukeli, Xenia; Willis, Peter; Skelley, Alison M.; Mathies, Richard A.; Quinn, Richard C.; Zent, Aaron P.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Amundson, Ron; Glavin Daniel P.; Botta, Oliver; Barron, Laurence; Blaney, Diana L.; Clark, Benton C.; Coleman, Max; Hofmann, Beda A.; Josset, Jean-Luc; Rettberg, Petra; Ride, Sally; Musée, François Robert; Sephton, Mark A.; Yen, Albert

    2008-06-01

    The Urey organic and oxidant detector consists of a suite of instruments designed to search for several classes of organic molecules in the martian regolith and ascertain whether these compounds were produced by biotic or abiotic processes using chirality measurements. These experiments will also determine the chemical stability of organic molecules within the host regolith based on the presence and chemical reactivity of surface and atmospheric oxidants. Urey has been selected for the Pasteur payload on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) upcoming 2013 ExoMars rover mission. The diverse and effective capabilities of Urey make it an integral part of the payload and will help to achieve a large portion of the mission's primary scientific objective: "to search for signs of past and present life on Mars." This instrument is named in honor of Harold Urey for his seminal contributions to the fields of cosmochemistry and the origin of life.

  6. The Urey instrument: an advanced in situ organic and oxidant detector for Mars exploration.

    PubMed

    Aubrey, Andrew D; Chalmers, John H; Bada, Jeffrey L; Grunthaner, Frank J; Amashukeli, Xenia; Willis, Peter; Skelley, Alison M; Mathies, Richard A; Quinn, Richard C; Zent, Aaron P; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Amundson, Ron; Glavin, Daniel P; Botta, Oliver; Barron, Laurence; Blaney, Diana L; Clark, Benton C; Coleman, Max; Hofmann, Beda A; Josset, Jean-Luc; Rettberg, Petra; Ride, Sally; Robert, François; Sephton, Mark A; Yen, Albert

    2008-06-01

    The Urey organic and oxidant detector consists of a suite of instruments designed to search for several classes of organic molecules in the martian regolith and ascertain whether these compounds were produced by biotic or abiotic processes using chirality measurements. These experiments will also determine the chemical stability of organic molecules within the host regolith based on the presence and chemical reactivity of surface and atmospheric oxidants. Urey has been selected for the Pasteur payload on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) upcoming 2013 ExoMars rover mission. The diverse and effective capabilities of Urey make it an integral part of the payload and will help to achieve a large portion of the mission's primary scientific objective: "to search for signs of past and present life on Mars." This instrument is named in honor of Harold Urey for his seminal contributions to the fields of cosmochemistry and the origin of life. PMID:18680409

  7. The Urey instrument: an advanced in situ organic and oxidant detector for Mars exploration.

    PubMed

    Aubrey, Andrew D; Chalmers, John H; Bada, Jeffrey L; Grunthaner, Frank J; Amashukeli, Xenia; Willis, Peter; Skelley, Alison M; Mathies, Richard A; Quinn, Richard C; Zent, Aaron P; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Amundson, Ron; Glavin, Daniel P; Botta, Oliver; Barron, Laurence; Blaney, Diana L; Clark, Benton C; Coleman, Max; Hofmann, Beda A; Josset, Jean-Luc; Rettberg, Petra; Ride, Sally; Robert, François; Sephton, Mark A; Yen, Albert

    2008-06-01

    The Urey organic and oxidant detector consists of a suite of instruments designed to search for several classes of organic molecules in the martian regolith and ascertain whether these compounds were produced by biotic or abiotic processes using chirality measurements. These experiments will also determine the chemical stability of organic molecules within the host regolith based on the presence and chemical reactivity of surface and atmospheric oxidants. Urey has been selected for the Pasteur payload on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) upcoming 2013 ExoMars rover mission. The diverse and effective capabilities of Urey make it an integral part of the payload and will help to achieve a large portion of the mission's primary scientific objective: "to search for signs of past and present life on Mars." This instrument is named in honor of Harold Urey for his seminal contributions to the fields of cosmochemistry and the origin of life.

  8. Simulation of polar atmospheric microwave and sub-millimetre spectra for characterizing potential new ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnham, David; Turner, Emma; Ford, George; Pumphrey, Hugh; Withington, Stafford

    2016-04-01

    Advanced detector technologies from the fields of astronomy and telecommunications are offering the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. Adoption of these technologies in ground-based passive microwave and sub-millimetre radiometry could allow new measurements of chemical species and winds in the polar middle atmosphere for verifying meteorological data-sets and atmospheric models. A site study to assess the feasibility of new polar observations is performed by simulating the downwelling clear-sky submillimetre spectrum over 10-2000 GHz (30 mm to 150 microns) at two Arctic and two Antarctic locations under different seasonal and diurnal conditions. Vertical profiles for temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis, and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified and minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures estimated. The optimal lines for all species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad frequency range. We also demonstrate the feasibility of measuring horizontal wind profiles above Halley station, Antarctica with time resolution as high as 0.5hr using simulated spectroradiometric observations of Doppler-shifted ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) lines in the 230-250 GHz region. The techniques presented provide a framework that can be applied to the retrieval of additional atmospheric parameters and be taken forward to simulate and guide the design of future microwave and sub

  9. Research on ground-based LWIR hyperspectral imaging remote gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhixiong; Yu, Chunchao; Zheng, Weijian; Lei, Zhenggang; Yan, Min; Yuan, Xiaochun; Zhang, Peizhong

    2015-10-01

    The new progress of ground-based long-wave infrared remote sensing is presented, which describes the windowing spatial and temporal modulation Fourier spectroscopy imaging in details. The prototype forms the interference fringes based on the corner-cube of spatial modulation of Michelson interferometer, using cooled long-wave infrared photovoltaic staring FPA (focal plane array) detector. The LWIR hyperspectral imaging is achieved by the process of collection, reorganization, correction, apodization, FFT etc. from data cube. Noise equivalent sensor response (NESR), which is the sensitivity index of CHIPED-1 LWIR hyperspectral imaging prototype, can reach 5.6×10-8W/(cm-1.sr.cm2) at single sampling. Hyperspectral imaging is used in the field of organic gas VOC infrared detection. Relative to wide band infrared imaging, it has some advantages. Such as, it has high sensitivity, the strong anti-interference ability, identify the variety, and so on.

  10. Improving Agricultural Water Resources Management Using Ground-based Infrared Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghvaeian, S.

    2014-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the largest user of freshwater resources in arid/semi-arid parts of the world. Meeting rapidly growing demands in food, feed, fiber, and fuel while minimizing environmental pollution under a changing climate requires significant improvements in agricultural water management and irrigation scheduling. Although recent advances in remote sensing techniques and hydrological modeling has provided valuable information on agricultural water resources and their management, real improvements will only occur if farmers, the decision makers on the ground, are provided with simple, affordable, and practical tools to schedule irrigation events. This presentation reviews efforts in developing methods based on ground-based infrared thermometry and thermography for day-to-day management of irrigation systems. The results of research studies conducted in Colorado and Oklahoma show that ground-based remote sensing methods can be used effectively in quantifying water stress and consequently triggering irrigation events. Crop water use estimates based on stress indices have also showed to be in good agreement with estimates based on other methods (e.g. surface energy balance, root zone soil water balance, etc.). Major challenges toward the adoption of this approach by agricultural producers include the reduced accuracy under cloudy and humid conditions and its inability to forecast irrigation date, which is a critical knowledge since many irrigators need to decide about irrigations a few days in advance.

  11. Dual-detector optical MEMS spectrum analyzer: advances, applications, and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Weiss, Alexander; Stock, Volker; Wiesner, Kerstin; Lampe, Uwe; Fleischer, Maximilian; Gessner, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    The spectroscopy market is enduring and growing one, in which the near infrared spectroscopy by means of the advances plays an important and indispensable role. Some nameable advances are the noninvasive character, the rapidity, which allows real-time measurements or the flexible sampling and sample presentation. To establish near infrared spectroscopic methods and tests at a wide variety of applications new technological innovations are necessary. One of these technological innovations is a modern scanning micro mirror spectrometers. We have developed a small sized, light weight MOEMS-spectrometers for different spectral regions which are due to the optical parameters less expensive, more flexible and offer better performance than traditional spectrometers even yet. The central component of the optical set-up is a large area scanning micro mirror, which oscillates in resonance with 250Hz. Thus, to record a single spectrum only 4 milliseconds are necessary. One of the important factors of NIR spectroscopy, which affects qualitative and quantitative determination, is the sample presentation. For optimal signal processing different sample presentation techniques such as transmission and flow cells, integrating spheres and attenuated total reflection (ATR) probes were realized. Consequently in combination with chemometric methods e.g. partial least square or principal component analysis several applications could be performed and investigated. This article describes the principles and the advances of the promising technology as well as some realized applications. Furthermore influences of the sample presentation and calibration procedures will be discussed closer.

  12. Studies of waveform requirements for intermediate mass-ratio coalescence searches with advanced gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. J. E.; Mandel, I.; Vecchio, A.

    2013-08-01

    The coalescence of a stellar-mass compact object into an intermediate-mass black hole (intermediate mass-ratio coalescence; IMRAC) is an important astrophysical source for ground-based gravitational-wave interferometers in the so-called advanced (or second-generation) configuration. However, the ability to carry out effective matched-filter-based searches for these systems is limited by the lack of reliable waveforms. Here we consider binaries in which the intermediate-mass black hole has a mass in the range 24M⊙-200M⊙ with a stellar-mass companion having masses in the range 1.4M⊙-18.5M⊙. In addition, we constrain the mass ratios, q, of the binaries to be in the range 1/140≤q≤1/10 and we restrict our study to the case of circular binaries with nonspinning components. We investigate the relative contribution to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the three different phases of the coalescence—inspiral, merger and ringdown—using waveforms computed within the effective one-body formalism matched to numerical relativity. We show that merger and ringdown contribute to a substantial fraction of the total SNR over a large portion of the mass parameter space, although in a limited portion the SNR is dominated by the inspiral phase. We further identify three regions in the IMRAC mass space in which (i) inspiral-only searches could be performed with losses in detection rates L in the range 10%≲L≲27%, (ii) searches based on inspiral-only templates lead to a loss in detection rates in the range 27%≲L≲50%, and (iii) templates that include merger and ringdown are essential to prevent losses in detection rates greater than 50%. In addition we find that using inspiral-only templates as filters can lead to large biases in the estimates of the mass parameters of IMRACs. We investigate the effectiveness with which the inspiral-only portion of the IMRAC waveform space is covered by comparing several existing waveform families in this regime. We find that

  13. Advances in InGaAsP-based avalanche diode single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzler, Mark A.; Jiang, Xudong; Entwistle, Mark; Slomkowski, Krystyna; Tosi, Alberto; Acerbi, Fabio; Zappa, Franco; Cova, Sergio

    2011-02-01

    In this Topical Review, we survey the state-of-the-art of single photon detectors based on avalanche diodes fabricated in the InGaAsP materials system for photon counting at near infrared wavelengths in the range from 0.9-1.6 µm. The fundamental trade-off between photon detection efficiency and dark count rate can now be managed with performance that adequately serves many applications, with low dark count rates of ∼1 kHz having been demonstrated at photon detection efficiencies of 20% for 25 µm diameter fiber-coupled devices with thermoelectric cooling. Timing jitter of less than 50 ps has been achieved, although device uniformity is shown to be essential in obtaining good jitter performance. Progress is also reported towards resolving the limitations imposed on photon counting rate by afterpulsing, with at least 50 MHz repetition frequencies demonstrated for 1 ns gated operation with afterpulsing limited to the range of 1-5%. We also present a discussion of future trends and challenges related to these devices organized according to the hierarchy of materials properties, device design concepts, signal processing and electronic circuitry, and multiplexing concepts. Whereas the materials properties of these devices may pose significant challenges for the foreseeable future, there has been considerable progress in device concepts and circuit solutions towards the present imperatives for higher counting rates and simpler device operation.

  14. Microgravity Investigation of Crew Reactions in 0-G (MICR0-G): Ground-Based Development Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Dava J.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the technology development of an advanced load sensor ground-based prototype and details the preliminary tests in microgravity during parabolic flights. The research effort is entitled, the Microgravity Investigation and Crew Reactions in 0-G (MICR0-G), a ground-based research effort funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The MICR0-G project was a follow-on to the Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors (EDLS) spaceflight experiment flown on the Russian Space Station Mir. The technology development of the advanced load sensor prototype has been carried out by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), with collaboration from Politecnico di Milano University and the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The key hardware of the advanced sensor prototype is a set of two types of load sensors - a hand-hold and foot restraints - similar in appearance to the mobility aids found in the Space Shuttle orbiter to assist the crew in moving inside the spacecraft, but able to measure the applied forces and moments about the x-, y-, and z- axes. The aim of Chapter 1 is to give a brief overview of the report contents. The first section summarizes the previous research efforts on astronaut-induced loads in microgravity. The second section provides information on the MICR0-G research project and the technology development work conducted at MIT. Section 1.3 details the motivation for designing a new generation of load sensors and describes the main enhancements and contributions of the MICR0-G advanced load sensors system compared to the EDLS system. Finally, the last section presents the outline of the report.

  15. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  16. Ground-based observations of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snodgrass, C.

    2015-10-01

    I will described the campaign of observations from ground-based (and Earth orbiting) telescopes that supports the Rosetta mission. Rosetta gets closer to the nucleus than any previous mission, and returns wonderfully detailed measurements from the heart of the comet, but at the cost of not seeing the large scale coma and tails. The ground-based campaign fills in the missing part of the picture, studying the comet at #1000km resolution, and following how the overall activity of the comet varies. These data provide context information for Rosetta, so changes in the inner coma seen by the spacecraft can be correlated with the phenomena observable in comets. This not only helps to complete our understanding of the activity of 67P, but also allows us to compare it with other comets that are only observed from the ground, and in that way extend the results of the Rosetta mission to the wider population. The ground-based campaign includes observations with nearly all major facilities world-wide. In 2014 the majority of data came from the ESO VLT, as the comet was still relatively faint and in Southern skies, but as it returns to visibility from Earth in 2015 it will be considerably brighter, approaching its perihelion in August, and at Northern declinations. I will show results from the 2014 campaign, including visible wavelength photometry and spectroscopy, and the latest results from early 2015 observations. I will also describe the varied observations that will be included in the campaign post-perihelion, and how all of these results fit around what we are learning about 67P from Rosetta.

  17. Space- and Ground-Based Observations of Exceptionally Young Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamblyn, P. M.; Merline, W. J.; Chapman, C. R.; Nesvorný, D.; Durda, D. D.

    2004-12-01

    We provide an overview and progress report on a suite of observations of very young asteroids. Three asteroid groups were previously identified through dynamical back integration as having arisen from very recent (<10 Myr) asteroid collisions (Nesvorný et al. 2002, Nature 417, 720; 2003 ApJ 591, 486). Hence these asteroid families provide an opportunity to probe the properties of the fragments of asteroid collisions before their characteristics have been masked by the aging and dynamical effects that dominate the observable properties of older asteroids. With a variety of observational programs, we aim to measure characteristics critical for comparison with hydrodynamical models of asteroid collisions. First, with a large Hubble Snapshot survey, we are testing if binaries are more prevalent among the young asteroids. This might be expected because ejection of mutually bound pairs is one mechanism for binary formation. Although our observed samples are small, we have discovered two new binaries among our control sample of old asteroids and none among the young asteroids sampled. We are extending the sample with ground-based Adaptive Optics at VLT, Gemini-N, Keck, and IRTF. In another ground-based experiment, we are measuring the lightcurve amplitudes and spin periods of these young asteroids for eventual comparison with simulations of asteroid breakup (e.g. Durda et al. 2004 Icarus 170, 243). Finally, with a Spitzer program, we are measuring the sizes and albedos of some of these young asteroids. This will immediately test if albedo is correlated with size or age, and provide the calibration for a ground-based determination of the size distribution. Together with the spin and shape information from lightcurves, these data will also further constrain the measurement of the Yarkovsky effect on main belt asteroids recently presented by Nesvorný & Bottke 2004 (Icarus, 170, 324).

  18. Flight- and Ground-Based Materials Science Programs at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Research Division of NASA funds research programs in all branches of materials science including ceramics and glasses. A NASA Research Announcement (NRA)is currently planned with proposals due in March 1999. Proposals are accepted for both flight- definition and ground- based research projects with a main criterion being a strong justification for microgravity. A review of the program in its entirety will be given, with special emphasis on microgravity related ceramics research. The topics of current interest in the NRA will be discussed in terms of International Space Station research and NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative.

  19. Sky type discrimination using a ground-based sun photometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeFelice, Thomas P.; Wylie, B.K.

    2001-01-01

    A 2-year feasibility study was conducted at the USGS EROS Data Center, South Dakota (43.733°N, 96.6167°W) to assess whether a four-band, ground-based, sun photometer could be used to discriminate sky types. The results indicate that unique spectral signatures do exist between sunny skies (including clear and hazy skies) and cirrus, and cirrostratus, altocumulus or fair-weather cumulus, and thin stratocumulus or altostratus, and fog/fractostratus skies. There were insufficient data points to represent other cloud types at a statistically significant level.

  20. Recent Improvements in AMSR2 Ground-Based RFI Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. P.; Gentemann, C. L.; Wentz, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    Passive satellite radiometer measurements in the microwave frequencies (6-89 GHz) are useful in providing geophysical retrievals of sea surface temperature (SST), atmospheric water vapor, wind speed, rain rate, and more. However, radio frequency interference (RFI) is one of the fastest growing sources of error in these retrievals. RFI can originate from broadcasting satellites, as well as from ground-based instrumentation that makes use of the microwave range. The microwave channel bandwidths used by passive satellite radiometers are often wider than the protected bands allocated for this type of remote sensing, a common practice in microwave radiometer design used to reduce the effect of instrument noise in the observed signal. However, broad channel bandwidths allow greater opportunity for RFI to affect these observations and retrievals. For ground-based RFI, a signal is broadcast directly into the atmosphere which may interfere with the radiometer - its antenna, cold mirror, hot load or the internal workings of the radiometer itself. It is relatively easy to identify and flag RFI from large sources, but more difficult to do so from small, sporadic sources. Ground-based RFI has high spatial and temporal variability, requiring constant, automated detection and removal to avoid spurious trends leaching into the geophysical retrievals. Ascension Island in the South Atlantic Ocean has been one of these notorious ground-based RFI sources, affecting many microwave radiometers, including the AMSR2 radiometer onboard JAXA's GCOM-W1 satellite. Ascension Island RFI mainly affects AMSR2's lower frequency channels (6.9, 7.3, and 10.65 GHz) over a broad spatial region in the South Atlantic Ocean, which makes it challenging to detect and flag this RFI using conventional channel and geophysical retrieval differencing techniques. The authors have developed a new method of using the radiometer's earth counts and hot counts, for the affected channels, to detect an Ascension Island

  1. Ground-based SMART-COMMIT Measurements for Studying Aerosol and Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2008-01-01

    From radiometric principles, it is expected that the retrieved properties of extensive aerosols and clouds from reflected/emitted measurements by satellite (and/or aircraft) should be consistent with those retrieved from transmitted/emitted radiance observed at the surface. Although space-borne remote sensing observations cover large spatial domain, they are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and/or the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite data sets. The development and deployment of SMARTCOMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile facilities are aimed for the optimal utilization of collocated ground-based observations as constraints to yield higher fidelity satellite retrievals and to determine any sampling bias due to target conditions. To quantify the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system and the atmospheric processes, SMART-COMMIT instruments fall into three categories: flux radiometer, radiance sensor and in-situ probe. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of SMART-COMMIT in recent field campaigns (e.g., CRYSTAL-FACE, UAE 2, BASEASIA, NAMMA) that were designed and executed to study the compelling variability in temporal scale of both anthropogenic and natural aerosols (e.g., biomass-burning smoke, airborne dust) and cirrus clouds. We envision robust approaches in which well-collocated ground-based measurements and space-borne observations will greatly advance our knowledge of extensive aerosols and clouds.

  2. Coupled Simulations, Ground-Based Experiments and Flight Experiments for Astrodynamics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, R.; Brown, M.; Lorrain, P.; Capon, C.; Lambert, A.; Benson, C.; Tuttle, S.; Griffin, D.

    Near-Earth satellites undergo complex and poorly understood interactions with their environment, leading to large uncertainties in predicting orbits and an associated risk of collision with other satellites and with space debris. The nature, evolution and behaviour of the growing cloud of space debris in that environment is even less well understood. Significant effort and expenditure is currently being made by governments in Australia, UK, USA, Europe and elsewhere in space surveillance and tracking, in order to mitigate the risk. However, a major gap exists with respect to the science of in-orbit behaviour. Research is underway in Australia to enable the prediction of the orbits of near-Earth space objects with order(s) of magnitude greater fidelity than currently possible. This is being achieved by coupling together the necessary parts of the puzzle - the physics of rarefied space object “aerodynamics” and the space physics and space weather that affects it - and employing our capabilities in ground-based and in-orbit experiments, ground-based observations and high performance computing to do so. As part of the effort, UNSW Canberra is investing $10M to develop a sustainable university-led program to develop and fly affordable in-orbit missions for space research. In the coming 6 years, we will fly a minimum of four cubesat missions, some in partnership with DSTO, which will include flight experiments for validating Space Situational Awareness astrodynamics simulation and observation capabilities. The flights are underpinned by ground-based experimental research employing space test chambers, advanced diagnostics, and supercomputer simulations that couple DSMC and Particle-in-Cell methods for modelling space object interactions with the ionosphere. This paper will describe the research both underway and planned, with particular emphasis on the coupled numerical/experimental/flight approach.

  3. Measuring Intermediate-Mass Black-Hole Binaries with Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors.

    PubMed

    Veitch, John; Pürrer, Michael; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-10-01

    We perform a systematic study to explore the accuracy with which the parameters of intermediate-mass black-hole binary systems can be measured from their gravitational wave (GW) signatures using second-generation GW detectors. We make use of the most recent reduced-order models containing inspiral, merger, and ringdown signals of aligned-spin effective-one-body waveforms to significantly speed up the calculations. We explore the phenomenology of the measurement accuracies for binaries with total masses between 50M(⊙) and 500M(⊙) and mass ratios between 0.1 and 1. We find that (i) at total masses below ∼200M(⊙), where the signal-to-noise ratio is dominated by the inspiral portion of the signal, the chirp mass parameter can be accurately measured; (ii) at higher masses, the information content is dominated by the ringdown, and total mass is measured more accurately; (iii) the mass of the lower-mass companion is poorly estimated, especially at high total mass and more extreme mass ratios; and (iv) spin cannot be accurately measured for our injection set with nonspinning components. Most importantly, we find that for binaries with nonspinning components at all values of the mass ratio in the considered range and at a network signal-to-noise ratio of 15, analyzed with spin-aligned templates, the presence of an intermediate-mass black hole with mass >100M(⊙) can be confirmed with 95% confidence in any binary that includes a component with a mass of 130M(⊙) or greater. PMID:26551801

  4. Measuring Intermediate-Mass Black-Hole Binaries with Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors.

    PubMed

    Veitch, John; Pürrer, Michael; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-10-01

    We perform a systematic study to explore the accuracy with which the parameters of intermediate-mass black-hole binary systems can be measured from their gravitational wave (GW) signatures using second-generation GW detectors. We make use of the most recent reduced-order models containing inspiral, merger, and ringdown signals of aligned-spin effective-one-body waveforms to significantly speed up the calculations. We explore the phenomenology of the measurement accuracies for binaries with total masses between 50M(⊙) and 500M(⊙) and mass ratios between 0.1 and 1. We find that (i) at total masses below ∼200M(⊙), where the signal-to-noise ratio is dominated by the inspiral portion of the signal, the chirp mass parameter can be accurately measured; (ii) at higher masses, the information content is dominated by the ringdown, and total mass is measured more accurately; (iii) the mass of the lower-mass companion is poorly estimated, especially at high total mass and more extreme mass ratios; and (iv) spin cannot be accurately measured for our injection set with nonspinning components. Most importantly, we find that for binaries with nonspinning components at all values of the mass ratio in the considered range and at a network signal-to-noise ratio of 15, analyzed with spin-aligned templates, the presence of an intermediate-mass black hole with mass >100M(⊙) can be confirmed with 95% confidence in any binary that includes a component with a mass of 130M(⊙) or greater.

  5. Precipitation signatures of ground-based VLF transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, P.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.; Bortnik, J.

    2008-07-01

    Numerical raytracing with Landau damping is used to calculate >100 keV electron precipitation signatures induced by hypothetical VLF transmitters distributed broadly in geomagnetic latitude and operating at a wide range of frequencies. A one-half second pulse from each source is simulated and attenuation to the base of the magnetosphere for geomagnetic latitudes from 10° to 60° is calculated. Source location affects induced precipitation more strongly than operating frequency or radiated power. Sources located at 35° to 45° induce the most >100 keV precipitation for the 10 to 40 kHz waves typical of ground-based VLF sources, while locations below λ ≃ 15° or above λ ≃ 55° are least effective at precipitating energetic electrons. In all cases, induced precipitation increases as the operating frequency decreases, with 10 kHz waves from a source at λ ≃ 35° the most effective at precipitating >100 keV electrons. Precipitation signatures produced by five existing ground-based VLF transmitters are also simulated: the NAA, NLK, NAU, NPM, and NWC VLF transmitters. NWC induces the strongest >100 keV electron precipitation signature, followed by NPM, NAU, NAA, and NLK.

  6. Light pollution simulations for planar ground-based light sources.

    PubMed

    Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2008-02-20

    The light pollution model is employed to analyze spatial behavior of luminance at the night sky under cloudless and overcast conditions. Enhanced light excess is particularly identified at cloudy skies, because the clouds efficiently contribute to the downward luminous flux. It is evident that size of ground-based light sources can play an important role in the case of overcast sky conditions. Nevertheless, the realistically sized light sources are rarely embedded into light pollution modeling, and rather they are replaced by simple point sources. We discuss the discrepancies between sky luminance distributions when at first the planar light sources are considered and at second the point-source approximation is accepted. The found differences are noticeable if the size of the light source, distance to the observer, and altitude of a cloudy layer are comparable one to the other. Compared with point-source approximation, an inclusion of the size factor into modeling the light sources leads to partial elimination of the steep changes of sky luminance (typical for point sources of light). The narrow and sharp light pillars normally presented on the sky illuminated by point light sources can disappear or fuse together when two or more nearby light sources are considered with their real sizes. Sky elements situated close to the horizon will glow efficiently if luminous flux originates from two-dimensional ground-based entities (such as cities or villages).

  7. Ground-based observation of near-Earth asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffey, Michael J.

    An increased ground-based observation program is an essential component of any serious attempt to assess the resource potential of near-Earth asteroids. A vigorous search and characterization program could lead to the discovery and description of about 400 to 500 near-Earth asteroids in the next 20 years. This program, in conjunction with meteorite studies, would provide the data base to ensure that the results of a small number of asteroid-rendezvous and sample-return missions could be extrapolated with confidence into a geological base map of the Aten, Apollo, and Amor asteroids. Ground-based spectral studies of nearly 30 members of the Aten/Apollo/Amor population provide good evidence that this class includes bodies composed of silicates, metal-silicates, and carbonaceous assemblages similar to those found in meteorites. The instruments that are being used or could be used to search for near-Earth asteroids are listed. Techniques useful in characterizing asteroids and the types of information obtainable using these techniques are listed.

  8. Ground-based observation of near-Earth asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    An increased ground-based observation program is an essential component of any serious attempt to assess the resource potential of near-Earth asteroids. A vigorous search and characterization program could lead to the discovery and description of about 400 to 500 near-Earth asteroids in the next 20 years. This program, in conjunction with meteorite studies, would provide the data base to ensure that the results of a small number of asteroid-rendezvous and sample-return missions could be extrapolated with confidence into a geological base map of the Aten, Apollo, and Amor asteroids. Ground-based spectral studies of nearly 30 members of the Aten/Apollo/Amor population provide good evidence that this class includes bodies composed of silicates, metal-silicates, and carbonaceous assemblages similar to those found in meteorites. The instruments that are being used or could be used to search for near-Earth asteroids are listed. Techniques useful in characterizing asteroids and the types of information obtainable using these techniques are listed.

  9. Ground-based visual inspection for CTBT verification

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, W.; Wohletz, K.

    1997-11-01

    Ground-based visual inspection will play an essential role in On-Site Inspection (OSI) for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification. Although seismic and remote sensing techniques are the best understood and most developed methods for detection of evasive testing of nuclear weapons, visual inspection will greatly augment the certainty and detail of understanding provided by these more traditional methods. Not only can ground-based visual inspection offer effective documentation in cases of suspected nuclear testing, but it also can provide accurate source location and testing media properties necessary for detailed analysis of seismic records. For testing in violation of the CTBT, an offending state may attempt to conceal the test, which most likely will be achieved by underground burial. While such concealment may not prevent seismic detection, evidence of test deployment, location, and yield can be disguised. In this light, if a suspicious event is detected by seismic or other remote methods, visual inspection of the event area is necessary to document any evidence that might support a claim of nuclear testing and provide data needed to further interpret seismic records and guide further investigations. However, the methods for visual inspection are not widely known nor appreciated, and experience is presently limited. Visual inspection can be achieved by simple, non-intrusive means, primarily geological in nature, and it is the purpose of this report to describe the considerations, procedures, and equipment required to field such an inspection. The inspections will be carried out by inspectors from members of the CTBT Organization.

  10. Airborne and Ground-Based Measurements Using a High-Performance Raman Lidar. Part 2; Ground Based

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Cadirola, Martin; Venable, Demetrius; Connell, Rasheen; Rush, Kurt; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    The same RASL hardware as described in part I was installed in a ground-based mobile trailer and used in a water vapor lidar intercomparison campaign, hosted at Table Mountain, CA, under the auspices of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The converted RASL hardware demonstrated high sensitivity to lower stratospheric water vapor indicating that profiling water vapor at those altitudes with sufficient accuracy to monitor climate change is possible. The measurements from Table Mountain also were used to explain the reason, and correct , for sub-optimal airborne aerosol extinction performance during the flight campaign.

  11. Functional Allocation for Ground-Based Automated Separation Assurance in NextGen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Mercer, Joey; Martin, Lynne; Homola, Jeffrey; Cabrall, Christopher; Brasil, Connie

    2010-01-01

    As part of an ongoing research effort into functional allocation in a NextGen environment, a controller-in-the-loop study on ground-based automated separation assurance was conducted at NASA Ames' Airspace Operations Laboratory in February 2010. Participants included six FAA front line managers, who are currently certified professional controllers and four recently retired controllers. Traffic scenarios were 15 and 30 minutes long where controllers interacted with advanced technologies for ground-based separation assurance, weather avoidance, and arrival metering. The automation managed the separation by resolving conflicts automatically and involved controllers only by exception, e.g., when the automated resolution would have been outside preset limits. Results from data analyses show that workload was low despite high levels of traffic, Operational Errors did occur but were closely tied to local complexity, and safety acceptability ratings varied with traffic levels. Positive feedback was elicited for the overall concept with discussion on the proper allocation of functions and trust in automation.

  12. Which future for electromagnetic Astronomy: Ground Based vs Space Borne Large Astrophysical Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubertini, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    The combined use of large ground based facilities and large space observatories is playing a key role in the advance of astrophysics by providing access to the entire electromagnetic spectrum, allowing high sensitivity observations from the lower radio wavelength to the higher energy gamma rays.It is nowadays clear that a forward steps in the understanding of the Universe evolution and large scale structure formation is essential and only possible with the combined use of multiwavelength imaging and spectral high resolution instruments.The increasing size, complexity and cost of large ground and space observatories places a growing emphasis on international collaboration. If the present set of astronomical facilities is impressive and complete, with nicely complementary space and ground based telescopes, the scenario becomes worrisome and critical in the next two decades. In fact, only a few ‘Large’ main space missions are planned and there is a need to ensure proper ground facility coverage: the synergy Ground-Space is not escapable in the timeframe 2020-2030.The scope of this talk is to review the current astronomical instrumentation panorama also in view of the recent major national agencies and international bodies programmatic decisions.This Division B meeting give us a unique opportunity to review the current situation and discuss the future perspectives taking advantage of the large audience ensured by the IAU GA.

  13. Capabilities and constraints of NASA's ground-based reduced gravity facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekan, Jack; Neumann, Eric S.; Sotos, Raymond G.

    1993-01-01

    The ground-based reduced gravity facilities of NASA have been utilized to support numerous investigations addressing various processes and phenomina in several disciplines for the past 30 years. These facilities, which include drop towers, drop tubes, aircraft, and sounding rockets are able to provide a low gravity environment (gravitational levels that range from 10(exp -2)g to 10(exp -6)g) by creating a free fall or semi-free fall condition where the force of gravity on an experiment is offset by its linear acceleration during the 'fall' (drop or parabola). The low gravity condition obtained on the ground is the same as that of an orbiting spacecraft which is in a state of perpetual free fall. The gravitational levels and associated duration times associated with the full spectrum of reduced gravity facilities including spaced-based facilities are summarized. Even though ground-based facilities offer a relatively short experiment time, this available test time has been found to be sufficient to advance the scientific understanding of many phenomena and to provide meaningful hardware tests during the flight experiment development process. Also, since experiments can be quickly repeated in these facilities, multistep phenomena that have longer characteristic times associated with them can sometimes be examined in a step-by-step process. There is a large body of literature which has reported the study results achieved through using reduced-gravity data obtained from the facilities.

  14. Electron multiplication CCD detector technology advancement for the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Leon K.; Demers, Richard T.; Hoenk, Michael; Peddada, Pavani; Nemati, Bijan; Cherng, Michael; Michaels, Darren; Loc, Anthony; Bush, Nathan; Hall, David; Murray, Neil; Gow, Jason; Burgon, Ross; Holland, Andrew; Reinheimer, Alice; Jorden, Paul R.; Jordan, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    The WFIRST-AFTA (Wide Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Asset) is a NASA space observatory. It will host two major astronomical instruments: a wide-field imager (WFI) to search for dark energy and carry out wide field near infrared (NIR) surveys, and a coronagraph instrument (CGI) to image and spectrally characterize extrasolar planets. In this paper, we discuss the work that has been carried out at JPL in advancing Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) technology to higher flight maturity, with the goal of reaching a NASA technology readiness level of 6 (TRL-6) by early-to-mid 2016. The EMCCD has been baselined for both the coronagraph's imager and integral field spectrograph (IFS) based on its sub-electron noise performance at extremely low flux levels - the regime where the AFTA CGI will operate. We present results from a study that fully characterizes the beginning of life performance of the EMCCD. We also discuss, and present initial results from, a recent radiation test campaign that was designed and carried out to mimic the conditions of the WFIRST-AFTA space environment in an L2 orbit, where we sought to assess the sensor's end of life performance, particularly degradation of its charge transfer efficiency, in addition to other parameters such as dark current, electron multiplication gain, clock induced charge and read noise.

  15. Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  16. Upcoming and Future Missions in the Area of Infrared Astronomy: Spacecraft and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    will also be discussed. Improved thermal detectors could have important applications in solar physics, specifically in the detection of far-IR synchrotron emission from energetic electrons in solar flares. For infrared astronomy we have missions like SIRTF and JWST, which will cover the spectral range from near-IR to far-IR in the search and probing of both new and old planetary systems in our galaxy and the measurement of the most distant galaxies of our universe. SIRTF is scheduled to be launched in August 2003, while JWST will be launched next decade. Another mission is TPF, which will use interferometer techniques at infrared wavelengths to search for planetary systems beyond 2010. With regard to ground based telescopes we have, for example, the twin 10 meter Keck telescopes and the IRTF telescope at Mauna Kea. The Keck telescopes are presently using interferometer techniques. Over the next several decades there are plans for 50 meter to 200 meter telescopes providing near-IR to far-IR measurements with the eventual plan to combine all telescopes using interferometer techniques to provide unprecedented spectral-spatial resolution and sensitivity.

  17. Preparation of a one-curie 171Tm target for the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Vieira, David J.

    2008-05-15

    Roughly one curie of 171Tm (t1/2=1.92a) has been produced and purified for the purpose of making a nuclear target for the first measurements of its neutron capture cross section. Target preparation consisted of three key steps: (1) material production; (2) separation and purification; and (3) electrodeposition onto a suitable backing material. Approximately 1.5 mg of the target material (at the time of separation) was produced by irradiating roughly 250 mg of its stable enriched 170Er lanthanide neighbor with neutrons at the ILL reactor in France. This production method resulted in a “difficult-to-separate” 1:167 mixture of near-neighboring lanthanides, Tm and Er. Separation and purification was accomplished using high-performance liquid chromatorgraphy (HPLC), with a proprietary cation exchange column (Dionex, CS-3) and alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid (a-HIB) eluent. This technique yielded a final product of ~95% purity with respect to Tm. A portion (20 ug) of the Tm was electrodeposited on thin Be foil and delivered to the Los Alamos Neutron Science CEnter (LANSCE) for preliminary analysis of its neutron capture cross section using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). This paper discusses the major hurdles associated with the separation and purification step including, scale-up issues related to the use of HPLC for material separation and purification of the target material from a-HIB and 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR) colorant.

  18. Ground-based column abundance measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, Clyde R.

    1988-01-01

    The preliminary results of ground-based OH column abundance measurements from Truk, Federated States of Micronesia, are contained. These are the first OH column measurements from the tropics, and constitute a signficcant contribution to the OH data base. Comparisons of tropical OH behavior with the extensive mid-latitude observations serve as a critical test of the current understanding of the HO (sub x) photochemistry and its relationship to the other major chemical families. The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in tropical stratospheric winds exerts a major influence on the Hadley cell vertical transport. Related QBOs in total O3 and in stratospheric H2O were identified, but QBO effects on other stratospheric species are still unknown. The solar tide in the tropics produces a diurnal surface pressure variation of 2 to 3 mb; its effect on OH photochemistry in the stratosphere may be significant.

  19. Ground-based column abundance measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Clyde R.

    1988-04-01

    The preliminary results of ground-based OH column abundance measurements from Truk, Federated States of Micronesia, are contained. These are the first OH column measurements from the tropics, and constitute a signficcant contribution to the OH data base. Comparisons of tropical OH behavior with the extensive mid-latitude observations serve as a critical test of the current understanding of the HO (sub x) photochemistry and its relationship to the other major chemical families. The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in tropical stratospheric winds exerts a major influence on the Hadley cell vertical transport. Related QBOs in total O3 and in stratospheric H2O were identified, but QBO effects on other stratospheric species are still unknown. The solar tide in the tropics produces a diurnal surface pressure variation of 2 to 3 mb; its effect on OH photochemistry in the stratosphere may be significant.

  20. GBOT: ground based optical tracking of the Gaia satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Martin; Bouquillon, Sebastien; Taris, Francois; Steele, Iain A.; Smart, Ricky L.; Andrei, Alexandre H.; Barache, Christophe; Carlucci, Teddy; Els, Sebastian G.

    2014-08-01

    Gaia, the 1 billion star, high precision, astrometric satellite will revolutionise our understanding in many areas of astronomy ranging from bodies in our Solar System to the formation and structure of our Galaxy. To fully achieve the ambitious goals of the mission, and to completely eliminate effects such as aberration, we must know the position and velocity vectors of the spacecraft as it orbits the Lagrange point to an accuracy greater than can be obtained by traditional radar techniques, leading to the decision to conduct astrometric observations of the Gaia satellite itself from the ground. Therefore the Ground Based Optical Tracking (GBOT) project was formed and a small worldwide network using 1-2 m telescopes established in order to obtain one measurement per day of a precision/accuracy of 20 mas. We will discuss all aspects of GBOT, setup, feasibility considerations, preliminary tests of observing methods, partner observatories, the pipeline/database (see also contribution by Bouquillon et al.1).

