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Sample records for advanced high-current particle

  1. A new method of rapid power measurement for MW-scale high-current particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongjian; Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Zhimin; Xie, Yahong; Liu, Sheng; Liang, Lizheng; Jiang, Caichao; Sheng, Peng; Yu, Ling

    2015-09-01

    MW-scale high current particle beams are widely applied for plasma heating in the magnetic confinement fusion devices, in which beam power is an important indicator for efficient heating. Generally, power measurement of MW-scale high current particle beam adopts water flow calorimetry (WFC). Limited by the principles of WFC, the beam power given by WFC is an averaged value. In this article a new method of beam power for MW-scale high-current particle beams is introduced: (1) the temperature data of thermocouples embedded in the beam stopping elements were obtained using high data acquire system, (2) the surface heat flux of the beam stopping elements are calculated using heat transfer, (3) the relationships between positions and heat flux were acquired using numerical simulation, (4) the real-time power deposited on the beam stopping elements can be calculated using surface integral. The principle of measurement was described in detail and applied to the EAST neutral beam injector for demonstration. The result is compared with that measured by WFC. Comparison of the results shows good accuracy and applicability of this measuring method.

  2. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2014-01-01

    Testing was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by Space Systems Loral, LLC (SSL). The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration of flight-type design that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four string currents (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micro-seconds to 2.75 milli-seconds. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-ESD functional testing showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. These test results point to a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission.

  3. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Hoang, B.; Wong, F.

    2014-01-01

    A test was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by SSL. The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array current (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 µs to 2.9 ms. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission application.

  4. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2014-01-01

    Testing was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by Space Systems/Loral, LLC (SSL). The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array currents (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micro-seconds to 2.75 milli-seconds. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission.

  5. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by SSL. The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array current (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micros to 2.9 ms. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission application.

  6. DARPA Advanced High Current Density Cathodes for Defense Applications: Development Phase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Relevant approximations are applied to these exact solutions in order to extract the general thermodynamic properties without the need for the full...understanding that has been developed in terms of the properties of the advanced cathode materials, the fabrication and optimization processing, and the design...demonstrated that the parameters a and P3 are not constants, and that when a simple account of realistic material properties is included, the variation of a and

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic modes analysis and control of Fusion Advanced Studies Torus high-current scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Villone, F.; Mastrostefano, S.; Calabrò, G.; Vlad, G.; Crisanti, F.; Fusco, V.; Marchiori, G.; Bolzonella, T.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2014-08-15

    One of the main FAST (Fusion Advanced Studies Torus) goals is to have a flexible experiment capable to test tools and scenarios for safe and reliable tokamak operation, in order to support ITER and help the final DEMO design. In particular, in this paper, we focus on operation close to a possible border of stability related to low-q operation. To this purpose, a new FAST scenario has then been designed at I{sub p} = 10 MA, B{sub T} = 8.5 T, q{sub 95} ≈ 2.3. Transport simulations, carried out by using the code JETTO and the first principle transport model GLF23, indicate that, under these conditions, FAST could achieve an equivalent Q ≈ 3.5. FAST will be equipped with a set of internal active coils for feedback control, which will produce magnetic perturbation with toroidal number n = 1 or n = 2. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mode analysis and feedback control simulations performed with the codes MARS, MARS-F, CarMa (both assuming the presence of a perfect conductive wall and using the exact 3D resistive wall structure) show the possibility of the FAST conductive structures to stabilize n = 1 ideal modes. This leaves therefore room for active mitigation of the resistive mode (down to a characteristic time of 1 ms) for safety purposes, i.e., to avoid dangerous MHD-driven plasma disruption, when working close to the machine limits and magnetic and kinetic energy density not far from reactor values.

  8. Westinghouse Advanced Particle Filter System

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Sanjana, Z.N.; Newby, R.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) are being developed and demonstrated for commercial, power generation application. Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful implementation of IGCC and PFBC in power generation gas turbine cycles. The objective of this work is to develop and qualify through analysis and testing a practical hot gas ceramic barrier filter system that meets the performance and operational requirements of PFBC and IGCC systems. This paper reports on the development and status of testing of the Westinghouse Advanced Hot Gas Particle Filter (W-APF) including: W-APF integrated operation with the American Electric Power, 70 MW PFBC clean coal facility--approximately 6000 test hours completed; approximately 2500 hours of testing at the Hans Ahlstrom 10 MW PCFB facility located in Karhula, Finland; over 700 hours of operation at the Foster Wheeler 2 MW 2nd generation PFBC facility located in Livingston, New Jersey; status of Westinghouse HGF supply for the DOE Southern Company Services Power System Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama; the status of the Westinghouse development and testing of HGF`s for Biomass Power Generation; and the status of the design and supply of the HGF unit for the 95 MW Pinon Pine IGCC Clean Coal Demonstration.

  9. Advances in holographic particle velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Scott; Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle; Liu, David

    1993-12-01

    Holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) is a promising technique for 3D flow velocity and hence vorticity measurements to study turbulence, coherent structures and vortex interactions. We discuss various aspects in the development of this technique ranging from hologram recording configurations such as in-line, off-axis and multibeam to data processing. Difficulties in implementation are analyzed and solutions are discussed. We also present preliminary measurement results in a 3D vortex flow using one of our prototype HPV systems.

  10. Particle-in-cell simulation of electron trajectories and irradiation uniformity in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Langping; Zhou, Guangxue; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2017-02-01

    In order to study electron trajectories in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) source based on carbon fiber bunches, the transmission process of electrons emitted from the annular cathode was simulated using a particle-in-cell model with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC). The simulation results show that the intense flow of the electrons emitted from the annular cathode are expanded during the transmission process, and the uniformity of the electron distribution is improved in the transportation process. The irradiation current decreases with the irradiation distance and the pressure, and increases with the negative voltage. In addition, when the irradiation distance and the cathode voltage are larger than 40 mm and -15 kV, respectively, a uniform irradiation current distribution along the circumference of the anode can be obtained. The simulation results show that good irradiation uniformity of circular components can be achieved by this annular cathode HCPEB source.

  11. Advanced analysis methods in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Each generation of high energy physics experiments is grander in scale than the previous - more powerful, more complex and more demanding in terms of data handling and analysis. The spectacular performance of the Tevatron and the beginning of operations of the Large Hadron Collider, have placed us at the threshold of a new era in particle physics. The discovery of the Higgs boson or another agent of electroweak symmetry breaking and evidence of new physics may be just around the corner. The greatest challenge in these pursuits is to extract the extremely rare signals, if any, from huge backgrounds arising from known physics processes. The use of advanced analysis techniques is crucial in achieving this goal. In this review, I discuss the concepts of optimal analysis, some important advanced analysis methods and a few examples. The judicious use of these advanced methods should enable new discoveries and produce results with better precision, robustness and clarity.

  12. High Current Power Controller

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    AFWAL-TR-81- 2016 U iui.N HIGH CURRENT Ŕ POWER CONTROLLER P. E. McCOLLUM Audwo ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL AUTONETICS STRATEGIC SYSTEMS DIVISION 3370...personnel. During norm3l operation, HCP \\.s pose no hazard, bLt unde- certain operating conditions potential noaza-ds do exist. They are: (1) During

  13. High current ion source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.; Galvin, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

  14. Beam Interaction Measurements with a Retarding Field Analyzer in a High-Current High-Vacuum Positively-Charged Particle Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Seidl, P A; Logan, B G; Baca, D; Vujic, J L

    2006-07-11

    A Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) was inserted in a drift region of a magnetic transport section of the high-current experiment (HCX) that is at high-vacuum to measure ions and electrons resulting from beam interaction with background gas and walls. The ions are expelled during the beam by the space-charge potential and the electrons are expelled mainly at the end of the beam, when the beam potential decays. The ion energy distribution shows the beam potential of {approx} 2100 V and the beam-background gas total cross-section of 1.6x10{sup -20} m{sup 2}. The electron energy distribution reveals that the expelled electrons are mainly desorbed from the walls and gain {approx} 22 eV from the beam potential decaying with time before entering the RFA. Details of the RFA design and of the measured energy distributions are presented and discussed.

  15. Advance particle and Doppler measurement methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, C.

    1985-01-01

    Particle environments, i.e., rain, ice, and snow particles are discussed. Two types of particles addressed are: (1) the natural environment in which airplanes fly and conduct test flights; and (2) simulation environments that are encountered in ground-test facilities such as wind tunnels, ranges, etc. There are characteristics of the natural environment that one wishes to measure. The liquid water content (LWC) is the one that seems to be of most importance; size distribution may be of importance in some applications. Like snow, the shape of the particle may be an important parameter to measure. As one goes on to environment in simulated tests, additional parameters may be required such as velocity distribution, the velocity lag of the particle relative to the aerodynamic flow, and the trajectory of the particle as it goes through the aerodynamic flow and impacts on the test object.

  16. Advanced Crew Escape Suits (ACES): Particle Impact Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) requested NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility to assist in determining the effects of impaired anodization on aluminum parts in advanced crew escape suits (ACES). Initial investigation indicated poor anodization could lead to an increased risk of particle impact ignition, and a lack of data was prevalent for particle impact of bare (unanodized) aluminum; therefore, particle impact tests were performed. A total of 179 subsonic and 60 supersonic tests were performed with no ignition of the aluminum targets. Based on the resulting test data, WSTF found no increased particle impact hazard was present in the ACES equipment.

  17. Workshop on advances in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Miller, W.A.

    1993-12-31

    This proceedings contains viewgraphs presented at the 1993 workshop held at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Discussed topics include: negative stress, reactive flow calculations, interface problems, boundaries and interfaces, energy conservation in viscous flows, linked penetration calculations, stability and consistency of the SPH method, instabilities, wall heating and conservative smoothing, tensors, tidal disruption of stars, breaking the 10,000,000 particle limit, modelling relativistic collapse, SPH without H, relativistic KSPH avoidance of velocity based kernels, tidal compression and disruption of stars near a supermassive rotation black hole, and finally relativistic SPH viscosity and energy.

  18. Fabrication of advanced particles and particle-based materials assisted by droplet-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Tao; Wang, Juan; Han, Jun-Jie

    2011-07-04

    Recent advances in the fabrication of complex particles and particle-based materials assisted by droplet-based microfluidics are reviewed. Monodisperse particles with expected internal structures, morphologies, and sizes in the range of nanometers to hundreds of micrometers have received a good deal of attention in recent years. Due to the capability of generating monodisperse emulsions and of executing precise control and operations on the suspended droplets inside the microchannels, droplet-based microfluidic devices have become powerful tools for fabricating complex particles with desired properties. Emulsions and multiple-emulsions generated in the microfluidic devices can be composed of a variety of materials including aqueous solutions, gels, polymers and solutions containing functional nanoparticles. They are ideal microreactors or fine templates for synthesizing advanced particles, such as polymer particles, microcapsules, nanocrystals, and photonic crystal clusters or beads by further chemical or physical operations. These particles are promising materials that may be applicable for many fields, such as photonic materials, drug delivery systems, and bio-analysis. From simple to complex, from spherical to nonspherical, from polymerization and reaction crystallization to self-assembly, this review aims to help readers be aware of the many aspects of this field.

  19. Perihelion advance of a test particle in the Kerr field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Enamul

    2017-01-01

    Here I represent a Perihelion advance of a test particle in the Kerr field. I assume that the spin of the central body to be very small and planar motion occurs only in the equatorial plane. I find some physical picture which is different from the case of Schwarzschild field and can recover the picture for Schwarzschild field. We use perturbation method to solve the equation of motion.

  20. Characterization of the interactions within fine particle mixtures in highly concentrated suspensions for advanced particle processing.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Akira; Bryant, Gary

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to summarize recent investigations into the dispersion of fine particles, and the characterization of their interactions, in concentrated suspensions. This summary will provide a better understanding of the current status of this research, and will provide useful feedback for advanced particle processing. Such processes include the fabrication of functional nanostructures and the sustainable beneficiation of complex ores. For example, there has been increasing demand for complex ore utilization due to the noticeable decrease in the accessibility of high grade and easily extractable ores. In order to maintain the sustainable use of mineral resources, the effective beneficiation of complex ores is urgently required. It can be successfully achieved only with selective particle/mineral dispersion/liberation and the assistance of mineralogical and particle characterization.

  1. High PRF high current switch

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Stuart L.; Hutcherson, R. Kenneth

    1990-03-27

    A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

  2. High current pulse transmission cable

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.

    1990-09-28

    This invention is comprised of a transmission cable for carrying high current pulses in which an even numbered plurality of electrical conductors surrounds a central ground conductor. Each electrical conductor is connected so that it at any instant in time it will carry current of opposite polarity to the polarity carried by adjacent conductors. This arrangement cancels practically all of the external fields generated by current in the conductors.

  3. Behaviour of advanced materials impacted by high energy particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Cerutti, F.; Dallocchio, A.; Garlasché, M.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N.; Marques dos Santos, S. D.; Peroni, L.; Scapin, M.; Boccone, V.

    2013-07-01

    Beam Intercepting Devices (BID) are designed to operate in a harsh radioactive environment and are highly loaded from a thermo-structural point of view. Moreover, modern particle accelerators, storing unprecedented energy, may be exposed to severe accidental events triggered by direct beam impacts. In this context, impulse has been given to the development of novel materials for advanced thermal management with high thermal shock resistance like metal-diamond and metal-graphite composites on top of refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and copper alloys. This paper presents the results of a first-of-its-kind experiment which exploited 440 GeV proton beams at different intensities to impact samples of the aforementioned materials. Effects of thermally induced shockwaves were acquired via high speed acquisition system including strain gauges, laser Doppler vibrometer and high speed camera. Preliminary information of beam induced damages on materials were also collected. State-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes (like Autodyn®), relying on complex material models including equation of state (EOS), strength and failure models, have been used for the simulation of the experiment. Preliminary results confirm the effectiveness and reliability of these numerical methods when material constitutive models are completely available (W and Cu alloys). For novel composite materials a reverse engineering approach will be used to build appropriate constitutive models, thus allowing a realistic representation of these complex phenomena. These results are of paramount importance for understanding and predicting the response of novel advanced composites to beam impacts in modern particle accelerators.

  4. HIGH CURRENT COAXIAL PHOTOMULTIPLIER TUBE

    DOEpatents

    Glass, N.W.

    1960-01-19

    A medium-gain photomultiplier tube having high current output, fast rise- time, and matched output impedance was developed. The photomultiplier tube comprises an elongated cylindrical envelope, a cylindrical anode supported at the axis of the envelope, a plurality of elongated spaced opaque areas on the envelope, and a plurality of light admitting windows. A photo-cathode is supported adjacent to each of the windows, and a plurality of secondary emissive dynodes are arranged in two types of radial arrays which are alternately positioned to fill the annular space between the anode and the envelope. The dynodes are in an array being radially staggered with respect to the dynodes in the adjacent array, the dynodes each having a portion arranged at an angle with respect to the electron path, such that electrons emitted by each cathode undergo multiplication upon impingement on a dynode and redirected flight to the next adjacent dynode.

  5. High current capacity electrical connector

    DOEpatents

    Bettis, Edward S.; Watts, Harry L.

    1976-01-13

    An electrical connector is provided for coupling high current capacity electrical conductors such as copper busses or the like. The connector is arranged in a "sandwiched" configuration in which a conductor plate contacts the busses along major surfaces thereof clamped between two stainless steel backing plates. The conductor plate is provided with a plurality of contact buttons affixed therein in a spaced array such that the caps of the buttons extend above the conductor plate surface to contact the busses. When clamping bolts provided through openings in the sandwiched arrangement are tightened, Belleville springs provided under the rim of each button cap are compressed and resiliently force the caps into contact with the busses' contacting surfaces to maintain a predetermined electrical contact area provided by the button cap tops. The contact area does not change with changing thermal or mechanical stresses applied to the coupled conductors.

  6. Study of nanoscale structural biology using advanced particle beam microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boseman, Adam J.

    This work investigates developmental and structural biology at the nanoscale using current advancements in particle beam microscopy. Typically the examination of micro- and nanoscale features is performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in order to decrease surface charging, and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface. As magnification increases, this layer begins to limit the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. A new technology, Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), is used to examine uncoated surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant fruit flies. Corneal nanostructures observed with HIM are further investigated by FIB/SEM to provide detailed three dimensional information about internal events occurring during early structural development. These techniques are also used to reconstruct a mosquito germarium in order to characterize unknown events in early oogenesis. Findings from these studies, and many more like them, will soon unravel many of the mysteries surrounding the world of developmental biology.

  7. Performance of Advanced Light Source particle beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, is complete. The particle beam diagnostics have been installed and tested. The beam injection systems have been running for two years. We have performance data on beam position monitors, beam intensity monitors, scintillators, beam collimators, a 50 {Omega} Faraday cup, and broad-band striplines and kickers used in the linac, transport lines, and the booster synchrotron. The single-turn monitoring capability of the booster beam position monitoring system has been particularly useful for studying beam dynamics. Beam diagnostics for the storage ring are being commissioned. In this paper we describe each instrument, show its performance, and outline how the instruments are controlled and their output data displayed.

  8. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements.

    PubMed

    Clark, G; Cohen, I; Westlake, J H; Andrews, G B; Brandt, P; Gold, R E; Gkioulidou, M A; Hacala, R; Haggerty, D; Hill, M E; Ho, G C; Jaskulek, S E; Kollmann, P; Mauk, B H; McNutt, R L; Mitchell, D G; Nelson, K S; Paranicas, C; Paschalidis, N; Schlemm, C E

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  9. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  10. High current transistor pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1991-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current trapezoidally shaped pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in the capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of Darlington transistors. A combination of diodes and Darlington transistors is used to obtain trapezoidal or triangular shaped current pulses into an inductive load and to recover the remaining energy in the same capacitor bank without reversing capacitor voltage. The transistors work in the switch mode, and the power losses are low. The rack mounted pulse generators presently used at SLAC contain a 660 microfarad storage capacitor bank and can deliver 400 amps at 800 volts into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The pulse generators are used in several different power systems, including pulse to pulse bipolar power supplies and in application with current pulses distributed into different inductive loads. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled by the central computer system through a specially developed multichannel controller. Several years of operation with the pulse generators have proven their consistent performance and reliability. 8 figs.

  11. Novel particle and radiation sources and advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mako, Frederick

    2016-03-01

    The influence Norman Rostoker had on the lives of those who had the pleasure of knowing him is profound. The skills and knowledge I gained as a graduate student researching collective ion acceleration has fueled a career that has evolved from particle beam physics to include particle and radiation source development and advanced materials research, among many other exciting projects. The graduate research performed on collective ion acceleration was extended by others to form the backbone for laser driven plasma ion acceleration. Several years after graduate school I formed FM Technologies, Inc., (FMT), and later Electron Technologies, Inc. (ETI). Currently, as the founder and president of both FMT and ETI, the Rostoker influence can still be felt. One technology that we developed is a self-bunching RF fed electron gun, called the Micro-Pulse Gun (MPG). The MPG has important applications for RF accelerators and microwave tube technology, specifically clinically improved medical linacs and "green" klystrons. In addition to electron beam and RF source research, knowledge of materials and material interactions gained indirectly in graduate school has blossomed into breakthroughs in materials joining technologies. Most recently, silicon carbide joining technology has been developed that gives robust helium leak tight, high temperature and high strength joints between ceramic-to-ceramic and ceramic-to-metal. This joining technology has the potential to revolutionize the ethylene production, nuclear fuel and solar receiver industries by finally allowing for the practical use of silicon carbide as furnace coils, fuel rods and solar receptors, respectively, which are applications that have been needed for decades.

  12. Advances in sublimation studies for particles of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Nguyen, Viet; Fischer, Thomas; Abrishami, Tara; Papantonakis, Michael; Kendziora, Chris; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    When handling explosives, or related surfaces, the hands routinely become contaminated with particles of explosives and related materials. Subsequent contact with a solid surface results in particle crushing and deposition. These particles provide an evidentiary trail which is useful for security applications. As such, the opto-physico-chemical characteristics of these particles are critical to trace explosives detection applications in DOD or DHS arenas. As the persistence of these particles is vital to their forensic exploitation, it is important to understand which factors influence their persistence. The longevity or stability of explosives particles on a substrate is a function of several environmental parameters or particle properties including: Vapor pressure, particle geometry, airflow, particle field size, substrate topography, humidity, reactivity, adlayers, admixtures, particle areal density, and temperature. In this work we deposited particles of 2,4-dinitrotoluene on standard microscopy glass slides by particle sieving and studied their sublimation as a function of airflow velocity, areal particle density and particle field size. Analysis of 2D microscopic images was used to compute and track particle size and geometrical characteristics. The humidity, temperature and substrate type were kept constant for each experiment. A custom airflow cell, using standard microscopy glass slide, allowed in-situ photomicroscopy. Areal particle densities and airflow velocities were selected to provide relevant loadings and flow velocities for a range of potential applications. For a chemical of interest, we define the radial sublimation velocity (RSV) for the equivalent sphere of a particle as the parameter to characterize the sublimation rate. The RSV is a useful parameter because it is independent of particle size. The sublimation rate for an ensemble of particles was found to significantly depend on airflow velocity, the areal density of the particles, and the

  13. New Pulsed Power Technology for High Current Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2002-06-27

    Recent advances in solid-state modulators now permit the design of a new class of high current accelerators. These new accelerators will be able to operate in burst mode at frequencies of several MHz with unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format. These new modulators can drive accelerators to high average powers that far exceed those of any other technology and can be used to enable precision beam manipulations. New insulator technology combined with novel pulse forming lines and switching may enable the construction of a new type of high gradient, high current accelerator. Recent developments in these areas will be reviewed.

  14. Advances in Bayesian Model Based Clustering Using Particle Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Merl, D M

    2009-11-19

    Recent work by Carvalho, Johannes, Lopes and Polson and Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy introduced a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) alternative to traditional iterative Monte Carlo strategies (e.g. MCMC and EM) for Bayesian inference for a large class of dynamic models. The basis of SMC techniques involves representing the underlying inference problem as one of state space estimation, thus giving way to inference via particle filtering. The key insight of Carvalho et al was to construct the sequence of filtering distributions so as to make use of the posterior predictive distribution of the observable, a distribution usually only accessible in certain Bayesian settings. Access to this distribution allows a reversal of the usual propagate and resample steps characteristic of many SMC methods, thereby alleviating to a large extent many problems associated with particle degeneration. Furthermore, Carvalho et al point out that for many conjugate models the posterior distribution of the static variables can be parametrized in terms of [recursively defined] sufficient statistics of the previously observed data. For models where such sufficient statistics exist, particle learning as it is being called, is especially well suited for the analysis of streaming data do to the relative invariance of its algorithmic complexity with the number of data observations. Through a particle learning approach, a statistical model can be fit to data as the data is arriving, allowing at any instant during the observation process direct quantification of uncertainty surrounding underlying model parameters. Here we describe the use of a particle learning approach for fitting a standard Bayesian semiparametric mixture model as described in Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy. In Section 2 we briefly review the previously presented particle learning algorithm for the case of a Dirichlet process mixture of multivariate normals. In Section 3 we describe several novel extensions to the original

  15. Advanced Scavenge Systems for an Integrated Engine Inlet Particle Separator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    INSTRUMENTAT10N............ .oooo.....& 117 TEST RIG FACILITY INSTALLAT ION ..................... 124 TEST PLA.N OUJTLINE. . ... . .. .. .. .. . ... IZ...CDD 40 - 00 COD 0 cc 0a co 0 im 0 00 0-4 < -i 4L B LA SECT ION I (HUB) I1- SECTION 2 2- SECTION 3 3- SECTION 4 4 SECTION 5 5 STACKING POINT L.o in...based on previous particle seoarator experienc*, the difference in separation ef~iciency from 20-percent scavenge to 25 percent scavenge is mall, and

  16. Advanced Handling and Sorting Techniques for Ultrasmall Particles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-15

    Nitrogen Mixtures III-ll Ashing of Inorganic Materials with Oxygen, Hydrogen and Tetrafluoromethane 111-19 Spread in a Particle Beam Diameter IV-14...MATERIALS WITH OXYGEN, HYDROGEN AND TETRAFLUOROMETHANE Sample Material Initial Wt gm Final Wt. gm % Residue A. Ashed with Oxygen 1. Clay... Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) 1. Silica Dust 2. Uranium Dioxide 0.5173 1.4142 1.1845 93.2 4.0943 73.4 0.5601 99.9 4.1506 100.0 0.3409 60.8 2.9834 100.0 0.6301

  17. Individual Particle Analysis of Ambient PM 2.5 Using Advanced Electron Microscopy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald J. Keeler; Masako Morishita

    2006-12-31

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate a combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques that can be effectively used to identify and characterize individual particles and their sources. Specific techniques to be used include high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), STEM energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), and energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM). A series of ambient PM{sub 2.5} samples were collected in communities in southwestern Detroit, MI (close to multiple combustion sources) and Steubenville, OH (close to several coal fired utility boilers). High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) -imaging showed a series of nano-metal particles including transition metals and elemental composition of individual particles in detail. Submicron and nano-particles with Al, Fe, Ti, Ca, U, V, Cr, Si, Ba, Mn, Ni, K and S were observed and characterized from the samples. Among the identified nano-particles, combinations of Al, Fe, Si, Ca and Ti nano-particles embedded in carbonaceous particles were observed most frequently. These particles showed very similar characteristics of ultrafine coal fly ash particles that were previously reported. By utilizing HAADF-STEM, STEM-EDX, and EF-TEM, this investigation was able to gain information on the size, morphology, structure, and elemental composition of individual nano-particles collected in Detroit and Steubenville. The results showed that the contributions of local combustion sources - including coal fired utilities - to ultrafine particle levels were significant. Although this combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques by itself can not identify source categories, these techniques can be utilized as complementary analytical tools that are capable of providing detailed information on individual particles.

  18. Innovative experimental particle physics through technological advances: Past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Harry W.K.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    This mini-course gives an introduction to the techniques used in experimental particle physics with an emphasis on the impact of technological advances. The basic detector types and particle accelerator facilities will be briefly covered with examples of their use and with comparisons. The mini-course ends with what can be expected in the near future from current technology advances. The mini-course is intended for graduate students and post-docs and as an introduction to experimental techniques for theorists.

  19. Design and physicochemical characterization of advanced spray-dried tacrolimus multifunctional particles for inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao; Hayes, Don; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Kuhn, Robert J; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design, develop, and optimize respirable tacrolimus microparticles and nanoparticles and multifunctional tacrolimus lung surfactant mimic particles for targeted dry powder inhalation delivery as a pulmonary nanomedicine. Particles were rationally designed and produced at different pump rates by advanced spray-drying particle engineering design from organic solution in closed mode. In addition, multifunctional tacrolimus lung surfactant mimic dry powder particles were prepared by co-dissolving tacrolimus and lung surfactant mimic phospholipids in methanol, followed by advanced co-spray-drying particle engineering design technology in closed mode. The lung surfactant mimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phosphor-rac-1-glycerol]. Laser diffraction particle sizing indicated that the particle size distributions were suitable for pulmonary delivery, whereas scanning electron microscopy imaging indicated that these particles had both optimal particle morphology and surface morphology. Increasing the pump rate percent of tacrolimus solution resulted in a larger particle size. X-ray powder diffraction patterns and differential scanning calorimetry thermograms indicated that spray drying produced particles with higher amounts of amorphous phase. X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry also confirmed the preservation of the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state for all engineered respirable particles. Furthermore, it was observed in hot-stage micrographs that raw tacrolimus displayed a liquid crystal transition following the main phase transition, which is consistent with its interfacial properties. Water vapor uptake and lyotropic phase transitions in the solid state at varying levels of relative humidity were determined by gravimetric vapor sorption technique. Water content in the various powders was very low and well within the levels necessary

  20. The Los Alamos Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop and beginning of the advanced accelerator concepts field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.

    2012-12-01

    The first Advanced Acceleration of Particles-AAC-Workshop (actually named Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop) was held at Los Alamos in January 1982. The workshop lasted a week and divided all the acceleration techniques into four categories: near field, far field, media, and vacuum. Basic theorems of particle acceleration were postulated (later proven) and specific experiments based on the four categories were formulated. This landmark workshop led to the formation of the advanced accelerator R&D program in the HEP office of the DOE that supports advanced accelerator research to this day. Two major new user facilities at Argonne and Brookhaven and several more directed experimental efforts were built to explore the advanced particle acceleration schemes. It is not an exaggeration to say that the intellectual breadth and excitement provided by the many groups who entered this new field provided the needed vitality to then recently formed APS Division of Beams and the new online journal Physical Review Special Topics-Accelerators and Beams. On this 30th anniversary of the AAC Workshops, it is worthwhile to look back at the legacy of the first Workshop at Los Alamos and the fine groundwork it laid for the field of advanced accelerator concepts that continues to flourish to this day.

  1. Single Particle ICP-MS: Advances toward routine analysis of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Manuel D; Olesik, John W; Barber, Angela G; Challis, Katie; Ranville, James F

    2016-07-01

    From its early beginnings in characterizing aerosol particles to its recent applications for investigating natural waters and waste streams, single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) has proven to be a powerful technique for the detection and characterization of aqueous dispersions of metal-containing nanomaterials. Combining the high-throughput of an ensemble technique with the specificity of a single particle counting technique and the elemental specificity of ICP-MS, spICP-MS is capable of rapidly providing researchers with information pertaining to size, size distribution, particle number concentration, and major elemental composition with minimal sample perturbation. Recently, advances in data acquisition, signal processing, and the implementation of alternative mass analyzers (e.g., time-of-flight) has resulted in a wider breadth of particle analyses and made significant progress toward overcoming many of the challenges in the quantitative analysis of nanoparticles. This review provides an overview of spICP-MS development from a niche technique to application for routine analysis, a discussion of the key issues for quantitative analysis, and examples of its further advancement for analysis of increasingly complex environmental and biological samples. Graphical Abstract Single particle ICP-MS workflow for the analysis of suspended nanoparticles.

  2. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J.; Weiland, J.; Zang, Q.

    2013-10-15

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport.

  3. HIGH CURRENT RADIO FREQUENCY ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to a high current radio frequency ion source. A cylindrical plasma container has a coil disposed around the exterior surface thereof along the longitudinal axis. Means are provided for the injection of an unionized gas into the container and for applying a radio frequency signal to the coil whereby a radio frequency field is generated within the container parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof to ionize the injected gas. Cathode and anode means are provided for extracting transverse to the radio frequency field from an area midway between the ends of the container along the longitudinal axis thereof the ions created by said radio frequency field. (AEC)

  4. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  5. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  6. Space charge templates for high-current beam modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, Leonid G.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    A computational method to evaluate space charge potential and gradients of charged particle beam in the presence of conducting boundaries, has been introduced. The three-dimensional (3D) field of the beam can be derived as a convolution of macro Green's functions (template fields), satisfying the same boundary conditions, as the original beam. Numerical experiments gave a confidence that space charge effects can be modeled by templates with enough accuracy and generality within dramatically faster computational times than standard combination: a grid density + Poisson solvers, realized in the most of Particle in Cell codes. The achieved rapidity may significantly broaden the high-current beam design space, making the optimization in automatic mode possible, which so far was only feasible for simplest self-field formulations such as rms envelope equations. The template technique may be used as a standalone program, or as an optional field solver in existing beam dynamics codes both in one-passage structures and in rings.

  7. High-Current Betatron and Stereobetatron,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-04

    an increase in the accelerated current and intensity of the radiation/emissicn of charged particle acceleratcrs is at present most urgent/actual and...physics, chemistry, etc. LOC = 80171501 PAGE b In proportion to the introduction of accelarators into the national economy the requirements fcr them are...accelerators, fccus special attention on possibility increases in the accelerated current. An increase in the number of accelerated particles and

  8. First results from solid state neutral particle analyzer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Z.; Zhu, Y. B.; Zhao, J. L.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2016-11-01

    Full function integrated, compact solid state neutral particle analyzers (ssNPA) based on absolute extreme ultraviolet silicon photodiode have been successfully implemented on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak to measure energetic particle. The ssNPA system has been operated in advanced current mode with fast temporal and spatial resolution capabilities, with both active and passive charge exchange measurements. It is found that the ssNPA flux signals are increased substantially with neutral beam injection (NBI). The horizontal active array responds to modulated NBI beam promptly, while weaker change is presented on passive array. Compared to near-perpendicular beam, near-tangential beam brings more passive ssNPA flux and a broader profile, while no clear difference is observed on active ssNPA flux and its profile. Significantly enhanced intensities on some ssNPA channels have been observed during ion cyclotron resonant heating.

  9. First results from solid state neutral particle analyzer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J Z; Zhu, Y B; Zhao, J L; Wan, B N; Li, J G; Heidbrink, W W

    2016-11-01

    Full function integrated, compact solid state neutral particle analyzers (ssNPA) based on absolute extreme ultraviolet silicon photodiode have been successfully implemented on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak to measure energetic particle. The ssNPA system has been operated in advanced current mode with fast temporal and spatial resolution capabilities, with both active and passive charge exchange measurements. It is found that the ssNPA flux signals are increased substantially with neutral beam injection (NBI). The horizontal active array responds to modulated NBI beam promptly, while weaker change is presented on passive array. Compared to near-perpendicular beam, near-tangential beam brings more passive ssNPA flux and a broader profile, while no clear difference is observed on active ssNPA flux and its profile. Significantly enhanced intensities on some ssNPA channels have been observed during ion cyclotron resonant heating.

  10. Advanced particle filter. Technical progress report No. 19, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Tidd advanced particle filtration (APF) test runs 25 through 34 were completed during the first quarter of 1995. All Tidd testing was completed with the conclusion of APF test run 34 on 3/30/95. The Westinghouse activities supporting the APF operation during this quarter included processing of test data and participating in one APF borescope inspection. Data is included on the filter operation.

  11. High current high accuracy IGBT pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, V.V.; Donaldson, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current triangular or trapezoidal pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in a capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The circuit can then recover the remaining energy and transfer it back to the capacitor bank without reversing the capacitor voltage. A third IGBT device is employed to control the initial charge to the capacitor bank, a command charging technique, and to compensate for pulse to pulse power losses. The rack mounted pulse generator contains a 525 {mu}F capacitor bank. It can deliver 500 A at 900V into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled to 0.02% accuracy by a precision controller through the SLAC central computer system. This pulse generator drives a series pair of extraction dipoles.

  12. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-06-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  13. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  14. Advanced In-Situ Detection and Chemical Analysis of Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Gemer, A.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Maute, K.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Williams, E.; O'brien, L.; Rocha, J. R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ulysses dust detector discovered that interstellar dust particles pass through the solar system. The Hyperdsut instrument is developed for the in-situ detection and analysis of these particles to determine the elemental, chemical and isotopic compositions. Hyperdust builds on the heritage of previous successful instruments, e.g. the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on Cassini. Hyperdust combines a highly sensitive Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) and the high mass resolution Chemical Analyzer (CA). The DTS will detect dust particles as small as 0.3 μm in radius, and the velocity vector information is used to confirm the interstellar origin and/or reveal the dynamics from the interactions within the solar system. The effective target area of the CA is > 600 cm2 achieves mass resolution in excess of 200, which is considerably higher than that of CDA, and is acheved by advanced ion optics design. The Hyperdust instrument is in the final phases of development to TRL 6.

  15. Computer automation of high current ion implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, Ollie; Lindsey, Paul; Cecil, Joseph; Pipe, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Complete computer automation of a high current ion implanter has been achieved. Special design considerations were necessary for automation including the development of a simplified ion source, a simplified beam transport control function, and a computer aided real-time feedback dosimetry control system. A special, versatile software architecture was also necessary to allow protected operation by unskilled operators, as well as diagnostic and maintenance modes accessible only to qualified personnel. Integral mounting of the DEC LSI-11 computer in the implanter frame provided additional challenges regarding EMI control and the electrical isolation required. The end result is a system in which all pertinent functions of the implanter are computer monitored and controlled continuously, allowing for automatic set-up, operation, on-line fault detection and diagnostics, with recovery software to correct many transient problems as they occur. This paper will discuss both general and specific solutions to the design problems encountered, and will review the system performance from a user point of view.

  16. High current regimes in RFX-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valisa, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Buratti, P.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Dal Bello, S.; Martin, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Sarff, J. S.; Spolaore, M.; Zanca, P.; Zanotto, L.; Agostini, M.; Alfier, A.; Antoni, V.; Apolloni, L.; Auriemma, F.; Barana, O.; Baruzzo, M.; Bettini, P.; Bonfiglio, D.; Bonomo, F.; Brombin, M.; Buffa, A.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Cavinato, M.; Chitarin, G.; DeLorenzi, A.; DeMasi, G.; Escande, D. F.; Fassina, A.; Franz, P.; Gaio, E.; Gazza, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Gobbin, M.; Grando, L.; Guazzotto, L.; Guo, S. C.; Igochine, V.; Innocente, P.; Lorenzini, R.; Luchetta, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Marrelli, L.; Martini, S.; Martines, E.; McCollam, K.; Milani, F.; Moresco, M.; Novello, L.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Peruzzo, S.; Piovan, R.; Piron, L.; Pizzimenti, A.; Piovesan, P.; Pomaro, N.; Predebon, I.; Puiatti, M. E.; Rostagni, G.; Sattin, F.; Scarin, P.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Soppelsa, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spizzo, G.; Taliercio, C.; Terranova, D.; Toigo, V.; Vianello, N.; Yadikin, D.; Zaccaria, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zilli, E.; Zuin, M.

    2008-12-01

    Optimization of machine operation, including plasma position control, density control and especially feedback control on multiple magnetohydrodynamic modes, has led RFX-mod to operate reliably at 1.5 MA, the highest current ever achieved on a reversed field pinch (RFP). At high current and low density the magnetic topology spontaneously self-organizes in an Ohmical helical symmetry, with the new magnetic axis helically twisting around the geometrical axis of the torus. The separatrix of the island disappears leaving a wide and symmetric thermal structure with large gradients in the electron temperature profile. The new topology still displays an intermittent nature but its overall presence has reached 85% of the current flat-top period. The large gradients in the electron temperature profile appear to be marginal for the destabilization of ion temperature gradient modes on the assumption that ions and electrons have the same gradients. There are indications that higher currents could provide the conditions under which to prove the existence of a true helical equilibrium as the standard RFP configuration.

  17. Achromatic beam transport of High Current Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-02-01

    The high current injector (HCI) provides intense ion beams of high charge state using a high temperature superconducting ECR ion source. The ion beam is accelerated upto a final energy of 1.8 MeV/u due to an electrostatic potential, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a drift tube linac (DTL). The ion beam has to be transported to superconducting LINAC which is around 50 m away from DTL. This section is termed as high energy beam transport section (HEBT) and is used to match the beam both in transverse and longitudinal phase space to the entrance of LINAC. The HEBT section is made up of four 90 deg. achromatic bends and interconnecting magnetic quadrupole triplets. Two RF bunchers have been used for longitudinal phase matching to the LINAC. The ion optical design of HEBT section has been simulated using different beam dynamics codes like TRACEWIN, GICOSY and TRACE 3D. The field computation code OPERA 3D has been utilized for hardware design of all the magnets. All the dipole and quadrupole magnets have been field mapped and their test results such as edge angles measurements, homogeneity and harmonic analysis etc. are reported. The whole design of HEBT section has been performed such that the most of the beam optical components share same hardware design and there is ample space for beam diagnostics as per geometry of the building. Many combination of achromatic bends have been simulated to transport the beam in HEBT section but finally the four 90 deg. achromatic bend configuration is found to be the best satisfying all the geometrical constraints with simplified beam tuning process in real time.

  18. Advanced laser particle accelerator development at LANL: from fast ignition to radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine A; Offermann, D T; Cobble, J A; Schmitt, M J; Gautier, D C; Kwan, T J T; Montgomery, D S; Kluge, Thomas; Bussmann, Micheal; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Gall, B; Geissel, M; Korgan, G; Kovaleski, S; Lockard, T; Malekos, S; Schollmeier, M; Sentoku, Y; Cowan, T E

    2010-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, SN M detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high current and high energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology in conjunction with our partners at the ForschungsZentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD). Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent etliciencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  19. Advanced Laser Particle Accelerator Development at LANL: From Fast Ignition to Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, K. A.; Offermann, D. T.; Cobble, J. A.; Schmitt, M. J.; Gautier, D. C.; Kwan, T. J.; Montgomery, D. S.; Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Gall, B.; Kovaleski, S.; Geissel, M.; Schollmeier, M.; Korgan, G.; Malekos, S.; Lockard, T.

    2010-11-04

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, Special Nuclear Material (SNM) detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high-current and high-energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology. Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent efficiencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt laser. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world [3]. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  20. Advancements in the Coupling of State-of-the-Art Energetic Particle and Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advancements in coupling the Earth Moon Mars Radiation Environment Module (EMMREM) and two MHD models, Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS) and ENLIL, have yielded promising results for predicting differential energy flux and radiation doses at 1AU. The EMMREM+MAS coupling focuses on the details of particle acceleration due to CMEs initiated low in the corona (1Rs - 20Rs). The EMMREM+ENLIL coupling gives results for CMEs initiated at ~20Rs and is part of a predictive capability being developed in conjunction with the CCMC. The challenge in forming large solar energetic particle events in both the prompt scenario lower down or for a gradual CME further out is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration regions while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream. We present here details of the MHD parameters and topology of a CME around the acceleration regions in the early evolution (below 2Rs), dose and flux predictions at 1AU, and how compression regions vs. shocks affect the evolution and spectrum of an SEP event.

  1. Advances in Quantifying the Radiative Effects of Aerosol Particles on Climate from Airborne Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, K. S.; Coddington, O.; Bergstrom, R.; Redemann, J.

    2007-12-01

    In the fourth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, large uncertainties persist in estimates of climate forcing by aerosol particles. One contributor to this uncertainty is the poorly quantified vertical distribution of solar radiation absorbed by aerosol particles, from the regional to global scale. Another is the spectral and spatial variability of surface albedo, an effect that can dominate the top-of-atmosphere perturbations due to aerosol scattering and absorption, particularly over land. Over the past three years a number of intensive airborne field experiments (ICARTT, MILAGRO, GoMACCS) have contributed significantly to our understanding of the impact of pollution outflow from urban-industrial centers on radiative forcing, using spectrally resolved radiometric measurements and novel observationally-based methods to derive forcing efficiency and flux divergence. We present an overview of some of the most significant advances in direct radiative forcing realized by these studies, and recommendations on where the greatest challenges remain. In addition we present findings from these experiments on the influence of aerosol particles on cloud radiative properties, a potentially greater effect but even more uncertain than direct radiative forcing.

  2. Advances in Single-Particle Electron Cryomicroscopy Structure Determination applied to Sub-tomogram Averaging

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Tanmay A.M.; Russo, Christopher J.; Löwe, Jan; Passmore, Lori A.; Scheres, Sjors H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent innovations in specimen preparation, data collection, and image processing have led to improved structure determination using single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Here we explore some of these advances to improve structures determined using electron cryotomography (cryo-ET) and sub-tomogram averaging. We implement a new three-dimensional model for the contrast transfer function, and use this in a regularized likelihood optimization algorithm as implemented in the RELION program. Using direct electron detector data, we apply both single-particle analysis and sub-tomogram averaging to analyze radiation-induced movements of the specimen. As in single-particle cryo-EM, we find that significant sample movements occur during tomographic data acquisition, and that these movements are substantially reduced through the use of ultrastable gold substrates. We obtain a sub-nanometer resolution structure of the hepatitis B capsid, and show that reducing radiation-induced specimen movement may be central to attempts at further improving tomogram quality and resolution. PMID:26256537

  3. The movement of particles in liquid metals under gravity forces and the interaction of particles with advancing solid-liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, F.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of shrinkage and gas porosity are discussed. Gravity forces enhance the removal of gas bubbles from a metal melt and contribute to the feeding of shrinkage porosity in castings. Experiments are reviewed which determine how large a density difference is required for metal particles to float or sink in a metal melt and to what extent do factors not considered in Stokes Law influence particle movement in a real system. As to the interaction of particles with an advancing solid-liquid interface, the results indicate that the metal particles are not rejected in a metal melt, and that concentrations of particles in a metal following solidification are due to other factors.

  4. Observation of Energetic Particle Driven Modes Relevant to Advanced Tokamak Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    R. Nazikian; B. Alper; H.L. Berk; D. Borba; C. Boswell; R.V. Budny; K.H. Burrell; C.Z. Cheng; E.J. Doyle; E. Edlund; R.J. Fonck; A. Fukuyama; N.N. Gorelenkov; C.M. Greenfield; D.J. Gupta; M. Ishikawa; R.J. Jayakumar; G.J. Kramer; Y. Kusama; R.J. La Haye; G.R. McKee; W.A. Peebles; S.D. Pinches; M. Porkolab; J. Rapp; T.L. Rhodes; S.E. Sharapov; K. Shinohara; J.A. Snipes; W.M. Solomon; E.J. Strait; M. Takechi; M.A. Van Zeeland; W.P. West; K.L. Wong; S. Wukitch; L. Zeng

    2004-10-21

    Measurements of high-frequency oscillations in JET [Joint European Torus], JT-60U, Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, and TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] plasmas are contributing to a new understanding of fast ion-driven instabilities relevant to Advanced Tokamak (AT) regimes. A model based on the transition from a cylindrical-like frequency-chirping mode to the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) has successfully encompassed many of the characteristics seen in experiments. In a surprising development, the use of internal density fluctuation diagnostics has revealed many more modes than has been detected on edge magnetic probes. A corollary discovery is the observation of modes excited by fast particles traveling well below the Alfven velocity. These observations open up new opportunities for investigating a ''sea of Alfven Eigenmodes'' in present-scale experiments, and highlight the need for core fluctuation and fast ion measurements in a future burning-plasma experiment.

  5. High-Current Experiments for Accelerator-Based Neutron Capture Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Hughey, B.H.; Shefer, R.E.; Yanch, J.C.; Blackburn, B.W.

    1999-06-06

    Several accelerator-based neutron capture therapy applications are under development. These applications include boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiform and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) for rheumatoid arthritis. These modalities use accelerator-based charged-particle reactions to create a suitable neutron source. Neutrons are produced using a high-current, 2-MV terminal tandem accelerator. For these applications to be feasible, high accelerator beam currents must be routinely achievable. An effort was undertaken to explore the operating regime of the accelerator in the milliampere range. In preparation for high-current operation of the accelerator, computer simulations of charged-particle beam optics were performed to establish high-current operating conditions. Herein we describe high beam current simulations and high beam current operation of the accelerator.

  6. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forward-forward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  7. Advances in 4D Treatment Planning for Scanned Particle Beam Therapy — Report of Dedicated Workshops

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Christoph; Graeff, Christian; Riboldi, Marco; Nill, Simeon; Baroni, Guido; Knopf, Antje-Christin

    2014-01-01

    We report on recent progress in the field of mobile tumor treatment with scanned particle beams, as discussed in the latest editions of the 4D treatment planning workshop. The workshop series started in 2009, with about 20 people from 4 research institutes involved, all actively working on particle therapy delivery and development. The first workshop resulted in a summary of recommendations for the treatment of mobile targets, along with a list of requirements to apply these guidelines clinically. The increased interest in the treatment of mobile tumors led to a continuously growing number of attendees: the 2012 edition counted more than 60 participants from 20 institutions and commercial vendors. The focus of research discussions among workshop participants progressively moved from 4D treatment planning to complete 4D treatments, aiming at effective and safe treatment delivery. Current research perspectives on 4D treatments include all critical aspects of time resolved delivery, such as in-room imaging, motion detection, beam application, and quality assurance techniques. This was motivated by the start of first clinical treatments of hepato cellular tumors with a scanned particle beam, relying on gating or abdominal compression for motion mitigation. Up to date research activities emphasize significant efforts in investigating advanced motion mitigation techniques, with a specific interest in the development of dedicated tools for experimental validation. Potential improvements will be made possible in the near future through 4D optimized treatment plans that require upgrades of the currently established therapy control systems for time resolved delivery. But since also these novel optimization techniques rely on the validity of the 4DCT, research focusing on alternative 4D imaging technique, such as MRI based 4DCT generation will continue. PMID:24354749

  8. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forwardforward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  9. The “Puck” energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low‐resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low‐resource but highly capable, mass‐species‐discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the “Puck” EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high‐voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions. PMID:27867799

  10. Comparison of Electron Cloud Simulation and Experiments in the High-Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S; Molvik, A; Bieniosek, F; Seidl, P; Vay, J; Verboncoeur, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-10-07

    A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability.

  11. Comparison of electron cloud simulation and experiments in the high-current experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Covo, M. Kireeff; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Verboncoeur, J.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2004-08-27

    A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability.

  12. High-Current Energy-Recovering Electron Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolitsa Merminga; David Douglas; Geoffrey Krafft

    2003-12-01

    The use of energy recovery provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices, electron-ion colliders, and other applications in photon science and nuclear and high-energy physics. Energy-recovering electron linear accelerators (called energy-recovering linacs, or ERLs) share many characteristics with ordinary linacs, as their six-dimensional beam phase space is largely determined by electron source properties. However, in common with classic storage rings, ERLs possess a high average-current-carrying capability enabled by the energy recovery process, and thus promise similar efficiencies. The authors discuss the concept of energy recovery and its technical challenges and describe the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Infrared Demonstration Free-Electron Laser (IR Demo FEL), originally driven by a 3548-MeV, 5-mA superconducting radiofrequency (srf) ERL, which provided the most substantial demonstration of energy recovery to date: a beam of 250 kW average power. They present an overview of envisioned ERL applications and a development path to achieving the required performance. They use experimental data obtained at the JLab IR Demo FEL and recent experimental results from CEBAF-ERL GeV-scale, comparatively low-current energy-recovery demonstration at JLab to evaluate the feasibility of the new applications of high-current ERLs, as well as ERLs' limitations and ultimate performance.