  1. Ground-Based Experiments on Vibrational Thermal Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, Michael F.; Rogers, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    Ground-based experiments on g-jitter effects in fluid flow provide insight that complements both theoretical studies and space-based experiments on this problem. We report preliminary results for experiments on Rayleigh-Benard convection subjected to time-dependent accelerations on a shaker table. For sinusoidal modulation, two qualitatively different pattern forming mechanisms come into play: geometry induced wavenumber selection (as in the standard "no-shake" Rayleigh-Benard problem) and dispersion induced wavenumber selection due to parametric instability (as in the Faraday surface-wave problem). We discuss preliminary results on the competition and co-existence of patterns due to these different instability mechanisms. We also discuss the implications of this work on the general question of pattern formation in the presence of noise.

  2. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  3. Telerobotic manipulator developments for ground-based space research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, J. N.; Babcock, S. M.; Butler, P. L.; Costello, H. M.; Glassell, R. L.; Kress, Reid L.; Kuban, D. P.; Rowe, J. C.; Williams, D. M.; Meintel, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    New opportunities for the application of telerobotic systems to enhance human intelligence and dexterity in the hazardous environment of space are presented by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Station Program. Because of the need for significant increases in extravehicular activity and the potential increase in hazards associated with space programs, emphasis is being heightened on telerobotic systems research and development. The Automation Technology Branch at NASA Langley Research Center currently is sponsoring the Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator (LTM) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop and demonstrate ground-based telerobotic manipulator system hardware for research and demonstrations aimed at future NASA applications. The LTM incorporates traction drives, modularity, redundant kinematics, and state-of-the-art hierarchical control techniques to form a basis for merging the diverse technological domains of robust, high-dexterity teleoperations and autonomous robotic operation into common hardware to further NASA's research.

  4. Progress in the ULTRA 1-m ground-based telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Robert C.; Martin, Robert N.; Twarog, Bruce; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Taghavi, Ray; Hale, Rick; Etzel, Paul; Fesen, Rob; Shawl, Steve

    2006-06-01

    We present the technical status of the Ultra Lightweight Telescope for Research in Astronomy (ULTRA) program. The program is a 3-year Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) program funded by NSF. The MRI is a collaborative effort involving Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. (CMA), University of Kansas, San Diego State University and Dartmouth College. Objectives are to demonstrate the feasibility of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite mirror technology for ground-based optical telescopes. CMA is spearheading the development of surface replication techniques to produce the optics, fabricating the 1m glass mandrel, and constructing the optical tube assembly (OTA). Presented will be an overview and status of the 1-m mandrel fabrication, optics development, telescope design and CFRP telescope fabrication by CMA for the ULTRA Telescope.

  5. Laminar Premixed and Diffusion Flames (Ground-Based Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Ground-based studies of soot processes in laminar flames proceeded in two phases, considering laminar premixed flames and laminar diffusion flames, in turn. The test arrangement for laminar premixed flames involved round flat flame burners directed vertically upward at atmospheric pressure. The test arrangement for laminar jet diffusion flames involved a round fuel port directed vertically upward with various hydrocarbon fuels burning at atmospheric pressure in air. In both cases, coflow was used to prevent flame oscillations and measurements were limited to the flame axes. The measurements were sufficient to resolve soot nucleation, growth and oxidation rates, as well as the properties of the environment needed to evaluate mechanisms of these processes. The experimental methods used were also designed to maintain capabilities for experimental methods used in corresponding space-based experiments. This section of the report will be limited to consideration of flame structure for both premixed and diffusion flames.

  6. Modelling atmospheric turbulence effects on ground-based telescope systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, L.W.; Flatte, S.M.; Max, C.E.

    1993-09-30

    Questions still exist concerning the appropriate model for turbulence- induced phase fluctuations seen in ground-based telescopes. Bester et al. used a particular observable (slope of the Allan variance) with an infrared interferometer in an attempt to distinguish models. The authors have calculated that observable for Kolmogorov and {open_quotes}random walk{close_quotes} models with a variety of outer scales and altitude-dependent turbulence and wind velocity. The authors have found that clear distinction between models requires good data on the vertical distribution of wind and turbulence. Furthermore, measurements at time separations of order 60 s are necessary to distinguish the {open_quotes}random walk{close_quotes} model from the Kolmogorov model.

  7. Ground-Based Thermal Imaging of Coastal and Riverine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwinski, T.; McKenna, T. E.; Puleo, J. A.; Meehan, C. L.

    2010-12-01

    Ground-based remote sensing can provide information on spatio-temporal distributions of sediment and geotechnical properties in dynamic coastal and riverine environments where it can be difficult to collect representative in-situ data. The spatio-temporal variability of grain size, moisture content and biological activity in these environments presents a major challenge in the development of robust remote sensing applications. For ground-based thermal imaging, the radiation received by the imager is a function of the temperature and emissivity of the sediment, observation geometry, atmospheric transmittance (distance and humidity), and reflected background radiation. This study examines the effects of observation geometry on emissivity and the apparent temperature of sediments. A bench-scale multi-spectral imaging system was developed to assess the effects of viewing angle, heating/cooling and moisture variation on thermal imager response. Preliminary results show the expected decrease in emissivity with increasing view angle. Our goal is to parameterize this effect so that imagery from uncontrolled field conditions can be corrected. Combined with corrections for atmospheric transmittance and reflected radiation and an emissivity separation routine, this will allow for a more accurate evaluation of spatio-temporal variations in surface temperature and enable evaluation of the heat-transfer processes driving temporal variations. Of primary interest is estimating the thermal and hydraulic properties of the sediment which serve as proxies for grain size, porosity and moisture content (fundamental parameters for geotechnical applications). This is facilitated using a numerical model that couples heat transfer in the subsurface and atmosphere and allows for periodic inundation with surface water. Results from laboratory experiments and a recent field study on a sandy beach along the Wolf River in Mississippi will be presented.

  8. Martian Meteorological Measurements Using Ground-Based Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, A.; Bailey, J.; Walter, M.; Crisp, D.

    2005-12-01

    An important component of the continuing Mars research program is the accurate determination of atmospheric and meteorological parameters, and analysis of how these parameters vary spatially and temporally. Ground-based observations are particularly useful in this regard, as they allow simultaneous global coverage and use of high-resolution spectroscopy to complement orbital measurements. Aside from the perils of atmospheric turbulence (correctable to some degree using adaptive optics), infrared observations of planetary atmospheres face another challenge -- correcting for the presence of telluric spectral lines. Based on atmospheric simulations using the SMART radiative transfer modelling tool1, we present evidence that the current technique of mitigating the effect of Earth's atmosphere by observing a nearby star of known spectral type (the ``standard star" method) can generate significant errors. Indeed, our simulations of measurements of the Martian 2-micron carbon dioxide band at a resolving power of 1000 produced variation between ``standard reduced" spectra and original modelled spectra of up to 50%2. Furthermore, we outline our proposed computational technique of iterative reduction by progressing modelled parameters towards observed values (which negates the ``standard star" issue), to be validated on data obtained from IRTF/Gemini South observations in October/November 2005, and present results to date. 1Meadows, V.S., Crisp, D., 1996, Ground-based near-infrared observations of the Venus nightside: The thermal structure and water abundance near the surface, JGR 101:E2, 4595 2Bailey, J. A., Simpson, A. J., Crisp, D., 2005, Correcting Infrared Spectra for Atmospheric Absorption, in preparation

  9. Space life sciences: ground-based iron-ion biology and physics, including shielding.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    This session of the 35th Scientific Assembly of COSPAR focuses on recent advances in ground-based studies of high-energy (mainly 1 GeV/nucleon) iron ions. The theme is interdisciplinary in nature and encompasses both physics and biology reports. Manned space missions, including those of the International Space Station and the planned Mars mission, will require the extended presence of crew members in space. As such, a better understanding in shielding design--in radiation detection as well as radio-protection based on simulating studies--is much needed. On the other hand, a better understanding of the basic mechanisms that modulate radiation sensitivity; in determining DNA double strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and the induction of apoptosis, will provide important information for an interventional approach. PMID:15929229

  10. Recent observations of the solar corona with a new ground-based Coronagraph in Argentina (MICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenborg, G.; Schwenn, R.; Srivastava, N.; Inhester, B.; Podlipnik, B.; Rovira, M.; Francile, C.

    1999-06-01

    As part of the new German-Argentinian Solar-Observatory in El Leoncito, San Juan, Argentina, a new ground-based solar telescope (MICA: Mirror Coronagraph for Argentina) began to operate in August 1997. MICA is an advanced mirror coronagraph, its design being an almost exact copy of the LASCO-C1 instrument. Since its installation, it has been imaging the inner solar corona (1.05 to 2.0 solar radii) in two spectral ranges, corresponding to the emission lines of the Fe XIV and Fe X ions. The instrument can image the corona as fast as every minute. Thus, it is ideally suited to study fast processes in the inner corona. In this way it is a good complement for the LASCO-C1 instrument. We present a brief review of the characteristics of the instrument, and some recent observations.

  11. Designing of a risk assessment architecture to analyze potential risks from space weather to space and ground based assets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattar, Erum

    2016-07-01

    Today's world is more vulnerable to space weather due to ever increased advance and costly space technology deployed in space and on ground. The space weather has a natural potential of posing harmful effects on space and ground based assets and on astronaut's life. This global challenge of space weather essentially demands global and regional preparedness to develop its situational awareness, analyzing risks and devise possible mitigation procedures. Considering risk mitigation architecture as inevitable for all scientific missions, this paper focuses to develop a risk assessment architecture for the space environment and to map its utility in identifying and analyzing potential risks to space and ground based assets from space weather in the South Asia region. Different risk assessment tools will be studied and would conclude in the most effective tool or strategy that may help to develop our capability in identifying, protecting and mitigating from the devastating effects of the space weather.

  12. Evaluation of satellite soil moisture products over Norway using ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesfeller, A.; Lahoz, W. A.; Jeu, R. A. M. de; Dorigo, W.; Haugen, L. E.; Svendby, T. M.; Wagner, W.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we evaluate satellite soil moisture products from the advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) over Norway using ground-based observations from the Norwegian water resources and energy directorate. The ASCAT data are produced using the change detection approach of Wagner et al. (1999), and the AMSR-E data are produced using the VUA-NASA algorithm (Owe et al., 2001, 2008). Although satellite and ground-based soil moisture data for Norway have been available for several years, hitherto, such an evaluation has not been performed. This is partly because satellite measurements of soil moisture over Norway are complicated owing to the presence of snow, ice, water bodies, orography, rocks, and a very high coastline-to-area ratio. This work extends the European areas over which satellite soil moisture is validated to the Nordic regions. Owing to the challenging conditions for soil moisture measurements over Norway, the work described in this paper provides a stringent test of the capabilities of satellite sensors to measure soil moisture remotely. We show that the satellite and in situ data agree well, with averaged correlation (R) values of 0.72 and 0.68 for ASCAT descending and ascending data vs in situ data, and 0.64 and 0.52 for AMSR-E descending and ascending data vs in situ data for the summer/autumn season (1 June-15 October), over a period of 3 years (2009-2011). This level of agreement indicates that, generally, the ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture products over Norway have high quality, and would be useful for various applications, including land surface monitoring, weather forecasting, hydrological modelling, and climate studies. The increasing emphasis on coupled approaches to study the earth system, including the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere, will benefit from the availability of validated and improved soil moisture satellite datasets, including those

  13. Relevance of near-Earth magnetic field modeling in deriving SEP properties using ground-based data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanellakopoulos, Anastasios; Plainaki, Christina; Mavromichalaki, Helen; Laurenza, Monica; Gerontidou, Maria; Storini, Marisa; Andriopoulou, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) are short-term increases observed in cosmic ray intensity records of ground-based particle detectors such as neutron monitors (NMs) or muon detectors; they are related to the arrival of solar relativistic particles in the terrestrial environment. Hence, GLE events are related to the most energetic class of solar energetic particle (SEP) events. In this work we investigate how the use of different magnetospheric field models can influence the derivation of the relativistic SEP properties when modeling GLE events. As a case study, we examine the event of 2012 May 17 (also known as GLE71), registered by ground-based NMs. We apply the Tsyganenko 89 and the Tsyganenko 96 models in order to calculate the trajectories of the arriving SEPs in the near-Earth environment. We show that the intersection of the SEP trajectories with the atmospheric layer at ~20 km from the Earth's surface (i.e., where the flux of the generated secondary particles is maximum), forms for each ground-based neutron monitor a specified viewing region that is dependent on the magnetospheric field configuration. Then, we apply the Neutron Monitor Based Anisotropic GLE Pure Power Law (NMBANGLE PPOLA) model (Plainaki et al. 2010, Solar Phys, 264, 239), in order to derive the spectral properties of the related SEP event and the spatial distributions of the SEP fluxes impacting the Earth's atmosphere. We examine the dependence of the results on the used magnetic field models and evaluate their range of validity. Finally we discuss information derived by modeling the SEP spectrum in the frame of particle acceleration scenarios.

  14. Evolution of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy from the early days to the Cherenkov Telescope Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillas, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    Most of what we know of cosmic gamma rays has come from spacecraft, but at energies above tens of GeV it has become possible to make observations with ground-based detectors of enormously greater collecting area. In recent years one such detector type, the cluster of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes, has reached a very productive state, whilst several alternative approaches have been explored, including converted solar power collectors and novel high-altitude particle shower detectors which promised to extend the energy range covered. Key examples of development from 1952 to 2011 are followed, noting the problems and discoveries that stimulated the current work, explaining the logic of the alternative approaches that were taken. The merits of the current major Cherenkov observatories and of other viable detectors are examined and compared, with examples of the astrophysical information they are beginning to provide. The detectors are still evolving, as we still do not understand the processes onto which the gamma rays provide a window. These include the acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays (in particular, the wide-band spectra of radiation from some individual supernova remnants are still hard to interpret), the highly relativistic and variable jets from active galactic nuclei, and aspects of the electrodynamics of pulsars. Larger groups of Cherenkov telescopes still offer the possibility of an increase in power of the technique for resolvable Galactic sources especially.

  15. The PixFEL project: development of advanced X-ray pixel detectors for application at future FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, G.; Comotti, D.; Fabris, L.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Forti, F.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Pancheri, L.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.; Mendicino, R.; Benkechkache, M. A.

    2015-02-01

    The PixFEL project aims to develop an advanced X-ray camera for imaging suited for the demanding requirements of next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities. New technologies can be deployed to boost the performance of imaging detectors as well as future pixel devices for tracking. In the first phase of the PixFEL project, approved by the INFN, the focus will be on the development of the microelectronic building blocks, carried out with a 65 nm CMOS technology, implementing a low noise analog front-end channel with high dynamic range and compression features, a low power ADC and high density memory. At the same time PixFEL will investigate and implement some of the enabling technologies to assembly a seamless large area X-ray camera composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. A pixel matrix with active edge will be developed to minimize the dead area of the sensor layer. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be explored to build a four-side buttable readout chip with small pixel pitch and all the on-board required functionalities. The ambitious target requirements of the new pixel device are: single photon resolution, 1 to 104 photons @ 1 keV to 10 keV input dynamic range, 10-bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, 1 kevent in-pixel memory and 100 μm pixel pitch. The long term goal of PixFEL will be the development of a versatile X-ray camera to be operated either in burst mode (European XFEL), or in continuous mode to cope with the high frame rates foreseen for the upgrade phase of the LCLS-II at SLAC.

  16. Frequency-domain gravitational waves from nonprecessing black-hole binaries. II. A phenomenological model for the advanced detector era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sebastian; Husa, Sascha; Hannam, Mark; Ohme, Frank; Pürrer, Michael; Forteza, Xisco Jiménez; Bohé, Alejandro

    2016-02-01

    We present a new frequency-domain phenomenological model of the gravitational-wave signal from the inspiral, merger and ringdown of nonprecessing (aligned-spin) black-hole binaries. The model is calibrated to 19 hybrid effective-one-body-numerical-relativity waveforms up to mass ratios of 1 ∶18 and black-hole spins of |a /m |˜0.85 (0.98 for equal-mass systems). The inspiral part of the model consists of an extension of frequency-domain post-Newtonian expressions, using higher-order terms fit to the hybrids. The merger ringdown is based on a phenomenological ansatz that has been significantly improved over previous models. The model exhibits mismatches of typically less than 1% against all 19 calibration hybrids and an additional 29 verification hybrids, which provide strong evidence that, over the calibration region, the model is sufficiently accurate for all relevant gravitational-wave astronomy applications with the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors. Beyond the calibration region the model produces physically reasonable results, although we recommend caution in assuming that any merger-ringdown waveform model is accurate outside its calibration region. As an example, we note that an alternative nonprecessing model, SEOBNRv2 (calibrated up to spins of only 0.5 for unequal-mass systems), exhibits mismatch errors of up to 10% for high spins outside its calibration region. We conclude that waveform models would benefit most from a larger number of numerical-relativity simulations of high-aligned-spin unequal-mass binaries.

  17. Probing Pluto's Atmosphere Using Ground-Based Stellar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicardy, Bruno; Rio de Janeiro Occultation Team, Granada Team, International Occultation and Timing Association, Royal Astronomical Society New Zealand Occultation Section, Lucky Star associated teams

    2016-10-01

    Over the last three decades, some twenty stellar occultations by Pluto have been monitored from Earth. They occur when the dwarf planet blocks the light from a star for a few minutes as it moves on the sky. Such events led to the hint of a Pluto's atmosphere in 1985, that was fully confirmed during another occultation in 1988, but it was only in 2002 that a new occultation could be recorded. From then on, the dwarf planet started to move in front of the galactic center, which amplified by a large factor the number of events observable per year.Pluto occultations are essentially refractive events during which the stellar rays are bent by the tenuous atmosphere, causing a gradual dimming of the star. This provides the density, pressure and temperature profiles of the atmosphere from a few kilometers above the surface up to about 250 km altitude, corresponding respectively to pressure levels of about 10 and 0.1 μbar. Moreover, the extremely fine spatial resolution (a few km) obtained through this technique allows the detection of atmospheric gravity waves, and permits in principle the detection of hazes, if present.Several aspects make Pluto stellar occultations quite special: first, they are the only way to probe Pluto's atmosphere in detail, as the dwarf planet is far too small on the sky and the atmosphere is far too tenuous to be directly imaged from Earth. Second, they are an excellent example of participative science, as many amateurs have been able to record those events worldwide with valuable scientific returns, in collaboration with professional astronomers. Third, they reveal Pluto's climatic changes on decade-scales and constrain the various seasonal models currently explored.Finally, those observations are fully complementary to space exploration, in particular with the New Horizons (NH) mission. I will show how ground-based occultations helped to better calibrate some NH profiles, and conversely, how NH results provide some key boundary conditions

  18. Independet Component Analyses of Ground-based Exoplanetary Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Martins-Filho, Walter; Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Pearson, Kyle; Waldmann, Ingo; Biddle, Lauren; Zellem, Robert Thomas; Alvarez-Candal, Alvaro

    2016-10-01

    Most observations of exoplanetary atmospheres are conducted when a "Hot Jupiter" exoplanet transits in front of its host star. These Jovian-sized planets have small orbital periods, on the order of days, and therefore a short transit time, making them more ameanable to observations. Measurements of Hot Jupiter transits must achieve a 10-4 level of accuracy in the flux to determine the spectral modulations of the exoplanetary atmosphere. In order to accomplish this level of precision, we need to extract systematic errors, and, for ground-based measurements, the effects of Earth's atmosphere, from the signal due to the exoplanet, which is several orders of magnitudes smaller. Currently, the effects of the terrestrial atmosphere and the some of the time-dependent systematic errors are treated by dividing the host star by a reference star at each wavelength and time step of the transit. More recently, Independent Component Analyses (ICA) have been used to remove systematic effects from the raw data of space-based observations (Waldmann 2014,2012; Morello et al.,2015,2016). ICA is a statistical method born from the ideas of the blind-source separation studies, which can be used to de-trend several independent source signals of a data set (Hyvarinen and Oja, 2000). One strength of this method is that it requires no additional prior knowledge of the system. Here, we present a study of the application of ICA to ground-based transit observations of extrasolar planets, which are affected by Earth's atmosphere. We analyze photometric data of two extrasolar planets, WASP-1b and GJ3470b, recorded by the 61" Kuiper Telescope at Stewart Observatory using the Harris B and U filters. The presentation will compare the light curve depths and their dispersions as derived from the ICA analysis to those derived by analyses that ratio of the host star to nearby reference stars.References: Waldmann, I.P. 2012 ApJ, 747, 12, Waldamann, I. P. 2014 ApJ, 780, 23; Morello G. 2015 ApJ, 806

  19. Hybrid deterministic and stochastic x-ray transport simulation for transmission computed tomography with advanced detector noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Lucretiu M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for simulation of noisy X-ray computed tomography data sets. The model is made of two main components, a photon transport simulation component that generates the noiseless photon field incident on the detector, and a detector response model that takes as input the incident photon field parameters and given the X-ray source intensity and exposure time can generate noisy data sets, accordingly. The photon transport simulation component combines direct ray-tracing of polychromatic X-rays for calculation of transmitted data, with Monte Carlo simulation for calculation of the scattered-photon data. The Monte Carlo scatter simulation is accelerated by implementing particle splitting and importance sampling variance reduction techniques. The detector-incident photon field data are stored as energy expansion coefficients on a refined grid that covers the detector area. From these data the detector response model is able to generate noisy detector data realizations, by reconstituting the main parameters that describe each detector element response in statistical terms, including spatial correlations. The model is able to generate very fast, on the fly, CT data sets corresponding to different radiation doses, as well as detector response characteristics, facilitating data management in extensive optimization studies by reducing the computation time and storage space demands.

  20. Predicting thunderstorm evolution using ground-based lightning detection networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    Lightning measurements acquired principally by a ground-based network of magnetic direction finders are used to diagnose and predict the existence, temporal evolution, and decay of thunderstorms over a wide range of space and time scales extending over four orders of magnitude. The non-linear growth and decay of thunderstorms and their accompanying cloud-to-ground lightning activity is described by the three parameter logistic growth model. The growth rate is shown to be a function of the storm size and duration, and the limiting value of the total lightning activity is related to the available energy in the environment. A new technique is described for removing systematic bearing errors from direction finder data where radar echoes are used to constrain site error correction and optimization (best point estimate) algorithms. A nearest neighbor pattern recognition algorithm is employed to cluster the discrete lightning discharges into storm cells and the advantages and limitations of different clustering strategies for storm identification and tracking are examined.

  1. Future enhancements to ground-based microburst detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Steven D.; Matthews, Michael P.; Dasey, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    This set of viewgraphs presents the results of the Cockpit Weather Information (CWI) program at M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory. The CWI program has been funded through NaSA Langley Research Center by the joint NASA/FAA Integrated Airborne Wind Shear Program for the past four years. During this time, over 120 microburst penetrations by research aircraft have been conducted under Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) testbed radar surveillance at Orlando, FL. The results of these in-situ measurements have been compared with ground-based detection methods. Several valuable insights were gained from this research activity. First, it was found that the current TDWR microburst shapes do not permit accurate characterization of microburst hazard in terms of the F factor hazard index, because they are based on loss value rather than shear. Second, it was found that the horizontal component of the F factor can be accurately estimated from shear, provided compensation is made for the dependence of outflow strength on altitude. Third, it was found that a simple continuity assumption for estimating the vertical component of the F factor yielded poor results. However, further research has shown that downdraft strength is correlated with features aloft detected by the TDWR radar scan strategy. The outcome of the CWI program is to move from the loss-based wind shear detection algorithm used in the TDWR to a shear-based detection scheme as proposed in the Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS).

  2. Phobos and Deimos. [ground based and spacecraft observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Ground-based and spacecraft observations of Phobos and Deimos are reviewed and the satellites' origin is discussed. The crater densities of both bodies are close to the saturation level. The largest impact events may have caused extensive fracturing of their surfaces. The surfaces are at least 1.5 billion years old and may date back to the early history of the solar system. The Martian satellites display large deviations from sphericity. As a result of tidal processes, they are in synchronous rotation. Several independent lines of evidence show that they have regoliths. Despite some provocative arguments, their internal strengths and the nature of their interior are poorly known at present. Photometric measurements suggest that they are made of either carbonaceous chondritic material or a basalt. Sinclair (1972), Born and Duxbury (1975) and Shor (1975) apparently have successfully determined Phobos' secular acceleration. Their value of approximately .001 deg/year/year implies that the interior of Mars has a low specific dissipation factor (about 100), may indicate that a portion of the Martian interior is experiencing partial melting. The low inclination of the satellites' orbits indicates that they were formed as part of the same process that resulted in Mars.

  3. A comparative study of satellite and ground-based phenology.

    PubMed

    Studer, S; Stöckli, R; Appenzeller, C; Vidale, P L

    2007-05-01

    Long time series of ground-based plant phenology, as well as more than two decades of satellite-derived phenological metrics, are currently available to assess the impacts of climate variability and trends on terrestrial vegetation. Traditional plant phenology provides very accurate information on individual plant species, but with limited spatial coverage. Satellite phenology allows monitoring of terrestrial vegetation on a global scale and provides an integrative view at the landscape level. Linking the strengths of both methodologies has high potential value for climate impact studies. We compared a multispecies index from ground-observed spring phases with two types (maximum slope and threshold approach) of satellite-derived start-of-season (SOS) metrics. We focus on Switzerland from 1982 to 2001 and show that temporal and spatial variability of the multispecies index correspond well with the satellite-derived metrics. All phenological metrics correlate with temperature anomalies as expected. The slope approach proved to deviate strongly from the temporal development of the ground observations as well as from the threshold-defined SOS satellite measure. The slope spring indicator is considered to indicate a different stage in vegetation development and is therefore less suited as a SOS parameter for comparative studies in relation to ground-observed phenology. Satellite-derived metrics are, however, very susceptible to snow cover, and it is suggested that this snow cover should be better accounted for by the use of newer satellite sensors.

  4. Characterizing GEO Titan Transtage Fragmentations using Ground-based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, H.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2016-01-01

    In a continued effort to better characterize the Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) environment, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) utilizes various ground-based optical assets to acquire photometric and spectral data of known debris associated with fragmentations in or near GEO. The Titan IIIC Transtage upper stage is known to have fragmented four times. Two of the four fragmentations were in GEO while a third Transtage fragmented in GEO transfer orbit. The forth fragmentation occurred in Low Earth Orbit. In order to better assess what may be causing these fragmentations, the NASA ODPO recently acquired a Titan Transtage test and display article that was previously in the custody of the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) in Tucson, Arizona. After initial inspections at AMARG demonstrated that the test article was of sufficient fidelity to be of interest, the test article was brought to JSC to continue material analysis and historical documentation of the Titan Transtage. The Transtage will be a subject of forensic analysis using spectral measurements to compare with telescopic data; as well, a scale model will be created to use in the Optical Measurement Center for photometric analysis of an intact Transtage, including a BRDF. The following presentation will provide a review of the Titan Transtage, the current analysis that has been done to date, and the future work to be completed in support of characterizing the GEO and near GEO orbital debris environment.

  5. Nonlinear analysis of the ground-based magnetometer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiTommaso, Joseph Henry

    When the first magnetometer was created by Frederick Gauss in 1833, scientists gained a powerful tool for studying the structure, dynamics, and strength of the Earth's magnetic field: the magnetosphere. Since Gauss' time, the world's scientific community has established ground-based magnetometer stations around the globe in an effort to study local and global perturbations and patterns of the Earth's magnetic field. The main focus of this network has been monitoring the magnetic flux and impact from the Sun's constant outflow of radiation and particles known as the solar wind, as well as its more violent eruptive events. There has been little work, by comparison, into the signals and correlations within the network itself. Since the Earth's field can roughly be mapped to a dipole and disturbances often have a large scale structure, one can surmise there should be some correlation between stations based on their relative positions to one another. What that correlation is or represents is not clear. To investigate this possible correlation and its nature, a set of nonlinear analytic methods were conducted on magnetic data collected from stations scattered across North America over an 18 year period. The analysis was focused on searching for spatial and temporal correlations of nonperiodic signals in the magnetometer network. The findings from that analysis suggest there exist nonlocal correlations between stations that are dependent on position, which could be useful in the development of a space weather risk assessment.

  6. Time series inversion of spectra from ground-based radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, O. M.; Eriksson, P.

    2013-07-01

    Retrieving time series of atmospheric constituents from ground-based spectrometers often requires different temporal averaging depending on the altitude region in focus. This can lead to several datasets existing for one instrument, which complicates validation and comparisons between instruments. This paper puts forth a possible solution by incorporating the temporal domain into the maximum a posteriori (MAP) retrieval algorithm. The state vector is increased to include measurements spanning a time period, and the temporal correlations between the true atmospheric states are explicitly specified in the a priori uncertainty matrix. This allows the MAP method to effectively select the best temporal smoothing for each altitude, removing the need for several datasets to cover different altitudes. The method is compared to traditional averaging of spectra using a simulated retrieval of water vapour in the mesosphere. The simulations show that the method offers a significant advantage compared to the traditional method, extending the sensitivity an additional 10 km upwards without reducing the temporal resolution at lower altitudes. The method is also tested on the Onsala Space Observatory (OSO) water vapour microwave radiometer confirming the advantages found in the simulation. Additionally, it is shown how the method can interpolate data in time and provide diagnostic values to evaluate the interpolated data.

  7. Time series inversion of spectra from ground-based radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, O. M.; Eriksson, P.

    2013-02-01

    Retrieving time series of atmospheric constituents from ground-based spectrometers often requires different temporal averaging depending on the altitude region in focus. This can lead to several datasets existing for one instrument which complicates validation and comparisons between instruments. This paper puts forth a possible solution by incorporating the temporal domain into the maximum a posteriori (MAP) retrieval algorithm. The state vector is increased to include measurements spanning a time period, and the temporal correlations between the true atmospheric states are explicitly specified in the a priori uncertainty matrix. This allows the MAP method to effectively select the best temporal smoothing for each altitude, removing the need for several datasets to cover different altitudes. The method is compared to traditional averaging of spectra using a simulated retrieval of water vapour in the mesosphere. The simulations show that the method offers a significant advantage compared to the traditional method, extending the sensitivity an additional 10 km upwards without reducing the temporal resolution at lower altitudes. The method is also tested on the OSO water vapour microwave radiometer confirming the advantages found in the simulation. Additionally, it is shown how the method can interpolate data in time and provide diagnostic values to evaluate the interpolated data.

  8. Observing Tsunamis in the Ionosphere Using Ground Based GPS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, D. A.; Komjathy, A.; Song, Y. Tony; Stephens, P.; Hickey, M. P.; Foster, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) show variations consistent with atmospheric internal gravity waves caused by ocean tsunamis following recent seismic events, including the Tohoku tsunami of March 11, 2011. We observe fluctuations correlated in time, space, and wave properties with this tsunami in TEC estimates processed using JPL's Global Ionospheric Mapping Software. These TEC estimates were band-pass filtered to remove ionospheric TEC variations with periods outside the typical range of internal gravity waves caused by tsunamis. Observable variations in TEC appear correlated with the Tohoku tsunami near the epicenter, at Hawaii, and near the west coast of North America. Disturbance magnitudes are 1-10% of the background TEC value. Observations near the epicenter are compared to estimates of expected tsunami-driven TEC variations produced by Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Spectral Full Wave Model, an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and found to be in good agreement. The potential exists to apply these detection techniques to real-time GPS TEC data, providing estimates of tsunami speed and amplitude that may be useful for future early warning systems.

  9. Bridge Testing With Ground-Based Interferometric Radar: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chiara, P.; Morelli, A.

    2010-05-28

    The research of innovative non-contact techniques aimed at the vibration measurement of civil engineering structures (also for damage detection and structural health monitoring) is continuously directed to the optimization of measures and methods. Ground-Based Radar Interferometry (GBRI) represents the more recent technique available for static and dynamic control of structures and ground movements.Dynamic testing of bridges and buildings in operational conditions are currently performed: (a) to assess the conformity of the structure to the project design at the end of construction; (b) to identify the modal parameters (i.e. natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratios) and to check the variation of any modal parameters over the years; (c) to evaluate the amplitude of the structural response to special load conditions (i.e. strong winds, earthquakes, heavy railway or roadway loads). If such tests are carried out by using a non-contact technique (like GBRI), the classical issues of contact sensors (like accelerometers) are easily overtaken.This paper presents and discusses the results of various tests carried out on full-scale bridges by using a Stepped Frequency-Continuous Wave radar system.

  10. Ground Based Studies of Thermocapillary Flows in Levitated Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhal, Satwindar Singh; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-based experiments together with analytical studies are presently being conducted for levitated drops. Both acoustic and electrostatic techniques are being employed to achieve levitation of drops in a gaseous environment. The scientific effort is principally on the thermal and the fluid phenomena associated with the local heating of levitated drops, both at 1-g and at low-g. In particular, the thermocapillary flow associated with local spot heating is being studied. Fairly stable acoustic levitation of drops has been achieved with some exceptions when random rotational motion of the drop persists. The flow visualization has been carried out by light scattering from smoke particles for the exterior flow and fluorescent tracer particles in the drop. The results indicate a lack of axial symmetry in the internal flow even though the apparatus and the heating are symmetric. The theoretical studies for the past year have included fundamental analyses of acoustically levitated spherical drops. The flow associated with a particle near the velocity antinode is being investigated by the singular perturbation technique. As a first step towards understanding the effect of the particle displacement from the antinode, the flow field about the node has been calculated for the first time. The effect of the acoustic field on the interior of a liquid drop has also been investigated. The results predict that the internal flow field is very weak.

  11. Assuring Ground-Based Detect and Avoid for UAS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen W.; Pai, Ganeshmadhav Jagadeesh; Berthold, Randall; Fladeland, Matthew; Storms, Bruce; Sumich, Mark

    2014-01-01

    One of the goals of the Marginal Ice Zones Observations and Processes Experiment (MIZOPEX) NASA Earth science mission was to show the operational capabilities of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) when deployed on challenging missions, in difficult environments. Given the extreme conditions of the Arctic environment where MIZOPEX measurements were required, the mission opted to use a radar to provide a ground-based detect-and-avoid (GBDAA) capability as an alternate means of compliance (AMOC) with the see-and-avoid federal aviation regulation. This paper describes how GBDAA safety assurance was provided by interpreting and applying the guidelines in the national policy for UAS operational approval. In particular, we describe how we formulated the appropriate safety goals, defined the processes and procedures for system safety, identified and assembled the relevant safety verification evidence, and created an operational safety case in compliance with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements. To the best of our knowledge, the safety case, which was ultimately approved by the FAA, is the first successful example of non-military UAS operations using GBDAA in the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS), and, therefore, the first nonmilitary application of the safety case concept in this context.

  12. Detecting Exoplanet Atmospheres from 2-m Ground-Based Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Shannon; Jang-Condell, H.; Lopez-Morales, M.; Kobulnicky, H. A.; Runnoe, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    The field of exoplanet atmospheric research is quickly expanding. Exoplanet atmospheres are difficult to detect in transmission because their signatures are so small compared to the light coming from the star during transit. However, by comparing observations of the superimposed exoplanet during transit to observations of the star alone, the planet's transmission spectrum may be obtained. We selected the hot Jupiter Kepler-4b and made observations of its host star during primary transits using the long-slit spectrograph at the 2.3m Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO). We used an 1800 l/mm grating which covered a wavelength range from approximately 5400 to 6800 angstroms. The slit was oriented to include a well-known comparison star of similar brightness, located 60 arcseconds away. The spectrum of this comparison star may be used to perform differential spectroscopy with the target spectrum. This minimizes atmospheric variations and helps to normalize the spectrum, reducing it to Poisson noise only. Absorption features seen only during transit can be attributed to the atmosphere of the planet. We will present preliminary data demonstrating the feasibility of detecting exoplanet atmospheres from medium-sized ground-based telescopes.

  13. Cardiovascular effects of weightlessness and ground-based simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, Harold

    1988-01-01

    A large number of animal and human flight and ground-based studies were conducted to uncover the cardiovascular effects of weightlessness. Findings indicate changes in cardiovascular function during simulations and with spaceflight that lead to compromised function on reambulation and/or return to earth. This altered state termed cardiovascular deconditioning is most clearly manifest when in an erect body state. Hemodynamic parameters inidicate the presence of excessive tachnycardia, hypotension (leading to presyncope in one-third of the subjects), decreased heart volume, decreased plasma and circulating blood volumes and loss of skeletal muscle mass, particularly in the lower limbs. No clinically harmful effects were observed to date, but in-depth follow-ups were limited, as was available physiologic information. Available data concerning the causes for the observed changes indicate significant roles for mechanisms involved with body fluid-volume regulation, altered cardiac function, and the neurohumoral control of the control of the peripheral circulation. Satisfactory measures are not found. Return to preflight state was variable and only slightly dependent on flight duration. Future progress awaits availability of flight durations longer than several weeks.

  14. Ground deformation from ground-based SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarchi, Dario; Casagli, Nicola; Fortuny-Guasch, Joaquim; Guerri, Letizia; Antonello, Giuseppe; Leva, Davide

    An in-depth analysis of the last two images acquired by the ground-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar system installed on Stromboli before the 5 April 2003 explosion allowed us to detect the precursory signals of the explosion related to ground deformation. In particular, it was possible to estimate the exact time of the explosion through the time domain analysis of raw data from the radar acquisition. This was interrupted by a blackout that occurred a few seconds after the event. The explosion onset time corresponds to a clear change in the intensity of the backscattered energy, related to the dense volcanic plume emission from the Crater. In addiction, the use of a particular interferometric processing technique for the last two acquisitions, consisting of the selection of synthetic sub-apertures from the main ones and creating with these a sequence of interferograms with a higher temporal resolution, detected precursory deformations starting 2 min before the explosion. These observations indicate the occurrence of an elastic deformation of a centimeter amplitude that affected the volcanic edifice progressively from the Crater down to the Sciara del Fuoco depression.

  15. Better flat-fielding for ground-based UV spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Florian; Hanuschik, Reinhard; Moehler, Sabine; Smette, Alain; Smoker, Jonathan; Bourget, Pierre; Dwyer, Peter J.; Rotschädl, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A new technological development, the laser driven light source (LDLS), in which a laser excited plasma emits intense continuum radiation over a wide wavelength range from well below the atmospheric cut-off up to 800 nm, promises to greatly improve our ability to provide high quality flat-fields for astronomical spectrographs. Its particular strength lies in the ground-based ultraviolet (UV). We report on tests conducted with a LDLS using FORS2, UVES, X-Shooter and CRIRES at ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in August 2013. Comparison with standard calibration sources such as halogen and deuterium lamps shows that with the LDLS flat-fields with a better balanced dynamic range and excellent signal to noise ratio can be achieved within short exposure times. This will enable higher quality science at the short wavelength end of existing spectrographs at the VLT. Furthermore the LDLS provides exceptional stability and long lifetime as important operational aspects. Optimised UV spectrographs such as the proposed CUBES (wavelength range 300-400 nm) project will be able to take full advantage of this development removing the long-standing limitation of signal to noise ratios of UV flat-fields.