  13. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung.

    1992-01-01

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  14. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung

    1992-12-31

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  15. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, Kyle

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  16. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  17. Stable superconducting magnet. [high current levels below critical temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, R. W. (Inventor)

    1967-01-01

    Operation of a superconducting magnet is considered. A method is described for; (1) obtaining a relatively high current in a superconducting magnet positioned in a bath of a gas refrigerant; (2) operating a superconducting magnet at a relatively high current level without training; and (3) operating a superconducting magnet containing a plurality of turns of a niobium zirconium wire at a relatively high current level without training.

  18. A Dynamic Model for the Interaction Between an Insoluble Particle and an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, A. V.; Mukherjee, S.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    2000-01-01

    Most models that describe the interaction of an insoluble particle with an advancing solid-liquid interface are based on the assumption of steady state. However, as demonstrated by experimental work, the process does not reach steady state until the particle is pushed for a while by the interface. In this work, a dynamic mathematical model was developed. The dynamic model demonstrates that this interaction is essentially non-steady state and that steady state eventually occurs only when solidification is conducted at sub-critical velocities. The model was tested for three systems: aluminum-zirconia particles, succinonitrilepolystyrene particles, and biphenyl-glass particles. The calculated values for critical velocity of the pushing/engulfment transition were in same range with the experimental ones.

  19. High average power, high current pulsed accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Neau, E.L.

    1995-05-01

    Which current pulsed accelerator technology was developed during the late 60`s through the late 80`s to satisfy the needs of various military related applications such as effects simulators, particle beam devices, free electron lasers, and as drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion devices. The emphasis in these devices is to achieve very high peak power levels, with pulse lengths on the order of a few 10`s of nanoseconds, peak currents of up to 10`s of MA, and accelerating potentials of up to 10`s of MV. New which average power systems, incorporating thermal management techniques, are enabling the potential use of high peak power technology in a number of diverse industrial application areas such as materials processing, food processing, stack gas cleanup, and the destruction of organic contaminants. These systems employ semiconductor and saturable magnetic switches to achieve short pulse durations that can then be added to efficiently give MV accelerating, potentials while delivering average power levels of a few 100`s of kilowatts to perhaps many megawatts. The Repetitive High Energy Puled Power project is developing short-pulse, high current accelerator technology capable of generating beams with kJ`s of energy per pulse delivered to areas of 1000 cm{sup 2} or more using ions, electrons, or x-rays. Modular technology is employed to meet the needs of a variety of applications requiring from 100`s of kV to MV`s and from 10`s to 100`s of kA. Modest repetition rates, up to a few 100`s of pulses per second (PPS), allow these machines to deliver average currents on the order of a few 100`s of mA. The design and operation of the second generation 300 kW RHEPP-II machine, now being brought on-line to operate at 2.5 MV, 25 kA, and 100 PPS will be described in detail as one example of the new high average power, high current pulsed accelerator technology.

  20. A Method for Consensus Reaching in Product Kansei Evaluation Using Advanced Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Consumers' opinions toward product design alternatives are often subjective and perceptual, which reflect their perception about a product and can be described using Kansei adjectives. Therefore, Kansei evaluation is often employed to determine consumers' preference. However, how to identify and improve the reliability of consumers' Kansei evaluation opinions toward design alternatives has an important role in adding additional insurance and reducing uncertainty to successful product design. To solve this problem, this study employs a consensus model to measure consistence among consumers' opinions, and an advanced particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm combined with Linearly Decreasing Inertia Weight (LDW) method is proposed for consensus reaching by minimizing adjustment of consumers' opinions. Furthermore, the process of the proposed method is presented and the details are illustrated using an example of electronic scooter design evaluation. The case study reveals that the proposed method is promising for reaching a consensus through searching optimal solutions by PSO and improving the reliability of consumers' evaluation opinions toward design alternatives according to Kansei indexes. PMID:28316619

  1. Recent advances in the modeling of plasmas with the Particle-In-Cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Lehe, Remi; Vincenti, Henri; Godfrey, Brendan; Lee, Patrick; Haber, Irv

    2015-11-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach is the method of choice for self-consistent simulations of plasmas from first principles. The fundamentals of the PIC method were established decades ago but improvements or variations are continuously being proposed. We report on several recent advances in PIC related algorithms, including: (a) detailed analysis of the numerical Cherenkov instability and its remediation, (b) analytic pseudo-spectral electromagnetic solvers in Cartesian and cylindrical (with azimuthal modes decomposition) geometries, (c) arbitrary-order finite-difference and generalized pseudo-spectral Maxwell solvers, (d) novel analysis of Maxwell's solvers' stencil variation and truncation, in application to domain decomposition strategies and implementation of Perfectly Matched Layers in high-order and pseudo-spectral solvers. Work supported by US-DOE Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231 and the US-DOE SciDAC program ComPASS. Used resources of NERSC, supported by US-DOE Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  2. A Method for Consensus Reaching in Product Kansei Evaluation Using Advanced Particle Swarm Optimization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan-Pu

    2017-01-01

    Consumers' opinions toward product design alternatives are often subjective and perceptual, which reflect their perception about a product and can be described using Kansei adjectives. Therefore, Kansei evaluation is often employed to determine consumers' preference. However, how to identify and improve the reliability of consumers' Kansei evaluation opinions toward design alternatives has an important role in adding additional insurance and reducing uncertainty to successful product design. To solve this problem, this study employs a consensus model to measure consistence among consumers' opinions, and an advanced particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm combined with Linearly Decreasing Inertia Weight (LDW) method is proposed for consensus reaching by minimizing adjustment of consumers' opinions. Furthermore, the process of the proposed method is presented and the details are illustrated using an example of electronic scooter design evaluation. The case study reveals that the proposed method is promising for reaching a consensus through searching optimal solutions by PSO and improving the reliability of consumers' evaluation opinions toward design alternatives according to Kansei indexes.

  3. Advanced multi-frequency radar: Design, preliminary measurements and particle size distribution retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majurec, Ninoslav

    In the spring of 2001 the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory (MIRSL) at the University of Massachusetts began the development of an advanced Multi-Frequency Radar (AMFR) system for studying clouds and precipitation. This mobile radar was designed to consist of three polarimetric Doppler subsystems operating at Ku-band (13.4 GHz), Ka-band (35.6 GHz) and W-band (94.92 GHz). This combination of frequency bands allows a measurement of a wide range of atmospheric targets ranging from weakly reflecting clouds to strong precipitation. The antenna beamwidths at each frequency were intentionally matched, ensuring consistent sampling volume. Multi-frequency radar remote sensing techniques are not widely used because few multi-frequency radars are available to the science community. One exception is the 33 GHz/95 GHz UMass Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS), which AMFR is intended to replace. AMFR's multi-parameter capabilities are designed for characterizing the complex microphysics of layer clouds and precipitation processes in winter storms. AMFR will also play an important role in developing algorithms and validating measurements for an upcoming generation of space-borne radars. The frequency bands selected for AMFR match those of several sensors that have been deployed or are under development. These include the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agencies (JAXA's) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite Ku-band (13 GHz) radar, the CloudSat W-band (95 GHz) radar, and the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) satellite radars at Ku-band and Ka-band. This dissertation describes the AMFR hardware design and development. Compared to CPRS, the addition of one extra frequency band (Ku) will extend AMFR's measurement capabilities towards the larger particle sizes (precipitation). AMFR's design is based around high-power klystron amplifiers. This ensures complete coherency (CPRS uses magnetrons and coherent-on-receive technique). The partial loss in sensitivity due to

  4. Evaluation of Particle Counter Technology for Detection of Fuel Contamination Detection Utilizing Advanced Aviation Forward Area Refueling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-24

    replacement of water bottom removal.  Recirculation – Air was purged from the filter separator vessel and fuel was again pumped from the tank , through...8, Automatic Particle Counter, cleanliness, free water , Diesel 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT none 18. NUMBER OF...Advanced Aviation Forward Area Refueling System Joel Schmitigal U S Army Tank Automotive Research DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release

  5. A new coincidence model for single particle counters, Part II: Advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Knapp, J Z; Lieberman, A; Abramson, L R

    1994-01-01

    Accuracy, acceptance limits and methods for U.S.P. (788) contaminating particle assays published in the XXII Revision are refined in U.S.P. XXIII. In both Revisions, although different numerical values and methods are employed, particle contamination limits remain constants for all S.V.I. container volumes. The effect of this quality standard is high particle concentration acceptance limits in the smallest S.V.I. container sizes. The effect of these high concentrations is to introduce both undercount errors and false counts into U.S.P. (788) SVI contaminating particle assays. There is general agreement that the count of high concentrations of particles by a single particle light extinction counter result in an increase of the average size of the distribution of particles reported and a decrease in their total number. The error mechanism is termed "signal coincidence." Understanding and control of both these problems is unified with the introduction of the count efficiency parameter. Part I of this paper makes available two core concepts with which evaluation and control of coincidence error in single particle counters can be accurately quantified. These two core concepts are the "Particle Triggered Poisson Model," a new more accurate statistical model of the particle counting process and a concentration measure that includes the effect of particle size on the counting capability of a detector. Use of these concepts make it possible to evaluate particle detector count efficiency capability from experimental data of the coincidence effect. This is an application paper. It combines the theory in the Part I paper with the replicability of particle counters into a simple test protocol. The test results can be used to calculate a contour of particle size and count within which both undercount errors and the introduction of false counts into U.S.P. (788) particle assays are controlled. From the data analyzed it can be seen that any single particle size test cannot

  6. Acceleration and stability of a high-current ion beam in induction fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas', V. I.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Federovskaya, O. V.

    2013-03-01

    A one-dimensional nonlinear analytic theory of the filamentation instability of a high-current ion beam is formulated. The results of 2.5-dimensional numerical particle-in-cell simulations of acceleration and stability of an annular compensated ion beam (CIB) in a linear induction particle accelerator are presented. It is shown that additional transverse injection of electron beams in magnetically insulated gaps (cusps) improves the quality of the ion-beam distribution function and provides uniform beam acceleration along the accelerator. The CIB filamentation instability in both the presence and the absence of an external magnetic field is considered.

  7. Acceleration and stability of a high-current ion beam in induction fields

    SciTech Connect

    Karas', V. I.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Federovskaya, O. V.

    2013-03-15

    A one-dimensional nonlinear analytic theory of the filamentation instability of a high-current ion beam is formulated. The results of 2.5-dimensional numerical particle-in-cell simulations of acceleration and stability of an annular compensated ion beam (CIB) in a linear induction particle accelerator are presented. It is shown that additional transverse injection of electron beams in magnetically insulated gaps (cusps) improves the quality of the ion-beam distribution function and provides uniform beam acceleration along the accelerator. The CIB filamentation instability in both the presence and the absence of an external magnetic field is considered.

  8. Use of advanced particle methods in modeling space propulsion and its supersonic expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borner, Arnaud

    This research discusses the use of advanced kinetic particle methods such as Molecular Dynamics (MD) and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model space propulsion systems such as electrospray thrusters and their supersonic expansions. MD simulations are performed to model an electrospray thruster for the ionic liquid (IL) EMIM--BF4 using coarse-grained (CG) potentials. The model is initially featuring a constant electric field applied in the longitudinal direction. Two coarse-grained potentials are compared, and the effective-force CG (EFCG) potential is found to predict the formation of the Taylor cone, the cone-jet, and other extrusion modes for similar electric fields and mass flow rates observed in experiments of a IL fed capillary-tip-extractor system better than the simple CG potential. Later, one-dimensional and fully transient three-dimensional electric fields, the latter solving Poisson's equation to take into account the electric field due to space charge at each timestep, are computed by coupling the MD model to a Poisson solver. It is found that the inhomogeneous electric field as well as that of the IL space-charge improve agreement between modeling and experiment. The boundary conditions (BCs) are found to have a substantial impact on the potential and electric field, and the tip BC is introduced and compared to the two previous BCs, named plate and needle, showing good improvement by reducing unrealistically high radial electric fields generated in the vicinity of the capillary tip. The influence of the different boundary condition models on charged species currents as a function of the mass flow rate is studied, and it is found that a constant electric field model gives similar agreement to the more rigorous and computationally expensive tip boundary condition at lower flow rates. However, at higher mass flow rates the MD simulations with the constant electric field produces extruded particles with higher Coulomb energy per ion, consistent with

  9. Heavy Charged Particle Radiobiology: Using Enhanced Biological Effectiveness and Improved Beam Focusing to Advance Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B.; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  10. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-03

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation.

  11. The Interaction Between an Insoluble Particle and an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: Micro-Gravity Experiments and Theoretical Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Ssen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of an insoluble particle with an advancing solid/liquid interface (SLI) has been a subject of investigation for the past four decades. While the original interest stemmed from geology applications (e.g., frost heaving in soil), researchers soon realized that the complex science associated with such an interaction is relevant to many other scientific fields encompassing metal matrix composites (MMCs), high temperature superconductors, inclusion management in steel, growth of monotectics, and preservation of biological cells. During solidification of a liquid containing an insoluble particle, three distinct interaction phenomena have been experimentally observed: instantaneous engulfment of the particle, continuous pushing, and particle pushing followed by engulfment. It was also observed that for given experimental conditions and particle size there is a critical solidification velocity, V(sub cr), above which a particle is engulfed. During solidification of MMCs pushing leads to particle agglomeration at the grain boundaries and this has detrimental effects on mechanical properties of the casting. Consequently, the process must be designed for instantaneous engulfment to occur. This implies the development of accurate theoretical models to predict V(sub cr), and perform benchmark experiments to test the validity of such models. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the pushing/engulfment phenomenon (PEP), its quantification in terms of the material and processing parameters remains a focus of research. Since natural convection currents occurring during terrestrial solidification experiments complicate the study of PEP, execution of experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) has been approved and funded by NASA. Extensive terrestrial (1g) experiments and preliminary micro-gravity (mu g) experiments on two space shuttle missions have been conducted in preparation for future experiments on the ISS. The investigated

  12. Regression modeling of particle size distributions in urban storm water: advancements through improved sample collection methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, Michael N.; Selbig, William R.

    2012-01-01

    A new sample collection system was developed to improve the representation of sediment entrained in urban storm water by integrating water quality samples from the entire water column. The depth-integrated sampler arm (DISA) was able to mitigate sediment stratification bias in storm water, thereby improving the characterization of suspended-sediment concentration and particle size distribution at three independent study locations. Use of the DISA decreased variability, which improved statistical regression to predict particle size distribution using surrogate environmental parameters, such as precipitation depth and intensity. The performance of this statistical modeling technique was compared to results using traditional fixed-point sampling methods and was found to perform better. When environmental parameters can be used to predict particle size distributions, environmental managers have more options when characterizing concentrations, loads, and particle size distributions in urban runoff.

  13. Advances in Automated QA/QC for TRISO Fuel Particle Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hockey, Ronald L.; Bond, Leonard J.; Batishko, Charles R.; Gray, Joseph N.; Saurwein, John J.; Lowden, Richard A.

    2004-06-30

    Fuel in most Generation IV reactor designs typically encompasses billions of the TRISO particles. Present day QA/QC methods, done manually and in many cases destructively, cannot economically test a statistically significant fraction of the large number of the individual fuel particles required. Fully automated inspection technologies are essential to economical TRISO fuel particle production. A combination of in-line nondestructive (NDE) measurements employing electromagnetic induction and digital optical imaging analysis is currently under investigation and preliminary data indicate the potential for meeting the demands of this application. To calibrate high-speed NDE methods, surrogate fuel particle samples are being coated with layers containing a wide array of defect types found to degrade fuel performance and these are being characterized via high-resolution CT and digital radiographic images.

  14. NATO Advanced Research Workshop: Optics of Biological Particles. Held in Novosibirsk, Russia on 3-6 Oct 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    A 3. DATES COVERED - 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE NATO Advanced Research Workshop Optics of Biological Particles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Characterization of Biologi- cal Species” 4 17:20 – 19:00 visit IChK&C 19:00 dinner 2nd day: Tuesday October 4 , 2005 09:00 – 09:30 Virginia Foot...surfaces; (3) erythrocyte lysis in isotonic solution of ammonium chloride; ( 4 ) endocytosis. OPTICS OF RED BLOOD CELLS AND CELL AGGREGATES Alexander V

  15. ADVANCED METHODS FOR THE COMPUTATION OF PARTICLE BEAM TRANSPORT AND THE COMPUTATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND MULTIPARTICLE PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Alex J. Dragt

    2012-08-31

    Since 1980, under the grant DEFG02-96ER40949, the Department of Energy has supported the educational and research work of the University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory (DSAT) Group. The primary focus of this educational/research group has been on the computation and analysis of charged-particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods, and on advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and multiparticle phenomena. This Final Report summarizes the accomplishments of the DSAT Group from its inception in 1980 through its end in 2011.

  16. Modeling Combined Chemotherapy and Particle Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Marco; Tommasino, Francesco; Yamada, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the only cancer for which deaths are predicted to increase in 2014 and beyond. Combined radiochemotherapy protocols using gemcitabine and hypofractionated X-rays are ongoing in several clinical trials. Recent results indicate that charged particle therapy substantially increases local control of resectable and unresectable pancreas cancer, as predicted from previous radiobiology studies considering the high tumor hypoxia. Combination with chemotherapy improves the overall survival (OS). We compared published data on X-ray and charged particle clinical results with or without adjuvant chemotherapy calculating the biological effective dose. We show that chemoradiotherapy with protons or carbon ions results in 1 year OS significantly higher than those obtained with other treatment schedules. Further hypofractionation using charged particles may result in improved local control and survival. A comparative clinical trial using the standard X-ray scheme vs. the best current standard with carbon ions is crucial and may open new opportunities for this deadly disease. PMID:26217585

  17. Characterizing the distribution of particles in urban stormwater: advancements through improved sampling technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, William R.

    2014-01-01

    A new sample collection system was developed to improve the representation of sediment in stormwater by integrating the entire water column. The depth-integrated sampler arm (DISA) was able to mitigate sediment stratification bias in storm water, thereby improving the characterization of particle size distribution from urban source areas. Collector streets had the lowest median particle diameter of 8 μm, followed by parking lots, arterial streets, feeder streets, and residential and mixed land use (32, 43, 50, 80 and 95 μm, respectively). Results from this study suggest there is no single distribution of particles that can be applied uniformly to runoff in urban environments; however, integrating more of the entire water column during the sample collection can address some of the shortcomings of a fixed-point sampler by reducing variability and bias caused by the stratification of solids in a water column.

  18. Particle-vibration coupling: Recent advances in microscopic calculations with the Skyrme Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colò, G.; Baldo, M.; Bortignon, P. F.; Rizzo, D.; Bocchi, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this contribution, we report some recent progress in our understanding of particle-vibration coupling (PVC) in nuclei. In particular, we first review the formal development that has allowed some of us to deduce the PVC equations within the Green's functionmethod. Applications are then discussed, both in the case of single-particle states and giant resonances in magic nuclei. We also present a new model that extends the PVC ansatz and is meant to account for the complete low-lying spectra of odd nuclei.

  19. High current density pulsed cathode experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.; Fant, K.; Vlieks, A.

    1990-06-01

    A 1.9 microperveance beam diode has been constructed to test high current density cathodes for use in klystrons. Several standard and specially coated dispenser cathodes are being tested. Results of tests to date show average cathode current densities in excess of 25 amps/cm, and maximum electric field gradients of more than 450 kV/cm for pulses of the order of 1{mu}sec. 3 refs., 11 figs.

  20. High-current, fast-switching transistor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    The design, wafer-processing techniques, and various measurements which include forward safe operating area, dc characteristics, and switching times are described for a larger-diameter (33) transistor. An improved base contact for equalizing the base-emitter voltage at high currents was developed along with an improved emitter contact preform which increases the silicon area available for current conduction. The electrical performance achieved is consistent with the proposed optimum design.

  1. Application of RF Superconductivity to High Current Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Chan K.C.D.

    1998-09-13

    In 1997, the authors initiated a development program in Los Alamos for high-current superconducting proton-linac technology to build prototypes components of this linac to demonstrate the feasibility. The authors are building 700-MHz niobium cavities with elliptical shapes, as well as power couplers to transfer high RF power to these cavities. The cavities and power couplers will be integrated in cryostats as linac cryomodules. In this paper, they describe the linac design and the status of the development program.

  2. Heat extraction from targets in high current electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubb, Ernest; Altemus, Rosemary; McCarthy, James; Biron, Don

    1982-12-01

    Various aspects of heat extraction from targets in high current electron beams are examined, among which are the dependences on boundary temperature, beam current density, and convective effects from an ambient gaseous environment. The design of a cooling system which extracts heat by forcing hydrogen (or helium) gas at a pressure of several Torr at near sonic velocities across a target surface is described. Boundary layer theory calculations and empirical measurements of the average heat transfer coefficient for the system are presented.

  3. Eddy Current, Magnetic Particle and Hardness Testing, Aviation Quality Control (Advanced): 9227.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This unit of instruction includes the principles of eddy current, magnetic particle and hardness testing; standards used for analyzing test results; techniques of operating equipment; interpretation of indications; advantages and limitations of these methods of testing; care and calibration of equipment; and safety and work precautions. Motion…

  4. Advanced 3D electromagnetic and particle-in-cell modeling on structured/unstructured hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, D.B.; Pasik, M.F.; Kiefer, M.L.; Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1998-01-01

    New techniques have been recently developed that allow unstructured, free meshes to be embedded into standard 3-dimensional, rectilinear, finite-difference time-domain grids. The resulting hybrid-grid modeling capability allows the higher resolution and fidelity of modeling afforded by free meshes to be combined with the simplicity and efficiency of rectilinear techniques. Integration of these new methods into the full-featured, general-purpose QUICKSILVER electromagnetic, Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code provides new modeling capability for a wide variety of electromagnetic and plasma physics problems. To completely exploit the integration of this technology into QUICKSILVER for applications requiring the self-consistent treatment of charged particles, this project has extended existing PIC methods for operation on these hybrid unstructured/rectilinear meshes. Several technical issues had to be addressed in order to accomplish this goal, including the location of particles on the unstructured mesh, adequate conservation of charge, and the proper handling of particles in the transition region between structured and unstructured portions of the hybrid grid.

  5. Sparking limits, cavity loading, and beam breakup instability associated with high-current rf linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Faehl, R.J.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The limitations on high-current rf linacs due to gap sparking, cavity loading, and the beam breakup instability are studied. It appears possible to achieve cavity accelerating gradients as high as 35 MV/m without sparking. Furthermore, a linear analysis, as well as self-consistent particle simulations of a multipulsed 10 kA beam, indicated that only a negligible small fraction of energy is radiated into nonfundamental cavity modes. Finally, the beam breakup instability is analyzed and found to be able to magnify initial radial perturbations by a factor of no more than about 20 during the beam transit time through a 1 GeV accelerator.

  6. ADVANCING THE ION BEAM THIN FILM PLANARIZATION PROCESS FOR THE SMOOTHING OF SUBSTRATE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkarimi, P B; Spiller, E; Baker, S L; Robinson, J C; Stearns, D G; Liddle, J A; Salmassi, F; Liang, T; Stivers, A R

    2004-10-19

    For a number of technologies small substrate contaminants are undesirable, and for one technology in particular, extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), they can be a very serious issue. We have demonstrated that the Ion Beam Thin Film Planarization Process, a coating process designed to planarize substrate asperities, can be extended to smooth {approx}70 nm and {approx}80 nm diameter particles on EUVL reticle substrates to a height of {approx}0.5 nm, which will render them noncritical in an EUVL printing process. We demonstrate this smoothing process using controlled nanoscale substrate particles and lines fabricated with an e-beam lithography process. The above smoothing process was also modified to yield an excellent reflectance/wavelength uniformity and a good EUV reflectivity for the multilayer, which is required for EUVL reticles. Cross-sectional TEM on a smoothed substrate line defect shows excellent agreement with results obtained from our multilayer growth model.

  7. Current Advances in Virus-Like Particles as a Vaccination Approach against HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chongbo; Ao, Zhujun; Yao, Xiaojian

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates against HIV-1 infection. They are capable of preserving the native conformation of HIV-1 antigens and priming CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses efficiently via cross presentation by both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. Progress has been achieved in the preclinical research of HIV-1 VLPs as prophylactic vaccines that induce broadly neutralizing antibodies and potent T cell responses. Moreover, the progress in HIV-1 dendritic cells (DC)-based immunotherapy provides us with a new vision for HIV-1 vaccine development. In this review, we describe updates from the past 5 years on the development of HIV-1 VLPs as a vaccine candidate and on the combined use of HIV particles with HIV-1 DC-based immunotherapy as efficient prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination strategies. PMID:26805898

  8. Advanced methods in global gyrokinetic full f particle simulation of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ogando, F.; Heikkinen, J. A.; Henriksson, S.; Janhunen, S. J.; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Leerink, S.

    2006-11-30

    A new full f nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation code, named ELMFIRE, has been developed for simulating transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas. The code is based on a gyrokinetic particle-in-cell algorithm, which can consider electrons and ions jointly or separately, as well as arbitrary impurities. The implicit treatment of the ion polarization drift and the use of full f methods allow for simulations of strongly perturbed plasmas including wide orbit effects, steep gradients and rapid dynamic changes. This article presents in more detail the algorithms incorporated into ELMFIRE, as well as benchmarking comparisons to both neoclassical theory and other codes.Code ELMFIRE calculates plasma dynamics by following the evolution of a number of sample particles. Because of using an stochastic algorithm its results are influenced by statistical noise. The effect of noise on relevant magnitudes is analyzed.Turbulence spectra of FT-2 plasma has been calculated with ELMFIRE, obtaining results consistent with experimental data.

  9. The Frontier of Modern Calorimetry: Hardware Advances and Application in Particle Physics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Tatiana

    While the last missing components of the SM puzzle seem to be successfully found, particle physicists remain hungry for what might be there, beyond the cosy boundaries of the well studies elementary particle world. However, the sophisticated technique of data analysis and acute Monte Carlo simulations remain fruitless. It appears that the successful intrusion into the realm, in which we were not welcome so far, may require a very different implication of effort. All those results might suggest, though banal, that we need an improvement on the hardware side. Indeed, the hadronic calorimeter of CMS is no competitor to its other state-of-art components. This obstacle in many cases significantly complicates the flow of the physics analysis. Besides, the era of high luminosity LHC operation in the offing is calling for the same. After exploration of the analysis debri with 8TeV collision data, we investigate various approaches for better calorimetry for the CMS detector.

  10. Advances and patents about grinding equipments with nano-particle jet minimum quantity lubrication.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongzhou; Li, Changhe; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Qiang; Hou, Yali

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a large number of patents have been devoted to developing minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) grinding techniques that can significantly improve both environmentally conscious and energy saving and costeffective sustainable grinding fluid alternatives. Among them, one patent is about a controllable nano-fluids jet MQL grinding system based on electrostatic atomization. Using the principle of electrostatics, it can achieve the control of droplet transfer by charging the sprayed droplets. This system can improve the uniformity of the droplet spectrum, liquid deposition efficiency and effective utilization of liquid. It can also effectively control the movement patterns of the droplets, thereby reducing the pollution of the environment and providing better health protection for workers. Although researchers accomplished profound and systematic studies on MQL, especially on nano-particles jet MQL. It can solve the shortage of MQL in cooling performance, greatly improve the working environment, save energy and reduce costs to achieve a low-carbon manufacturing. The unique lubricating performance and tribological property of solid nano-particles form nano-particle shearing films at the grinding wheel/workpiece interface, which can enhance the lubricating performance of MQL grinding. Existing studies on MQL grinding equipments, however, cannot meet the needs of the technological development. Therefore, our research provided a general introduction of the latest patients and research progress of nanoparticles jet MQL grinding equipments presented by the research team from Qingdao Technological University.

  11. Remediating radium contaminated legacy sites: Advances made through machine learning in routine monitoring of "hot" particles.

    PubMed

    Varley, Adam; Tyler, Andrew; Smith, Leslie; Dale, Paul; Davies, Mike

    2015-07-15

    The extensive use of radium during the 20th century for industrial, military and pharmaceutical purposes has led to a large number of contaminated legacy sites across Europe and North America. Sites that pose a high risk to the general public can present expensive and long-term remediation projects. Often the most pragmatic remediation approach is through routine monitoring operating gamma-ray detectors to identify, in real-time, the signal from the most hazardous heterogeneous contamination (hot particles); thus facilitating their removal and safe disposal. However, current detection systems do not fully utilise all spectral information resulting in low detection rates and ultimately an increased risk to the human health. The aim of this study was to establish an optimised detector-algorithm combination. To achieve this, field data was collected using two handheld detectors (sodium iodide and lanthanum bromide) and a number of Monte Carlo simulated hot particles were randomly injected into the field data. This allowed for the detection rate of conventional deterministic (gross counts) and machine learning (neural networks and support vector machines) algorithms to be assessed. The results demonstrated that a Neural Network operated on a sodium iodide detector provided the best detection capability. Compared to deterministic approaches, this optimised detection system could detect a hot particle on average 10cm deeper into the soil column or with half of the activity at the same depth. It was also found that noise presented by internal contamination restricted lanthanum bromide for this application.

  12. Advances in Thermal Spray Deposition of Billets for Particle Reinforced Light Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzelburger, Martin; Zimmermann, Christian; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-01

    Forming of light-metals in semi-solid state offers some advantages like low process temperatures, improved mould durability, good flow behavior and fine, globular microstructure of the final material. By the introduction of ceramic particles, increased elastic modulus and yield strength as well as wear resistance and creep behavior can be obtained. By semi-solid forging or semi-solid casting, particle reinforced metals (PRM) can be produced with improved matrix microstructure and beneficial forming process parameters compared to conventional MMC manufacturing techniques. The production of this kind of light metal matrix composites requires the supply of dense semi-finished parts with well defined volume fractions of homogeneously distributed particulate reinforcement. A manufacturing method for cylindrical light metal billets is described that applies thermal spraying as a build-up process for simultaneous deposition of matrix and reinforcement phase with cored wires as spraying material. Thermal spraying leads to small grain sizes and prevents dendrite formation. However, long process cycle times lead to billet heating and recrystallization of the matrix microstructure. In order to preserve small grain sizes that enable semi-solid forming, the thermal spraying process was analyzed by in-flight particle analysis and thermography. As a consequence, the deposition process was optimized by adaptation of the thermal spraying parameters and by application of additional cooling, leading to lower billet temperatures and finer PRM billet microstructure.

  13. Advances in Thermal Spray Deposition of Billets for Particle Reinforced Light Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzelburger, Martin; Zimmermann, Christian; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-07

    Forming of light-metals in semi-solid state offers some advantages like low process temperatures, improved mould durability, good flow behavior and fine, globular microstructure of the final material. By the introduction of ceramic particles, increased elastic modulus and yield strength as well as wear resistance and creep behavior can be obtained. By semi-solid forging or semi-solid casting, particle reinforced metals (PRM) can be produced with improved matrix microstructure and beneficial forming process parameters compared to conventional MMC manufacturing techniques. The production of this kind of light metal matrix composites requires the supply of dense semi-finished parts with well defined volume fractions of homogeneously distributed particulate reinforcement. A manufacturing method for cylindrical light metal billets is described that applies thermal spraying as a build-up process for simultaneous deposition of matrix and reinforcement phase with cored wires as spraying material. Thermal spraying leads to small grain sizes and prevents dendrite formation. However, long process cycle times lead to billet heating and recrystallization of the matrix microstructure. In order to preserve small grain sizes that enable semi-solid forming, the thermal spraying process was analyzed by in-flight particle analysis and thermography. As a consequence, the deposition process was optimized by adaptation of the thermal spraying parameters and by application of additional cooling, leading to lower billet temperatures and finer PRM billet microstructure.

  14. Characterization of exposures to nanoscale particles and fibers during solid core drilling of hybrid carbon nanotube advanced composites.

    PubMed

    Bello, Dhimiter; Wardle, Brian L; Zhang, Jie; Yamamoto, Namiko; Santeufemio, Christopher; Hallock, Marilyn; Virji, M Abbas

    2010-01-01

    This work investigated exposures to nanoparticles and nanofibers during solid core drilling of two types of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT)-hybrid composites: (1) reinforced plastic hybrid laminates (alumina fibers and CNT); and (2) graphite-epoxy composites (carbon fibers and CNT). Multiple real-time instruments were used to characterize the size distribution (5.6 nm to 20 microm), number and mass concentration, particle-bound polyaromatic hydrocarbons (b-PAHs), and surface area of airborne particles at the source and breathing zone. Time-integrated samples included grids for electron microscopy characterization of particle morphology and size resolved (2 nm to 20 microm) samples for the quantification of metals. Several new important findings herein include generation of airborne clusters of CNTs not seen during saw-cutting of similar composites, fewer nanofibers and respirable fibers released, similarly high exposures to nanoparticles with less dependence on the composite thickness, and ultrafine (< 5 nm) aerosol originating from thermal degradation of the composite material.

  15. Development of RF linac for high-current applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.C.D.; Lawrence, G.P.; Schneider, J.D.

    1997-12-31

    High-current proton linacs are promising sources of neutrons for material processing and research applications. Recently, a linac design that makes use of a combination of normal-conducting (NC) and superconducting (SC) linac technologies has been proposed for the US Accelerator Production of Tritium Project. As a result, a multi-year engineering development and demonstration (ED and D) program is underway. In this paper, the authors will describe the design and merits of the NC/SC hybrid approach. The scope, technology issues, and present status of the ED and D Program, and the participation of industry will also be described.

  16. High Current Cathode Thermal Behavior, Part II: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodfellow, K. D.; Polk, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Cathode erosion is one of the life limiting mechanisms for several classes of electric thrusters. Since cathode erosion is strongly dependent on the cathode temperature, a quantitative understanding of the effects of cathode operation on the cathode temperature is required. The development of a cathode/plasma interaction model for determining the heat loads to the cathode as function of the various free stream plasma parameters is presented. This model is combined with a cathode thermal model in order to provide a complete and integrated picture of high current cathode operation.

  17. Astro-E2 Magnesium Diboride High Current Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, J. S.; Tuttle, J. G.; Riall, S.; Mustafi, S.; Gray, A.; Edmonds, R.; Marrero, V.

    2003-01-01

    The recent discovery of superconducting properties in MgB_2 and rapid development of small diameter steel-clad wires has opened up the possibility of enhancing the design of the baseline Astro-E2 high current lead assembly. Replacing YBCO filaments with MgB_2 wires and modifying the heat sink location can give much higher margins against quench from temperature oscillations of the 4 K heat sink, although wih some overall thermal penalty. The design and performance of a new lead assembly during flight qualification is discussed, with emphasis on thermal, structural, and electrical test results.

  18. High Current Systems for HyperV and PLX Plasma Railguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Messer, S.; Elton, R.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2011-10-01

    HyperV is developing gas fed, pulsed, plasma railgun accelerators for PLX and other high momentum plasma applications. The present 2.5 cm square-bore plasma railgun forms plasma armatures from high density neutral gas (argon), preionizes it electrothermally, and accelerates the armature with 30 cm long parallel-plate railgun electrodes driven by a pulse forming network (PFN). Recent experiments have successfully formed and accelerated plasma armatures of ~4 mg at 40 km/s, with PFN currents of ~400 kA. In order to further increase railgun performance to the PLX design goal of 8 mg at 50 km/s, the PFN was upgraded to support currents of up to ~750 kA. A high voltage, high current linear array spark-gap switch and flexible, low-inductance transmission line were designed and constructed to handle the increased current load. We will describe these systems and present initial performance data from high current operation of the plasma rail gun from spectroscopy, interferometry, and imaging systems as well as pressure, magnetic field, and optical diagnostics. High current performance of railgun bore materials for electrodes and insulators will also be discussed as well as plans for upcoming experimentation with advanced materials. Supported by the U.S. DOE Joint Program in HEDLP.

  19. Advances in the field of single-particle cryo-electron microscopy over the last decade.

    PubMed

    Frank, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    In single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), molecules suspended in a thin aqueous layer are rapidly frozen and imaged at cryogenic temperature in the transmission electron microscope. From the random projection views, a three-dimensional image is reconstructed, enabling the structure of the molecule to be obtained. In this article I discuss technological progress over the past decade, which has, in my own field of study, culminated in the determination of ribosome structure at 2.5-Å resolution. I also discuss likely future improvements in methodology.

  20. Modeling ion-induced electrons in the High Current Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, P. H.; Verboncoeur, J. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Molvik, A. W.; Vay, J.-L.; Veitzer, S. A.

    2006-05-01

    A primary concern for high current ion accelerators is contaminant electrons. These electrons can interfere with the beam ions, causing emittance growth and beam loss. Numerical simulation is a main tool for understanding the interaction of the ion beam with the contaminant electrons, but these simulations then require accurate models of electron generation. These models include ion-induced electron emission from ions hitting the beam pipe walls or diagnostics. However, major codes for modeling ion beam transport are written in different programming languages and used on different computing platforms. For electron generation models to be maximally useful, researchers should be able to use them easily from many languages and platforms. A model of ion-induced electrons including the electron energy distribution is presented here, including a discussion of how to use the Babel software tool to make these models available in multiple languages and how to use the GNU Autotools to make them available on multiple platforms. An application to simulation of the end region of the High Current Experiment is shown. These simulations show formation of a virtual cathode with a potential energy well of amplitude 12.0eV, approximately six times the most probable energy of the ion-induced electrons. Oscillations of the virtual cathode could lead to possible longitudinal and transverse modulation of the density of the electrons moving out of the virtual cathode.

  1. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Modeling ion-induced electrons in the High Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltz, P.H.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Cohen, R.H.; Molvik, A.W.; Vay, J.-L.; Veitzer, S.A.

    2006-05-15

    A primary concern for high current ion accelerators is contaminant electrons. These electrons can interfere with the beam ions, causing emittance growth and beam loss. Numerical simulation is a main tool for understanding the interaction of the ion beam with the contaminant electrons, but these simulations then require accurate models of electron generation. These models include ion-induced electron emission from ions hitting the beam pipe walls or diagnostics. However, major codes for modeling ion beam transport are written in different programming languages and used on different computing platforms. For electron generation models to be maximally useful, researchers should be able to use them easily from many languages and platforms. A model of ion-induced electrons including the electron energy distribution is presented here, including a discussion of how to use the Babel software tool to make these models available in multiple languages and how to use the GNU Autotools to make them available on multiple platforms. An application to simulation of the end region of the High Current Experiment is shown. These simulations show formation of a virtual cathode with a potential energy well of amplitude 12.0 eV, approximately six times the most probable energy of the ion-induced electrons. Oscillations of the virtual cathode could lead to possible longitudinal and transverse modulation of the density of the electrons moving out of the virtual cathode.

  3. High Current Ion Source Development for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G A; Grote, D P; Kwan, J W

    2003-09-04

    We are developing high-current-density high-brightness sources for Heavy Ion Fusion applications. Heavy ion driven inertial fusion requires beams of high brightness in order to achieve high power density at the target for high target gain. At present, there are no existing ion source types that can readily meet all the driver HIF requirements, though sources exist which are adequate for present experiments and which with further development may achieve driver requirements. Our two major efforts have been on alumino-silicate sources and RF plasma sources. Experiments being performed on a 10-cm alumino-silicate source are described. To obtain a compact system for a HIF driver we are studying RF plasma sources where low current beamlets are combined to produce a high current beam. A 80-kV 20-{micro}s source has produced up to 5 mA of Ar{sup +} in a single beamlet. The extraction current density was 100 mA/cm{sup 2}. We present measurements of the extracted current density as a function of RF power and gas pressure, current density uniformity, emittance, and energy dispersion (due to charge exchange).

  4. RF Input Power Couplers for High Current SRF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, V. F.; Anders, W.; Burrill, Andrew; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver; Neumann, Axel; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-12-01

    High current SRF technology is being explored in present day accelerator science. The bERLinPro project is presently being built at HZB to address the challenges involved in high current SRF machines with the goal of generating and accelerating a 100 mA electron beam to 50 MeV in continuous wave (cw) mode at 1.3 GHz. One of the main challenges in this project is that of handling the high input RF power required for the photo-injector as well as booster cavities where there is no energy recovery process. A high power co-axial input power coupler is being developed to be used for the photo-injector and booster cavities at the nominal beam current. The coupler is based on the KEK–cERL design and has been modified to minimise the penetration of the coupler tip in the beam pipe without compromising on beam-power coupling (Qext ~105). Herein we report on the RF design of the high power (115 kW per coupler, dual couplers per cavity) bERLinPro (BP) coupler along with initial results on thermal calculations. We summarise the RF conditioning of the TTF-III couplers (modified for cw operation) performed in the past at BESSY/HZB. A similar conditioning is envisaged in the near future for the low current SRF photo-injector and the bERLinPro main linac cryomodule.

  5. Advanced oxidation of natural organic matter using hydrogen peroxide and iron-coated pumice particles.

    PubMed

    Kitis, M; Kaplan, S S

    2007-08-01

    The oxidative removal of natural organic matter (NOM) from waters using hydrogen peroxide and iron-coated pumice particles as heterogeneous catalysts was investigated. Two NOM sources were tested: humic acid solution and a natural source water. Iron coated pumice removed about half of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration at a dose of 3000 mg l(-1) in 24 h by adsorption only. Original pumice and peroxide dosed together provided UV absorbance reductions as high as 49%, mainly due to the presence of metal oxides including Al(2)O(3), Fe(2)O(3) and TiO(2) in the natural pumice, which are known to catalyze the decomposition of peroxide forming strong oxidants. Coating the original pumice particles with iron oxides significantly enhanced the removal of NOM with peroxide. A strong linear correlation was found between iron contents of coated pumices and UV absorbance reductions. Peroxide consumption also correlated with UV absorbance reduction. Control experiments proved the effective coating and the stability of iron oxide species bound on pumice surfaces. Results overall indicated that in addition to adsorptive removal of NOM by metal oxides on pumice surfaces, surface reactions between iron oxides and peroxide result in the formation of strong oxidants, probably like hydroxyl radicals, which further oxidize both adsorbed NOM and remaining NOM in solution, similar to those in Fenton-like reactions.

  6. Advances in nuclear data and all-particle transport for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Chadwick, M.B.; Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1994-05-01

    Fast neutrons have been used to treat over 15,000 cancer patients worldwide and proton therapy is rapidly emerging as a treatment of choice for tumors around critical anatomical structures. Neutron therapy requires evaluated data to {approximately}70 MeV while proton therapy requires data to {approximately}250 MeV. Collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the medical physics community has revealed limitations in nuclear cross section evaluations and radiation transport capabilities that have prevented neutron and proton radiation therapy centers from using Monte Carlo calculations to accurately predict dose in patients. These evaluations require energy- and angle-dependent cross sections for secondary neutrons, charged-particles and recoil nuclei. We are expanding the LLNL nuclear databases to higher energies for biologically important elements and have developed a three-dimensional, all-particle Monte Carlo radiation transport code that uses computer-assisted-tomography (CT) images as the input mesh. This code, called PEREGRINE calculates dose distributions in the human body and can be used as a tool to determine the dependence of dose on details of the evaluated nuclear data. In this paper, we will review the status of the nuclear data required for neutron and proton therapy, describe the capabilities of the PEREGRINE package, and show the effects of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution.

  7. Generation of multi-charged high current ion beams using the SMIS 37 gas-dynamic electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, M. A.; Zorin, V. G.; Sidorov, A. V.; Bokhanov, A. F.; Izotov, I. V.; Razin, S. V.; Skalyga, V. A.

    2013-06-02

    A gas-dynamic ECR ion source (GaDIS) is distinguished by its ability to produce high current and high brightness beams of moderately charged ions. Contrary to a classical ECR ion source where the plasma confinement is determined by the slow electron scattering into an empty loss-cone, the higher density and lower electron temperature in a GaDIS plasma lead to an isotropic electron distribution with the confinement time determined by the prompt gas-dynamic flow losses. As a result, much higher ion fluxes are available, however a decrease in the confinement time of the GaDIS plasma lowers the ion charge state. The gas-dynamic ECR ion source concept has been successfully realized in the SMIS 37 experimental facility operated at the Institute of Applied Physics, Russia. The use of high-power (~100 kW) microwave (37.5 GHz) radiation provides a dense plasma (~1013 cm-3) with a relatively low electron temperature (~50- 100 eV) and allows for the generation of high current (~1 A/cm2) beams of multi-charged ions. In this work we report on the present status of the SMIS 37 ion source and discuss the advanced numerical modeling of ion beam extraction using the particle-in-cell code WARP

  8. The Search for Fractional Charge Particles in an Advanced, Automated Variation of the Millikan Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I. T.; Halyo, V.; Lee, E. R.; Loomba, D.; Perl, M. L.

    2001-04-01

    We will present a variation on the Millikan apparatus designed to look for fractionally charged particles in bulk materials, and results from the current run. Oil drops are produced from a drop-on-demand ejector, and imaged by a digital CCD camera and framegrabber combination. A networked Linux cluster is used to simultaneously collect and analyze data, and to monitor and control the apparatus. The experiment is fully automated, and utilizes laminar air flow to make possible the accurate measurements of charge on large (20 micron) fluid drops. The experiment has the capability to process a total of 10^7 to 10^8 drops (20-200 mg), and the ability to use large drops enables the search to be carried out in mineral suspensions.

  9. New HOM coupler design for high current SRF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Hahn, H.; Johnson, E.

    2011-03-28

    Damping higher order modes (HOMs) significantly to avoid beam instability is a challenge for the high current Energy Recovery Linac-based eRHIC at BNL. To avoid the overheating effect and high tuning sensitivity, current, a new band-stop HOM coupler is being designed at BNL. The new HOM coupler has a bandwidth of tens of MHz to reject the fundamental mode, which will avoid overheating due to fundamental frequency shifting because of cooling down. In addition, the S21 parameter of the band-pass filter is nearly flat from first higher order mode to 5 times the fundamental frequency. The simulation results showed that the new couplers effectively damp HOMs for the eRHIC cavity with enlarged beam tube diameter and 2 120{sup o} HOM couplers at each side of cavity. This paper presents the design of HOM coupler, HOM damping capacity for eRHIC cavity and prototype test results.

  10. A High-Current, Stable Nonaqueous Organic Redox Flow Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Duan, Wentao; Huang, Jinhua; Zhang, Lu; Li, Bin; Reed, David; Xu, Wu; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2016-10-14

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries are promising in pursuit of high-energy storage systems owing to the broad voltage window, but currently are facing key challenges such as poor cycling stability and lack of suitable membranes. Here we report a new nonaqueous all-organic flow chemistry that demonstrates an outstanding cell cycling stability primarily because of high chemical persistency of the organic radical redox species and their good compatibility with the supporting electrolyte. A feasibility study shows that Daramic® and Celgard® porous separators can lead to high cell conductivity in flow cells thus producing remarkable cell efficiency and material utilization even at high current operations. This result suggests that the thickness and pore size are the key performance-determining factors for porous separators. With the greatly improved flow cell performance, this new flow system largely addresses the above mentioned challenges and the findings may greatly expedite the development of durable nonaqueous flow batteries.

  11. Design of a proof of principle high current transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S.M.; Bangerter, R.O.; Barnard, J.J.; Celata, C.M.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Seidl, P.A.

    2000-01-15

    Preliminary designs of an intense heavy-ion beam transport experiment to test issues for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) are presented. This transport channel will represent a single high current density beam at full driver scale and will evaluate practical issues such as aperture filling factors, electrons, halo, imperfect vacuum, etc., that cannot be fully tested using scaled experiments. Various machine configurations are evaluated in the context of the range of physics and technology issues that can be explored in a manner relevant to a full scale driver. it is anticipated that results from this experiment will allow confident construction of next generation ''Integrated Research Experiments'' leading to a full scale driver for energy production.

  12. Fast high-temperature superconductor switch for high current applications

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyov, VF; Li, Q

    2013-07-15

    Reversible operation of a high current superconductor switch based on the quench of high-resistance second generation high temperature superconducting wire is demonstrated. The quench is induced by a burst of an ac field generated by an inductively coupled radio-frequency coil. The switch makes a superconducting-to-normal transition within 5 ms and also has a rapid recovery to the superconducting state. The device has potential applications as an active current limiter or as a storage switch for superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. Operation in a full flux penetration/flow regime can effectively minimize the detrimental effects of the intrinsic conductor non-uniformity. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  13. Interdigitated back contact solar cell with high-current collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, C. M.; Nasby, R. D.; Sexton, F. W.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Norwood, D. P.

    Internal current collection efficiencies greater than 90% and energy conversion efficiencies of 18 % at 30 suns were measured on a laboratory version of the interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cell. A phosphorous gettering diffusion was performed on the front surface and then etched off to achieve these high current collection efficiencies. Thermal oxides were grown on the front and back of the cell to passivate the silicon surfaces. Although the internal collection efficiencies of the cell were high, series resistance caused the fill factor (FF) to decrease at concentrations above 30 suns. Dark current measurements on cells with a new grid spacing indicate that the series resistance is much lower than in the previous cell design. It is suggested that this should result in higher efficiencies at high concentration.

  14. Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; D.M. Gassner; J.G. Grimes; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; Z. Segalov; K. Smith; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; K. Yip; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; J.R. Delayen; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble

    2005-05-16

    Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

  15. Ultra-high current density thin-film Si diode

    DOEpatents

    Wang; Qi

    2008-04-22

    A combination of a thin-film .mu.c-Si and a-Si:H containing diode structure characterized by an ultra-high current density that exceeds 1000 A/cm.sup.2, comprising: a substrate; a bottom metal layer disposed on the substrate; an n-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited the bottom metal layer; an i-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the n-layer; a buffer layer of a-Si:H deposited on the i-layer, a p-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the buffer layer; and a top metal layer deposited on the p-layer.