  16. Ground-based Instrumentations in Africa and its Scientific and Societal Benefits to the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, Endawoke

    2012-07-01

    to the scientific importance, the ground-based instrumentations have also direct impact in advancing space science research by establishing and furthering sustainable research/training infrastructure within Africa so that more young scientists will be educated in their own country. The paper will present research results performed by graduate students who utilize data from the recently deployed instruments within the African universities.

  17. Ground-based Network and Supersite Measurements for Studying Aerosol Properties and Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.

    2008-01-01

    capability of AERONET SMART-COMMIT in current Asian Monsoon Year-2008 campaigns that are designed and being executed to study the compelling variability in temporal scale of both anthropogenic and natural aerosols (e.g., airborne dust, smoke, mega-city pollutant). Feedback mechanisms between aerosol radiative effects and monsoon dynamics have been recently proposed, however there is a lack of consensus on whether aerosol forcing would be more likely to enhance or reduce the strength of the monsoon circulation. We envision robust approaches which well-collocated ground-based measurements and space-borne observations will greatly advance our understanding of absorbing aerosols (e.g., "Global Dimming" vs. "Elevated Heat-Pump" effects) on aerosol cloud water cycle interactions.

  18. Overview and Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements spanning a longer interval. The NSF/NCAR GV employed standard flight-level measurements and new airborne lidar and imaging measurements of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-105 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) and two IR "wing" cameras imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar measuring radial winds below the Falcon. DEEPWAVE also included extensive ground-based measurements in New Zealand, Tasmania, and Southern Ocean Islands. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights and 13 Falcon flights, and ground-based measurements occurred whether or not the aircraft were flying. Collectively, many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation spanning altitudes of 0-100 km were observed. Examples include strong mountain wave (MW) forcing and breaking in the lower and middle stratosphere, weak MW forcing yielding MW penetration into the MLT having very large amplitudes and momentum fluxes, MW scales at higher altitudes ranging from ~10-250 km, large-scale trailing waves from orography refracting into the polar vortex and extending to high altitudes, GW generation by deep convection, large-scale GWs arising from jet stream sources, and strong MWs in the MLT arising from strong surface flow over a small island. DEEPWAVE yielded a number of surprises, among

  19. SNM Movement Detection/Radiation Sensors and Advanced Materials Portfolio Review, CdMnTe (CMT) Gamma Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov,A.

    2009-06-02

    The project goals are: (1) Develop CMT radiation detectors - Demonstrate feasibility (Phase 1 is complete) and Improve material properties and device performance; (2) This project will lead to novel radiation detectors - high detection efficiency, high energy-resolution, ambient-temperature operation, and low production cost; and (3) Such detectors are needed in areas of nonproliferation and national security for detection of SNM. Research highlights are: (1) We achieved our Phase-I goal - Demonstration of CMT detector performance approaching that of CZT detectors; (2) Demonstrated that In-doped CMT is much closer to its anticipated performance as radiation detectors than other alternative materials, TlBr and HgI{sub 2} - Large crystal volumes, 10{sup 10}{Omega}{center_dot}cm, 3 x 10{sup -3}cm{sup 2}/V, and stable response; and (3) Conducted material and device characterization experiments - Detectors: I-V, {mu}{sub e}, ({mu}{tau}){sub e}, internal E fields, energy spectra, and high-resolution x-ray response mapping data and Materials - DLTS, TCT, PL, EPDs, XRD, PCD and IR transmission.

  20. TeV γ-ray astronomy with ground-based air-shower arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafá, Miguel A.

    2016-07-01

    The TeV energy band is a very exciting window into the origin of high energy cosmic radiation, particle acceleration, and the annihilation of dark matter particles. Above a few hundred GeV, ground-based experiments of very large effective areas open a new domain to study extragalactic sources at intermediate redshifts, galaxy clusters, gamma ray bursts, AGN and their flaring states, extended sources and galactic diffuse emission, and to indirect searches for dark matter. In particular, ground arrays of particle detectors -that operate with high duty cycles and large fields of view- can extend to multi-TeV energies the measurements made with experiments on satellites, and complement the observations done with air Cherenkov telescopes on the ground. Key science goals of ground arrays include performing unbiased all-sky surveys, monitoring of transient events from known (and unknown) sources, and detecting extended regions of diffuse emission. In this paper, the status and most recent results from ARGO-YBJ, Tibet AS, HAWC, and LHAASO are presented.

  1. Ground-based observations of uranus and neptune using CCD instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.A.

    1985-07-01

    The author verifies that with the help of charge-coupled devices (CCD) great progress is being made in ground-based astronomical observations, including the study of the remote giant planets Uranus and Neptune. In reading the CCD the top row of pixels (potential wells) is moved into the sequential (shift) reading register; after this each row (line) of pixels moves its electrons upward (in each column) until the bottom row is cleared. This process is repeated for each row until the device is interrogated sequentially. The use of CCD detectors for purposes of image acquisition and spectroscopy has already found wide popularity at astronomical observatories, and soon it will spread to space research. The first known attempts to use CCD to obtain astronomical images was made by the author and his colleagues in April 1976. The result was the first observations of structure on the dark disk of Uranus. In general, the more refined the mathematical provision, the more information can be extracted from the images or spectra.

  2. Jovian thundercloud observation with Jovian orbiter and ground-based telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yukihiro; Nakajima, Kensuke; Takeuchi, Satoru; Sato, Mitsuteru; Fukuhara, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Makoto; Yair, Yoav; Fischer, Georg; Aplin, Karen

    The latest observational and theoretical studies suggest that thunderstorms in Jupiter's at-mosphere are very important subject not only for understanding of meteorology, which may determine the large scale structures such as belt/zone and big ovals, but also for probing the water abundance of the deep atmosphere, which is crucial to constrain the behavior of volatiles in early solar system. Here we suggest a very simple high-speed imager on board Jovian orbiter, Optical Lightning Detector, OLD, optimized for detecting optical emissions from lightning dis-charge in Jupiter. OLD consists of radiation-tolerant CMOS sensors and two H Balmer Alpha line (656.3nm) filters. In normal sampling mode the frame intervals is 29ms with a full frame format of 512x512 pixels and in high-speed sampling mode the interval could be reduced down to 0.1ms by concentrating a limited area of 30x30 pixels. Weight, size and power consump-tion are about 1kg, 16x7x5.5 cm (sensor) and 16x12x4 cm (circuit), and 4W, respectively, though they can be reduced according to the spacecraft resources and required environmental tolerance. Also we plan to investigate the optical flashes using a ground-based middle-sized telescope, which will be built by Hokkaido University, with narrow-band high speed imaging unit using an EM-CCD camera. Observational strategy with these optical lightning detectors and spectral imagers, which enables us to estimate the horizontal motion and altitude of clouds, will be introduced.

  3. Towards a Handshake of Ground-Based Measurements and Remote-Sensing of Vegetation Traits at Global Scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattge, J.; Díaz, S.; Lavorel, S.; Prentice, I. C.; Leadley, P.; Reich, P. B.; Banerjee, A.; Fazayeli, F.; Schrodt, F. I.; Joswig, J.; Mahecha, M. D.; Wirth, C.

    2014-12-01

    Plant traits determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services, and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. Plant traits thus are a key to understand and predict the adaptation of ecosystems to environmental changes. At the same time ground based measurements of plant trait data are dispersed over a wide range of databases, many of these not publicly available. To overcome this deficiency IGBP and DIVERSITAS have initiated the development of a joint database, called TRY, aiming at constructing a standard resource of ground based plant trait observations for the ecological community and for the development of global vegetation models. So far the TRY initiative has united a wide range of the plant trait research community worldwide and gained an unprecedented buy-in of trait data: about 250 trait databases have been contributed and the data repository currently contains about 5.6 million trait entries for 90,000 out of the world's 350,000 plant species. The database includes data for 1100 traits, characterizing the vegetative and regeneration stages of the plant life cycle, including growth, dispersal, establishment and persistence. Based on advanced methods for gap-filling and spatial extrapolation currently being developed in applied statistics and machine learning and in combination with environmental information and species distribution ranges, the unprecedented availability of ground based trait measurements is expected to allow for up-scaling of trait observations from plant to ecosystem level and from point measurements to regional and global scales. These up-scaled data products are expected to provide a link from ground based trait measurements to remote sensing of vegetation function and traits with global coverage.

  4. Spatiotemporal Path-Matching for Comparisons Between Ground- Based and Satellite Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkoff, Timothy A.; Valencia, Sandra; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.

    2005-01-01

    The spatiotemporal sampling differences between ground-based and satellite lidar data can contribute to significant errors for direct measurement comparisons. Improvement in sample correspondence is examined by the use of radiosonde wind velocity to vary the time average in ground-based lidar data to spatially match coincident satellite lidar measurements. Results are shown for the 26 February 2004 GLAS/ICESat overflight of a ground-based lidar stationed at NASA GSFC. Statistical analysis indicates that improvement in signal correlation is expected under certain conditions, even when a ground-based observation is mismatched in directional orientation to the satellite track.

  5. Three Years of Ground-based Thermal Monitoring at Kilauea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. J.; Johnson, J. B.; Pirie, D.; Horton, K.; Flynn, L.; Garbeil, H.; Ramm, H.; Pilger, E.

    2003-12-01

    Three permanent ground-based infrared (8 to 14 micron) radiometers, located on Pu'u 'O'o's north crater rim, have provided continuous real-time monitoring of activity within Pu'u 'O'o since March 2001. Our thermal sensors are able to detect lava flows, catastrophic changes in crater floor morphology, and variations in the style and vigor of volcanic degassing. These continuous, long-term thermal observations, integrated with RSAM and tilt measurements, provide an opportunity to investigate the changing nature of systemic activity at Kilauea. For example, our thermal sensors are able to detect periods of lava effusion on the crater floor, coincident with the termination of the rootless shield to the east and subsequent back-up into Pu'u O'o, before activity transitioned to the Mother's Day flow field. Since June 2001, at least one radiometer has been continuously aimed at the central pit vent of Pu'u O'o, whose thermal record has been dominated by regular gas jetting events, typically referred to as gas pistoning. These events are very often observed in the thermal records, indicating that they are a dominant mode of degassing at Kilauea. During June and July of 2000, gas pistoning from the central pit vent occurred with fundamental recurrence intervals of about 2 to 10 minutes, but since October has slowed to less frequent 20 to 40 minute intervals. We propose that the variation in piston frequency is related to dramatic changes in the geometry of the underground plumbing system at Pu'u 'O'o. Currently thermal monitoring of two individual vents, which are separated by ~100 m, provides evidence for linked degassing, further demonstrating the complex and ephemeral nature of the plumbing system beneath Pu'u 'O'o's crater floor.

  6. Ozone profiles above Kiruna from two ground-based radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Niall J.; Walker, Kaley A.; Raffalski, Uwe; Kivi, Rigel; Gross, Jochen; Manney, Gloria L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents new atmospheric ozone concentration profiles retrieved from measurements made with two ground-based millimetre-wave radiometers in Kiruna, Sweden. The instruments are the Kiruna Microwave Radiometer (KIMRA) and the Millimeter wave Radiometer 2 (MIRA 2). The ozone concentration profiles are retrieved using an optimal estimation inversion technique, and they cover an altitude range of ˜ 16-54 km, with an altitude resolution of, at best, 8 km. The KIMRA and MIRA 2 measurements are compared to each other, to measurements from balloon-borne ozonesonde measurements at Sodankylä, Finland, and to measurements made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite. KIMRA has a correlation of 0.82, but shows a low bias, with respect to the ozonesonde data, and MIRA 2 shows a smaller magnitude low bias and a 0.98 correlation coefficient. Both radiometers are in general agreement with each other and with MLS data, showing high correlation coefficients, but there are differences between measurements that are not explained by random errors. An oscillatory bias with a peak of approximately ±1 ppmv is identified in the KIMRA ozone profiles over an altitude range of ˜ 18-35 km, and is believed to be due to baseline wave features that are present in the spectra. A time series analysis of KIMRA ozone for winters 2008-2013 shows the existence of a local wintertime minimum in the ozone profile above Kiruna. The measurements have been ongoing at Kiruna since 2002 and late 2012 for KIMRA and MIRA 2, respectively.

  7. Project management for complex ground-based instruments: MEGARA plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vargas, María. Luisa; Pérez-Calpena, Ana; Gil de Paz, Armando; Gallego, Jesús; Carrasco, Esperanza; Cedazo, Raquel; Iglesias, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    The project management of complex instruments for ground-based large telescopes is a challenge itself. A good management is a clue for project success in terms of performance, schedule and budget. Being on time has become a strict requirement for two reasons: to assure the arrival at the telescope due to the pressure on demanding new instrumentation for this first world-class telescopes and to not fall in over-costs. The budget and cash-flow is not always the expected one and has to be properly handled from different administrative departments at the funding centers worldwide distributed. The complexity of the organizations, the technological and scientific return to the Consortium partners and the participation in the project of all kind of professional centers working in astronomical instrumentation: universities, research centers, small and large private companies, workshops and providers, etc. make the project management strategy, and the tools and procedures tuned to the project needs, crucial for success. MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is a facility instrument of the 10.4m GTC (La Palma, Spain) working at optical wavelengths that provides both Integral-Field Unit (IFU) and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) capabilities at resolutions in the range R=6,000-20,000. The project is an initiative led by Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) in collaboration with INAOE (Mexico), IAA-CSIC (Spain) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain). MEGARA is being developed under contract with GRANTECAN.

  8. Ground-based Measurement Of Saharan Dust In Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, M. J.; Ji, Q.; Tsay, S.; Hsu, C.; Hansell, R. A.; Augustine, D.

    2007-12-01

    An extensive field experiment, named NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA) was conducted during August-September of 2006 to investigate the genesis and development of hurricanes. Two ground-based mobile laboratories, Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SMART) and Chemical, Optical, Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere (COMMIT), were deployed at Sal Island, Cape Verde to continuously monitor the structure and composition of the atmosphere in the major path of the Saharan Air Layer and the African Easterly Waves. A Micro-Pulse Lidar in SMART, which measures the vertical profiles of backscatter from the atmospheric particulates continuously, caught several episodes of Saharan dust layers reached the surface site. Simultaneously, physical and optical properties of aerosols (e.g., mixture of the Saharan dust and maritime aerosols) were captured by several instruments in COMMIT. In this study, we propose a novel method to separate dust properties from those of marine background aerosols by utilizing the synergy of a suite of in-situ measurements. Derived parameters are mass scattering coefficients and single scattering albedo (SSA) for dust near the surface (~10m). As a crosscheck, the SSA based on the surface measurements is compared with the result of Deep Blue satellite-based aerosol retrievals, which is now incorporated in the operational MODIS aerosol product. The presented preliminary results will be useful in studying the properties of Saharan dust originated from various source regions, which, in turns, can be used as inputs to aerosol transport models to help better understand the interactions between aerosol and cloud water cycle.

  9. Ground-based observations of the Io plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N.

    A series of ground-based 1-D spatially resolved, high resolution spectra (in SII, SIII, and OII) of the Io plasma torus were acquired in October 1999, around the time of the Galileo I24 passage through the IPT. In a previous paper (Thomas et al., JGR, 106, 26277, 2001), we have presented the initial results from these observations. In this presentation, we will describe recent more detailed analysis which seems to be lending further insight into the structure of the IPT. In particular, we have used an "onion-peeling" technique to remove line of sight effects from the observations. The resulting profiles, show the so-called ribbon region (5.7 RJ) being clearly separated from the cold torus (5.3 RJ) by a region of lower SII emission. SIII emission is now shown to be almost completely absent in the cold torus. The ratio of these two species is seen to rise systematically and almost linearly with jovicentric distance from the cold torus through to the warm torus (beyond 6.0 RJ). Models can be used to interpret this behaviour in terms of changing electron temperature with distance. We compare our results with the only other measurement of this property which was based on Voyager 1 PLS observations. We further show that the peak of OII emission is not centred at the, what we now call, the sulphur ribbon. We attempt to derive the relative composition of the three major species in the torus as a function of jovicentric distance using our data.

  10. Cloud optical thickness retrievals from ground-based pyranometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jinhuan

    2006-11-01

    A method is developed to retrieve total cloud optical thickness (COT) from global solar radiation (GSR) detected by ground-based pyranometer, and approaches to input aerosol/molecular/gas parameters for COT retrievals are presented. On the basis of numerical simulations and comparative tests, main error factors of COT retrievals are analyzed, which include radiation data error, cloud inhomogeneity, uncertainties of aerosol optical parameters, and surface albedo. The retrieved COT error, caused by a -5% or 5% systematic error of the GSR measurement, is within ±0.6 and ±5.0 for COT ranges of 0-5.0 and 5-100, respectively. The AOT, the aerosol single scatter albedo (SSA), and the surface albedo are three significant parameters affecting COT retrieval accuracy. The mean SSA in the pyranometer spectral response range and the broadband surface albedo are suitably used in the retrievals. If uncertainties of AOT, SSA, and surface albedo are within ±0.1, ±0.05, and ±0.05, respectively, the retrieval accuracy is accepted for most applications. Furthermore, COTs (τPyr) from pyranometer data at two meteorological observatories are compared with COTs (τISCCP) from ISCCP and COTs (τMODIS) from MODIS. The relative standard deviations between monthly mean τPyr and τMODIS, or τPyr and τISCCP, are all less than 45.4% for both sites. The agreement among the yearly mean τPyr,τMODIS, and τISCCP is satisfactory. The absolute (relative) deviations between the yearly mean τPyr and τMODIS are within ±1.55 (8%) for both sites, and the deviations between the τPyr and τISCCP are within ±1.94 (25%). The yearly mean τPyr also agrees considerably well with τISCCP in the broken cloud case.

  11. Simulating the Performance of Ground-Based Optical Asteroid Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Eric J.; Shelly, Frank C.; Gibbs, Alex R.; Grauer, Albert D.; Hill, Richard E.; Johnson, Jess A.; Kowalski, Richard A.; Larson, Stephen M.

    2014-11-01

    We are developing a set of asteroid survey simulation tools in order to estimate the capability of existing and planned ground-based optical surveys, and to test a variety of possible survey cadences and strategies. The survey simulator is composed of several layers, including a model population of solar system objects and an orbital integrator, a site-specific atmospheric model (including inputs for seeing, haze and seasonal cloud cover), a model telescope (with a complete optical path to estimate throughput), a model camera (including FOV, pixel scale, and focal plane fill factor) and model source extraction and moving object detection layers with tunable detection requirements. We have also developed a flexible survey cadence planning tool to automatically generate nightly survey plans. Inputs to the cadence planner include camera properties (FOV, readout time), telescope limits (horizon, declination, hour angle, lunar and zenithal avoidance), preferred and restricted survey regions in RA/Dec, ecliptic, and Galactic coordinate systems, and recent coverage by other asteroid surveys. Simulated surveys are created for a subset of current and previous NEO surveys (LINEAR, Pan-STARRS and the three Catalina Sky Survey telescopes), and compared against the actual performance of these surveys in order to validate the model’s performance. The simulator tracks objects within the FOV of any pointing that were not discovered (e.g. too few observations, too trailed, focal plane array gaps, too fast or slow), thus dividing the population into “discoverable” and “discovered” subsets, to inform possible survey design changes. Ongoing and future work includes generating a realistic “known” subset of the model NEO population, running multiple independent simulated surveys in coordinated and uncoordinated modes, and testing various cadences to find optimal strategies for detecting NEO sub-populations. These tools can also assist in quantifying the efficiency of novel

  12. Ground-Based Remote Retrievals of Cumulus Entrainment Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Timothy J.; Turner, David D.; Berg, Larry K.; Krueger, Steven K.

    2013-07-26

    While fractional entrainment rates for cumulus clouds have typically been derived from airborne observations, this limits the size and scope of available data sets. To increase the number of continental cumulus entrainment rate observations available for study, an algorithm for retrieving them from ground-based remote sensing observations has been developed. This algorithm, called the Entrainment Rate In Cumulus Algorithm (ERICA), uses the suite of instruments at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site of the United States Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility as inputs into a Gauss-Newton optimal estimation scheme, in which an assumed guess of the entrainment rate is iteratively adjusted through intercomparison of modeled liquid water path and cloud droplet effective radius to their observed counterparts. The forward model in this algorithm is the Explicit Mixing Parcel Model (EMPM), a cloud parcel model that treats entrainment as a series of discrete entrainment events. A quantified value for measurement uncertainty is also returned as part of the retrieval. Sensitivity testing and information content analysis demonstrate the robust nature of this method for retrieving accurate observations of the entrainment rate without the drawbacks of airborne sampling. Results from a test of ERICA on three months of shallow cumulus cloud events show significant variability of the entrainment rate of clouds in a single day and from one day to the next. The mean value of 1.06 km-¹ for the entrainment rate in this dataset corresponds well with prior observations and simulations of the entrainment rate in cumulus clouds.

  13. The Advanced Virgo monolithic fused silica suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisa, D.; Aisa, S.; Campeggi, C.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Farnesini, L.; Majorana, E.; Mezzani, F.; Montani, M.; Naticchioni, L.; Perciballi, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Piluso, A.; Puppo, P.; Rapagnani, P.; Travasso, F.; Vicerè, A.; Vocca, H.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of gravitational waves is one of the most challenging prospects faced by experimental physicists. Suspension thermal noise is an important noise source at operating frequencies between approximately 10 and 30 Hz, and represents a limit to the sensitivity of the ground based interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Its effects can be reduced by minimizing the losses and by optimizing the geometry of the suspension fiber as well as its attachment system. In this proceeding we will describe the mirrors double stage monolithic suspension system to be used in the Advanced Virgo (AdV) detector. We also present the results of the thermal noise study, performed with the help of a finite elements model, taking into account the precise geometry of the fibers attachment systems on the suspension elements. We shall demonstrate the suitability of this suspension for installation in AdV.

  14. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Advances in Telescope and Detector Technologies - Impacts on the Study and Understanding of Binary Star and Exoplanet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott; Devinney, Edward J.

    2012-04-01

    Current and planned telescope systems (both on the ground and in space) as well as new technologies will be discussed with emphasis on their impact on the studies of binary star and exoplanet systems. Although no telescopes or space missions are primarily designed to study binary stars (what a pity!), several are available (or will be shortly) to study exoplanet systems. Nonetheless those telescopes and instruments can also be powerful tools for studying binary and variable stars. For example, early microlensing missions (mid-1990s) such as EROS, MACHO and OGLE were initially designed for probing dark matter in the halos of galaxies but, serendipitously, these programs turned out to be a bonanza for the studies of eclipsing binaries and variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds and in the Galactic Bulge. A more recent example of this kind of serendipity is the Kepler Mission. Although Kepler was designed to discover exoplanet transits (and so far has been very successful, returning many planetary candidates), Kepler is turning out to be a ``stealth'' stellar astrophysics mission returning fundamentally important and new information on eclipsing binaries, variable stars and, in particular, providing a treasure trove of data of all types of pulsating stars suitable for detailed Asteroseismology studies. With this in mind, current and planned telescopes and networks, new instruments and techniques (including interferometers) are discussed that can play important roles in our understanding of both binary star and exoplanet systems. Recent advances in detectors (e.g. laser frequency comb spectrographs), telescope networks (both small and large - e.g. Super-WASP, HAT-net, RoboNet, Las Combres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Network), wide field (panoramic) telescope systems (e.g. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and Pan-Starrs), huge telescopes (e.g. the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), the Overwhelming Large Telescope (OWL) and the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT

  16. Improved Space Object Orbit Determination Using CMOS Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Peltonen, J.; Sännti, T.; Silha, J.; Flohrer, T.

    2014-09-01

    CMOS-sensors, or in general Active Pixel Sensors (APS), are rapidly replacing CCDs in the consumer camera market. Due to significant technological advances during the past years these devices start to compete with CCDs also for demanding scientific imaging applications, in particular in the astronomy community. CMOS detectors offer a series of inherent advantages compared to CCDs, due to the structure of their basic pixel cells, which each contains their own amplifier and readout electronics. The most prominent advantages for space object observations are the extremely fast and flexible readout capabilities, feasibility for electronic shuttering and precise epoch registration, and the potential to perform image processing operations on-chip and in real-time. The major challenges and design drivers for ground-based and space-based optical observation strategies have been analyzed. CMOS detector characteristics were critically evaluated and compared with the established CCD technology, especially with respect to the above mentioned observations. Similarly, the desirable on-chip processing functionalities which would further enhance the object detection and image segmentation were identified. Finally, we simulated several observation scenarios for ground- and space-based sensor by assuming different observation and sensor properties. We will introduce the analyzed end-to-end simulations of the ground- and space-based strategies in order to investigate the orbit determination accuracy and its sensitivity which may result from different values for the frame-rate, pixel scale, astrometric and epoch registration accuracies. Two cases were simulated, a survey using a ground-based sensor to observe objects in LEO for surveillance applications, and a statistical survey with a space-based sensor orbiting in LEO observing small-size debris in LEO. The ground-based LEO survey uses a dynamical fence close to the Earth shadow a few hours after sunset. For the space-based scenario

  17. Scope of Jovian lightning observation by ground-based and spacecraft instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Nakajima, K.

    2009-12-01

    It is suggested by recent observational and theoretical studies that the thunderstorms, i.e., strong moist convective clouds in Jupiter’s atmosphere are very important not only as an essential ingredient of meteorology of Jupiter but also as a potentially very useful “probe” of the water abundance of the deep atmosphere, which is crucial to constrain the behavior of volatiles in early solar system. We would propose the lightning observation with properly designed optical device onboard Jovian system orbiter and with the ground-based telescope. Based on detailed analysis of cloud motions by Galileo orbiter, Gierasch et al. proposed that the thunderstorms can produce the small scale eddies and ultimately drive the belt/zone structure. Moreover, the belt zone structure helps the development of thunderstorms in the belt region in accordance with observation; the belt/zone structure and thunderstorms may be in a symbiotic relation. This framework is a refined version of shallow origin theory, but, although it is a very fantastic idea, quantitative verification remains to be done. Most recent numerical modeling by our group calculated all three types of cloud, i.e., H2O, NH3, and, NH4SH. One of the most important findings is the existence of distinct, quasi-periodic temporal variation of the convective cloud activity; explosion of cloud activity extending all over the computational domain occurs separated by quiet period of order of 10 days. Another surprising finding is that the period of the active/break cycle is roughly proportional to the amount of condensable component in the sub-cloud layer. This strong correspondence between the deep volatile abundance and temporal variability of cloud convection implies a new method to probe the deep atmosphere. We believe JGO with other optical equipments especially for atmospheric spectral imaging is the ideal platform for the lightning detector. Comparing quantitative lightning activity with ambient cloud motion and

  18. ACCESS: Detector Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Matthew J.; Kaiser, M.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Mott, D. B.; Wen, Y.; Foltz, R.; McCandliss, S. R.; Pelton, R. S.; Wright, E. L.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Riess, A. G.; Benford, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Woodgate, B. E.; Bohlin, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Kurucz, R. L.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.

    2013-01-01

    ACCESS, Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars, is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments that will enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 to 1.7 micron bandpass (overview Kaiser et al.). The flight detector and detector spare have been integrated with their electronics and flight mount. The controller electronics have been flight qualified. Vibration testing to launch loads and thermal vacuum testing of the detector, mount, and housing have been performed. The flight detector controller boards have been installed into a ruggedized flight housing. They have been successfully vacuum tested for periods significantly longer than the flight length, and components have been heat-sunk and reinforced as necessary. Thermal stability tests have been performed, and results will be presented. Goddard Space Flight Center’s Detector Characterization Lab (DCL) executed initial characterization tests for the flight detector in 2007. These were repeated in 2012, to ensure and establish baseline performance. Current lab characterization tests at Johns Hopkins are ongoing, and results will be presented. NASA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G supports this work.

  19. Processing electronic photos of Mercury produced by ground based observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid

    New images of Mercury have been obtained by processing of ground based observations that were carried out using the short exposure technique. The disk of the planet extendeds usually from 6 to 7 arc seconds, with the linear size of the image in a focal plane of the telescope about 0.3-0.5 mm on the average. Processing initial millisecond electronic photos of the planet is very labour-consuming. Some features of processing of initial millisecond electronic photos by methods of correlation stacking were considered in (Ksanfomality et al., 2005; Ksanfomality and Sprague, 2007). The method uses manual selection of good photos including a so-called pilot- file, the search for which usually must be done manually. The pilot-file is the most successful one, in opinion of the operator. It defines the future result of the stacking. To change pilot-files increases the labor of processing many times. Programs of processing analyze the contents of a sample, find in it any details, and search for recurrence of these almost imperceptible details in thousand of other stacking electronic pictures. If, proceeding from experience, the form and position of a pilot-file still can be estimated, the estimation of a reality of barely distinct details in it is somewhere in between the imaging and imagination. In 2006-07 some programs of automatic processing have been created. Unfortunately, the efficiency of all automatic programs is not as good as manual selection. Together with the selection, some other known methods are used. The point spread function (PSF) is described by a known mathematical function which in its central part decreases smoothly from the center. Usually the width of this function is accepted at a level 0.7 or 0.5 of the maxima. If many thousands of initial electronic pictures are acquired, it is possible during their processing to take advantage of known statistics of random variables and to choose the width of the function at a level, say, 0.9 maxima. Then the

  20. Postural Responses Following Space Flight and Ground Based Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofman, Igor S.; Reschke, Millard F.; Cerisano, Jody M.; Fisher, Elizabeth A.; Tomilovskaya, Elena V.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa B.; Bloomberg, Jacob B.

    2013-01-01

    With the transition from the Shuttle program to the International Space Station (ISS), the opportunity to fly sensorimotor experiments in a weightless environment has become increasingly more difficult to obtain. As a result, more investigations have turned to ground-based analogs as a way of evaluating an experiment's viability. The two primary analogs available to most investigators are 6deg head down bed rest (HDBR) and dry immersion (DI). For the time being, HDBR investigations have been associated with studies conducted in the United States while the Russians and several other European Union states have concentrated their efforts on using DI as the space flight analog of choice. While either model may be viable for cardiovascular, bone and other system changes, vestibular and sensorimotor investigators have retained serious reservations of either analog's potential to serve as a replacement for a true weightless environment. These reservations have merit, but it is worthwhile to consider that not all changes associated with sensorimotor function during space flight are the result of top-down modifications, but may also be due to the lack, or change, of appropriate support surfaces applying force to the bottom of the feet. To this end we have compared quiet stance postural responses between short duration Space Shuttle flights, long duration ISS flights and HDBR of varying duration. Using these three platforms, representing different modifications of support we investigated postural ataxia using a quiet stance model. Quiet stance was obtained by asking the subjects to stand upright on a force plate, eyes open, arms at the side of the body for three min. From the force plate we obtained average sway velocity in two axes as well as length of line (stabilogram). These parameters were then related to EMG activity recorded from the medial gastrocnemius and lateral tibialis. It is significant to note that postural ataxia measured as quiet stance shows analogous

  1. Neutron radiography as a non-destructive method for diagnosing neutron converters for advanced thermal neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraro, A.; Albani, G.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Croci, G.; Angella, G.; Birch, J.; Cazzaniga, C.; Caniello, R.; Dell'Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Grosso, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Höglund, C.; Hultman, L.; Schimdt, S.; Robinson, L.; Rebai, M.; Salvato, G.; Tresoldi, D.; Vasi, C.; Tardocchi, M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the well-known problem of 3He shortage, a series of different thermal neutron detectors alternative to helium tubes are being developed, with the goal to find valid candidates for detection systems for the future spallation neutron sources such as the European Spallation Source (ESS). A possible 3He-free detector candidate is a charged particle detector equipped with a three dimensional neutron converter cathode (3D-C). The 3D-C currently under development is composed by a series of alumina (Al2O3) lamellas coated by 1 μ m of 10B enriched boron carbide (B4C). In order to obtain a good characterization in terms of detector efficiency and uniformity it is crucial to know the thickness, the uniformity and the atomic composition of the B4C neutron converter coating. In this work a non-destructive technique for the characterization of the lamellas that will compose the 3D-C was performed using neutron radiography. The results of these measurements show that the lamellas that will be used have coating uniformity suitable for detector applications. This technique (compared with SEM, EDX, ERDA, XPS) has the advantage of being global (i.e. non point-like) and non-destructive, thus it is suitable as a check method for mass production of the 3D-C elements.

  2. Results from the characterisation of Advanced GAmma Tracking Array prototype detectors and their consequences for the next-generation nuclear physics spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, M. R.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Nelson, L.; Nolan, P.; Rigby, S.; Unsworth, C.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.; Medina, P.; Parisel, C.; Santos, C.

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) is a European project that is aiming to construct a complete 4π High Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer for nuclear structure studies at future Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) Facilities. The proposed array will utilise digital electronics, Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) and Gamma-Ray Tracking (GRT) algorithms, to overcome the limited efficiencies encountered by current Escape Suppressed Spectrometers (ESS), whilst maintaining the high Peak-to-Total ratio. Two AGATA symmetrical segmented Canberra Eurisys (CE) prototype HPGe detectors have been tested at the University of Liverpool. A highly collimated Cs-137 (662keV) beam was raster scanned across each detector and data were collected in both singles and coincidence modes. The charge sensitive preamplifier output pulse shapes from all 37 channels (one for each of the 36 segments and one for the centre contact) were digitised and stored for offline analysis. The shapes of the real charge and image charge pulses have been studied to give detailed information on the position dependent response of each detector. 1mm position sensitivity has been achieved with the parameterisation of average pulse shapes, calculated from data collected with each of the detectors. The coincidence data has also been utilised to validate the electric field simulation code Multi Geometry Simulation (MGS). The precisely determined 3D interaction positions allow the comparison of experimental pulse shapes from single site interactions with those generated by the simulation. It is intended that the validated software will be used to calculate a basis data set of pulse shapes for the array, from which any interaction site can be determined through a χ2 minimisation of the digitized pulse with linear combinations of basis pulseshapes. The results from this partial validation, along with those from the investigation into the position sensitivity of each detector are presented.

  3. Ground-based imaging spectrometry of canopy phenology and chemistry in a deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, M. P.; Friedl, M. A.; Frolking, S. E.; Hilker, T.; O'Keefe, J.; Richardson, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    late-summer plant stress. Changes in the spectral shape and indices throughout the growing season revealed coupling of leaf biochemistry and phenology, as visually observed in situ. Further, the spectrally rich imagery provided well calibrated reflectance data to simulate vegetation index time series of common spaceborne remote sensing platforms such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Landsat. Comparisons between the simulated time series and in situ phenology observations yielded an enhanced interpretation of vegetation indices for determining phenological transition dates. This study demonstrates an advance in our ability to relate canopy phenology to leaf-level dynamics and demonstrates the role that ground-based imaging spectrometry can play in advancing spaceborne remote sensing of vegetation phenology.

  4. Pyroelectric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, Eugene E.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Hansen, William L.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The multi-agency, long-term Global Change programs, and specifically NASA's Earth Observing system, will require some new and advanced photon detector technology which must be specifically tailored for long-term stability, broad spectral range, cooling constraints, and other parameters. Whereas MCT and GaAs alloy based photovoltaic detectors and detector arrays reach most impressive results to wavelengths as long as 12 microns when cooled to below 70 K, other materials, such as ferroelectrics and pyroelectrics, appear to offer special opportunities beyond 12 microns and above 70 K. These materials have found very broad use in a wide variety of room temperature applications. Little is known about these classes of materials at sub-room temperatures and no photon detector results have been reported. From the limited information available, researchers conclude that the room temperature values of D asterisk greater than or equal to 10(exp 9) cm Hz(exp 1/2)/W may be improved by one to two orders of magnitude upon cooling to temperatures around 70 K. Improvements of up to one order of magnitude appear feasible for temperatures achievable by passive cooling. The flat detector response over a wavelength range reaching from the visible to beyond 50 microns, which is an intrinsic advantage of bolometric devices, makes for easy calibration. The fact that these materials have been developed for reduced temperature applications makes ferro- and pyroelectric materials most attractive candidates for serious exploration.

  5. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  6. Ground-based monitoring of solar radiation in Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Integrated measurements of solar radiation in Kishinev, Moldova have been started by Atmospheric Research Group (ARG) at the Institute of Applied Physics from 2003. Direct, diffuse and total components of solar and atmospheric long-wave radiation are measured by using of the radiometric complex at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station. Measurements are fulfilled at the stationary and moving platforms equipped with the set of 9 broadband solar radiation sensors overlapping wavelength range from UV-B to IR. Detailed description of the station can be found at the site http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E). Summary of observation data acquired at the station in the course of short-term period from 2004 to 2009 are presented below. Solar radiation measurements were fulfilled by using CM11(280-3000 nm) and CH1 sensors (Kipp&Zonen). In the course of a year maximum and minimum of monthly sums of total radiation was ~706.4 MJm-2 in June and ~82.1MJm-2 in December, respectively. Monthly sums of direct solar radiation (on horizontal plane) show the maximum and minimum values of the order ~456.9 MJm-2 in July and ~25.5MJm-2 in December, respectively. In an average, within a year should be marked the predominance of direct radiation over the scattered radiation, 51% and 49%, respectively. In the course of a year, the percentage contribution of the direct radiation into the total radiation is ~55-65% from May to September. In the remaining months, the percentage contribution decreases and takes the minimum value of ~ 28% in December. In an average, annual sum of total solar radiation is ~4679.9 MJm-2. For the period from April to September accounts for ~76% of the annual amount of total radiation. Annual sum of sunshine duration accounts for ~2149 hours, which is of ~ 48% from the possible sunshine duration. In an average, within a year maximum and minimum of sunshine duration is ~ 304 hours in

  7. Design of an advanced positron emission tomography detector system and algorithms for imaging small animal models of human disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foudray, Angela Marie Klohs

    Detecting, quantifying and visualizing biochemical mechanism in a living system without perturbing function is the goal of the instrument and algorithms designed in this thesis. Biochemical mechanisms of cells have long been known to be dependent on the signals they receive from their environment. Studying biological processes of cells in-vitro can vastly distort their function, since you are removing them from their natural chemical signaling environment. Mice have become the biological system of choice for various areas of biomedical research due to their genetic and physiological similarities with humans, the relatively low cost of their care, and their quick breeding cycle. Drug development and efficacy assessment along with disease detection, management, and mechanism research all have benefited from the use of small animal models of human disease. A high resolution, high sensitivity, three-dimensional (3D) positioning positron emission tomography (PET) detector system was designed through device characterization and Monte Carlo simulation. Position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) were characterized in various packaging configurations; coupled to various configurations of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystals. Forty novelly packaged final design devices were constructed and characterized, each providing characteristics superior to commercially available scintillation detectors used in small animal imaging systems: ˜1mm crystal identification, 14-15% of 511 keV energy resolution, and averaging 1.9 to 5.6 ns coincidence time resolution. A closed-cornered box-shaped detector configuration was found to provide optimal photon sensitivity (˜10.5% in the central plane) using dual LSO-PSAPD scintillation detector modules and Monte Carlo simulation. Standard figures of merit were used to determine optimal system acquisition parameters. A realistic model for constituent devices was developed for understanding the signals reported by the

  8. The Aries auroral modelling campaign - Characterization and modelling of an evening auroral arc observed from a rocket and a ground-based line of meridian scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A. V.; Gattinger, R. L.; Creutzberg, F.; Harris, F. R.; Mcnamara, A. G.; Yau, A. W.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Lummerzheim, D.; Rees, M. H.; Mcdade, I. C.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the Aries experiments and results is presented with specific attention given to the tomographic analysis developed from ground-based photometric data. The instrumentation includes particle detectors, rocket photometers, plasma probes, and 1-deg meridian scanning photometers, and an all-sky TV system. The geophysical conditions during the observations are described including the auroral features and wavelengths, rocket trajectories, and the effectiveness of particle measurements. The tomographic inversion is explained with examples of rocket-photometer height data and contrasted with ground-based photometric data. The modeling techniques used to derive height profiles are described and indirectly compared to measured auroral intensities and intensity ratios. An enhancement of atomic oxygen is inferred from discrepancies with previous studies which confirm the difference between observed intensity ratios and modeled results.

  9. Piloted simulation of a ground-based time-control concept for air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.

    1989-01-01

    A concept for aiding air traffic controllers in efficiently spacing traffic and meeting scheduled arrival times at a metering fix was developed and tested in a real time simulation. The automation aid, referred to as the ground based 4-D descent advisor (DA), is based on accurate models of aircraft performance and weather conditions. The DA generates suggested clearances, including both top-of-descent-point and speed-profile data, for one or more aircraft in order to achieve specific time or distance separation objectives. The DA algorithm is used by the air traffic controller to resolve conflicts and issue advisories to arrival aircraft. A joint simulation was conducted using a piloted simulator and an advanced concept air traffic control simulation to study the acceptability and accuracy of the DA automation aid from both the pilot's and the air traffic controller's perspectives. The results of the piloted simulation are examined. In the piloted simulation, airline crews executed controller issued descent advisories along standard curved path arrival routes, and were able to achieve an arrival time precision of + or - 20 sec at the metering fix. An analysis of errors generated in turns resulted in further enhancements of the algorithm to improve the predictive accuracy. Evaluations by pilots indicate general support for the concept and provide specific recommendations for improvement.

  10. Affordable Options for Ground-Based, Large-Aperture Optical Space Surveillance Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Beason, J. D.; Kiziah, R.; Spillar, E.; Vestrand, W. T.; Cox, D.; McGraw, J.; Zimmer, P.; Holland, C.

    2013-09-01

    The Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) - has demonstrated significant capability improvements over legacy ground-based optical space surveillance systems. To fulfill better the current and future space situational awareness (SSA) requirements, the Air Force would benefit from a global network of such telescopes, but the high cost to replicate the SST makes such an acquisition decision difficult, particularly in an era of fiscal austerity. Ideally, the Air Force needs the capabilities provided by the SST, but at a more affordable price. To address this issue, an informal study considered a total of 67 alternative optical designs, with each being evaluated for cost, complexity and SSA performance. One promising approach identified in the study uses a single mirror at prime focus with a small number of corrective lenses. This approach results in telescopes that are less complex and estimated to be less expensive than replicated SSTs. They should also be acquirable on shorter time scales. Another approach would use a modest network of smaller telescopes for space surveillance. This approach provides significant cost advantages but faces some challenges with very dim objects. In this paper, we examine the cost and SSA utility for each of the 67 designs considered.

  11. Ground-based Optical Observations of Geophysical Phenomena: Aurora Borealis and Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samara, Marilia

    2010-10-01

    Advances in low-light level imaging technology have enabled significant improvements in the ground based study of geophysical phenomena. In this talk we focus on two such phenomena that occur in the Earth's ionosphere: aurorae and meteors. Imaging the aurora which is created by the interplay of the Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere, provides a tool for remote sensing physical processes that are otherwise very difficult to study. By quantifying the intensities, scale sizes and lifetimes of auroral structures, we can gain significant insight into the physics behind the generation of the aurora and the interaction of the magnetosphere with the solar wind. Additionally, the combination of imaging with radars provides complimentary data and therefore more information than either method on its own. Meteor observations are a perfect example of this because the radar can accurately determine only the line-of-sight component of velocity, while imaging provides the direction of motion, the perpendicular velocity and brightness (a proxy for mass), therefore enabling a much more accurate determination of the full velocity vector and mass.

  12. Development of an improved ground-based prototype of space plant-growing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S.; Liu, X.; Ai, W.; Tang, Y.; Zhu, J.; Wang, X.; Wei, M.; Qin, L.; Yang, Y.

    Based on a formerly developed ground-based prototype of space plant-growing facility, the development of its improved prototype has been finished, so as to make its operating principle better adapt to the space microgravity environment. According to the developing experience of its first generation prototype and detailed demonstration and design of technique plan, its blueprint design and machining of related components, whole facility installment, debugging and trial operations were all done gradually. Its growing chamber contains a volume of about 0.5 m3 and a growing area of approximate 0.5 m2; the atmospheric environmental parameters in the growing chamber and water content in the growing media were controlled totally and effectively; lighting source is a combination of both red and blue light emitting diodes (LED). The following demonstrating results showed that the entire system design of the prototype is reasonable and its operating principle can nearly meet the requirements of space microgravity environment. Therefore, our plant-growing technique in space was advanced further, which laid an important foundation for next development of the space plant-growing facility and plant-cultivating experimental research in space microgravity condition.

  13. Development of an improved ground-based prototype of space vegetable-producing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Guo, S.; Zhu, J.; Wang, X.; Ai, W.; Wei, M.; Qin, L.; Deng, Y.

    Based on the development of a ground-based prototype of space vegetable-producing facility development of its improved prototype has been finished so as to make its operating principle adapt to the space microgravity environment better According to the developing experience of first-generation prototype of the space vegetable-producing facility and detailed demonstration and design of technique plan its blueprint design and machining of related components whole facility installment debugging and trial operations were done Its growing chamber contains a volume of about 0 5m 3 and a growing area of approximate 0 5m 2 the atmospheric environmental parameters in the growing chamber and water content in the growing media were totally and effectively controlled lighting sources are the combinations of both red and blue light emitting diode LED The following demonstrating results showed that the entire system design of the facility is reasonable and its operating principle can meet nearly the requirements of space microgravity environment Therefore our plant growing technique in space was advanced greatly which laid an important foundation for next development of the space vegetable-producing facility to be tested and applied in space station

  14. Estimation of water quality and plant primary production in Arctic wetlands using ground based spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, C.; Lougheed, V.; Tweedie, C.

    2010-12-01

    Wetlands represent a significant portion of the Arctic tundra landscape, which is experiencing warming at an unprecedented rate. Understanding of primary production in these ecosystems is essential for assessing carbon fluxes and climate change effects. Remote sensing techniques are known to be accurate and cost effective to monitor aquatic vegetation and water quality parameters; however, their utility in mapping these ecosystems is unknown. We used a handheld hyperspectral radiometer (Unispec, PP Systems) to measure reflectance across the visible and near-infrared spectrum (400-1100nm) of two predominant aquatic graminoid species (Carex aquatilis and Arctophila fulva) along an anthropogenic disturbance gradient in tundra ponds of Barrow, Alaska. Spectral measurements were validated with in situ biomass harvest and water quality monitoring (e.g DOC, nutrients, algal chlorophyll). Reflectance of the two plant species exhibited spectral differences in the near-infrared portion of the spectrum. These reflectance measurements were also associated with water quality and plant biomass. Future efforts will involve the extrapolation of these ground based observations to a regional level using airborne and satellite imagery. This study advances large scale quantification and monitoring of water quality and aquatic plant production in the Arctic tundra and aids understanding of anthropogenic and climate effects in this rapidly changing ecosystem.

  15. Remote sensing of Sonoran Desert vegetation structure and phenology with ground-based LiDAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Joel B.; Munson, Seth M.; Webb, Robert H.; Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Duran, Cesar M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term vegetation monitoring efforts have become increasingly important for understanding ecosystem response to global change. Many traditional methods for monitoring can be infrequent and limited in scope. Ground-based LiDAR is one remote sensing method that offers a clear advancement to monitor vegetation dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. We determined the effectiveness of LiDAR to detect intra-annual variability in vegetation structure at a long-term Sonoran Desert monitoring plot dominated by cacti, deciduous and evergreen shrubs. Monthly repeat LiDAR scans of perennial plant canopies over the course of one year had high precision. LiDAR measurements of canopy height and area were accurate with respect to total station survey measurements of individual plants. We found an increase in the number of LiDAR vegetation returns following the wet North American Monsoon season. This intra-annual variability in vegetation structure detected by LiDAR was attributable to a drought deciduous shrub Ambrosia deltoidea, whereas the evergreen shrub Larrea tridentata and cactus Opuntia engelmannii had low variability. Benefits of using LiDAR over traditional methods to census desert plants are more rapid, consistent, and cost-effective data acquisition in a high-resolution, 3-dimensional context. We conclude that repeat LiDAR measurements can be an effective method for documenting ecosystem response to desert climatology and drought over short time intervals and at detailed-local spatial scale.

  16. Hybrid onboard and ground based digital channelizer beam-forming for SATCOM interference mitigation and protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wenhao; Wang, Gang; Tian, Xin; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik; Chen, Genshe

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel beam-forming power allocation method for a satellite communication (SATCOM) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) system to mitigate the co-channel interference (CCI) as well as limiting the signal leakage to the adversary users. In SATCOM systems, the beam-forming technique is a conventional way of avoiding interference, controlling the antenna beams, and mitigating undesired signals. We propose to use an advanced beam-forming technique which considers the number of independent channels used and transmitting power deployed to reduce and mitigate the unintentional interference effect. With certain quality of service (QoS) for the SATCOM system, independent channels components will be selected. It is desired to use less and stronger channel components when possible. On the other hand, considering that SATCOM systems often face the problem that adversary receiver detects the signal, a proposed power allocation method can efficiently reduce the received power at the adversary receiver. To reduce the computational burden on the transponder in order to minimize the size, mass, power consumption and delay for the satellite, we apply a hybrid onboard and ground based beam-forming design to distribute the calculation between the transponder and ground terminals. Also the digital channelizer beam-forming (DCB) technique is employed to achieve dynamic spatial control.

  17. Research on Ground-Based LWIR Hyperspectral Imaging Remote Gas Detection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei-jian; Lei, Zheng-gang; Yu, Chun-chao; Yang, Zhi-xiong; Wang, Hai-yangi; Fu, Yan-peng; Li, Xun-niu; Liao, Ning-fang; Su, Jun-hong

    2016-02-01

    The new progress of ground-based long-wave infrared remote sensing is presented, which describes the windowing spatial and temporal modulation Fourier spectroscopy imaging in details. The prototype forms the interference fringes based on the corner-cube of spatial modulation of Michelson interferometer, using cooled long-wave infrared photovoltaic staring FPA (focal plane array) detector. The LWIR hyperspectral imaging is achieved by the process of collection, reorganization, correction, apodization, FFT etc. from data cube. Noise equivalent spectral radiance (NESR), which is the sensitivity index of CHIPED-1 LWIR hyperspectral imaging prototype, can reach 5.6 x 10⁻⁸ W · (cm⁻¹ · sr · cm²)⁻¹ at single sampling. The data is the same as commercial temporal modulation hyperspectral imaging spectrometer. It can prove the advantage of this technique. This technique still has space to be improved. For instance, spectral response range of CHIPED-1 LWIR hyperspectral imaging prototype can reach 11. 5 µm by testing the transmission curve of polypropylene film. In this article, choosing the results of outdoor high-rise and diethyl ether gas experiment as an example, the authors research on the detecting method of 2D distribution chemical gas VOC by infrared hyperspectral imaging. There is no observed diethyl ether gas from the infrared spectral slice of the same wave number in complicated background and low concentration. By doing the difference spectrum, the authors can see the space distribution of diethyl ether gas clearly. Hyperspectral imaging is used in the field of organic gas VOC infrared detection. Relative to wide band infrared imaging, it has some advantages. Such as, it has high sensitivity, the strong anti-interference ability, identify the variety, and so on.

  18. Research on Ground-Based LWIR Hyperspectral Imaging Remote Gas Detection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei-jian; Lei, Zheng-gang; Yu, Chun-chao; Yang, Zhi-xiong; Wang, Hai-yangi; Fu, Yan-peng; Li, Xun-niu; Liao, Ning-fang; Su, Jun-hong

    2016-02-01

    The new progress of ground-based long-wave infrared remote sensing is presented, which describes the windowing spatial and temporal modulation Fourier spectroscopy imaging in details. The prototype forms the interference fringes based on the corner-cube of spatial modulation of Michelson interferometer, using cooled long-wave infrared photovoltaic staring FPA (focal plane array) detector. The LWIR hyperspectral imaging is achieved by the process of collection, reorganization, correction, apodization, FFT etc. from data cube. Noise equivalent spectral radiance (NESR), which is the sensitivity index of CHIPED-1 LWIR hyperspectral imaging prototype, can reach 5.6 x 10⁻⁸ W · (cm⁻¹ · sr · cm²)⁻¹ at single sampling. The data is the same as commercial temporal modulation hyperspectral imaging spectrometer. It can prove the advantage of this technique. This technique still has space to be improved. For instance, spectral response range of CHIPED-1 LWIR hyperspectral imaging prototype can reach 11. 5 µm by testing the transmission curve of polypropylene film. In this article, choosing the results of outdoor high-rise and diethyl ether gas experiment as an example, the authors research on the detecting method of 2D distribution chemical gas VOC by infrared hyperspectral imaging. There is no observed diethyl ether gas from the infrared spectral slice of the same wave number in complicated background and low concentration. By doing the difference spectrum, the authors can see the space distribution of diethyl ether gas clearly. Hyperspectral imaging is used in the field of organic gas VOC infrared detection. Relative to wide band infrared imaging, it has some advantages. Such as, it has high sensitivity, the strong anti-interference ability, identify the variety, and so on. PMID:27209776

  19. Exoplanets -New Results from Space and Ground-based Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udry, Stephane

    The exploration of the outer solar system and in particular of the giant planets and their environments is an on-going process with the Cassini spacecraft currently around Saturn, the Juno mission to Jupiter preparing to depart and two large future space missions planned to launch in the 2020-2025 time frame for the Jupiter system and its satellites (Europa and Ganymede) on the one hand, and the Saturnian system and Titan on the other hand [1,2]. Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, is the only other object in our Solar system to possess an extensive nitrogen atmosphere, host to an active organic chemistry, based on the interaction of N2 with methane (CH4). Following the Voyager flyby in 1980, Titan has been intensely studied from the ground-based large telescopes (such as the Keck or the VLT) and by artificial satellites (such as the Infrared Space Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope) for the past three decades. Prior to Cassini-Huygens, Titan's atmospheric composition was thus known to us from the Voyager missions and also through the explorations by the ISO. Our perception of Titan had thus greatly been enhanced accordingly, but many questions remained as to the nature of the haze surrounding the satellite and the composition of the surface. The recent revelations by the Cassini-Huygens mission have managed to surprise us with many discoveries [3-8] and have yet to reveal more of the interesting aspects of the satellite. The Cassini-Huygens mission to the Saturnian system has been an extraordinary success for the planetary community since the Saturn-Orbit-Insertion (SOI) in July 2004 and again the very successful probe descent and landing of Huygens on January 14, 2005. One of its main targets was Titan. Titan was revealed to be a complex world more like the Earth than any other: it has a dense mostly nitrogen atmosphere and active climate and meteorological cycles where the working fluid, methane, behaves under Titan conditions the way that water does on

  20. Observation of TGFs onboard "Vernov" satellite and TGEs in ground-based experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, Vitaly; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Svertilov, Sergey; Garipov, Gali; Iyudin, Anatoly; Klimov, Pavel; Morozenko, Violetta; Maximov, Ivan; Mishieva, Tatiana; Klimov, Stanislav; Pozanenko, Alexey; Rothkaehl, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    "Vernov" satellite with RELEC experiment on-board was launched on 2014 July, 8 into a polar solar-synchronous orbit. The payload includes DRGE gamma-ray spectrometer providing measurements in 10-3000 keV energy range with four detectors directed to atmosphere. Total area of DRGE detectors is ~500 cm2. The data were recorded both in monitoring and gamma by gamma modes with timing accuracy ~15 us. Several TGF candidates with 10-40 gammas in a burst with duration <1ms were detected. Analysis of data from other instruments on-board "Vernov" satellite shows the absence of significant electromagnetic pulses around correspondent time moments. Comparison with WWLLN lightning network data base also indicates that there were no thunderstorms connected with most of detected TGF candidates. Possible connection of these flashes with electron precipitations is discussed. Ground-based experiments, with similar gamma-spectrometers were conducted, to study the spectral, temporal and spatial characteristics of TGEs in 20-3000 keV energy range, as well, as to search the fast hard X-ray and gamma-ray flashes possibly appearing at the moment of lightning. The time of each gamma-quantum interaction was recorded with an ~15 us s accuracy together with detailed spectral data. Measurements were done on the ground at Moscow region, and at mountain altitude in Armenia at Aragatz station. During the time interval covering spring, summer and autumn of 2015 a number of TGEs were detected. Measured low-energy gamma-ray spectra usually contain a set of lines that can be interpreted as radiation of Rn-222 daughter isotopes. The increase of Rn-222 radiation was detected during rainfalls with thunderstorm, as well, as during rainy weather without thunderstorms. Variations of Rn-222 radiation dominate at low energies (<2.6MeV) and must be taken into account in the experiments performed to measure low energy gamma-radiation from the electrons accelerated in thunderclouds. There were no significant

  1. LIGO-India: expanding the international network of gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Balasubramanian

    2015-04-01

    The first detection of Gravitational Waves (GW) by ground based detectors will open up a fundamentally new observational window to the Universe with implications for astrophysics and eventually cosmology and fundamental physics. The realization of GW astronomy requires a global network of Advanced GW detectors including upcoming observatories like KAGRA (Japan) and LIGO-India to provide good sky localization of the GW sources. LIGO-India is expected to play a key role in locating and deciphering the sources contributing to the GW symphony. The current status of LIGO-India project and the exciting future research opportunities of this ambitious Indo-US collaboration in science, technology and computation will be finally indicated. Acknowledge CISA and APS for the Award of a APS Beller Lectureship. BRI supported by the AIRBUS Group Corporate Foundation through a visiting professorship, which is part of the ``Mathematics of Complex Systems'' chair at ICTS.

  2. The Tunka detector complex: from cosmic-ray to gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnev, N.; Astapov, I.; Barbashina, N.; Bogdanov, A.; Bogorodskii, D.; Boreyko, V.; Büker, M.; Brückner, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Chvalaev, O.; Gress, O.; Gress, T.; Dyachok, A.; Epimakhov, S.; Gafatov, A.; Gorbunov, N.; Grebenyuk, V.; Grinuk, A.; Haungs, A.; Hiller, R.; Horns, D.; Huege, T.; Ivanova, A.; Kalinin, A.; Karpov, N.; Kalmykov, N.; Kazarina, Y.; Kindin, V.; Kirichkov, N.; Kiryuhin, S.; Kleifges, M.; Kokoulin, R.; Komponiest, K.; Konstantinov, A.; Konstantinov, E.; Korobchenko, A.; Korosteleva, E.; Kostunin, D.; Kozhin, V.; Krömer, O.; Kunnas, M.; Kuzmichev, L.; Lenok, V.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lubsandorzhiev, N.; Mirgazov, R.; Mirzoyan, R.; Monkhoev, R.; Nachtigall, R.; Pakhorukov, A.; Panasyuk, M.; Pankov, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Platonov, V.; Poleschuk, V.; Popova, E.; Porelli, A.; Prosin, V.; Ptuskin, V.; Rubtsov, G.; Rühle, C.; Samoliga, V.; Satunin, P.; Savinov, V.; Saunkin, A.; Schröder, F.; Semeney, Yu; Shaibonov (junior, B.; Silaev, A.; Silaev (junior, A.; Skurikhin, A.; Slucka, V.; Spiering, C.; Sveshnikova, L.; Tabolenko, V.; Tkachenko, A.; Tkachev, L.; Tluczykont, M.; Voronin, D.; Wischnewski, R.; Zagorodnikov, A.; Zurbanov, V.; Yashin, I.

    2015-08-01

    TAIGA stands for “Tunka Advanced Instrument for cosmic ray physics and Gamma Astronomy” and is a project to build a complex, hybrid detector system for ground-based gamma- ray astronomy from a few TeV to several PeV, and for cosmic-ray studies from 100 TeV to 1 EeV. TAIGA will search for ”PeVatrons” (ultra-high energy gamma-ray sources) and measure the composition and spectrum of cosmic rays in the knee region (100 TeV - 10 PeV) with good energy resolution and high statistics. TAIGA will include Tunka-HiSCORE (an array of wide-angle air Cherenkov stations), an array of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes, an array of particle detectors, both on the surface and underground, and the TUNKA-133 air Cherenkov array.

  3. Assessing ground-based counts of nestling bald eagles in northeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, M.R.; Hatfield, J.S.; Lindquist, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    We present evidence that the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) productivity survey in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness of northeastern Minnesota may have underestimated the number of nestlings during 1986-1988. Recommendations are provided to achieve more accurate ground-based counts. By conducting ground-based observations for up to 1 hour/nest, an accurate count of the number of bald eagle nestlings can be obtained. If nests are only observed for up to 30 minutes/nest, an accurate determination of nest success can be made. The effort that managers put into counts should be based on the intended use of the productivity data. If small changes in mean productivity would trigger management action, the less acurate ground-based counts should be conducted with caution. Prior to implementing ground-based counts, a study like ours should estimate bias associated with different survey procedures and the observation time needed to achieve accurate results.

  4. Precursor Analysis for Flight- and Ground-Based Anomaly Risk Significance Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the precursor analysis for flight and ground based anomaly risk significance. It includes information on accident precursor analysis, real models vs. models, and probabilistic analysis.

  5. Predictors of sprint start speed: the effects of resistive ground-based vs. inclined treadmill training.

    PubMed

    Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R; Brent, Jensen L; Divine, Jon G; Hewett, Timothy E

    2007-08-01

    There is currently no consensus with regard to the most effective method to train for improved acceleration, or with regard to which kinematic variable provides the greatest opportunity for improvement in this important performance characteristic. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of resistive ground-based speed training and incline treadmill speed training on speed-related kinematic measures and sprint start speed. The hypothesis tested was that incline treadmill training would improve sprint start time, while the ground-based resistive training would not. Corollary hypotheses were that treadmill training would increase stride frequency and ground-based training would not affect kinematics during the sprint start. Thirty-one high school female soccer players (15.7 +/- 0.5 years) were assigned to either treadmill (n = 17) or ground-based (n = 14) training groups and trained 2 times a week for 6 weeks. The treadmill group utilized incline speed training on a treadmill, while the ground-based group utilized partner band resistance ground-based techniques. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used (4.5 m mark) before and after training to quantify kinematics during the fastest of 3 recorded sprint starts (9.1 m). Both groups decreased average sprint start time from 1.75 +/- 0.12 to 1.68 +/- 0.08 seconds (p < 0.001). Training increased stride frequency (p = 0.030) but not stride length. After training, total vertical pelvic displacement and stride length predicted 62% of the variance in sprint start time for the resistive ground-based group, while stride length and stride frequency accounted for 67% prediction of the variance in sprint start time for the treadmill group. The results of this study indicate that both incline treadmill and resistive ground-based training are effective at improving sprint start speed, although they potentially do so through differing mechanisms.

  6. Precipitation and microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band radars and ground-based instrumentation during HOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Simmer, Clemens; Handwerker, Jan; Trömel, Silke

    2016-06-01

    This study presents a first analysis of precipitation and related microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band Doppler radars (BoXPol, JuXPol and KiXPol) in conjunction with a ground-based network of disdrometers, rain gauges and vertically pointing micro rain radars (MRRs) during the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) during April and May 2013 in Germany. While JuXPol and KiXPol were continuously observing the central HOPE area near Forschungszentrum Jülich at a close distance, BoXPol observed the area from a distance of about 48.5 km. MRRs were deployed in the central HOPE area and one MRR close to BoXPol in Bonn, Germany. Seven disdrometers and three rain gauges providing point precipitation observations were deployed at five locations within a 5 km × 5 km region, while three other disdrometers were collocated with the MRR in Bonn. The daily rainfall accumulation at each rain gauge/disdrometer location estimated from the three X-band polarimetric radar observations showed very good agreement. Accompanying microphysical processes during the evolution of precipitation systems were well captured by the polarimetric X-band radars and corroborated by independent observations from the other ground-based instruments.

  7. Lidar CO2 profiling in the atmosphere : from ground-based measurements and geophysical applications to spaceborne simulated performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, Fabien; Edouard, Dimitri; Cénac, Claire; Pellegrino, Jessica; Dumas, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of climate prediction, it is necessary to understand the evolution of carbon cycle and particularly surface-atmosphere exchanges of carbon dioxide (CO2). In the carbon budget, the CO2 land sink study is definitively the main interest of CO2 lidar measurements ultimately from space. There is a need of ground-based, airborne and spaceborne observations that enable to address the patterns and the quantification of CO2 sources and sinks at local to regional scales (100 m to 100 km) and CO2 lidar is a well suited instrument to do so. In addition, the current fossil fuel emissions of CO2, that are only known from statistical data reported by emitting countries themselves, no longer have a small uncertainty. Lidar CO2 profiling has a role to play to assess how good or not is the current baseline of emissions and how are efficient the measures that are currently taken by cities and regions to reduce emissions. In this paper, we will present the current status of lidar CO2 profiling in the atmosphere from a ground-based instrument and the potential applications in the carbon cycle studies and we will conclude by the feasibility of a space mission with the recent technological advances.

  8. Advanced computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Advanced concepts in hardware, software and algorithms are being pursued for application in next generation space computers and for ground based analysis of space data. The research program focuses on massively parallel computation and neural networks, as well as optical processing and optical networking which are discussed under photonics. Also included are theoretical programs in neural and nonlinear science, and device development for magnetic and ferroelectric memories.

  9. Flight performance of an advanced CZT imaging detector in a balloon-borne wide-field hard X-ray telescope—ProtoEXIST1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelemy, S.; Baker, R.; Garson, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Apple, J.; Cleveland, W. H.

    2011-10-01

    We successfully carried out the first high-altitude balloon flight of a wide-field hard X-ray coded-aperture telescope ProtoEXIST1, which was launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico on October 9, 2009. ProtoEXIST1 is the first implementation of an advanced CdZnTe (CZT) imaging detector in our ongoing program to establish the technology required for next generation wide-field hard X-ray telescopes such as the High Energy Telescope (HET) in the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST). The CZT detector plane in ProtoEXIST1 consists of an 8×8 array of closely tiled 2 cm×2 cm×0.5 cm thick pixellated CZT crystals, each with 8×8 pixels, mounted on a set of readout electronics boards and covering a 256 cm2 active area with 2.5 mm pixels. A tungsten mask, mounted at 90 cm above the detector provides shadowgrams of X-ray sources in the 30-600 keV band for imaging, allowing a fully coded field of view of 9°×9° (and 19°×19° for 50% coding fraction) with an angular resolution of 20‧. In order to reduce the background radiation, the detector is surrounded by semi-graded (Pb/Sn/Cu) passive shields on the four sides all the way to the mask. On the back side, a 26 cm×26 cm×2 cm CsI(Na) active shield provides signals to tag charged particle induced events as well as ≳100keV background photons from below. The flight duration was only about 7.5 h due to strong winds (60 knots) at float altitude (38-39 km). Throughout the flight, the CZT detector performed excellently. The telescope observed Cyg X-1, a bright black hole binary system, for ˜1h at the end of the flight. Despite a few problems with the pointing and aspect systems that caused the telescope to track about 6.4° off the target, the analysis of the Cyg X-1 data revealed an X-ray source at 7.2σ in the 30-100 keV energy band at the expected location from the optical images taken by the onboard daytime star camera. The success of this first flight is very

  10. Sensitive Ground-based Search for Sulfuretted Species on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayat, Alain; Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J.; Riesen, T. E.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    2012-10-01

    We searched for active release of gases on Mars during mid Northern Spring and early Northern Summer seasons, between Ls= 34° and Ls= 110°. The targeted volcanic areas, Tharsis and Syrtis Major, were observed during the interval 23 Nov. 2011 to 13 May 2012, using the high resolution infrared spectrometer (CSHELL) on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (NASA/IRTF) and the ultra-high resolution heterodyne receiver (Barney) at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). The two main reservoirs of atmospheric sulfur on Mars are expected to be SO2 and H2S. Because these two species have relatively short photochemical lifetimes, 160 and 9 days respectively (Wong et al. 2004), they stand as powerful indicators of recent activity. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is the expected end-product of the reactions between sulfuretted species and other molecules in the Martian atmosphere. Our multi-band survey targeted SO2, SO and H2S at their rotational transitions at 346.523 GHz, 304.078 GHz and 300.505 GHz respectively, and OCS in its combination band (ν1+ν3) at 3.42 µm and its fundamental band (ν3) centered at 4.85 µm. The radiative transfer model used to derive abundance ratios for these species was validated by performing line-inversion retrievals on the carbon monoxide (CO) strong rotational (3-2) line at sub-mm wavelengths (rest frequency 345.796 GHz). Preliminary results and abundance ratios for SO2, H2S, SO, OCS and CO will be presented. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program (AK, ATT, MJM), NASA Astrobiology Institute (MJM), NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program (GLV), and NSF grant number AST-0838261 to support graduate students at the CSO (AK). References: Wong, A.S., Atreya, S. K., Formisano, V., Encrenaz, T., Ignatiev, N.I., "Atmospheric photochemistry above possible martian hot spots", Advances in Space Research, 33 (2004) 2236-2239.

  11. Design, construction, and implementation of a ground-based solar spectrograph for the National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, E.; Moen, D.; Peck, C.; Zimny, C.; Repasky, K.

    2012-10-01

    A solar spectrograph is an instrument that takes incoming sunlight over a specified portion of the sun's emitted electromagnetic spectrum and separates the light into its constituent frequency components, or spectrum. The components are then sent to a detector that measures intensity, which reveals the location of spectral properties of the light such as absorption and emission lines. The National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition (NSSSC) is a Montana Space Grant Consortium sponsored competition where undergraduate student teams from across the country design, build, and implement a ground-based solar spectrograph to perform any solar related task and demonstrate their spectrographs for the competition in May 2012 in Bozeman, MT. Each team is given a 2,000-dollar budget to build their spectrograph, which cannot be exceeded, and all spectrographs must follow regulations in the NSSSC guidelines. This team designed a spectrograph to be capable of imaging the sun across the visible spectrum using spatial filters and a standard photo detector rather than a traditional charge-coupled device due to budget limitations. The spectrograph analyzes the spectrum of small sections of the sun to determine how the spectrum varies across solar features such as the corona, active regions, and quiet regions. In addition to solar imaging, the spectrograph will also analyze atmospheric absorption of the solar spectrum by comparing the measured spectrum to the theoretical spectrum calculated from the blackbody equation.

  12. Development and verification of ground-based tele-robotics operations concept for Dextre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Sarmad

    2013-05-01

    The Special Purpose Dextreous Manipulator (Dextre) is the latest addition to the on-orbit segment of the Mobile Servicing System (MSS); Canada's contribution to the International Space Station (ISS). Launched in March 2008, the advanced two-armed robot is designed to perform various ISS maintenance tasks on robotically compatible elements and on-orbit replaceable units using a wide variety of tools and interfaces. The addition of Dextre has increased the capabilities of the MSS, and has introduced significant complexity to ISS robotics operations. While the initial operations concept for Dextre was based on human-in-the-loop control by the on-orbit astronauts, the complexities of robotic maintenance and the associated costs of training and maintaining the operator skills required for Dextre operations demanded a reexamination of the old concepts. A new approach to ISS robotic maintenance was developed in order to utilize the capabilities of Dextre safely and efficiently, while at the same time reducing the costs of on-orbit operations. This paper will describe the development, validation, and on-orbit demonstration of the operations concept for ground-based tele-robotics control of Dextre. It will describe the evolution of the new concepts from the experience gained from the development and implementation of the ground control capability for the Space Station Remote Manipulator System; Canadarm 2. It will discuss the various technical challenges faced during the development effort, such as requirements for high positioning accuracy, force/moment sensing and accommodation, failure tolerance, complex tool operations, and the novel operational tools and techniques developed to overcome them. The paper will also describe the work performed to validate the new concepts on orbit and will discuss the results and lessons learned from the on-orbit checkout and commissioning of Dextre using the newly developed tele-robotics techniques and capabilities.

  13. Dust forecast over North Africa: verification with satellite and ground based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Aditi; Kumar, Sumit; George, John P.

    2016-05-01

    Arid regions of North Africa are considered as one of the major dust source. Present study focuses on the forecast of aerosol optical depth (AOD) of dust over different regions of North Africa. NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM) produces dust AOD forecasts at different wavelengths with lead time upto 240 hr, based on 00UTC initial conditions. Model forecast of dust AOD at 550 nm up to 72 hr forecast, based on different initial conditions are verified against satellite and ground based observations of total AOD during May-June 2014 with the assumption that except dust, presence of all other aerosols type are negligible. Location specific and geographical distribution of dust AOD forecast is verified against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station observations of total and coarse mode AOD. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) dark target and deep blue merged level 3 total aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) retrieved dust AOD at 532 nm are also used for verification. CALIOP dust AOD was obtained by vertical integration of aerosol extinction coefficient at 532 nm from the aerosol profile level 2 products. It is found that at all the selected AERONET stations, the trend in dust AODs is well predicted by NCUM up to three days advance. Good correlation, with consistently low bias (~ +/-0.06) and RMSE (~ 0.2) values, is found between model forecasts and point measurements of AERONET, except over one location Cinzana (Mali). Model forecast consistently overestimated the dust AOD compared to CALIOP dust AOD, with a bias of 0.25 and RMSE of 0.40.

  14. Parameter Estimation for Compact Binaries with Ground-Based Gravitational-Wave Observations Using the LALInference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veitch, J.; Raymond, V.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Graff, P.; Vitale, S.; Aylott, B.; Blackburn, K.; Christensen, N.; Coughlin, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational wave (GW) detectors will begin operation in the coming years, with compact binary coalescence events a likely source for the first detections. The gravitational waveforms emitted directly encode information about the sources, including the masses and spins of the compact objects. Recovering the physical parameters of the sources from the GW observations is a key analysis task. This work describes the LALInference software library for Bayesian parameter estimation of compact binary signals, which builds on several previous methods to provide a well-tested toolkit which has already been used for several studies. We show that our implementation is able to correctly recover the parameters of compact binary signals from simulated data from the advanced GW detectors. We demonstrate this with a detailed comparison on three compact binary systems: a binary neutron star (BNS), a neutron star - black hole binary (NSBH) and a binary black hole (BBH), where we show a cross-comparison of results obtained using three independent sampling algorithms. These systems were analysed with non-spinning, aligned spin and generic spin configurations respectively, showing that consistent results can be obtained even with the full 15-dimensional parameter space of the generic spin configurations. We also demonstrate statistically that the Bayesian credible intervals we recover correspond to frequentist confidence intervals under correct prior assumptions by analysing a set of 100 signals drawn from the prior. We discuss the computational cost of these algorithms, and describe the general and problem-specific sampling techniques we have used to improve the efficiency of sampling the compact binary coalescence (CBC) parameter space.

  15. Chirplet Clustering Algorithm for Black Hole Coalescence Signatures in Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemtzow, Zachary; Chassande-Mottin, Eric; Mohapatra, Satyanarayan R. P.; Cadonati, Laura

    2012-03-01

    Within this decade, gravitational waves will become new astrophysical messengers with which we can learn about our universe. Gravitational wave emission from the coalescence of massive bodies is projected to be a promising source for the next generation of gravitational wave detectors: advanced LIGO and advanced Virgo. We describe a method for the detection of binary black hole coalescences using a chirplet template bank, Chirplet Omega. By appropriately clustering the linearly variant frequency sin-Gaussian pixels the algorithm uses to decompose the data, the signal to noise ratio SNR of events extended in time can be significantly increased. We present such a clustering method and discuss its impacts on performance and detectability of binary black hole coalescences in ground based gravitational wave interferometers.

  16. Update of the ISTP Solar Maximum Mission: ISTP Project Scientist for Theory and Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steve

    1999-01-01

    Building upon the numerous successes of the pre-solar maximum International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) mission, the ISTP Solar Maximum Mission is expected to produce new insights into global flow of energy, momentum, and mass, from the Sun, through the heliosphere, into the magnetosphere and to their final deposition in the terrestrial upper atmosphere/ionosphere system. Of particular interest is the determination of the geo-effectiveness of solar events, principally Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). Given the expected increased frequency and strength of CMEs during the Solar Maximum period, a major advance in our understanding of nature of the coupling of CMEs to the magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere system is expected. The roles during this time of the various ISTP assets will be discussed. These assets will include the SOHO, Wind, Polar, and Geotail spacecraft, the ground-based observing networks and the theory tools.

  17. Suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicles as an Opportunity to Consolidate and Calibrate Ground Based and Satellite Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    2014-12-01

    XCOR Aerospace, a commercial space company, is planning to provide frequent, low cost access to near-Earth space on the Lynx suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle (sRLV). Measurements in the external vacuum environment can be made and can launch from most runways on a limited lead time. Lynx can operate as a platform to perform suborbital in situ measurements and remote sensing to supplement models and simulations with new data points. These measurements can serve as a quantitative link to existing instruments and be used as a basis to calibrate detectors on spacecraft. Easier access to suborbital data can improve the longevity and cohesiveness of spacecraft and ground-based resources. A study of how these measurements can be made on Lynx sRLV will be presented. At the boundary between terrestrial and space weather, measurements from instruments on Lynx can help develop algorithms to optimize the consolidation of ground and satellite based data as well as assimilate global models with new data points. For example, current tides and the equatorial electrojet, essential to understanding the Thermosphere-Ionosphere system, can be measured in situ frequently and on short notice. Furthermore, a negative-ion spectrometer and a Faraday cup, can take measurements of the D-region ion composition. A differential GPS receiver can infer the spatial gradient of ionospheric electron density. Instruments and optics on spacecraft degrade over time, leading to calibration drift. Lynx can be a cost effective platform for deploying a reference instrument to calibrate satellites with a frequent and fast turnaround and a successful return of the instrument. A calibrated reference instrument on Lynx can make collocated observations as another instrument and corrections are made for the latter, thus ensuring data consistency and mission longevity. Aboard a sRLV, atmospheric conditions that distort remotely sensed data (ground and spacecraft based) can be measured in situ. Moreover, an

  18. ACCESS: Detector Control and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Matthew J.; Kaiser, M.; McCandliss, S. R.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Wright, E. L.; Bohlin, R.; Kurucz, R. L.; Riess, A. G.; Pelton, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Mott, D. B.; Wen, Y.; Benford, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.; Woodgate, B. E.

    2014-01-01

    ACCESS, Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars, is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments that will enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 to 1.7 micron bandpass (companion poster, Kaiser et al.). The flight detector and detector spare have been selected and integrated with their electronics and flight mount. The controller electronics have been flight qualified. Vibration testing to launch loads and thermal vacuum testing of the detector, mount, and housing have been successfully performed. Further improvements to the flight controller housing have been made. A cryogenic ground test system has been built. Dark current and read noise tests have been performed, yielding results consistent with the initial characterization tests of the detector performed by Goddard Space Flight Center’s Detector Characterization Lab (DCL). Detector control software has been developed and implemented for ground testing. Performance and integration of the detector and controller with the flight software will be presented. NASA APRA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G supports this work.

  19. Zero-Gravity Locomotion Simulators: New Ground-Based Analogs for Microgravity Exercise Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perusek, Gail P.; DeWitt, John K.; Cavanagh, Peter R.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Gilkey, Kelly M.