  16. High pressure, high current, low inductance, high reliability sealed terminals

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-03-23

    The invention is a terminal assembly having a casing with at least one delivery tapered-cone conductor and at least one return tapered-cone conductor routed there-through. The delivery and return tapered-cone conductors are electrically isolated from each other and positioned in the annuluses of ordered concentric cones at an off-normal angle. The tapered cone conductor service can be AC phase conductors and DC link conductors. The center core has at least one service conduit of gate signal leads, diagnostic signal wires, and refrigerant tubing routed there-through. A seal material is in direct contact with the casing inner surface, the tapered-cone conductors, and the service conduits thereby hermetically filling the interstitial space in the casing interior core and center core. The assembly provides simultaneous high-current, high-pressure, low-inductance, and high-reliability service.

  17. Drift distance survey in DPIS for high current beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue,T.; Okamura, M.; Kondo, K.; Tamura, J.; Kashiwagi, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2009-09-20

    In a laser ion source, plasma drift distance is one of the most important design parameters. Ion current density and beam pulse width are defined by plasma drift distance between laser target and beam extraction position. In direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS), which uses a laser ion source and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac, we can apply relatively higher electric field at the beam extraction due to the unique shape of a positively biased electrode. However, when we aim at very high current acceleration like several tens of mA, we observed mismatched beam extraction conditions. We tested three different ion current at ion extraction region by changing plasma drift distance to study better extraction condition. In this experiment, C{sup 6+} beam was accelerated. We confirmed that the matching condition can be improved by controlling plasma drift distance.

  18. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  19. High current beam transport with multiple beam arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.

    1985-05-01

    Highlights of recent experimental and theoretical research progress on the high current beam transport of single and multiple beams by the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are presented. In the single beam transport experiment (SBTE), stability boundaries and the emittance growth of a space charge dominated beam in a long quadrupole transport channel were measured and compared with theory and computer simulations. Also, a multiple beam ion induction linac (MBE-4) is being constructed at LBL which will permit study of multiple beam transport arrays, and acceleration and bunch length compression of individually focused beamlets. Various design considerations of MBE-4 regarding scaling laws, nonlinear effects, misalignments, and transverse and longitudinal space charge effects are summarized. Some aspects of longitudinal beam dynamics including schemes to generate the accelerating voltage waveforms and to amplify beam current are also discussed.

  20. Heavy-Ion Injector for the High Current Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J. W.; Prost, L.; Seidl, P.

    2001-10-01

    We report on progress in development of the Heavy-Ion Injector at LBNL, which is being prepared for use as an injector for the High Current Experiment (HCX). It is composed of a 10-cm-diameter surface ionization source, an extraction diode, and an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator, with a typical operating current of 0.6 A of potassium ions at 1.8 MeV, and a beam pulse length of 4.5 microsecs. We have improved the Injector equipment and diagnostics, and have characterized the source emission and radial beam profiles at the diode and ESQ regions. We find improved agreement with EGUN predictions, and improved compatibility with the downstream matching section. Plans are to attach the matching section and the initial ESQ transport section of HCX. Results will be presented and compared with EGUN and WARP simulations.

  1. Incorporating advanced language models into the P300 speller using particle filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speier, W.; Arnold, C. W.; Deshpande, A.; Knall, J.; Pouratian, N.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The P300 speller is a common brain-computer interface (BCI) application designed to communicate language by detecting event related potentials in a subject’s electroencephalogram signal. Information about the structure of natural language can be valuable for BCI communication, but attempts to use this information have thus far been limited to rudimentary n-gram models. While more sophisticated language models are prevalent in natural language processing literature, current BCI analysis methods based on dynamic programming cannot handle their complexity. Approach. Sampling methods can overcome this complexity by estimating the posterior distribution without searching the entire state space of the model. In this study, we implement sequential importance resampling, a commonly used particle filtering (PF) algorithm, to integrate a probabilistic automaton language model. Main result. This method was first evaluated offline on a dataset of 15 healthy subjects, which showed significant increases in speed and accuracy when compared to standard classification methods as well as a recently published approach using a hidden Markov model (HMM). An online pilot study verified these results as the average speed and accuracy achieved using the PF method was significantly higher than that using the HMM method. Significance. These findings strongly support the integration of domain-specific knowledge into BCI classification to improve system performance.

  2. Incorporating advanced language models into the P300 speller using particle filtering

    PubMed Central

    Speier, W; Arnold, CW; Deshpande, A; Knall, J

    2015-01-01

    Objective The P300 speller is a common brain–computer interface (BCI) application designed to communicate language by detecting event related potentials in a subject’s electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. Information about the structure of natural language can be valuable for BCI communication, but attempts to use this information have thus far been limited to rudimentary n-gram models. While more sophisticated language models are prevalent in natural language processing literature, current BCI analysis methods based on dynamic programming cannot handle their complexity. Approach Sampling methods can overcome this complexity by estimating the posterior distribution without searching the entire state space of the model. In this study, we implement sequential importance resampling, a commonly used particle filtering (PF) algorithm, to integrate a probabilistic automaton language model. Main Result This method was first evaluated offline on a dataset of 15 healthy subjects, which showed significant increases in speed and accuracy when compared to standard classification methods as well as a recently published approach using a hidden Markov model (HMM). An online pilot study verified these results as the average speed and accuracy achieved using the PF method was significantly higher than that using the HMM method. Significance These findings strongly support the integration of domain-specific knowledge into BCI classification to improve system performance. PMID:26061188

  3. Superstructure for high current applications in superconducting linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sekutowicz, Jacek; Kneisel, Peter

    2008-03-18

    A superstructure for accelerating charged particles at relativistic speeds. The superstructure consists of two weakly coupled multi-cell subunits equipped with HOM couplers. A beam pipe connects the subunits and an HOM damper is included at the entrance and the exit of each of the subunits. A coupling device feeds rf power into the subunits. The subunits are constructed of niobium and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. The length of the beam pipe between the subunits is selected to provide synchronism between particles and rf fields in both subunits.

  4. A Superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Dietderich, D. R.; Joseph, J. M.; Lizarazo, J.; Prestemon, S. O.; Miller, G.; Weijers, H. W.

    2010-02-15

    This article describes the development of a direct-current (dc) superconducting transformer system for the high current test of superconducting cables. The transformer consists of a core-free 10 464 turn primary solenoid which is enclosed by a 6.5 turn secondary. The transformer is designed to deliver a 50 kA dc secondary current at a dc primary current of about 50 A. The secondary current is measured inductively using two toroidal-wound Rogowski coils. The Rogowski coil signal is digitally integrated, resulting in a voltage signal that is proportional to the secondary current. This voltage signal is used to control the secondary current using a feedback loop which automatically compensates for resistive losses in the splices to the superconducting cable samples that are connected to the secondary. The system has been commissioned up to 28 kA secondary current. The reproducibility in the secondary current measurement is better than 0.05% for the relevant current range up to 25 kA. The drift in the secondary current, which results from drift in the digital integrator, is estimated to be below 0.5 A/min. The system's performance is further demonstrated through a voltage-current measurement on a superconducting cable sample at 11 T background magnetic field. The superconducting transformer system enables fast, high resolution, economic, and safe tests of the critical current of superconducting cable samples.

  5. A superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing.

    PubMed

    Godeke, A; Dietderich, D R; Joseph, J M; Lizarazo, J; Prestemon, S O; Miller, G; Weijers, H W

    2010-03-01

    This article describes the development of a direct-current (dc) superconducting transformer system for the high current test of superconducting cables. The transformer consists of a core-free 10,464 turn primary solenoid which is enclosed by a 6.5 turn secondary. The transformer is designed to deliver a 50 kA dc secondary current at a dc primary current of about 50 A. The secondary current is measured inductively using two toroidal-wound Rogowski coils. The Rogowski coil signal is digitally integrated, resulting in a voltage signal that is proportional to the secondary current. This voltage signal is used to control the secondary current using a feedback loop which automatically compensates for resistive losses in the splices to the superconducting cable samples that are connected to the secondary. The system has been commissioned up to 28 kA secondary current. The reproducibility in the secondary current measurement is better than 0.05% for the relevant current range up to 25 kA. The drift in the secondary current, which results from drift in the digital integrator, is estimated to be below 0.5 A/min. The system's performance is further demonstrated through a voltage-current measurement on a superconducting cable sample at 11 T background magnetic field. The superconducting transformer system enables fast, high resolution, economic, and safe tests of the critical current of superconducting cable samples.

  6. Characterization of a High Current, Long Life Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanNoord, Jonathan L.; Kamhawi, Hani; McEwen, Heather K.

    2006-01-01

    The advent of higher power spacecraft makes it desirable to use higher power electric propulsion thrusters such as ion thrusters or Hall thrusters. Higher power thrusters require cathodes that are capable of producing higher currents. One application of these higher power spacecraft is deep-space missions that require tens of thousands of hours of operation. This paper presents the approach used to design a high current, long life hollow cathode assembly for that application, along with test results from the corresponding hollow cathode. The design approach used for the candidate hollow cathode was to reduce the temperature gradient in the insert, yielding a lower peak temperature and allowing current to be produced more uniformly along the insert. The lower temperatures result in a hollow cathode with increased life. The hollow cathode designed was successfully operated at currents from 10 to 60 A with flow rates of 5 to 19 sccm with a maximum orifice temperature measured of 1100 C. Data including discharge voltage, keeper voltage, discharge current, flow rates, and orifice plate temperatures are presented.

  7. Dynamics of a high-current relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Strelkov, P. S.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Ivanov, I. E. Shumeiko, D. V.

    2015-06-15

    The dynamics of a high-current relativistic electron beam is studied experimentally and by numerical simulation. The beam is formed in a magnetically insulated diode with a transverse-blade explosive-emission cathode. It is found experimentally that the radius of a 500-keV beam with a current of 2 kA and duration of 500 ns decreases with time during the beam current pulse. The same effect was observed in numerical simulations. This effect is explained by a change in the shape of the cathode plasma during the current pulse, which, according to calculations, leads to a change in the beam parameters, such as the electron pitch angle and the spread over the longitudinal electron momentum. These parameters are hard to measure experimentally; however, the time evolution of the radial profile of the beam current density, which can be measured reliably, coincides with the simulation results. This allows one to expect that the behavior of the other beam parameters also agrees with numerical simulations.

  8. Lattice Effects Due to High Currents in PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.-J.; Smith, H.; Turner, J.L.; /SLAC

    2005-05-09

    The very high beam currents in the PEP-II B-Factory have caused many expected and unexpected effects: Synchrotron light fans move the beam pipe and cause dispersion; higher order modes cause excessive heating, e-clouds around the positron beam blow up its beam size. Here we describe an effect where the measured dispersion of the beam in the Low Energy Ring (LER) is different at high and at low beam currents. The dispersion was iteratively lowered by making anti-symmetric orbit bumps in many sextupole duplets, checking each time with a dispersion measurement where a dispersive kick is generated. This can be done parasitically during collisions. It was a surprise when checking the low current characterization data that there is a change. Subsequent high and low current measurements confirmed the effect. One source was believed to be located far away from any synchrotron radiation in the middle of a straight (PR12), away from sextupoles and skew quadrupoles and created a dispersion wave of about 70 mm at high current while at low current it is negligible.

  9. High Current Cathodes Fabricated by KrF Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilgenbach, Ronald M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Jones, M. C.; Johnston, M. D.; Jordan, N. M.; Hoff, B. W.

    2010-10-08

    In this paper we review several high power laser ablation techniques that have been utilized to fabricate high current (1-80 kA) electron beam cathodes for accelerators and microwave sources: 1) Projection Ablation Lithography (PAL) cathodes, 2) Ablation Line Focus (ALF) cathodes, and 3) Metal-Oxide-Junction (MOJ) cathodes. Laser-ablative micromachining techniques (PAL and ALF) have been utilized to generate micron-scale features on metal substrates that provide electric field (beta) enhancement for Fowler-Nordheim emission and plasma cathodes. Since these laser-ablated patterns are directly, laser-written on the substrate metal they exhibit much higher thermal conductivity for higher current capability and increased damage thresholds. Metal-Oxide-Junction (MOJ) cathodes exploit the triple-point electron emission that occurs at the interface between metal, insulator and vacuum.The ablation laser is a KrF excimer laser with a pulse energy of 600 mJ and pulselength of 20 ns. Cathode experiments were performed on the MELBA-C accelerator: V = -300 kV, pulselength = 0.5 microsecond. Data will be presented for PAL, ALF and MOJ cathodes.

  10. X-Pinch in High-Current Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryunetkin, B. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Ivanenkov, G. V.; Khakhalin, S. Ya.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Pikuz, S. A.; Romanova, V. M.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.

    1994-03-01

    The review of X-pinch investigations in high current diode of BIN facility (250 kA, 100 ns) is presented. The main purposes were to investigate pinch forming processes and hot dense plasma properties. X-pinch is also considered as a source for multiple charged ions spectroscopy and for X-ray optics testing. The set of diagnostics applied in these experiments allowed us to investigate the pinch forming processes in different configurations of crossed wires loads. High spectral and space resolved measurements of plasma radiation in 1-200 Å range, absolute energy measurements and electron beam registration were provided. Plasma parameters were obtained from relative intensities and shapes of multiple charged ions spectral lines. Electron density of plasma with the temperature Te = 0.2-1 keV variated from 1023 cm-3 in hot spot to 1018 cm-3 during plasma expansion. In recombining plasma, an inversion of Al He-like ions levels population was registrated. Total radiation output of 0.5 mm pinch reached hundreds Joules in 2-100 Å range during 100 ns.

  11. A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rebai, M.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Cavenago, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M.; Croci, G.; Gervasini, G.; Ghezzi, F.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Murtas, F.; Gorini, G.

    2012-02-15

    A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams is proposed for installation on the spectral shear interferometry for direct electric field reconstruction (SPIDER, Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) test beam facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission on the beam dump surface by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses gas electron multiplier detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. The cathode is made of a thin polythene film and an aluminium film; it is designed for detection of neutrons of energy >2.2 MeV with an incidence angle < 45 deg. CNESM was designed on the basis of simulations of the different steps from the deuteron beam interaction with the beam dump to the neutron detection in the nGEM. Neutron scattering was simulated with the MCNPX code. CNESM on SPIDER is a first step towards the application of this diagnostic technique to the MITICA beam test facility, where it will be used to resolve the horizontal profile of the beam intensity.

  12. Los Alamos high-current proton storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G. P.; Hardekopf, R. A.; Jason, A. J.; Clout, P. N.; Sawyer, G. A.

    1985-05-01

    The Proton Storage Ring (PSR), whose installation was recently completed at Los Alamos, is a fast-cycling high-current accumulator designed to produce intense 800 MeV proton pulses for driving a spallation neutron source. The ring converts long beam pulses from the LAMPF linear accelerator into short bunches well matched to requirements of a high-resolution neutron-scattering materials science program. The initial performance goal for this program is to provide 100-(MU)A average current at the neutron production target within a 12-Hz pulse rate. Operation at 20 (MU)A is scheduled for September 1985, with full intensity within the next year. The storage ring was originally designed to function in a second mode in which six 1-ns bunches are accumulated and separately extracted every LAMPF macropulse. Implementation of this mode, which would serve a fast-neutron nuclear-physics program, was deferred in favor of initial concentration on the neutron-scattering program. The PSR design and status is summarized. Unique machine features include high peak current, two-step charge-stripping injection, a low-impedance buncher amplifier to counter beam-loading, and a high-repetition-rate strip-line extraction kicker.

  13. High-current carbon-epoxy capillary cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleizer, J. Z.; Queller, T.; Bliokh, Yu.; Yatom, S.; Vekselman, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Bernshtam, V.

    2012-07-01

    The results of experiments on the reproducible generation of an electron beam having a high current density of up to 300 A/cm2 and a satisfactorily uniform cross-sectional distribution of current density in a ˜200 kV, ˜450 ns vacuum diode with a carbon-epoxy capillary cathode are presented. It was found that the source of the electrons is the plasma formed as a result of flashover inside the capillaries. It is shown that the plasma formation occurs at an electric field ≤15 kV/cm and that the cathode sustains thousands of pulses without degradation in its emission properties. Time- and space-resolved visible light observation and spectroscopy analyses were used to determine the cathode plasma's density, temperature, and expansion velocity. It was found that the density of the cathode plasma decreases rapidly in relation to the distance from the cathode. In addition, it was found that the main reason for the short-circuiting of the accelerating gap is the formation and expansion of the anode plasma. Finally, it was shown that when an external guiding magnetic field is present, the injection of the electron beam into the drift space with a current amplitude exceeding its critical value changes the radial distribution of the current density of the electron beam because the inner electrons are reflected from the virtual cathode.

  14. High current rf (HCRF) linac program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The High Current Radio Frequency (HCRF) Accelerator program began as an effort funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) through the Office of Naval Research (ONR). The three options carried a negotiated total of $3,731,115 so that the total negotiated amount was $3,950,340. SDIO only provided $600,000 for the effort, and only one of the three options was exercised. An additional $310,000 was provided by DARPA, the Office of Naval Technology (ONT) and the Naval Ocean System Center (NOSC) for a collaborative effort to explore an RF technology application in naval surveillance (ultra-wideband radar), an activity covered by the HCRF statement of work. Technical work on the HCRF program consisted of in-depth technology studies and experimental support on the naval radar task. The overall goal of the HCRF program was to develop an fundamentally new technology for compact (high gradient) electron accelerators that can efficiently drive high gain, single pass FEL amplifiers producing output radiation at a wavelength of approximately one micron or less in a pulsed format for boost phase and mid-course SDIO missions. SDIO mission requirements dictated that the accelerator technology goals be consistent with a laser system that can produce greater than ten megawatts of average optical power during a 200 second battle from a space platform placed in orbit with a single heavy lift booster.

  15. Some Physical and Engineering Aspects of High Current EBIS

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, A; Prelec, K.

    1999-05-21

    Some applications of an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) require intensities of highly charged ions significantly greater than those which have been achieved in present EBIS sources. For example, the ion source for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) must be capable of generating 3 x 10{sup 9} ions of Au{sup 35+} or 2 x 10{sup 9} ions of U{sup 45+} per pulse. In this case, if the fraction of ions of interest is 20% of the total ion space charge, the total extracted charge is {approximately} 5 x 10{sup 11}. It is also desirable to extract these ions in a 10 {micro}s pulse to allow single turn injection into the first synchrotrons. Requirements for an EBIS which could meet the needs of the LHC at CERN are similar ({approximately} 1.5 x 10{sup 9} ions of Pb{sup 54+} in 5.5 {micro}s). This charge yield is about an order of magnitude greater than that achieved in existing EBIS sources, and is what is meant here by high current. This also implies, then, an EBIS with a high electron beam current.

  16. Using advanced dispersion models and mobile monitoring to characterize spatial patterns of ultrafine particles in an urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwack, Leonard M.; Hanna, Steven R.; Spengler, John D.; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2011-09-01

    In urban settings with elevated bridges, buildings, and other complex terrain, the relationship between traffic and air pollution can be highly variable and difficult to accurately characterize. Atmospheric dispersion models are often used in this context, but incorporating background concentrations and characterizing emissions at high spatiotemporal resolution is challenging, especially for ultrafine particles (UFPs). Ambient pollutant monitoring can characterize this relationship, especially when using continuous real-time monitoring. However, it is challenging to quantify local source contributions over background or to characterize spatial patterns across a neighborhood. The goal of this study is to evaluate contributions of traffic to neighborhood-scale air pollution using a combination of regression models derived from mobile UFP monitoring observations collected in Brooklyn, NY and outputs from the Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) model. QUIC is a dispersion model that can explicitly take into account the three-dimensional shapes of buildings. The monitoring-based regression model characterized concentration gradients from a major elevated roadway, controlling for real-time traffic volume, meteorological variables, and other local sources. QUIC was applied to simulate dispersion from this same major roadway. The relative concentration decreases with distance from the roadway estimated by the monitoring-based regression model after removal of background and by QUIC were similar. Horizontal contour plots with both models demonstrated non-uniform patterns related to building configuration and source heights. We used the best-fit relationship between the monitoring-based regression model after removal of background and the QUIC outputs ( R2 = 0.80) to estimate a UFP emissions factor of 5.7 × 10 14 particles/vehicle-km, which was relatively consistent across key model assumptions. Our joint applications of novel techniques for analyzing mobile monitoring

  17. High-current fast electron beam propagation in a dielectric target.

    PubMed

    Klimo, Ondrej; Tikhonchuk, V T; Debayle, A

    2007-01-01

    Recent experiments demonstrate an efficient transformation of high intensity laser pulse into a relativistic electron beam with a very high current density exceeding 10(12) A cm(-2). The propagation of such a beam inside the target is possible if its current is neutralized. This phenomenon is not well understood, especially in dielectric targets. In this paper, we study the propagation of high current density electron beam in a plastic target using a particle-in-cell simulation code. The code includes both ionization of the plastic and collisions of newborn electrons. The numerical results are compared with a relatively simple analytical model and a reasonable agreement is found. The temporal evolution of the beam velocity distribution, the spatial density profile, and the propagation velocity of the ionization front are analyzed and their dependencies on the beam density and energy are discussed. The beam energy losses are mainly due to the target ionization induced by the self-generated electric field and the return current. For the highest beam density, a two-stream instability is observed to develop in the plasma behind the ionization front and it contributes to the beam energy losses.

  18. Electrical and hydrodynamic characterization of a high current pulsed arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Martins, R.; Chemartin, L.; Zaepffel, C.; Lalande, Ph; Soufiani, A.

    2016-05-01

    High current pulsed arcs are of significant industrial interest and, aiming to reduce time and cost, there is progressively more and more need for computation tools that describe and predict the behaviour of these arcs. These simulation codes need inputs and validations by experimental databases, but accurate data is missing for this category of electric discharges. The principal lack of understanding is with respect to the transient phase of the current, which can reach thousands of amperes in a few microseconds. In this paper, we present the work realized on an experimental setup that simulates in the laboratory an arc column subjected to five levels of high pulsed current, ranging from 10 kA to 100 kA, with the last one corresponding to the standard lightning current waveform used in aircraft certification processes. This device was instrumented by high speed video cameras to assess the characteristic sizes of the arc channel and to characterize the shock wave generated by the arc expansion. The arc channel radius was measured over time during the axisymmetric phase and reached 3.2 cm. The position and velocity of the shock wave was determined during the first 140 μs. The background-oriented schlieren method was used to study the shock wave and a model for the light deflection inside the shock wave was developed. The mass density profile of the shock wave was estimated and showed good agreement with Rankine-Hugoniot relations at the wave front. Electrical measurements were also used to estimate the time-dependent resistance and conductivity of the arc for times lasting up to 50 μs.

  19. New progress of high current gasdynamic ion source (invited).

    PubMed

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Sidorov, A; Razin, S; Vodopyanov, A; Tarvainen, O; Koivisto, H; Kalvas, T

    2016-02-01

    The experimental and theoretical research carried out at the Institute of Applied Physics resulted in development of a new type of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs)-the gasdynamic ECRIS. The gasdynamic ECRIS features a confinement mechanism in a magnetic trap that is different from Geller's ECRIS confinement, i.e., the quasi-gasdynamic one similar to that in fusion mirror traps. Experimental studies of gasdynamic ECRIS were performed at Simple Mirror Ion Source (SMIS) 37 facility. The plasma was created by 37.5 and 75 GHz gyrotron radiation with power up to 100 kW. High frequency microwaves allowed to create and sustain plasma with significant density (up to 8 × 10(13) cm(-3)) and to maintain the main advantages of conventional ECRIS such as high ionization degree and low ion energy. Reaching such high plasma density relies on the fact that the critical density grows with the microwave frequency squared. High microwave power provided the average electron energy on a level of 50-300 eV enough for efficient ionization even at neutral gas pressure range of 10(-4)-10(-3) mbar. Gasdynamic ECRIS has demonstrated a good performance producing high current (100-300 mA) multi-charged ion beams with moderate average charge (Z = 4-5 for argon). Gasdynamic ECRIS has appeared to be especially effective in low emittance hydrogen and deuterium beams formation. Proton beams with current up to 500 emA and RMS emittance below 0.07 π ⋅ mm ⋅ mrad have been demonstrated in recent experiments.

  20. New progress of high current gasdynamic ion source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Skalyga, V. Sidorov, A.; Vodopyanov, A.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.

    2016-02-15

    The experimental and theoretical research carried out at the Institute of Applied Physics resulted in development of a new type of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs)—the gasdynamic ECRIS. The gasdynamic ECRIS features a confinement mechanism in a magnetic trap that is different from Geller’s ECRIS confinement, i.e., the quasi-gasdynamic one similar to that in fusion mirror traps. Experimental studies of gasdynamic ECRIS were performed at Simple Mirror Ion Source (SMIS) 37 facility. The plasma was created by 37.5 and 75 GHz gyrotron radiation with power up to 100 kW. High frequency microwaves allowed to create and sustain plasma with significant density (up to 8 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}) and to maintain the main advantages of conventional ECRIS such as high ionization degree and low ion energy. Reaching such high plasma density relies on the fact that the critical density grows with the microwave frequency squared. High microwave power provided the average electron energy on a level of 50-300 eV enough for efficient ionization even at neutral gas pressure range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar. Gasdynamic ECRIS has demonstrated a good performance producing high current (100-300 mA) multi-charged ion beams with moderate average charge (Z = 4-5 for argon). Gasdynamic ECRIS has appeared to be especially effective in low emittance hydrogen and deuterium beams formation. Proton beams with current up to 500 emA and RMS emittance below 0.07 π ⋅ mm ⋅ mrad have been demonstrated in recent experiments.

  1. The high current transport experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Baca, D.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Morse, E.

    2004-05-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program to explore heavy-ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high intensity (line charge density {approx} 0.2 {micro}C/m) over long pulse durations (4 {micro}s) in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and steering, envelope matching, image charges and focusing field nonlinearities, halo and, electron and gas cloud effects. We present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K{sup +} ion beam transported through ten electrostatic quadrupoles. The measurements cover two different fill factor studies (60% and 80% of the clear aperture radius) for which the transverse phase-space of the beam was characterized in detail, along with beam energy measurements and the first halo measurements. Electrostatic quadrupole transport at high beam fill factor ({approx}80%) is achieved with acceptable emittance growth and beam loss, even though the initial beam distribution is not ideal (but the emittance is low) nor in thermal equilibrium. We achieved good envelope control, and rematching may only be needed every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor) in a longer lattice of similar design. We also show that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics.

  2. Plasma Emission Characteristics From a High Current Hollow Cathode in an Ion Thruster Discharge Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-11-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 5A) has been documented in the literature. In order to further elucidate these findings, an investigation of a high current cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber has been undertaken. Using Langmuir probes, a low energy charged particle analyzer and emission spectroscopy, the behavior of the near-cathode plasma and the emitted ion energy distribution was characterized. The presence of energetic ions was confirmed. It was observed that these ions had energies in excess of the discharge voltage and thus cannot be simply explained by ions falling out of plasma through a potential difference of this order. Additionally, evidence provided by Langmuir probes suggests the existence of a double layer essentially separating the hollow cathode plasma column from the main discharge. The radial potential difference associated with this double layer was measured to be of order the ionization potential.

  3. Plasma Emission Characteristics from a High Current Hollow Cathode in an Ion Thruster Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 5A) has been documented in the literature. In order to further elucidate these findings, an investigation of a high current cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber has been undertaken. Using Langmuir probes, a low energy charged particle analyzer and emission spectroscopy, the behavior of the near-cathode plasma and the emitted ion energy distribution was characterized. The presence of energetic ions was confirmed. It was observed that these ions had energies in excess of the discharge voltage and thus cannot be simply explained by ions falling out of plasma through a potential difference of this order. Additionally, evidence provided by Langmuir probes suggests the existence of a double layer essentially separating the hollow cathode plasma column from the main discharge. The radial potential difference associated with this double layer was measured to be of order the ionization potential.

  4. Low Impedance Bellows for High-current Beam Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G; Nassiri, A; Waldschmidt, G J; Yang, Y; Feingold, J J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A; Wang, H; Jang, J; Kim, S H

    2012-07-01

    In particle accelerators, bellows are commonly used to connect beamline components. Such bellows are traditionally shielded to lower the beam impedance. Excessive beam impedance can cause overheating in the bellows, especially in high beam current operation. For an SRF-based accelerator, the bellows must also be particulate free. Many designs of shielded bellows incorporate rf slides or fingers that prevent convolutions from being exposed to wakefields. Unfortunately these mechanical structures tend to generate particulates that, if left in the SRF accelerator, can migrate into superconducting cavities, the accelerator's critical components. In this paper, we describe a prototype unshielded bellows that has low beam impedance and no risk of particulate generation.

  5. Magnetic particle imaging: advancements and perspectives for real-time in vivo monitoring and image-guided therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablico-Lansigan, Michele H.; Situ, Shu F.; Samia, Anna Cristina S.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging biomedical imaging technology that allows the direct quantitative mapping of the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. MPI's increased sensitivity and short image acquisition times foster the creation of tomographic images with high temporal and spatial resolution. The contrast and sensitivity of MPI is envisioned to transcend those of other medical imaging modalities presently used, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray scans, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this review, we present an overview of the recent advances in the rapidly developing field of MPI. We begin with a basic introduction of the fundamentals of MPI, followed by some highlights over the past decade of the evolution of strategies and approaches used to improve this new imaging technique. We also examine the optimization of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers used for imaging, underscoring the importance of size homogeneity and surface engineering. Finally, we present some future research directions for MPI, emphasizing the novel and exciting opportunities that it offers as an important tool for real-time in vivo monitoring. All these opportunities and capabilities that MPI presents are now seen as potential breakthrough innovations in timely disease diagnosis, implant monitoring, and image-guided therapeutics.

  6. Compact high current generator for x-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlov, A. V.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Zorin, V. B.

    2006-12-01

    We report here a design of the portable high current generator, which can be used for a row of experiments and applications, including, but not limited to, X pinch, plasma focus, vacuum spark, etc. The X generator consists of the capacitor bank, multigap spark switch, load chamber, and built-in high voltage triggering generator. The capacitor bank consists of 12 General Atomics 35404 type capacitors (20nF, 25nH, 0.2Ω, 100kV). It stores ˜0.8kJ at 80kV charging voltage. Each three capacitors are commuted to a load by the multigap spark switch, which is able to commute by eight parallel channels. Switches operate in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. At 76kV charging voltage the generator provides ˜260kA with 120ns rise time and 5nH inductive load and ˜220kA with 145ns rise time and 10nH. Delay of output pulse relative to high voltage triggering pulse is ˜65ns with 5ns jitter. The dimensions of the generator are 1240×1240×225mm3 and the weight is ˜250kg, and only one high voltage power supply is required as additional equipment for the generator. The generator with a pumping system is placed on area about 0.5m2. Operation and handling are very simple, because no oil nor purified gases are required for the generator. The X generator has been successfully employed for experiments on the Ni X pinch load. X-ray pulse duration (full width at half maximum above 1keV) was about 5ns. Radiation yield Wr⩾500mJ was observed in the 1.2-1.5KeV range and Wr⩾20mJ in the 3-5keV energy range, which is comparable to results, obtained on the nanosecond accelerators. Clearly resolved images of 6μm wire indicate micron level size of hot spot. These results demonstrate possibility of this generator for application for x-ray backlighting.

  7. Stretchable electronics for wearable and high-current applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbich, Daniel; Shannon, Lesley; Gray, Bonnie L.

    2016-04-01

    Advances in the development of novel materials and fabrication processes are resulting in an increased number of flexible and stretchable electronics applications. This evolving technology enables new devices that are not readily fabricated using traditional silicon processes, and has the potential to transform many industries, including personalized healthcare, consumer electronics, and communication. Fabrication of stretchable devices is typically achieved through the use of stretchable polymer-based conductors, or more rigid conductors, such as metals, with patterned geometries that can accommodate stretching. Although the application space for stretchable electronics is extensive, the practicality of these devices can be severely limited by power consumption and cost. Moreover, strict process flows can impede innovation that would otherwise enable new applications. In an effort to overcome these impediments, we present two modified approaches and applications based on a newly developed process for stretchable and flexible electronics fabrication. This includes the development of a metallization pattern stamping process allowing for 1) stretchable interconnects to be directly integrated with stretchable/wearable fabrics, and 2) a process variation enabling aligned multi-layer devices with integrated ferromagnetic nanocomposite polymer components enabling a fully-flexible electromagnetic microactuator for large-magnitude magnetic field generation. The wearable interconnects are measured, showing high conductivity, and can accommodate over 20% strain before experiencing conductive failure. The electromagnetic actuators have been fabricated and initial measurements show well-aligned, highly conductive, isolated metal layers. These two applications demonstrate the versatility of the newly developed process and suggest potential for its furthered use in stretchable electronics and MEMS applications.

  8. Recent advances in particle and droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices based on surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuochen; Zhe, Jiang

    2011-04-07

    Manipulation of microscale particles and fluid liquid droplets is an important task for lab-on-a-chip devices for numerous biological researches and applications, such as cell detection and tissue engineering. Particle manipulation techniques based on surface acoustic waves (SAWs) appear effective for lab-on-a-chip devices because they are non-invasive, compatible with soft lithography micromachining, have high energy density, and work for nearly any type of microscale particles. Here we review the most recent research and development of the past two years in SAW based particle and liquid droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices including particle focusing and separation, particle alignment and patterning, particle directing, and liquid droplet delivery.

  9. Studies in High Current Density Ion Sources for Heavy Ion Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon-Golcher, Edwin

    2002-06-01

    This dissertation develops diverse research on small (diameter ~ few mm), high current density (J ~ several tens of mA/cm2) heavy ion sources. The research has been developed in the context of a programmatic interest within the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program to explore alternative architectures in the beam injection systems that use the merging of small, bright beams. An ion gun was designed and built for these experiments. Results of average current density yield () at different operating conditions are presented for K+ and Cs+ contact ionization sources and potassium aluminum silicate sources. Maximum values for a K+ beam of ~90 mA/cm2 were observed in 2.3 μs pulses. Measurements of beam intensity profiles and emittances are included. Measurements of neutral particle desorption are presented at different operating conditions which lead to a better understanding of the underlying atomic diffusion processes that determine the lifetime of the emitter. Estimates of diffusion times consistent with measurements are presented, as well as estimates of maximum repetition rates achievable. Diverse studies performed on the composition and preparation of alkali aluminosilicate ion sources are also presented. In addition, this work includes preliminary work carried out exploring the viability of an argon plasma ion source and a bismuth metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. For the former ion source, fast rise-times (~ 1 μs), high current densities (~ 100 mA/cm+) and low operating pressures (< 2 mtorr) were verified. For the latter, high but acceptable levels of beam emittance were measured (εn ≤ 0.006 π· mm · mrad) although measured currents differed from the desired ones (I ~ 5mA) by about a factor of 10.

  10. Experimental study of a high-current FEM with a broadband microwave system

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, G.G.; Bratman, V.L.; Ginzburg, N.S.

    1995-12-31

    One of the main features of FELs and FEMs is the possibility of fast and wideband tuning of the resonant frequency of active media, which can be provided by changing the particle energy. For a frequency adjustable FEM-oscillator, a broadband microwave system, which is simply combined with an electron-optical FEM system and consists of an oversized waveguide and reflectors based on the microwave beams multiplication effect has been proposed and studied successfully in {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} measurements. Here, the operating ability of a cavity, that includes some key elements of the broadband microwave system, was tested in the presence of an electron beam. To provide large particle oscillation velocities in a moderate undulator field and the presence of a guide magnetic field, the FEM operating regime of double resonance was chosen. In this regime the cyclotron as well as undulator resonance conditions were satisfied. The FEM-oscillator was investigated experimentally on a high-current accelerator {open_quotes}Sinus-6{close_quotes} that forms an electron beam with particle energy 500keV and pulse duration 25ns. The aperture with a diameter 2.5mm at the center of the anode allows to pass through only the central fraction of the electron beam with a current about 100A and a small spread of longitudinal velocities of the particles. Operating transverse velocity was pumped into the electron beam in the pulse plane undulator of a 2.4cm period. The cavity with a frequency near 45GHz consists of a square waveguide and two reflectors. The broadband up-stream reflector based on the multiplication effect had the power reflectivity coefficient more than 90% in the frequency band 10% for the H{sup 10} wave of the square waveguide with the maximum about 100% at a frequency 45GHz. The down-stream narrow-band Bragg reflector had the power reflection coefficient approximately 80% in the frequency band of 4% near 45GHz for the operating mode.

  11. Mechanisms for the formation and transport of ion fluxes in the plasma of a high-current vacuum spark

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. N.; Zemchenkova, N. V.; Klyachin, N. A.; Prokhorovich, D. E.

    2010-09-15

    The processes of ion flux formation in the plasma of a high-current vacuum spark were investigated experimentally. It is shown that multicharged ions are generated in the neck formed in the erosion products of the inner electrode. The plasma escaping from the neck region plays a role of a piston dragging particles of the cold peripheral plasma into ambient space. As the discharge current increases, the flux of the evaporated electrode material grows, the degree of ionization of the plasma produced decreases, and the efficiency of plasma heating caused by the pinching effect is reduced.

  12. Model of convection mass transfer in titanium alloy at low energy high current electron beam action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, V. D.; Granovskii, A. Yu; Nevskii, S. A.; Konovalov, S. V.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The convection mixing model is proposed for low-energy high-current electron beam treatment of titanium alloys, pre-processed by heterogeneous plasma flows generated via explosion of carbon tape and powder TiB2. The model is based on the assumption vortices in the molten layer are formed due to the treatment by concentrated energy flows. These vortices evolve as the result of thermocapillary convection, arising because of the temperature gradient. The calculation of temperature gradient and penetration depth required solution of the heat problem with taking into account the surface evaporation. However, instead of the direct heat source the boundary conditions in phase transitions were changed in the thermal conductivity equation, assuming the evaporated material takes part in the heat exchange. The data on the penetration depth and temperature distribution are used for the thermocapillary model. The thermocapillary model embraces Navier-Stocks and convection heat transfer equations, as well as the boundary conditions with the outflow of evaporated material included. The solution of these equations by finite elements methods pointed at formation of a multi-vortices structure when electron-beam treatment and its expansion over new zones of material. As the result, strengthening particles are found at the depth exceeding manifold their penetration depth in terms of the diffusion mechanism.

  13. Simulative research on the expansion of cathode plasma in high-current electron beam diode

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Qifu; Liu Lie

    2012-09-15

    The expansion of cathode plasma has long been recognized as a limiting factor in the impedance lifetime of high-current electron beam diode. Realistic modeling of such plasma is of great necessity in order to discuss the dynamics of cathode plasma. Using the method of particle-in-cell, the expansion of cathode plasma is simulated in this paper by a scaled-down diode model. It is found that the formation of cathode plasma increases the current density in the diode. This consequently leads to the decrease of the potential at plasma front. Once the current density has been increased to a certain value, the potential at plasma front would then be equal to or lower than the plasma potential. Then the ions would move towards the anode, and the expansion of cathode plasma is thereby formed. Different factors affecting the plasma expansion velocity are discussed in this paper. It is shown that the decrease of proton genatation rate has the benefit of reducing the plasma expansion velocity.

  14. Investigation of various equations of state for high current, pulsed power load modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luginsland, John; Parkinson, Roland; Rigby, Fred; Toepfer, Alan

    2002-08-01

    A number of technologies utilize the increasing availability of modern pulsed power systems to produce high currents to resistively drive solid, metallic loads into the plasma state. Examples include ablation plasma deposition, circuit breakers, fuses, exploding and imploding wires, and high velocity jet disruption. One important feature in any computational model of these phenomena is the equation of state (EOS). The equations of state used in these models are typically as varied as the range of applications. In this work, using a segmented wire experiment performed at the Army Research Laboratory [1] as a benchmark, we investigate three equations of state [2-4]. We assess the merits of the EOS for both their physical accuracy and easy of use computationally. Finally, we comment on the availability of the information necessary to build the EOS, given the wide variety of materials that are used in this applied field. [1] C.E. Hollandsworth et al., J. Appl. Phys., vol. 84, no. 9, 4992-5000, 1998. [2] SESAME tables, LANL T-1 Division, Equation of State and Strength of Materials. [3] Zhukov, Demidov, and Ryabenko, Fiz. Metal. Metalloved., vol. 57, no. 2, 224-229, 1984. [4] Chittenden et al., Laser and Particle Beams, vol. 19, issue 3, 323-343, 2001, and references therein.

  15. Surface composite nanostructures of AZ91 magnesium alloy induced by high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. C.; Hao, S. Z.; Wen, H.; Huang, R. F.

    2014-06-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment was conducted on an AZ91 cast magnesium alloy with accelerating voltage 27 kV, energy density 3 J/cm2 and pulse duration 2.5 μs. The surface microstructure was characterized by optical microscope (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The surface corrosion property was tested with electrochemical method in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. It is found that after 1 pulse of HCPEB treatment, the initial eutectic α phase and Mg17Al12 particles started to dissolve in the surface modified layer of depth ∼15 μm. When using 15 HCPEB pulses, the Al content in surface layer increased noticeably, and the phase structure was modified as composite nanostructures consisted of nano-grained Mg3.1Al0.9 domains surrounded by network of Mg17Al12 phase. The HCPEB treated samples showed an improved corrosion resistance with cathodic current density decreased by two orders of magnitude as compared to the initial AZ91 alloy.

  16. A superconducting quadrupole array for transport of multiple high current beams

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Shuman, D.

    1999-11-01

    We present a conceptual design of a superconducting quadrupole magnet array for the side-by-side transport of multiple high current particle beams in induction linear accelerators. The magnetic design uses a modified cosine 20 current distribution inside a square cell boundary. Each interior magnet's neighbors serve as the return flux paths and the poles are placed as close as possible to each other to facilitate this. No iron is present in the basic 2-D magnetic design; it will work at any current level without correction windings. Special 1/8th quadrupoles are used along the transverse periphery of the array to contain and channel flux back into the array, making every channel look as part of an infinite array. This design provides a fixed dimension array boundary equal to the quadrupole radius that can be used for arrays of any number of quadrupole channels, at any field level. More importantly, the design provides magnetic field separation between the array and the induction cores which may be surrounding it. Flux linkage between these two components can seriously affect the operation of both of them.

  17. High Current Density, Long Life Cathodes for High Power RF Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Collins, George; Falce, Lou; Schwartzkopf, Steve; Busbaher, Daniel

    2014-01-22

    This program was tasked with improving the quality and expanding applications for Controlled Porosity Reservoir (CPR) cathodes. Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) initially developed CPR cathodes on a DOE-funded SBIR program to improve cathodes for magnetron injection guns. Subsequent funding was received from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The program developed design requirements for implementation of the technology into high current density cathodes for high frequency applications. During Phase I of this program, CCR was awarded the prestigious 2011 R&D100 award for this technology. Subsequently, the technology was presented at numerous technical conferences. A patent was issued for the technology in 2009. These cathodes are now marketed by Semicon Associates, Inc. in Lexington, KY. They are the world’s largest producer of cathodes for vacuum electron devices. During this program, CCR teamed with Semicon Associates, Inc. and Ron Witherspoon, Inc. to improve the fabrication processes and expand applications for the cathodes. Specific fabrications issues included the quality of the wire winding that provides the basic structure and the sintering to bond the wires into a robust, cohesive structure. The program also developed improved techniques for integrating the resulting material into cathodes for electron guns.

  18. High-Current Gain Two-Dimensional MoS₂-Base Hot-Electron Transistors.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos M; Lan, Yann-Wen; Zeng, Caifu; Chen, Jyun-Hong; Kou, Xufeng; Navabi, Aryan; Tang, Jianshi; Montazeri, Mohammad; Adleman, James R; Lerner, Mitchell B; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Li, Lain-Jong; Chen, Chii-Dong; Wang, Kang L

    2015-12-09

    The vertical transport of nonequilibrium charge carriers through semiconductor heterostructures has led to milestones in electronics with the development of the hot-electron transistor. Recently, significant advances have been made with atomically sharp heterostructures implementing various two-dimensional materials. Although graphene-base hot-electron transistors show great promise for electronic switching at high frequencies, they are limited by their low current gain. Here we show that, by choosing MoS2 and HfO2 for the filter barrier interface and using a noncrystalline semiconductor such as ITO for the collector, we can achieve an unprecedentedly high-current gain (α ∼ 0.95) in our hot-electron transistors operating at room temperature. Furthermore, the current gain can be tuned over 2 orders of magnitude with the collector-base voltage albeit this feature currently presents a drawback in the transistor performance metrics such as poor output resistance and poor intrinsic voltage gain. We anticipate our transistors will pave the way toward the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density, low-energy, and high-frequency hot-carrier electronic applications.

  19. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  20. Characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of advanced spray-dried chemotherapeutic PEGylated phospholipid particles for dry powder inhalation delivery in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Meenach, Samantha A; Anderson, Kimberly W; Zach Hilt, J; McGarry, Ronald C; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-07-16

    Pulmonary inhalation chemotherapeutic drug delivery offers many advantages for lung cancer patients in comparison to conventional systemic chemotherapy. Inhalable particles are advantageous in their ability to deliver drug deep in the lung by utilizing optimally sized particles and higher local drug dose delivery. In this work, spray-dried and co-spray dried inhalable lung surfactant-mimic PEGylated lipopolymers as microparticulate/nanoparticulate dry powders containing paclitaxel were rationally designed via organic solution advanced spray drying (no water) in closed-mode from dilute concentration feed solution. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine poly(ethylene glycol) (DPPE-PEG) with varying PEG chain length were mixed with varying amounts of paclitaxel in methanol to produce co-spray dried microparticles and nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy showed the spherical particle morphology of the inhalable particles. Thermal analysis and X-ray powder diffraction confirmed the retention of the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid-state following spray drying, the degree of solid-state molecular order, and solid-state phase transition behavior. The residual water content of the particles was very low as quantified analytically Karl Fisher titration. The amount of paclitaxel loaded into the particles was quantified which indicated high encapsulation efficiencies (43-99%). Dry powder aerosol dispersion performance was measured in vitro using the Next Generation Impactor (NGI) coupled with the Handihaler dry powder inhaler device and showed mass median aerodynamic diameters in the range of 3.4-7 μm. These results demonstrate that this novel microparticulate/nanoparticulate chemotherapeutic PEGylated phospholipid dry powder inhalation aerosol platform has great potential in lung cancer drug delivery.

  1. Effect of advanced aftertreatment for PM and NOx reduction on heavy-duty diesel engine ultrafine particle emissions.

    PubMed

    Herner, Jorn Dinh; Hu, Shaohua; Robertson, William H; Huai, Tao; Chang, M-C Oliver; Rieger, Paul; Ayala, Alberto

    2011-03-15

    Four heavy-duty and medium-duty diesel vehicles were tested in six different aftertreament configurations using a chassis dynamometer to characterize the occurrence of nucleation (the conversion of exhaust gases to particles upon dilution). The aftertreatment included four different diesel particulate filters and two selective catalytic reduction (SCR) devices. All DPFs reduced the emissions of solid particles by several orders of magnitude, but in certain cases the occurrence of a volatile nucleation mode could increase total particle number emissions. The occurrence of a nucleation mode could be predicted based on the level of catalyst in the aftertreatment, the prevailing temperature in the aftertreatment, and the age of the aftertreatment. The particles measured during nucleation had a high fraction of sulfate, up to 62% of reconstructed mass. Additionally the catalyst reduced the toxicity measured in chemical and cellular assays suggesting a pathway for an inverse correlation between particle number and toxicity. The results have implications for exposure to and toxicity of diesel PM.

  2. Advances in the simulation and automated measurement of well-sorted granular material: 2. Direct measures of particle properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Rubin, David M.

    2012-01-01

    1. In this, the second of a pair of papers on the structure of well-sorted natural granular material (sediment), new methods are described for automated measurements from images of sediment, of: 1) particle-size standard deviation (arithmetic sorting) with and without apparent void fraction; and 2) mean particle size in material with void fraction. A variety of simulations of granular material are used for testing purposes, in addition to images of natural sediment. Simulations are also used to establish that the effects on automated particle sizing of grains visible through the interstices of the grains at the very surface of a granular material continue to a depth of approximately 4 grain diameters and that this is independent of mean particle size. Ensemble root-mean squared error between observed and estimated arithmetic sorting coefficients for 262 images of natural silts, sands and gravels (drawn from 8 populations) is 31%, which reduces to 27% if adjusted for bias (slope correction between observed and estimated values). These methods allow non-intrusive and fully automated measurements of surfaces of unconsolidated granular material. With no tunable parameters or empirically derived coefficients, they should be broadly universal in appropriate applications. However, empirical corrections may need to be applied for the most accurate results. Finally, analytical formulas are derived for the one-step pore-particle transition probability matrix, estimated from the image's autocorrelogram, from which void fraction of a section of granular material can be estimated directly. This model gives excellent predictions of bulk void fraction yet imperfect predictions of pore-particle transitions.

  3. Advances in understanding the genesis and evolution solar energetic particle events over the last two solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Rami

    2016-04-01

    I will review the observational and modeling efforts related to solar energetic particle (SEP) events over the 23rd and 24th solar cycles. I will concentrate on large SEP events related to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), but discuss observations related to the possible role of flares in the acceleration of particles in those events, as well. The possible roles of various acceleration and transport processes in understanding the characteristics of the events will be discussed. This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA).