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining health and fitness in crewmembers during space missions is essential for preserving performance for mission-critical tasks. NASA's Exercise Countermeasures Project (ECP) provides space exploration exercise hardware and monitoring requirements that lead to devices that are reliable, meet medical, vehicle, and habitat constraints, and use minimal vehicle and crew resources. ECP will also develop and validate efficient exercise prescriptions that minimize daily time needed for completion of exercise yet maximize performance for mission activities. In meeting these mission goals, NASA Glenn Research Center (Cleveland, OH, USA), in collaboration with the Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, Ohio, USA), has developed a suite of zero-gravity locomotion simulators and associated technologies to address the need for ground-based test analog capability for simulating in-flight (microgravity) and surface (partial-gravity) exercise to advance the health and safety of astronaut crews and the next generation of space explorers. Various research areas can be explored. These include improving crew comfort during exercise, and understanding joint kinematics and muscle activation pattern differences relative to external loading mechanisms. In addition, exercise protocol and hardware optimization can be investigated, along with characterizing system dynamic response and the physiological demand associated with advanced exercise device concepts and performance of critical mission tasks for Exploration class missions. Three zero-gravity locomotion simulators are currently in use and the research focus for each will be presented. All of the devices are based on a supine subject suspension system, which simulates a reduced gravity environment by completely or partially offloading the weight of the exercising test subject s body. A platform for mounting treadmill is positioned perpendicularly to the test subject. The Cleveland Clinic Zero-g Locomotion Simulator (ZLS) utilizes a

  20. New techniques for imaging photon-counting and particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, Jonathan Stephen

    Since the advent of space-based astronomy in the early 1960's, there has been a need for space-qualified detectors with sufficient sensitivity and resolution to detect and image single photons, ions or electrons. This thesis describes a research programme to develop detectors that fulfil these requirements. I begin by describing the role of detectors in space astronomy and follow with a review of detector technologies, with particular emphasis on imaging techniques. Conductive charge division image readouts offer high performance, simplicity, and flexibility and their potential is investigated in both theory and practice. I introduce the basic design concept and discuss the fundamental factors limiting performance in relation to physical design and to underlying physical processes. Readout manufacturing techniques are reviewed and a novel method presented. I describe specific space and ground-based readout applications which proved valuable in teaching lessons and raising questions. These questions initiated an experimental programme, whose goals were to understand limiting physical processes and find techniques to overcome them. Results are presented, and the innovation of the progressive geometry readout technique, which this programme also spawned, is described. Progressive geometry readout devices, such as the Vernier anode, offer dramatically improved performance and have been successfully flight-proven. I describe the development of a Vernier readout for the J-PEX sounding rocket experiment, and discuss the instrument calibration and the flight programme. First investigations into a next generation of charge division readout design are presented. These devices will use charge comparison instead of amplitude measurement to further enhance resolution and count rate capability. In conclusion, I summarize the advances made during the course of this research, and discuss ongoing technological developments and further work which will enable MCP detectors to

  1. Supporting a Diverse Community of Undergraduate Researchers in Satellite and Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R.; Liou-Mark, J.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. remains in grave danger of losing its global competitive edge in STEM. To find solutions to this problem, the Obama Administration proposed two new national initiatives: the Educate to Innovate Initiative and the $100 million government/private industry initiative to train 100,000 STEM teachers and graduate 1 million additional STEM students over the next decade. To assist in ameliorating the national STEM plight, the New York City College of Technology has designed its NSF Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program in satellite and ground-based remote sensing to target underrepresented minority students. Since the inception of the program in 2008, a total of 45 undergraduate students of which 38 (84%) are considered underrepresented minorities in STEM have finished or are continuing with their research or are pursuing their STEM endeavors. The program is comprised of the three primary components. The first component, Structured Learning Environments: Preparation and Mentorship, provides the REU Scholars with the skill sets necessary for proficiency in satellite and ground-based remote sensing research. The students are offered mini-courses in Geographic Information Systems, MATLAB, and Remote Sensing. They also participate in workshops on the Ethics of Research. Each REU student is a member of a team that consists of faculty mentors, post doctorate/graduate students, and high school students. The second component, Student Support and Safety Nets, provides undergraduates a learning environment that supports them in becoming successful researchers. Special networking and Brown Bag sessions, and an annual picnic with research scientists are organized so that REU Scholars are provided with opportunities to expand their professional community. Graduate school support is provided by offering free Graduate Record Examination preparation courses and workshops on the graduate school application process. Additionally, students are supported by college

  2. Extragalactic Science with the Next Generation of Ground Based TeV {gamma}-Ray Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczynski, Henric

    2008-12-24

    The ground based Cherenkov telescope experiments H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS, and the space borne Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope are currently exploring the galactic and extragalactic Universe in {gamma}-rays. At the time of writing this article, a large number of Active Galactic Nuclei have been studied in great detail and the {gamma}-ray observations have had a major impact on our understanding of the structure of jets from these objects. In this contribution, the status of ground based {gamma}-ray observations of AGN and other extragalactic source classes is reviewed as of October, 2008. After discussing source classes that could be detected with next generation ground based experiments like AGIS, CTA, and HAWC, the potential impact of the observations on the fields of high energy astrophysics, structure formation, observational cosmology, and fundamental physics is reviewed. We close with a discussion of the technical requirements that arise from the science drivers.

  3. BigBOSS: The Ground-Based Stage IV BAO Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, David; Bebek, Chris; Heetderks, Henry; Ho, Shirley; Lampton, Michael; Levi, Michael; Mostek, Nick; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Perlmutter, Saul; Roe, Natalie; Sholl, Michael; Smoot, George; White, Martin; Dey, Arjun; Abraham, Tony; Jannuzi, Buell; Joyce, Dick; Liang, Ming; Merrill, Mike; Olsen, Knut; Salim, Samir

    2009-04-01

    The BigBOSS experiment is a proposed DOE-NSF Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with an all-sky galaxy redshift survey. The project is designed to unlock the mystery of dark energy using existing ground-based facilities operated by NOAO. A new 4000-fiber R=5000 spectrograph covering a 3-degree diameter field will measure BAO and redshift space distortions in the distribution of galaxies and hydrogen gas spanning redshifts from 0.2< z< 3.5. The Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit (DETF FoM) for this experiment is expected to be equal to that of a JDEM mission for BAO with the lower risk and cost typical of a ground-based experiment.

  4. Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program in New Zealand in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, Dave; Smith, Ron; Taylor, Mike; Doyle, Jim; Eckermann, Steve; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Rapp, Markus; Williams, Biff; Bossert, Katrina; Pautet, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, Tasmania, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements beginning in late May and extending beyond the airborne component. DEEPWAVE employed two aircraft, the NSF/NCAR GV and the German DLR Falcon. The GV carried the standard flight-level instruments, dropsondes, and the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP). It also hosted new airborne lidar and imaging instruments built specifically to allow quantification of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes (e.g., orography, convection, jet streams, fronts, and secondary GW generation) throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-100 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) was also developed for the GV, and together with additional IR "wing" cameras, imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar able to measure radial winds below the Falcon where aerosol backscatter was sufficient. Additional ground-based instruments included a 449 MHz boundary layer radar, balloons at multiple sites, two ground-based Rayleigh lidars, a second ground-based AMTM, a Fabry Perot interferometer measuring winds and temperatures at ~87 and 95 km, and a meteor radar measuring winds from ~80-100 km. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights, 13 Falcon flights, and an extensive series of ground-based measurements whether or not the aircraft were flying. Together, these observed many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation

  5. Interpretation of ground-based microwave measurements of the moon using a detailed regolith properties model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L.; Keihm, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed model for the regolith's thermophysical and microwave properties has been used for the interpretation of ground-based measurements of the moon's microwave brightness temperature variation with lunar phase and changes during eclipses. The ground-based measurements include some crucial new lunation variation observations at 2.8, 6.0 and 13.1 cm. The many parameters in the regolith properties model were assigned values based on a careful review of Apollo in situ and lab sample measurements of thermophysical and electrical properties. The first identification of a wavelength-dependent component of scattering is reported.

  6. Consistent interpretation of ground based and GOME BrO slant column data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R. W.; Bovensmann, H.; Kaiser, J. W.; Richter, A.; Rozanov, A.; Wittrock, F.; Burrows, J. P.

    Model computations of slant column densities (SCD) enable the comparison between ground based and satellite based absorption measurements of scattered light and are therefore a good basis to investigate the presence of tropospheric BrO amounts. In this study ground based zenith sky and GOME nadir measurements of BrO SCD are compared with simulations for the 19-21 March 1997 at Ny-Ålesund. The vertical columns of tropospheric BrO amounts are estimated to be in the range 4 ±0.8 ∗ 10 13 [molecules/cm 2] for the investigated period and location.

  7. Behavior of stem cells under outer-space microgravity and ground-based microgravity simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui; Li, Liang; Chen, Jianling; Wang, Jinfu

    2015-06-01

    With rapid development of space engineering, research on life sciences in space is being conducted extensively, especially cellular and molecular studies on space medicine. Stem cells, undifferentiated cells that can differentiate into specialized cells, are considered a key resource for regenerative medicine. Research on stem cells under conditions of microgravity during a space flight or a ground-based simulation has generated several excellent findings. To help readers understand the effects of outer space and ground-based simulation conditions on stem cells, we reviewed recent studies on the effects of microgravity (as an obvious environmental factor in space) on morphology, proliferation, migration, and differentiation of stem cells.

  8. Ground-based determination of atmospheric radiance for correction of ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peacock, K.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for estimating the atmospheric radiance observed by a downward sensor (ERTS) using ground-based measurements. A formula is obtained for the sky radiance at the time of the ERTS overpass from the radiometric measurement of the sky radiance made at a particular solar zenith angle and air mass. A graph illustrates ground-based sky radiance measurements as a function of the scattering angle for a range of solar air masses. Typical values for sky radiance at a solar zenith angle of 48 degrees are given.

  9. Exploring the Birth and Evolution of the Universe: How Detectors Have Revolutionized Space Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, Samuel H.

    2012-01-01

    The past century has seen tremendous advances in the capability of instruments used for astronomical imaging and spectroscopy. Capabilities of instruments have expanded in many dimensions; the scale of telescopes has grown tremendously, the wavelengths used for astronomy have grown from visible light to the full electromagnetic spectrum, extending from gamma rays to low frequency radio waves. Additional advances have been enabled by the availability of space facilities, which eliminate the effects of the earths atmosphere and magnetosphere, and allow cooling of instruments to avoid instrumental thermal radiation. Even with all these advances, the increase in capability of detection systems has produced truly revolutionary improvements in capability. Today, I will describe the advances in astronomical detection from the photographic plates of the early 20th century to the giant high efficiency focal planes being developed for modern space and ground based astronomical instrument. I will review the demanding performance requirements set by space astronomy, and show how the detector community has risen to the challenge in producing high performance detectors for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the James Webb Space Telescope, now under development.

  10. A synthesis of star calibration techniques for ground-based narrowband electron-multiplying charge-coupled device imagers used in auroral photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubbs, Guy; Michell, Robert; Samara, Marilia; Hampton, Don; Jahn, Jorg-Micha

    2016-06-01

    A technique is presented for the periodic and systematic calibration of ground-based optical imagers. It is important to have a common system of units (Rayleighs or photon flux) for cross comparison as well as self-comparison over time. With the advancement in technology, the sensitivity of these imagers has improved so that stars can be used for more precise calibration. Background subtraction, flat fielding, star mapping, and other common techniques are combined in deriving a calibration technique appropriate for a variety of ground-based imager installations. Spectral (4278, 5577, and 8446 Å) ground-based imager data with multiple fields of view (19, 47, and 180°) are processed and calibrated using the techniques developed. The calibration techniques applied result in intensity measurements in agreement between different imagers using identical spectral filtering, and the intensity at each wavelength observed is within the expected range of auroral measurements. The application of these star calibration techniques, which convert raw imager counts into units of photon flux, makes it possible to do quantitative photometry. The computed photon fluxes, in units of Rayleighs, can be used for the absolute photometry between instruments or as input parameters for auroral electron transport models.

  11. Colour polymeric paints research under atomic oxygen in flight and ground-based experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernik, V. N.; Naumov, S. F.; Sokolova, S. P.; Gerasimova, T. I.; Kurilyonok, A. O.; Poruchikova, Ju. V.; Novikova, V. A.

    2003-09-01

    Three types of colour coatings were tested to atomic oxygen resistance on ground-based and in-flight experiments. The epoxy enamels colouring change and significant mass losses are observed. The effect of atomic oxygen on silicone enamels almost does not change their colouring and mass. Protection of the epoxy enamels by a layer of silicone varnish increases paints resistance.

  12. Evaluation of rotating-cylinder and piston-cylinder reactors for ground-based emulsion polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. S.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to apply ground-based emulsion polymerization reactor technology to improve the production of: monodisperse latex particles for calibration standards, chromatographic separation column packing, and medical research; and commercial latexes such as those used for coatings, foams, and adhesives.

  13. Plant diversity to support humans in a CELSS ground-based demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, J. M.; Hoff, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Factors that influence the human nutritional requirements envisioned in a controlled ecological life support system ground-based demonstrator and on bioavailability experiments of Ca, Fe and Zn are discussed. The interrelationhip of protein and magnesium on Ca retention is also described.

  14. Ground-Based Remote Sensing of Water-Stressed Crops: Thermal and Multispectral Imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-based methods of remote sensing can be used as ground-truthing for satellite-based remote sensing, and in some cases may be a more affordable means of obtaining such data. Plant canopy temperature has been used to indicate and quantify plant water stress. A field research study was conducted ...

  15. Ground-based thermal and multispectral imaging of limited irrigation crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-based methods of remote sensing can be used as ground-truth for satellite-based remote sensing, and in some cases may be a more affordable means of obtaining such data. Plant canopy temperature has been used to indicate and quantify plant water stress. A field research study was conducted in ...

  16. Ground-Based Navigation and Dispersion Analysis for the Orion Exploration Mission 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D' Souza, Christopher; Holt, Greg; Zanetti, Renato; Wood, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the Orion Exploration Mission 1 Linear Covariance Analysis for the DRO mission using ground-based navigation. The Delta V statistics for each maneuver are presented. In particular, the statistics of the lunar encounters and the Entry Interface are presented.

  17. Analysis of global cloudiness. 2: Comparison of ground-based and satellite-based cloud climatologies

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, I.I.; Schlesinger, M.E. |

    1994-08-01

    Cloud climatologies are developed and intercompared for International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCO) (1983-1988), Meteor I (1971-1980), Meteor II (1979-1988), and Nimbus 7 (1979-1985) satellite observations, and for Berlyand and Strokina (1975, 1980) and Warren et al. (1986, 1988) ground-based observations. The satellite annual-mean, global- mean cloudiness, 0.57 +/- 0.05, is less than the ground-based value, 0.61 +/- 0.01, predominantly because of the low value for Nimbus 7. There is agreement between the satellite means of ISCCP, 0.62, and Meteor II, 0.61, and the ground-based means of Warren et al., 0.62, and Berlyand and Strokina, 0.60. Each satellite- and ground-based climatology shows that the hemispheric- mean cloudiness is larger in summer than that in winter in both the northern and southern hemispheres. Excluding Nimbus 7 observations, the zonal- mean cloudiness distributions for January, July, and July minus January display reasonably good agreement between 60 deg S and 60 deg N. In polar latitudes there is significant disagreement among the different climatologies, even in the sign of cloudiness changes from winter to summer. This evinces the need for special cloudiness experiments in polar regions, particularly in winter and summer.

  18. Simulation of the imaging quality of ground-based telescopes affected by atmospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yubin; Kou, Songfeng; Gu, Bozhong

    2014-08-01

    Ground-based telescope imaging model is developed in this paper, the relationship between the atmospheric disturbances and the ground-based telescope image quality is studied. Simulation of the wave-front distortions caused by atmospheric turbulences has long been an important method in the study of the propagation of light through the atmosphere. The phase of the starlight wave-front is changed over time, but in an appropriate short exposure time, the atmospheric disturbances can be considered as "frozen". In accordance with Kolmogorov turbulence theory, simulating atmospheric disturbances of image model based on the phase screen distorted by atmospheric turbulences is achieved by the fast Fourier transform (FFT). Geiger mode avalanche photodiode array (APD arrays) model is used for atmospheric wave-front detection, the image is achieved by inversion method of photon counting after the target starlight goes through phase screens and ground-based telescopes. Ground-based telescope imaging model is established in this paper can accurately achieve the relationship between the quality of telescope imaging and monolayer or multilayer atmosphere disturbances, and it is great significance for the wave-front detection and optical correction in a Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics system (MCAO).

  19. Coherent Backscattering Effect in Icy Satellites: Model, Cassini VIMS, and Ground-Based Near-Infrared Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, Karly M.; Kolokolova, L.; Verbiscer, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Compositional mapping of icy satellite surfaces is usually based on correlating spectral absorption band depths with the abundance of ice/non-ice species and/or particle size alone. However, absorption band depths and shapes also depend on observation geometry, specifically the solar phase angle α. The constructive interference of light that is responsible for the coherent backscattering effect (CBE) should significantly alter the interpretation of spacecraft spectra obtained at α < 2 degrees in particular (Helfenstein et al. 1997 Icarus 128, 2-14), but the magnitude of the CBE on band depth has not yet been quantified or studied in detail. In this work, we explore the relationship between α, spectral band depth and shape caused by CBE for both Cassini Visual & Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and ground-based near-infrared observations of bright and dark satellites. We report numerical CBE modeling performed using the publicly available multisphere T-matrix (MSTM) computer code to simulate the change in absorption bands with the solar phase angle seen in the spectra of icy bodies. We compare these models to Cassini VIMS extracted I/F spectra for selected icy satellites (e.g., Rhea, Iapetus, Enceladus) as well as ground-based λ = 0.9 - 2.4 μm spectra of Tethys, Dione, Iapetus, Rhea, and Enceladus acquired using Triplespec (R=3000) at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico. Such results ultimately place limits on the size and packing fraction of icy satellite regolith particles and aid in interpretations of the structure, composition, and evolution of icy satellites. This work is supported by NASA’s Outer Planets Research program (NNX12AM76G; PI Pitman), Planetary Astronomy program (NNX09AD06G; PI Verbiscer), and NASA’s Advanced Supercomputing Division. Calibrated Cassini VIMS data cubes appear courtesy of B. J. Buratti and the Cassini VIMS team.

  20. Investigation of the Influence of Microgravity on Transport Mechanisms in a Virtual Spaceflight Chamber: A Ground Based Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.; Rangel, Roger; Witherow, William; Rogers, Jan; Lal, Ravindra B.

    1999-01-01

    In January 1992, the IML-1 FES experiment produced a set of classic experimental data and a 40 hour holographic "movie" of an ensemble of spheres in a fluid in microgravity. Because the data are in the form of holograms, we can study the three-dimensional distribution of particles with unprecedented detail by a variety of methods and for a wide variety of interests. The possession of the holographic movie is tantamount to having a complex experiment in space while working in an easily accessible laboratory on earth. The movie contains a vast amount of useful data, including residual g, g-jitter, convection and transport data, and particle fluid interaction data. The information content in the movie is so great that we have scarcely begun to tap into the data that is actually available in the more than 1000 holograms, each containing as much as 1000 megabytes of information. This ground-based project is exploiting this data and the concept of holographic storage of spaceflight data to provide an understanding of the effects of microgravity in materials processing. This paper provides the foundation, objectives, and status of the ground based project. The primary objective of this project is to advance the understanding of microgravity effects on crystal growth, convection in materials processing in the space environment, and complex transport phenomena at low Reynolds numbers. This objective is being achieved both experimentally and theoretically. Experiments are making use of existing holographic data recorded during the IML- I spaceflight. A parallel theoretical effort is providing the models for understanding the particle fields and their physics in the microgravity environment.

  1. A Fast Method for Embattling Optimization of Ground-Based Radar Surveillance Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.; Cheng, H.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, J.

    A growing number of space activities have created an orbital debris environment that poses increasing impact risks to existing space systems and human space flight. For the safety of in-orbit spacecraft, a lot of observation facilities are needed to catalog space objects, especially in low earth orbit. Surveillance of Low earth orbit objects are mainly rely on ground-based radar, due to the ability limitation of exist radar facilities, a large number of ground-based radar need to build in the next few years in order to meet the current space surveillance demands. How to optimize the embattling of ground-based radar surveillance network is a problem to need to be solved. The traditional method for embattling optimization of ground-based radar surveillance network is mainly through to the detection simulation of all possible stations with cataloged data, and makes a comprehensive comparative analysis of various simulation results with the combinational method, and then selects an optimal result as station layout scheme. This method is time consuming for single simulation and high computational complexity for the combinational analysis, when the number of stations increases, the complexity of optimization problem will be increased exponentially, and cannot be solved with traditional method. There is no better way to solve this problem till now. In this paper, target detection procedure was simplified. Firstly, the space coverage of ground-based radar was simplified, a space coverage projection model of radar facilities in different orbit altitudes was built; then a simplified objects cross the radar coverage model was established according to the characteristics of space objects orbit motion; after two steps simplification, the computational complexity of the target detection was greatly simplified, and simulation results shown the correctness of the simplified results. In addition, the detection areas of ground-based radar network can be easily computed with the

  2. Ground-Based Lidar Measurements During the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkoff, Timothy; Qian, Li; Kleidman, Richard; Stewart, Sebastian; Welton, Ellsworth; Li, Zhu; Holbem, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) field campaign was carried out between June 26th and August 29th of 2007 in the multi-state Maryland-Virginia-Pennsylvania region of the U.S. to study aerosol properties and cloud-aerosol interactions during overpasses of the CALIPSO satellite. Field work was conducted on selected days when CALIPSO ground tracks occurred in the region. Ground-based measurements included data from multiple Cimel sunphotometers that were placed at intervals along a segment of the CALIPSO ground-track. These measurements provided sky radiance and AOD measurements to enable joints inversions and comparisons with CALIPSO retrievals. As part of this activity, four ground-based lidars provided backscatter measurements (at 523 nm) in the region. Lidars at University of Maryland Baltimore County (Catonsville, MD) and Goddard Space Flight Center (Greenbelt, MD) provided continuous data during the campaign, while two micro-pulse lidar (MPL) systems were temporarily stationed at various field locations directly on CALIPSO ground-tracks. As a result, thirteen on-track ground-based lidar observations were obtained from eight different locations in the region. In some cases, nighttime CALIPSO coincident measurements were also obtained. In most studies reported to date, ground-based lidar validation efforts for CALIPSO rely on systems that are at fixed locations some distance away from the satellite ground-track. The CATZ ground-based lidar data provide an opportunity to examine vertical structure properties of aerosols and clouds both on and off-track simultaneously during a CALIPSO overpass. A table of available ground-based lidar measurements during this campaign will be presented, along with example backscatter imagery for a number of coincident cases with CALIPSO. Results indicate that even for a ground-based measurements directly on-track, comparisons can still pose a challenge due to the differing spatio-temporal properties of the ground and satellite

  3. Ground-Based Measurement Experiment and First Results with Geosynchronous-Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer Engineering Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Bingham, Gail E.; Huppi, Ronald J.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Zollinger, Lori J.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Tansock, Joseph J.; Reisse, Robert A.; Hooker, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    The geosynchronous-imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (GIFTS) engineering demonstration unit (EDU) is an imaging infrared spectrometer designed for atmospheric soundings. It measures the infrared spectrum in two spectral bands (14.6 to 8.8 microns, 6.0 to 4.4 microns) using two 128 x 128 detector arrays with a spectral resolution of 0.57 cm(exp -1) with a scan duration of approximately 11 seconds. From a geosynchronous orbit, the instrument will have the capability of taking successive measurements of such data to scan desired regions of the globe, from which atmospheric status, cloud parameters, wind field profiles, and other derived products can be retrieved. The GIFTS EDU provides a flexible and accurate testbed for the new challenges of the emerging hyperspectral era. The EDU ground-based measurement experiment, held in Logan, Utah during September 2006, demonstrated its extensive capabilities and potential for geosynchronous and other applications (e.g., Earth observing environmental measurements). This paper addresses the experiment objectives and overall performance of the sensor system with a focus on the GIFTS EDU imaging capability and proof of the GIFTS measurement concept.

  4. Validation of CALIPSO level-2 products using a ground based lidar in Thessaloniki, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakaki, Elina; Vraimaki, Eleni; Balis, Dimitris

    2011-11-01

    We present initial aerosol validation results of the space-borne lidar CALIOP -onboard the CALIPSO satellite - Level 2 extinction coefficient profiles, using coincident observations performed with a ground-based lidar in Thessaloniki, Greece (40.5° N, 22.9° E, 50m above sea level). A ground-based backscatter/Raman lidar system is operating since 2000 at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics (LAP) in the framework of the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork (EARLINET), the first lidar network for tropospheric aerosol studies on a continental scale. Since July 2006, a total of 150 coincidental aerosol ground-based lidar measurements were performed over Thessaloniki during CALIPSO overpasses. The ground-based measurements were performed each time CALIPSO overpasses the station location within a maximum distance of 100 km. The duration of the ground-based lidar measurements was approximately two hours, centred on the satellite overpass time. The analysis was performed for 4 different horizontal resolutions of 5, 25, 45 and 105 km. For our analysis we have used Atmospheric Volume Description (AVD) array to screen out everything that is not an aerosol. Also, the cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD) score, which provides a numerical confidence level for the classification of layers by the CALIOP cloud-aerosol discrimination algorithm was set between -80 and -100. CALIPSO extinction QC flags, which summarize the final state of the extinction retrieval, was also used. In our analysis we have used those measurements where the lidar ratio is unchanged (extinction QC = 0) during the extinction retrieval or it the retrieval is constrained (extinction QC = 1). The comparison was performed both for extinction and backscater coefficient profiles. For clear sky conditions, the comparison shows good performances of the CALIPSO on-board lidar.

  5. Ground-based and spacecraft-based data sets: examples of synergy from recent missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, Bonnie; Hicks, Michael; Bauer, James

    2015-08-01

    Missions to small bodies have returned a wealth of observations at high spatial resolution and new wavelengths. Nevertheless, spacecraft data is often deficient in many ways, lacking in temporal coverage, specific viewing geometries, context, spectral range, and calibrations. Several recent examples illustrate how modest ground-based “support” measurements for missions to small bodies have substantially enhanced the results from these missions. Triton, Neptune’s giant moon, was observed by Voyager 2 in 1989: high resolution images showed a sublimating polar cap and explosive plumes of volatiles. This instant in time was placed into context by subsequent ground-based and HST observations of the moon that showed continued volatile transport. Similarly, decades of ground-based observations leading up to the New Horizons fast flyby of Pluto monitored long-term changes in frosts on the dwarf planet’s surface. Another example of synergistic measurements for small-body missions is that of complementary solar phase angle coverage. Space-based missions seldom have small phase angle measurements; similarly, ground-based measurements are often lacking at large solar phase angles (except of course for NEOs). This complementary phase angle coverage enables accurate photometric modeling, including determination of the bolometric Bond albedo, which is a key parameter for thermal modeling. Another key use of ground-based observations is to check and refine spacecraft calibrations, at least at wavelengths that are visible from Earth. In some cases, complete calibration sets are provided by Earth-based observing programs, such as that of ROLO (RObotic Lunar Observatory) for the Moon. Finally, context and the “big picture” in both time and space are provided by telescopic views of spacecraft targets before, during, and after mission durations or critical events.The astronomical community should continue to support, and participate in, teams that make synergistic

  6. Comparison of MODIS and VIIRS cloud properties with ARM ground-based observations over Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporre, Moa K.; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Håkansson, Nina; Thoss, Anke; Swietlicki, Erik; Petäjä, Tuukka

    2016-07-01

    Cloud retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard the satellites Terra and Aqua and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard the Suomi-NPP satellite are evaluated using a combination of ground-based instruments providing vertical profiles of clouds. The ground-based measurements are obtained from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) programme mobile facility, which was deployed in Hyytiälä, Finland, between February and September 2014 for the Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) campaign. The satellite cloud parameters cloud top height (CTH) and liquid water path (LWP) are compared with ground-based CTH obtained from a cloud mask created using lidar and radar data and LWP acquired from a multi-channel microwave radiometer. Clouds from all altitudes in the atmosphere are investigated. The clouds are diagnosed as single or multiple layer using the ground-based cloud mask. For single-layer clouds, satellites overestimated CTH by 326 m (14 %) on average. When including multilayer clouds, satellites underestimated CTH by on average 169 m (5.8 %). MODIS collection 6 overestimated LWP by on average 13 g m-2 (11 %). Interestingly, LWP for MODIS collection 5.1 is slightly overestimated by Aqua (4.56 %) but is underestimated by Terra (14.3 %). This underestimation may be attributed to a known issue with a drift in the reflectance bands of the MODIS instrument on Terra. This evaluation indicates that the satellite cloud parameters selected show reasonable agreement with their ground-based counterparts over Finland, with minimal influence from the large solar zenith angle experienced by the satellites in this high-latitude location.

  7. Connecting ground-based in-situ observations, ground-based remote sensing and satellite data within the Pan Eurasian Experiment (PEEX) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petäjä, Tuukka; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Lappalainen, Hanna K.; Moisseev, Dmitri; O'Connor, Ewan; Bondur, Valery; Kasimov, Nikolai; Kotlyakov, Vladimir; Guo, Huadong; Zhang, Jiahua; Matvienko, Gennadii; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Baklanov, Alexander; Zilitinkevich, Sergej; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-10-01

    Human activities put an increasing stress on the Earth' environment and push the safe and sustainable boundaries of the vulnerable eco-system. It is of utmost importance to gauge with a comprehensive research program the current status of the environment, particularly in the most vulnerable locations. The Pan-Eurasian Experiment (PEEX) is a new multidisciplinary research program aiming at resolving the major uncertainties in the Earth system science and global sustainability questions in the Arctic and boreal Pan-Eurasian regions. The PEEX program aims to (i) understand the Earth system and the influence of environmental and societal changes in both pristine and industrialized Pan-Eurasian environments, (ii) establish and sustain long-term, continuous and comprehensive ground-based airborne and seaborne research infrastructures, and utilize satellite data and multi-scale model frameworks filling the gaps of the insitu observational network, (iii) contribute to regional climate scenarios in the northern Pan-Eurasia and determine the relevant factors and interactions influencing human and societal wellbeing (iv) promote the dissemination of PEEX scientific results and strategies in scientific and stake-holder communities and policy making, (v) educate the next generation of multidisciplinary global change experts and scientists, and (vi) increase the public awareness of climate change impacts in the Pan- Eurasian region. In this contribution, we underline general features of the satellite observations relevant to the PEEX research program and how satellite observations connect to the ground-based observations.

  8. a Compact Dial LIDAR for Ground-Based Ozone Atmospheric Profiling Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Young, R.; Carrion, W.; Pliutau, D.; Ganoe, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    A compact differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric ozone campaigns. This lidar will be integrated into the Air Quality lidar Network (AQLNet) currently made up of four other ozone lidars across the country. The lidar system consists of a UV and green laser transmitter, a telescope and an optical signal receiver box with associated Licel photon counting and analog channels. The laser transmitter consist of a Coherent Evolution 30 TEM00 1-kHz diode pumped Q-switched Nd:YLF inter-cavity doubled laser pumping a Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser with all the associated power and lidar control support units on a single system rack. A custom-designed Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser has a wavelength range of 282 to 300-nm that is selectable between two or more wavelengths. The current wavelengths are online 286.4 nm and offline 293.1 nm. The 527-nm visible beam is transmitted into the atmosphere for aerosol measurements. The fourth harmonic 262 nm beam is split by a beamsplitter into two pump beams that pump each face of the Ce:LiCAF crystal. A short laser cavity consisting of a 60% reflective (1m radius of curvature) output mirror, a dispersive prism and a flat HR mirror is used to produce the UV wavelengths. In order to produce different wavelengths, the high-reflectivity rear mirror is mounted on a servo controlled galvanometer motor to allow rapid tuning between the on and offline ozone wavelengths. Typical laser results are 6.8-W at 527-nm, 800-mW at 262-nm and 130-mW at the UV transmitted wavelengths. The lidar receiver system consists of a receiver telescope with a 40-cm diameter parabolic mirror. A fiber optic cable transmits the received signal from the telescope to the receiver box, which houses the detectors. A separate one inch diameter telescope with PMT and filter is used to sample the very near field to allow

  9. History of infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalski, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper overviews the history of infrared detector materials starting with Herschel's experiment with thermometer on February 11th, 1800. Infrared detectors are in general used to detect, image, and measure patterns of the thermal heat radiation which all objects emit. At the beginning, their development was connected with thermal detectors, such as thermocouples and bolometers, which are still used today and which are generally sensitive to all infrared wavelengths and operate at room temperature. The second kind of detectors, called the photon detectors, was mainly developed during the 20th Century to improve sensitivity and response time. These detectors have been extensively developed since the 1940's. Lead sulphide (PbS) was the first practical IR detector with sensitivity to infrared wavelengths up to ˜3 μm. After World War II infrared detector technology development was and continues to be primarily driven by military applications. Discovery of variable band gap HgCdTe ternary alloy by Lawson and co-workers in 1959 opened a new area in IR detector technology and has provided an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Many of these advances were transferred to IR astronomy from Departments of Defence research. Later on civilian applications of infrared technology are frequently called "dual-use technology applications." One should point out the growing utilisation of IR technologies in the civilian sphere based on the use of new materials and technologies, as well as the noticeable price decrease in these high cost technologies. In the last four decades different types of detectors are combined with electronic readouts to make detector focal plane arrays (FPAs). Development in FPA technology has revolutionized infrared imaging. Progress in integrated circuit design and fabrication techniques has resulted in continued rapid growth in the size and performance of these solid state arrays.

  10. Improved Space Object Observation Techniques Using CMOS Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Hinze, A.; Schlatter, P.; Silha, J.; Peltonen, J.; Santti, T.; Flohrer, T.

    2013-08-01

    CMOS-sensors, or in general Active Pixel Sensors (APS), are rapidly replacing CCDs in the consumer camera market. Due to significant technological advances during the past years these devices start to compete with CCDs also for demanding scientific imaging applications, in particular in the astronomy community. CMOS detectors offer a series of inherent advantages compared to CCDs, due to the structure of their basic pixel cells, which each contain their own amplifier and readout electronics. The most prominent advantages for space object observations are the extremely fast and flexible readout capabilities, feasibility for electronic shuttering and precise epoch registration, and the potential to perform image processing operations on-chip and in real-time. Presently applied and proposed optical observation strategies for space debris surveys and space surveillance applications had to be analyzed. The major design drivers were identified and potential benefits from using available and future CMOS sensors were assessed. The major challenges and design drivers for ground-based and space-based optical observation strategies have been analyzed. CMOS detector characteristics were critically evaluated and compared with the established CCD technology, especially with respect to the above mentioned observations. Similarly, the desirable on-chip processing functionalities which would further enhance the object detection and image segmentation were identified. Finally, the characteristics of a particular CMOS sensor available at the Zimmerwald observatory were analyzed by performing laboratory test measurements.

  11. Ground-based astrometry with wide field imagers. V. Application to near-infrared detectors: HAWK-I@VLT/ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libralato, M.; Bellini, A.; Bedin, L. R.; Piotto, G.; Platais, I.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Milone, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    High-precision astrometry requires accurate point-spread function modeling and accurate geometric-distortion corrections. This paper demonstrates that it is possible to achieve both requirements with data collected at the high acuity wide-field K-band imager (HAWK-I), a wide-field imager installed at the Nasmyth focus of UT4/VLT ESO 8 m telescope. Our final astrometric precision reaches ~3 mas per coordinate for a well-exposed star in a single image with a systematic error less than 0.1 mas. We constructed calibrated astro-photometric catalogs and atlases of seven fields: the Baade's window, NGC 6656, NGC 6121, NGC 6822, NGC 6388, NGC 104, and the James Webb Space Telescope calibration field (in the Large Magellanic Cloud). We make these catalogs and images electronically available to the community. Furthermore, as a demonstration of the efficacy of our approach, we combined archival material taken with the optical wide-field imager at the MPI/ESO 2.2 m with HAWK-I observations. We showed that we are able to achieve an excellent separation between cluster members and field objects for NGC 6656 and NGC 6121 with a time base-line of about 8 years. Using both HST and HAWK-I data, we also study the radial distribution of the SGB populations in NGC 6656 and conclude that the radial trend is flat within our uncertainty. We also provide membership probabilities for most of the stars in NGC 6656 and NGC 6121 catalogs and estimate membership for the published variable stars in these two fields. Catalogs, fortran code, and distortion maps are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/563/A80Based on observations with the 8 m VLT ESO telescope.

  12. Comparison of NLDAS Weather Forcing Data with Ground-based Measurements in Irrigated Areas of Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, C. M.; Geli, H. M.; Lewis, C. S.; Verdin, J. P.; Senay, G. B.

    2012-12-01

    This analysis is being conducted in the context of standardizing and providing guidelines for the production of evapotranspiration (ET) and crop water use maps in the Western United States, a project funded by the USGS. Spatial ET maps can be obtained using remote sensing-based methods at field/local scales. There are presently different remote sensing methods in the literature that provide reasonable levels of accuracy at these scales. Most of these methods use weather data from ground-based weather stations in the area being modeled with the assumption of being reasonably representative of the local conditions. Ground-based stations are generally sparse in nature for various reasons. However, at regional/continental scales this assumption will not be applicable and requires the use of other approaches to account for the variability of the near surface weather conditions. The North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) which provides gridded weather forcing data can potentially provide such information. These NLDAS data are available at 1/8th of a degree grid (~ 14 km × 14 km) a relatively coarse resolution considering the requirement of estimating ET at field scales. In order to use the NLDAS weather forcing data in remote sensing of ET at field to regional scales with increased confidence, it is important to compare it with ground-based observations under different surface conditions. Such comparison will help to identify the associated uncertainties and biases. It can also help to quantify the uncertainties in the remote sensing-based model estimates of ET. This study presents a preliminary result the comparison between ground-based weather data to the NLDAS gridded products in irrigated areas. Ground-based data from about 24 stations in and around the state of Utah, maintained by the National Weather Service and Utah State University, are used in the analysis. The comparison considered both hourly and daily data. These stations were operated over

  13. Evaluating evaporation from field crops using airborne radiometry and ground-based meteorological data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, R. D.; Moran, M.S.; Gay, L.W.; Raymond, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne measurements of reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation were combined with ground-based measurements of incoming solar radiation, air temperature, windspeed, and vapor pressure to calculate instantaneous evaporation (LE) rates using a form of the Penman equation. Estimates of evaporation over cotton, wheat, and alfalfa fields were obtained on 5 days during a one-year period. A Bowen ratio apparatus, employed simultaneously, provided ground-based measurements of evaporation. Comparison of the airborne and ground techniques showed good agreement, with the greatest difference being about 12% for the instantaneous values. Estimates of daily (24 h) evaporation were made from the instantaneous data. On three of the five days, the difference between the two techniques was less than 8%, with the greatest difference being 25%. The results demonstrate that airborne remote sensing techniques can be used to obtain spatially distributed values of evaporation over agricultural fields. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Validation of Aura OMI by Aircraft and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPeters, R. D.; Petropavlovskikh, I.; Kroon, M.

    2006-12-01

    Both aircraft-based and ground-based measurements have been used to validate ozone measurements by the OMI instrument on Aura. Three Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) flights have been conducted, in November 2004 and June 2005 with the NASA WB57, and in January/February 2005 with the NASA DC-8. On these flights, validation of OMI was primarily done using data from the CAFS (CCD Actinic Flux Spectroradiometer) instrument, which is used to measure total column ozone above the aircraft. These measurements are used to differentiate changes in stratospheric ozone from changes in total column ozone. Also, changes in ozone over high clouds measured by OMI were checked in a flight over tropical storm Arlene on a flight on June 11th. Ground-based measurements were made during the SAUNA campaign in Sodankyla, Finland, in March and April 2006. Both total column ozone and the ozone vertical distribution were validated.

  15. Thunderstorms and ground-based radio noise as observed by radio astronomy Explorer 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. A.; Herman, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) data were analyzed to determine the frequency dependence of HF terrestrial radio noise power. RAE observations of individual thunderstorms, mid-ocean areas, and specific geographic regions for which concommitant ground based measurements are available indicate that noise power is a monotonically decreasing function of frequency which conforms to expectations over the geographic locations and time periods investigated. In all cases investigated, active thunderstorm regions emit slightly higher power as contrasted to RAE observations of the region during meteorologically quiet periods. Noise levels are some 15 db higher than predicted values over mid-ocean, while in locations where ground based measurements are available a maximum deviation of 5 db occurs. Worldwide contour mapping of the noise power at 6000 km for five individual months and four observing frequencies, examples of which are given, indicate high noise levels over continental land masses with corresponding lower levels over ocean regions.

  16. Method for evaluating trends in greenhouse gases from ground-based remote FTIR measurements over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, T.; Forbes, A.; Woods, P.; Demaziere, M.; Vigouroux, C.; Mahieu, E.; Demoulin, P.; Velazco, V.; Notholt, J.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.; Kramer, I.; Sussman, R.; Stremme, W.; Mellqvist, J.; Strandberg, A.; Ellingsen, K.; Gauss, M.

    2007-11-01

    This paper describes the statistical analysis of annual trends in long term datasets of greenhouse gas measurements taken over ten or more years. The analysis technique employs a bootstrap resampling method to determine both the long-term and intra-annual variability of the datasets, together with the uncertainties on the trend values. The method has been applied to data from a European network of ground-based solar FTIR instruments to determine the trends in the tropospheric, stratospheric and total columns of ozone, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ethane and HCFC-22. The suitability of the method has been demonstrated through statistical validation of the technique, and comparison with ground-based in-situ measurements and 3-D atmospheric models.

  17. Evaluating the Accuracy of Plasmasphere Data Assimilation from Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Lichtenberger, J.; Friedel, R. H.; Clilverd, M.; Heilig, B.; Vellante, M.; Raita, T.; Rodger, C. J.; Reda, J.; Collier, A.; Holzworth, R. H.; Ober, D. M.; Boudouridis, A.; Zesta, E.; Chi, P. J.

    2013-05-01

    VLF and magnetometer observations can be used to remotely sense the plasmasphere. VLF whistler waves can be used to measure the electron density and magnetic Field Line Resonance (FLR) measurements can be used to measure the mass density. In principle it is then possible to remotely map the plasmasphere with a network of ground-based stations which are also less expensive and more permanent than satellites. The PLASMON project, funded by the EU FP-7 program, is in the process of doing just this. A large number of ground-based observations will be input into a data assimilative framework which models the plasmasphere structure and dynamics. The data assimilation framework combines the Ensemble Kalman Filter with the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model. Here we simulate the observations from these networks, with appropriate uncertainties, and use them to drive the data assimilation framework to recover the plasmaspheric configuration. We will discuss the level of accuracy that can be achieved.

  18. Evaluating the Accuracy of Plasmasphere Data Assimilation from Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Lichtenberger, J.; Duffy, J.; Friedel, R. H.; Clilverd, M.; Heilig, B.; Vallante, M.; Manninen, J. K.; Rodger, C. J.; Collier, A.; Reda, J.; Holzworth, R. H.; Ober, D. M.; Boudouridis, A.; Zesta, E.; Chi, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    VLF and magnetometer observations can be used to remotely sense the plasmasphere. VLF whistler waves can be used to measure the electron density and magnetic Field Line Resonance (FLR) measurements can be used to measure the mass density. In principle it is then possible to remotely map the plasmasphere with a network of ground-based stations which are also less expensive and more permanent than satellites. The PLASMON project, funded by the EU FP-7 program, is in the process of doing just this. A large number of ground-based observations will be input into a data assimilative framework which models the plasmasphere structure and dynamics. The data assimilation framework combines the Ensemble Kalman Filter with the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model. Here we simulate the observations from these networks, with appropriate uncertainties, and use them to drive the data assimilation framework to recover the plasmaspheric configuration. We will discuss the level of accuracy that can be achieved.

  19. Evaluating the Accuracy of Plasmasphere Data Assimilation from Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Anders M.; Lichtenberger, Janos; Duffy, Jared; Friedel, Reiner; Clilverd, Mark; Heilig, Balazs; Vellante, Massimo; Raita, Tero; Rodger, Craig; Collier, Andrew; Reda, Jan; Holzworth, Robert; Ober, Daniel; Boudouridis, Athanasios; Zesta, Eftyhia; Chi, Peter J.

    2013-04-01

    VLF and magnetometer observations can be used to remotely sense the plasmasphere. VLF whistler waves can be used to measure the electron density and magnetic Field Line Resonance (FLR) measurements can be used to measure the mass density. In principle it is then possible to remotely map the plasmasphere with a network of ground-based stations which are also less expensive and more permanent than satellites. The PLASMON project, funded by the EU FP-7 program, is in the process of doing just this. A large number of ground-based observations will be input into a data assimilative framework which models the plasmasphere structure and dynamics. The data assimilation framework combines the Ensemble Kalman Filter with the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model. Here we simulate the observations from these networks, with appropriate uncertainties, and use them to drive the data assimilation framework to recover the plasmaspheric configuration. We will discuss the level of accuracy that can be achieved.

  20. Perspectives of astronomy in Kazakhstan: from new ground-based telescopes to space ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omarov, Ch. T.; Zhantayev, Zh. Sh.

    2012-09-01

    Astronomical observations in Kazakhstan are carried out for over 60 years. The advantage of the geographical location makes it possible to set and conduct programs of stationary ground-based observations, that from the most observatories of other countries are difficult or impossible. However outdated technical condition of scientific equipment, which include ground-based optical telescopes, poses a direct problem to the development of astronomy in Kazakhstan. In addition, observational data in the other spectral bands from space telescopes are needed. Therefore, in order to create a modern experimental astrophysical base today in Kazakhstan two projects are being put forward in the frame of national space program: 1) a new optical telescope with a primary mirror 3.6 meters (completed in 2016), and 2) participation in the international space project "World Space Observatory -Ultraviolet" that to be launched in 2014.

  1. Measuring glacier surface temperatures with ground-based thermal infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry-Wake, Caroline; Baraer, Michel; McKenzie, Jeffrey M.; Mark, Bryan G.; Wigmore, Oliver; Hellström, Robert È.; Lautz, Laura; Somers, Lauren

    2015-10-01

    Spatially distributed surface temperature is an important, yet difficult to observe, variable for physical glacier melt models. We utilize ground-based thermal infrared imagery to obtain spatially distributed surface temperature data for alpine glaciers. The infrared images are used to investigate thermal microscale processes at the glacier surface, such as the effect of surface cover type and the temperature gradient at the glacier margins on the glacier's temperature dynamics. Infrared images were collected at Cuchillacocha Glacier, Cordillera Blanca, Peru, on 23-25 June 2014. The infrared images were corrected based on ground truth points and local meteorological data. For the control points, the Pearson's correlation coefficient between infrared and station temperatures was 0.95. The ground-based infrared camera has the potential for greatly improving glacier energy budget studies, and our research shows that it is critical to properly correct the thermal images to produce robust, quantifiable data.

  2. Study on the data matching of ground-based radar and laser point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhiwei; Wang, Chenxi; Yue, Jianping

    2016-07-01

    Due to the unique imaging approach for ground-based radar, identification and classification in observation area is very difficult. In order to improve the accuracy of the calculation and application combine with other data resource. it is necessary to implement data matching of radar images and 3D laser point cloud. First, the 3D cloud should to be transformed to orthographic maps, and then the horizontal rotation and orbit attitude angle parameters would be estimated for similarity transformation according to the characteristics such as common points and lines. Finally, the same reference point of the ground-based SAR data and cloud data is employed to accomplished in a two-dimensional coordinate system (called local common coordinate system).

  3. Combined Characterisation of GOME and TOMS Total Ozone Using Ground-Based Observations from the NDSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, J.-C.; VanRoozendael, M.; Simon, P. C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Goutail, F.; Andersen, S. B.; Arlander, D. W.; BuiVan, N. A.; Claude, H.; deLaNoee, J.; DeMaziere, M.; Dorokhov, V.; Eriksen, P.; Gleason, J. F.; Tornkvist, K. Karlsen; Hoiskar, B. A. Kastad; Kyroe, E.; Leveau, J.; Merienne, M.-F.; Milinevsky, G.

    1998-01-01

    Several years of total ozone measured from space by the ERS-2 GOME, the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), and the ADEOS TOMS, are compared with high-quality ground-based observations associated with the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC), over an extended latitude range and a variety of geophysical conditions. The comparisons with each spaceborne sensor are combined altogether for investigating their respective solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence, dispersion, and difference of sensitivity. The space- and ground-based data are found to agree within a few percent on average. However, the analysis highlights for both Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and TOMS several sources of discrepancies, including a dependence on the SZA at high latitudes and internal inconsistencies.

  4. Infrared ground-based astronomy with the Hughes 256 X 256 PtSi array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, A.; Joyce, R.; Gatley, I.; Gates, J.; Herring, J.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that large format PtSi Schottky diode infrared arrays, the Hughes 256 X 256 hybrid Schottky array in particular, are competitive alternatives to the smaller format photovoltaic arrays for ground-based astronomy. The modest quantum efficiency of the PtSi compared to the photovoltaic devices is more than compensated for by the larger format. The use of hybrid technology yields effective fill factors of nearly 100 percent, and the low dark current, noise, excellent imaging characteristics, cost, and solid nitrogen operating temperature add to the effectiveness of this array for ground-based imaging. In addition to discussing the characteristics of this array, researchers present laboratory test data and astronomical results achieved at Kitt Peak.

  5. Transmutation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Klupák, V.; Sus, F.; Kučera, J.; Kůs, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-03-01

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  6. Specifying the Earth's Plasmasphere With Data Assimilation of Ground-Based Field-Line Resonance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Rivera, S.; McCarthy, N.; Ober, D. M.; Zesta, E.; Chi, P. J.; Moldwin, M.

    2009-12-01

    The plasmasphere is an important medium for propagation of the waves which contribute to the decay and acceleration of energetic particles in the radiation belts and ring current. Accurate knowledge of the plasmasphere evolution is thus an important element for accurately predicting the evolution of the energetic particle populations. A variety of routine measurements provide information about the plasmasphere, including ground-based and space-based magnetic field measurements, space based in-situ plasma density measurements, whistler wave measurements, TEC measurements from GPS receivers, and in some cases global EUV images. Combining these measurements with a physics-based model through a data assimilation scheme should, in principle, allow a better specification of the plasmasphere. Other information which can be used include information about the global magnetic and electric fields from a combination of measurements and models. In this paper we will discuss modeling the plasmasphere using ground-based field-line resonance measurements. The advantages of ground-based measurements over space-based measurements are the longevity of the magnetometer arrays, the potentially greater simultaneous coverage in local time and L-shell (as opposed to single-point satellite measurements), and the lower cost of maintaining the networks. In this paper we will explore using a network of ground-based magnetometers to constrain the evolution of the plasmasphere through a data assimilation scheme. We will use the Ober et al. [1997] plasmasphere model, a particle filter data assimilation scheme, and simulated field-line resonance measurements as well as measurements from the McMAC, MEASURE, SAMBA, and CARISMA, magnetometer arrays.

  7. Description of the Large-Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS) ground based experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS) ground-based experiment is provided. A description of the experiment, as originally defined, and the experiment objectives and potential applications of the technology resulting from the experiment are presented. Also, the results of two studies which were conducted to investigate the feasibility of implementing the experiment are presented and discussed. Finally, a description of the configuration which was selected for the experiment is described, and a summary of the paper is presented.

  8. The response of a ground-based antenna to variations of ionospheric potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, Kh. F.

    Analytical and numerical models are used to study the response of a ground-based atmospheric electric antenna to ionospheric potential variations. The three-term Schweidler-Gish formula is used to describe the vertical profile of conductivity. It is shown that the different inertia of the volume discharge redistribution in the vertical column can lead to a phase shift between the two antenna signals.

  9. The crop growth research chamber: A ground-based facility for CELSS research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David L.

    1990-01-01

    A ground based facility for the study of plant growth and development under stringently controlled environments is being developed by the Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program at the Ames Research Center. Several Crop Growth Research Chambers (CGRC) and laboratory support equipment provide the core of this facility. The CGRC is a closed (sealed) system with a separate recirculating atmosphere and nutrient delivery systems. The atmospheric environment, hydroponic environment, systems controls, and data acquisition are discussed.

  10. Camera Concepts for the Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepomuk Otte, Adam

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a concept for the next generation observatory in ground-based very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Design goals are ten times better sensitivity, higher angular resolution, and a lower energy threshold than existing Cherenkov telescopes. Each telescope is equipped with a camera that detects and records the Cherenkov-light flashes from air showers. The camera is comprised of a pixelated focal plane of blue sensitive and fast (nanosecond) photon detectors that detect the photon signal and convert it into an electrical one. The incorporation of trigger electronics and signal digitization into the camera are under study. Given the size of AGIS, the camera must be reliable, robust, and cost effective. We are investigating several directions that include innovative technologies such as Geiger-mode avalanche-photodiodes as a possible detector and switched capacitor arrays for the digitization.

  11. Atomic oxygen interaction with spacecraft materials: Relationship between orbital and ground-based testing for materials certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jon B.; Koontz, Steven L.; Lan, Esther H.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen on boron nitride (BN), silicon nitride (Si3N4), Intelsat 6 solar cell interconnects, organic polymers, and MoS2 and WS2 dry lubricant, were studied in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) flight experiments and in a ground based simulation facility. Both the inflight and ground based experiments employed in situ electrical resistance measurements to detect penetration of atomic oxygen through materials and Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) analysis to measure chemical composition changes. Results are given. The ground based results on the materials studied to date show good qualitative correlation with the LEO flight results, thus validating the simulation fidelity of the ground based facility in terms of reproducing LEO flight results. In addition it was demonstrated that ground based simulation is capable of performing more detailed experiments than orbital exposures can presently perform. This allows the development of a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in the LEO environment degradation of materials.

  12. Estimating evapotranspiration and drought stress with ground-based thermal remote sensing in agriculture: a review.

    PubMed

    Maes, W H; Steppe, K

    2012-08-01

    As evaporation of water is an energy-demanding process, increasing evapotranspiration rates decrease the surface temperature (Ts) of leaves and plants. Based on this principle, ground-based thermal remote sensing has become one of the most important methods for estimating evapotranspiration and drought stress and for irrigation. This paper reviews its application in agriculture. The review consists of four parts. First, the basics of thermal remote sensing are briefly reviewed. Second, the theoretical relation between Ts and the sensible and latent heat flux is elaborated. A modelling approach was used to evaluate the effect of weather conditions and leaf or vegetation properties on leaf and canopy temperature. Ts increases with increasing air temperature and incoming radiation and with decreasing wind speed and relative humidity. At the leaf level, the leaf angle and leaf dimension have a large influence on Ts; at the vegetation level, Ts is strongly impacted by the roughness length; hence, by canopy height and structure. In the third part, an overview of the different ground-based thermal remote sensing techniques and approaches used to estimate drought stress or evapotranspiration in agriculture is provided. Among other methods, stress time, stress degree day, crop water stress index (CWSI), and stomatal conductance index are discussed. The theoretical models are used to evaluate the performance and sensitivity of the most important methods, corroborating the literature data. In the fourth and final part, a critical view on the future and remaining challenges of ground-based thermal remote sensing is presented. PMID:22922637

  13. Limitation of Ground-based Estimates of Solar Irradiance Due to Atmospheric Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert F.; Holben, Brent N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncertainty in ground-based estimates of solar irradiance is quantitatively related to the temporal variability of the atmosphere's optical thickness. The upper and lower bounds of the accuracy of estimates using the Langley Plot technique are proportional to the standard deviation of aerosol optical thickness (approx. +/- 13 sigma(delta tau)). The estimates of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) in two Cimel sun photometer channels from the Mauna Loa site of AERONET are compared with satellite observations from SOLSTICE (Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment) on UARS (Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite) for almost two years of data. The true solar variations related to the 27-day solar rotation cycle observed from SOLSTICE are about 0.15% at the two sun photometer channels. The variability in ground-based estimates is statistically one order of magnitude larger. Even though about 30% of these estimates from all Level 2.0 Cimel data fall within the 0.4 to approx. 0.5% variation level, ground-based estimates are not able to capture the 27-day solar variation observed from SOLSTICE.

  14. [Development of a ground-based experimental facility for space cultivation of higher plant].

    PubMed

    Guo, S S; Wang, P X; Hou, J D; Ai, W D; Chao, Z G

    2000-02-01

    A ground-based experimental facility was developed for conducting initial ground-based simulation study of Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). The facility is composed of a main chamber, O2 and CO2 composition control subsystems, plant cultivation subsystem and whole data management subsystem. The growth room, being composed of a inner wall of mirror-face stainless steel, holds a volume of 1.8 m3 and a growing area of 1.2 m2; electronic fluorescent lamps were used as lighting sources and polyvinyl formal was used for root matrixes; the environmental parameters of the growing room such as temperature, relative humidity, O2 concentration, CO2 concentration, lighting period and irradiance intensity and the nutrient parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen concentration, liquid level of nutrient storage tank and flow rate of nutrient were all controlled automatically; all of the above-mentioned parameters can be inspected, collected, stored and printed regularly and dynamically. The results of a combined debugging and preliminary plant cultivation verified that the technical target of the facility had reached its initial design requirements, it can be used to conduct ground-based simulation studies of space cultivation of higher plants.

  15. Integrating ground-based EO data in satellite-based systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, S.V.; Daugherty, P.; Yow, T.G.

    1997-02-01

    Earth observation (EO) and other forms of geo-referenced data are typically thought of as being ``satellite data.`` It is true that the majority of EO data are satellite oriented; thus, most on-line EO data systems are designed primarily for satellite image data. However, there is A small but significant minority of EO data that is not satellite image data; i.e., it is ground-based or terrestrial data Unfortunately, many on-line systems designed for satellite data do not take into account the somewhat different nature of associated ground-based data, Data queries that work most of the time but fail because the system has not taken into account less common data are not robust enough for today`s users. In order to avoid embarrassing problems, EO system designers must be aware of the nature of ground- based data. In this paper we describe some of our insights on this subject in the hope that the designers of other systems may learn from our experience.

  16. Estimating evapotranspiration and drought stress with ground-based thermal remote sensing in agriculture: a review.

    PubMed

    Maes, W H; Steppe, K

    2012-08-01

    As evaporation of water is an energy-demanding process, increasing evapotranspiration rates decrease the surface temperature (Ts) of leaves and plants. Based on this principle, ground-based thermal remote sensing has become one of the most important methods for estimating evapotranspiration and drought stress and for irrigation. This paper reviews its application in agriculture. The review consists of four parts. First, the basics of thermal remote sensing are briefly reviewed. Second, the theoretical relation between Ts and the sensible and latent heat flux is elaborated. A modelling approach was used to evaluate the effect of weather conditions and leaf or vegetation properties on leaf and canopy temperature. Ts increases with increasing air temperature and incoming radiation and with decreasing wind speed and relative humidity. At the leaf level, the leaf angle and leaf dimension have a large influence on Ts; at the vegetation level, Ts is strongly impacted by the roughness length; hence, by canopy height and structure. In the third part, an overview of the different ground-based thermal remote sensing techniques and approaches used to estimate drought stress or evapotranspiration in agriculture is provided. Among other methods, stress time, stress degree day, crop water stress index (CWSI), and stomatal conductance index are discussed. The theoretical models are used to evaluate the performance and sensitivity of the most important methods, corroborating the literature data. In the fourth and final part, a critical view on the future and remaining challenges of ground-based thermal remote sensing is presented.

  17. Flow Characteristics of Tidewater Glaciers in Greenland and Alaska using Ground-Based LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnegan, D. C.; Stearns, L. A.; Hamilton, G. S.; O'Neel, S.

    2010-12-01

    LiDAR scanning systems have been employed to characterize and quantify multi-temporal glacier and ice sheet changes for nearly three decades. Until recently, LiDAR scanning systems were limited to airborne and space-based platforms which come at a significant cost to deploy and are limited in spatial and temporal sampling capabilities necessary to compare with in-situ field measurements. Portable ground-based LiDAR scanning systems are now being used as a glaciological tool. We discuss research efforts to employ ground-based near-infrared LiDAR systems at two differing tidewater glacier systems in the spring of 2009; Helheim Glacier in southeast Greenland and Columbia Glacier in southeast Alaska. Preliminary results allow us to characterize short term displacement rates and detailed observations of calving processes. These results highlight the operational limitations and capabilities of commercially available LiDAR systems, and allow us to identify optimal operating characteristics for monitoring small to large-scale tidewater glaciers in near real-time. Furthermore, by identifying the operational limitations of these sensors it allows for optimal design characteristics of new sensors necessary to meet ground-based calibration and validation requirements of ongoing scientific missions.

  18. Comparisons of CH4 ground-based FTIR measurements near Saint Petersburg with GOSAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, N. M.; Makarova, M. V.; Poberovskii, A. V.; Timofeyev, Yu. M.

    2014-04-01

    Atmospheric column-average methane mole fractions measured with ground-based Fourier-transform spectroscopy near Saint Petersburg, Russia (59.9° N, 29.8° E, 20 m a.s.l.) are compared with similar data obtained with the Japanese GOSAT (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite) in the years 2009-2012. Average CH4 mole fractions for the GOSAT data version V01.xx are -15.0 ± 5.4 ppb less than the corresponding values obtained from ground-based measurements (with the standard deviations of biases at 13.0 ± 4.2 ppb). For the GOSAT data version V02.xx, the average values of the differences are -1.9 ± 1.8 ppb with standard deviations of 14.5 ± 1.3 ppb. This verifies that FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopic observations near Saint Petersburg have similar biases with GOSAT satellite data as FTIR measurements at other ground-based networks and aircraft CH4 estimations.

  19. Ground-based walking training improves quality of life and exercise capacity in COPD.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Sally L; Ng, L W Cindy; McKeough, Zoe J; Jenkins, Sue; Hill, Kylie; Eastwood, Peter R; Hillman, David R; Cecins, Nola; Spencer, Lissa M; Jenkins, Christine; Alison, Jennifer A

    2014-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of ground-based walking training on health-related quality of life and exercise capacity in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). People with COPD were randomised to either a walking group that received supervised, ground-based walking training two to three times a week for 8-10 weeks, or a control group that received usual medical care and did not participate in exercise training. 130 out of 143 participants (mean±sd age 69±8 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 s 43±15% predicted) completed the study. Compared to the control group, the walking group demonstrated greater improvements in the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score (mean difference -6 points (95% CI -10- -2), p<0.003), Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire total score (mean difference 7 points (95% CI 2-11), p<0.01) and endurance shuttle walk test time (mean difference 208 s (95% CI 104-313), p<0.001). This study shows that ground-based walking training is an effective training modality that improves quality of life and endurance exercise capacity in people with COPD. PMID:25142484

  20. Low light level detectors for astronomy.

    PubMed

    Boyce, P B

    1977-10-14

    There is an almost bewildering variety of detectors being used for ground-based astronomical observations. Many of the detectors have advantages for particular projects. One-dimensional detectors are simple, yet suitable for spectroscopy. Other detectors offer high photometric precision and dimensional stability. Some are designed for observing only faint objects and some for bright ones. Sometimes the necessity of having a high quantum efficiency at a particular wavelength dictates the choice of detector. In reality the situation is even more chaotic. This review has not covered some of the exotic detectors that have been developed for x-ray and far-ultraviolet imaging from spacecraft. These detectors use devices such as resistive plates, multianode or crossed-wire microchannel plates, and so on. These devices have not yet seen extensive use in ground-based applications, and their future as visible light detectors remains uncertain. The reasons for the development of such a wide variety of detectors are clear. Commercially available devices are simply not capable of meeting the low light level and photometric performance capabilities needed for astronomical observations. The driving forces are the commercial and military applications for detectors, and with few exceptions there has not been sufficient funding available to mount a detector development program for astronomy. Therefore, astronomers have sought to adapt existing commercial devices to the particular problem at hand. The large number of individual efforts summarized in this review is the result. In the future, I expect the variety to diminish as one or two really good detectors become capable of performing well under the wide variety of observational conditions encountered in astronomy. Many people have proclaimed the ultimate detector to be just around the corner. This is yet to happen. However, I venture to speculate that low-noise, high-performance CCD detectors with a format of 500 by 500 or larger

  1. SOLAR SYSTEM OBJECTS AS COSMIC RAYS DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Privitera, P.; Motloch, P.

    2014-08-10

    In a recent Letter, Jupiter is presented as an efficient detector for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs), through measurement by an Earth-orbiting satellite of gamma rays from UHECRs showers produced in Jupiter's atmosphere. We show that this result is incorrect, due to erroneous assumptions on the angular distribution of shower particles. We evaluated other solar system objects as potential targets for UHECRs detection, and found that the proposed technique is either not viable or not competitive with traditional ground-based UHECRs detectors.

  2. Developments of the general relativity accuracy test (GReAT): a ground-based experiment to test the weak equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Nozzoli, S.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Shapiro, I. I.; Milyukov, V.

    2000-06-01

    Some future tests of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) with laboratory-size proof masses are likely to be conducted in freefall conditions in order to improve the test accuracy substantially. Some years ago the authors of this paper proposed to test the WEP in a vertical freefall inside a capsule released from a high-altitude balloon. The estimated accuracy in testing the WEP, with a 95% confidence level, is a few parts in 1015 in a 30 s freefall. When compared with other proposed orbital freefall experiments and ground-based tests, the vertical freefall retains some key advantages of the former without some of the disadvantages of the latter. Moreover, a two orders of magnitude increase in the accuracy of testing the WEP could be achieved with an affordable experiment that allows us to recover the detector and repeat the launches at short time intervals.

  3. Comparison of Thermal Structure Results from Venus Express and Ground Based Observations since Vira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    An international team was formed in 2013 through the International Space Studies Institute (Bern, Switzerland) to compare recent results of the Venus atmospheric thermal structure from spacecraft and ground based observations made since the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) was developed (Kliore et al., 1985, Keating et al., 1985). Five experiments on European Space Agency's Venus Express orbiter mission have yielded results on the atmospheric structure during is operational life (April 2006 - November 2014). Three of these were from occultation methods: at near infrared wavelengths from solar occultations, (SOIR, 70 - 170 km), at ultraviolet wavelengths from stellar occultations (SPICAV, 90-140 km), and occultation of the VEx-Earth radio signal (VeRa, 40-90 km). In-situ drag measurements from three different techniques (accelerometry, torque, and radio tracking, 130 - 200 km) were also obtained using the spacecraft itself while passive infrared remote sensing was used by the VIRTIS experiment (70 - 120 km). The only new data in the -40-70 km altitude range are from radio occultation, as no new profiles of the deep atmosphere have been obtained since the VeGa 2 lander measurements in 1985 (not included in VIRA). Some selected ground based results available to the team were also considered by team in the inter comparisons. The temperature structure in the lower thermosphere from disk resolved ground based observations (except for one ground based investigation), is generally consistent with the Venus Express results. These experiments sampled at different periods, at different locations and at different local times and have different vertical and horizontal resolution and coverage. The data were therefore binned in latitude and local time bins and compared, ignoring temporal variations over the life time of the Venus Express mission and assumed north-south symmetry. Alternating warm and cooler layers are present in the 120-160 altitude range in results

  4. Multisensor mine detector for peacekeeping: improved landmine detector concept (ILDC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Carruthers, Al

    1996-05-01

    The Improved Landmine Detector Concept Project was initiated in Autumn 1994 to develop a prototype vehicle mounted mine detector for low metal content and nonmetallic mines for a peacekeeping role on roads. The system will consist of a teleoperated vehicle carrying a highly sensitive electromagnetic induction (EMI) detector, an infrared imager (IR), ground probing radar (GPR), and a thermal neutron activation (TNA) detector for confirmation. The IR, EMI and TNA detectors have been under test since 1995 and the GPR will be received in June 1996. Results of performance trials of the individual detectors are discussed. Various design configurations and their tradeoffs are discussed. Fusion of data from the detectors to reduce false alarm rate and increase probability of detection, a key element to the success of the system, is discussed. An advanced development model of the system is expected to be complete by Spring 1997.

  5. Comparison of INSAT-3D AOD over Indian region with satellite- and ground-based measurements: a data assimilation perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumit; George, John P.; Sreevathsa, M. N. Raghavendra; Indira Rani, S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper aims at comparing the INSAT-3D AOD with other space based observations over the continental regions. INSAT-3D launched in 2013 is an advanced geostationary weather satellite of India at 82° East longitude provides Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) observations at 650 nm over both land and ocean. The level-3 daily AOD measurements from MODIS (both Aqua and Terra) and MISR are used for comparison with that from INSAT-3D. This work is applied during premonsoon season of 2015. Overall statistical scores and systematic errors are compared to characterize various error sources. Our study indicates that significant differences exist between different aerosol observations which may be partly due to retrieval algorithm, sensor configurations and temporal sampling. Comparison of INSAT observed AOD shows less bias towards MISR and MODIS-Terra observed AOD than with MODIS-Aqua. The INSAT observations over oceanic region have better correlation, minimum bias and rmse than land region. Overall, the mean bias of the dataset is ±0.05, with a root mean square error of 0.22, but these errors are also found highly dependent on geographical region. Additionally, we compared INSAT 660 nm AOD with two AERONET ground stations. The comparison of INSAT with different observations shows that the retrieved AOD is closer to the ground-based data than the MISR and MODIS AOD.

  6. Improved CO [lidar detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, P.L.; Busch, G.E.; Thompson, D.C.; Remelius, D.K.; Wells, F.D.

    1999-07-18

    A high sensitivity, CO{sub 2} lidar detector, based on recent advances in ultra-low noise, readout integrated circuits (ROIC), is being developed. This detector will combine a high speed, low noise focal plane array (FPA) with a dispersive grating spectrometer. The spectrometer will filter the large background flux, thereby reducing the limiting background photon shot noise. In order to achieve the desired low noise levels, the HgCdTe FPA will be cooled to {approximately}50K. High speed, short pulse operation of the lidar system should enable the detector to operate with the order of a few noise electrons in the combined detector/ ROIC output. Current receiver design concepts will be presented, along with their expected noise performance.

  7. Construction of an Inexpensive Sun Photometer for Measuring Aerosols Optical Depth (AOD) and Comparison Between the Ground Based and Satellite Based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamun, M.; Mondol, P.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols influence our weather and climate because they affect the amount of sunlight reaching Earth's surface. An important way of probing the atmosphere from the ground is to measure the effects of the atmosphere on sunlight transmitted through the atmosphere to Earth's surface. These indirect techniques provide information about the entire atmosphere above the observer, not just the atmosphere that can be sampled directly. In response to global issues of air quality and climate change, and to the need to improve the quality of science education, inexpensive atmosphere monitoring instruments have been developed. This paper describes a new kind of inexpensive two channels LED Sun Photometer for monitoring aerosols that provide much better long-term stability than instruments that use expensive interference filters. Here HAZE-SPAN TERC VHS-1 model has been used for constructing sun photometer with light emitting diode as detector. Monitoring Earth's atmosphere is a challenging task. As there is no facility in our country (Bangladesh) for ground based measurement for monitoring aerosol so, this type of study is very essential. This study compares the aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from the Terra and Aqua MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers (MODIS) with ground-based measurements from a handheld sun photometer over the region of Rajshahi, Bangladesh for The 15 days duration of June 2012. The results indicate that the Terra and Aqua MODIS AOD retrievals at 550 nm have good correlations with the measurements from the handheld sun photometer. The correlation coefficients r = 0.88 for Terra and r = 0.55 for Aqua where as r = 0.65 for Terra and Aqua themselves. AOD for another wavelength at 625 nm is documented in this study for finding out the relation of AOD at different wavelengths. In this paper it has been described and summarized briefly investigations for four important topics: LEDs used as light detectors, construction of sun photometer and its

  8. SPECKLE SUPPRESSION THROUGH DUAL IMAGING POLARIMETRY, AND A GROUND-BASED IMAGE OF THE HR 4796A CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkley, Sasha; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Brenner, Douglas; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Remi; Graham, James R.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Lloyd, James P.; Roberts, Lewis C.; Kuhn, Jeffrey

    2009-08-10

    We demonstrate the versatility of a dual imaging polarimeter working in tandem with a Lyot coronagraph and adaptive optics to suppress the highly static speckle noise pattern-the greatest hindrance to ground-based direct imaging of planets and disks around nearby stars. Using a double difference technique with the polarimetric data, we quantify the level of speckle suppression, and hence improved sensitivity, by placing an ensemble of artificial faint companions into real data, with given total brightness and polarization. For highly polarized sources within 0.''5, we show that we achieve 3 to 4 mag greater sensitivity through polarimetric speckle suppression than simply using a coronagraph coupled to a high-order adaptive optics system. Using such a polarimeter with a classical Lyot coronagraph at the 3.63 m Advanced Electro-Optical System telescope, we have obtained a 6.5{sigma} detection in the H band of the 76 AU diameter circumstellar debris disk around the star HR 4796A. Our data represent the first definitive ground-based near-IR polarimetric image of the HR 4796A debris disk and clearly show the two outer ansae of the disk, evident in Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS/STIS imaging. Comparing our peak linearly polarized flux with the total intensity in the lobes as observed by NICMOS, we derive a lower limit to the fractional linear polarization of >29% caused by dust grains in the disk. In addition, we fit simple morphological models of optically thin disks to our data allowing us to constrain the dust disk scale height (2.5{sup +5.0} {sub -1.3} AU) and scattering asymmetry parameter (g = (cos {theta}) = 0.20{sup +.07} {sub -.10}). These values are consistent with several lines of evidence suggesting that the HR 4796A disk is dominated by a micron-sized dust population, and are indeed typical of disks in transition between those surrounding the Herbig Ae stars to those associated with Vega-like stars.

  9. Ammonia Seasonal and Diurnal Variability: Ground-based Measurement and Global Model Simulation Comparisons to Evaluate Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. J.; Sun, K.; Khan, M. A.; Tao, L.; Ginoux, P. A.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric ammonia is an important precursor to fine particulate matter. Ammonia emissions are highly variable on spatial and temporal scales, with implications for air quality and climate change. We evaluate ammonia emission dynamics from urban and agricultural regions by examining variability of concentrations on diurnal and seasonal temporal scales for ground-based measurements and model simulations which must be able to predict aerosol precursor dynamics correctly for aerosol modeling. We compared ground-based, gas phase ammonia measurements with GFDL AM3 model simulations (hourly and monthly) of surface layer ammonia mixing ratios with horizontal resolutions of both 0.5° x 0.625° and 2° x 2°. The model assumes an annual mean ammonia emission rate from the EDGARv4 emission inventory for each grid cell despite large seasonal, diurnal and spatial variability of ammonia emissions. We examined urban regions of New York City and Baltimore, Maryland and the agricultural Lancaster County, Pennsylvania region. In the Baltimore urban region, measured concentrations by our open-path ammonia sensor in October 2011 and April 2012 were >3 ppbv NH3, which exceeds the model predictions of ~0.5 ppbv NH3 for previous years during the same months. For the New York City urban region, modeled monthly concentrations are highest in summer at ~0.3 ppbv NH3 whereas recent measurements in the literature have indicated ~5 ppbv NH3 during summer. The spatial variability of emissions within the grid cell contributes to these discrepancies. We also examined predicted and measured diurnal variability. Maxima in ammonia mixing ratios are predicted by the model during early morning and minima in late morning to early afternoon consistent with boundary layer mixing dynamics in both the urban and agricultural regions. The model does not predict diurnal cycles consistent with urban emissions (rush hours) in contrast to winter-time measurements in urban areas. In addition, aerosol dynamics

  10. Monitoring Precipitation Contents and Extinction By Using A Ground-based Passive Microwave Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzano, F. S.; Fionda, E.; Ciotti, P.; Consalvi, F.

    In the last decades microwave radiometry has proved to be a valuable tool for retriev- ing atmospheric parameters both from ground-based and from satellite-borne plat- forms. Ground-based microwave radiometry has been mainly investigated for esti- mating temperature, water vapor and cloud liquid profiles in the absence of precip- itation. However, the increasing use of multifrequency radiometers in ground-based stations, especially for communication purposes, rises the question of their potential for retrieving also rainfall rate from ground. This capability might be also useful when weather radars are also present, since radiometric estimates might be used as a further constraint within the radar inversion procedure. One of the main problems of ground- based radiometry for rainfall retrieval is the possible impact of water layers on the receiving antenna whose measurements can be heavily contaminated. The estimate of atmospheric parameters by microwave radiometry may be approached by using both experimental and simulated data. The use of experimental measurements is limited by their scarcity or even their lack. The modeling approach is generally more versatile, even though it requests a thorough insight into the e.m. interaction between the mi- crowave radiation and the scattering medium. The radiative transfer theory has been so far the most used approach to take into account multiple scattering and vertical inho- mogeneity of the atmosphere in the presence of hydrometeor scattering. Following a previous work, the objective of this paper is to investigate about radiometric frequency sets and system configurations best suited for observing both stratiform and convective precipitation. We develop inversion algorithms for ground-based retrieval of surface rainrate, adopting a model-based approach. For both stratiform and convective precip- itation, we use a radiative transfer model (RTM), including spherical liquid, melt and ice hydrometeors. From the solution of

  11. Parameter estimation of neutron star-black hole binaries using an advanced gravitational-wave detector network: Effects of the full post-Newtonian waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Mishra, Chandra Kant; Pai, Archana; Arun, K. G.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the effects of using the full waveform (FWF) over the conventional restricted waveform of the inspiral signal from a coalescing compact binary system in extracting the parameters of the source, using a global network of second generation interferometric detectors. We study a hypothetical population of (1.4-10)M⊙ neutron star-black hole binaries (uniformly distributed and oriented in the sky) by employing the full post-Newtonian waveforms, which not only include contributions from various harmonics other than the dominant one (quadrupolar mode) but also the post-Newtonian amplitude corrections associated with each harmonic, of the inspiral signal expected from this system. It is expected that the GW detector network consisting of the two LIGO detectors and a Virgo detector will be joined by KAGRA (a Japanese detector) and by proposed LIGO-India. We study the problem of parameter estimation with all 16 possible detector configurations. Comparing medians of error distributions obtained using FWFs with those obtained using restricted waveforms (which only include contributions from the dominant harmonic with Newtonian amplitude) we find that the measurement accuracies for luminosity distance and the cosine of the inclination angle improve almost by a factor of 1.5-2 depending upon the network under consideration. We find that this improvement can be attributed to the presence of additional inclination angle dependent terms, which appear in the amplitude corrections to various harmonics, which break the strong degeneracy between the luminosity distance and inclination angle. Although the use of FWF does not improve the source localization accuracy much, the global network consisting of five detectors will improve the source localization accuracy by a factor of 4 as compared to the estimates using a three-detector LIGO-Virgo network for the same waveform model.