  4. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emissions Project (APBF-DEC): 2,000-Hour Performance of a NOx Adsorber Catalyst and Diesel Particle Filter System for a Medium-Duty, Pick-Up Diesel Engine Platform; Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-03-01

    Presents the results of a 2,000-hour test of an emissions control system consisting of a nitrogen oxides adsorber catalyst in combination with a diesel particle filter, advanced fuels, and advanced engine controls in an SUV/pick-up truck vehicle platform.

  5. Airborne Particles: What We Have Learned About Their Role in Climate from Remote Sensing, and Prospects for Future Advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Desert dust, wildfire smoke, volcanic ash, biogenic and urban pollution particles, all affect the regional-scale climate of Earth in places and at times; some have global-scale impacts on the column radiation balance, cloud properties, atmospheric stability structure, and circulation patterns. Remote sensing has played a central role in identifying the sources and transports of airborne particles, mapping their three-dimensional distribution and variability, quantifying their amount, and constraining aerosol air mass type. The measurements obtained from remote sensing have strengths and limitations, and their value for characterizing Earths environment is enhanced immensely when they are combined with direct, in situ observations, and used to constrain aerosol transport and climate models. A similar approach has been taken to study the role particles play in determining the climate of Mars, though based on far fewer observations. This presentation will focus what we have learned from remote sensing about the impacts aerosol have on Earths climate; a few points about how aerosols affect the climate of Mars will also be introduced, in the context of how we might assess aerosol-climate impacts more generally on other worlds.

  6. Advanced zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron particles for acidic magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited ZnS and other IR materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzman, S.; Giannechini, L. J.; Romanofsky, H. J.; Golini, N.; Taylor, B.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a modified version of zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron (CI) particles that were invented at the University of Rochester in 2008. The amount of zirconia on the coating is increased to further protect the iron particles from corrosion when introduced to an acidic environment. Five low-pH, magnetorheological (MR) fluids were made with five acids: acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric, and hydrofluoric. All fluids were based on the modified zirconia-coated CI particles. Off-line viscosity and pH stability were measured for all acidic MR fluids to determine the ideal fluid composition for acidic MR finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (ZnS) and other infrared (IR) optical materials, such as hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) ZnS, CVD zinc selenide (ZnSe), and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). Results show significant reduction in surface artifacts (millimeter-size, pebble-like structures on the finished surface) for several standard-grade CVD ZnS substrates and good surface roughness for the non-CVD MgF2 substrate when MR finished with our advanced acidic MR fluid.

  7. Advances in colloid and biocolloid transport in porous media: particle size-dependent dispersivity and gravity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate prediction of colloid and biocolloid transport in porous media relies heavily on usage of suitable dispersion coefficients. The widespread procedure for dispersion coefficient determination consists of conducting conservative tracer experiments and subsequently fitting the collected breakthrough data with a selected advection-dispersion transport model. The fitted dispersion coefficient is assumed to characterize the porous medium and is often used thereafter to analyze experimental results obtained from the same porous medium with other solutes, colloids, and biocolloids. The classical advection-dispersion equation implies that Fick's first law of diffusion adequately describes the dispersion process, or that the dispersive flux is proportional to the concentration gradient. Therefore, the above-described procedure inherently assumes that the dispersive flux of all solutes, colloids and biocolloids under the same flow field conditions is exactly the same. Furthermore, the available mathematical models for colloid and biocoloid transport in porous media do not adequately account for gravity effects. Here an extensive laboratory study was undertaken in order to assess whether the dispersivity, which traditionally has been considered to be a property of the porous medium, is dependent on colloid particle size, interstitial velocity and length scale. The breakthrough curves were successfully simulated with a mathematical model describing colloid and biocolloid transport in homogeneous, water saturated porous media. The results demonstrated that the dispersivity increases very slowly with increasing interstitial velocity, and increases with column length. Furthermore, contrary to earlier results, which were based either on just a few experimental observations or experimental conditions leading to low mass recoveries, dispersivity was positively correlated with colloid particle size. Also, transport experiments were performed with biocolloids (bacteriophages:

  8. Current-confinement structure and extremely high current density in organic light-emitting transistors.

    PubMed

    Sawabe, Kosuke; Imakawa, Masaki; Nakano, Masaki; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Takenobu, Taishi

    2012-12-04

    Extremely high current densities are realized in single-crystal ambipolar light-emitting transistors using an electron-injection buffer layer and a current-confinement structure via laser etching. Moreover, a linear increase in the luminance was observed at current densities of up to 1 kA cm(-2) , which is an efficiency-preservation improvement of three orders of magnitude over conventional organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) at high current densities.

  9. Influence of High-Current-Density Impulses on the Compression Behavior: Experiments with Iron and a Nickel-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demler, E.; Gerstein, G.; Dalinger, A.; Epishin, A.; Rodman, D.; Nürnberger, F.

    2016-12-01

    Difficulties of processing of high strength and/or brittle materials by plastic deformation, e.g., by forging, require to develop new industrial technologies. In particular, the feasible deformation rates are limited for low-ductile metallic materials. For this reason, processes were investigated to improve the deformability in which electrical impulses are to be applied to lower the yield strength. However, owing to the impulse duration and low current densities, concomitant effects always occur, e.g., as a result of Joule heating. Current developments in power electronics allow now to transmit high currents as short pulses. By reducing the impulse duration and increasing the current density, the plasticity of metallic materials can be correspondingly increased. Using the examples of polycrystalline iron and a single-crystal, nickel-based alloy (PWA 1480), current advances in the development of methods for forming materials by means of high-current-density impulses are demonstrated. For this purpose, appropriate specimens were loaded in compression and, using novel testing equipment, subjected to a current strength of 10 kA with an impulse duration of 2 ms. For a pre-defined strain, the test results show a significant decrease in the compressive stress during the compression test and a significant change in the dislocation distribution following the current impulse treatment.

  10. Influence of High-Current-Density Impulses on the Compression Behavior: Experiments with Iron and a Nickel-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demler, E.; Gerstein, G.; Dalinger, A.; Epishin, A.; Rodman, D.; Nürnberger, F.

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties of processing of high strength and/or brittle materials by plastic deformation, e.g., by forging, require to develop new industrial technologies. In particular, the feasible deformation rates are limited for low-ductile metallic materials. For this reason, processes were investigated to improve the deformability in which electrical impulses are to be applied to lower the yield strength. However, owing to the impulse duration and low current densities, concomitant effects always occur, e.g., as a result of Joule heating. Current developments in power electronics allow now to transmit high currents as short pulses. By reducing the impulse duration and increasing the current density, the plasticity of metallic materials can be correspondingly increased. Using the examples of polycrystalline iron and a single-crystal, nickel-based alloy (PWA 1480), current advances in the development of methods for forming materials by means of high-current-density impulses are demonstrated. For this purpose, appropriate specimens were loaded in compression and, using novel testing equipment, subjected to a current strength of 10 kA with an impulse duration of 2 ms. For a pre-defined strain, the test results show a significant decrease in the compressive stress during the compression test and a significant change in the dislocation distribution following the current impulse treatment.

  11. Physicochemical characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of organic solution advanced spray-dried cyclosporine A multifunctional particles for dry powder inhalation aerosol delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Zhang, Weifen; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    In this systematic and comprehensive study, inhalation powders of the polypeptide immunosuppressant drug - cyclosporine A - for lung delivery as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were successfully designed, developed, and optimized. Several spray drying pump rates were rationally chosen. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, Karl Fischer titration, laser size diffraction, and gravimetric vapor sorption. Aerosol dispersion performance was conducted using a next generation impactor with a Food and Drug Administration-approved DPI device. These DPIs displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance with high values in emitted dose, respirable fraction, and fine particle fraction. In addition, novel multifunctional inhalation aerosol powder formulations of cyclosporine A with lung surfactant-mimic phospholipids were also successfully designed and developed by advanced organic solution cospray drying in closed mode. The lung surfactantmimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-snglycero- 3-(phosphor-rac-1-glycerol). These cyclosporine A lung surfactant-mimic aerosol powder formulations were comprehensively characterized. Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state was preserved following advanced organic solution spray drying in closed mode. These novel multifunctional inhalation powders were optimized for DPI delivery with excellent aerosol dispersion performance and high aerosol performance parameters.

  12. Physicochemical characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of organic solution advanced spray-dried cyclosporine A multifunctional particles for dry powder inhalation aerosol delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao; Zhang, Weifen; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    In this systematic and comprehensive study, inhalation powders of the polypeptide immunosuppressant drug – cyclosporine A – for lung delivery as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were successfully designed, developed, and optimized. Several spray drying pump rates were rationally chosen. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, Karl Fischer titration, laser size diffraction, and gravimetric vapor sorption. Aerosol dispersion performance was conducted using a next generation impactor with a Food and Drug Administration-approved DPI device. These DPIs displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance with high values in emitted dose, respirable fraction, and fine particle fraction. In addition, novel multifunctional inhalation aerosol powder formulations of cyclosporine A with lung surfactant-mimic phospholipids were also successfully designed and developed by advanced organic solution cospray drying in closed mode. The lung surfactantmimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-snglycero- 3-(phosphor-rac-1-glycerol). These cyclosporine A lung surfactant-mimic aerosol powder formulations were comprehensively characterized. Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state was preserved following advanced organic solution spray drying in closed mode. These novel multifunctional inhalation powders were optimized for DPI delivery with excellent aerosol dispersion performance and high aerosol performance parameters. PMID:23569375

  13. Advanced spray-dried design, physicochemical characterization, and aerosol dispersion performance of vancomycin and clarithromycin multifunctional controlled release particles for targeted respiratory delivery as dry powder inhalation aerosols.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Woong; Li, Xiaojian; Vogt, Frederick G; Hayes, Don; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Park, Eun-Seok; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-10-15

    Respirable microparticles/nanoparticles of the antibiotics vancomycin (VCM) and clarithromycin (CLM) were successfully designed and developed by novel organic solution advanced spray drying from methanol solution. Formulation optimization was achieved through statistical experimental design of pump feeding rates of 25% (Low P), 50% (Medium P) and 75% (High P). Systematic and comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hot-stage microscopy (HSM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Karl Fischer titration (KFT), laser size diffraction (LSD), gravimetric vapor sorption (GVS), confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and spectroscopy for chemical imaging mapping. These novel spray-dried (SD) microparticulate/nanoparticulate dry powders displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) with high values in emitted dose (ED), respirable fraction (RF), and fine particle fraction (FPF). VCM DPIs displayed better aerosol dispersion performance compared to CLM DPIs which was related to differences in the physicochemical and particle properties of VCM and CLM. In addition, organic solution advanced co-spray drying particle engineering design was employed to successfully produce co-spray-dried (co-SD) multifunctional microparticulate/nanoparticulate aerosol powder formulations of VCM and CLM with the essential lung surfactant phospholipid, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), for controlled release pulmonary nanomedicine delivery as inhalable dry powder aerosols. Formulation optimization was achieved through statistical experimental design of molar ratios of co-SD VCM:DPPC and co-SD CLM:DPPC. XRPD and DSC confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid-state was preserved following spray drying. Co-SD VCM:DPPC and co-SD CLM:DPPC dry powder aerosols demonstrated controlled release of antibiotic drug that was fitted to various

  14. SRRC/ANL high current l-band single cell photocathode rf gun.

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C. H.

    1998-07-16

    A high current L-band photocathode rf gun is under development at SRRC (Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Taiwan) in collaboration with ANL (Argonne National Laboratory, USA). The goal is to produce up to 100 nC charge with the surface field gradient of over 90 MV/m at the center of the photocathode. In this report, they present the detailed design and initial test results. If successful, this gun will be used as the future AWA (Argonne Wakefield Accelerator)[1] high current gun.

  15. Analysis of particle size and interface effects on the strength and ductility of advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettehad, Mahmood

    This thesis is devoted to the numerical investigation of mechanical behavior of Dual phase (DP) steels. Such grade of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) is favorable to the automotive industry due the unique properties such as high strength and ductility with low finished cost. Many experimental and numerical studies have been done to achieve the optimized behavior of DP steels by controlling their microstructure. Experiments are costly and time consuming so in recent years numerical tools are utilized to help the metallurgist before doing experiments. Most of the numerical studies are based on classical (local) constitutive models where no material length scale parameters are incorporated in the model. Although these models are proved to be very effective in modeling the material behavior in the large scales but they fail to address some critical phenomena which are important for our goals. First, they fail to address the size effect phenomena which materials show at microstructural scale. This means that materials show stronger behavior at small scales compared to large scales. Another issue with classical models is the mesh size dependency in modeling the softening behavior of materials. This means that in the finite element context (FEM) the results will be mesh size dependent and no converged solution exist upon mesh refinement. Thereby by applying the classical (local) models one my loose the accuracy on measuring the strength and ductility of DP steels. Among the non-classical (nonlocal) models, gradient-enhanced plasticity models which consider the effect of neighboring point on the behavior of one specific point are proved to be numerically effective and versatile tools to accomplish the two concerns mentioned above. So in this thesis a gradient-enhanced plasticity model which incorporates both the energetic and dissipative material length scales is derived based on the laws of thermodynamics. This model also has a consistent yield-like function for the

  16. High current electric arcs above the In-Ga-Sn eutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementyeva, I. B.; Pinchuk, M. E.

    2016-11-01

    The results of investigations of high-current dc and ac arc discharges of atmospheric pressure emerging above the free surface of liquid metal (In-Ga-Sn eutectic alloy) are presented in the paper. The mechanism of the arc formation due to pinch-effect is discussed here.

  17. An annular high-current electron beam with an energy spread in a coaxial magnetically insulated diode

    SciTech Connect

    Grishkov, A. A. Pegel, I. V.

    2013-11-15

    An elementary theory of an annular high-current electron beam in a uniform transport channel and a coaxial magnetically insulated diode is generalized to the case of counterpropagating electron beams with a spread over kinetic energies. Expressions for the sum of the absolute values of the forward and backward currents in a uniform transport channel and for the flux of the longitudinal component of the generalized momentum in a coaxial magnetically insulated diode as functions of the maximum electron kinetic energy are derived for different values of the relative width of the energy distribution function. It is shown that, in a diode with an expanding transport channel and a virtual cathode limiting the extracted current, counterpropagating particle flows are established between the cathode and the virtual cathode within a certain time interval after the beginning of electron emission. The accumulation of electrons in these flows is accompanied by an increase in their spread over kinetic energies and the simultaneous decrease in the maximum kinetic energy. The developed model agrees with the results of particle-in-cell simulations performed using the KARAT and OOPIC-Pro codes.

  18. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Y. E-mail: hirano.yoichi@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2015-11-15

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm{sup 2}) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E{sub ib} ≈ 150–200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E{sub ib} is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  19. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Y; Kiyama, S; Fujiwara, Y; Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm(2)) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E(ib) ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E(ib) is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  20. MIDOT: A novel probe for monitoring high-current flat transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, K.; Novac, B. M.; Graneau, N.; Senior, P.; Smith, I. R.; Sinclair, M.

    2016-12-01

    A novel inductive probe, termed MIDOT, was developed for monitoring high-current flat transmission lines. While being inexpensive the probe does not require calibration, is resistant to both shock waves and temperature variations, and it is easy to manufacture and mount. It generates strong output signals that are relatively easy to interpret and has a detection region limited to a pre-defined part of the transmission line. The theoretical background related to the MIDOT probes, together with their practical implementation in both preliminary experimentation and high-current tests, is also presented in the paper. The novel probe can be used to benchmark existing 2D numerical codes used in calculating the current distribution inside the conductors of a transmission line but can also easily detect an early movement of a transmission line component. The probe can also find other applications, such as locating the position of a pulsed current flowing through a thin wire.

  1. Investigations of a high current linear aperture radial multichannel pseudospark switch.

    PubMed

    Lamba, R P; Pathania, V; Meena, B L; Rahaman, H; Pal, U N; Prakash, Ram

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a high current linear aperture radial multichannel Pseudospark switch (LARM-PSS) is reported which has been analyzed for its high current characteristics. In order to enhance hold-off voltage and support hollow cathode effect for the ignition of the discharge in this configuration, the field penetration analysis through circular and linear apertures of the electrodes has been carried out. The linear apertures in the electrodes increase the current handling capacity than that of circular aperture electrodes without significant compromise of the hold-off capacity. The developed LARM-PSS switch is capable to hold voltage up to 25 kV at gas pressure between 10 and 50 Pa for hydrogen. The switch has been operated using a 800 nF capacitor bank and conducted an effective charge up to 1.5 C with peak switch current ∼20 kA at applied voltage 19 kV.

  2. Investigations of a high current linear aperture radial multichannel pseudospark switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamba, R. P.; Pathania, V.; Meena, B. L.; Rahaman, H.; Pal, U. N.; Prakash, Ram

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a high current linear aperture radial multichannel Pseudospark switch (LARM-PSS) is reported which has been analyzed for its high current characteristics. In order to enhance hold-off voltage and support hollow cathode effect for the ignition of the discharge in this configuration, the field penetration analysis through circular and linear apertures of the electrodes has been carried out. The linear apertures in the electrodes increase the current handling capacity than that of circular aperture electrodes without significant compromise of the hold-off capacity. The developed LARM-PSS switch is capable to hold voltage up to 25 kV at gas pressure between 10 and 50 Pa for hydrogen. The switch has been operated using a 800 nF capacitor bank and conducted an effective charge up to 1.5 C with peak switch current ˜20 kA at applied voltage 19 kV.

  3. Status of high current ion source operation at the GSI accelerator facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, R.; Galonska, M.; Gutermuth, B.; Heymach, F.; Krichbaum, H.; Leible, K.-D.; Ochs, K.; Schäffer, P.; Schäffer, S.; Spädtke, P.; Stork, M.; Wesp, A.; Mayr, R.

    2008-02-01

    Vacuum arc ion sources, Penning ion sources, and filament driven multicusp ion sources are used for the production of high current ion beams of a variety of metallic and gaseous ions at the GSI accelerator facility. For accelerator operation, the ion sources have to provide a stable beam over a long period of time with an energy of 2.2keV/u and a maximum mass over charge ratio of 65. The status of beam time operation at the high current injector is presented here giving an outline on important ion source data, such as ion beam current, ion beam spectrum, transversal emittance, life time, duty factor, and transmission along the low energy beam transport section.

  4. Status of high current ion source operation at the GSI accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, R.; Galonska, M.; Gutermuth, B.; Heymach, F.; Krichbaum, H.; Leible, K.-D.; Ochs, K.; Schaeffer, P.; Schaeffer, S.; Spaedtke, P.; Stork, M.; Wesp, A.; Mayr, R.

    2008-02-15

    Vacuum arc ion sources, Penning ion sources, and filament driven multicusp ion sources are used for the production of high current ion beams of a variety of metallic and gaseous ions at the GSI accelerator facility. For accelerator operation, the ion sources have to provide a stable beam over a long period of time with an energy of 2.2 keV/u and a maximum mass over charge ratio of 65. The status of beam time operation at the high current injector is presented here giving an outline on important ion source data, such as ion beam current, ion beam spectrum, transversal emittance, life time, duty factor, and transmission along the low energy beam transport section.

  5. A High-Gradient CW R Photo-Cathode Electron Gun for High Current Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer

    2005-05-01

    The paper describes the analysis and preliminary design of a high-gradient photo-cathode RF gun optimized for high current CW operation. The gun cell shape is optimized to provide maximum acceleration for the newly emitted beam while minimizing wall losses in the structure. The design is intended for use in future high-current high-power CW FELs but the shape optimization for low wall losses may be advantageous for other applications such as XFELs or Linear Colliders using high peak power low duty factor guns where pulse heating is a limitation. The concept allows for DC bias on the photocathode in order to repel ions and improve cathode lifetime.

  6. Progress on the high-current 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Xu W.; Astefanous, C.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; et al

    2012-05-20

    The 704 MHz high current superconducting cavity has been designed with consideration of both performance of fundamental mode and damping of higher order modes. A copper prototype cavity was fabricated by AES and delivered to BNL. RF measurements were carried out on this prototype cavity, including fundamental pass-band and HOM spectrum measurements, HOM studies using bead-pull setup, prototyping of antenna-type HOM couplers. The measurements show that the cavity has very good damping for the higher-order modes, which was one of the main goals for the high current cavity design. 3D cavity models were simulated with Omega3P code developed by SLAC to compare with the measurements. The paper describes the cavity design, RF measurement setups and results for the copper prototype. The progress with the niobium cavity fabrication will also be described.

  7. A mechanical connector design for high-current, high-coulomb pulsed power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Leighton, K.S.

    1992-02-25

    A technique to make reliable high-current, high-coulomb electrical contact was developed for transmitting power into railguns. The method uses spring loaded removable connectors that are installed independently from the launcher. The simple rod-type design and absence of fastener holes allow maximum utilization of material mechanical properties. Repeated experiments with 9.5-mm diameter connectors demonstrated reliable pulsed charge transfer of 200 coulombs at currents of over 400kA. 20 refs.

  8. Surface modification of structural materials by low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, A. V. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Kazachenok, M. S. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Sinyakova, E. A.; Borodovitsina, O. M.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2014-11-14

    Microstructure formation in surface layers of pure titanium and ferritic-martensitic steel subjected to electron beam treatment is studied. It is shown that low energy high-current pulsed electron beam irradiation leads to the martensite structure within the surface layer of pure titanium. Contrary, the columnar ferrite grains grow during solidification of ferritic-martensitic steel. The effect of electron beam energy density on the surface morphology and microstructure of the irradiated metals is demonstrated.

  9. New computer control system for the high current ion implanter PR-80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunouchi, T.; Sasaki, M.; Sato, S.; Harada, M.

    1989-02-01

    For a current semiconductor fabrication line, an ion implanter should have the versatility to handle different types of process menus and it should be FA compatible. An optical loopway linked microprocessor control system has been developed for our high current ion implanter. The system is compatible with SECS-II, and its preventive maintenance program is a powerful tool for efficient operation of the implanter.

  10. Conversion of high explosive chemical energy into energy of powerful nanosecond high-current pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, K. V.; Mikhaylov, V. M.; Nesterov, E. V.; Stroganov, V. A.; Chernykh, E. V.

    2015-01-01

    This study is a contribution into the development of physicotechnical foundations for generation of powerful nanosecond high-current pulses on the basis of explosively driven magnetic flux compression generators. This problem is solved by using inductive storage of energy for matching comparatively low-voltage explosively driven magnetic flux compression generators and high-impedance loads; short forming lines and vacuum diodes. Experimental data of charging of forming lines are given.

  11. Longitudinal and Transverse Instabilities in a High Current Modified Betatron Electron Accelerator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-17

    Conlinuod) image charges and currents on the toroidal chamber walls. The electron ring, which is assumed to have an energy spread, is taken to be located...We find an unstable hybrid mode of oscillation which is a coupled azimuthal and longitudinal mode and exists at beam energies below the transition... energy . The negative mass/kink instability associated with an ultra high current (I - 10 kA) modified beta- tron electron accelerator is analyzed and

  12. Enhanced D-T supershot performance at high current using extensive lithium conditioning in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.K.; Strachan, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Scott, S.D.; Budny, R.; Bell, R.E.; Bitter, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.; Grek, B.

    1995-05-01

    A substantial improvement in supershot fusion plasma performance has been realized by combining the enhanced confinement due to tritium fueling with the enhanced confinement due to extensive Li conditioning of the TFTR limiter. This combination has resulted in not only significantly higher global energy confinement times than had previously been obtained in high current supershots, but also the highest ratio of central fusion output power to input power observed to date.

  13. Influence of the Thomson effect on the pulse heating of high-current electrical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkushev, A. G.; Pavleino, M. A.; Pavleino, O. M.; Pavlov, V. A.

    2014-09-01

    Pulse heating of high-current contacts is notable for the presence of considerable temperature gradients in the contact area, which cause the Thomson effect—the appearance of thermoelectric currents. The amount of this effect against conventional Joule heat release is quantitatively estimated. Pulse heating of electrical contacts is numerically simulated with the use of the Comsol program package. It is demonstrated that thermoelectric currents make a negligible contribution to heating in the case of copper contacts.

  14. High-power Čerenkov microwave oscillators utilizing High-Current nanosecond Electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, S. D.; Polevin, S. D.; Rostov, V. V.

    1996-12-01

    A short review is given of results obtained at the Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences on generating high-power microwave radiation. Most of the research was devoted to a study of stimulated Čerenkov radiation from relativistic electron beams. It is shown that the efficiency of a relativistic 3-cm backward wave tube with a nonuniform coupling resistance can reach 35%. High-frequency radiation was discovered in the emission spectrum of the Čerenkov oscillators and it was shown that the nature of the radiation was associated with the stimulated scattering of low-frequency radiation by the relativistic electrons. Radiation with a power of 500 MW was obtained in the 8-mm wavelength range using a two-beam Čerenkov oscillator. High-current pulse-periodic nanosecond accelerators with a charging device utilizing a Tesla transformer were used in the experiments. The possibility was demonstrated of generating high-power microwave radiation with a pulse-repetition frequency of up to 100 Hz. An average power of ˜500 W was achieved from the relativistic oscillators. A relativistic backward wave tube with a high-current electron beam was used to make a prototype nanosecond radar device. Some of the results presented were obtained jointly with the Russian Academy of Sciences Institute of Applied Physics. Questions concerning multiwave Čerenkov interaction are not considered in this paper.

  15. High Current Systems for HyperV and PLX Plasma Railguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Samuel; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Wu, Linchun; Elton, Raymond; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2010-11-01

    HyperV has been developing coaxial pulsed, plasma railgun accelerators for PLX and other high momentum plasma experiments. The full scale HyperV coaxial gun accelerates plasma armatures using a contoured electrode gap designed to mitigate the blow-by instability. Previous experiments with the full scale gun successfully formed and accelerated annular plasma armatures, but were limited to currents of up to only ˜400 kA. In order to increase full scale gun performance to the design goal of 200 μg at 200 km/s, the pulse forming networks required upgrading to support currents up to ˜1 MA. A high voltage, high current field-effect sparkgap switch and low inductance transmission line were designed and constructed to handle the increased current pulse. We will describe these systems and present initial test data from high current operation of the full-scale coax gun along with plans for future testing. Similar high current accelerator banks, switches, and TM lines will also be required to power PLX railguns which are planned to operate at 8000 μg at 50 km/s. The design of that experiment may require the capacitor banks to be located as much as 10 feet from the gun. We discuss the available options for low inductance connections for these systems.

  16. Methods of high current magnetic field generator for transcranial magnetic stimulation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouda, N. R.; Pritchard, J.; Weber, R. J.; Mina, M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the design procedures and underlying concepts of a novel High Current Magnetic Field Generator (HCMFG) with adjustable pulse width for transcranial magnetic stimulation applications. This is achieved by utilizing two different switching devices, the MOSFET and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Results indicate that currents as high as ±1200 A can be generated with inputs of +/-20 V. Special attention to tradeoffs between field generators utilizing IGBT circuits (HCMFG1) and MOSFET circuits (HCMFG2) was considered. The theory of operation, design, experimental results, and electronic setup are presented and analyzed.

  17. High-current lanthanum-hexaboride electron emitter for a quasi-stationary arc plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V. I. Ivanov, A. A. Shul’zhenko, G. I.

    2015-11-15

    A high-current electron emitter on the basis of lanthanum hexaboride is developed for quasi-stationary arc plasma generators of ion sources. The emitter consists of a set of LaB{sub 6} washers interleaved with washers made of thermally extended graphite. The emitter is heated by the current flowing through the graphite washers. The thermal regime of emitter operation during plasma generation is considered. The emitter has been successfully used in the ion sources of the diagnostic injectors of fast hydrogen atomic beams.

  18. High current Cu3P liquid metal ion source using a novel extractor configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi-Rusli, R. H.; Corelli, J. C.

    1987-12-01

    It has been found that by utilizing a sharp needle for the extractor electrode in close proximity to the source tip wetted with Cu3P liquid alloy, a large increase (factor ˜300) in ion current is observed in comparison to standard liquid metal ion sources (LMIS's). In standard previously used LMIS's the extractor electrode was a flat plane with a circular hole centered on the source needle tip. This new high current source has important applications in focused and broad ion beam deposition systems.

  19. Efficiency of pulse high-current generator energy transfer into plasma liner energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    The efficiency of capacitor-bank energy transfer from a high-current pulse generator into kinetic energy of a plasma liner has been analyzed. The analysis was performed using a model including the circuit equations and equations of the cylindrical shell motion. High efficiency of the energy transfer into kinetic energy of the liner is shown to be achieved only by a low-inductance generator. We considered an "ideal" liner load in which the load current is close to zero in the final of the shell compression. This load provides a high (up to 80%) efficiency of energy transfer and higher stability when compressing the liner.

  20. Methods of high current magnetic field generator for transcranial magnetic stimulation application

    SciTech Connect

    Bouda, N. R. Pritchard, J.; Weber, R. J.; Mina, M.

    2015-05-07

    This paper describes the design procedures and underlying concepts of a novel High Current Magnetic Field Generator (HCMFG) with adjustable pulse width for transcranial magnetic stimulation applications. This is achieved by utilizing two different switching devices, the MOSFET and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Results indicate that currents as high as ±1200 A can be generated with inputs of +/−20 V. Special attention to tradeoffs between field generators utilizing IGBT circuits (HCMFG{sub 1}) and MOSFET circuits (HCMFG{sub 2}) was considered. The theory of operation, design, experimental results, and electronic setup are presented and analyzed.

  1. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, A.; Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Saini, A.; Solyak, N.; Yostrikov, A.

    2012-09-01

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  2. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, Alexander; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Gonin, Ivan; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Lunin, Andrei; Saini, Arun; Solyak, Nikolay; Vostrikov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  3. Productivity Improvement for the SHX--SEN's Single-Wafer High-Current Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Ninomiya, Shiro; Ochi, Akihiro; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Yumiyama, Toshio; Kudo, Tetsuya; Kurose, Takeshi; Kariya, Hiroyuki; Tsukihara, Mitsukuni; Ishikawa, Koji; Ueno, Kazuyoshi

    2011-01-07

    Equipment productivity is a critical issue for device fabrication. For ion implantation, productivity is determined both by ion current at the wafer and by utilization efficiency of the ion beam. Such improvements not only result in higher fabrication efficiency but also reduce consumption of both electrical power and process gases. For high-current ion implanters, reduction of implant area is a key factor to increase efficiency. SEN has developed the SAVING system (Scanning Area Variation Implantation with Narrower Geometrical pattern) to address this opportunity. In this paper, three variations of the SAVING system are introduced along with discussion of their effects on fab productivity.

  4. High-field, high-current-density, stable superconducting magnets for fusion machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Lubell, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Designs for large fusion machines require high-performance superconducting magnets to reduce cost or increase machine performance. By employing force-flow cooling, cable-in-conduit conductor configuration, and NbTi superconductor, it is now possible to design superconducting magnets that operate a high fields (8-12 T) with high current densities (5-15 kA/cm/sup 2/ over the winding pack) in a stable manner. High current density leads to smaller, lighter, and thus less expensive coils. The force-flow cooling provides confined helium, full conductor insulation, and a rigid winding pack for better load distribution. The cable-in-conduit conductor configuration ensures a high stability margin for the magnet. The NbTi superconductor has reached a good engineering material standard. Its strain-insensitive critical parameters are particularly suitable for complex coil windings of a stellarator machine. The optimization procedure for such a conductor design, developed over the past decade, is summarized here. If desired a magnet built on the principles outlines in this paper can be extended to a field higher than the design value without degrading its stability by simply lowering the operating temperature below 4.2 K. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  5. REVIEW OF VARIOUS APPROACHES TO ADDRESS HIGH CURRENTS IN SRF ELECTRON LINACS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.

    2005-07-10

    The combination of high-brightness electron sources and high-current SRF Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) leads to a new emerging technology: High-power, high-brightness electron beams. This technology enables extremely high average power Free-Electron Lasers, a new generation of extreme brightness light sources, electron coolers of high-energy hadron storage rings, polarized electron-hadron colliders of very high luminosity, compact Thomson scattering X-ray sources, terahertz radiation generators and much more. What is typical for many of these applications is the need for very high current, defined here as over 100 mA average current, and high brightness, which is charge dependant, but needs to be in the range of between sub micron up to perhaps 50 microns, usually the lower--the better. Suffice it to say that while there are a number of projects aiming at this level of performance, none is anywhere near it. This work will review the problems associated with the achievement of such performance and the various approaches taken in a number of laboratories around the world to address the issues.

  6. Development and Testing of High Current Hollow Cathodes for High Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Van Noord, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist In-Space Propulsion project is sponsoring the testing and development of high power Hall thrusters for implementation in NASA missions. As part of the project, NASA Glenn Research Center is developing and testing new high current hollow cathode assemblies that can meet and exceed the required discharge current and life-time requirements of high power Hall thrusters. This paper presents test results of three high current hollow cathode configurations. Test results indicated that two novel emitter configurations were able to attain lower peak emitter temperatures compared to state-of-the-art emitter configurations. One hollow cathode configuration attained a cathode orifice plate tip temperature of 1132 degC at a discharge current of 100 A. More specifically, test and analysis results indicated that a novel emitter configuration had minimal temperature gradient along its length. Future work will include cathode wear tests, and internal emitter temperature and plasma properties measurements along with detailed physics based modeling.

  7. Progress and future developments of high current ion source for neutral beam injector in the ASIPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Liu, Zhimin; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Sheng, Peng; Jiang, Caichao

    2015-04-01

    A high current hot cathode bucket ion source, which based on the US long pulse ion source is developed in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The ion source consists of a bucket plasma generator with multi-pole cusp fields and a set of tetrode accelerator with slit apertures. So far, four ion sources are developed and conditioned on the ion source test bed. 4 MW hydrogen beam with beam energy of 80 keV is extracted. In Aug. 2013, EAST NBI 1 with two ion source installed on the EAST, and achieved H-mode plasma with NBI injection for the first time. In order to achieve stable long pulse operation of high current ion source and negative ion source research, the RF ion source with 200 mm diameter and 120 mm depth driver is designed and developed. The first RF plasma generated with 2 kW power of 1 MHz frequency. More of the RF plasma tests and negative source relative research need to do in the future.

  8. Progress and future developments of high current ion source for neutral beam injector in the ASIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Liu, Zhimin; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Sheng, Peng; Jiang, Caichao

    2015-04-08

    A high current hot cathode bucket ion source, which based on the US long pulse ion source is developed in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The ion source consists of a bucket plasma generator with multi-pole cusp fields and a set of tetrode accelerator with slit apertures. So far, four ion sources are developed and conditioned on the ion source test bed. 4 MW hydrogen beam with beam energy of 80 keV is extracted. In Aug. 2013, EAST NBI 1 with two ion source installed on the EAST, and achieved H-mode plasma with NBI injection for the first time. In order to achieve stable long pulse operation of high current ion source and negative ion source research, the RF ion source with 200 mm diameter and 120 mm depth driver is designed and developed. The first RF plasma generated with 2 kW power of 1 MHz frequency. More of the RF plasma tests and negative source relative research need to do in the future.

  9. R & D on Very-High-Current Superconducting Proton Linac, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2013-03-31

    The aim of this R&D project was to develop a superconducting cavity for a very-­ high-current proton accelerator. The particular application motivating the proposal was a LHC upgrade called the Superconducting Proton Linac, or SPL. Under the grant awarded to Stony Brook University the cavity was designed, a prototype copper cavity, followed by the niobium cavity, were built. A new set of HOM dampers was developed. The cavity has outstanding RF performance parameters – low surface fields, low power loss and all HOMs are fully damped. In fact, it is a “universal cavity” in the sense that it is suited for the acceleration of high-­current protons and well as high current electrons. Its damping of HOM modes is so good that it can see service in a multi-pass linac or an Energy Recovery Linac in addition to the easier service in a single-pass linac. Extensive measurements were made on the cavities and couplers, with the exception of the cold test of the niobium cavity. At the time of this report the cavity has been chemically processed and is ready for vertical testing which will be carried out shortly.

  10. Aperture Test for Internal Target Operation in the JLAB High-current ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-01

    A high current beam transmission test has been successfully completed at the JLAB FEL Facility, culminating in very low-loss transmission of a high current CW beam through a small aperture. The purpose of this test was to determine if an ERL is capable of meeting the stringent requirements imposed by the use of a 1018/cm3 internal gas target proposed for the DarkLight experiment*. Minimal beamline modifications were made to create a machine configuration that is substantially different from those used in routine UV or IR FEL operation. A sustained (8 hour) high power beam run was performed, with clean transmission through a 2 mm transverse aperture of 127 mm length simulating the target configuration. A beam size of 50 um (rms) was measured near the center of the aperture. Experimental data from a week-long test run consistently exhibited beam loss of only a few ppm on the aperture while running 4.5 mA current at 100 MeV -- or nearly 0.5 MW beam power. This surpassed the users? expectation and demonstrated a unique capability of an ERL for this type of experiments. This report presents a summary of the experiment, a brief overview of our activities, and outlines future plans.

  11. Characterisation of high current density resonant tunneling diodes for THz emission using photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Kristof J. P.; Baba, Razvan; Stevens, Benjamin J.; Mukai, Toshikazu; Ohnishi, Dai; Hogg, Richard A.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) provide high speed current oscillation which is applicable to THz generation when coupled to a suitably designed antenna. For this purpose, the InGaAs/AlAs/InP materials have been used, as this system offers high electron mobility, suitable band-offsets, and low resistance contacts. However for high current density operation (~MA/cm2) the epitaxial structure is challenging to characterize using conventional techniques as it consists of a single, very thin AlAs/InGaAs quantum well (QW). Here, we present a detailed low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopic study of high current density RTDs that allow the non-destructive mapping of a range of critical parameters for the device. We show how the doping level of the emitter/collector and contact layers in the RTD structure can be measured using the Moss-Burstein effect. For the full device structure, we show how emission from the QW may be identified, and detail how the emission changes with differing indium composition and well widths. We show that by studying nominally identical, un-doped structures, a type-II QW emission is observed, and explain the origin of the type-I emission in doped devices. This observation opens the way for a new characterization scheme where a "dummy" RTD active element is incorporated below the real RTD structure. This structure allows significantly greater control in the epitaxial process.

  12. Gyrotron-driven high current ECR ion source for boron-neutron capture therapy neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Sidorov, A.; Maslennikova, A.; Volovecky, A.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O.

    2014-12-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a perspective treatment method for radiation resistant tumors. Unfortunately its development is strongly held back by a several physical and medical problems. Neutron sources for BNCT currently are limited to nuclear reactors and accelerators. For wide spread of BNCT investigations more compact and cheap neutron source would be much more preferable. In present paper an approach for compact D-D neutron generator creation based on a high current ECR ion source is suggested. Results on dense proton beams production are presented. A possibility of ion beams formation with current density up to 600 mA/cm2 is demonstrated. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron target bombarded by such deuteron beams would theoretically yield a neutron flux density up to 6·1010 cm-2/s. Thus, neutron generator based on a high-current deuteron ECR source with a powerful plasma heating by gyrotron radiation could fulfill the BNCT requirements significantly lower price, smaller size and ease of operation in comparison with existing reactors and accelerators.

  13. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Alexander, Joshua B.; Cardenas, Henry E.; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    2008-01-01

    This work examines field performance of nanoscale pozzolan treatments delivered el ctrokinetically to suppress chloride induced corrosion of concrete reinforcement. The particles are 20 nm silica spheres coated with 2 nm alumina particles that carry a net positive charge. Earlier work demonstrated that the alumina particles were stripped from the silica carriers and formed a dense phase with an interparticle spacing that is small enough to inhibit the transport of solvated chlorides. A D.C. field was used to inject the particles into the pores of concrete specimens, directly toward the mild steel bars that were embedded within each 3 inch diameter by 6 inch length concrete specimen. The voltage was held constant at 25 v per inch of concrete cover for a period of 7 days. These voltages permitted current densities as high as 3 A/sq m. During the final 3 days, a 1 molar solution of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate was used to provide a source of calcium to facilitate stronger and more densified phase formation within the pores. In a departure from prior work the particle treatments were started concurrent with chloride extraction in order to determine if particle delivery would inhibit chloride transport. Following treatment the specimens were immersed in seawater for 4 weeks. After this posttreatment exposure, the specimens were tested for tensile strength and the steel reinforcement was examined for evidence of corrosion. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted to assess impact on microstructure.

  14. Evidence for large-area superemission into a high-current glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, W.; Dominic, V.; Kirkman, G. F.; Gundersen, M. A.

    1988-10-01

    This letter presents evidence for large-area (≊1 cm2) cathode superemission (˜10 000 A/cm2) into a high-current glow discharge in a pseudospark or back lighted thyratron switch. Cathodes studied with a scannning electron microscope following operation at 6-8 kA, ≊1 μs pulse length, and 105 pulses in a low-pressure H2 discharge show evidence of melting of a thin surface layer within a radius of ˜4 mm, indicating that the discharge is a superdense glow with a cross-sectional area of the order of 1 cm2, rather than an arc. Further supporting evidence is provided by streak camera data. An ion beam present during the avalanche phase of the discharge is responsible for heating the cathode surface resulting in a significant field-enhanced thermionic emission.

  15. Update on the high-current injector for the Stanford Linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.B.; Clendenin, J.E.; Ecklund, S.D.; Miller, R.H.; Sheppard, J.C.; Sinclair, C.K.; Sodja, J.

    1983-03-01

    The high current injector has become operational. There are two crucial areas where improvements must be made to meet collider specifications: while the injector can produce up to 10/sup 11/ e/sup -/ in a single S-band bucket, initially much of this charge was captured in a low energy tail and was this not suitable for transport through the accelerator and injection into the damping ring. Pulse to pulse position jitter has been observed, resulting in transverse wake field which increases beam emittance. The problems described above contribute to substantial current loss during transport from the injector (40 MeV) to the SLC damping ring (1.2 GeV). Experimental studies are continuing with the aim of understanding and improving beam characteristics including bunch length, pulse to pulse stability and emittance. The present status of these studies is reported.

  16. A high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet and its beam emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Zeen; Tan Xinjian; Du Hongxin; Luo Ben; Liu Zhanwen

    2008-07-15

    The progress of a 2.45 GHz high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet for T(d,n){sup 4}He reaction neutron generator is reported in this paper. At 600 W microwave power and 22 kV extraction voltage, 90 mA peak hydrogen ion beam is extracted from a single aperture of 6 mm diameter. The beam emittance is measured using a simplified pepper-pot method. The (x,x{sup '}) emittance and the (y,y{sup '}) emittance for 14 keV hydrogen ion beam are 55.3{pi} and 58.2{pi} mm mrad, respectively. The normalized emittances are 0.302{pi} and 0.317{pi} mm mrad, respectively.

  17. High current density and low turn-on field from aligned Cd(OH)2 nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagal, Vivekanand S.; Patil, Girish P.; Deore, Amol B.; Baviskar, Prashant K.; Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; More, Mahendra A.; Chavan, Padmakar G.

    2016-04-01

    High current density of 9.8 mA/cm2 was drawn at an applied field of 4.1 V/μm from aligned Cd(OH)2 nanosheets and low turn-on field of 1.4 V/μm was found for the emission current density of 10 μA/cm2. The aligned Cd(OH)2 nanosheets were synthesized by CBD technique on Cadmium foil. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the field emission studies of Cd(OH)2 nanosheets. Simple synthesis route coupled with superior field emission properties indicate the possible use of Cd(OH)2 nanosheets for micro/nanoelectronic devices.

  18. Superconducting Accelerating Structure for High-Current Cyclotrons for Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Nathaniel; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2011-10-01

    An accelerator driven molten salt fission core is being designed to provide reliable power by subcritical nuclear fission for the next few millennia. Fission is driven by proton beams from a flux-coupled stack of three high-current cyclotrons. A key innovation in attaining the needed beam current and efficiency is a superconducting Niobium rf accelerating cavity that can accelerate bunches in the 200 orbits uniformly. The unique design allows for several cavities to be stacked, and also provides uniform acceleration and eliminates higher order modes in the cyclotron. The design and properties of the superconducting cavity will increase the efficiency of the cyclotron and the overall energy amplification from the molten salt core by an order of magnitude compared to conventional designs.

  19. Transport and Measurements of High-Current Electron Beams from X pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonov, Alexey V.; Mingaleev, Albert R.; Romanova, Vera M.; Tarakanov, Vladimir P.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Blesener, Isaac C.; Kusse, Bruce R.; Hammer, David A.

    2009-01-21

    Generation of electron beams is an unavoidable property of X-pinches and other pulsed-power-driven pinches of different geometry. Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups with different geometry's are discussed. Of particular interest is the partially neutralized nature of the beam propagating from the X-pinch to a diagnostic system. Two scenarios of electron beam propagation from X-pinch to Faraday cup are analyzed by means of computer simulation using the PIC-code KARAT. The first is longitudinal neutralization by ions extracted from plasma at an output window of the X-pinch diode; the second is the beam transport through a plasma background between the diode and a diagnostic system.

  20. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration.

    PubMed

    Margarone, D; Krasa, J; Prokupek, J; Velyhan, A; Torrisi, L; Picciotto, A; Giuffrida, L; Gammino, S; Cirrone, P; Cutroneo, M; Romano, F; Serra, E; Mangione, A; Rosinski, M; Parys, P; Ryc, L; Limpouch, J; Laska, L; Jungwirth, K; Ullschmied, J; Mocek, T; Korn, G; Rus, B

    2012-02-01

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10(16)-10(19) W∕cm(2). The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  1. Anodic Oxidation of Carbon Steel at High Current Densities and Investigation of Its Corrosion Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Khan, Hamid Yazdani

    2017-02-01

    This work aims at studying the influence of high current densities on the anodization of carbon steel. Anodic protective coatings were prepared on carbon steel at current densities of 100, 125, and 150 A/dm2 followed by a final heat treatment. Coatings microstructures and morphologies were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The corrosion resistance of the uncoated carbon steel substrate and the anodic coatings were evaluated in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The results showed that the anodic oxide coatings which were prepared at higher current densities had thicker coatings as a result of a higher anodic forming voltage. Therefore, the anodized coatings showed better anti-corrosion properties compared to those obtained at lower current densities and the base metal.

  2. Overview of superconducting RF technology and its application to high-current linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.

    1994-08-01

    Superconducting linacs may be a viable option for high-current applications such as copious neutron production like that needed for transmutation of radioactive waste. These linacs must run reliably for many years and allow easy routine maintenance. superconducting cavities operate efficiently with high cw gradients, properties which help to reduce operating and capital costs. However, cost effectiveness is not the sole consideration in these applications. For example, beam impingement must be essentially eliminated to prevent unsafe radioactivation of the accelerating structures, and thus large apertures are needed through which to pass the beam. Because of their high efficiency, superconducting cavities can be designed with very large bore apertures, thereby reducing the effect of beam impingement.

  3. Development and fabrication of low ON resistance high current vertical VMOS power FETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, S.

    1979-01-01

    The design of a VMOS Power FET exhibiting low ON resistance, high current as well as high breakdown voltage and fast switching speeds is described. The design which is based on a 1st-order device model, features a novel polysilicon-gate structure and fieldplated groove termination to achieve high packing density and high breakdown voltage, respectively. One test chip, named VNTKI, can block 180 V at an ON resistence of 2.5 ohm. A 150 mil x 200 mil (.19 sq cm) experimental chip has demonstrated a breakdown voltage of 200v, an ON resistance of 0.12 ohm, a switching time of less than 100 ns, and a pulse drain - current of 50 A with 10 V gate drive.

  4. High-Current Pulsed Electron Treatment of Hypoeutectic Al-10Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diankun, Lu; Bo, Gao; Guanglin, Zhu; Jike, Lv; Liang, Hu

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, an analysis of the effect of high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) on a hypoeutectic Al-10Si alloy. The Al-10Si alloy was treated by HCPEB in order to see the potential of this fairly recent technique in modifying its wear resistance. For the beam energy density of 3 J/cm2 used in the present work, the melting mode was operative and led to the formation of a "wavy" surface and the absence of mass primary Si phase and eutectic microstructure. The surface nanocrystallization of primary and eutectic Si phases led to the increase in macro-hardness of the top surface layer, and the wear resistance was drastically improved with a factor of 4.

  5. High current gain 4H-SiC bipolar junction transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yourun, Zhang; Jinfei, Shi; Ying, Liu; Chengchun, Sun; Fei, Guo; Bo, Zhang

    2016-04-01

    A novel 4H-SiC BJT of high current gain with a suppressing surface traps effect has been proposed. It is effective to improve the current gain due to the lower electrons density in the surface region by extending the emitter metal to overlap the passivation layer on the extrinsic base surface. The electrons trapped in the extrinsic base surface induce the degeneration of SiC BJTs device performance. By modulating the electron recombination rate, the novel structure can increase the current gain to 63.2% compared with conventional ones with the compatible process technology. Optimized sizes are an overlapped metal length of 4 μm, as well as an oxide layer thickness of 50 nm. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61306093, 61401075).

  6. Switch contact device for interrupting high current, high voltage, AC and DC circuits

    DOEpatents

    Via, Lester C.; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Ryan, John M.

    2005-01-04

    A high voltage switch contact structure capable of interrupting high voltage, high current AC and DC circuits. The contact structure confines the arc created when contacts open to the thin area between two insulating surfaces in intimate contact. This forces the arc into the shape of a thin sheet which loses heat energy far more rapidly than an arc column having a circular cross-section. These high heat losses require a dramatic increase in the voltage required to maintain the arc, thus extinguishing it when the required voltage exceeds the available voltage. The arc extinguishing process with this invention is not dependent on the occurrence of a current zero crossing and, consequently, is capable of rapidly interrupting both AC and DC circuits. The contact structure achieves its high performance without the use of sulfur hexafluoride.