  12. First-generation science cases for ground-based terahertz telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Koch, Patrick M.; Matsushita, Satoki; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Nakamura, Masanori; Asada, Keiichi; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Urata, Yuji; Wang, Ming-Jye; Wang, Wei-Hao; Takahashi, Satoko; Tang, Ya-Wen; Chang, Hsian-Hong; Huang, Kuiyun; Morata, Oscar; Otsuka, Masaaki; Lin, Kai-Yang; Tsai, An-Li; Lin, Yen-Ting; Srinivasan, Sundar; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Pu, Hung-Yi; Kemper, Francisca; Patel, Nimesh; Grimes, Paul; Huang, Yau-De; Han, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Yen-Ru; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Lin, Lupin Chun-Che; Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Burgos, Roberto; Chen, Ming-Tang; Inoue, Makoto; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2016-02-01

    Ground-based observations at terahertz (THz) frequencies are a newly explorable area of astronomy in the coming decades. We discuss science cases for a first-generation 10-m class THz telescope, focusing on the Greenland Telescope as an example of such a facility. We propose science cases and provide quantitative estimates for each case. The largest advantage of ground-based THz telescopes is their higher angular resolution (˜ 4″ for a 10-m dish), as compared to space or airborne THz telescopes. Thus, high-resolution mapping is an important scientific argument. In particular, we can isolate zones of interest for Galactic and extragalactic star-forming regions. The THz windows are suitable for observations of high-excitation CO lines and [N II] 205-μm lines, which are scientifically relevant tracers of star formation and stellar feedback. Those lines are the brightest lines in the THz windows, so they are suitable for the initiation of ground-based THz observations. THz polarization of star-forming regions can also be explored since it traces the dust population contributing to the THz spectral peak. For survey-type observations, we focus on "sub-THz" extragalactic surveys, the uniqueness of which is detecting galaxies at redshifts z ˜ 1-2, where the dust emission per comoving volume is the largest in the history of the Universe. Finally we explore possibilities of flexible time scheduling, which enables us to monitor active galactic nuclei, and to target gamma-ray burst afterglows. For these objects, THz and submillimeter wavelength ranges have not yet been explored.

  13. CO2 vertical profile retrieval from ground-based IR atmospheric spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravian, Kobra; Loehnert, Ulrich; Turner, David; Ebell, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    CO2 vertical profile retrieval from ground-based IR atmospheric spectra In this study, we developed an algorithm for retrieving the CO2 vertical profile from atmospheric ground-based zenith spectra in the mid IR. Providing the CO2 profile from continuous (24h/day) ground-based spectra would be a great potential for studying the carbon cycle, the evaluation of satellite measurements or the assessment of numerical models, which forecast the near-surface CO2 flux. In order to retrieve the CO2 profile, we used observations of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) that was installed at the JOYCE (Jülich ObservatorY for Cloud Evolution), Germany in 2012. AERI measures downwelling infrared radiances from 520 cm-1 (3.3 μm) to 3020 cm-1 (19 μm) with a spectral resolution of 1 cm-1 and a temporal resolution of 1 minute. In a first step, we performed sensitivity studies for finding the most-suited spectral bands with highest sensitivity to the mean column amount of CO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR). Then an algorithm, known as AERIoe (Turner and Löhnert 2014), was applied to retrieve the mean column amount of CO2 VMR using simulated radiances in clear sky cases. AERIoe is a variational retrieval algorithm to provide information on Temperature, humidity, trace gases and clouds. The simulated AERI radiances were generated by a line by line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) using model temperature, humidity and CO2 profile. The retrieval results of mean column amount of CO2 VMR are in good agreement with the true ones. In addition to the mean column amount, we modified AERIoe to retrieve the CO2 vertical profile. First results reveal that there is more than 1 degree of freedom for CO2 profile. We will show results how the retrieval method is refined to optimally exploit the information on the CO2 profile contained in the AERI measurements.

  14. GROMOS-C, a novel ground based microwave radiometer for ozone measurement campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, S.; Murk, A.; Kämpfer, N.

    2015-03-01

    Stratospheric ozone is of major interest as it absorbs most of harmful UV radiation from the sun, allowing life on Earth. Ground based microwave remote sensing is the only method that allows to measure ozone profiles up to the mesopause, 24 h and under different weather conditions with high time resolution. In this paper a novel ground based microwave radiometer is presented. It is called GROMOS-C (GRound based Ozone MOnitoring System for Campaigns), and it has been designed to measure the vertical profile of ozone distribution in the middle atmosphere, by observing ozone emission spectra at a frequency of 110.836 GHz. The instrument is designed in a compact way which makes it transportable and suitable for outdoor use in campaigns, an advantageous feature that is lacking in present day ozone radiometers. It is operated through remote control. GROMOS-C is a total power radiometer which uses a preamplified heterodyne receiver, and a digital Fast Fourier Transform spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Among its main new features stands out the incorporation of different calibration loads, including a noise diode and a new type of blackbody target specifically designed for this instrument, based on Peltier elements. The calibration scheme does not depend on the use of liquid nitrogen, therefore GROMOS-C can be operated at remote places with no maintenance requirements. In addition the instrument can be switched in frequency to observe the CO line at 115 GHz. A description of the main characteristics of GROMOS-C is included in this paper, as well as the results of a first campaign at the High Altitude Research Station in Jungfraujoch (HFSJ), Switzerland. The validation is performed by comparison of the retrieved profiles against equivalent profiles from MLS satellite data, ECMWF model data, as well as our nearby NDACC ozone radiometer measuring at Bern.

  15. GROMOS-C, a novel ground-based microwave radiometer for ozone measurement campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, S.; Murk, A.; Kämpfer, N.

    2015-07-01

    Stratospheric ozone is of major interest as it absorbs most harmful UV radiation from the sun, allowing life on Earth. Ground-based microwave remote sensing is the only method that allows for the measurement of ozone profiles up to the mesopause, over 24 hours and under different weather conditions with high time resolution. In this paper a novel ground-based microwave radiometer is presented. It is called GROMOS-C (GRound based Ozone MOnitoring System for Campaigns), and it has been designed to measure the vertical profile of ozone distribution in the middle atmosphere by observing ozone emission spectra at a frequency of 110.836 GHz. The instrument is designed in a compact way which makes it transportable and suitable for outdoor use in campaigns, an advantageous feature that is lacking in present day ozone radiometers. It is operated through remote control. GROMOS-C is a total power radiometer which uses a pre-amplified heterodyne receiver, and a digital fast Fourier transform spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Among its main new features, the incorporation of different calibration loads stands out; this includes a noise diode and a new type of blackbody target specifically designed for this instrument, based on Peltier elements. The calibration scheme does not depend on the use of liquid nitrogen; therefore GROMOS-C can be operated at remote places with no maintenance requirements. In addition, the instrument can be switched in frequency to observe the CO line at 115 GHz. A description of the main characteristics of GROMOS-C is included in this paper, as well as the results of a first campaign at the High Altitude Research Station at Jungfraujoch (HFSJ), Switzerland. The validation is performed by comparison of the retrieved profiles against equivalent profiles from MLS (Microwave Limb Sounding) satellite data, ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast) model data, as well as our nearby NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric

  16. Specifying the Earth's Plasmasphere With Data Assimilation of Ground-Based Field-Line Resonance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Anders; McCarthy, Nicholas; Rivera, Samuell; Ober, Daniel; Zesta, Eftyhia; Chi, Peter; Moldwin, Mark; Ridley, Aaron

    The plasmasphere is an important medium for propagation of the waves which contribute to the decay and acceleration of energetic particles in the radiation belts and ring current. Accurate knowledge of the plasmasphere evolution is important for accurately predicting the evolution of the energetic particle populations. A variety of routine measurements provide information about the plasmasphere, including ground-based and space-based magnetic field-line resonance measurements, space based in-situ plasma density measurements, whistler wave measurements, TEC measurements from GPS receivers, and in some cases global EUV images. Combining these measurements with a physics-based model through a data assimilation scheme should, in principle, allow a better specification of the plasmasphere. Other information which can be used include information about the global magnetic and electric fields from a combination of measurements and models, for example AMIE. In this presentation we will discuss modeling the plasmasphere using these data. A particular advantage of ground-based measurements over space-based measurements are the longevity of the magnetometer and VLF stations, the potentially greater simultaneous coverage in local time and L-shell (as opposed to single-point satellite measurements), and the lower cost of maintaining the networks. In this paper we will explore using a network of ground-based magnetometers to constrain the evolution of the plas-masphere through a data assimilation scheme. We will use the Ober et al. [1997] plasmasphere model, a particle filter data assimilation scheme, and simulated or actual field-line resonance measurements from the McMAC, MEASURE, SAMBA, and CARISMA, magnetometer arrays.

  17. Structure and evolution of Pluto's Atmosphere from ground-based stellar occultations between 2002 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, Erick; Sicardy, Bruno; Rio de Janeiro occultation team, Granada occultation team, International Occultation and Timing Association

    2016-10-01

    Ground-Based stellar occultations probe Pluto's atmosphere from about 3 km altitude (~ 10 μbar pressure level) up to 260 km altitude (~0.1 μbar). Our main goal is to derive Pluto's atmosphere evolution using thirteen ground-based occultations observed between 2002 and 2015 (plus 2016, if available). We consistently analyze the light curves using the Dias et al. (ApJ 811, 53, 2015) model, and confirm the general pressure increase by a factor of about 1.5 between 2002 and 2015 and a factor of almost three between 1988 and 2015. Implications for Pluto's seasonal evolution will be briefly discussed in the context of the New Horizons (NH) findings.Ground-based-derived temperature profiles will be compared with NH's results, where we use new temperature boundary conditions in our inversion procedures, as given by NH near 260 km altitude. Although the profiles reasonably agree, significant discrepancies are observed both in the deeper stratospheric zone (altitude < 30 km), and the mesospheric zone (altitudes between 30 and 260 km). Possible biases will be discussed.Additionally, we use a central flash event observed in New Zealand on June 29, 2015 (close to the NH flyby) to provide an upper limit of Pluto's atmospheric oblateness near 4 km altitude. We will also explore the possibility that small deviations in the observed flash (compared to the model) are caused by the local topographic features revealed by NH.Finally, possible correlations between spike activity in the occultation light-curves and local underlying presence of free nitrogen ice terrains will be investigated.Part of the research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Community's H2020 (2014-2020/ ERC Grant Agreement n 669416 "LUCKY STAR").

  18. Kepler and Ground-Based Transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, Drake; Sada, Pedro V.; Jackson, Brian; Peterson, Steven W.; Agol, Eric; Knutson, Heather A.; Jennings, Donald E.; Haase, Plynn; Bays, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze 26 archival Kepler transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b, supplemented by ground-based transits observed in the blue (B band) and near-IR (J band). Both the planet and host star are smaller than previously believed; our analysis yields Rp = 4.31 R xor 0.06 R xor and Rs = 0.683 R solar mass 0.009 R solar mass, both about 3 sigma smaller than the discovery values. Our ground-based transit data at wavelengths bracketing the Kepler bandpass serve to check the wavelength dependence of stellar limb darkening, and the J-band transit provides a precise and independent constraint on the transit duration. Both the limb darkening and transit duration from our ground-based data are consistent with the new Kepler values for the system parameters. Our smaller radius for the planet implies that its gaseous envelope can be less extensive than previously believed, being very similar to the H-He envelope of GJ 436b and Kepler-4b. HAT-P-11 is an active star, and signatures of star spot crossings are ubiquitous in the Kepler transit data. We develop and apply a methodology to correct the planetary radius for the presence of both crossed and uncrossed star spots. Star spot crossings are concentrated at phases 0.002 and +0.006. This is consistent with inferences from Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements that the planet transits nearly perpendicular to the stellar equator. We identify the dominant phases of star spot crossings with active latitudes on the star, and infer that the stellar rotational pole is inclined at about 12 deg 5 deg to the plane of the sky. We point out that precise transit measurements over long durations could in principle allow us to construct a stellar Butterfly diagram to probe the cyclic evolution of magnetic activity on this active K-dwarf star.

  19. Rainfall Intensity Estimation by Ground-Based Dual-Frequency Microwave Radiometers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gin-Rong; Liu, Chung-Chih; Kuo, Tsung-Hua

    2001-06-01

    Many investigators have used satellite data to derive rainfall intensity and to compare them with rain gauge data. However, there has always been a problem: what is the optimal time period for the two different types of data? A set of well-controlled data collected by ground-based dual-frequency microwave radiometers at the National Central University (24.9°N, 121.1°E) in Taiwan between January of 1996 and December of 1997 was used to find the answer. The results show that a 1-h interval would be the optimal time period and that hourly data will provide a better accuracy than other options (5, 10, or 30 min or 2 h). Two algorithms, the differential and the brightness temperature, were established to estimate rainfall intensity using ground-based dual-frequency microwave brightness temperature and rain gauge data. The results show that the root-mean-square error and the correlation coefficient are 0.63 mm h1 and 0.88, respectively, for the differential method, and 0.91 mm h1 and 0.71 for the brightness temperature method. The analysis also shows that because the atmospheric background and environmental influence in the continuous observations are identical, the changes in brightness temperature are only caused from the changes in liquid water content in the air. That probably made the differential method a better choice for rainfall intensity estimation than the brightness temperature method. Moreover, ground-based radiometers measure downwelling radiation from bottom up, and little ice-particle scattering or horizontal inhomogeneity is involved. The results can be compared with retrievals from satellite microwave radiometers for a better understanding of the physics of microwave emission and scattering due to raindrops or ice particles.

  20. Ground-Based Observational Support for Spacecraft Exploration of the Outer Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Glenn S.

    2009-09-01

    This report presents both a retrospective of ground-based support for spacecraft missions to the outer solar system and a perspective of support for future missions. Past support is reviewed in a series of case studies involving the author. The most basic support is essential, providing the mission with information without which the planned science would not have been accomplished. Another is critical, without which science would have been returned, but missing a key element in its understanding. Some observations are enabling by accomplishing one aspect of an experiment which would otherwise not have been possible. Other observations provide a perspective of the planet as a whole which is not available to instruments with narrow fields of view and limited spatial coverage, sometimes motivating a re-prioritizing of experiment objectives. Ground-based support is also capable of providing spectral coverage not present in the complement of spacecraft instruments. Earth-based observations also have the capability of filling in gaps of spacecraft coverage of atmospheric phenomena, as well as providing surveillance of longer-term behavior than the coverage available to the mission. Future missions benefiting from ground-based support would include the Juno mission to Jupiter in the next decade, a flagship-class mission to the Jupiter or to the Saturn systems currently under consideration, and possible intermediate-class missions which might be proposed in NASA’s New Frontiers category. One of the principal benefits of future 30 m-class giant telescopes would be to improve the spatial resolution of maps of temperature and composition which are derived from observations of thermal emission at mid-infrared and longer wavelengths. In many situations, this spatial resolution is competitive with those of the relevant instruments on the spacecraft themselves.

  1. Ground-Based Network and Supersite Observations to Complement and Enrich EOS Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1997 NASA has been successfully launching a series of satellites - the Earth Observing System (EOS) - to intensively study, and gain a better understanding of, the Earth as an integrated system. Space-borne remote sensing observations, however, are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and/or the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite datasets. Through numerous participations, particularly but not limited to the EOS remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over the years, NASA/GSFC has developed and continuously refined ground-based networks and mobile observatories that proved to be vital in providing high temporal measurements, which complement and enrich the satellite observations. These are: the AERO NET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) a federation of ground-based globally distributed network of spectral sun-sky photometers; the MPLNET (Micro-Pulse Lidar NETwork, a similarly organized network of micro-pulse lidar systems measuring aerosol and cloud vertical structure continuously; and the SMART-COMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere, mobile observatories, a suite of spectral radiometers and in-situ probes acquiring supersite measurements. Most MPLNET sites are collocated with those of AERONET, and both networks always support the deployment of SMART-COMMIT worldwide. These data products follow the data structure of EOS conventions: Level-0, instrument archived raw data; Level-1 (or 1.5), real-time data with no (or limited) quality assurance; Level-2, not real high temporal and spectral resolutions. In this talk, we will present NASA/GSFC groundbased facilities, serving

  2. Experimental validation of Lyot stop apodization in ground-based coronagraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagigas, Miguel A.; Valle, Pedro J.; Cagigal, Manuel P.; Prieto-Blanco, Xesús; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Villo-Pérez, Isidro; Femenía, B.; Pérez-Prieto, J. A.; Rodríguez, L. F.; López, R.; Oscoz, A.; Rebolo, R.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the use of apodizing functions at the coronagraph Lyot plane may be useful for improving the image contrast of ground-based coronagraphs. An experimental set-up consisting of a tip-tilt mirror, a coronagraph and a low-noise EMCCD camera was implemented at the William Herschel Telescope. Images were taken in the I band, which meant that the D/r0 value was around 10. Experimental results confirm that, for moderately aberrated wavefronts, our instrument works as theoretically expected, and that the contrast value attained is high enough to provide direct detection of faint companions.

  3. Sensitivity of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes for anisotropics in the cosmic gamma-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Ripken, Joachim; Horns, Dieter; Elsaesser, Dominik; Mannheim, Karl

    2008-12-24

    Self-annihilating dark matter contributes to the extra galactic very high-energy {gamma}-ray background. This contribution is expected to be anisotropic following the density distribution of non-baryonic dark matter. We explore the possibilities to search for these anisotropies with present and future ground-based gamma-ray experiments like H.E.S.S., MAGIC, or CTA. A multipole-expansion of simulated events is used to investigate the sensitivity for anisotropies detectable with narrow field of view observations.

  4. Protocol for Atomic Oxygen Testing of Materials in Ground-Based Facilities. No. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K.

    1995-01-01

    A second version of standard guidelines is proposed for improving materials testing in ground-based atomic oxygen environments for the purpose of predicting the durability of the tested materials in low Earth orbit (LEO). Accompanying these guidelines are background information and notes about testing. Both the guidelines and the additional information are intended to aid users who wish to evaluate the potential hazard of atomic oxygen in LEO to a candidate space component without actually flying the component in space, and to provide a framework for more consistent atomic oxygen testing in the future.

  5. Quasi-automatic software support for Gaia ground based optical tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouquillon, S.; Barache, C.; Carlucci, T.; Taris, F.; Altmann, M.; Andrei, A. H.; Smart, R.; Steele, Iain A.; Els, Sebastian G.

    2014-07-01

    The ESA Gaia satellite mission will create a catalog of 1 billion stars with unprecedented astrometric precision. To achieve its aim in terms of astrometric precision, a ground based optical tracking campaign (GBOT) of the satellite itself is necessary during the five years of the mission. We present an overview of the GBOT project as a whole in another contribution1 (Altmann et al. in SPIE category "observatory operations"). The present paper will focus more specifically on the software solutions developed by the GBOT group.

  6. Exo-zodi detection capability of the Ground-Based European Nulling Interferometry Experiment (GENIE) instrument.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Oswald; Flatscher, Reinhold; Ergenzinger, Klaus

    2006-06-20

    The Ground-Based European Nulling Interferometry Experiment (GENIE) is intended as an Earth-based precursor for the European Darwin mission that will prepare the Darwin science program and demonstrate the required technology at system level. We propose a compact nulling interferometer design consisting of a two-telescope aperture configuration, an optional split-pupil add-on, and only four active control loops for counteracting environmentally induced disturbances. We show by simulation that the proposed instrument is able to detect, within a few minutes of observation time, exo-zodiacal dust clouds around Sunlike stars at 20 parsecs that are 20 times stronger than the local zodiacal dust cloud density.

  7. Morphology classification of galaxies in CL 0939+4713 using a ground-based telescope image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukugita, M.; Doi, M.; Dressler, A.; Gunn, J. E.

    1995-01-01

    Morphological classification is studied for galaxies in cluster CL 0939+4712 at z = 0.407 using simple photometric parameters obtained from a ground-based telescope image with seeing of 1-2 arcseconds full width at half maximim (FWHM). By ploting the galaxies in a plane of the concentration parameter versus mean surface brightness, we find a good correlation between the location on the plane and galaxy colors, which are known to correlate with morphological types from a recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) study. Using the present method, we expect a success rate of classification into early and late types of about 70% or possibly more.

  8. Ground-Based Gas-Liquid Flow Research in Microgravity Conditions: State of Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, J.; Colin, C.; Fabre, J.

    1999-01-01

    During the last decade, ground-based microgravity facilities have been utilized in order to obtain predictions for spacecraft system designers and further the fundamental understanding of two-phase flow. Although flow regime, pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient data has been obtained for straight tubes and a limited number of fittings, measurements of the void fraction, film thickness, wall shear stress, local velocity and void information are also required in order to develop general mechanistic models that can be utilized to ascertain the effects of fluid properties, tube geometry and acceleration levels. A review of this research is presented and includes both empirical data and mechanistic models of the flow behavior.

  9. Plant diversity to support humans in a CELSS ground based demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, J. M.; Hoff, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) for human habitation in preparation for future long duration space flights is considered. The success of such a system depends upon the feasibility of revitalization of food resources and the human nutritional needs which are to be met by these food resources. Edible higher plants are prime candidates for the photoautotrophic components of this system if nutritionally adequate diets can be derived from these plant sources to support humans. Human nutritional requirements information based on current knowledge are developed for inhabitants envisioned in the CELSS ground based demonstrator. Groups of plant products that can provide the nutrients are identified.

  10. Performance of ground-based high-frequency receiving arrays with electrically-small ground planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, M. M.

    1991-09-01

    Electrically-small ground planes degrade the performance of ground-based high-frequency receiving arrays because the arrays are more susceptible to earth multipath, ground losses, and external currents on element feed cables. Performance degradations include a reduction in element directive gain near the horizon, distortion of the element azimuthal pattern, an increase in the system internal noise factor, and increases in the array factor root-mean-squared (rms) phase error and beam-pointing errors. The advantage of electrically-small ground planes is their relatively low cost of construction and maintenance.

  11. Estimating forest LAI profiles and structural parameters using a ground-based laser called 'Echidna'.

    PubMed

    Jupp, David L B; Culvenor, D S; Lovell, J L; Newnham, G J; Strahler, A H; Woodcock, C E

    2009-02-01

    There are many techniques for measuring leaf area index (LAI) and forest canopy foliage profiles but their accuracy is questionable. This paper briefly reviews current methods of estimating forest LAI and presents a novel, ground-based laser system, Echidna that can make a wide range of measurements of forest structure, including LAI. Here, use of the system to provide field data and derived gap probabilities in the form of a 'hemispherical photograph with range' is demonstrated. The results show consistency and reproducibility and do not depend on special conditions for the natural light field. PMID:19203942

  12. Surface features on Mars: Ground-based albedo and radar compared with Mariner 9 topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H.

    1973-01-01

    Earth-based albedo maps of Mars were compared with Mariner 9 television data and ground-based radar profiles to investigate the nature of the bright and dark albedo features. Little correlation was found except at the boundaries of classical albedo features, where some topographic control is indicated. Wind-blown dust models for seasonal and secular albedo variations are supported, but it is not clear whether the fines are derived from bright or dark parent rock. Mars, like the Earth and Moon, has probably generated two distinct types of crustal material.

  13. Triton's surface properties - A preliminary analysis from ground-based, Voyager photopolarimeter subsystem, and laboratory measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Lane, A. L.; Gibson, J.; Burrows, H.; Nelson, R. M.; Bliss, D.; Smythe, W.; Garkanian, V.; Wallis, B.

    1991-01-01

    The surface properties of Triton were investigated using data from the ground-based and Voyager photopolarimeter subsystem (PPS) observations of Triton's phase curve. The results indicate that Triton has a high single-scattering albedo (0.96 +/-0.01 at 0.75 micron) and an unusually compacted surface, possibly similar to that of Europa. Results also suggest that Triton's single-particle phase function and the macroscopically rough character of its surface are similar to those of most other icy satellites.

  14. Precise ground-based solar photometry and variations of total irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Herzog, A. D.; Lawrence, J. K.; Walton, S. R.; Hudson, H. S.; Fisher, B. M.

    1992-01-01

    Several empirical models of sunspot and facular irradiance effects were tested by assessing the degree of correlation between variations in the total solar irradiance, as measured by the active cavity radiometer irradiance monitor on the SMM and the measures of magnetic activity on the solar disk. This was done by analyzing images made during 21 days between June 20 and July 14, 1988. The paper also describes the instruments and the methods used to gather the ground-based photometric images, as well as the analysis procedure.

  15. Initial ground-based thermospheric wind measurements using Doppler asymmetric spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (DASH).

    PubMed

    Englert, Christoph R; Harlander, John M; Emmert, John T; Babcock, David D; Roesler, Frederick L

    2010-12-20

    We present the first thermospheric wind measurements using a Doppler Asymmetric Spatial Heterodyne (DASH) spectrometer and the oxygen red-line nightglow emission. The ground-based observations were made from Washington, DC and include simultaneous calibration measurements to track and correct instrument drifts. Even though the measurements were made under challenging thermal and light pollution conditions, they are of good quality with photon statistics uncertainties between about three and twenty-nine meters per second, depending on the nightglow intensity. The wind data are commensurate with a representative set of Millstone Hill Fabry-Perot wind measurements selected for similar geomagnetic and solar cycle conditions.

  16. Test and training simulator for ground-based teleoperated in-orbit servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bernd E.

    1989-01-01

    For the Post-IOC(In-Orbit Construction)-Phase of COLUMBUS it is intended to use robotic devices for the routine operations of ground-based teleoperated In-Orbit Servicing. A hardware simulator for verification of the relevant in-orbit operations technologies, the Servicing Test Facility, is necessary which mainly will support the Flight Control Center for the Manned Space-Laboratories for operational specific tasks like system simulation, training of teleoperators, parallel operation simultaneously to actual in-orbit activities and for the verification of the ground operations segment for telerobotics. The present status of definition for the facility functional and operational concept is described.

  17. Liquid Structures and Physical Properties -- Ground Based Studies for ISS Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Bendert, J. C.; Mauro, N. A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of electrostatically-levitated supercooled liquids have demonstrated strong short- and medium-range ordering in transition metal and alloy liquids, which can influence phase transitions like crystal nucleation and the glass transition. The structure is also related to the liquid properties. Planned ISS experiments will allow a deeper investigation of these results as well as the first investigations of a new type of coupling in crystal nucleation in primary crystallizing liquids, resulting from a linking of the stochastic processes of diffusion with interfacial-attachment. A brief description of the techniques used for ground-based studies and some results relevant to planned ISS investigations are discussed.

  18. Comparing satellite- to ground-based automated and manual cloud coverage observations - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, A.; Lockhoff, M.; Schrempf, M.; Tohsing, K.; Liley, B.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2015-05-01

    In this case study we compare cloud fractional cover measured by radiometers on polar satellites (AVHRR) and on one geostationary satellite (SEVIRI) to ground-based manual (SYNOP) and automated observations by a cloud camera (Hemispherical Sky Imager, HSI). These observations took place in Hannover, Germany, and in Lauder, New Zealand, over time frames of 3 and 2 months, respectively. Daily mean comparisons between satellite derivations and the ground-based HSI found the deviation to be 6 ± 14% for AVHRR and 8 ± 16% for SEVIRI, which can be considered satisfactory. AVHRR's instantaneous differences are smaller (2 ± 22%) than instantaneous SEVIRI cloud fraction estimates (8 ± 29%) when compared to HSI due to resolution and scenery effect issues. All spaceborne observations show a very good skill in detecting completely overcast skies (cloud cover ≥ 6 oktas) with probabilities between 92 and 94% and false alarm rates between 21 and 29% for AVHRR and SEVIRI in Hannover, Germany. In the case of a clear sky (cloud cover lower than 3 oktas) we find good skill with detection probabilities between 72 and 76%. We find poor skill, however, whenever broken clouds occur (probability of detection is 32% for AVHRR and 12% for SEVIRI in Hannover, Germany). In order to better understand these discrepancies we analyze the influence of algorithm features on the satellite-based data. We find that the differences between SEVIRI and HSI cloud fractional cover (CFC) decrease (from a bias of 8 to almost 0%) with decreasing number of spatially averaged pixels and decreasing index which determines the cloud coverage in each "cloud-contaminated" pixel of the binary map. We conclude that window size and index need to be adjusted in order to improve instantaneous SEVIRI and AVHRR estimates. Due to its automated operation and its spatial, temporal and spectral resolution, we recommend as well that more automated ground-based instruments in the form of cloud cameras should be installed

  19. Methane Emissions from Bangladesh: Bridging the Gap Between Ground-based and Space-borne Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, C.; Bennartz, R.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    Gaining an understanding of methane (CH4) emission sources and atmospheric dispersion is an essential part of climate change research. Large-scale and global studies often rely on satellite observations of column CH4 mixing ratio whereas high-spatial resolution estimates rely on ground-based measurements. Extrapolation of ground-based measurements on, for example, rice paddies to broad region scales is highly uncertain because of spatio-temporal variability. We explore the use of ground-based river stage measurements and independent satellite observations of flooded area along with satellite measurements of CH4 mixing ratio to estimate the extent of methane emissions. Bangladesh, which comprises most of the Ganges Brahmaputra Meghna (GBM) delta, is a region of particular interest for studying spatio-temporal variation of methane emissions due to (1) broadscale rice cultivation and (2) seasonal flooding and atmospheric convection during the monsoon. Bangladesh and its deltaic landscape exhibit a broad range of environmental, economic, and social circumstances that are relevant to many nations in South and Southeast Asia. We explore the seasonal enhancement of CH4 in Bangladesh using passive remote sensing spectrometer CH4 products from the SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). The seasonal variation of CH4 is compared to independent estimates of seasonal flooding from water gauge stations and space-based passive microwave water-to-land fractions from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager (TRMM-TMI). Annual cycles in inundation (natural and anthropogenic) and atmospheric CH4 concentrations show highly correlated seasonal signals. NOAA's HYSPLIT model is used to determine atmospheric residence time of ground CH4 fluxes. Using the satellite observations, we can narrow the large uncertainty in extrapolation of ground-based CH4 emission estimates from rice paddies

  20. Initial ground-based thermospheric wind measurements using Doppler asymmetric spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (DASH).

    PubMed

    Englert, Christoph R; Harlander, John M; Emmert, John T; Babcock, David D; Roesler, Frederick L

    2010-12-20

    We present the first thermospheric wind measurements using a Doppler Asymmetric Spatial Heterodyne (DASH) spectrometer and the oxygen red-line nightglow emission. The ground-based observations were made from Washington, DC and include simultaneous calibration measurements to track and correct instrument drifts. Even though the measurements were made under challenging thermal and light pollution conditions, they are of good quality with photon statistics uncertainties between about three and twenty-nine meters per second, depending on the nightglow intensity. The wind data are commensurate with a representative set of Millstone Hill Fabry-Perot wind measurements selected for similar geomagnetic and solar cycle conditions. PMID:21197018

  1. The Results of Ground-based and In-flight Testing of Charge-dissipative and Conducting EKOM Thermal Control Paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiman, J. I.; Iskanderova, Z.; Issoupov, V.; Grigorevskiy, A. V.; Kiseleva, L. V.; Finckenor, M.; Naumov, S. F.; Sokolova, S. P.; Kurilenok, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    An international program on comparative evaluation of space durability of thermal control paints from a number of countries was initiated a few years ago at ITL with coatings from Russia, France and USA being studied. This paper describes the results of the study on space durability of three types of charge-dissipative and conductive Russian advanced polymer-based EKOM thermal control paints. Extensive ground-based testing in fast atomic oxygen (FAO) beam facilities was used to test the space durability of these paints and the enhancement of their atomic oxygen erosion resistance by a surface modification technology, Photosil™. All pristine EKOM paints were also tested in a direct materials exposure experiment on Russian module "Zvezda" onboard the International Space Station. Space durability and change of the major physical properties were evaluated after these experiments using a number of analytical techniques. Both, the ground-based testing and the flight experiments indicated signs of surface erosion with some changes of thermal optical properties. Therefore, the paints were also modified by a surface treatment technology, Photosil™, to increase their erosion resistance to atomic oxygen, tested in the same ground-based FAO facilities up to high FAO fluencies and compared with testing results of pristine materials. The comparison indicated that the surface-modified paints exhibit reduced mass loss, full stabilization and no surface morphology changes, thus indicating at full protection from the high FAO fluencies. It was demonstrated that the developed surface modification treatment could be applied successfully to charge dissipative and conductive paints, to enhance the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment resistance of external thermal control coatings in long-term space missions.

  2. Determination of chlorophyll photosynthetic potential in vegetation using ground-based and satellite methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botvich, Irina; Alexander, Sidko; Pisman, Tamara; Shevyrnogov, Anatoly

    An integrated study of the vegetation in the south of Krasnoyarsk Territory was carried out on the basis of ground-based and satellite remote measurements. The research objects were agricultural crops (wheat, oats) during the vegetation period. The satellite calculations were based on the data having high (Landsat 7 ETM+) and medium spatial resolution (Terra-Modis). Both kinds of data were used to calculate the chlorophyll photosynthetic potential (CPSP) as the area of the triangle made up by the reflection values in the green, red and near infrared spectrum regions. The connection was determined between the ground-based and satellite measurements of CPSP. Having analyzed the remote field and satellite measurements of the brightness spectral ratios of agricultural crops during vegetation, we showed the possibility of estimation of structural changes in the near infrared spectrum region. A lack or excess of water in plants causes structural changes in their phytoelements, which affects their reflectance. We showed the possibility of assessing morpho-physiological changes and species composition of crops. We determined the correlation between the spectral reflectance in various crops with chlorophyll content in plants and biomass changes.

  3. De-mystifying earned value management for ground based astronomy projects, large and small

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Timothy; Brennan, Patricia; Mueller, Mark

    2014-08-01

    The scale and complexity of today's ground based astronomy projects have justifiably required Principal Investigator's and their project teams to adopt more disciplined management processes and tools in order to achieve timely and accurate quantification of the progress and relative health of their projects. Earned Value Management (EVM) is one such tool. Developed decades ago and used extensively in the defense and construction industries, and now a requirement of NASA projects greater than $20M; EVM has gained a foothold in ground-based astronomy projects. The intent of this paper is to de-mystify EVM by discussing the fundamentals of project management, explaining how EVM fits with existing principles, and describing key concepts every project can use to implement their own EVM system. This paper also discusses pitfalls to avoid during implementation and obstacles to its success. The authors report on their organization's most recent experience implementing EVM for the GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) project. G-CLEF is a fiber-fed, optical echelle spectrograph that has been selected as a first light instrument for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), planned for construction at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile's Atacama Desert region.

  4. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-Aki K; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-05-20

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module ("Kibo") on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides "space-based controls" by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments. PMID:26822934

  5. Preliminary Design of a Ramjet for Integration with Ground-Based Launch Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayles, Emily L.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the preliminary design of a ramjet for integration with a ground based launch assist. The reasons for the use of ground-based launch assist and the proposed mechanism for a system are reviewed. The use of a Optimal Trajectory by Implicit Simulation (OTIS), to model the flight and comparison with an actual rocket trajectory is given. The OTIS system is reviewed, The benefits of a launch assist system are analyzed concluding that a launch assist can provide supersonic speeds thus allowing ignition of ramjet without an onboard compressor. This means a further reduction in total launch weight. The Ramjet study is reviewed next. This included a review of the ONX simulations, the verification of the ONX results with the use of Holloman Sled experiment data as derived from the Feasibility of Ramjet Engine Test Capability on The Holloman AFB Sled Track. The conclusion was that the ONX system was not sufficient to meet the needs for the modeling required. The GECAT (Graphical Engine Cycle Analysis Tool) is examined. The results of the GECAT simulations was verified with data from Stataltex and D21 flights. The Next steps are: to create a GECAT Model of a launch assist ramjet, to adjust the geometry to produce the desired thrust, and to survey the ramjet's performance over a range of Mach numbers. The assumptions and requirements of a launch assist ramjet are given, and the acceptable flight regimes are reviewed.

  6. Potential use of ground-based sensor technologies for weed detection.

    PubMed

    Peteinatos, Gerassimos G; Weis, Martin; Andújar, Dionisio; Rueda Ayala, Victor; Gerhards, Roland

    2014-02-01

    Site-specific weed management is the part of precision agriculture (PA) that tries to effectively control weed infestations with the least economical and environmental burdens. This can be achieved with the aid of ground-based or near-range sensors in combination with decision rules and precise application technologies. Near-range sensor technologies, developed for mounting on a vehicle, have been emerging for PA applications during the last three decades. These technologies focus on identifying plants and measuring their physiological status with the aid of their spectral and morphological characteristics. Cameras, spectrometers, fluorometers and distance sensors are the most prominent sensors for PA applications. The objective of this article is to describe-ground based sensors that have the potential to be used for weed detection and measurement of weed infestation level. An overview of current sensor systems is presented, describing their concepts, results that have been achieved, already utilized commercial systems and problems that persist. A perspective for the development of these sensors is given.

  7. Ground-based research with heavy ions for space radiation protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Kronenberg, A.

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is one of the acknowledged potential showstoppers for long duration manned interplanetary missions. Human exploratory missions cannot be safely performed without a substantial reduction of the uncertainties associated with different space radiation health risks, and the development of effective countermeasures. Most of our knowledge of the biological effects of heavy charged particles comes from accelerator-based experiments. During the 35th COSPAR meeting, recent ground-based experiments with high-energy iron ions were discussed, and these results are briefly summarised in this paper. High-quality accelerator-based research with heavy ions will continue to be the main source of knowledge of space radiation health effects and will lead to reductions of the uncertainties in predictions of human health risks. Efforts in materials science, nutrition and pharmaceutical sciences and their rigorous evaluation with biological model systems in ground-based accelerator experiments will lead to the development of safe and effective countermeasures to permit human exploration of the Solar System.

  8. Zeeman effect in atmospheric O2 measured by ground-based microwave radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas-Guzmán, F.; Kämpfer, N.; Murk, A.; Larsson, R.; Buehler, S. A.; Eriksson, P.

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the Zeeman effect on stratospheric O2 using ground-based microwave radiometer measurements. The interaction of the Earth magnetic field with the oxygen dipole leads to a splitting of O2 energy states, which polarizes the emission spectra. A special campaign was carried out in order to measure this effect in the oxygen emission line centered at 53.07 GHz. Both a fixed and a rotating mirror were incorporated into the TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer) in order to be able to measure under different observational angles. This new configuration allowed us to change the angle between the observational path and the Earth magnetic field direction. Moreover, a high-resolution spectrometer (1 kHz) was used in order to measure for the first time the polarization state of the radiation due to the Zeeman effect in the main isotopologue of oxygen from ground-based microwave measurements. The measured spectra showed a clear polarized signature when the observational angles were changed, evidencing the Zeeman effect in the oxygen molecule. In addition, simulations carried out with the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) allowed us to verify the microwave measurements showing a very good agreement between model and measurements. The results suggest some interesting new aspects for research of the upper atmosphere.