  7. A new high current laboratory and pulsed homopolar generator power supply at the University of Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, J. E.; Aanstoos, T. A.

    1984-03-01

    The University of Texas at Austin is constructing a facility for research in pulse power technology for the Center for Electromechanics at the Balcones Research Center. The facility, designed to support high-current experiments, will be powered by six homopolar generators, each rated at 10 MJ and arranged to allow matching the requirements of resistive and inductive loads at various voltage and current combinations. Topics covered include the high bay, the power supply configuration and parameters, the speed and field control, and the magnetic circuit. Also considered are the removable air-cooled brushes, the water-cooled field coils, the hydraulic motor sizing and direct coupling, the low-impedance removable field coils, and the hydrostatic bearing design.

  8. Optimization of Superconducting Focusing Quadrupoles for the HighCurrent Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbi, GianLuca; Gourlay, Steve; Gung, Chen-yu; Hafalia, Ray; Lietzke, Alan; Martovetski, Nicolai; Mattafirri, Sara; Meinke, Rainer; Minervini, Joseph; Schultz, Joel; Seidl, Peter

    2005-09-16

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program is progressing through a series of physics and technology demonstrations leading to an inertial fusion power plant. The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physics of intense beams with high line-charge density. Superconducting focusing quadrupoles have been developed for the HCX magnetic transport studies. A baseline design was selected following several pre-series models. Optimization of the baseline design led to the development of a first prototype that achieved a conductor-limited gradient of 132 T/m in a 70 mm bore, without training, with measured field errors at the 0.1% level. Based on these results, the magnet geometry and fabrication procedures were adjusted to improve the field quality. These modifications were implemented in a second prototype. In this paper, the optimized design is presented and comparisons between the design harmonics and magnetic measurements performed on the new prototype are discussed.

  9. High ion charge states in a high-current, short-pulse, vacuum ARC ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Brown, I.; MacGill, R.; Dickinson, M.

    1996-08-01

    Ions of the cathode material are formed at vacuum arc cathode spots and extracted by a grid system. The ion charge states (typically 1-4) depend on the cathode material and only little on the discharge current as long as the current is low. Here the authors report on experiments with short pulses (several {mu}s) and high currents (several kA); this regime of operation is thus approaching a more vacuum spark-like regime. Mean ion charge states of up to 6.2 for tungsten and 3.7 for titanium have been measured, with the corresponding maximum charge states of up to 8+ and 6+, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of Saha calculations and freezing of the charge state distribution.

  10. Enabling cost-effective high-current burst-mode operation in superconducting accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting (SC) accelerators are very efficient for CW or long-pulse operation, and normal conducting (NC) accelerators are cost effective for short-pulse operation. The addition of a short NC linac section to a SC linac can correct for the energy droop that occurs when pulsed high-current operation is required that exceeds the capability of the klystrons to replenish the cavity RF fields due to the long field fill-times of SC structures, or a requirement to support a broad range of beam currents results in variable beam loading. This paper describes the implementation of this technique to enable microseconds of high beam-current,more » 90 mA or more, in a 12 GeV SC long-pulse accelerator designed for the MaRIE 42-keV XFEL proposed for Los Alamos National Laboratory.« less

  11. Enabling cost-effective high-current burst-mode operation in superconducting accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting (SC) accelerators are very efficient for CW or long-pulse operation, and normal conducting (NC) accelerators are cost effective for short-pulse operation. The addition of a short NC linac section to a SC linac can correct for the energy droop that occurs when pulsed high-current operation is required that exceeds the capability of the klystrons to replenish the cavity RF fields due to the long field fill-times of SC structures, or a requirement to support a broad range of beam currents results in variable beam loading. This paper describes the implementation of this technique to enable microseconds of high beam-current, 90 mA or more, in a 12 GeV SC long-pulse accelerator designed for the MaRIE 42-keV XFEL proposed for Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  12. Microstructure Analysis of HPb59-1 Brass Induced by High Current Pulsed Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Jike; Gao, Bo; Hu, Liang; Lu, Shuaidan; Tu, Ganfeng

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effects of high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) on the microstructure evolution of casting HPb59-1 (Cu 57.1 mass%, Pb 1.7 mass% and Zn balance) alloy were investigated. The results showed a "wavy" surface which was formed with Pb element existing in the forms of stacking block and microparticles on the top surface layer after treatment. Nanocrystalline structures including Pb grains and two phases (α and β) were formed on the top remelted layer and their sizes were all less than 100 nm. The disordered β phase was generated in the surface layer after HCPEB treatment, which is beneficial for the improvement of surface properties. Meanwhile, there was a large residual stress on the alloy surface, along with the appearance of microcracks, and the preferred orientations of grains also changed.

  13. HIGH-CURRENT COLD CATHODE FIELD EMISSION ARRAY FOR ELECTRON LENS APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2012-12-28

    During Phase I, the following goals were achieved: (1) design and fabrication of a novel, nano-dimensional CNT field emitter assembly for high current density application, with high durability; (2) fabrication of a ceramic based micro channel plate (MCP) and characterization of its secondary electron emission; and (3) characterizing the CNT/MCP cathode for high field emission and durability. As a result of these achievements, a relatively high current density of ~ 1.2 A/cm2 from a CNT cathode and single channel MCP were measured. The emission current was also extremely stable with a peak-to-peak variation of only 1.8%. The emission current could be further enhanced to meet requirements for electron lens applications by increasing the number of MCP channels. A calculation for maximum possible current density with a 1200 channel/cm2 MCP, placed over a cathode with 1200 uniformly functioning CNTs, would be ~1.46 kA/cm2, neglecting space charge limitations. Clearly this level of emission is far greater than what is needed for the electron lens application, but it does offer a highly comforting margin to account for sub-standard emitters and/or to allow the lesser challenge of building a cathode with fewer channels/cm2. A satisfactory goal for the electron lens application would be a controllable emission of 2-4 mA per channel in an ensemble of 800-1200 uniformly-functioning channels/cm2, and a cathode with overall area of about 1 cm2.

  14. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P. Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  15. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Mishra, L; Kewlani, H; Patil, D S; Mittal, K C

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10(-3) mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  16. Neutron generator for BNCT based on high current ECR ion source with gyrotron plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Razin, S; Sidorov, A; Maslennikova, A; Volovecky, A; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O

    2015-12-01

    BNCT development nowadays is constrained by a progress in neutron sources design. Creation of a cheap and compact intense neutron source would significantly simplify trial treatments avoiding use of expensive and complicated nuclear reactors and accelerators. D-D or D-T neutron generator is one of alternative types of such sources for. A so-called high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source with plasma heating by millimeter wave gyrotron radiation is suggested to be used in a scheme of D-D neutron generator in the present work. Ion source of that type was developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). It can produce deuteron ion beams with current density up to 700-800 mA/cm(2). Generation of the neutron flux with density at the level of 7-8·10(10) s(-1) cm(-2) at the target surface could be obtained in case of TiD2 target bombardment with deuteron beam accelerated to 100 keV. Estimations show that it is enough for formation of epithermal neutron flux with density higher than 10(9) s(-1) cm(-2) suitable for BNCT. Important advantage of described approach is absence of Tritium in the scheme. First experiments performed in pulsed regime with 300 mA, 45 kV deuteron beam directed to D2O target demonstrated 10(9) s(-1) neutron flux. This value corresponds to theoretical estimations and proofs prospects of neutron generator development based on high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source.

  17. Particle Accelerators in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  18. Transition from Beam-Target to Thermonuclear Fusion in High-Current Deuterium Z-Pinch Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermann, Dustin; Welch, Dale; Rose, Dave; Thoma, Carsten; Clark, Robert; Mostrom, Chris; Schmidt, Andrea; Link, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    Fusion yields from dense, Z-pinch plasmas are known to scale with the drive current, which is favorable for many potential applications. Decades of experimental studies, however, show an unexplained drop in yield for currents above a few mega-ampere (MA). In this work, simulations of DD Z-Pinch plasmas have been performed in 1D and 2D for a constant pinch time and initial radius using the code LSP, and observations of a shift in scaling are presented. The results show that yields below 3 MA are enhanced relative to pure thermonuclear scaling by beamlike particles accelerated in the Rayleigh-Taylor induced electric fields, while yields above 3 MA are reduced because of energy lost by the instability and the inability of the beamlike ions to enter the pinch region. This research was developed with funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

  19. High-Current Density, High-Brightness Electron Beams from Large-Area Lanthanum Hexaboride Cathodes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-13

    Clarendon, Oxford, 1977), Chaps. 4.3-4.4. 15. Claude Lejeune and Jean Aubert, in Applied Charged Particle Optics, edited by A. Septier (Academic, New...Applications Intl. Corp. 1710 Goodridge Drive McLean, VA 22102 Dr. Charles C. Damm Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory P.O. Box 808 Livermore, CA 94550

  20. Characterization of Prototype Superconducting Magnetic Quadrupolesfor the High Current Transport Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Sabbi, GianLuca; Seidl, Peter

    2001-02-22

    Later phases of the High Current Transport Experiment (HCX) at LBNL will employ superconducting magnetic quadrupole lenses to focus an intense, heavy-ion beam over approximately 50 lattice periods (100 quadrupoles). Here they present a characterization of a baseline quadrupole design suitable for transporting a single, low-energy ({approx} 2 MeV), high-current ({approx} 800 mA) heavy-ion (K{sup +}) beam that will be provided from an existing injector and beam matching section. For optimal performance in this application, a compact quadrupole magnet providing high focusing strength and high field quality is required. The reference parameters that they have chosen take into account magnet development work by AML, LLNL, and MIT and result in a transport lattice well matched to programmatic needs with a lattice period of approximately 50 cm. The goal of this note is to introduce a common framework where the magnetic performance of different designs can be compared. In that regard, they try to avoid the details of an earlier parameter note [1] where provisions for tweaks in magnet excitation, cryostat assembly, etc. were discussed in fairly general terms. This note is not intended to be a final specification for the HCX quadrupoles to be constructed or to be the sole basis on which competing magnet designs will be compared. Other aspects such as prototype test results, economic considerations, and attractiveness within the context of ultimate applications in multi-beam drivers for heavy-ion fusion (i.e, compatibility with magnet arrays, etc.) will all factor in the selection of the appropriate design option. This note is organized as follows. Magnet characterizations including geometric and conductor parameters are given in Sec II. Performance parameters to be reported that quantify the magnet properties are outlined in Sec III. Supporting information is included in appendices. A reference coordinate system to be employed in field calculations is defined in Appendix A

  1. Crystallization of Ti33Cu67 metallic glass under high-current density electrical pulses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the phase and structure evolution of the Ti33Cu67 amorphous alloy subjected to electrical pulses of high current density. By varying the pulse parameters, different stages of crystallization could be observed in the samples. Partial polymorphic nanocrystallization resulting in the formation of 5- to 8-nm crystallites of the TiCu2 intermetallic in the residual amorphous matrix occurred when the maximum current density reached 9.7·108 A m-2 and the pulse duration was 140 μs, though the calculated temperature increase due to Joule heating was not enough to reach the crystallization temperature of the alloy. Samples subjected to higher current densities and higher values of the evolved Joule heat per unit mass fully crystallized and contained the Ti2Cu3 and TiCu3 phases. A common feature of the crystallized ribbons was their non-uniform microstructure with regions that experienced local melting and rapid solidification. PACS: 81; 81.05.Bx; 81.05.Kf. PMID:21871070

  2. Metal based gas diffusion layers for enhanced fuel cell performance at high current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Nabeel; Van Steen, Eric; Tanaka, Shiro; Levecque, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    The gas diffusion layer strongly influences the performance and durability of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. A major drawback of current carbon fiber based GDLs is the non-controlled variation in porosity resulting in a random micro-structure. Moreover, when subjected to compression these materials show significant reduction in porosity and permeability leading to water management problems and mass transfer losses within the fuel cell. This study investigated the use of uniform perforated metal sheets as GDLs in conjunction with microchannel flowfields. A metal sheet design with a pitch of 110 μm and a hole diameter of 60 μm in combination with an MPL showed superior performance in the high current density region compared to a commercially available carbon paper based GDL in a single cell environment. Fuel cell testing with different oxidants (air, heliox and oxygen) indicate that the metal sheet offers both superior diffusion and reduced flooding in comparison to the carbon based GDL. The presence of the MPL has been found to be critical to the functionality of the metal sheet suggesting that the MPL design may represent an important optimisation parameter for further improvements in performance.

  3. Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Fibers and Sheets for a High Current Electron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Larry

    Field emission (FE) properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers from Rice University and the University of Cambridge have been studied for use within a high current electron source for a directed energy weapon. Upon reviewing the performance of these two prevalent CNT fibers, cathodes were designed with CNT fibers from the University of Cincinnati Nanoworld Laboratory. Cathodes composed of a single CNT fiber, an array of three CNT fibers, and a nonwoven CNT sheet were investigated for FE properties; the goal was to design a cathode with emission current in excess of 10 mA. Once the design phase was complete, the cathode samples were fabricated, characterized, and then analyzed to determine FE properties. Electrical conductivity of the CNT fibers was characterized with a 4-probe technique. FE characteristics were measured in an ultra-high vacuum chamber at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The arrayed CNT fiber and the enhanced nonwoven CNT sheet emitter design demonstrated the most promising FE properties. Future work will include further analysis and cathode design using this nonwoven CNT sheet material to increase peak current performance during electron emission.

  4. Hybrid monitor for both beam position and tilt of pulsed high-current beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, J. He, X.; Ma, C.; Zhao, L.; Li, Q.; Dai, Z.

    2014-09-15

    A Hybrid beam monitor, integrated with both azimuthal and axial B-dot probes, was designed for simultaneous measurement of both beam position and beam angle for pulsed high-current beams at the same location in beam pipe. The output signals of axial B-dot probes were found to be mixed with signals caused by transverse position deviation. In order to eliminate the unwanted signals, an elimination method was developed and its feasibility tested on a 50-Ω coaxial line test stand. By this method, a waveform, shape-like to that of input current and proportional to the tilt angle, was simulated and processed by following integration step to achieve the tilt angle. The tests showed that the measurement error of displacement and tilt angle less than 0.3 mm and 1.5 mrad, respectively. The latter error could be reduced with improved probes by reducing the inductance of the axial B-dot probe, but the improvement reached a limit due to some unknown systemic mechanism.

  5. High current pulsed electron beam treatment of AZ31 Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Bo; Hao Shengzhi; Zou Jianxin; Grosdidier, Thierry; Jiang Limin; Zhou Jiyang; Dong Chuang

    2005-11-15

    This paper reports, for the first time, an analysis of the effect of High Current Pulsed Electron Beam (HCPEB) on a Mg alloy. The AZ31 alloy was HCPEB treated in order to see the potential of this fairly recent technique in modifying its wear resistance. For the 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} beam energy density used in the present work, the evaporation mode was operative and led to the formation of a ''wavy'' surface and the absence of eruptive microcraters. The selective evaporation of Mg over Al led to an Al-rich melted surface layer and precipitation hardening from the over saturated solid solution. Due to the increase in hardness of the top surface layer, the friction coefficient values were lowered by more than 20% after the HCPEB treatments, and the wear resistance was drastically (by a factor of 6) improved. The microhardness of the HCPEB samples was also increased significantly down to a depth of about 500 {mu}m, far exceeding the heat-affected zone (about 40 {mu}m). This is due to the effect of the propagation of the shockwave associated with this HCPEB treatment.

  6. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2013-07-15

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar and 400–1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 3.8 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and 4–14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  7. A strong-focusing 800 MeV cyclotron for high-current applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, N.; Assadi, S.; Badgley, K.; Comeaux, J.; Kellams, J.; McInturff, A.; McIntyre, P.; Sattarov, A.

    2013-04-01

    A superconducting strong-focusing cyclotron (SFC) is being developed for high-current applications. It incorporates four innovations. Superconducting quarter-wave cavities are used to provide >20 MV/turn acceleration. The orbit separation is thereby opened so that bunch-bunch interactions between successive orbits are eliminated. Quadrapole focusing channels are incorporated within the sectors so that alternating-gradient strong-focusing transport is maintained throughout. Dipole windings on the inner and outer orbits provide enhanced control for injection and extraction of bunches. Finally each sector magnet is configured as a flux-coupled stack of independent apertures, so that any desired number of independent cyclotrons can be integrated within a common footprint. Preliminary simulations indicate that each SFC should be capable of accelerating 10 mA CW to 800 MeV with very low loss and >50% energy efficiency. A primary motivation for SFC is as a proton driver for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core. The cores are fueled solely with the transuranics from spent nuclear fuel from a conventional nuclear power plant. The beams from one SFC stack would destroy all of the transuranics and long-lived fission products that are produced by a GWe reactor [1]. This capability offers the opportunity to close the nuclear fuel cycle and provide a path to green nuclear energy.

  8. Detection and clearing of trapped ions in the high current Cornell photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Full, S.; Bartnik, A.; Bazarov, I. V.; Dobbins, J.; Dunham, B.; Hoffstaetter, G. H.

    2016-03-01

    We have recently performed experiments to test the effectiveness of three ion-clearing strategies in the Cornell high intensity photoinjector: DC clearing electrodes, bunch gaps, and beam shaking. The photoinjector reaches a new regime of linac beam parameters where high continuous wave beam currents lead to ion trapping. Therefore ion mitigation strategies must be evaluated for this machine and other similar future high current linacs. We have developed several techniques to directly measure the residual trapped ions. Our two primary indicators of successful clearing are the amount of ion current removed by a DC clearing electrode, and the absence of bremsstrahlung radiation generated by beam-ion interactions. Measurements were taken for an electron beam with an energy of 5 MeV and continuous wave beam currents in the range of 1-20 mA. Several theoretical models have been developed to explain our data. Using them, we are able to estimate the clearing electrode voltage required for maximum ion clearing, the creation and clearing rates of the ions while employing bunch gaps, and the sinusoidal shaking frequency necessary for clearing via beam shaking. In all cases, we achieve a maximum ion clearing of at least 70% or higher, and in some cases our data is consistent with full ion clearing.

  9. A high-current rail-type gas switch with preionization by an additional corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, E. I.; Belozerov, O. S.; Krastelev, E. G.

    2016-12-01

    The characteristics of a high-current rail-type gas switch with preionization of the gas (air) in a spark gap by an additional corona discharge are investigated. The experiments were performed in a voltage range of 10-45 kV using a two-electrode switch consisting of two cylindrical electrodes with a diameter of 22 mm and a length of 100 mm and a set of laterally located corona-discharge needles. The requirements for the position and size of the needles are defined for which a corona discharge is ignited before a breakdown of the main gap and does not change to a sparking form, and the entire length of the rail electrodes is efficiently used. The fulfillment of these requirements ensures stable operation of the switch with a small variation of the pulse breakdown voltage, which is not more than 1% for a fixed voltage-pulse rise time in the range from 150 ns to 3.5 μs. A short delay time of the switch breakdown makes it possible to control the two-electrode switch by an overvoltage pulse of nanosecond duration.

  10. Development and fabrication of a high current, fast recovery power diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. H.; Balodis, V.; Devance, D. C.; Gaugh, C. E.; Karlsson, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    A high voltage (VR = 1200 V), high current (IF = 150 A), fast recovery ( 700 ns) and low forward voltage drop ( 1.5 V) silicon rectifier was designed and the process developed for its fabrication. For maximum purity, uniformity and material characteristic stability, neutron transmutation n-type doped float zone silicon is used. The design features a hexagonal chip for maximum area utilization of space available in the DO-8 diode package, PIN diffused junction structure with deep diffused D(+) anode and a shallow high concentration n(+) cathode. With the high temperature glass passivated positive bevel mesa junction termination, the achieved blocking voltage is close to the theoretical limit of the starting material. Gold diffusion is used to control the lifetime and the resulting effect on switching speed and forward voltage tradeoff. For solder reflow assembly, trimetal (Al-Ti-Ni) contacts are used. The required major device electrical characteristics were achieved. Due to the tradeoff nature of forward voltage drop and reverse recovery time, a compromise was reached for these values.

  11. Deformation of contact surfaces in a vacuum interrupter after high-current interruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoran; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhou, Zhipeng; Jiang, Yanjun; Wang, Jianhua; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2016-08-01

    In a high-current interruption, the contact surface in a vacuum interrupter might be severely damaged by constricted vacuum arcs causing a molten area on it. As a result, a protrusion will be initiated by a transient recovery voltage after current zero, enhancing the local electric field and making breakdowns occur easier. The objective of this paper is to simulate the deformation process on the molten area under a high electric field by adopting the finite element method. A time-dependent Electrohydrodynamic model was established, and the liquid-gas interface was tracked by the level-set method. From the results, the liquid metal can be deformed to a Taylor cone if the applied electric field is above a critical value. This value is correlated to the initial geometry of the liquid metal, which increases as the size of the liquid metal decreases. Moreover, the buildup time of a Taylor cone obeys the power law t = k × E-3, where E is the initial electric field and k is a coefficient related to the material property, indicating a temporal self-similar characteristic. In addition, the influence of temperature has little impact on the deformation but has great impact on electron emission. Finally, the possible reason to initiate a delayed breakdown is associated with the deformation. The breakdown does not occur immediately when the voltage is just applied upon the gap but is postponed to several milliseconds later when the tip is formed on the liquid metal.

  12. Thermal instability induced by high current densities in high-Tc coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maza, J.; Ferro, G.; Veira, J. A.; Vidal, F.

    2013-10-01

    By using a 1 ms pulse technique, the current-voltage curves (CVC) under zero-applied magnetic field have been measured in practical high-Tc superconducting wires based on coated (RE)BCO. The measurements extend up to the so-called supercritical current intensity, I*, at which superconductivity disappears accompanied by an abrupt jump in the voltage. The resulting CVC, including the temperature dependence of I*, were analysed at a quantitative level in terms of a thermal instability model proposed recently. An attractive aspect of our thermal instability approach is that in spite of the complexity of the coated layered structure, in its simpler formulation all the geometric and thermal variables are encapsulated into a single characteristic parameter r with units of thermal resistance. All the experimental results for I* from 76 to 86 K are quantitatively, within 2%, accounted for by the thermal instability analysis. Furthermore, the best-fit value of r is found to be quite consistent with the inner geometry and composition of the wires. Another remarkable result of our analysis is that the temperature T* reached by the wire at I*, i.e., the temperature triggering the thermal runaway, is less than one kelvin above the bath temperature. These results further support the universality of the thermal instability mechanism of superconductivity quenching by high current densities.

  13. High current multicharged metal ion source using high power gyrotron heating of vacuum arc plasma.

    PubMed

    Vodopyanov, A V; Golubev, S V; Khizhnyak, V I; Mansfeld, D A; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu

    2008-02-01

    A high current, multi charged, metal ion source using electron heating of vacuum arc plasma by high power gyrotron radiation has been developed. The plasma is confined in a simple mirror trap with peak magnetic field in the plug up to 2.5 T, mirror ratio of 3-5, and length variable from 15 to 20 cm. Plasma formed by a cathodic vacuum arc is injected into the trap either (i) axially using a compact vacuum arc plasma gun located on axis outside the mirror trap region or (ii) radially using four plasma guns surrounding the trap at midplane. Microwave heating of the mirror-confined, vacuum arc plasma is accomplished by gyrotron microwave radiation of frequency 75 GHz, power up to 200 kW, and pulse duration up to 150 micros, leading to additional stripping of metal ions by electron impact. Pulsed beams of platinum ions with charge state up to 10+, a mean charge state over 6+, and total (all charge states) beam current of a few hundred milliamperes have been formed.

  14. High current density PQQ-dependent alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase bioanodes.

    PubMed

    Aquino Neto, Sidney; Hickey, David P; Milton, Ross D; De Andrade, Adalgisa R; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we explore the bioelectrooxidation of ethanol using pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH and AldDH) enzymes for biofuel cell applications. The bioanode architectures were designed with both direct electron transfer (DET) and mediated electron transfer (MET) mechanisms employing high surface area materials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and MWCNT-decorated gold nanoparticles, along with different immobilization techniques. Three different polymeric matrices were tested (tetrabutyl ammonium bromide (TBAB)-modified Nafion; octyl-modified linear polyethyleneimine (C8-LPEI); and cellulose) in the DET studies. The modified Nafion membrane provided the best electrical communication between enzymes and the electrode surface, with catalytic currents as high as 16.8 ± 2.1 µA cm(-2). Then, a series of ferrocene redox polymers were evaluated for MET. The redox polymer 1,1'-dimethylferrocene-modified linear polyethyleneimine (FcMe2-C3-LPEI) provided the best electrochemical response. Using this polymer, the electrochemical assays conducted in the presence of MWCNTs and MWCNTs-Au indicated a Jmax of 781 ± 59 µA cm(-2) and 925 ± 68 µA cm(-2), respectively. Overall, from the results obtained here, DET using the PQQ-dependent ADH and AldDH still lacks high current density, while the bioanodes that operate via MET employing ferrocene-modified LPEI redox polymers show efficient energy conversion capability in ethanol/air biofuel cells.

  15. Gamma-resonance Contraband Detection using a high current tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, B. F.; Beis, J.; Dale, D.; Rogers, J.; Ruegg, R.; Debiak, T.; Kamykowski, E.; Melnychuk, S.; Rathke, J.; Sredniawski, J.

    1999-04-26

    TRIUMF and Northrop Grumman have developed a new system for the detection of concealed explosives and drugs. This Contraband Detection System (CDS) is based on the resonant absorption by {sup 14}N of gammas produced using {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N. The chosen reaction uses protons at 1.75 MeV and the gammas have an energy of 9.17 MeV. By measuring both the resonant and the non-resonant absorption using detectors with good spatial resolution, and applying standard tomographic techniques, we are able to produce 3D images of both the nitrogen partial density and the total density. The images together may be utilized with considerable confidence to determine if small amounts of nitrogen based explosives, heroin or cocaine are present in the interrogated containers. Practical Gamma Resonant Absorption (GRA) scanning requires an intense source of protons. However this proton source must also be very stable, have low energy spread, and have good spatial definition. These demands suggested a tandem as the accelerator of choice. We have therefore constructed a 2 MeV H{sup -} tandem optimized for high current (10 mA) operation, while minimizing the overall size of the accelerator. This has required several special innovations which will be presented in the paper. We will also present initial commissioning results.

  16. Integrating a Machine Protection System for High-Current Free Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; James Coleman; Richard Evans; Al Grippo; Kevin Jordan

    2002-09-01

    A fully integrated Machine Protection System (MPS) is critical to efficient commissioning and safe operation of all high-current accelerators. The MPS needs to monitor the status of all devices that could enter the beam path, the beam loss monitors (BLMs), magnet settings, beam dump status, etc. This information is then presented to the electron source controller, which must limit the beam power or shut down the beam completely. The MPS for the energy recovery linac (ERL) at the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser [1] generates eight different power limits, or beam modes, which are passed to the drive laser pulse controller (DLPC) (photocathode source controller). These range from no beam to nearly 2 megawatts of electron beam power. Automatic masking is used for the BLMs during low-power modes when one might be using beam viewers. The system also reviews the setup for the two different beamlines, the IR path or the UV path, and will allow or disallow operations based on magnet settings and valve positions. This paper will describe the approach taken for the JLab 10-kW FEL. Additional details can be found on our website http://laser.jlab.org [2].

  17. High current SRF cavity design for SPL and eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomenstnykh, S.; Calaga, R.; Hahn, H.; Johnson, E.; Kewisch, J.

    2011-03-28

    A high current five-cell Nb superconducting cavity, called BNL3 cavity, was optimized and designed for the SPL and eRHIC. For the fundamental mode, the optimization process aimed at maximizing the R/Q of the fundamental mode and the geometry factor G under an acceptable RF field ratio level of B{sub peak}/E{sub acc} and E{sub peak}/E{sub acc}. For higher order modes, the optimization is to lower (R/Q)Q{sub ext} for dipole and quadrupole modes to suppress the beam-break-up (BBU). To extract the HOM power out of the cavity, the BNL3 cavity employs a larger beam pipe, allowing the propagation of HOMs, but not the fundamental mode. Six HOM couplers (three at each end) are used to extract large HOM power. To avoid the cross-talk between cavities, tapers are employed between the cavities. This paper presents the design of the BNL3 cavity, end groups and BBU simulation results.

  18. Probe characterization of high-current driven metal plasma in a vacuum-arc rail gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, T.; Roychowdhury, P.; Venkatramani, N.

    2004-10-01

    The characteristics of metal plasma launched by high-current electric arc in a vacuum-arc rail gun are determined by employing electrical and magnetic probes. These measurements are validated by results from theoretical simulations. The arc coupled nonlinear circuit equations are solved simultaneously with the Newtonian arc motion and revealed the undercritically damped behavior of the arc current identical to the arc-current signal recorded by the Rogowski magnetic probe. Similarly the arc velocity and displacement derived from the signatures of B-dot probes are shown to concur closely with the results of J ×B propulsion from simulation. The heating of plasma is formulated in a three-electron population regime with direct arc energy coupling through magnetohydrodynamic, ion-acoustic, Coulomb, and neutral interactions. This results in high temperature (Te) of hundreds of eV in the arc as revealed by the simulation. Hence Te of the rapidly cooling and equilibrating plasma that emerged from the muzzle is high around 80-90eV, which is confirmed by Langmuir electric probe measurements. Density ne of this metal plasma is shown to be in the range 4×1021-6×1021m-3 and includes multiple ion charge states. The exit velocity of the plasma measured by a pair of Langmuir probes is close to 2.2×106cm/s and matched well with the arc velocity determined by the B-dot probes and the results from simulation.

  19. A cookbook for building a high-current dimpled H– magnetron source for accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Bollinger, Daniel S.; Karns, Patrick R.; Tan, Cheng -Yang

    2015-10-30

    A high-current (>50 mA) dimpled H– magnetron source has been built at Fermilab for supplying H– beam to the entire accelerator complex. Despite many decades of expertise with slit H– magnetron sources at Fermilab, we were faced with many challenges from the dimpled H– magnetron source, which needed to be overcome in order to make it operational. Dimpled H– sources for high-energy physics are not new: Brookhaven National Laboratory has operated a dimpled H- source for more than two decades. However, the transference of that experience to Fermilab took about two years because a cookbook for building this type ofmore » source did not exist and seemingly innocuous or undocumented choices had a huge impact on the success or failure for this type of source. Moreover, it is the goal of this paper to document the reasons for these choices and to present a cookbook for building and operating dimpled H– magnetron sources.« less

  20. Current halo structures in high-current plasma experiments: {theta}-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, Yu. V.

    2007-03-15

    Experimental data elucidating mechanisms for halo formation in {theta}-pinch discharges are presented and discussed. The experiments were performed with different gases (H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, He, and Ar) in a theta-pinch device with a porcelain vacuum chamber and an excitation coil 15 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length. The stored energy, the current in the excitation coil, and the current half-period were W = 10 kJ, I = 400 kA, and T/2 = 14 {mu}s, respectively. It is found that the plasma rings (halos) surrounding the pinch core arise as a result of coaxial pinch stratification due to both the excitation of closed currents (inductons) inside the pinch and the radial convergence of the plasma current sheaths produced after the explosion of T-layers formed near the wall in the initial stage of the discharge. It is concluded that halo structures observed in pinches, tokamaks, and other high-current devices used in controlled fusion research have the same nature.

  1. Incorporation of Ca and P on anodized titanium surface: Effect of high current density.

    PubMed

    Laurindo, Carlos A H; Torres, Ricardo D; Mali, Sachin A; Gilbert, Jeremy L; Soares, Paulo

    2014-04-01

    This study systematically evaluated the surface and corrosion characteristics of commercially pure titanium (grade 2) modified by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) with high current density. The anodization process was carried out galvanostatically (constant current density) using a solution containing calcium glycerophosphate (0.02mol/L) and calcium acetate (0.15mol/L). The current densities applied were 400, 700, 1000 and 1200mA/cm(2) for a period of 15s. Composition, crystalline structure, morphology, roughness, wettability and "in-vitro" bioactivity test in SBF of the anodized layer were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, profilometry and contact angle measurements. Corrosion properties were evaluated by open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The results show that the TiO2 oxide layers present an increase of thickness, porosity, roughness, wettability, Ca/P ratio, and bioactivity, with the applied current density up to 1000mA/cm(2). Corrosion resistance also increases with applied current density. It is observed that for 1200mA/cm(2), there is a degradation of the oxide layer. In general, the results suggest that the anodized TiO2 layer with better properties is formed with an applied current of 1000mA/cm(2).

  2. High current metal ion implantation to synthesize some conducting metal-silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B. X.; Gao, K. Y.

    1999-06-10

    High current metal-ion implantation by a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source was conducted to synthesize some conducting metal-silicides. It was found that C54-TiSi{sub 2}, ZrSi{sub 2}, NiSi{sub 2}, CoSi{sub 2}, {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}, NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2} layers on Si wafers with good electric properties could be obtained directly after implantation. In comparison, the formation of some other silicides like {alpha}-FeSi{sub 2}, NbSi{sub 2}, TaSi{sub 2}, tetragonal-WSi{sub 2} and tetragonal-MoSi{sub 2} required an additional post-annealing to improve their crystallinity and thus their electric properties. Interestingly, the NiSi{sub 2} layers of superior electric properties were obtained at a selected Ni-ion current density of 35 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. At this current, a beam heating raised the Si wafer to a specific temperature of 380 deg. C, at which the size difference between NiSi{sub 2} and Si lattices was nil. The resistivity of the NiSi{sub 2} layers so obtained was much lower than that of the Ni-disilicide formed by solid-state reaction at >750 deg. C. The formation mechanism of the above metal-silicides and the associated electric properties will also be discussed.

  3. Design and characterization of the annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam source for circular components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Langping; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-01

    In order to irradiate circular components with high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB), an annular cathode based on carbon fiber bunches was designed and fabricated. Using an acceleration voltage of 25 kV, the maximum pulsed irradiation current and energy of this annular cathode can reach 7.9 kA and 300 J, respectively. The irradiation current density distribution of the annular cathode HCPEB source measured along the circumferential direction shows that the annular cathode has good emission uniformity. In addition, four 9310 steel substrates fixed uniformly along the circumferential direction of a metal ring substrate were irradiated by this annular cathode HCPEB source. The surface and cross-section morphologies of the irradiated samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM images of the surface reveal that crater and surface undulation have been formed, which hints that the irradiation energy of the HCPEB process is large enough for surface modification of 9310 steel. Meanwhile, SEM cross-section images exhibit that remelted layers with a thickness of about 5.4 μm have been obtained in all samples, which proves that a good practical irradiation uniformity can be achieved by this annular cathode HCPEB source.

  4. Sharp burnout failure observed in high current-carrying double-walled carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li; Toth, Geza; Wei, Jinquan; Liu, Zheng; Gao, Wei; Ci, Lijie; Vajtai, Robert; Endo, Morinobu; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the current-carrying capability and the high-current-induced thermal burnout failure modes of 5-20 µm diameter double-walled carbon nanotube (DWNT) fibers made by an improved dry-spinning method. It is found that the electrical conductivity and maximum current-carrying capability for these DWNT fibers can reach up to 5.9 × 105 S m - 1 and over 1 × 105 A cm - 2 in air. In comparison, we observed that standard carbon fiber tended to be oxidized and burnt out into cheese-like morphology when the maximum current was reached, while DWNT fiber showed a much slower breakdown behavior due to the gradual burnout in individual nanotubes. The electron microscopy observations further confirmed that the failure process of DWNT fibers occurs at localized positions, and while the individual nanotubes burn they also get aligned due to local high temperature and electrostatic field. In addition a finite element model was constructed to gain better understanding of the failure behavior of DWNT fibers.

  5. High yield neutron generator based on a high-current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Skalyga, V.; Sidorov, A.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Strelkov, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.

    2015-09-07

    In present paper, an approach for high yield compact D-D neutron generator based on a high current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source is suggested. Results on dense pulsed deuteron beam production with current up to 500 mA and current density up to 750 mA/cm{sup 2} are demonstrated. Neutron yield from D{sub 2}O and TiD{sub 2} targets was measured in case of its bombardment by pulsed 300 mA D{sup +} beam with 45 keV energy. Neutron yield density at target surface of 10{sup 9} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} was detected with a system of two {sup 3}He proportional counters. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron yield from a high quality TiD{sub 2} target bombarded by D{sup +} beam demonstrated in present work accelerated to 100 keV could reach 6 × 10{sup 10} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. It is discussed that compact neutron generator with such characteristics could be perspective for a number of applications like boron neutron capture therapy, security systems based on neutron scanning, and neutronography.

  6. Biomimetic Particles as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in the development of novel nanoparticle and microparticle-based therapeutics. An emerging paradigm is the incorporation of biomimetic features into these synthetic therapeutic constructs to enable them to better interface with biological systems. Through the control of size, shape, and material consistency, particle cores have been generated that better mimic natural cells and viruses. In addition, there have been significant advances in biomimetic surface functionalization of particles through the integration of bio-inspired artificial cell membranes and naturally derived cell membranes. Biomimetic technologies enable therapeutic particles to have increased potency to benefit human health. PMID:26277289

  7. Biomimetic particles as therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Randall A; Sunshine, Joel C; Green, Jordan J

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in the development of novel nanoparticle- and microparticle-based therapeutics. An emerging paradigm is the incorporation of biomimetic features into these synthetic therapeutic constructs to enable them to better interface with biological systems. Through the control of size, shape, and material consistency, particle cores have been generated that better mimic natural cells and viruses. In addition, there have been significant advances in biomimetic surface functionalization of particles through the integration of bio-inspired artificial cell membranes and naturally derived cell membranes. Biomimetic technologies enable therapeutic particles to have increased potency to benefit human health.

  8. Non-local microscopic view of signal propagation times in BJTs biased up to high currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palestri, P.; Selmi, L.

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents a microscopic analysis of signal propagation delay in bipolar transistors featuring relevant non-equilibrium transport effects. First, the physical mechanisms responsible of signal delay are reviewed. A novel technique to extract signal delays from self-consistent Monte Carlo device simulations is presented. These results are then used for a physically based comparison between compact quasi-static delay formulas and more accurate particle simulations carried out over a broad range of collector currents.

  9. Simulation study of radial dose due to the irradiation of a swift heavy ion aiming to advance the treatment planning system for heavy particle cancer therapy: The effect of emission angles of secondary electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moribayashi, Kengo

    2015-12-01

    A radial dose simulation model has been proposed in order to advance the treatment planning system for heavy particle cancer therapy. Here, the radial dose is the dose due to the irradiation of a heavy ion as a function of distances from this ion path. The model proposed here may overcome weak points of paradigms that are employed to produce the conventional radial dose distributions. To provide the radial dose with higher accuracy, this paper has discussed the relationship between the emission angles of secondary electrons and the radial dose. It is found that the effect of emission angles becomes stronger on the radial dose with increasing energies of the secondary electrons.

  10. Characterization of a high current pulsed arc using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Martins, R.; Zaepffel, C.; Chemartin, L.; Lalande, Ph; Soufiani, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present the investigation realized on an experimental setup that simulates an arc column subjected to the transient phase of a lightning current waveform in laboratory conditions. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to assess space- and time-resolved properties of this high current pulsed arc. Different current peak levels are utilised in this work, ranging from 10 kA to 100 kA, with a peak time around 15 µs. Ionic lines of nitrogen and oxygen are used to determine the radial profiles of temperature and electron density of the arc channel over time from 2 µs to 36 µs. A combination of 192 N II and O II lines is considered in the calculation of the bound-bound contribution of the absorption coefficient of the plasma channel. Calculations of the optical thickness showed that self-absorption of these ionic lines in the arc column is important. To obtain temperature and electron density profiles in the arc, we solved the radiative transfer equation across the channel under an axisymmetric assumption and considering the channel formed by uniform concentric layers. For the 100 kA current peak level, the temperature reaches more than 38 000 K and the electron density reaches 5  ×  1018 cm-3. The pressure inside the channel is calculated using the air plasma composition at local thermodynamic equilibrium, and reaches 45 bar. The results are discussed and utilised to estimate the electrical conductivity of the arc channel.

  11. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry; Alexander, Joshua; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Calle, Luz marina

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatment was used as a rapid repair measure to mitigate chloride induced corrosion of reinforced concrete in the field. EN treatment uses an electric field to transport positively charged nanoparticles to the reinforcement through the concrete capillary pores. Cylindrical reinforced concrete specimens were batched with 4.5 wt % salt content (based on cement mass). Three distinct electrokinetic treatments were conducted using high current density (up to 5 A/m2) to form a chloride penetration barrier that was established in 5 days, as opposed to the traditional 6-8 weeks, generally required for electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). These treatments included basic EN treatment, EN with additional calcium treatment, and basic ECE treatment. Field exposures were conducted at the NASA Beachside Corrosion Test Site, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. The specimens were subjected to sea water immersion at the test site as a posttreatment exposure. Following a 30-day post-treatment exposure period, the specimens were subjected to indirect tensile testing to evaluate treatment impact. The EN treated specimens exhibited 60% and 30% increases in tensile strength as compared to the untreated controls and ECE treated specimens respectively. The surfaces of the reinforcement bars of the control specimens were 67% covered by corrosion products. In contrast, the EN treated specimens exhibited corrosion coverage of only 4%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a dense concrete microstructure adjacent to the bars of the treated specimens as compared to the control and ECE specimens. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis of the polished EN treated specimens showed a reduction in chloride content by a factor of 20 adjacent to the bars. This study demonstrated that EN treatment was successful in forming a chloride penetration barrier rapidly. This work also showed that the chloride barrier was effective when samples were exposed to

  12. A time-resolved imaging and electrical study on a high current atmospheric pressure spark discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomares, J. M.; Kohut, A.; Galbács, G.; Engeln, R.; Geretovszky, Zs.

    2015-12-01

    We present a time-resolved imaging and electrical study of an atmospheric pressure spark discharge. The conditions of the present study are those used for nanoparticle generation in spark discharge generator setups. The oscillatory bipolar spark discharge was generated between two identical Cu electrodes in different configurations (cylindrical flat-end or tipped-end geometries, electrode gap from 0.5 to 4 mm), in a controlled co-axial N2 flow, and was supplied by a high voltage capacitor. Imaging data with nanosecond time resolution were collected using an intensified CCD camera. This data were used to study the time evolution of plasma morphology, total light emission intensity, and the rate of plasma expansion. High voltage and high current probes were employed to collect electrical data about the discharge. The electrical data recorded allowed, among others, the calculation of the equivalent resistance and inductance of the circuit, estimations for the energy dissipated in the spark gap. By combining imaging and electrical data, observations could be made about the correlation of the evolution of total emitted light and the dissipated power. It was also observed that the distribution of light emission of the plasma in the spark gap is uneven, as it exhibits a "hot spot" with an oscillating position in the axial direction, in correlation with the high voltage waveform. The initial expansion rate of the cylindrical plasma front was found to be supersonic; thus, the discharge releases a strong shockwave. Finally, the results on equivalent resistance and channel expansion are comparable to those of unipolar arcs. This shows the spark discharge has a similar behavior to the arc regime during the conductive phase and until the current oscillations stop.

  13. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  14. Effects of Neutral Density on Energetic Ions Produced Near High-Current Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kameyama, Ikuya

    1997-01-01

    Energy distributions of ion current from high-current, xenon hollow cathodes, which are essential information to understand erosion phenomena observed in high-power ion thrusters, were obtained using an electrostatic energy analyzer (ESA). The effects of ambient pressure and external flow rate introduced immediately downstream of hollow cathode on ion currents with energies greater than that associated with the cathode-to-anode potential difference were investigated. The results were analyzed to determine the changes in the magnitudes of ion currents to the ESA at various energies. Either increasing the ambient pressure or adding external flow induces an increase in the distribution of ion currents with moderate energies (epsilon less than 25 to 35 eV) and a decrease in the distribution for high energies (epsilon greater than 25 to 35 eV). The magnitude of the current distribution increase in the moderate energy range is greater for a cathode equipped with a toroidal keeper than for one without a keeper, but the distribution in the high energy range does not seem to be affected by a keeper. An MHD model, which has been proposed to describe energetic-ion production mechanism in hollow cathode at high discharge currents, was developed to describe these effects. The results show, however, that this model involves no mechanism by which a significant increase of ion current could occur at any energy. It was found, on the other hand, that the potential-hill model of energetic ion production, which assumes existence of a local maximum of plasma potential, could explain combined increases in the currents of ions with moderate energies and decreases in high energy ions due to increased neutral atom density using a charge-exchange mechanism. The existing, simplified version of the potential-hill model, however, shows poor quantitative agreement with measured ion-current-energy-distribution changes induced by neutral density changes.

  15. Quasi-1D van der Waals materials as high current-density local interconnects (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyarov, Maxim; Aytan, Ece; Bloodgood, Matthew; Salguero, Tina T.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-09-01

    The continuous downscaling of interconnect dimensions in combination with the introduction of low-k dielectrics has increased the number of heat dissipation, integration and reliability challenges in modern electronics. As a result, there is a strong need for new materials that have high current-carrying capacity for applications as nanoscale interconnects. In this presentation, we show that quasi-one-dimensional (1D) van der Waals metals such as TaSe3 have excellent breakdown current density exceeding that of 5 MA/cm2. This value is above that currently achievable in conventional copper or aluminum wires. The quasi-1D van der Waals materials are characterized by strong bonds along one dimension and weak van der Waals bonds along two other dimensions. The material for this study was grown by the chemical vapor transport (CVT) method. Both mechanical and chemical exfoliation methods were used to fabricate nanowires with lateral dimensions below 100 nm. The dimensions of the quasi-1D nanowires were verified with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The metal (Ti/Au) contacts for the electrical characterization were deposited using electron beam evaporation (EBE). The measurements were conducted on a number of prototype interconnects with multiple electric contacts to ensure reproducibility. The obtained results suggest that quasi-1D van der Waals metals present a feasible alternative to conventional copper interconnects in terms of the current-carrying capacity and the breakdown current-density. This work was supported, in part, by the SRC and DARPA through STARnet Center for Function Accelerated nanoMaterial Engineering (FAME).

  16. Inclusive Focus Particles in English and Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Sang-gu

    2011-01-01

    When discussing focus particles, it has been common practice to rely on the dichotomy of inclusive vs. exclusive particles, "a la" Konig (1991). Inclusive focus particles are often further divided into scalar particles, such as "also", "too", and "either", and non-scalar particles, such as "even". In this thesis, I advance a comparative analysis…

  17. Control of coupled-bunch instabilities in high current storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertson, G.

    1991-04-01

    Intense particle beams may be subject to coupled-bunch instabilities that would grow at rates greater than the bunch oscillation frequencies. The suppression of the growth requires both reduction of the driving impedances and active feedback of bunch motions. The shunt impedances of higher-order cavity resonances can be reduced by passive dampers and the beam impedance within the band of the fundamental resonance can be reduced by rf feedback around the cavity and power amplifier. The feedback of bunch motions composed of numerous coupled-bunch modes requires broad-band systems for which the amplifiers are costly. Examples proposed for electron storage rings are presented. 10 refs, 5 figs.

  18. Chemistry of atmospheric nucleation: on the recent advances on precursor characterization and atmospheric cluster composition in connection with atmospheric new particle formation.

    PubMed

    Kulmala, M; Petäjä, T; Ehn, M; Thornton, J; Sipilä, M; Worsnop, D R; Kerminen, V-M

    2014-01-01

    The recent development in measurement techniques and theoretical understanding has enabled us to study atmospheric vapor, cluster and nanoparticle concentrations, dynamics, and their connection to atmospheric nucleation. Here we present a summary of the chemistry of atmospheric clustering, growing nanoparticles, and their precursors. In this work, we focus particularly on atmospheric gas-to-particle conversion and recent progress in its understanding.

  19. The effect of asphaltene particle size and distribution on the temporal advancement of the asphaltene deposition profile in the well column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinali Hasanvand, Mahdi; Mosayebi Behbahani, Reza; Feyzi, Farzaneh; Ali Mousavi Dehghani, Seyed

    2016-05-01

    Asphaltene deposition in oil wells is an inconvenient production problem. Generating a precise deposition model for the well column is essential for optimal well design and prevention/reduction of deposition-associated difficulties. The goal of this study is to determine the effects of various parameters on the deposition process. These parameters include oil viscosity, temperature, flow velocity, well diameter and asphaltene particle size and particle size distribution. The first five parameters are analyzed using Escobedo and Mansoori (2010), Cleaver and Yates (1975) and Friedlander and Johnstone (1957) asphaltene deposition models. The last parameter (asphaltene particle size distribution) is not directly included in the asphaltene deposition models. Therefore, a dynamic well column model is generated by combining transport phenomena (mass, heat and momentum transfer) equations with thermodynamic models. The model is fine-tuned and verified based on field data from an Iranian producing oil well with frequent asphaltene deposition problem and subsequently used for predicting the time-dependent development of the asphaltene deposition profile in the well column for a series of asphaltene particle size distributions. The results show the effect of the said parameters depends on how the buffer layer and Brownian motion are defined. The Escobedo and Mansoori (2010) model is found to make better predictions of deposited asphaltene in the studied well.

  20. An experimental investigation of cathode erosion in high current magnetoplasmadynamic arc discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codron, Douglas A.

    Since the early to mid 1960's, laboratory studies have demonstrated the unique ability of magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters to deliver an exceptionally high level of specific impulse and thrust at large power processing densities. These intrinsic advantages are why MPD thrusters have been identified as a prime candidate for future long duration space missions, including piloted Mars, Mars cargo, lunar cargo, and other missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The large total impulse requirements inherent of the long duration space missions demand the thruster to operate for a significant fraction of the mission burn time while requiring the cathodes to operate at 50 to 10,000 kW for 2,000 to 10,000 hours. The high current levels lead to high operational temperatures and a corresponding steady depletion of the cathode material by evaporation. This mechanism has been identified as the life-limiting component of MPD thrusters. In this research, utilizing subscale geometries, time dependent cathode axial temperature profiles under varying current levels (20 to 60 A) and argon gas mass flow rates (450 to 640 sccm) for both pure and thoriated solid tungsten cathodes were measured by means of both optical pyrometry and charged-coupled (CCD) camera imaging. Thoriated tungsten cathode axial temperature profiles were compared against those of pure tungsten to demonstrate the large temperature reducing effect lowered work function imparts by encouraging increased thermionic electron emission from the cathode surface. Also, Langmuir probing was employed to measure the electron temperature, electron density, and plasma potential near the "active zone" (the surface area of the cathode responsible for approximately 70% of the emitted current) in order to characterize the plasma environment and verify future model predictions. The time changing surface microstructure and elemental composition of the thoriated tungsten cathodes were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope

  1. Progress in Nanoengineered Microstructures for Tunable High-Current, High-Temperature Superconducting Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T. G.; Civale, L.; Maiorov, B.; Feldmann, D. M.; Coulter, Yates; Miller, D. J.; Maroni, Victor A.; Chen, Zhijun; Larbalestier, D. C.; Feenstra, Roeland; Li, Xiaoping; Huang, Y.; Kodenkandath, Thomas; Zhang, W.; Rupich, Marty; Malozemoff, Alex

    2008-01-01

    High critical current densities (J{sub c}) in thick films of the Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO, {Tc}{approx}92 K) superconductor directly depend upon the types of nanoscale defects and their densities within the films. A major challenge for developing a viable wire technology is to introduce nanoscale defect structures into the YBCO grains of the thick film suitable for flux pinning and the tailoring of the superconducting properties to specific, application-dependent, temperature and magnetic field conditions. Concurrently, the YBCO film needs to be integrated into a macroscopically defect-free conductor in which the grain-to-grain connectivity maintains levels of inter-grain J{sub c} that are comparable to the intra-grain J{sub c}. That is, high critical current (I{sub c}) YBCO coated conductors must contain engineered in homogeneities on the nanoscale, while being homogeneous on the macroscale. An analysis is presented of the advances in high-performance YBCO coated-conductors using chemical solution deposition (CSD) based on metal trifluoroacetates and the subsequent processing to nano-engineer the microstructure for tunable superconducting wires. Multi-scale structural, chemical, and electrical investigations of the CSD film processes, thick film development, key microstructural features, and wire properties are presented. Prospects for further development of much higher I{sub c} wires for large-scale, commercial application are discussed within the context of these recent advances.

  2. Three-dimensional simulations of high-current beams in induction accelerators with WARP3d

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D.P.; Friedman, A.; Haber, I.

    1995-09-01

    For many issues relevant to acceleration and propagation of heavy-ion beams for inertial confinement fusion, understanding the behavior of the beam requires the self-consistent inclusion of the self-fields of the beams in multiple dimensions. For these reasons, the three-dimensional simulation code WARP3d A.Friedman was developed. The code combines the particle-in-cell plasma simulation technique with a realistic description of the elements which make up an accelerator. In this paper, the general structure of the code is reviewed and details of two ongoing applications are presented along with a discussion of simulation techniques used. The most important results of this work are presented.

  3. Simulating Electron Clouds in High-Current Ion Accelerators with Solenoid Focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W; Grote, D; Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Vay, J; Seidl, P; Roy, P; Coleman, J; Armijo, J; Haber, I

    2006-08-15

    Contamination from electrons is a concern for the solenoid-focused ion accelerators being developed for experiments in high-energy-density physics (HEDP). These electrons are produced directly by beam ions hitting lattice elements and intercepting diagnostics, or indirectly by ionization of desorbed neutral gas, and they are believed responsible for time dependence of the beam radius, emittance, and focal distance seen on the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The electrostatic particle-in-cell code WARP has been upgraded to included the physics needed to simulate electron-cloud phenomena. We present preliminary self-consistent simulations of STX experiments suggesting that the observed time dependence of the beam stems from a complicated interaction of beam ions, desorbed neutrals, and electrons.

  4. RESULTS OF BEAM TESTS ON A HIGH CURRENT EBIS TEST STAND.

    SciTech Connect

    BEEBE,E.; ALESSI,J.; BELLAVIA,S.; HERSHCOVITCH,A.; KPONOU,A.; LOCKEY,R.; PIKIN,A.; PRELEC,K.; KUZNETSOV,G.; TIUNOV,M.

    1999-03-29

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory there is an R&D program to design an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) for use in a compact ion injector to be developed for the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC). The BNL effort is directed at developing an EBIS with intensities of 3 x 10{sup 9} particles/pulse of ions such as Au{sup 35+} and U{sup 45+}, and requires an electron beam on the order of 10A. The construction of a test stand (EBTS) with the full electron beam power and 1/3 the length of the EBIS for RHIC is nearing completion. Initial commissioning of the EBTS was made with pulsed electron beams of duration < 1ms and current up to 13 A. Details of the EBTS construction, results of the pulse tests, and preparations for DC electron beam tests are presented.

  5. Robust, easily shaped, and epoxy-free carbon-fiber-aluminum cathodes for generating high-current electron beams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lie; Li, Limin; Wen, Jianchun; Wan, Hong

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the construction of carbon-fiber-aluminum (CFA) cathode by squeezing casting and its applications for generating high-current electron beams to drive high-power microwave sources. The fabrication process avoided using epoxy, a volatile deteriorating the vacuum system. These cathodes had a higher hardness than conventional aluminum, facilitating machining. After surface treatment, carbon fibers became the dominator determining emission property. A multineedle CFA cathode was utilized in a triode virtual cathode oscillator (vircator), powered by a approximately 450 kV, approximately 400 ns pulse. It was found that 300-400 MW, approximately 250 ns microwave was radiated at a dominant frequency of 2.6 GHz. Further, this cathode can endure high-current-density emission without detectable degradation in performance as the pulse shot proceeded, showing the robust nature of carbon fibers as explosive emitters. Overall, this new class of cold cathodes offers a potential prospect of developing high-current electron beam sources.

  6. Demonstration of high current carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors at industrially relevant voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Mitchell

    lifetime and the potential for an all transparent display. And because carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and organics are used, CN-VFET and CN-VOLET devices are compatible with flexible displays. This dissertation describes the first ever demonstration of CN-VFETs and CN-VOLETs and relates their performance to the specific properties of the CNTs and the new device architecture. In the work that followed, the CN-VFET was systematically optimized overcoming the problems revealed in the demonstration devices. The large undesired hysteresis was decreased by 96%, the on/off ratio was improved three orders of magnitude and the operating voltages were reduced to state of the art values. Additionally, the current output per device area of the CN-VFET was demonstrated to be greater than any other low resolution patterned organic transistor by a factor of 3.9. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the CNTs induce a reorientation of the high mobility plane in small molecule organics like pentacene to coincide with the vertical direction, giving additional explanation for the large currents observed in the CN-VFET. The ability to drive high currents and potentially inexpensive fabrication may provide the solution for the AMOLED backplane problem.

  7. Study of the possibility to control ion generation and transport in a high-current vacuum spark

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. N.; Zemchenkova, N. V.; Prokhorovich, D. E.

    2011-06-15

    The possibilities of optimizing a high-current vacuum spark as a source of metal ions are discussed. The influence of the shape and size of the electrodes on both the depth to which the hot plasma region is immersed in the surrounding cold matter and the plasma state in the hot spot, which is the source of multicharged ions, is demonstrated. Methods for optimization of the design of the discharge device for increasing the ion yield from a high-current vacuum spark are considered.

  8. Space-charge effects in ultra-high current electron bunches generated by laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Grinner, F. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Maier, A. R.; Becker, S.; Mikhailova, J. M.

    2009-02-11

    Recent advances in laser-plasma accelerators, including the generation of GeV-scale electron bunches, enable applications such as driving a compact free-electron-laser (FEL). Significant reduction in size of the FEL is facilitated by the expected ultra-high peak beam currents (10-100 kA) generated in laser-plasma accelerators. At low electron energies such peak currents are expected to cause space-charge effects such as bunch expansion and induced energy variations along the bunch, potentially hindering the FEL process. In this paper we discuss a self-consistent approach to modeling space-charge effects for the regime of laser-plasma-accelerated ultra-compact electron bunches at low or moderate energies. Analytical treatments are considered as well as point-to-point particle simulations, including the beam transport from the laser-plasma accelerator through focusing devices and the undulator. In contradiction to non-self-consistent analyses (i.e., neglecting bunch evolution), which predict a linearly growing energy chirp, we have found the energy chirp reaches a maximum and decreases thereafter. The impact of the space-charge induced chirp on FEL performance is discussed and possible solutions are presented.

  9. High brightness, high current injector design for the ATF upgrade at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-04-01

    Brookhaven National Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is in the process of moving to a new place and upgrading its major capabilities: The electron beam energy and CO2 laser power. Specifically, the maximum electron beam energy will be first projected to 100-150 MeV and then upgraded to 500 MeV while at the same time the laser power will increase 100 fold, thus making the new ATF a powerful tool in advanced accelerator concept research. The bright electron bunch produced by the new state-of-the-art photocathode rf gun will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. The injector is a key element of this accelerator upgrade. It must deliver a high average current beam with very small transverse and longitudinal emittances, at a sufficiently high energy that space charge effects are under control. We review here the detailed injector design and present first results from beam dynamics simulations. We give emphasis in the production of compressed flat beams which have important applications in novel light-source concepts and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. We present a theoretical model and with the aid of simulation examine the influence of space charge, bunch compression and suggest a operating regime with minimal phase space dilutions.

  10. Advanced biostack experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors; (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars; (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness); and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  11. Double disordered YBCO coated conductors of industrial scale: high currents in high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraimov, D.; Ballarino, A.; Barth, C.; Bottura, L.; Dietrich, R.; Francis, A.; Jaroszynski, J.; Majkic, G. S.; McCallister, J.; Polyanskii, A.; Rossi, L.; Rutt, A.; Santos, M.; Schlenga, K.; Selvamanickam, V.; Senatore, C.; Usoskin, A.; Viouchkov, Y. L.

    2015-11-01

    A significant increase of critical current in high magnetic field, up to 31 T, was recorded in long tapes manufactured by employing a double-disorder route. In a double-disordered high-temperature superconductor (HTS), a superimposing of intrinsic and extrinsic disorder takes place in a way that (i) the intrinsic disorder is caused by local stoichiometry deviations that lead to defects of crystallinity that serve as pining centers in the YBa2Cu3O x-δ matrix and (ii) the extrinsic disorder is introduced via embedded atoms or particles of foreign material (e.g. barium zirconate), which create a set of lattice defects. We analyzed possible technological reasons for this current gain. The properties of these tapes over a wider field-temperature range as well as field anisotropy were also studied. Record values of critical current as high as 309 A at 31 T, 500 A at 18 Tm and 1200 A at 5 T were found in 4 mm wide tape at 4.2 K and B perpendicular to tape surface. HTS layers were processed in medium-scale equipment that allows a maximum batch length of 250 m while 22 m long batches were provided for investigation. Abnormally high ratios (up to 10) of critical current density measured at 4.2 K, 19 T to critical current density measured at 77 K, self-field were observed in tapes with the highest in-field critical current. Anisotropy of the critical current as well as angular dependences of n and α values were investigated. The temperature dependence of critical current is presented for temperatures between 4.2 and 40 K. Prospects for the suppression of the dog-bone effect by Cu plating and upscale of processing chain to >500 m piece length are discussed.

  12. Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This section of the publication includes papers entitled: (1) Coupled growth in hypermonotectics; (2) Directional solidification of refined Al-4 wt.% Cu alloys; (3) Effects of convection on interface curvature during growth of concentrated ternary compounds; (4) Directional solidification of Al-1.5 wt.% Ni alloys; (5) Interactive response of advancing phase boundaries to particles; (6) INTeractive Response of Advancing Phase boundaries to Particles-INTRAPP; and (7) Particle engulfment and pushing by solidifying interfaces.

  13. A facile hydrothermal recovery of nano sealed MnO2 particle from waste batteries: An advanced material for electrochemical and environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylarappa, M.; Venkata Lakshmi, V.; Vishnu Mahesh, K. R.; Nagaswarupa, H. P.; Raghavendra, N.

    2016-09-01

    This work deliberates a method for manganese (Mn) recovery as manganese oxide obtained by leaching of waste batteries with 3M sulphuric acid. The Experimental test for the recovery of Mn present within the waste dry cell batteries were carried out by a reductive leachant. Elemental composition of leached sample was confirmed by Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and Surface morphology of the recovered MnO2 was examined by using Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM). Phase composition was confirmed from X-ray Diffractro meter (XRD). The obtained leached solution was treated with 4M NaOH, yielded to Manganese Dioxide with high extraction degree, while it do not touches the Zn content within the solutions. The recovered samples were characterized using XRD, EDAX, SEM and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The electrochemical properties of the as-recovered sample from leached solution was examined used cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Remarkably, the 80 wt.% MnO2 displays reversibility, diffusion constant, smaller equivalent series resistance and charge transfer resistance in 0.5M NaOH showed superior results as compared to alternative electrolytes. The ideal capacitive behaviour of MnO2 electrode and nano particle was applied to photocatalytic degradation of dyes.

  14. Three-dimensional hollow-structured binary oxide particles as an advanced anode material for high-rate and long cycle life lithium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Deli; Wang, Jie; He, Huan; ...

    2015-12-30

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising anode candidates for next-generation lithium-ion batteries for their high theoretical capacity. However, the large volume expansion and low lithium ion diffusivity leading to a poor charging/discharging performance. In this study, we developed a surfactant and template-free strategy for the synthesis of a composite of CoxFe3–xO4 hollow spheres supported by carbon nanotubes via an impregnation–reduction–oxidation process. The synergy of the composite, as well as the hollow structures in the electrode materials, not only facilitate Li ion and electron transport, but also accommodate large volume expansion. Using state-of-the-art electron tomography, we directly visualize themore » particles in 3-D, where the voids in the hollow structures serve to buffer the volume expansion of the material. These improvements result in a high reversible capacity as well as an outstanding rate performance for lithium-ion battery applications. As a result, this study sheds light on large-scale production of hollow structured metal oxides for commercial applications in energy storage and conversion.« less

  15. Three-dimensional hollow-structured binary oxide particles as an advanced anode material for high-rate and long cycle life lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deli; Wang, Jie; He, Huan; Han, Lili; Lin, Ruoqian; Xin, Huolin L.; Wu, Zexing; Liu, Hongfang

    2015-12-30

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising anode candidates for next-generation lithium-ion batteries for their high theoretical capacity. However, the large volume expansion and low lithium ion diffusivity leading to a poor charging/discharging performance. In this study, we developed a surfactant and template-free strategy for the synthesis of a composite of CoxFe3–xO4 hollow spheres supported by carbon nanotubes via an impregnation–reduction–oxidation process. The synergy of the composite, as well as the hollow structures in the electrode materials, not only facilitate Li ion and electron transport, but also accommodate large volume expansion. Using state-of-the-art electron tomography, we directly visualize the particles in 3-D, where the voids in the hollow structures serve to buffer the volume expansion of the material. These improvements result in a high reversible capacity as well as an outstanding rate performance for lithium-ion battery applications. As a result, this study sheds light on large-scale production of hollow structured metal oxides for commercial applications in energy storage and conversion.

  16. Advanced Penning-type ion source development and passive beam focusing techniques for an associated particle imaging neutron generator with enhanced spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sy, Amy Vong

    The use of accelerator-based neutron generators for non-destructive imaging and analysis in commercial and security applications is continuously under development, with improvements to available systems and combinations of available techniques revealing new capabilities for real-time elemental and isotopic analysis. The recent application of associated particle imaging (API) techniques for time- and directionally-tagged neutrons to induced fission and transmission imaging methods demonstrates such capabilities in the characterization of fissile material configurations and greatly benefits from improvements to existing neutron generator systems. Increased neutron yields and improved spatial resolution can enhance the capabilities of imaging methods utilizing the API technique. The work presented in this dissertation focused on the development of components for use within an API neutron generator with enhanced system spatial resolution. The major focus areas were the ion source development for plasma generation, and passive ion beam focusing techniques for the small ion beam widths necessary for the enhanced spatial resolution. The ion source development focused on exploring methods for improvement of Penning-type ion sources that are used in conventional API neutron generator systems, while the passive beam focusing techniques explored both ion beam collimation and ion guiding with tapered dielectric capillaries for reduced beam widths at the neutron production target.

  17. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a high-current electric discharge in a closed volume

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Gritsinin, S. I.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kuleshov, P. S.; Popov, N. A.; Starik, A. M.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2009-06-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies and numerical calculations of the ignition of a stoichiometric CH{sub 4}: O{sub 2} gas mixture by a high-current gliding discharge. It is shown that this type of discharge generates an axially propagating thermal wave (precursor) that penetrates into the gas medium and leads to fast gas heating. This process is followed by an almost simultaneous ignition of the gas mixture over the entire reactor volume.

  18. Issues concerning high current lower energy electron beams required for ion cooling between EBIS LINAC and booster

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2009-03-01

    Some issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that will be needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, are examined. Options for propagating such an electron beam, as well as the effect of neutralizing background plasma on electron and ion beam parameters are calculated. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper.

  19. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a high-current electric discharge in a closed volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Gritsinin, S. I.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kuleshov, P. S.; Popov, N. A.; Starik, A. M.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2009-06-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies and numerical calculations of the ignition of a stoichiometric CH4: O2 gas mixture by a high-current gliding discharge. It is shown that this type of discharge generates an axially propagating thermal wave (precursor) that penetrates into the gas medium and leads to fast gas heating. This process is followed by an almost simultaneous ignition of the gas mixture over the entire reactor volume.

  20. High gain GaAs Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches (PCSS): Device lifetime, high current testing, optical pulse generators

    SciTech Connect

    Zutavern, F.J.; Loubriel, G.M.; Helgeson, W.D.; O`Malley, M.W.; Gallegos, R.R.; Hjalmarson, H.P.; Baca, A.G.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents results from three areas of GaAs PCSS research and development: device lifetime, high current switching, and PCSS-driven laser diode arrays (LDA). The authors have performed device lifetime tests on both lateral and vertical switches as a function of current amplitude, pulse width, and charging time. At present, their longest-lived switch reached 4 {times} 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show damage near the contacts even after only 5 pulses. They are presently searching for the threshold at which no damage is evident after a single shot. In high current tests, they have reached 5.2 kA at 4.2 kV. This was achieved using twenty fiber-optic coupled lasers to distribute current filaments over a 5 mm wide PCSS. Current waveforms and images of the current filaments as a function of current amplitude will be presented. The lasers used to trigger the high current PCSS were driven with a miniature PCSS. Low inductance, high speed GaAs PCSS are very effective as short pulse laser diode array drivers. Some types of arrays gain switch, producing a compressed optical pulse which is only 75 ps wide. Results from tests with a variety of laser diode arrays will be presented.

  1. High Current Responsivity and Wide Modulation Bandwidth Terahertz Detector Using High-Electron-Mobility Transistor for Wireless Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Nukariya, T.; Ueda, Y.; Otsuka, T.; Asada, M.

    2016-07-01

    A high-current-responsivity terahertz (THz) detector was fabricated using a broadband bow-tie antenna and an InAlAs/InGaAs high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) with a short gate length. High-current responsivity can be achieved by using a short gate length; the resulting high transconductance exhibited ballistic transport in the channel. We fabricated the HEMT detector with a 50-nm-long channel; the transconductance was 1.2 S/mm and the subthreshold slope was 120 mV/dec, yielding a high-current responsivity (˜5 A/W) and a cutoff frequency of 460 GHz. We also measured the modulation bandwidth of the THz detector using a heterodyne mixing technique with a uni-traveling carrier photodiode (UTC-PD) for providing the radio frequency (RF) and a frequency multiplier as a local oscillator. The intensity of the intermediate signal (IF) was measured by changing the frequency of the UTC-PD; very high bandwidths of up to 26 GHz were obtained. The experimental results agree well with electromagnetic simulations, which indicate that the bandwidth is determined by the external circuit. The conversion gain from RF to IF was -2 dB in the heterodyne mixing by using the HEMT detector.

  2. Development of advanced model catalysts: A study of catalysis over epitaxially grown titanium oxide films, palladium foils and platinum nano-particle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Peter W.

    1997-11-01

    Titania overlayers were grown in two different ordered structures on Pt(111) as seen by Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED). Fully oxidized, films maintain the symmetry of top layer of the substrate and form a coincident 18.2 A unit cell. These overlayers could be grown in monolayer and multi-layer coverages. They are seen by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to have TiOsb2 stoichiometry. Above 400sp°C the oxide disproportionates and titanium migrates into the bulk to form an alloy. The LEED and XPS data are consistent with the model of a close-packed lattice of oxygen anions with titanium cations in the octahedral sites. Vacuum annealing above 600sp°C forms a partially reduced monolayer with the stoichiometry Tisb4Osb7. This overlayer does not have the symmetry of the substrate. The unit cell is given by the coincidence of the substrate lattice with a rectangular cell of 3.5 A x 4.2 A. Ion Scattering Spectroscopy data suggests the structure is formed upon creating oxygen vacancies. Ethane oxidation was performed over palladium foils under a wide range of reactant concentrations to produce COsb2, Hsb2O, CHsb4 and Csb2Hsb4. The foils required an initial activation period at high temperature (>400sp°C) under fuel rich reaction conditions. Methane and COsb2 displayed similar kinetics although methane was produced with ˜1/85spth the rate. Ethylene was a reaction intermediate and eventually converted to COsb2. Depending on their concentration, water and oxygen inhibited combustion. A mechanism consistent with the observed kinetics is proposed in which the rate determining step is ethyl formation on a Pd-PdO or PdO-PdO two-atom site. Electron Beam Lithography was used to fabricate nanometer-scale arrays of platinum particles on an oxidized silicon wafer. Low energy ion bombardment was used to clean the array, which was then active for ethylene hydrogenation with rates comparable to the literature. Thermal desorption experiments demonstrated the possibility of

  3. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans [Reno, NV; Chakrabarty, Rajan K [Reno, NV; Arnott, W Patrick [Reno, NV

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  4. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  5. A new range of high-current Tandetron TM accelerator systems with terminal voltages of 1-6 MV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mous, D. J. W.; Visser, J.; Gottdang, A.; Haitsma, R. G.

    2004-06-01

    HVE has designed a range of high-current Tandetrons TM with terminal voltages of 1 MV up to 6 MV. Characteristic for the accelerator design is the coaxial construction of the all-solid-state power supply that is wrapped around the high-energy acceleration tube. Equipped with a new all-solid-state RF driver, the Tandetrons TM are able to provide ion beams with output powers in excess of 10 kW and are as such suitable for applications like neutron production in biomedical research, boron neutron capture therapy, isotope production for positron emission tomography, as well as explosives detection using pulsed fast neutron analysis. Recently, a 1.25 MV version has passed the pre-delivery factory tests during which it was conditioned up to 1.5 MV and has delivered more than 1 mA target current. It will be used as a source of intermediate energy neutrons for the quantification of Al in human tissues. This specific application draws on the high-current capability of the Tandetron TM. The injector is equipped with one multi-cusp ion source, but injectors can comprise two multi-cusp ion sources with output currents of up to several mA's for H/D and more than 100 μA for He. A 2 MV/1 mA version of the high-current range is currently under construction for the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A recently installed 5 MV version of this range of Tandetrons TM dedicated to scientific research has demonstrated terminal voltage ripple below 10 -5 as well as an extremely fast transient response.

  6. The structure and properties of boron carbide ceramics modified by high-current pulsed electron-beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Yuri; Tolkachev, Oleg Petyukevich, Maria Polisadova, Valentina; Teresov, Anton; Ivanova, Olga Ikonnikova, Irina

    2016-01-15

    The present work is devoted to numerical simulation of temperature fields and the analysis of structural and strength properties of the samples surface layer of boron carbide ceramics treated by the high-current pulsed electron-beam of the submillisecond duration. The samples made of sintered boron carbide ceramics are used in these investigations. The problem of calculating the temperature field is reduced to solving the thermal conductivity equation. The electron beam density ranges between 8…30 J/cm{sup 2}, while the pulse durations are 100…200 μs in numerical modelling. The results of modelling the temperature field allowed ascertaining the threshold parameters of the electron beam, such as energy density and pulse duration. The electron beam irradiation is accompanied by the structural modification of the surface layer of boron carbide ceramics either in the single-phase (liquid or solid) or two-phase (solid-liquid) states. The sample surface of boron carbide ceramics is treated under the two-phase state (solid-liquid) conditions of the structural modification. The surface layer is modified by the high-current pulsed electron-beam produced by SOLO installation at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia. The elemental composition and the defect structure of the modified surface layer are analyzed by the optical instrument, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties of the modified layer are determined measuring its hardness and crack resistance. Research results show that the melting and subsequent rapid solidification of the surface layer lead to such phenomena as fragmentation due to a crack network, grain size reduction, formation of the sub-grained structure due to mechanical twinning, and increase of hardness and crack resistance.

  7. The structure and properties of boron carbide ceramics modified by high-current pulsed electron-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yuri; Tolkachev, Oleg; Petyukevich, Maria; Teresov, Anton; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Polisadova, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    The present work is devoted to numerical simulation of temperature fields and the analysis of structural and strength properties of the samples surface layer of boron carbide ceramics treated by the high-current pulsed electron-beam of the submillisecond duration. The samples made of sintered boron carbide ceramics are used in these investigations. The problem of calculating the temperature field is reduced to solving the thermal conductivity equation. The electron beam density ranges between 8…30 J/cm2, while the pulse durations are 100…200 μs in numerical modelling. The results of modelling the temperature field allowed ascertaining the threshold parameters of the electron beam, such as energy density and pulse duration. The electron beam irradiation is accompanied by the structural modification of the surface layer of boron carbide ceramics either in the single-phase (liquid or solid) or two-phase (solid-liquid) states. The sample surface of boron carbide ceramics is treated under the two-phase state (solid-liquid) conditions of the structural modification. The surface layer is modified by the high-current pulsed electron-beam produced by SOLO installation at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia. The elemental composition and the defect structure of the modified surface layer are analyzed by the optical instrument, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties of the modified layer are determined measuring its hardness and crack resistance. Research results show that the melting and subsequent rapid solidification of the surface layer lead to such phenomena as fragmentation due to a crack network, grain size reduction, formation of the sub-grained structure due to mechanical twinning, and increase of hardness and crack resistance.

  8. Study of the contributions of the electrode materials to the plasma of a high-current vacuum spark

    SciTech Connect

    Bashutin, O. A.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Dodulad, E. I.; Savjolov, A. S.; Sarantsev, S. A.

    2012-03-15

    The contribution of the electrode material to the formation of the plasma of a low-inductive high-current vacuum spark and its influence on the process of discharge micropinching were studied using X-ray spectroscopy and laser diagnostics. Electrode system configurations are determined in which the contributions of the materials of both electrodes to the plasma emitting X-rays are comparable and in which the contribution of one electrode is dominating. It is found that discharge pinching occurs primarily in the vapor of the pointed electrode independently of its polarity. The experimental results indicate the formation of a suprathermal electron beam in the micropinch region.

  9. Radiation damage in single crystal CVD diamond material investigated with a high current relativistic 197Au beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietraszko, J.; Galatyuk, T.; Grilj, V.; Koenig, W.; Spataro, S.; Träger, M.

    2014-11-01

    Single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition (ScCVD) diamond based prototype detectors have been constructed for the high intensity heavy ion experiments HADES and CBM at the future FAIR facility at GSI Darmstadt. Their properties have been studied with a high current density beam (about 2-3×106/s/mm2) of 1.25A GeV Au69+197 ions. Details of the design, the intrinsic properties of the detectors and their performance after irradiation with such a beam are reported.

  10. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of the high- current emission lanthanum and niobium contained ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolmatov, O. Yu; Shamanin, I. V.; Chursin, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the production of metal-ceramic high-current emitters containing lanthanum hexaboride LaB6 by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis. Tests of emitters as explosive-emission cathodes in an OMEGA-350 microsecond accelerator are presented. Experiments show that when a metal-ceramic cathode is used, the emitted energy was 12-17% higher than that produced by tungsten and graphite cathodes and the beam “signature” is a circle with a small (∼ 15%) variation in radius.

  11. Deep-blue efficient OLED based on NPB with little efficiency roll-off under high current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian

    2017-03-01

    NPB usually is used as a hole-transport layer in OLED. In fact, it is a standard pure blue-emission material. However, its light-emitting efficiency in OLED is low due to emissive nature of organic material. Herein, a deep-blue OLDE based on NPB was fabricated. The light-emitting efficiency of the device demonstrates a moderate value, and efficiency roll-off is little under high current density. The device demonstrates that the electroplex's emission decreases with increasing electric field intensity.

  12. Microstructural, textural and hardness evolution of commercially pure Zr surface-treated by high current pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Linjiang; Chen, Baofeng; Wang, Shuyan; Zhang, Zhuo; Murty, Korukonda L.

    2016-12-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatments were performed for a commercially pure Zr sheet, with remarkable surface modifications demonstrated. After the HCPEB treatments, the prior equiaxed grains with a bimodal basal texture are replaced by ultra fine plates with dense nanotwins and an unusual fiber texture of < 11 2 bar 0 > normal to the sheet surface. Increased number of pulses leads to further refined microstructures and intensified textures, jointly resulting in continuous increase of hardness. Reasons for such modifications could mainly be attributed to ultra fast heating/cooling and strong variant selection due to presence of complex thermal and stress fields.

  13. Magnetic Particle Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.

    2010-02-01

    Rapid advances in the synthesis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles has stimulated widespread interest in their use as contrast agents for visualizing biological processes with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). With this approach, strong particle magnetism alters the MRI signal from nearby water protons and this, in turn, affects observed image contrast. Magnetic particle detection with MRI is therefore indirect and suffers from several associated problems, including poor quantification and tissuedependent performance. Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) overcomes these by directly measuring the amount of superparamagnetic material at each location. Mass sensitivity, spatial resolution, and imaging time is also comparable to or better than that achieved with MRI. Moreover, MPI is relatively inexpensive, meets all current safety guidelines, is quantitative, provides unambiguous contrast with tissue-independent performance, and can detect lower particle concentrations. Here, the basic principles behind MPI are described, factors affecting sensitivity and resolution are discussed, and potential utility for biomedical use is examined.

  14. A high-current electron gun for the electron beam ion trap at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, S. Baumann, T. M.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Snyder, A.

    2014-02-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) in NSCL’s reaccelerator ReA uses continuous ion injection and accumulation. In order to maximize capture efficiency and minimize breeding time into high charge states, the EBIT requires a high-current/high current-density electron beam. A new electron gun insert based on a concave Ba-dispenser cathode has been designed and built to increase the current transmitted through the EBIT’s superconducting magnet. With the new insert, stable EBIT operating conditions with 0.8 A of electron beam have been established. The design of the electron gun is presented together with calculated and measured perveance data. In order to assess the experimental compression of the electron beam, a pinhole CCD camera has been set up to measure the electron beam radius. The camera observes X-rays emitted from highly charged ions, excited by the electron beam. Initial tests with this camera setup will be presented. They indicate that a current density of 640 A/cm{sup 2} has been reached when the EBIT magnet was operated at 4 T.

  15. Does lightning destroy rocks?: Results from a laboratory lightning experiment using an impulse high-current generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakasa, Sachi A.; Nishimura, Seisuke; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Matsukura, Yukinori

    2012-08-01

    To understand the destruction of rocks and changes to landforms by lightning strikes, laboratory experiments of lightning strikes were performed using three kinds of rock samples as targets. Artificial lightning with known electric current was simulated by an impulse high-current generator in the laboratory. The artificial lightning is different to natural lightning. The high-current generator can generate up to 20 kA of electric current equal to 50% of the value of natural lightning, but up to 50 kV of electric voltage which is a tenth to hundredth that of natural lightning. Experimental results showed that the rock samples with low mechanical resistance, tuff and rhyolite, were destroyed, while the rock sample with high mechanical resistance, i.e., granite, was not broken by lightning strikes. These results indicate that natural lightning causes rocks and bedrock to break. These imply that lightning might change landforms, for example gnammas and fractures on tors and mountain peaks where lightning tends to strike.

  16. Specific and efficient electrochemical selection of Geoalkalibacter subterraneus and Desulfuromonas acetoxidans in high current-producing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pierra, Mélanie; Carmona-Martínez, Alessandro A; Trably, Eric; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Bernet, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Two different saline sediments were used to inoculate potentiostatically controlled reactors (a type of microbial bioelectrochemical system, BES) operated in saline conditions (35 gNaCl l(-1)). Reactors were fed with acetate or a mixture of acetate and butyrate at two pH values: 7.0 or 5.5. Electroactive biofilm formation lag-phase, maximum current density production and coulombic efficiency were used to evaluate the overall performance of reactors. High current densities up to 8.5 A m(-2) were obtained using well-defined planar graphite electrodes. Additionally, biofilm microbial communities were characterized by CE-SSCP and 454 pyrosequencing. As a result of this procedure, two anode-respiring bacteria (ARB) always dominated the anodic biofilms: Geoalkalibacter subterraneus and/or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans. This suggests that a strong electrochemically driven selection process imposed by the applied potential occurs in the BES system. Moreover, the emergence of Glk. subterraneus in anodic biofilms significantly contributes to broaden the spectrum of high current producing microorganisms electrochemically isolated from environmental samples.

  17. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  18. The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP) commercial payload is making use of major advances in separation technology: The Phase Partitioning Experiment (PPE); the Micorencapsulation experiment; and the Hemoglobin Separation Experiment (HSE). Using ADSEP, commercial researchers will attempt to determine the partition coefficients for model particles in a two-phase system. With this information, researchers can develop a higher resolution, more effective cell isolation procedure that can be used for many different types of research and for improved health care. The advanced separation technology is already being made available for use in ground-based laboratories.

  19. Recent trends in particle size analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    Recent advances and developments in the particle-sizing technologies are briefly reviewed in accordance with three operating principles including particle size and shape descriptions. Significant trends of the particle size analysing equipment recently developed show that compact electronic circuitry and rapid data processing systems were mainly adopted in the instrument design. Some newly developed techniques characterizing the particulate system were also introduced.

  20. Cathode performance during two beam operation of the high current high polarization electron gun for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, O.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Degen, C.; Gassner, D. M.; Lambiase, R.; Meng, W.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, E.; Pietz, J.; Ackeret, M.; Yeckel, C.; Miller, R.; Dobrin, E.; Thompson, K.

    2015-05-03

    Two electron beams from two activated bulk GaAs photocathodes were successfully combined during the recent beam test of the High Current High Polarization Electron gun for eRHIC. The beam test took place in Stangenes Industries in Palo Alto, CA, where the cathodes were placed in diagonally opposite locations inside the high voltage shroud. No significant cross talking between the cathodes was found for the pertinent vacuum and low average current operation, which is very promising towards combining multiple beams for higher average current. This paper describes the cathode preparation, transport and cathode performance in the gun for the combining test, including the QE and lifetimes of the photocathodes at various steps of the experiment.

  1. A HIGH CURRENT, HIGH VOLTAGE SOLID-STATE PULSE GENERATOR FOR THE NIF PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; Barbosa, F; Cook, E G; Hickman, B C; Akana, G L; Brooksby, C A

    2007-07-27

    A high current, high voltage, all solid-state pulse modulator has been developed for use in the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) subsystem in the National Ignition Facility. The MOSFET-switched pulse generator, designed to be a more capable plug-in replacement for the thyratron-switched units currently deployed in NIF, offers unprecedented capabilities including burst-mode operation, pulse width agility and a steady-state pulse repetition frequency exceeding 1 Hz. Capable of delivering requisite fast risetime, 17 kV flattop pulses into a 6 {Omega} load, the pulser employs a modular architecture characteristic of the inductive adder technology, pioneered at LLNL for use in acceleration applications, which keeps primary voltages low (and well within the capabilities of existing FET technology), reduces fabrication costs and is amenable to rapid assembly and quick field repairs.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of high current-density, submicron, NbN/MgO/NbN tunnel junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. A.; Leduc, Henry G.; Judas, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    At near-millimeter wavelengths, heterodyne receivers based on SIS tunnel junctions are the most sensitive available. However, in order to scale these results to submillimeter wavelengths, certain device properties should be scaled. The tunnel-junction's current density should be increased to reduce the RC product. The device's area should be reduced to efficiently couple power from the antenna to the mixer. Finally, the superconductor used should have a large energy gap to minimize RF losses. Most SIS mixers use Nb or Pb-alloy tunnel junctions; the gap frequency for these materials is approximately 725 GHz. Above the gap frequency, these materials exhibit losses similar to those in a normal metal. The gap frequency in NbN films is as-large-as 1440 GHz. Therefore, we have developed a process to fabricate small area (down to 0.13 sq microns), high current density, NbN/MgO/NbN tunnel junctions.

  3. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  4. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  5. Particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10) are provided for separating and classifying particles (48,50,56) by dispersing the particles within a fluid (52) that is upwardly flowing within a cone-shaped pipe (12) that has its large end (20) above its small end (18). Particles of similar size and shape (48,50) migrate to individual levels (A,B) within the flowing fluid. As the fluid is deflected by a plate (42) at the top end of the pipe (12), the smallest particles are collected on a shelf-like flange (40). Ever larger particles are collected as the flow rate of the fluid is increased. To prevent particle sticking on the walls (14) of the pipe (12), additional fluid is caused to flow into the pipe (12) through holes (68) that are specifically provided for that purpose. Sticking is further prevented by high frequency vibrators (70) that are positioned on the apparatus (10).

  6. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  7. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  8. Advanced stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Arnulf

    1983-03-01

    Toroidal confinement of a plasma by an external magnetic field is not compatible with axisymmetry, in contrast to confinement by the pinch effect of induced electric currents as in a tokomak or by the reversed field pinch configuration. The existence of magnetic surfaces throughout the region in which grad p ≠ 0 is therefore not guaranteed in such configurations, though it is necessary for MHD-equilibrium when the lines of force possess a finite twist (or "rotational transform"). These twisted equilibria are called stellarators. The other type of external confinement requires all lines of force to be closed upon themselves and p to be function of the well defined quantity Q = φ d l/ B only. The resulting "bumpy" tori are sometimes also referred to as being M + S like. By discussing specific examples it is shown that stellarator configurations exist which retain as much as possible the properties of M + S like configurations, combine these with the magnetic well, and with an approximation to the isodynamic requirement of D. Palumbo. These so-called Advanced Stellarators shown an improvement in predicted particle confinement and beta-limit compared to the classical stellarators. They can also be viewed as forming a system of linked stabilized mirrors of small mirror ratio. These fields can be produced by modular coils. A prototype of such a configuration is being designed by the stellarator division of IPP under the name of Wendelstein VII-AS. Expected physical data and technical details of W VII-AS are given.

  9. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  10. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1998-12-29

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents. 3 figs.

  11. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  12. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2005-09-20

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  13. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr

    2000-07-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a previous screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  14. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  15. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  16. Very High Current Density Nb/AlN/Nb Tunnel Junctions for Low-Noise Submillimeter Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, Jonathan; Miller, David; Chen, Jian; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.; Stern, Jeff A.

    2000-01-01

    We have fabricated and tested submillimeter-wave superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers using very high current density Nb/AlN/Nb tunnel junctions (J(sub c) approximately equal 30 kA/sq cm) . The junctions have low resistance-area products (R(sub N)A approximately 5.6 Omega.sq micron), good subgap to normal resistance ratios R(sub sg)/R(sub N) approximately equal 10, and good run-to-run reproducibility. From Fourier transform spectrometer measurements, we infer that omega.R(sub N)C = 1 at 270 GHz. This is a factor of 2.5 improvement over what is generally available with Nb/AlO(x)/Nb junctions suitable for low-noise mixers. The AlN-barrier junctions are indeed capable of low-noise operation: we measure an uncorrected receiver noise temperature of T(sub RX) = 110 K (DSB) at 533 GHz for an unoptimized device. In addition to providing wider bandwidth operation at lower frequencies, the AlN-barrier junctions will considerably improve the performance of THz SIS mixers by reducing RF loss in the tuning circuits.

  17. A cookbook for building a high-current dimpled H magnetron source for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, Daniel S.; Karns, Patrick R.; Tan, Cheng -Yang

    2015-10-30

    A high-current (>50 mA) dimpled H magnetron source has been built at Fermilab for supplying H beam to the entire accelerator complex. Despite many decades of expertise with slit H magnetron sources at Fermilab, we were faced with many challenges from the dimpled H magnetron source, which needed to be overcome in order to make it operational. Dimpled H sources for high-energy physics are not new: Brookhaven National Laboratory has operated a dimpled H- source for more than two decades. However, the transference of that experience to Fermilab took about two years because a cookbook for building this type of source did not exist and seemingly innocuous or undocumented choices had a huge impact on the success or failure for this type of source. Moreover, it is the goal of this paper to document the reasons for these choices and to present a cookbook for building and operating dimpled H magnetron sources.

  18. Research on soft x-rays in high-current plasma-focus discharges and estimation of plasma electron temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Zaloga, D.; Sadowski, M. J.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Malinowski, K.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Surala, W.; Zielinska, E.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents results of experimental studies of dense and high-temperature plasmas, which were produced by pulsed high-current discharges within a modernised PF-1000U facility operated at different initial gas conditions, and supplied from a condenser bank which delivered energy of about 350 kJ. The investigated discharges were performed at the initial deuterium filling under pressure of 1.6-2.0 hPa, with or without an additional puffing of pure deuterium (1 cm3, under pressure 0.15 MPa, at instants 1.5-2 ms before the main discharge initiation). For a comparison discharges were also performed at the initial neon filling under pressure of 1.1-1.3 hPa, with or without the addition of deuterium puffing. The recorded discharge current waveforms, laser interferometric images, signals of hard x-rays and fusion neutrons, as well as time-integrated x-ray pinhole images and time-resolved x-ray signals were compared. From a ratio of the x-ray signals recorded behind beryllium filters of different thickness there were estimated values of a plasma electron temperature (T e) in a region at the electrode outlets. For pure deuterium discharges an averaged T e value amounted to 150-170 eV, while for neon discharges with the deuterium puffing it reached 330-880 eV (with accuracy of  ±20%).

  19. Modification of polymer velvet cathode via metallic Mo coating for enhancement of high-current electron emission performances

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Ying; Wang, Bing; Yi, Yong; Xia, Liansheng; Zhang, Huang

    2013-09-15

    The effect of surface Mo coating on the high-current electron emission performances for polymer velvet cathode has been investigated in a diode with A-K gap of 11.5 cm by the combination of time-resolved electrical diagnostic and temporal pressure variation. Compared with uncoated polymer velvet cathode under the single-pulsed emission mode, the Mo-coated one shows lower outgassing levels (∼0.40 Pa L), slower cathode plasma expansion velocity (∼2.30 cm/μs), and higher emission stability as evidences by the change in cathode current, temporal pressure variation, and diode perveance. Moreover, after Mo coating, the emission consistency of the polymer velvet cathode between two adjacent pulses is significantly improved in double-pulsed emission mode with ∼500 ns interval between two pulses, which further confirms the effectiveness of Mo coating for enhancement of electron emission performance of polymer velvet cathodes. These results should be of interest to the high-repetitive high-power microwave systems with cold cathodes.

  20. Streak-Camera Measurements with High Currents in PEP-II and Variable Optics in SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Weixeng; Fisher, Alan, a Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2008-06-05

    A dual-axis, synchroscan streak camera was used to measure longitudinal bunch profiles in three storage rings at SLAC: the PEP-II low- and high-energy rings, and SPEAR3. At high currents, both PEP rings exhibit a transient synchronous-phase shift along the bunch train due to RF-cavity beam loading. Bunch length and profile asymmetry were measured along the train for a range of beam currents. To avoid the noise inherent in a dual-axis sweep, we accumulated single-axis synchroscan images while applying a 50-ns gate to the microchannel plate. To improve the extinction ratio, an upstream mirror pivoting at 1 kHz was synchronized with the 2kHz MCP gate to deflect light from other bunches off the photocathode. Bunch length was also measured on the HER as a function of beam energy. For SPEAR3 we measured bunch length as a function of single-bunch current for several lattices: achromatic, low-emittance and low momentum compaction. In the first two cases, resistive and reactive impedance components can be extracted from the longitudinal bunch profiles. In the low-alpha configurations, we observed natural bunch lengths approaching the camera resolution, requiring special care to remove instrumental effects, and saw evidence of periodic bursting.

  1. A HIgh Current Density Low Cost Niobium 3 Tin Titanium Doped Conductor Utilizing A Novel Internal Tin Process

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce A Zeitlin

    2005-02-23

    An internal tin conductor has been developed using a Mono Element Internal Tin (MEIT) with an integral Nb barrier surrounding the Nb filaments. High current densities of 3000 A/mm2+ at 12 T and 1800 A/mm2 at 15 T have been achieved in conductors as small as 0.152 mm with the use of Nb7.5Ta filaments and Ti in the Sn core. In contrast, conductors with pure Nb and Ti in the Sn achieved 2700 A/mm2 at 12 T. Two internal fins, developed and patented on the project, were introduced into the filament array and reduced the effective filament diameter (Deff) by 38%. Additional fins will further reduce Deff The conductor was produced from 152.4 mm diameter billets to produce wire as small as 0.152 mm. The process promises be scaleable to 304 mm diameter billets yielding wire of 0.304 mm diameter. The MEIT process wire was easy to draw with relatively few breaks. The cost of this conductor in large production quantities based on the cost model presented could meet the 1.5 $/kilo amp meter(KAM) target of the HEP community

  2. Characterization of Downstream Ion Energy Distributions From a High Current Hollow Cathode in a Ring Cusp Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 10 Angstroms) has been documented in the literature. As part of an ongoing effort to uncover the underlying physics of the formation of these ions, ion efflux from a high current hollow cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber was investigated. Using a spherical sector electrostatic energy analyzer located downstream of the discharge cathode, the ion energy distribution over a 0 to 60 eV energy range was measured. The sensitivity of the ion energy distribution function to zenith angle was also assessed at 3 different positions: 0, 15, and 25 degrees. The measurements suggest that the majority of the ion current at the measuring point falls into the analyzer with an energy approximately equal to the discharge voltage. The ion distribution, however, was found to be quite broad. The high energy tail of the distribution function tended to grow with increasing discharge current. Sensitivity of the profiles to flow rate at fixed discharge current was also investigated. A simple model is presented that provides a potential mechanism for the production of ions with energies above the discharge voltage.

  3. WC/Co composite surface structure and nano graphite precipitate induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, S. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, Y.; Gey, N.; Grosdidier, T.; Dong, C.

    2013-11-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation was conducted on a WC-6% Co hard alloy with accelerating voltage of 27 kV and pulse duration of 2.5 μs. The surface phase structure was examined by using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) methods. The surface tribological properties were measured. It was found that after 20 pulses of HCPEB irradiation, the surface structure of WC/Co hard alloy was modified dramatically and composed of a mixture of nano-grained WC1-x, Co3W9C4, Co3W3C phases and graphite precipitate domains ˜50 nm. The friction coefficient of modified surface decreased to ˜0.38 from 0.6 of the initial state, and the wear rate reduced from 8.4 × 10-5 mm3/min to 6.3 × 10-6 mm3/min, showing a significant self-lubricating effect.

  4. Proceedings of the DOE workshop on the role of a high-current accelerator in the future of nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, D.C.; Peterson, E.J.

    1989-05-01

    The meeting was prompted by recent problems with isotope availability from DOE accelerator facilities; these difficulties have resulted from conflicting priorities between physics experiments and isotope production activities. The workshop was a forum in which the nuclear medicine community, isotope producers, industry, and other interested groups could discuss issues associated with isotope availability (including continuous supply options), the role of DOE and industry in isotope production, and the importance of research isotopes to the future of nuclear medicine. The workshop participants endorsed DOE's presence in supplying radioisotopes for research purposes and recommended that DOE should immediately provide additional support for radionuclide production in the form of personnel and supplies, DOE should establish a policy that would allow income from sales of future ''routine'' radionuclide production to be used to support technicians, DOE should obtain a 70-MeV, 500-/mu/A variable-energy proton accelerator as soon as possible, and DOE should also immediately solicit proposals to evaluate the usefulness of a new or upgraded high-energy, high-current machine for production of research radionuclides. This proceedings volume is a summary of workshop sessions that explored the future radionuclide needs of the nuclear medicine community and discussed the DOE production capabilities that would be required to meet these needs.

  5. Methods of optical diagnostics of electron-positron beams and interaction between plasma and high-current electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyacheslavov, L. N.; Ivantsivskii, M. V.; Meshkov, O. I.; Popov, S. S.; Smaluk, V. V.

    2012-03-01

    Optical diagnostics is widely used, both in plasma-physics experiments and in measuring parameters of electron and positron beams in accelerators. In doing so, the approaches with the same methodological base are often applied, which is explained by similarity of certain properties of objects under study despite the fact that these fields of physics are absolutely specific and require using the specialized techniques. The possibility of close contacts and cooperation among scientists concerned with similar problems in different fields of physics contributes to the fruitful exchange of ideas and helps to overcome these problems. It is especially characteristic of the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, which is famous for pioneering works in the field of electron-positron colliders and controlled thermonuclear fusion. The first part of this paper presents a review of optical diagnostics of the stationary beam parameters in cyclic accelerators of electrons and positrons. The only techniques considered are those that became the recognized tools at colliders and storage rings of the latest generation, without which the routine operation of the facility is difficult to imagine. The second part of the paper describes optical diagnostics used in experiments of heating the plasma by a high-current electron beam.