  9. Spectroscopic Analysis Of The Hayabusa Re-Entry Using Airborne And Ground Based Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohle, Stefan; Marynowski, Thomas; Mezger, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    The Hayabusa sample return capsule, which contained precious asteroid samples, re-entered the Earth’s atmosphere on June 13, 2010. An ablative carbon-phenolic thermal protection system (TPS) was used to enable a safe return for the small capsule and the containing samples. A research aircraft operated by NASA has been setup with a wide range of imaging and spectrographic cameras for remote sensing of the radiation of the Hayabusa capsule during its entry flight. We developed for this mission a new instrument aiming to measure the translational temperature from the line broadening of heated atmospheric gases in their plasma state. Therefore, a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer was setup aboard the aircraft. Using an imaging spectrograph and an intensified camera it was possible to detect atomic oxygen and nitrogen emissions simultaneously with high resolution. We supported also the ground based observation with an infrared camera and a wide range miniature fibre spectrometer. The paper presents the setup of both, the airborne instrument and the ground based setup as well as first look results from the successful observation mission.

  10. Spectroscopic Analysis of the Hayabusa Re-Entry Using Airborne and Ground Based Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-08-01

    The Hayabusa sample return capsule, which contained precious asteroid samples, re-entered the Earth's atmosphere on June 13, 2010. An ablative carbon-phenolic thermal protection system (TPS) was used to enable a safe return for the small capsule and the containing samples. A research aircraft operated by NASA has been setup with a wide range of imaging and spectrographic cameras for remote sensing of the radiation of the Hayabusa capsule during its entry flight. We developed for this mission a new instrument aiming to measure the translational temperature from the line broadening of heated atmospheric gases in their plasma state. Therefore, a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer was setup aboard the aircraft. Using an imaging spectrograph and an intensified camera it was possible to detect atomic oxygen and nitrogen emissions simultaneously with high resolution. We supported also the ground based observation with an infrared camera and a wide range miniature fibre spectrometer. The paper presents the setup of both, the airborne instrument and the ground based setup as well as first look results from the successful observation mission.

  11. Ground based magnetometers: The workhorse of the magnetospheric-ionospheric community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerloev, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    For decades ground based magnetometers have proven to be the workhorse of magnetosphere-ionosphere physics and their importance is indisputable. SuperMAG is the next logical step for the ground magnetometer community to take in the development of a user friendly data service enabling an understanding as well as monitoring of the global electric current system. The data set provided by the ground magnetometer community is truly unique since it provide continuous and nearly global measurement of a fundamental parameter - the ground level magnetic field perturbations. The very strength of this data set also resulted in painstaking and labor-intensive data-handling, which effectively limited research. Analysts faced several inherent complications: confusing or even unknown coordinate systems, a multitude of data artifacts and errors, unknown baselines, and even difficulties obtaining data. These problems have resulted in a serious underutilization of data from magnetometers. In this paper we present a solution to these complications (the SuperMAG initiative) which is a worldwide collaboration of organizations and national agencies that currently operate more than 300 ground based magnetometers. SuperMAG provides easy access to validated ground magnetic field perturbations in the same coordinate system, identical time resolution and with a common baseline removal approach. The purpose of SuperMAG it to help scientists, teachers, students and the general public have easy access to measurements of the Earth's magnetic field. The presentation will focus on current and future SuperMAG capabilities illustrating the potential for now-casting and eventually forecasting.

  12. Proceedings of the 2010 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marvin A; Patterson, Eileen F

    2010-09-21

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2010: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2010 in Orlando, Florida,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, National Science Foundation (NSF), Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  13. Proceedings of the 2009 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marv A; Aguilar - Chang, Julio; Anderson, Dale; Arrowsmith, Marie; Arrowsmith, Stephen; Baker, Diane; Begnaud, Michael; Harste, Hans; Maceira, Monica; Patton, Howard; Phillips, Scott; Randall, George; Rowe, Charlotte; Stead, Richard; Steck, Lee; Whitaker, Rod; Yang, Xiaoning

    2009-09-21

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2009: Ground -Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2009 in Tucson, Arizona,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  14. Proceedings of the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marv A; Aguilar-chang, Julio; Arrowsmith, Marie; Arrowsmith, Stephen; Baker, Diane; Begnaud, Michael; Harste, Hans; Maceira, Monica; Patton, Howard; Phillips, Scott; Randall, George; Revelle, Douglas; Rowe, Charlotte; Stead, Richard; Steck, Lee; Whitaker, Rod; Yang, Xiaoning

    2008-09-23

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 23-25 September, 2008 in Portsmouth, Virginia. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  15. Ground-based very high energy gamma ray astronomy: Observational highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turver, K. E.

    1986-01-01

    It is now more than 20 years since the first ground based gamma ray experiments involving atmospheric Cerenkov radiation were undertaken. The present highlights in observational ground-based very high energy (VHE) gamma ray astronomy and the optimism about an interesting future for the field follow progress in these areas: (1) the detection at increased levels of confidence of an enlarged number of sources so that at present claims were made for the detection, at the 4 to 5 sd level of significance, of 8 point sources; (2) the replication of the claimed detections with, for the first time, confirmation of the nature and detail of the emission; and (3) the extension of gamma ray astronomy to the ultra high energy (UHE) domain. The pattern, if any, to emerge from the list of sources claimed so far is that X-ray binary sources appear to be copious emitters of gamma rays over at least 4 decades of energy. These X-ray sources which behave as VHE and UHE gamma ray emitters are examined.

  16. Ground-based research with heavy ions for space radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Durante, M; Kronenberg, A

    2005-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is one of the acknowledged potential showstoppers for long duration manned interplanetary missions. Human exploratory missions cannot be safely performed without a substantial reduction of the uncertainties associated with different space radiation health risks, and the development of effective countermeasures. Most of our knowledge of the biological effects of heavy charged particles comes from accelerator-based experiments. During the 35th COSPAR meeting, recent ground-based experiments with high-energy iron ions were discussed, and these results are briefly summarised in this paper. High quality accelerator-based research with heavy ions will continue to be the main source of knowledge of space radiation health effects and will lead to reductions of the uncertainties in predictions of human health risks. Efforts in materials science, nutrition and pharmaceutical sciences and their rigorous evaluation with biological model systems in ground-based accelerator experiments will lead to the development of safe and effective countermeasures to permit human exploration of the Solar System. PMID:15934192

  17. Validation of ozone monitoring instrument ultraviolet index against ground-based UV index in Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Muyimbwa, Dennis; Dahlback, Arne; Ssenyonga, Taddeo; Chen, Yi-Chun; Stamnes, Jakob J; Frette, Øyvind; Hamre, Børge

    2015-10-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) overpass solar ultraviolet (UV) indices have been validated against the ground-based UV indices derived from Norwegian Institute for Air Research UV measurements in Kampala (0.31° N, 32.58° E, 1200 m), Uganda for the period between 2005 and 2014. An excessive use of old cars, which would imply a high loading of absorbing aerosols, could cause the OMI retrieval algorithm to overestimate the surface UV irradiances. The UV index values were found to follow a seasonal pattern with maximum values in March and October. Under all-sky conditions, the OMI retrieval algorithm was found to overestimate the UV index values with a mean bias of about 28%. When only days with radiation modification factor greater than or equal to 65%, 70%, 75%, and 80% were considered, the mean bias between ground-based and OMI overpass UV index values was reduced to 8%, 5%, 3%, and 1%, respectively. The overestimation of the UV index by the OMI retrieval algorithm was found to be mainly due to clouds and aerosols.

  18. Ground based detection of the plasmapause and the density of the plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilig, Balázs; Darrouzet, Fabien; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Lichtenberger, János; Vellante, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    Although our knowledge on the plasmasphere dynamics has improved greatly thanks to some recent space missions (IMAGE, Cluster), continuous monitoring of the plasmapause position and plasma density remains unsolved. Ground based observation of geomagnetic field line resonances (FLRs) has the potential to achieve this goal. A meridional array of properly spaced magnetometers, such as EMMA (European quasi - Meridional Magnetometer Array, setup in frame of the PLASMON EU FP7 project), can provide dayside plasma density profiles. Compared to VLF whistlers, the other ground based source of plasmasphere density, FLRs have the advantage that they are often observed not only in the plasmasphere, but also outside it, in the plasmatrough, making them suitable for the detection of the plasmapause. The detection of FLRs is based on the amplitude and phase gradient observed between stations closely spaced in North-South direction. At normal conditions FLRs can be identified by a maximum in the cross phase spectra. Under special conditions, near the plasmapause the phase difference is reverted giving a minimum at the resonance frequency. This feature yields another possibility for the detection of the plasmapause. We present some events to demonstrate how the motion of the plasmapause can be monitored by means of EMMA. Results are compared to in-situ plasma density/plasmapause observations (WHISPER data onboard Cluster, EMFISIS data onboard Van Allen Probe) and some empirical models.

  19. Aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) viewed by satellite and ground-based remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoo-Jun; Kim, Byung-Gon

    2013-05-01

    Various aerosol and cloud microphysical properties have been compared and examined for several years using ground-based remote sensing data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM), which showed that the clouds with strong above-cloud inversions are more immune to variations in the meteorological environment and the associated aerosol-cloud interactions appear to be more dominant in nearly adiabatic clouds by comparing different environmental conditions. Meanwhile, MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and NCEP/NCAR (National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research) reanalysis data from 2001 to 2008 have been analysed to understand long-term aerosol and cloud optical properties, and their relationships in East Asia. Specifically only relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud fraction (CF) for the low-level liquid-phase clouds exhibit the overall positive correlation, being consistent with cloud lifetime effect. The results imply that ground-based remote sensing is probably better for the study of aerosol-cloud microphysical interactions, whereas satellite remote sensing is more appropriate for the study of aerosol and cloud macroscopic interactions.

  20. a Universal De-Noising Algorithm for Ground-Based LIDAR Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xin; Xiang, Chengzhi; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Ground-based lidar, working as an effective remote sensing tool, plays an irreplaceable role in the study of atmosphere, since it has the ability to provide the atmospheric vertical profile. However, the appearance of noise in a lidar signal is unavoidable, which leads to difficulties and complexities when searching for more information. Every de-noising method has its own characteristic but with a certain limitation, since the lidar signal will vary with the atmosphere changes. In this paper, a universal de-noising algorithm is proposed to enhance the SNR of a ground-based lidar signal, which is based on signal segmentation and reconstruction. The signal segmentation serving as the keystone of the algorithm, segments the lidar signal into three different parts, which are processed by different de-noising method according to their own characteristics. The signal reconstruction is a relatively simple procedure that is to splice the signal sections end to end. Finally, a series of simulation signal tests and real dual field-of-view lidar signal shows the feasibility of the universal de-noising algorithm.

  1. Proceedings of the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Benson, Jody; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2005-09-20

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 20-22 September, 2005 in Rancho Mirage, California. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  2. Proceedings of the 2011 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Patterson, Eileen F.; Sandoval, Marisa N.

    2011-09-13

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2011: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 13-15 September, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), National Science Foundation (NSF), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States' capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  3. Proceedings of the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Benson, Jody; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2007-09-25

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 25-27 September, 2007 in Denver, Colorado. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  4. Proceedings of the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Benson, Jody; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2006-09-19

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 19-21 September, 2006 in Orlando, Florida. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  5. Report on the ground-based observation campaign of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehin, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Rosetta gets closer to the nucleus than any previous mission, and returns wonderfully detailed measurements from the heart of the comet, but at the cost of not seeing the large scale coma and tails. The ground-based campaign fills in the missing part of the picture, studying the comet at about 1000 km resolution, and following how the overall activity of the comet varies. These data provide context information for Rosetta, so changes in the inner coma seen by the spacecraft can be correlated with the phenomena observable in comets. This will not only help to complete our understanding of the activity of 67P, but also to allow us to compare it with other comets that are only observed from the ground.The ground-based campaign includes observations with nearly all major facilities world-wide. In 2014 the majority of data came from the ESO VLT, as the comet was still relatively faint and in Southern skies, but as it returns to visibility from Earth in 2015 it is considerably brighter, approaching its perihelion in August, and at Northern declinations. I will present results from the 2014 campaign, including visible wavelength photometry and spectroscopy, and the latest results from 2015 observations.

  6. Towards the development of tamper-resistant, ground-based mobile sensor nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascarenas, David; Stull, Christopher; Farrar, Charles

    2011-11-01

    Mobile sensor nodes hold great potential for collecting field data using fewer resources than human operators would require and potentially requiring fewer sensors than a fixed-position sensor array. It would be very beneficial to allow these mobile sensor nodes to operate unattended with a minimum of human intervention. In order to allow mobile sensor nodes to operate unattended in a field environment, it is imperative that they be capable of identifying and responding to external agents that may attempt to tamper with, damage or steal the mobile sensor nodes, while still performing their data collection mission. Potentially hostile external agents could include animals, other mobile sensor nodes, or humans. This work will focus on developing control policies to help enable a mobile sensor node to identify and avoid capture by a hostile un-mounted human. The work is developed in a simulation environment, and demonstrated using a non-holonomic, ground-based mobile sensor node. This work will be a preliminary step toward ensuring the cyber-physical security of ground-based mobile sensor nodes that operate unattended in potentially unfriendly environments.

  7. Analysis of stratospheric NO2 trends above Kiruna using ground-based zenith sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Myojeong; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Hendrick, François; Platt, Ulrich; Pukite, Janis; Raffalski, Uwe; Van Roozendael, Michel; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric NO2 not only destroys ozone but acts as a buffer against halogen catalyzed ozone loss by converting halogen species into stable nitrates. To a better understanding of the impacts of stratospheric NO2 and O3 chemistry, we need long-term measurement data. In this study, ground-based zenith sky DOAS has successfully monitored trace gases related to stratospheric ozone chemistry since 1997. In this study, we shows the trend in stratospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) at Kiruna, Sweden (68.84°N, 20.41°E) as derived from ground-based zenith sky DOAS over the period 1997 to 2015. The results will be compared with satellite data measured from GOME on ERS-2, SCIAMACHY on EnviSAT, and GOME-2 on METOP-A. To calculate the trends, we apply a multiple linear regression model including variables to describe effects caused by the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), solar activity, and stratospheric aerosol amount.

  8. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-aki K.; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module (“Kibo”) on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides “space-based controls” by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments. PMID:26822934

  9. Nighttime Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements Using a Ground-based Lunar Photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkoff, Tim; Omar, Ali; Haggard, Charles; Pippin, Margaret; Tasaddaq, Aasam; Stone, Tom; Rodriguez, Jon; Slutsker, Ilya; Eck, Tom; Holben, Brent; Welton, Judd; da Silva, Arlindo; Colarco, Pete; Trepte, Charles; Winker, David

    2015-01-01

    In recent years it was proposed to combine AERONET network photometer capabilities with a high precision lunar model used for satellite calibration to retrieve columnar nighttime AODs. The USGS lunar model can continuously provide pre-atmosphere high precision lunar irradiance determinations for multiple wavelengths at ground sensor locations. When combined with measured irradiances from a ground-based AERONET photometer, atmospheric column transmissions can determined yielding nighttime column aerosol AOD and Angstrom coefficients. Additional demonstrations have utilized this approach to further develop calibration methods and to obtain data in polar regions where extended periods of darkness occur. This new capability enables more complete studies of the diurnal behavior of aerosols, and feedback for models and satellite retrievals for the nighttime behavior of aerosols. It is anticipated that the nighttime capability of these sensors will be useful for comparisons with satellite lidars such as CALIOP and CATS in additional to ground-based lidars in MPLNET at night, when the signal-to-noise ratio is higher than daytime and more precise AOD comparisons can be made.

  10. Synchronized observations by using the STEREO and the largest ground-based decametre radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.; Mann, G.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Kaiser, M. L.; Briand, C.; Zarka, P.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Koval, A. A.; Mel'nik, V. N.; Mukha, D. V.; Panchenko, M.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the approach to simultaneous (synchronous) solar observations of radio emission by using the STEREO-WAVES instruments (frequency range 0.125-16 MHz) and the largest ground-based low-frequency radio telescope. We illustrate it by the UTR-2 radio telescope implementation (10-30 MHz). The antenna system of the radio telescope is a T-shape-like array of broadband dipoles and is located near the village Grakovo in the Kharkiv region (Ukraine). The third observation point on the ground in addition to two space-based ones improves the space-mission performance capabilities for the determination of radio-emission source directivity. The observational results from the high sensitivity antenna UTR-2 are particularly useful for analysis of STEREO data in the condition of weak event appearances during solar activity minima. In order to improve the accuracy of flux density measurements, we also provide simultaneous observations with a large part of the UTR-2 radio telescope array and its single dipole close to the STEREO-WAVES antennas in sensitivity. This concept has been studied by comparing the STEREO data with ground-based records from 2007-2011 and shown to be effective. The capabilities will be useful in the implementation of new instruments (LOFAR, LWA, MWA, etc.) and during the future Solar Orbiter mission.

  11. Optical/infrared views of the distant universe with ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J. S.; Tolstoy, E.

    1997-05-01

    Ground-based optical/IR observatories offer access to the rest frame ultraviolet and visible spectral regions of objects with high redshifts. Current observations of high redshift objects with natural seeing of 0.5-1 arcsec include optical/IR photometry and a variety of spectroscopic measurements. These take advantage of the large apertures and efficient instruments of ground-based observatories to obtain high spectral resolution and to reach low surface brightnesses, which is required to overcome cosmological effects. The success of natural guide star adaptive optics systems suggests that observations could become routine with image diameters <=0.25 arcsec (and often approaching 0.1 arcsec) over modest fields of view in the IJHK bands. The combination of adaptive optics on 8-10-m class telescopes, versatile arrays of powerful instruments (including multi-slit or integral field unit spectrographs), and airglow suppression schemes will support deeper and more intensive infrared investigations of faint galaxies, and will allow us to take advantage of increased brightness in strong emission lines. This work should lead to a better understanding of selection effects at high redshift, as well as the identification and measurement of internal properties for typical galaxies at early epochs.

  12. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-Aki K; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-05-20

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module ("Kibo") on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides "space-based controls" by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments.

  13. Ground-based Observations of Water Vapor in Planet-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyk, Colette; Zhang, K.; Pontoppidan, K.; Blake, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Spitzer-IRS spectroscopy has shown that protoplanetary disks around low-mass young stars are generally blanketed in the mid-IR with strong molecular emission lines. Observations of these emission lines are allowing us, for the first time, to investigate disk chemistry in planet-forming regions, and to test our understanding of planet formation processes, such as the condensation sequence. However, at the spectral resolution of the IRS, the emission lines are unresolved and blended, making their interpretation difficult, even in the context of sophisticated radiative transfer disk modeling. In addition, with Spitzer alone, we are primarily sensitive to the few-AU region of protoplanetary disks, but do not get a complete picture of the water chemistry throughout the disk. Therefore, we have been pursuing a campaign of ground-based observing of water vapor in protoplanetary disks, utilizing a range of high-resolution spectrographs probing near- through mid-infrared wavelengths. I will present an update on our ground-based observing program and discuss implications for disk chemistry and planet formation.

  14. Coordinated Ground-Based Observations and the New Horizons Fly-by of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eliot; Young, Leslie; Parker, Joel; Binzel, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft is scheduled to make its closest approach to Pluto on July 14, 2015. NH carries seven scientific instruments, including separate UV and Visible-IR spectrographs, a long-focal-length imager, two plasma-sensing instruments and a dust counter. There are three arenas in particular in which ground-based observations should augment the NH instrument suite in synergistic ways: IR spectra at wavelengths longer than 2.5 µm (i.e., longer than the NH Ralph spectrograph), stellar occultation observations near the time of the fly-by, and thermal surface maps and atmospheric CO abundances based on ALMA observations - we discuss the first two of these. IR spectra in the 3 - 5 µm range cover the CH4 absorption band near 3.3 µm. This band can be an important constraint on the state and areal extent of nitrogen frost on Pluto's surface. If this band depth is close to zero (as was observed by Olkin et al. 2007), it limits the area of nitrogen frost, which is bright at that wavelength. Combined with the NH observations of nitrogen frost at 2.15 µm, the ground-based spectra will determine how much nitrogen frost is diluted with methane, which is a basic constraint on the seasonal cycle of sublimation and condensation that takes place on Pluto (and similar objects like Triton and Eris). There is a fortuitous stellar occultation by Pluto on 29-JUN-2015, only two weeks before the NH closest approach. The occulted star will be the brightest ever observed in a Pluto event, about 2 magnitudes brighter than Pluto itself. The track of the event is predicted to cover parts of Australia and New Zealand. Thanks to HST and ground based campaigns to find a TNO target reachable by NH, the position of the shadow path will be known at the +/-100 km level, allowing SOFIA and mobile ground-based observers to reliably cover the central flash region. Ground-based & SOFIA observations in visible and IR wavelengths will characterize the haze opacity and vertical

  15. Polar Stratospheric Clouds from ground-based lidar and CALIPSO observations and Chemistry Climate Models evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierli, Federico; Di Liberto, Luca; Cairo, Francesco; Cagnazzo, Chiara; Snels, Marcel; Keckhut, Philippe; Jumelet, Julien; Pitts, Michael C.

    2014-05-01

    We evaluate the Antarctic PSC observational databases of CALIPSO and the ground-based lidars of NDACC (Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) located in McMurdo and Dumont D'Urville stations and provide a process-oriented evaluation of PSC in a subset of CCMVAL-2 chemistry-climate models. Lidar observatories have a decadal coverage, albeit with discontinuities, spanning from 1992 to today hence offering a unique database. A clear issue is the representativeness of ground-based long-term data series of the Antarctic stratosphere conditions that may limit their value in climatological studies and model evaluation. The comparison with the CALIPSO observations with a global coverage is, hence, a key issue. In turn, models can have a biased representation of the stratospheric conditions and of the PSC microphysics leading to large discrepancies in PSC occurrence and composition. CALIPSO observations indicate a large longitudinal variability in PSC formation in the polar atmosphere and ground-based observations are hence representative of different cloud conditions. Point-to-point comparison is difficult due to sparseness of the database (or PSC appearance at the edge of the vortex) and to intrinsic differences in spatial distribution between models and observations. So the use of simple diagnostics that are independent from instrumental coverage is fundamental. Comparison between ground-based and satellite borne-lidar is overall satisfactory and differences may be attributed to differences in coverage. As expected, McMurdo site is dominated by a NAT-type regime that is a clear feature of the eastern part of polar vortex while Dumont D'Urville is largely influenced by the transition at the edge the polar vortex resulting, on average, in a much reduced PSC coverage with a partition between NAT and STS cloud types. Data from the 5 CCMs having provided PSC surface areas on daily basis have been evaluated using the same diagnostic type that may be derived

  16. Atomic oxygen effects on boron nitride and silicon nitride: A comparison of ground based and space flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.; Lan, E. H.; Smith, C. A.; Whatley, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen on boron nitride (BN) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) were evaluated in a low Earth orbit (LEO) flight experiment and in a ground based simulation facility. In both the inflight and ground based experiments, these materials were coated on thin (approx. 250A) silver films, and the electrical resistance of the silver was measured in situ to detect any penetration of atomic oxygen through the BN and Si3N4 materials. In the presence of atomic oxygen, silver oxidizes to form silver oxide, which has a much higher electrical resistance than pure silver. Permeation of atomic oxygen through BN, as indicated by an increase in the electrical resistance of the silver underneath, was observed in both the inflight and ground based experiments. In contrast, no permeation of atomic oxygen through Si3N4 was observed in either the inflight or ground based experiments. The ground based results show good qualitative correlation with the LEO flight results, indicating that ground based facilities such as the one at Los Alamos National Lab can reproduce space flight data from LEO.

  17. A comparison of ground-based and space flight data: Atomic oxygen reactions with boron nitride and silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.; Lan, E. H.; Smith, C. A.; Whatley, W. J.; Koontz, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen on boron nitride (BN) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) have been studied in low Earth orbit (LEO) flight experiments and in a ground-based simulation facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both the in-flight and ground-based experiments employed the materials coated over thin (approx 250 Angstrom) silver films whose electrical resistance was measured in situ to detect penetration of atomic oxygen through the BN and Si3N4 materials. In the presence of atomic oxygen, silver oxidizes to form silver oxide, which has a much higher electrical resistance than pure silver. Permeation of atomic oxygen through BN, as indicated by an increase in the electrical resistance of the silver underneath, was observed in both the in-flight and ground-based experiments. In contrast, no permeation of atomic oxygen through Si3N4 was observed in either the in-flight or ground-based experiments. The ground-based results show good qualitative correlation with the LEO flight results, thus validating the simulation fidelity of the ground-based facility in terms of reproducing LEO flight results.

  18. Smoke Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the photo, Fire Chief Jay Stout of Safety Harbor, Florida, is explaining to young Richard Davis the workings of the Honeywell smoke and fire detector which probably saved Richard's life and that of his teen-age brother. Alerted by the detector's warning, the pair were able to escape their burning home. The detector in the Davis home was one of 1,500 installed in Safety Harbor residences in a cooperative program conducted by the city and Honeywell Inc.

  19. Modeling turbulent fluxes at a winter wheat stand -possibilities and limitations of ground-based thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrends, H. E.; Haseneder-Lind, R.; Schickling, A.; Crewell, S.; Rascher, U.

    2013-12-01

    Aircraft and satellite sensors operating in the thermal infrared (TIR) region of the spectrum provide spatially comprehensive information on the radiometric surface temperature (TR), representing an integrated temperature based on the radiation emitted from different surface components. TR data are commonly applied as a proxy for the (theoretical) aerodynamic temperature, which satisfies the bulk resistance formulation for the sensible heat transport. The quantitative relation between the radiometric and the aerodynamic temperature is however complex and strongly affected by ambient conditions and surface characteristics. Consequently, TR-based estimates of the latent and sensible heat flux can have high levels of uncertainty. Ground-based studies for the validation of remotely sensed TR data and for the evaluation of TR-based models are crucial. Ground-based TIR cameras, allowing for a high observation frequency and for studying the spatial variability of temperatures, might provide a suitable tool for such studies. We aim at testing the limitations and the possibilities of passive ground-based thermography for the application in studies on the diurnal and seasonal changes of land-atmosphere interactions. Operating at a frequency of 5 min., a TIR camera is mounted at a height of 2m at a winter wheat stand (TR32 research site, Germany), capturing images of a 1m x 1m area (320 × 240 pixel) during spring and summer 2013. Radiometric temperatures are corrected for the influence of cloud cover and evaluated using observations from thermocouples (leaf temperature), RTDs (canopy temperature profile) and an IR radiometer (spatially integrated temperature). Simultaneous hyperspectral and sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements are used as a proxy for plant functioning and status. Spatial image information is integrated into the framework of different flux modeling approaches, ranging from established one-source to complex, multi-layer models. Modelled fluxes are

  20. Ground-based Observations of the Solar Sources of Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronig, A. M.; Pötzi, W.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of the Sun and its activity is a task of growing importance in the frame of space weather research and awareness. Major space weather disturbances at Earth have their origin in energetic outbursts from the Sun: solar flares, coronal mass ejections and associated solar energetic particles. In this review we discuss the importance and complementarity of ground-based and space-based observations for space weather studies. The main focus is drawn on ground-based observations in the visible range of the spectrum, in particular in the diagnostically manifold Hα spectral line, which enables us to detect and study solar flares, filaments (prominences), filament (prominence) eruptions, and Moreton waves. Existing Hα networks such as the GONG and the Global High-Resolution Hα Network are discussed. As an example of solar observations from space weather research to operations, we present the system of real-time detection of Hα flares and filaments established at Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO; Austria) in the frame of the space weather segment of the ESA Space Situational Awareness programme (swe.ssa.esa.int). An evaluation of the system, which is continuously running since July 2013 is provided, covering an evaluation period of almost 2.5 years. During this period, KSO provided 3020 hours of real-time Hα observations at the ESA SWE portal. In total, 824 Hα flares were detected and classified by the real-time detection system, including 174 events of Hα importance class 1 and larger. For the total sample of events, 95 % of the automatically determined flare peak times lie within ±5 min of the values given in the official optical flares reports (by NOAA and KSO), and 76 % of the start times. The heliographic positions determined are better than ±5°. The probability of detection of flares of importance 1 or larger is 95 %, with a false alarm rate of 16 %. These numbers confirm the high potential of automatic flare detection and alerting from ground-based

  1. KEPLER AND GROUND-BASED TRANSITS OF THE EXO-NEPTUNE HAT-P-11b

    SciTech Connect

    Deming, Drake; Jackson, Brian; Jennings, Donald E.; Sada, Pedro V.; Peterson, Steven W.; Haase, Flynn; Bays, Kevin; Agol, Eric; Knutson, Heather A.

    2011-10-10

    We analyze 26 archival Kepler transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b, supplemented by ground-based transits observed in the blue (B band) and near-IR (J band). Both the planet and host star are smaller than previously believed; our analysis yields R{sub p} = 4.31 R{sub +} {+-} 0.06 R{sub +} and R{sub s} = 0.683 R{sub sun} {+-} 0.009 R{sub sun}, both about 3{sigma} smaller than the discovery values. Our ground-based transit data at wavelengths bracketing the Kepler bandpass serve to check the wavelength dependence of stellar limb darkening, and the J-band transit provides a precise and independent constraint on the transit duration. Both the limb darkening and transit duration from our ground-based data are consistent with the new Kepler values for the system parameters. Our smaller radius for the planet implies that its gaseous envelope can be less extensive than previously believed, being very similar to the H-He envelope of GJ 436b and Kepler-4b. HAT-P-11 is an active star, and signatures of star spot crossings are ubiquitous in the Kepler transit data. We develop and apply a methodology to correct the planetary radius for the presence of both crossed and uncrossed star spots. Star spot crossings are concentrated at phases -0.002 and +0.006. This is consistent with inferences from Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements that the planet transits nearly perpendicular to the stellar equator. We identify the dominant phases of star spot crossings with active latitudes on the star, and infer that the stellar rotational pole is inclined at about 12{sup 0} {+-} 5{sup 0} to the plane of the sky. We point out that precise transit measurements over long durations could in principle allow us to construct a stellar Butterfly diagram to probe the cyclic evolution of magnetic activity on this active K-dwarf star.

  2. Laser Guidestar Satellite for Ground-based Adaptive Optics Imaging of Geosynchronous Satellites and Astronomical Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlow, W. A.; Cahoy, K.; Males, J.; Carlton, A.; Yoon, H.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time observation and monitoring of geostationary (GEO) satellites with ground-based imaging systems would be an attractive alternative to fielding high cost, long lead, space-based imagers, but ground-based observations are inherently limited by atmospheric turbulence. Adaptive optics (AO) systems are used to help ground telescopes achieve diffraction-limited seeing. AO systems have historically relied on the use of bright natural guide stars or laser guide stars projected on a layer of the upper atmosphere by ground laser systems. There are several challenges with this approach such as the sidereal motion of GEO objects relative to natural guide stars and limitations of ground-based laser guide stars; they cannot be used to correct tip-tilt, they are not point sources, and have finite angular sizes when detected at the receiver. There is a difference between the wavefront error measured using the guide star compared with the target due to cone effect, which also makes it difficult to use a distributed aperture system with a larger baseline to improve resolution. Inspired by previous concepts proposed by A.H. Greenaway, we present using a space-based laser guide starprojected from a satellite orbiting the Earth. We show that a nanosatellite-based guide star system meets the needs for imaging GEO objects using a low power laser even from 36,000 km altitude. Satellite guide star (SGS) systemswould be well above atmospheric turbulence and could provide a small angular size reference source. CubeSatsoffer inexpensive, frequent access to space at a fraction of the cost of traditional systems, and are now being deployed to geostationary orbits and on interplanetary trajectories. The fundamental CubeSat bus unit of 10 cm cubed can be combined in multiple units and offers a common form factor allowing for easy integration as secondary payloads on traditional launches and rapid testing of new technologies on-orbit. We describe a 6U CubeSat SGS measuring 10 cm x 20 cm x

  3. System-level view of geospace dynamics: Challenges for high-latitude ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, E.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, research programs including GEM, CEDAR, GEMSIS, GO Canada, and others are focusing on how geospace works as a system. Coupling sits at the heart of system level dynamics. In all cases, coupling is accomplished via fundamental processes such as reconnection and plasma waves, and can be between regions, energy ranges, species, scales, and energy reservoirs. Three views of geospace are required to attack system level questions. First, we must observe the fundamental processes that accomplish the coupling. This "observatory view" requires in situ measurements by satellite-borne instruments or remote sensing from powerful well-instrumented ground-based observatories organized around, for example, Incoherent Scatter Radars. Second, we need to see how this coupling is controlled and what it accomplishes. This demands quantitative observations of the system elements that are being coupled. This "multi-scale view" is accomplished by networks of ground-based instruments, and by global imaging from space. Third, if we take geospace as a whole, the system is too complicated, so at the top level we need time series of simple quantities such as indices that capture important aspects of the system level dynamics. This requires a "key parameter view" that is typically provided through indices such as AE and DsT. With the launch of MMS, and ongoing missions such as THEMIS, Cluster, Swarm, RBSP, and ePOP, we are entering a-once-in-a-lifetime epoch with a remarkable fleet of satellites probing processes at key regions throughout geospace, so the observatory view is secure. With a few exceptions, our key parameter view provides what we need. The multi-scale view, however, is compromised by space/time scales that are important but under-sampled, combined extent of coverage and resolution that falls short of what we need, and inadequate conjugate observations. In this talk, I present an overview of what we need for taking system level research to its next level, and how

  4. The Application of Millimeter Wave Spectroscopy to Ground-Based Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Niall J.

    A new ground-based millimeter wave radiometer, SPEIR, was designed as part of an observation system to detect and monitor ozone-related trace gases in the Arctic stratosphere. SPEIR is designed to operate in the frequency range 265--280 GHz and measure the atmospheric spectra of ozone, nitrous oxide, nitric acid, and chlorine monoxide, from which vertical profiles of the gas concentrations can be retrieved. The observation system was characterised and simulated to determine its capability while operating at its intended location at Eureka, Nunavut (80°N). The altitude ranges and resolution of the retrieved profiles were determined, as well as the most significant sources of error in the profile of each gas. Optimal estimation statistics were compared to inversions of 500 simulated spectra. The results are in good agreement but showed that nonlinearities in the forward model, if not accounted for, can cause errors of 5--10% when constructing climatologies or analyzing trends with the trace gas profiles. A sensitivity study was performed to quantify the effects that uncertainties in the spectral parameters of molecules have on ground-based measurements at 265--280 GHz, and recommendations are made for new laboratory measurements. An inversion scheme was created to retrieve ozone profiles from measurements made by KIMRA (Kiruna Microwave Radiometer) and MIRA 2 (Millimeter Wave Radiometer 2), two ground-based millimeter wave radiometers in Kiruna, Sweden (68°N). The resulting profiles in winter/spring 2012/2013 were compared to each other, and to those from ozonesondes and the satellite instrument Aura MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). The Kiruna instruments are biased low compared to the ozonesondes and generally agree with MLS. A significant oscillatory bias was found in KIMRA profiles and is attributed to standing wave features in the spectral measurements. Winter-time KIMRA ozone from 2008--2013 was used to investigate the natural variability of ozone above Kiruna. A

  5. The Application of Millimeter Wave Spectroscopy to Ground-Based Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Niall J.

    A new ground-based millimeter wave radiometer, SṔEIR, was designed as part of an observation system to detect and monitor ozone-related trace gases in the Arctic stratosphere. SṔEIR is designed to operate in the frequency range 265-280 GHz and measure the atmospheric spectra of ozone, nitrous oxide, nitric acid, and chlorine monoxide, from which vertical profiles of the gas concentrations can be retrieved. The observation system was characterised and simulated to determine its capability while operating at its intended location at Eureka, Nunavut (80°N). The altitude ranges and resolution of the retrieved profiles were determined, as well as the most significant sources of error in the profile of each gas. Optimal estimation statistics were compared to inversions of 500 simulated spectra. The results are in good agreement but showed that nonlinearities in the forward model, if not accounted for, can cause errors of 5- 10% when constructing climatologies or analyzing trends with the trace gas profiles. A sensitivity study was performed to quantify the effects that uncertainties in the spectral parameters of molecules have on ground-based measurements at 265-280 GHz, and recommendations are made for new laboratory measurements. An inversion scheme was created to retrieve ozone profiles from measurements made by KIMRA (Kiruna Microwave Radiometer) and MIRA 2 (Millimeter Wave Radiometer 2), two ground-based millimeter wave radiometers in Kiruna, Sweden (68°N). The resulting profiles in winter/spring 2012/2013 were compared to each other, and to those from ozonesondes and the satellite instrument Aura MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). The Kiruna instruments are biased low compared to the ozonesondes and generally agree with MLS. A significant oscillatory bias was found in KIMRA profiles and is attributed to standing wave features in the spectral measurements. Winter-time KIMRA ozone from 2008-2013 was used to investigate the natural variability of ozone above Kiruna

  6. Development of a Portable, Ground-based Ozone Lidar Instrument for Tropospheric Ozone Research and Educational Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyba, Thomas; Zemker, Thomas; Fishman, Jack (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to develop a portable, eye-safe, ground-based ozone lidar instrument specialized for ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements in the troposphere. This research project directly supports the goal of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise to understand the distribution and budget of tropospheric ozone (objective 1.5 of the Earth Science Strategic Enterprise Plan, 1998-2002). It can participate in ground validation experiments for TES, a tropospheric ozone satellite mission due to be launched in 2002. It can also be utilized for correlative ground measurements in future GTE (Global Tropospheric Experiment) and space-based ozone lidar missions, such as ORACLE. Multiple ground-based ozone lidar systems would improve the data obtained through current ozone-sonde networks. This prototype instrument could to serve as the basic unit for these and other future monitoring projects requiring multi-instrument networks, such as that proposed for the Global Tropospheric Ozone Project (GTOP). GTOP is currently being formulated by a scientific panel of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project to meet its goal to better understand the processes that control the global distribution of tropospheric ozone. In order for the lidar to be widely deployed in networks, it must be fairly easy to use and maintain as well as being cost-competitive with a ground station launching ozonesondes several times a day. A second 2-year grant to continue this effort with students participating in ground tests and system improvements has been awarded by the Office of Equal Employment Opportunities (OEOP). This project also supports existing NASA lidar missions through its development of advanced, compact lidar technology. Innovations in both transmitters and receivers have been made in this project. Finally, this system could be modified in the future to probe more deeply into the stratosphere. This could be accomplished by increasing the

  7. Optical Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goushcha, Alexander; Tabbert, Bernd

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities - from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  8. Optical Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbert, Bernd; Goushcha, Alexander

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  9. Some validation results of orbital and ground based CO and CH4 total content measurements in background and industrial regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitin, Vadim; Shtabkin, Yury; Elansky, Nikolai; Skorokhod, Andrey; Safronov, Alexandr; Dzhola, Anatoly

    2015-04-01

    The results of ground-based spectroscopic measurements of CO and CH4 total content (TC) in Moscow, Zvenigorod (53 km toward West from the Moscow center), ZOTTO station (Central Siberia) and Beijing (China) during 2010-2014 years for conditions of typical and anomalous emission rates are presented and compared with satellite TC data (the latest versions of MOPITT, AIRS, IASI products). The empiric coefficients and relationships between data of ground-based and satellite CO and CH4 total contents (TC) are discussed. The comparison demonstrated a good agreement (R2 ~ 0.6-0.9) of satellite and ground-based CO TC data in low pollution conditions and systematic underestimation of satellite CO TC (150-300 %) in condition of intense surface emissions (events of wild fires in Siberia in 2011-2012 and strong atmospheric pollutions in Beijing). The best correlation (R2 ~ 0.4) for polluted conditions of Beijing was obtained in summer time-period for averaged AIRS v.6 CO TC data for