  6. Fabrication of single cylindrical Au-coated nanopores with non-homogeneous fixed charge distribution exhibiting high current rectifications.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Saima; Ali, Mubarak; Ramirez, Patricio; Gómez, Vicente; Oschmann, Bernd; Muench, Falk; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Zentel, Rudolf; Mafe, Salvador; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2014-08-13

    We designed and characterized a cylindrical nanopore that exhibits high electrochemical current rectification ratios at low and intermediate electrolyte concentrations. For this purpose, the track-etched single cylindrical nanopore in polymer membrane was coated with a gold (Au) layer via electroless plating technique. Then, a non-homogeneous fixed charge distribution inside the Au-coated nanopore was obtained by incorporating thiol-terminated uncharged poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) chains in series to poly(4-vinylpyridine) chains, which were positively charged at acidic pH values. The functionalization reaction was checked by measuring the current-voltage curves prior to and after the chemisorption of polymer chains. The experimental nanopore characterization included the effects of temperature, adsorption of chloride ions, electrolyte concentration, and pH of the external solutions. The results obtained are further explained in terms of a theoretical continuous model. The combination of well-established chemical procedures (thiol and self-assembled monolayer formation chemistry, electroless plating, ion track etching) and physical models (two-region pore and Nernst-Planck equations) permits the obtainment of a new nanopore with high current rectification ratios. The single pore could be scaled up to multipore membranes of potential interest for pH sensing and chemical actuators.

  7. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of repulsive particle-particle and particle-wall interactions: Coughing and choking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başaǧaoǧlu, Hakan; Succi, Sauro

    2010-04-01

    We propose and numerically investigate a new particle retention mechanism for particle entrapment in creeping flows in a constricted section of a saturated rough-walled narrow flow channel. We hypothesize that particles, whose size is smaller than channel width, can be temporarily or permanently immobilized in a flow channel away from channel walls due to particle-particle and particle-wall repulsive potentials, and, consequently, the flow field is clogged temporarily (coughing) or permanently (choking). Two mathematically simplified repulsive particle-particle and particle-wall interaction potentials are incorporated into a two-dimensional colloidal lattice-Boltzmann model. These potentials are two-body Lennard-Jones 12 and screened electrostatic repulsive potentials. Numerical simulations reveal that unlike in smooth-walled flow channels, particles are entrapped away from rough-walled channel walls and subsequently clog the flow field if fluid-drag and repulsive forces on particles are in balance. Off-balance forces, however, could result in temporary clogging if repulsive forces are stronger on the advancing edge of a particle than on its trailing edge. The new conceptualization and two-particle numerical simulations successfully captured (i) temporary entrapment of two particles (coughing), (ii) temporary entrapment of one of the particles with permanent entrapment of the other particle (coughing-choking), and (iii) permanent entrapment of both particles (choking) as a function of repulsive interaction strength.

  8. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  9. Theoretical and experimental study of a high-current vacuum arc in a uniform axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimiya, Osami

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the electron temperature, floating potential, plasma density, and average plasma pressure in a magnetically confined high-current vacuum arc are described. A 40-mm-diam, 30-mm-long arc was initiated between OFCu copper electrodes in a uniform axial magnetic field by triggering the gap. The crest values of the arc current ranged from 3 to 20 kA. The electron temperature by Langmuir probe measurement was Te= 2.5-3.0 eV with a uniform space distribution and was independent of the arc current. The space distribution of the ion density was parabolic in the radial direction and with a zero derivative in the axial direction. The average plasma pressure by paramagnetic measurement increased with the square of the arc current. The experiment showed that the arc column could be considered as an infinitely long column in which the plasma parameters have zero axial derivatives. Theoretical analysis has been carried out under the following assumptions. An infinitely long cylindrical and fully ionized steady-state plasma in which all quantities varied in the r direction only was considered. The anisotropy factor σ∥/σ⊥ for electrical conductivities was taken into account in the theoretical analysis, where σ∥ and σ⊥ were electrical conductivities parallel to the magnetic field and perpendicular to it, respectively. The plasma parameters determined from the experiments and theoretical analysis agreed closely with each other when the factor σ∥/σ⊥ was equal to ˜2, which is the theoretical upper limit in a high magnetic field. Constant temperature characteristics independent of the arc current have been found to be clearly seen by using line radiation as the dominant power loss in the power balance equation.

  10. Spatial and Time Dynamics of Non-Linear Vortices in Plasma Lens for High-Current Ion Beam Focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Alexei A.; Maslov, Vasyl I.; Onishchenko, Ivan N.; Tretyakov, Vitalij N.

    2002-11-01

    It is known from numerical simulation (see, for example, [1]) and from experiments (see, for example, [2]), that an electron density bunches as discrete vortices are long - living structures in vacuum. However, in laboratory experiments [2] it has been shown that the vortices are changed faster, when they are submersed in electrons, distributed around them. The charged plasma lens intended for a focussing of high-current ion beams, has the same crossed configuration of a radial electrical and longitudinal magnetic field [3], as only electron plasma. In this lens the vortical turbulence is excited [3]. The vortex - bunch and vortex - hole are rotated in the inverse directions in system of their rest. The instability development in initially homogeneous plasma causes that the vortices are excited by pairs. Namely, if the vortex - bunch of electrons is generated, near the vortex - hole of electrons is also generated. It is shown, that in nonuniform plasma the vortices behave is various in time. Namely, the vortex - bunch goes to area of larger electron density, and the vortex - hole goes to area of smaller electron density. The speed of the vortex - hole is less than speed of the vortex - bunch. It is shown, that the electron vortices, generated in the plasma lens, can result in to formation of spiral distribution of electron density. The physical mechanism of coalescence of electron vortices - bunches is proposed. 1.Driscoll C.F. et al. Plasma Phys. Contr. Fus. Res. 3 (1989) 507. 2.Kiwamoto Y. et al. Non-neutral plasma physics. Princeton. 1999. P. 99-105. 3.Goncharov A. et al. Plasma Phys. Rep. 20 (1994) 499.

  11. Diagnostics and electron-optics of a high current electron beam in the TANDEM free electron laser - status report

    SciTech Connect

    Arensburg, A.; Avramovich, A.; Chairman, D.

    1995-12-31

    In the construction of the Israeli TANDEM FEL the major task is to develop a high quality electron optic system. The goal is to focus the e-beam to a minimal radius (1 mm) in the interaction region (the wiggler). Furthermore, good focusing throughout the accelerator is essential in order to achieve high transport efficiency avoiding discharge and voltage drop of the high voltage terminal. We have completed the electron optical design and component procurement, including 8 quadrupole lenses 4 steering coils and an electrostatic control system. All are being assembled into the high voltage terminal and controlled by a fiber optic link. Diagnostic means based on fluorescent screens and compact CCD camera cards placed at the HV terminal and at the end of the e-gun injector have been developed. We report first measurements of the beam emittance at the entrance to the Tandem accelerator tube using the {open_quote}pepper pot{close_quote} technique. The experiment consists of passing the 0.5 Amp beam through a thin plate which is perforated with an army of 0.5 mm holes. The spots produced on a fluorescent screen placed 90 cm from the pepper pot were recorded with a CCD camera and a frame grabber. The measured normalized emittance is lower than 10{pi} mm mR which is quite close to the technical limit of dispenser cathode e-guns of the kind we have. Recent results of the measured transport efficiency and the diagnostics of the high current (1A, 1.5MV) electron-optical system will be reported.

  12. Production of Excess Heat, Impurity Elements and Unnatural Isotopic Ratios in High-Current Glow Discharge Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabut, A. B.

    2005-12-01

    Results recorded for excess heat measurements in experiments with a high-current glow discharge in D2, Xe and Kr, using previously deuterated Pd and Ti cathode samples, are presented. Excess power up to 10-15 W (and efficiency up to 150%) was recorded for the experiments with a Pd cathode samples in a D2 discharge. Excess power up to 5 W (and efficiency up to 150%) was recorded for previously deuterated Pd cathode samples in Xe and Kr discharges. Excess heat was not observed in similar experiments using pure Pd cathode samples in Xe and Kr discharges. The production of impurity nuclides (7Li, 13C, 15N, 20Ne, 29Si, 44Ca, 48Ca, 56Fe, 57Fe, 59Co, 64Zn, 66Zn, 75As, 107Ag, 109Ag, 110Cg, 111Cg, 112Cg, 114Cg, and 115In) at a rate of up to 1013 atoms/s was recorded. Soft x-ray radiation from the solid-state cathode (with an intensity up to 0.01 Gy/s) was recorded for discharge experiments carried out in H2, D2, Ar, Xe, Kr. X-ray radiation was observed as bursts (up to 106 photons in a burst and up to 105 bursts a second) during the discharge and within 100 ms after turning off the discharge current. The x-ray radiation data showed that excited energy levels having the lifetime up to 100 ms, and more, and an energy of 1.2-1.8 keV, exist in the solid medium. Possible mechanisms for producing the excess heat, and products of nuclear transmutation reactions, in the solid medium with such excited energy levels is considered.

  13. Auroral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-06-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  14. Auroral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  15. The Advanced Helical Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-10-26

    A high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) generator called the Advanced Helical Generator (AHG) has been designed, built, and successfully tested. The AHG incorporates design principles of voltage and current management to obtain a high current and energy gain. Its design was facilitated by the use of modern modeling tools as well as high precision manufacture. The result was a first-shot success. The AHG delivered 16 Mega-Amperes of current and 11 Mega-Joules of energy to a quasi-static 80 nH inductive load. A current gain of 154 times was obtained with a peak exponential rise time of 20 {micro}s. We will describe in detail the design and testing of the AHG.

  16. Summary of the particle physics and technology working group

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Lammel et al.

    2002-12-10

    Progress in particle physics has been tightly related to technological advances during the past half century. Progress in technologies has been driven in many cases by the needs of particle physics. Often, these advances have benefited fields beyond particle physics: other scientific fields, medicine, industrial development, and even found commercial applications. The particle physics and technology working group of Snowmass 2001 reviewed leading-edge technologies recently developed or in the need of development for particle physics. The group has identified key areas where technological advances are vital for progress in the field, areas of opportunities where particle physics may play a principle role in fostering progress, and areas where advances in other fields may directly benefit particle physics. The group has also surveyed the technologies specifically developed or enhanced by research in particle physics that benefit other fields and/or society at large.

  17. Phase and Structural States Formed in Titanium Nickelide Subsurface Layers Exposed to High-Current Pulsed Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyman, A. A.; Meisner, L. L.; Lotkov, A. I.; Semin, V. O.

    2015-06-01

    The behavior of the non-equilibrium states formed in the subsurface layers of a titanium nickelide-based alloy exposed to electron beams operated in the pulsed surface layer melting mode is investigated experimentally. Using methods of an x-ray diffraction analysis, and optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopies, an 8-10 μm thick surface layer is shown to exhibit В2 phase-based structure undergoing inhomogeneous lattice microstrain. The core layer located at a depth of 10-20 μm below the irradiated surface contains a small amount (up to 5 vol.%) of a phase with В19' martensite structure along with a slightly distorted lattice and unmelted Ti2Ni phase particles. Electron beam treatment brings about changes in the chemical composition of the surface-modified layer which becomes enriched in titanium owing to the dissolution of the Ti2Ni phase particles therein. Transmission electron microscopy has not revealed martensite phases in the modified layer. The electron beam exposure of the titanium nickelide surface is assumed to give rise to nonequilibrium highly distorted bcc structure.

  18. Ti/Pd/Ag Contacts to n-Type GaAs for High Current Density Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengyun; Rey-Stolle, Ignacio

    2016-06-01

    The metallization stack Ti/Pd/Ag on n-type Si has been readily used in solar cells due to its low metal/semiconductor specific contact resistance, very high sheet conductance, bondability, long-term durability, and cost-effectiveness. In this study, the use of Ti/Pd/Ag metallization on n-type GaAs is examined, targeting electronic devices that need to handle high current densities and with grid-like contacts with limited surface coverage (i.e., solar cells, lasers, or light emitting diodes). Ti/Pd/Ag (50 nm/50 nm/1000 nm) metal layers were deposited on n-type GaAs by electron beam evaporation and the contact quality was assessed for different doping levels (from 1.3 × 1018 cm-3 to 1.6 × 1019 cm-3) and annealing temperatures (from 300°C to 750°C). The metal/semiconductor specific contact resistance, metal resistivity, and the morphology of the contacts were studied. The results show that samples doped in the range of 1018 cm-3 had Schottky-like I- V characteristics and only samples doped 1.6 × 1019 cm-3 exhibited ohmic behavior even before annealing. For the ohmic contacts, increasing annealing temperature causes a decrease in the specific contact resistance ( ρ c,Ti/Pd/Ag ~ 5 × 10-4 Ω cm2). In regard to the metal resistivity, Ti/Pd/Ag metallization presents a very good metal conductivity for samples treated below 500°C ( ρ M,Ti/Pd/Ag ~ 2.3 × 10-6 Ω cm); however, for samples treated at 750°C, metal resistivity is strongly degraded due to morphological degradation and contamination in the silver overlayer. As compared to the classic AuGe/Ni/Au metal system, the Ti/Pd/Ag system shows higher metal/semiconductor specific contact resistance and one order of magnitude lower metal resistivity.

  19. A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF with co-axial cable transmitting energy for material dynamics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guiji; Chen, Xuemiao; Cai, Jintao; Zhang, Xuping; Chong, Tao; Luo, Binqiang; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei; Tan, Fuli; Liu, Cangli; Wu, Gang

    2016-06-01

    A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF (Multi-Modules Assembly Facility, MMAF) was developed for material dynamics experiments under ramp wave and shock loadings at the Institute of Fluid Physics (IFP), which can deliver 3 MA peak current to a strip-line load. The rise time of the current is 470 ns (10%-90%). Different from the previous CQ-4 at IFP, the CQ-3-MMAF energy is transmitted by hundreds of co-axial high voltage cables with a low impedance of 18.6 mΩ and low loss, and then hundreds of cables are reduced and converted to tens of cables into a vacuum chamber by a cable connector, and connected with a pair of parallel metallic plates insulated by Kapton films. It is composed of 32 capacitor and switch modules in parallel. The electrical parameters in short circuit are with a capacitance of 19.2 μF, an inductance of 11.7 nH, a resistance of 4.3 mΩ, and working charging voltage of 60 kV-90 kV. It can be run safely and stable when charged from 60 kV to 90 kV. The vacuum of loading chamber can be up to 10-2 Pa, and the current waveforms can be shaped by discharging in time sequences of four groups of capacitor and switch modules. CQ-3-MMAF is an adaptive machine with lower maintenance because of its modularization design. The COMSOL Multi-physics® code is used to optimize the structure of some key components and calculate their structural inductance for designs, such as gas switches and cable connectors. Some ramp wave loading experiments were conducted to check and examine the performances of CQ-3-MMAF. Two copper flyer plates were accelerated to about 3.5 km/s in one shot when the working voltage was charged to 70 kV. The velocity histories agree very well. The dynamic experiments of some polymer bonded explosives and phase transition of tin under ramp wave loadings were also conducted. The experimental data show that CQ-3-MMAF can be used to do material dynamics experiments in high rate and low cost shots. Based on this design concept, the peak

  20. A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF with co-axial cable transmitting energy for material dynamics experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiji; Chen, Xuemiao; Cai, Jintao; Zhang, Xuping; Chong, Tao; Luo, Binqiang; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei; Tan, Fuli; Liu, Cangli; Wu, Gang

    2016-06-01

    A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF (Multi-Modules Assembly Facility, MMAF) was developed for material dynamics experiments under ramp wave and shock loadings at the Institute of Fluid Physics (IFP), which can deliver 3 MA peak current to a strip-line load. The rise time of the current is 470 ns (10%-90%). Different from the previous CQ-4 at IFP, the CQ-3-MMAF energy is transmitted by hundreds of co-axial high voltage cables with a low impedance of 18.6 mΩ and low loss, and then hundreds of cables are reduced and converted to tens of cables into a vacuum chamber by a cable connector, and connected with a pair of parallel metallic plates insulated by Kapton films. It is composed of 32 capacitor and switch modules in parallel. The electrical parameters in short circuit are with a capacitance of 19.2 μF, an inductance of 11.7 nH, a resistance of 4.3 mΩ, and working charging voltage of 60 kV-90 kV. It can be run safely and stable when charged from 60 kV to 90 kV. The vacuum of loading chamber can be up to 10(-2) Pa, and the current waveforms can be shaped by discharging in time sequences of four groups of capacitor and switch modules. CQ-3-MMAF is an adaptive machine with lower maintenance because of its modularization design. The COMSOL Multi-physics® code is used to optimize the structure of some key components and calculate their structural inductance for designs, such as gas switches and cable connectors. Some ramp wave loading experiments were conducted to check and examine the performances of CQ-3-MMAF. Two copper flyer plates were accelerated to about 3.5 km/s in one shot when the working voltage was charged to 70 kV. The velocity histories agree very well. The dynamic experiments of some polymer bonded explosives and phase transition of tin under ramp wave loadings were also conducted. The experimental data show that CQ-3-MMAF can be used to do material dynamics experiments in high rate and low cost shots. Based on this design concept, the peak

  1. Particle Sizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Microspheres are tiny plastic beads that represent the first commercial products manufactured in orbit. An example of how they are used is a new aerodynamic particle sizer designated APS 33B produced by TSI Incorporated. TSI purchased the microspheres from the National Bureau of Standards which certified their exact size and the company uses them in calibration of the APS 33B* instrument, latest in a line of TSI systems for generating counting and weighing minute particles of submicron size. Instruments are used for evaluating air pollution control devices, quantifying environments, meteorological research, testing filters, inhalation, toxicology and other areas where generation or analysis of small airborne particles is required. * The APS 33B is no longer being manufactured. An improved version, APS 3320, is now being manufactured. 2/28/97

  2. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  3. Particle Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki K. M.

    2014-05-01

    Geophysics research has long been dominated by classical mechanics, largely disregarding the potential of particle physics to augment existing techniques. The purpose of this article is to review recent progress in probing Earth's interior with muons and neutrinos. Existing results for various volcanological targets are reviewed. Geoneutrinos are also highlighted as examples in which the neutrino probes elucidate the composition of Earth's deep interior. Particle geophysics has the potential to serve as a useful paradigm to transform our understanding of Earth as dramatically as the X-ray transformed our understanding of medicine and the body.

  4. Generating high-current monoenergetic proton beams by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the phase-stable acceleration regime.

    PubMed

    Yan, X Q; Lin, C; Sheng, Z M; Guo, Z Y; Liu, B C; Lu, Y R; Fang, J X; Chen, J E

    2008-04-04

    A new ion acceleration method, namely, phase-stable acceleration, using circularly-polarized laser pulses is proposed. When the initial target density n(0) and thickness D satisfy a(L) approximately (n(0)/n(c))D/lambda(L) and D>l(s) with a(L), lambda(L), l(s), and n(c) the normalized laser amplitude, the laser wavelength in vacuum, the plasma skin depth, and the critical density of the incident laser pulse, respectively, a quasiequilibrium for the electrons is established by the light pressure and the space charge electrostatic field at the interacting front of the laser pulse. The ions within the skin depth of the laser pulse are synchronously accelerated and bunched by the electrostatic field, and thereby a high-intensity monoenergetic proton beam can be generated. The proton dynamics is investigated analytically and the results are verified by one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  5. Parametric study of a high current-density EBIS Charge Breeder regarding Two Stream plasma Instability (TSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Breitenfeldt, Martin; Lombardi, Alessandra; Wenander, Fredrik; Pikin, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we report on our results from the design study of an advanced Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) based Charge Breeder (ECB). The ECB should fulfill the requirements of the HIE-ISOLDE upgrade, and if possible be adapted for ion injection into TSR@ISOLDE, as well as serve as an early prototype of a future EURISOL ECB. Fulfilling the HIE-ISOLDE/TSR@ISOLDE specifications requires simultaneous increase in electron beam energy, current and current density in order to provide the requested beams with proper charge state, high intensity and with a specified pulse repetition rate. We have carried out a study on the technical requirements of the ECB. The obtained parameters were optimized to comply with technical limitations arising from the electron beam technology and plasma physics in an ECB.

  6. Particle blender

    DOEpatents

    Willey, Melvin G.

    1981-01-01

    An infinite blender that achieves a homogeneous mixture of fuel microspheres is provided. Blending is accomplished by directing respective groups of desired particles onto the apex of a stationary coaxial cone. The particles progress downward over the cone surface and deposit in a space at the base of the cone that is described by a flexible band provided with a wide portion traversing and in continuous contact with the circumference of the cone base and extending upwardly therefrom. The band, being attached to the cone at a narrow inner end thereof, causes the cone to rotate on its arbor when the band is subsequently pulled onto a take-up spool. As a point at the end of the wide portion of the band passes the point where it is tangent to the cone, the blended particles are released into a delivery tube leading directly into a mold, and a plate mounted on the lower portion of the cone and positioned between the end of the wide portion of the band and the cone assures release of the particles only at the tangent point.

  7. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  8. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  9. Particle acceleration at collisionless shocks: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G.P.; Li Gang; Webb, G.M.; Le Roux, J.A.; Florinski, V.; Ao, X.; Rice, W.K.M.

    2005-08-01

    An overview of shock acceleration is presented, focusing primarily on interplanetary shocks and the termination shock as examples. An extended discussion of recent advances in modeling real solar energetic particle (SEP) and energetic storm particle (ESP) events is presented. When the energy of accelerated particles becomes very large, their back reaction on the flow can result in a shock that is significantly mediated, and as an example, we consider some results for the termination shock.

  10. Particle processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshio, Sakka

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, there has been strong demand for the development of novel devices and equipment that support advanced industries including IT/semiconductors, the environment, energy and aerospace along with the achievement of higher efficiency and reduced environmental impact. Many studies have been conducted on the fabrication of innovative inorganic materials with novel individual properties and/or multifunctional properties including electrical, dielectric, thermal, optical, chemical and mechanical properties through the development of particle processing. The fundamental technologies that are key to realizing such materials are (i) the synthesis of nanoparticles with uniform composition and controlled crystallite size, (ii) the arrangement/assembly and controlled dispersion of nanoparticles with controlled particle size, (iii) the precise structural control at all levels from micrometer to nanometer order and (iv) the nanostructural design based on theoretical/experimental studies of the correlation between the local structure and the functions of interest. In particular, it is now understood that the application of an external stimulus, such as magnetic energy, electrical energy and/or stress, to a reaction field is effective in realizing advanced particle processing [1-3]. This special issue comprises 12 papers including three review papers. Among them, seven papers are concerned with phosphor particles, such as silicon, metals, Si3N4-related nitrides, rare-earth oxides, garnet oxides, rare-earth sulfur oxides and rare-earth hydroxides. In these papers, the effects of particle size, morphology, dispersion, surface states, dopant concentration and other factors on the optical properties of phosphor particles and their applications are discussed. These nanoparticles are classified as zero-dimensional materials. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and graphene are well-known one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) materials, respectively. This special issue also

  11. Analysis and design of a high-current, high-voltage accurate power supply for the APS storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fathizadeh, M.

    1993-08-01

    There are 81 dipole magnets contained in the storage ring at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). These magnets are connected in series and are energized by only one 12-phase power supply. The eighty-first magnet is located in a temperature-controlled room with an NMR probe to monitor the magnetic field in the magnet and provide a reference signal for correction of the field drift due to aging of the components. The current in the magnets will be held at 497 A. The required current stability of the power supply is {plus_minus}30 ppM, the current reproducibility is {plus_minus}50 ppM, and the current ripple is {plus_minus}400 ppM. The voltage required to maintain such a current in the magnets is about 1700 V. Different schemes for regulating current in the magnets are studied. Pspice software is used to simulate the behavior and the design of such a power supply under different conditions. The pros and cons of each scheme will be given and the proper power and regulating scheme will be selected.

  12. Sampling of respirable isocyanate particles.

    PubMed

    Gylestam, Daniel; Gustavsson, Marcus; Karlsson, Daniel; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar

    2014-04-01

    An advanced design of a denuder impactor (DI) sampler has been developed for characterization of possible airborne isocyanate exposure in different particle size fractions. The sampler is equipped with 12 different parallel denuder tubes, 4 impaction stages with the cut-off values (d50) of: 9.5, 4, 2.5 and 1 µm, and an end filter that collects particles < 1 µm. All collecting parts were impregnated with di-n-butylamine DBA as the reagent in a mixture with acetic acid. The performance of the DI sampler was studied on a standard atmosphere containing gas and particulate isocyanates. The isocyanate atmosphere was generated by liquid permeation of 2,4-, 2,6-Toluene Diisocyanate (TDI), 1,6-Hexamethylene Diisocyanate (HDI) and Isophorone Diisocyanate (IPDI). 4,4'-Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (MDI) particles were generated by heating of technical MDI and condensing the mixture of gas and particle-borne MDI in an atmosphere containing mixed salt particles. The study was performed in a 0.85 m3 environmental chamber with stainless steel walls. With the advancement of the DI sampler it is now possible to collect isocyanate particle samples for up to 320 min. The performance of the DI sampler is essentially unaffected by the humidity. The DI sampler and the ASSET EZ4-NCO sampler (Sigma-Aldrich/Supelco, Bellefonte, PA, USA) gave similar results. Sample losses within the DI sampler are low. In the environmental chamber it was observed that the particle distribution may be affected by the humidity and ageing. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to separate a flow of selected fractions containing MDI particles from mixed MDI and salt particles. The particle-size distribution had a maximum at about 300 nm, but later in the environmental chamber 1 µm dominated. The distribution was very different as compared to with only NaCl or MDI present. The biological relevance for studying isocyanate nano particles is significant as these have the possibility to reach the

  13. Particle classifier

    SciTech Connect

    Etkin, B.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a classifier for particulate material comprising a housing having an inlet to receive a classifying air flow flowing in a given direction, collection means downstream of the inlet to receive material classified by the air flow, and material introduction means intermediate the inlet and the collection means to introduce particles entrained in a secondary air stream into the housing in a direction other than the given direction. The material introduction means includes a material outlet aperture in a wall of the housing extending generally perpendicular to the given direction, conveying means to convey material and the secondary air stream to the material outlet and diverting means to divert the secondary air stream to a direction generally parallel to the classifying air flow flowing in the given direction. The diverting means includes a surface extending downstream from the outlet and adjacent thereto and being dimensioned to divert the secondary airstream by a Coanda effect generally parallel to the given direction and thereby segregate the secondary air/stream from the particles and permit continued movement of the particles along predictable trajectories.

  14. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  15. Integration of an Axcelis Optima HD Single Wafer High Current Implanter for p- and n-S/D Implants in an Existing Batch Implanter Production Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeide, Matthias; Kontratenko, Serguei; Müller, Ralf Peter; Krimbacher, Bernhard

    2008-11-01

    This paper is focused on the integration and qualification of an Axcelis Optima HD single wafer high current spot beam implanter in an existing 200 mm production line with different types of Axcelis batch implanters for high current applications. Both the design of the beamline and the beam shape are comparable between single wafer and batch high current spot beam implanters. In contrast to the single wafer high current ribbon beam implanter, energy contamination is not a concern for the considered spot beam tool because the drift mode can be used down to energies in the 2 keV region. The most important difference between single wafer and batch high current implanters is the significantly higher dose rate and, therefore, the higher damage rate for the single wafer tool due to the different scanning architecture. The results of the integration of high dose implantations, mainly for p- and n-S/D formation, for DRAM 110 nm without pre-amorphization implantation (PAI), CMOS Logic from around 250 nm down to 90 nm without and with PAI, are presented and discussed. Dopant concentration profile analysis using SIMS was performed for different technologies and implantation conditions. The impurity activation was measured using sheet resistance and in some cases spreading resistance technique was applied. The amorphous layer thickness was measured using TEM. Finally, device data are presented in combination with dose, energy and beam current variations. The results have shown that the integration of implantation processes into crystalline structure without PAI is more complex and time consuming than implantations into amorphous layer where the damage difference due to the different dose rates is negligible.

  16. Interplay of particle shape and suspension properties: a study of cube-like particles.

    PubMed

    Audus, Debra J; Hassan, Ahmed M; Garboczi, Edward J; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-05-07

    With advances in anisotropic particle synthesis, particle shape is now a feasible parameter for tuning suspension properties. However, there is a need to determine how these newly synthesized particles affect suspension properties and a need to solve the inverse problem of inferring the particle shape from property measurements. Either way, accurate suspension property predictions are required. Towards this end, we calculated a set of dilute suspension properties for a family of cube-like particles that smoothly interpolate between spheres and cubes. Using three conceptually different methods, we numerically computed the electrical properties of particle suspensions, including the intrinsic conductivity of perfect conductors and insulators. We also considered hydrodynamic properties relevant to particle solutions including the hydrodynamic radius, the intrinsic viscosity and the intrinsic solvent diffusivity. Additionally, we determined the second osmotic virial coefficient using analytic expressions along with numerical integration. As the particles became more cube-like, we found that all of the properties investigated become more sensitive to particle shape.

  17. Advanced Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Mike; Nelms, Rick

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that explores the depth and breadth of scientific facts, principles, and procedures which are required in the Advanced General National Vocational Qualifications (GNVQ) science through comparison with GCE Advanced level. The final report takes account of the updated 1996 version of GNVQ science. (DDR)

  18. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark Raymond

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 μm were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the

  19. Observations and Modeling of Geospace Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinlin

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive measurements of energetic particles and electric and magnetic fields from state-of-art instruments onboard Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, revealed new features of the energetic particles and the fields in the inner magnetosphere and impose new challenges to any quantitative modeling of the physical processes responsible for these observations. Concurrent measurements of energetic particles by satellites in highly inclined low Earth orbits and plasma and fields by satellites in farther distances in the magnetospheres and in the up stream solar wind are the critically needed information for quantitative modeling and for leading to eventual accurate forecast of the variations of the energetic particles in the magnetosphere. In this presentation, emphasis will be on the most recent advance in our understanding of the energetic particles in the magnetosphere and the missing links for significantly advance in our modeling and forecasting capabilities.

  20. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    SciTech Connect

    Karas’, V. I. Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov–Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  1. Electron density profile measurements at a self-focusing ion beam with high current density and low energy extracted through concave electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y. Nakamiya, A.; Sakakita, H.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.

    2014-02-15

    The self-focusing phenomenon has been observed in a high current density and low energy ion beam. In order to study the mechanism of this phenomenon, a special designed double probe to measure the electron density and temperature is installed into the chamber where the high current density ion beam is injected. Electron density profile is successfully measured without the influence of the ion beam components. Estimated electron temperature and density are ∼0.9 eV and ∼8 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3} at the center of ion beam cross section, respectively. It was found that a large amount of electrons are spontaneously accumulated in the ion beam line in the case of self-forcing state.

  2. Design of a high-current low-energy beam transport line for an intense D-T/D-D neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaolong; Wang, Junrun; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jianyi; Xia, Li; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Yanyan; Jiang, Bing; Huang, Zhiwu; Ma, Zhanwen; Wei, Zheng; Qian, Xiangping; Xu, Dapeng; Lan, Changlin; Yao, Zeen

    2016-03-01

    An intense D-T/D-D neutron generator is currently being developed at the Lanzhou University. The Cockcroft-Walton accelerator, as a part of the neutron generator, will be used to accelerate and transport the high-current low-energy beam from the duoplasmatron ion source to the rotating target. The design of a high-current low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line and the dynamics simulations of the mixed beam were carried out using the TRACK code. The results illustrate that the designed beam line facilitates smooth transportation of a deuteron beam of 40 mA, and the number of undesired ions can be reduced effectively using two apertures.

  3. New method of a "point-like" neutron source creation based on sharp focusing of high-current deuteron beam onto deuterium-saturated target for neutron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, S.; Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Sidorov, A.

    2017-02-01

    A possibility of a compact powerful point-like neutron source creation is discussed. Neutron yield of the source based on deuterium-deuterium (D-D) reaction is estimated at the level of 1011 s‑1 (1013 s‑1 for deuterium-tritium reaction). The fusion takes place due to bombardment of deuterium- (or tritium) loaded target by high-current focused deuterium ion beam with energy of 100 keV. The ion beam is formed by means of high-current quasi-gasdynamic ion source of a new generation based on an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge in an open magnetic trap sustained by powerful microwave radiation. The prospects of proposed generator for neutron tomography are discussed. Suggested method is compared to the point-like neutron sources based on a spark produced by powerful femtosecond laser pulses.

  4. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas', V. I.; Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  5. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  6. Compositions of energetic particle populations in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of helium and heavier particles with energies below about 10 to 20 MeV/nucleon are discussed with emphasis on the composition of solar flare particles, corotating energetic particle streams, and the anomalous cosmic ray component. Future advances expected from results obtained from ISEE -3, Voyager, and the international solar polar spacecraft are reviewed.

  7. Aerosol Mass Loading, Mixing State, Size and Number in Present Day (2000) and Future (2100): Study with the Advanced Particle Microphysics (APM) module in the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, G.; Yu, F.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols affect the global energy budget by scattering and absorbing sunlight (direct effects) and by changing the microphysical properties, lifetime, and coverage of clouds (indirect effects). One of the key challenges in quantifying the aerosol direct and indirect effects is to deep our understanding about the size distribution, size-resolved composition, and mixing state of aerosols. However, detailed information on size distribution and mixing state is often not available or incomplete in current climate models. Here, we incorporated APM into CESM. APM is a multi-type, multi-component (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, SOA, BC, OC, dust, and sea salt), size-resolved particle microphysics model. Online chemistry, up-to-date nucleation, oxidation aging of medium-volatile and semi-volatile organic gases, aerosol-cloud interaction with stratiform cloud, shallow convection cloud, and deep convection cloud are considered. The amounts of secondary species coated on primary particles, through condensation, coagulation, equilibrium uptake, and aqueous chemistry, are also tracked. Model results are compared with aerosol mass observed by IMPROVE/EMEP, vertical structure of global particle number from aircraft-based field campaigns, particle and cloud condensation nuclei number at ground-based stations, aerosol optical properties retrieved by several satellites. Model results can capture the major characteristics shown in these observations. With this model system, we find that global burdens of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, BC, OC from 2000 to 2100, under scenario RCP 4.5 where total radiative forcing is stabilized before 2100, are decreased by 44%, 50%, 43%, 40%, 40%, respectively. Dust and sea salt increase slightly. Global burdens of secondary species coated on BCOC, dust, and sea salt are deceased by 34%, 30% and 60%, respectively. Global averaged aerosol number in the lower troposphere (from surface to 3 km) is significantly decreased, especially for particles smaller than

  8. Characterization and performance of a high-power solid-state laser for a high-current photo-cathode injector

    SciTech Connect

    Shukui Zhang; David Hardy; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2005-08-21

    We report the characterization and performance of a diode-pumped, high-power, picosecond laser system designed for high-current photo-cathode accelerator injector at repetition rates of both 75MHz and 750MHz. The characterization includes measurement of the amplification gain, thermally induced beam mode variation, harmonic conversion efficiency, system's amplitude stability, beam pointing stability, beam profile, and pulse width for both frequencies.

  9. Aging characteristics of blue InGaN micro-light emitting diodes at an extremely high current density of 3.5 kA cm-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Pengfei; Althumali, Ahmad; Gu, Erdan; Watson, Ian M.; Dawson, Martin D.; Liu, Ran

    2016-04-01

    The aging characteristics of blue InGaN micro-light emitting diodes (micro-LEDs) with different sizes have been studied at an extremely high current density 3.5 kA cm-2 for emerging micro-LED applications including visible light communication (VLC), micro-LED pumped organic lasers and optogenetics. The light output power of micro-LEDs first increases and then decreases due to the competition of Mg activation in p-GaN layer and defect generation in the active region. The smaller micro-LEDs show less light output power degradation compared with larger micro-LEDs, which is attributed to the lower junction temperature of smaller micro-LEDs. It is found that the high current density without additional junction temperature cannot induce significant micro-LED degradation at room temperature but the combination of the high current density and high junction temperature leads to strong degradation. Furthermore, the cluster LEDs, composed of a micro-LED array, have been developed with both high light output power and less light output degradation for micro-LED applications in solid state lighting and VLC.

  10. Advances in Norovirus Biology

    PubMed Central

    Karst, Stephanie M.; Wobus, Christiane E.; Goodfellow, Ian G.; Green, Kim Y.

    2014-01-01

    Human noroviruses are a major cause of epidemic and sporadic gastroenteritis worldwide, and can chronically infect immunocompromised patients. Efforts to develop effective vaccines and antivirals have been hindered by the uncultivable nature and extreme genetic diversity of human noroviruses. Although they remain a particularly challenging pathogen to study, recent advances in norovirus animal models and in vitro cultivation systems have led to an increased understanding of norovirus molecular biology and replication, pathogenesis, cell tropism, and innate and adaptive immunity. Furthermore, clinical trials of vaccines consisting of nonreplicating virus-like particles have shown promise. In this review, we summarize these recent advances and discuss controversies in the field, which is rapidly progressing towards generation of antiviral agents and increasingly effective vaccines. PMID:24922570

  11. Video Fact Sheets: Everyday Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-06

    What are Advanced Materials? Ames Laboratory is behind some of the best advanced materials out there. Some of those include: Lead-Free Solder, Photonic Band-Gap Crystals, Terfenol-D, Aluminum-Calcium Power Cable and Nano Particles. Some of these are in products we use every day.

  12. Video Fact Sheets: Everyday Advanced Materials

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    What are Advanced Materials? Ames Laboratory is behind some of the best advanced materials out there. Some of those include: Lead-Free Solder, Photonic Band-Gap Crystals, Terfenol-D, Aluminum-Calcium Power Cable and Nano Particles. Some of these are in products we use every day.

  13. Theoretical Particle Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    2013-08-07

    Abstract: Theoretical Particle Astrophysics The research carried out under this grant encompassed work on the early Universe, dark matter, and dark energy. We developed CMB probes for primordial baryon inhomogeneities, primordial non-Gaussianity, cosmic birefringence, gravitational lensing by density perturbations and gravitational waves, and departures from statistical isotropy. We studied the detectability of wiggles in the inflation potential in string-inspired inflation models. We studied novel dark-matter candidates and their phenomenology. This work helped advance the DoE's Cosmic Frontier (and also Energy and Intensity Frontiers) by finding synergies between a variety of different experimental efforts, by developing new searches, science targets, and analyses for existing/forthcoming experiments, and by generating ideas for new next-generation experiments.

  14. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    DOEpatents

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  15. Particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Sinoto, Makoto; Matsunobu, Akira; Toyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Kudo, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in external beam radiotherapy have allowed us to deliver higher doses to the tumors while decreasing doses to the surrounding tissues. Dose escalation using high-precision radiotherapy has improved the treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy has been widely used throughout the world as the most advanced form of photon radiotherapy. In contrast, particle radiotherapy has also been under development, and has been used as an effective and non-invasive radiation modality for prostate and other cancers. Among the particles used in such treatments, protons and carbon ions have the physical advantage that the dose can be focused on the tumor with only minimal exposure of the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions also have radiobiological advantages that include higher killing effects on intrinsic radio-resistant tumors, hypoxic tumor cells and tumor cells in the G0 or S phase. However, the degree of clinical benefit derived from these theoretical advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer has not been adequately determined. The present article reviews the available literature on the use of particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer as well as the literature on the physical and radiobiological properties of this treatment, and discusses the role and the relative merits of particle radiotherapy compared with current photon-based radiotherapy, with a focus on proton beam therapy and carbon ion radiotherapy.

  16. Progress in the analysis of complex atmospheric particles

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup

    2016-06-01

    This study presents an overview of recent advances in field and laboratory studies of atmospheric particles formed in processes of environmental air-surface interactions. The overarching goal of these studies is to advance predictive understanding of atmospheric particle composition, particle chemistry during aging, and their environmental impacts. The diversity between chemical constituents and lateral heterogeneity within individual particles adds to the chemical complexity of particles and their surfaces. Once emitted, particles undergo transformation via atmospheric aging processes that further modify their complex composition. We highlight a range of modern analytical approaches that enable multimodal chemical characterization of particles with both molecular and lateral specificity. When combined, these approaches provide a comprehensive arsenal of tools for understanding the nature of particles at air-surface interactions and their reactivity and transformations with atmospheric aging. We discuss applications of these novel approaches in recent studies and highlight additional research areas to explore the environmental effects of air-surface interactions.

  17. Progress in the Analysis of Complex Atmospheric Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup

    2016-06-16

    This manuscript presents an overview on recent advances in field and laboratory studies of atmospheric particles formed in processes of environmental air-surfaces interactions. The overarching goal of these studies is to advance predictive understanding of atmospheric particle composition, particle chemistry during aging, and their environmental impacts. The diversity between chemical constituents and lateral heterogeneity within individual particles adds to the chemical complexity of particles and their surfaces. Once emitted, particles undergo transformation via atmospheric aging processes that further modify their complex composition. We highlight a range of modern analytical approaches that enable multi-modal chemical characterization of particles with both molecular and lateral specificity. When combined, they provide a comprehensive arsenal of tools for understanding the nature of particles at air-surface interactions and their reactivity and transformations with atmospheric aging. We discuss applications of these novel approaches in recent studies and highlight additional research areas to explore environmental effects of air-surface interactions.

  18. Progress in the Analysis of Complex Atmospheric Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup

    2016-06-01

    This article presents an overview of recent advances in field and laboratory studies of atmospheric particles formed in processes of environmental air-surface interactions. The overarching goal of these studies is to advance predictive understanding of atmospheric particle composition, particle chemistry during aging, and their environmental impacts. The diversity between chemical constituents and lateral heterogeneity within individual particles adds to the chemical complexity of particles and their surfaces. Once emitted, particles undergo transformation via atmospheric aging processes that further modify their complex composition. We highlight a range of modern analytical approaches that enable multimodal chemical characterization of particles with both molecular and lateral specificity. When combined, these approaches provide a comprehensive arsenal of tools for understanding the nature of particles at air-surface interactions and their reactivity and transformations with atmospheric aging. We discuss applications of these novel approaches in recent studies and highlight additional research areas to explore the environmental effects of air-surface interactions.

  19. Long-pulse production of high current negative ion beam by using actively temperature controlled plasma grid for JT-60SA negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, A.; Hanada, M.; Yoshida, M.; Umeda, N.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Grisham, L. R.

    2015-04-08

    The temperature control system of the large-size plasma grid has been developed to realize the long pulse production of high-current negative ions for JT-60SA. By using this prototype system for the JT-60SA ion source, 15 A negative ions has been sustained for 100 s for the first time, which is three times longer than that obtained in JT-60U. In this system, a high-temperature fluorinated fluid with a high boiling point of 270 degree Celsius is circulated in the cooling channels of the plasma grids (PG) where a cesium (Cs) coverage is formed to enhance the negative ion production. Because the PG temperature control had been applied to only 10% of the extraction area previously, the prototype PG with the full extraction area (110 cm × 45 cm) was developed to increase the negative ion current in this time. In the preliminary results of long pulse productions of high-current negative ions at a Cs conditioning phase, the negative ion production was gradually degraded in the last half of 100 s pulse where the temperature of an arc chamber wall was not saturated. From the spectroscopic measurements, it was found that the Cs flux released from the wall might affect to the negative ion production, which implied the wall temperature should be kept low to control the Cs flux to the PG for the long-pulse high-current production. The obtained results of long-pulse production and the PG temperature control method contributes the design of the ITER ion source.

  20. Advancing Reflectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-21

    transmissions, was first demonstrated using Global Navigation Satellite System ( GNSS ) reflections. Recently, reflectometry has been extended to digital... GNSS +R workshop provided an opportunity for engineers and Earth scientists to assess the state of the art, demonstrate new applications, and discuss...18 Eos, Vol. 94, No. 21, 21 May 2013 MEETING -.~ Advancing Reflectometry Workshop on Renectometry Using GNSS and Other Signals of Opportunity

  1. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  2. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Research advances, a new feature in Journal of Chemical Engineering that brings information about innovations in current areas of research to high school and college science faculty with an intent to provide educators with timely descriptions of latest progress in research that can be integrated into existing courses to update course content and…

  3. High current pulsed positron microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Stoeffl, W.; Kumar, A.; Sterne, P.A.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.

    1997-05-01

    We are developing a low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopy to provide a new defect analysis capability at the 10{sup 10} e{sup +}s{sup -l} beam at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron linac. When completed, the pulsed positron microprobe will enable defect specific, 3-dimensional maps of defect concentrations with sub-micron resolution of defect location. By coupling these data with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes and positron implantation profiles we will both map the identity and concentration of defect distributions.

  4. High current gain transistor laser

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Song; Qiao, Lijun; Zhu, Hongliang; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A transistor laser (TL), having the structure of a transistor with multi-quantum wells near its base region, bridges the functionality gap between lasers and transistors. However, light emission is produced at the expense of current gain for all the TLs reported up to now, leading to a very low current gain. We propose a novel design of TLs, which have an n-doped InP layer inserted in the emitter ridge. Numerical studies show that a current flow aperture for only holes can be formed in the center of the emitter ridge. As a result, the common emitter current gain can be as large as 143.3, which is over 15 times larger than that of a TL without the aperture. Besides, the effects of nonradiative recombination defects can be reduced greatly because the flow of holes is confined in the center region of the emitter ridge. PMID:27282466

  5. Electropneumatic rheostat regulates high current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haacker, J. F.; Jedlicka, J. R.; Wagoner, C. B.

    1965-01-01

    Electropneumatic rheostat maintains a constant direct current in each of several high-power parallel loads, of variable resistance, across a single source. It provides current regulation at any preset value by dissipating the proper amount of energy thermally, and uses a column of mercury to vary the effective length of a resistance element.

  6. Processes of chemoionization in the course of inflammation of a methane-oxygen mixture by a high-current gliding surface discharge in a closed chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Artem’ev, K. V.; Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Kossyi, I. A. Misakyan, M. A.; Popov, N. A.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2015-05-15

    Results are presented from experiments on the inflammation of a stoichiometric methane-oxygen mixture by a high-current multielectrode spark-gap in a closed cylindrical chamber. It is shown that, in both the preflame and well-developed flame stages, the gas medium is characterized by a high degree of ionization (n{sub e} ≈ 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}) due to chemoionization processes and a high electron-neutral collision frequency (ν{sub e0} ≈ 10{sup 12} s{sup −1})

  7. Tracking single particle rotation: Probing dynamics in four dimensions

    DOE PAGES

    Anthony, Stephen Michael; Yu, Yan

    2015-04-29

    Direct visualization and tracking of small particles at high spatial and temporal resolution provides a powerful approach to probing complex dynamics and interactions in chemical and biological processes. Analysis of the rotational dynamics of particles adds a new dimension of information that is otherwise impossible to obtain with conventional 3-D particle tracking. In this review, we survey recent advances in single-particle rotational tracking, with highlights on the rotational tracking of optically anisotropic Janus particles. Furthermore, strengths and weaknesses of the various particle tracking methods, and their applications are discussed.

  8. Sources of zodiacal dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.

    2007-08-01

    The orbital evolution of dust particles produced by asteroids, comets, and trans- Neptunian objects was integrated [1-3]. Analysis of results of these integrations testify in favor of a considerable fraction of particles produced by comets among overall zodiacal dust particles, but it does not contradict to >30% of asteroidal dust needed for explanation of formation of dust bands. Fractions of asteroidal particles, particles originating beyond Jupiter's orbit (including trans-Neptunian particles), and cometary particles originating inside of Jupiter's orbit are estimated to be about 1/3 each, with a possible deviation from 1/3 up to 0.1-0.2. Comparison of the plots of the number density vs. the distance R from the Sun obtained for particles produced by different small bodies with the plots based on observations shows that asteroidal and trans- Neptunian particles alone can not explain the observed almost constant number density at R ∼3-18 AU and a lot of particles must be produced by comets at R ∼5-10 AU [2-3]. Comparison of the WHAM (Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper spectrometer) observations of spectra of zodiacal light with our models showed [4-5] that a significant fraction of particles produced by short-period comets is required to fit the observations of the width and velocity of the Mg I line. Comparison of the observations of the number density inside Jupiter's orbit with the number density of particles produced by different small bodies leads to the same conclusion about a considerable fraction of cometary particles. This comparison does not make limitations on cometary particles produced beyond Jupiter's orbit, but it shows that the fraction of particles produced by Encke-type comets (with eccentricities ∼0.8-0.9) does not exceed 0.15 of the overall population. The estimated fraction of particles produced by long-period and Halley-type comets among zodiacal dust also does not exceed 0.1-0.15. Though trans-Neptunian particles fit different observations of

  9. Shock Interaction with Random Spherical Particle Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Chris; Mehta, Yash; Salari, Kambiz; Jackson, Thomas L.; Balachandar, S. "Bala"; Thakur, Siddharth

    2016-11-01

    In this talk we present results on fully resolved simulations of shock interaction with randomly distributed bed of particles. Multiple simulations were carried out by varying the number of particles to isolate the effect of volume fraction. Major focus of these simulations was to understand 1) the effect of the shockwave and volume fraction on the forces experienced by the particles, 2) the effect of particles on the shock wave, and 3) fluid mediated particle-particle interactions. Peak drag force for particles at different volume fractions show a downward trend as the depth of the bed increased. This can be attributed to dissipation of energy as the shockwave travels through the bed of particles. One of the fascinating observations from these simulations was the fluctuations in different quantities due to presence of multiple particles and their random distribution. These are large simulations with hundreds of particles resulting in large amount of data. We present statistical analysis of the data and make relevant observations. Average pressure in the computational domain is computed to characterize the strengths of the reflected and transmitted waves. We also present flow field contour plots to support our observations. U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  10. An analysis of the anomalous high-current cathode emission in pseudospark and back-of-the-cathode lighted thyratron switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, W.; Dominic, V.; Kirkman, G. F.; Gundersen, M. A.

    1989-06-01

    An analysis of the anomalously large cathode emission recently observed in the superdense glow of pseudospark and back-lighted thyratrons is presented. These switches are low-pressure (27 PaH2) glow-discharge pulsed-power devices. After operating at peak discharge currents of 6 to 8 kA and pulse durations of 0.5 to 1 microsec., the surface surrounding the cathode hole was found to have been homogeneously melted within a radius of approx. 4 mm indicating that the discharge is a superdense glow discharge, not an arc, with a cross-sectional area on the order of 1 sq cm. This conclusion is also supported by streak camera measurements. The current density at the cathode surface under these conditions is 5 to 10 kA/sq cm, several orders of magnitude larger than that of thermionic cathodes in common thyratrons. This high-current density is explained by intense cathode heating from a high-current density ion beam produced in the cathode fall during the initial stage of current buildup. The surface heating resulting from this beam yields a significant field-enhanced thermionic emission of electrons.

  11. An analysis of the anomalous high-current cathode emission in pseudospark and back-of-the-cathode lighted thyratron switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, W.; Dominic, V.; Kirkman, G. F.; Gundersen, M. A.

    1989-06-01

    An analysis of the anomalously large cathode emission recently observed in the superdense glow of pseudospark and back-lighted thyratrons is presented. These switches are low-pressure (27 Pa H2) glow-discharge pulsed-power devices. After operating at peak discharge currents of 6-8 kA and pulse durations of 0.5-1 μs, the surface surrounding the cathode hole was found to have been homogeneously melted within a radius of ≊4 mm indicating that the discharge is a superdense glow discharge, not an arc, with a cross-sectional area on the order of 1 cm2. This conclusion is also supported by streak camera measurements. The current density at the cathode surface under these conditions is 5-10 kA/cm2, several orders of magnitude larger than that of thermionic cathodes in common thyratrons. This high-current density is explained by intense cathode heating from a high-current density ion ``beam'' produced in the cathode fall during the initial stage of current buildup. The surface heating resulting from this ``beam'' yields a significant field-enhanced thermionic emission of electrons.

  12. Effect of high current electron beam in a 30 MeV radio frequency linac for neutron-time-of-flight applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, B. Acharya, S.; Rajawat, R. K.; DasGupta, K.

    2016-01-15

    A high power pulsed radio frequency electron linac is designed by BARC, India to accelerate 30 MeV, 10 A, 10 ns beam for neutron-time-of-flight applications. It will be used as a neutron generator and will produce ∼10{sup 12}–10{sup 13} n/s. It is essential to reduce the beam instability caused by space charge effect and the beam cavity interaction. In this paper, the wakefield losses in the accelerating section due to bunch of RMS (Root mean square) length 2 mm (at the gun exit) is analysed. Loss and kick factors are numerically calculated using CST wakefield solver. Both the longitudinal and transverse wake potentials are incorporated in beam dynamics code ELEGANT to find the transverse emittance growth of the beam propagating through the linac. Beam loading effect is examined by means of numerical computation carried out in ASTRA code. Beam break up start current has been estimated at the end of the linac which arises due to deflecting modes excited by the high current beam. At the end, transverse beam dynamics of such high current beam has been analysed.

  13. Effect of high current electron beam in a 30 MeV radio frequency linac for neutron-time-of-flight applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, B.; Acharya, S.; Rajawat, R. K.; DasGupta, K.

    2016-01-01

    A high power pulsed radio frequency electron linac is designed by BARC, India to accelerate 30 MeV, 10 A, 10 ns beam for neutron-time-of-flight applications. It will be used as a neutron generator and will produce ˜1012-1013 n/s. It is essential to reduce the beam instability caused by space charge effect and the beam cavity interaction. In this paper, the wakefield losses in the accelerating section due to bunch of RMS (Root mean square) length 2 mm (at the gun exit) is analysed. Loss and kick factors are numerically calculated using CST wakefield solver. Both the longitudinal and transverse wake potentials are incorporated in beam dynamics code ELEGANT to find the transverse emittance growth of the beam propagating through the linac. Beam loading effect is examined by means of numerical computation carried out in ASTRA code. Beam break up start current has been estimated at the end of the linac which arises due to deflecting modes excited by the high current beam. At the end, transverse beam dynamics of such high current beam has been analysed.

  14. Recent Advancements of RF Guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faillace, Luigi

    High-brightness, high-current electron beams are the main requirement for fourth generation light sources such as free-electron lasers (FELs), energy recovery Linacs (ERLs) and high-energy linear colliders. The most successful device for producing such beams is the Radio-Frequency (RF) photoinjector that has been undergoing a constant evolution over the past nearly 30 years towards the production of ever-lower beam emittances and higher currents. The on-going progress in the technology of higher quality materials as well as the enhanced quality of laser pulse shaping have allowed huge improvements in the generation of higher-quality electron beams. Here, it is presented an overview of recent advancements and future perspectives of RF photoinjectors for a fifth generation light source.

  15. Particle contamination formation in magnetron sputtering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, G.S.; Sequeda, F.; Huang, C.

    1997-07-01

    Defects caused by particulate contamination are an important concern in the fabrication of thin film products. Often, magnetron sputtering processes are used for this purpose. Particle contamination generated during thin film processing can be detected using laser light scattering, a powerful diagnostic technique which provides real-time, {ital in situ} imaging of particles {gt}0.3 {mu}m on the target, substrate, or in the plasma. Using this technique, we demonstrate that the mechanisms for particle generation, transport, and trapping during magnetron sputter deposition are different from the mechanisms reported in previously studied plasma etch processes, due to the inherent spatial nonuniformity of magnetically enhanced plasmas. During magnetron sputter deposition, one source of particle contamination is linked to portions of the sputtering target surface exposed to weaker plasma density. There, film redeposition induces filament or nodule growth. Sputter removal of these features is inhibited by the dependence of sputter yield on angle of incidence. These features enhance trapping of plasma particles, which then increases filament growth. Eventually the growths effectively {open_quotes}short-circuit{close_quotes} the sheath, causing high currents to flow through these features. This, in turn, causes mechanical failure of the growth resulting in fracture and ejection of the target contaminants into the plasma and onto the substrate. Evidence of this effect has been observed in semiconductor fabrication and storage disk manufacturing. Discovery of this mechanism in both technologies suggests it may be universal to many sputter processes. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  16. Particle In-Flight Velocity and Dispersion Measurements at Increasing Particle Feed Rates in Cold Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M.; Yin, S.; Lupoi, R.

    2017-01-01

    Cold spray (CS) is attracting interest of research and industry due to its rapid, solid-state particle deposition process and respective advantages over conventional deposition technologies. The acceleration of the particles is critical to the efficiency of CS, and previous investigations rarely consider the particle feed rate. However, because higher particle loadings are typically used in the process, the effect of this cannot be assumed negligible. This study therefore investigates the particle velocities in the supersonic jet of an advanced CS system at low- and high pressure levels and varying particle feed rates using particle image velocimetry. The particle dispersion and velocity evolution along the jet axis were investigated for several feedstock materials. It was found that the average particle velocity noticeably decreases with increasing particulate loading in all cases. The velocity distribution and particle dispersion were also observed to be influenced by the feed rate. Effects are driven by both mass loading and volume fraction, depending on the feedstock's particle velocity parameter. Increased particle feed rates hence affect the magnitude and distribution of impact velocity and consequently the efficiency of CS. In particular, numerical models neglecting this interconnection are required to be further improved, based on these experimental studies.

  17. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  18. Dynamics of Carroll particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Gomis, Joaquim; Longhi, Giorgio

    2014-10-01

    We investigate particles whose dynamics are invariant under the Carroll group. Although a single, free such Carroll particle has no non-trivial dynamics (the Carroll particle does not move), we show that non-trivial dynamics exists for a set of interacting Carroll particles. Furthermore, we gauge the Carroll algebra and couple the Carroll particle to these gauge fields. It turns out that for such a coupled system, even a single Carroll particle can have non-trivial dynamics.

  19. NASA Advanced Fuels Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    1998-01-01

    NASA with the USAF Research Laboratory and it's industry partners, has been conducting planning and research into advanced fuels. This work is sponsored under the NASA Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP). The current research focus is on Alternative Hydrocarbon fuels, Monopropellants, and Solid Cryogens for storing atoms of Hydrogen, Boron, Carbon, and Aluminum. Alternative hydrocarbons that are under consideration are bi cyclo propylidene, spiro pentane, and tri propargyl amine. These three fuels have been identified as initial candidates to increase the specific impulse of hydrocarbon fueled rockets by 10-15 seconds over 02/RP-1. Formulation of these propellants is proceeding this year, and rocket engine testing is planned for the near future. Monopropellant investigations are focused on dinitramine based fuels, and potential collaborations with the US Navy. The dinitramine fuel work is being conducted under an Small Business Innovation research (SBIR) contract with the team of Orbital Technologies Corp. (Madison, WI) and SRI (Menlo Park, CA). This work may lead to a high density, high specific impulse monopropellants that can simplify the operations for launch vehicles and spacecraft. Solid Cryogens are being considered to store atoms of Hydrogen, Boron, Carbon, and Aluminum. Stored atom propellants are potentially the highest specific impulse chemical rockets that may be practical. These fuels are composed of atoms, stored in solid cryogenic particles, suspended in a cryogenic liquid or gel. The fuel would be fed to a rocket engine as a slurry or gelled cryogenic liquid with the suspended particles with the trapped atoms. Testing is planned to demonstrate the formation of the particles, and then characterize the slurry flows. Rocket propellant and propulsion technology improvements can be used to reduce the development time and operational costs of new space vehicle programs. Advanced propellant technologies can make the space vehicles safer, more

  20. Advanced Thermally Stable Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    A. Boehman; C. Song; H. H. Schobert; M. M. Coleman; P. G. Hatcher; S. Eser

    1998-01-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet fuels has five components: 1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; 2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles during thermal stressing; 3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; 4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and 5) assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics from coal.

  1. Temperature distribution in a sample with second-phase microinclusions during irradiation by a low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepel', D. A.; Markov, A. B.

    2017-02-01

    Using the methods of numerical integration, a temperature field has been calculated that arose in the surface layer of titanium nickelide target with NiTi2 intermetallic inclusions during irradiation by a lowenergy high-current electron beam with a duration of the order of a microsecond. The calculated temperature field has been compared with that obtained previously for a target of stainless steel 316L containing MnS inclusions. It has been found that, as in the case of stainless steel, the regions of inclusions are overheated. However, the temperature increase for NiTi2 (12 K) is significantly lower than in the case of stainless steel 316L (283 K). The dynamics of melting of these systems are also considerably different.

  2. Measurement of ion species in high current ECR H{sup +}/D{sup +} ion source for IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Shinto, K. Ichimiya, R.; Ihara, A.; Ikeda, Y.; Kasugai, A.; Kitano, T.; Kondo, K.; Takahashi, H.; Senée, F.; Bolzon, B.; Chauvin, N.; Gobin, R.; Valette, M.

    2016-02-15

    Ion species ratio of high current positive hydrogen/deuterium ion beams extracted from an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source for International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility accelerator was measured by the Doppler shift Balmer-α line spectroscopy. The proton (H{sup +}) ratio at the middle of the low energy beam transport reached 80% at the hydrogen ion beam extraction of 100 keV/160 mA and the deuteron (D{sup +}) ratio reached 75% at the deuterium ion beam extraction of 100 keV/113 mA. It is found that the H{sup +} ratio measured by the spectroscopy gives lower than that derived from the phase-space diagram measured by an Allison scanner type emittance monitor. The H{sup +}/D{sup +} ratio estimated by the emittance monitor was more than 90% at those extraction currents.

  3. Measurement of DNA Double-Strand Break Yield in Human Cancer Cells by High-Current, Short-Duration Bunches of Laser-Accelerated Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, Akifumi; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Maeda, Takuya; Sakaki, Hironao; Hori, Toshihiko; Ogura, Koichi; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Kondo, Kiminori; Bolton, Paul R.; Kawanishi, Shunichi

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the radiobiological effects of high dose rates that are attributed to high current, short bunch beam generation with laser-dreven ion acceleration, we have developed an experimental setup that uses laser-accelerated protons. In-vitro human lung cancer cells: A549 pulmonary adenocarcinoma are irradiated with a laser-accelerated proton bunches with a duration of 2×10-8 s and flux of ˜1015 cm-2 s-1, amounting to single bunch absorbed dose at the 1 Gy level. The double-strand break (DSB) yield in cell DNA is analyzed for the laser-accelerated proton beam at an average LET of 41 keV/µm.

  4. Switching performance and efficiency investigation of GaN based DC-DC Buck converter for low voltage and high current applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatawi, Khaled; Almasoudi, Fahad; Matin, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    The Wide band-gap (WBG) materials "such as Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Gallium nitride (GaN)" based power switching devices provide higher performance capabilities compared to Si-based power switching devices. The wide band-gap materials based power switching devices outperform Si-based devices in many performance characteristics such as: low witching loss, low conduction loss, high switching frequencies, and high operation temperature. GaN based switching devices benefit a lot of applications such as: future electric vehicles and solar power inverters. In this paper, a DC-DC Buck converter based on GaN FET for low voltage and high current applications is designed and investigated. The converter is designed for stepping down a voltage of 48V to 12V with high switching frequency. The capability of the GaN FET based buck converter is studied and compared to equivalent SiC MOSFET and Si-based MOSFET buck converters. The analysis of switching losses and efficiency was performed to compare the performance capabilities of GaN FET, SiC MOSFET and Si-based MOSFET. The results showed that the overall switching losses of GaN FET are lower than that of SiC and Si-based power switching devices. Also, the performance capability of GaN devices with higher frequencies is studied. GaN devices with high frequencies will reduce the total size and the cost of the power converter. In Addition, the overall efficiency of the DC-DC Buck converter is higher with the GaN FET switching devices, which make it more suitable for low voltage and high current applications.

  5. Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, J. D.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  6. DNA-Grafted Janus Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, Ching; Lin, Keng-Hui; Juan, Wen-Tau

    2008-03-01

    Recently there have been advances in generating Janus microspheres whose two hemispheres have different chemical compositions [1-4]. The new types of particles open up possibilities for assembly of complex structures. Here we attach DNA molecules onto one side of Janus microspheres. The new type of colloidal particles resembles surfactant molecules and may give us interesting new structures.Reference: [1] Y. Lu, H. Xiong, X. Jiang, Y.Xia, M. Prentiss and G. M.Whitesides, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 12724 (2003) [2] O.Cayre, V. N.Paunov and O. D. Velev, J. Mater. Chem. 13, 2445 (2003) [3] R. F. Shepherd, J. C. Conrad, S. K. Rhodes, D. R. Link, M. Marquez, D. A. Weitz and J. A. Lewis, Langmuir 22, 8618 (2006) [4] L. Hong, S. Jiang and S. Granick, Langmuir 22, 9495 (2006)

  7. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley Miller; Rich Gebert; William Swanson

    1999-11-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the US Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a manner that has not been done before. The AHPC concept consists of a combination of fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emission with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC is currently being tested at the 2.7-MW scale at the Big Stone power station.

  8. Manifestations of advanced civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracewell, R. N.

    A list of possible modes of detecting advanced civilizations elsewhere in the universe is provided, including EM Alfven, and gravity waves, matter transfer, and exotica such as tachyons, black hole tunneling, and telepathy. Further study is indicated for low frequency radio wave propagation, which may travel along magnetic fields to reach the earth while laser beams are not favored because of the power needed for transmitting quanta instead of waves. IR, X ray, and UV astronomy are noted to be suitable for detecting signals in those ranges, while Alfven wave communication will be best observed by probes outside the orbit of Jupiter, where local anomalies have less effect. Particle propagation communication is viewed as unlikely, except as a trace of an extinct civilization, but panspermia, which involves interstellar spreading of seeds and/or spores, receives serious attention, as does laser probe or pellet propulsion.

  9. Particle Tracks in Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment using a special air gun, particles are shot into aerogel at high velocities. Closeup of particles that have been captured in aerogel are shown here. The particles leave a carrot-shaped trail in the aerogel. Aerogel was used on the Stardust spacecraft to capture comet particles from Comet Wild 2.

  10. Tutorial on Solar Energetic-Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonRosenvinge, Tycho T.

    2004-01-01

    Particles from the Sun at energies above approx. 1 MeV/nucleon have been studied in space for over 35 years. There have been major advances in instrumentation for studying elemental and isotopic composition, kinetic energy, charge states, time intensity histories, and anisotropies of energetic particles. There have also been extensive improvements in the observations of solar phenomena, including radio bursts, Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), and solar photons from soft X-ray to gamma-ray energies. Despite these advances, there is a lack of agreement as to the acceleration processes responsible for the particles seen in space shortly after the solar event. In particular, the relative importance of solar flares and CME-driven shocks is disputed for events of moderate to larger size. The reasons for this will be reviewed, and the prospects for resolving this issue will be evaluated.

  11. High beta, sawtooth-free tokamak operation using energetic trapped particles

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Bussac, M.N.; Romanelli, F.

    1988-08-01

    It is shown that a population of high energy trapped particles, such as that produced by ion cyclotron heating in tokamaks, can result in a plasma completely stable to both sawtooth oscillations and the fishbone mode. The stable window of operation increases in size with plasma temperature and with trapped particle energy, and provides a means of obtaining a stable plasma with high current and high beta. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Particle Detectors: Research and Development at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Fabjan, C. W.

    2008-04-21

    Over the past 15 years a worldwide Detector R and D Programme has made the LHC experiments possible. These experiments operate at a new level of event rate and detection capabilities. Based on these advances, Detector R and D is continuing at CERN in close collaboration with University and Research Institutes. Several main directions are being pursued for solid-state and gaseous tracking devices, advanced crystal and noble liquid calorimetry, particle identification methods, and advanced signal-processing techniques. This effort is directed towards experiments at even higher collision rates at the LHC, the requirements for the next generation of linear electron-positron colliders and for applications outside particle physics, such as medical diagnostics instrumentation. We shall illustrate this challenging, stimulating and creative programme with examples and show how these developments are taking place in close collaboration between CERN and institutions around the globe.

  13. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  14. Superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padamsee, H.

    1992-02-01

    RF Superconductivity has become an important technology for particle accelerators for high energy physics, nuclear physics, and free electron lasers. More than 100 MVolts of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities have been installed in accelerators for heavy ions and operated at gradients of 2-3 MV/m in excess of 105 hours. More than 500 MVolts are installed in electron accelerators and operated at gradients of 4-6 MV/m in excess of 104 hours. Encouraged by this success, another 500 meters of SRF cavities are in the production line. New applications for High Energy Physics are forthcoming for high current e+e- colliders in the B-quark energy range (B-factory). For the next linear collider in the TeV energy range, there are many compelling attractions to use SRF, if the gradients can be improved substantially and the costs lowered. Substantial progress has been made in understanding performance limitations and in inventing cures through better cavity geometries, materials, and processes. Techniques are now in hand to reach 15-20 MV/m accelerating. In light of this progress, the potential of high gradient SRF for a TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) will be explored.

  15. Theoretical and experimental examination of particle-particle interaction effects on induced dipole moments and dielectrophoretic responses of multiple particle chains.

    PubMed

    Moncada-Hernandez, Hector; Nagler, Eliot; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2014-07-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), an electrokinetic phenomenon based on particle polarizations in nonuniform electric fields, is increasingly employed for particle and cell characterizations and manipulations in microdevices. However, particle number densities are rarely varied and particle-particle interactions are largely overlooked, but both affect particle's effective polarizations by changing the local electric field, which directly impacts particle assembly into chains. This work examines theoretical and experimental particle-particle interactions and dielectrophoretic responses in nonuniform electric fields, then presents individual and chain velocities of spherical polystyrene microparticles and red blood cells (RBCs) under DEP forces in a modified quadruple electrode microdevice. Velocities are independently compared between 1, 2, 3, and 4 polystyrene beads and RBCs assembled into chains aligned with the electric field. Simulations compared induced dipole moments for particles experiencing the same (single point) and changing (multiple points) electric fields. Experiments and simulations are compared by plotting DEP velocities versus applied signal frequency from 1 kHz to 80 MHz. Simulations indicate differences in the DEP force exerted on each particle according to chain position. Simulations and experiments show excellent qualitative agreement; chains with more particles experienced a decrease in the DEP response for both polystyrene beads and RBCs. These results advance understanding of the extent that induced dipole polarizations with multiple particle chains affect observed behaviors in electrokinetic cellular diagnostic systems.

  16. Long-term cycle stability at a high current for nanocrystalline LiFePO4 coated with a conductive polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Hung-Cuong; Lim, Hanjo; Park, Ki Dong; Yeo, In-Hyeong; Kang, Yongku; Mho, Sun-il

    2013-03-01

    Highly uniform hierarchical-microstructured LiFePO4 particles with dumbbell- and donut-shape and individual LiFePO4 nanocrystals were prepared by a hydrothermal method utilizing citric acid or a triblock copolymer (Pluronic P123) as a surfactant. The cathode composed of the individual nanocrystalline LiFePO4 particles exhibited higher specific capacity than the cathodes composed of the hierarchically assembled microparticles. Coating a conductive polymer, poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT), on the surface of LiFePO4 particles improved the battery performances such as large specific capacities, high rate capability and an improved cycle stability. The nanocrystalline LiFePO4 particles coated with PEDOT (20 wt%) exhibited the highest discharge capacities of 175 and 136 mAh g-1 for the first battery cycle and 163 and 128 mAh g-1 after 500 battery cycles, with a degradation rate of 6-7%, at the rates of 1 and 10 C, respectively.

  17. Multiphase Instabilities in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S. ``Bala''

    2015-11-01

    Explosive dispersal of particles is a complex multiphase phenomenon that can be observed in volcanic eruptions or in engineering applications such as multiphase explosives. As the layer of particles moves outward at high speed, it undergoes complex interactions with the blast-wave structure following the reaction of the energetic material. Particularly in this work, we are interested in the multiphase flow instabilities related to Richmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RM) instabilities (in the gas phase and particulate phase), which take place as the particle layer disperses. These types of instabilities are known to depend on initial conditions for a relatively long time of their evolution. Using a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, we study the growth of these instabilities and their dependence on initial conditions related to the particulate phase - namely, (i) particle size, (ii) initial distribution, and (iii) mass ratio (particles to explosive). Additional complexities associated with compaction of the layer of particles are avoided here by limiting the simulations to modest initial volume fraction of particles. A detailed analysis of the initial conditions and its effects on multiphase RM/RT-like instabilities in the context of an explosive dispersal of particles is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  18. Particle capture device

    DOEpatents

    Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2016-02-23

    In example embodiments, particle collection efficiency in aerosol analyzers and other particle measuring instruments is improved by a particle capture device that employs multiple collisions to decrease momentum of particles until the particles are collected (e.g., vaporized or come to rest). The particle collection device includes an aperture through which a focused particle beam enters. A collection enclosure is coupled to the aperture and has one or more internal surfaces against which particles of the focused beam collide. One or more features are employed in the collection enclosure to promote particles to collide multiple times within the enclosure, and thereby be vaporized or come to rest, rather than escape through the aperture.

  19. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

    1987-11-30

    Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

  20. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, John C.; Buican, Tudor N.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser defines an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam interrogates the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam intersects the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis.

  1. Particle processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, there has been strong demand for the development of novel devices and equipment that support advanced industries including IT/semiconductors, the environment, energy and aerospace along with the achievement of higher efficiency and reduced environmental impact. Many studies have been conducted on the fabrication of innovative inorganic materials with novel individual properties and/or multifunctional properties including electrical, dielectric, thermal, optical, chemical and mechanical properties through the development of particle processing. The fundamental technologies that are key to realizing such materials are (i) the synthesis of nanoparticles with uniform composition and controlled crystallite size, (ii) the arrangement/assembly and controlled dispersion of nanoparticles with controlled particle size, (iii) the precise structural control at all levels from micrometer to nanometer order and (iv) the nanostructural design based on theoretical/experimental studies of the correlation between the local structure and the functions of interest. In particular, it is now understood that the application of an external stimulus, such as magnetic energy, electrical energy and/or stress, to a reaction field is effective in realizing advanced particle processing [1-3]. This special issue comprises 12 papers including three review papers. Among them, seven papers are concerned with phosphor particles, such as silicon, metals, Si3N4-related nitrides, rare-earth oxides, garnet oxides, rare-earth sulfur oxides and rare-earth hydroxides. In these papers, the effects of particle size, morphology, dispersion, surface states, dopant concentration and other factors on the optical properties of phosphor particles and their applications are discussed. These nanoparticles are classified as zero-dimensional materials. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and graphene are well-known one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) materials, respectively. This special issue also

  2. Advanced Computation in Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, William

    2001-10-01

    Scientific simulation in tandem with theory and experiment is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. This talk will review recent progress and future directions for advanced simulations in magnetically-confined plasmas with illustrative examples chosen from areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, magnetic reconnection, and others. Significant recent progress has been made in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics, giving increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was made possible by innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales together with access to powerful new computational resources. In particular, the fusion energy science community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel machines (MPP's). A good example is the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop MPP's to produce 3-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. It should be emphasized that these calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for tens of thousands time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In general, results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. The associated scientific excitement should serve to stimulate improved cross-cutting collaborations with other fields and also to help attract

  3. Advanced computations in plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W. M.

    2002-05-01

    Scientific simulation in tandem with theory and experiment is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. In this paper we review recent progress and future directions for advanced simulations in magnetically confined plasmas with illustrative examples chosen from magnetic confinement research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, magnetic reconnection, and others. Significant recent progress has been made in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics, giving increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was made possible by innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales together with access to powerful new computational resources. In particular, the fusion energy science community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel machines (MPP's). A good example is the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop (multi-trillion floating point computations per second) MPP's to produce three-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. It should be emphasized that these calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for thousands of time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In general, results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. The associated scientific excitement should serve to

  4. Shock Particle Interaction - Fully Resolved Simulations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Yash; Neal, Chris; Jackson, Thomas L.; Balachandar, S. "Bala"; Thakur, Siddharth

    2016-11-01

    Currently there is a substantial lack of fully resolved data for shock interacting with multiple particles. In this talk we will fill this gap by presenting results of shock interaction with 1-D array and 3-D structured arrays of particles. Objectives of performing fully resolved simulations of shock propagation through packs of multiple particles are twofold, 1) To understand the complicated physical phenomena occurring during shock particle interaction, and 2) To translate the knowledge from microscale simulations in building next generation point-particle models for macroscale simulations that can better predict the motion (forces) and heat transfer for particles. We compare results from multiple particle simulations against the single particle simulations and make relevant observations. The drag history and flow field for multiple particle simulations are markedly different from those of single particle simluations, highlighting the effect of neighboring particles. We propose new models which capture this effect of neighboring particles. These models are called Pair-wise Interaction Extended Point Particle models (PIEP). Effect of multiple neighboring particles is broken down into pair-wise interactions, and these pair-wise interactions are superimposed to get the final model U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  5. Thermal Cycling Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings with MCrAlY Bond Coat Irradiated by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Lv, Peng; Guan, Qingfeng; Xu, Xiaojing; Lu, Jinzhong; Wang, Zhiping; Han, Zhiyong

    2016-11-30

    Microstructural modifications of a thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coat subjected to high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) and their relationships with thermal cycling behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were investigated. Microstructural observations revealed that the rough surface of air plasma spraying (APS) samples was significantly remelted and replaced by many interconnected bulged nodules after HCPEB irradiation. Meanwhile, the parallel columnar grains with growth direction perpendicular to the coating surface were observed inside these bulged nodules. Substantial Y-rich Al2O3 bubbles and varieties of nanocrystallines were distributed evenly on the top of the modified layer. A physical model was proposed to describe the evaporation-condensation mechanism taking place at the irradiated surface for generating such surface morphologies. The results of thermal cycling test showed that HCPEB-TBCs presented higher thermal cycling resistance, the spalling area of which after 200 cycles accounted for only 1% of its total area, while it was about 34% for APS-TBCs. The resulting failure mode, i.e., in particular, a mixed delamination crack path, was shown and discussed. The irradiated effects including compact remelted surface, abundant nanoparticles, refined columnar grains, Y-rich alumina bubbles, and deformation structures contributed to the formation of a stable, continuous, slow-growing, and uniform thermally grown oxide with strong adherent ability. It appeared to be responsible for releasing stress and changing the cracking paths, and ultimately greatly improving the thermal cycling behavior of HCPEB-TBCs.

  6. High current density GaAs/Si rectifying heterojunction by defect free Epitaxial Lateral overgrowth on Tunnel Oxide from nano-seed

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Charles; Molière, Timothée; Cherkashin, Nikolay; Alvarez, José; Vincent, Laetitia; Jaffré, Alexandre; Hallais, Géraldine; Connolly, James Patrick; Mencaraglia, Denis; Bouchier, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the heteroepitaxy of GaAs on Si has never failed in the last years due to the potential for monolithic integration of GaAs-based devices with Si integrated circuits. But in spite of this effort, devices fabricated from them still use homo-epitaxy only. Here we present an epitaxial technique based on the epitaxial lateral overgrowth of micrometer scale GaAs crystals on a thin SiO2 layer from nanoscale Si seeds. This method permits the integration of high quality and defect-free crystalline GaAs on Si substrate and provides active GaAs/Si heterojunctions with efficient carrier transport through the thin SiO2 layer. The nucleation from small width openings avoids the emission of misfit dislocations and the formation of antiphase domains. With this method, we have experimentally demonstrated for the first time a monolithically integrated GaAs/Si diode with high current densities of 10 kA.cm−2 for a forward bias of 3.7 V. This epitaxial technique paves the way to hybrid III–V/Si devices that are free from lattice-matching restrictions, and where silicon not only behaves as a substrate but also as an active medium. PMID:27142097

  7. High current density GaAs/Si rectifying heterojunction by defect free Epitaxial Lateral overgrowth on Tunnel Oxide from nano-seed.

    PubMed

    Renard, Charles; Molière, Timothée; Cherkashin, Nikolay; Alvarez, José; Vincent, Laetitia; Jaffré, Alexandre; Hallais, Géraldine; Connolly, James Patrick; Mencaraglia, Denis; Bouchier, Daniel

    2016-05-04

    Interest in the heteroepitaxy of GaAs on Si has never failed in the last years due to the potential for monolithic integration of GaAs-based devices with Si integrated circuits. But in spite of this effort, devices fabricated from them still use homo-epitaxy only. Here we present an epitaxial technique based on the epitaxial lateral overgrowth of micrometer scale GaAs crystals on a thin SiO2 layer from nanoscale Si seeds. This method permits the integration of high quality and defect-free crystalline GaAs on Si substrate and provides active GaAs/Si heterojunctions with efficient carrier transport through the thin SiO2 layer. The nucleation from small width openings avoids the emission of misfit dislocations and the formation of antiphase domains. With this method, we have experimentally demonstrated for the first time a monolithically integrated GaAs/Si diode with high current densities of 10 kA.cm(-2) for a forward bias of 3.7 V. This epitaxial technique paves the way to hybrid III-V/Si devices that are free from lattice-matching restrictions, and where silicon not only behaves as a substrate but also as an active medium.

  8. Vertical organic light-emitting transistor showing a high current on/off ratio through dielectric encapsulation for the effective charge pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyujeong; Lee, In-Ho; Park, Hea-Lim; Lee, Sin-Hyung; Han, Jongseok; Lee, Changhee; Keum, Chang-Min; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a vertical organic light emitting transistor (VOLET) showing a high current on/off ratio through dielectric encapsulation of a finger-like source electrode, which is placed between the bottom gate electrode and the top drain electrode. In such a VOLET configuration, the charge transport occurs largely from the source electrode to an underlying organic semiconductor (OSC) layer through the interface between the OSC and the gate insulator. Accordingly, the current leakage is greatly reduced and the transistor-type switching behavior with a high on/off current ratio is achieved. The on/off current ratio of our VOLET is about 100 times higher than that of an existing VOLET with no dielectric encapsulation. Numerical simulations of the spatial distributions of the charge densities and the charge pathways performed in the two different VOLET configurations are in good agreement with the experimental results. Our dielectric encapsulation approach will provide a versatile method for developing a new class of high-performance OLET displays.

  9. Neutralization of space charge on high-current low-energy ion beam by low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Yasuhito; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Shuhei; Ikeda, Keita; Kitagawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki

    2012-11-06

    Neutralization of space charge on a high-current and low-energy ion beam was attempted to reduce the divergence with an aid of low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). An argon ion beam with the energy of 500 eV and the current of 0.25 mA was produced by a microwave ion source. The initial beam divergence and the emittance were measured at the entrance of the analysis chamber in order to estimate the intrinsic factors for beam divergence. The current density distribution of the beam after transport of 730 mm was measured by a movable Faraday cup, with and without electron supply from Si-FEAs. A similar experiment was performed with tungsten filaments as an electron source. The results indicated that the electron supply from FEA had almost the same effect as the thermionic filament, and it was confirmed that both electron sources can neutralize the ion beam.

  10. Plasma modified production of high-current, high-purity cw H{sup +}, D{sup +}, and H{sup -} beams from microwave-driven sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, D.; Lykke, K.R.; McMichael, G.E.

    1996-10-01

    We have recently reported production of cw proton beams from magnetically confined microwave-driven sources, operating under nonresonant (non-ECR) conditions, with proton fractions > 0.95, the remaining fraction consisting of H{sub 2}{sup +} (0.05) with no H{sub 3}{sup +}. We achieve this by adding H{sub 2}O to the plasma at molecular concentrations of 1% and about 700 W 2.45 GHz RF power to the source. High-current (45 mA) high-power (45 kV) beams of >92% proton purity have been produced using this technique. Additional impurity ions O{sup +} at 4ppt and OH{sup +} and H{sub 2}O{sup +} at << 1ppt are produced. We report further progress using this technique and similar results achieved for cw D{sup +} beams with D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O additives. Finally, we report progress made in the direct extraction of cw H{sup -} beams from microwave-driven sources in terms of ion source surface material and confining magnetic field configurations. Mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Formation of microcraters and hierarchically-organized surface structures in TiNi shape memory alloy irradiated with a low-energy, high-current electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, L. L. Meisner, S. N.; Markov, A. B. Ozur, G. E. Yakovlev, E. V.; Rotshtein, V. P.; Gudimova, E. Yu.

    2015-10-27

    The regularities of surface cratering in TiNi alloy irradiated with a low-energy, high-current electron beam (LEHCEB) in dependence on energy density and number of pulses are studied. LEHCEB processing of TiNi samples was carried out using RITM-SP facility. Energy density E{sub s} was varied from 1 to 5 J/cm{sup 2}, pulse duration was 2.5–3.0 μs, the number of pulses n = 1–128. The dominant role of non-metallic inclusions [mainly, TiC(O)] in the nucleation of microcraters was found. It was revealed that at small number of pulses (n = 2), an increase in energy density leads both to increasing average diameter and density of microcraters. An increase in the number of pulses leads to a monotonic decrease in density of microcraters, and, therefore, that of the proportion of the area occupied by microcraters, as well as a decrease in the surface roughness. The multiple LEHCEB melting of TiNi alloy in crater-free modes enables to form quasi-periodical, hierarchically-organized microsized surface structures.

  12. Producing nano-grained and Al-enriched surface microstructure on AZ91 magnesium alloy by high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Shengzhi; Li, Mincai

    2016-05-01

    Surface treatment of AZ91 magnesium alloy was carried out by high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) with accelerating voltage 27 kV and energy density 3 J/cm2. The surface microstructure and phase composition were characterized by using optical microscope (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The surface microhardness and corrosion resistance were measured. Under HCPEB treatments, the preferential evaporation of Mg element occurred intensively on irradiated surface and the initial large Mg17Al12 phases were dissolved. The nano-grained and Al-enriched surface modified layer was ultimately formed of depth ∼8 μm. According to the testing results, the surface microhardness increased from 63 to 141 HK after 30 pulses of HCPEB treatment, while the best improvement of corrosion resistance was obtained by 15 pulses of HCPEB treatment with a cathodic current density decreased by two orders of magnitude as compared with the initial AZ91 sample.

  13. Development of a low-energy and high-current pulsed neutral beam injector with a washer-gun plasma source for high-beta plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Ii, Toru; Gi, Keii; Umezawa, Toshiyuki; Asai, Tomohiko; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a novel and economical neutral-beam injection system by employing a washer-gun plasma source. It provides a low-cost and maintenance-free ion beam, thus eliminating the need for the filaments and water-cooling systems employed conventionally. In our primary experiments, the washer gun produced a source plasma with an electron temperature of approximately 5 eV and an electron density of 5 × 10(17) m(-3), i.e., conditions suitable for ion-beam extraction. The dependence of the extracted beam current on the acceleration voltage is consistent with space-charge current limitation, because the observed current density is almost proportional to the 3/2 power of the acceleration voltage below approximately 8 kV. By optimizing plasma formation, we successfully achieved beam extraction of up to 40 A at 15 kV and a pulse length in excess of 0.25 ms. Its low-voltage and high-current pulsed-beam properties enable us to apply this high-power neutral beam injection into a high-beta compact torus plasma characterized by a low magnetic field.

  14. Estimates if population inversion for deep-UV transitions in Kr-like Y,Zr,Nb and Mo in a high-current reflex discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Finkenthal, M, May, M J; Fournier, K; Goldstein, W H; Shlyaptsev, V N; Soukhanovskii, V; Stutman, D

    1999-07-06

    Kr-like ions are good candidates for FUV lasing since they can be produced in plasmas quite easily. We present results from a spectroscopic investigation of Y IV emission from a high current density, cold cathode reflex discharge. The Y II to Y V emission is recorded in the 200-3000 {angstrom} range using photometrically calibrated spectrometers, while the emission of trace aluminum ions serves for plasma diagnostics. The intensities of the Y IV 4d - 5p and 5s - 5p transitions strongly increase relative to lines from Y II and Y III with increasing plasma current. The spectra studied here are obtained at a current density of 1.75 A/cm{sup 2}. Experimental Y IV intensity ratios spanning several excited configurations are compared with collisional radiative predictions of the HULLAC atomic physics package. Good agreement is found for the measured and predicted ratios of 4p{sup 5}5p to 4p{sup 5}5s level populations per statistical weight. Finally, the response of the Kr-like system to a fast, transient excitation pulse is examined using the RADEX code. Large transient gains are predicted for several 5s - 5p transitions in Y IV, Zr V, Nb VI and Mo VII.

  15. Efficiency roll-off suppression in organic light-emitting diodes using size-tunable bimetallic bowtie nanoantennas at high current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yukun; Yun, Feng; Huang, Yi; Wu, Zhaoxin; Li, Yufeng; Jiao, Bo; Feng, Lungang; Li, Sanfeng; Ding, Wen; Zhang, Ye

    2016-07-01

    Size-tunable bimetallic bowtie nanoantennas have been utilized to suppress the efficiency roll-off characteristics in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) using both the numerical and experimental approaches. The resonant range can be widened by the strong dual-atomic couplings in bimetallic bowtie nanoantennas. Compared with the green OLED with conventional bowtie nanoantennas at a high current density of 800 mA/cm2, the measured efficiency roll-off ratio of the OLED with size-modulated bowtie nanoantennas is decreased from 53.2% to 41.8%, and the measured current efficiency is enhanced by 29.9%. When the size-modulated bowtie nanoantennas are utilized in blue phosphorescent OLEDs, the experimental roll-off ratio is suppressed from 43.6% to 25.9% at 250 mA/cm2, and the measured current efficiency is also enhanced significantly. It is proposed that the efficiency roll-off suppression is mainly related to the enhanced localized surface plasmon effect, which leads to a shorter radiative lifetime.

  16. High current density GaAs/Si rectifying heterojunction by defect free Epitaxial Lateral overgrowth on Tunnel Oxide from nano-seed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Charles; Molière, Timothée; Cherkashin, Nikolay; Alvarez, José; Vincent, Laetitia; Jaffré, Alexandre; Hallais, Géraldine; Connolly, James Patrick; Mencaraglia, Denis; Bouchier, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Interest in the heteroepitaxy of GaAs on Si has never failed in the last years due to the potential for monolithic integration of GaAs-based devices with Si integrated circuits. But in spite of this effort, devices fabricated from them still use homo-epitaxy only. Here we present an epitaxial technique based on the epitaxial lateral overgrowth of micrometer scale GaAs crystals on a thin SiO2 layer from nanoscale Si seeds. This method permits the integration of high quality and defect-free crystalline GaAs on Si substrate and provides active GaAs/Si heterojunctions with efficient carrier transport through the thin SiO2 layer. The nucleation from small width openings avoids the emission of misfit dislocations and the formation of antiphase domains. With this method, we have experimentally demonstrated for the first time a monolithically integrated GaAs/Si diode with high current densities of 10 kA.cm‑2 for a forward bias of 3.7 V. This epitaxial technique paves the way to hybrid III–V/Si devices that are free from lattice-matching restrictions, and where silicon not only behaves as a substrate but also as an active medium.

  17. High-Current and High-Transconductance Self-Aligned P+-GaAs Junction HFET of Complete Enhancement-Mode Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishii, Katsunori; Yokoyama, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Shinji; Tamura, Akiyoshi; Inoue, Kaoru

    1999-04-01

    High-current and high-transconductance self-aligned p+-GaAs junction HFETs (PJ-HFETs) of a complete enhancement-mode operation have been developed for the first time. Due to the advantages of the p/n junction, the barrier height of 1.12 eV has been obtained. To obtain high activation for the Si implanted epitaxial layers, we optimized theannealing conditions. The 0.8 µm-gate complete enhancement mode PJ-HFET with a large forward gate voltage swing of more than 1.5 V exhibited a K-value of 400 mS/Vmm, a maximum transconductance (gmMAX) of 410 mS/mm and a maximum drain current (IMAX) of 380 mA/mm with a threshold voltage (Vth) of 0.2 V. The standard deviation of Vth was 18.4 mV across a 3 inch wafer. Operated with a drain bias of 3.3 V, the PJ-HFET demonstrated a power-added efficiency (PAE) of 39.5% with an adjacent channel leakage ratio (ACPR) of -57.4 dBc at an output power (Pout) of 21.5 dBm and a frequency of 1.9 GHz.

  18. Optimization of BaZrO3 concentration as secondary phase in superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 for high current applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Bilal A.; Malik, Manzoor A.; Asokan, K.

    2016-04-01

    We report the superconducting state properties of YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) on introduction of BaZrO3 (BZO) as a secondary phase. YBCO+xBZO (x= 0, 2, 4, 6, and 10 wt%) composite samples were prepared by solid state reaction method and characterized for structural, morphological and superconducting properties. X-ray diffraction confirms the increased crystallinity and images of scanning electron microscopy measurement show an increase in both grain size and grain connectivity on addition of BZO in YBCO. These effects are well pronounced in an applied magnetic field. Critical current density, JC, as well as the pinning force peaks at 4% of BZO concentration showed significant difference. A three-fold enhancement in JC and a six-fold enhancement in pinning force were observed at this optimum BZO concentration. This has been attributed to the pinning of flux lines in YBCO due to introduction of BZO as a secondary phase. These results show that this composite has potential application in high current applications.

  19. Basics of particle therapy I: physics.

    PubMed

    Park, Seo Hyun; Kang, Jin Oh

    2011-09-01

    With the advance of modern radiation therapy technique, radiation dose conformation and dose distribution have improved dramatically. However, the progress does not completely fulfill the goal of cancer treatment such as improved local control or survival. The discordances with the clinical results are from the biophysical nature of photon, which is the main source of radiation therapy in current field, with the lower linear energy transfer to the target. As part of a natural progression, there recently has been a resurgence of interest in particle therapy, specifically using heavy charged particles, because these kinds of radiations serve theoretical advantages in both biological and physical aspects. The Korean government is to set up a heavy charged particle facility in Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences. This review introduces some of the elementary physics of the various particles for the sake of Korean radiation oncologists' interest.

  20. Charged Particle lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Research development in the Charged Particle Lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE) is reported. The CPLEE is ion-electron spectrometer placed on the lunar surface for the purpose of measuring charged particle fluxes impacting the moon from a variety of regions and to study the interactions between space plasmas and the lunar surface. The principal accomplishments reported include: (1) furnishing design specifications for construction of the CPLEE instruments; (2) development of an advanced computer-controlled facility for automated instrument calibration; (3) active participation in the deployment and past-deployment operational phases with regard to data verification and operational mode selection; and (4) publication of research papers, including a study of lunar photoelectrons, a study of plasmas resulting from man-made lunar impart events, a study of magnetotail and magnetosheath particle populations, and a study of solar-flare interplanetary particles.

  1. Basics of particle therapy I: physics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seo Hyun

    2011-01-01

    With the advance of modern radiation therapy technique, radiation dose conformation and dose distribution have improved dramatically. However, the progress does not completely fulfill the goal of cancer treatment such as improved local control or survival. The discordances with the clinical results are from the biophysical nature of photon, which is the main source of radiation therapy in current field, with the lower linear energy transfer to the target. As part of a natural progression, there recently has been a resurgence of interest in particle therapy, specifically using heavy charged particles, because these kinds of radiations serve theoretical advantages in both biological and physical aspects. The Korean government is to set up a heavy charged particle facility in Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences. This review introduces some of the elementary physics of the various particles for the sake of Korean radiation oncologists' interest. PMID:22984664

  2. Acoustic Resonator Optimisation for Airborne Particle Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devendran, Citsabehsan; Billson, Duncan R.; Hutchins, David A.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    Advances in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and biomedical research necessitate micro-machined manipulators to capture, handle and position delicate micron-sized particles. To this end, a parallel plate acoustic resonator system has been investigated for the purposes of manipulation and entrapment of micron sized particles in air. Numerical and finite element modelling was performed to optimise the design of the layered acoustic resonator. To obtain an optimised resonator design, careful considerations of the effect of thickness and material properties are required. Furthermore, the effect of acoustic attenuation which is dependent on frequency is also considered within this study, leading to an optimum operational frequency range. Finally, experimental results demonstrated good particle levitation and capture of various particle properties and sizes ranging to as small as 14.8 μm.

  3. Solar Neutral Particles

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows a neutral solar particle's path leaving the sun, following the magnetic field lines out to the heliosheath. The solar particle hits a hydrogen atom, stealing its electron, and ...

  4. Charged Particle Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    Improved version of Faraday cup increases accuracy of measurements of flux density of charged particles incident along axis through collection aperture. Geometry of cone-and-sensing cup combination assures most particles are trapped.

  5. Particle physics: Axions exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Maria Paola

    2016-11-01

    Physicists are hunting for a particle called the axion that could solve two major puzzles in fundamental physics. An ambitious study calculates the expected mass of this particle, which might reshape the experimental searches. See Letter p.69

  6. Particle exposures and infections

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Ci...

  7. Classical confined particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    An alternative picture of classical many body mechanics is proposed. In this picture particles possess individual kinematics but are deprived from individual dynamics. Dynamics exists only for the many particle system as a whole. The theory is complete and allows to determine the trajectories of each particle. It is proposed to use our picture as a classical prototype for a realistic theory of confined particles.

  8. Solar flare particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the solar particles accelerated by solar flares and subsequently observed near the orbit of the earth are studied. Considered are solar particle intensity-time profiles, the composition and spectra of solar flare events, and the propagation of solar particles in interplanetary space. The effects of solar particles at the earth, riometer observations of polar cap cosmic noise absorption events, and the production of solar cell damage at synchronous altitudes by solar protons are also discussed.

  9. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  10. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  11. Particle charge spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An airflow through a tube is used to guide a charged particle through the tube. A detector may be used to detect charge passing through the tube on the particle. The movement of the particle through the tube may be used to both detect its charge and size.

  12. When is a Particle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drell, Sidney D.

    1978-01-01

    Gives a new definition for the concept of the elementary particle in nuclear physics. Explains why the existance of the quark as an elementary particle could be an accepted fact even though it lacks what traditionally identifies a particle. Compares this with the development which took place during the discovery of the neutrino in the early…

  13. Energetic charged particle beams for disablement of mines

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.

    1995-03-27

    LLNL has an ongoing program of weapons disablement using energetic charged particle beams; this program combines theoretical and experimental expertise in accelerators, high-energy and nuclear physics, plasma physics and hydrodynamics to simulate/measure effects of electron and proton beams on weapons. This paper reviews work by LLNL, LANL and NSWC on detonating sensitive and insensitive high explosives and land mines using high-current electron beams. Computer simulations are given. 20--160 MeV electron beams incident on wet/dry soils are being studied, along with electron beam propagation in air. Compact high current, high energy accelerators are being developed for mine clearing. Countermine missions of interest are discussed. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Improvement of III-nitride visible and ultraviolet light-emitting diode performance, including extraction efficiency, electrical efficiency, thermal management and efficiency maintenance at high current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vampola, Kenneth

    In this work, highly efficient broad-area LEDs on bulk GaN substrates were developed and the fabrication process and device layout were optimized. This optimization relied in part on electrical, optical, thermal and recombination models. The peak external quantum efficiency of the 450 nm LEDs was over 68% when biased at 20 mA. The efficiency characteristic showed a typical droop curve, decreasing at high current densities. The cause of this droop is unknown. An exploratory experiment was conducted to characterize electron overflow and its role in efficiency droop. Novel device structures were developed, allowing direct measurement of overflow electrons in LED-like structures under electrical injection. In these test structures, electrons were observed in the p-type region of the LED only at current densities where efficiency droop was active. The onset of efficiency droop was preceded by the onset of electron overflow. However, the magnitude of the overflow current could not be measured and it is undetermined whether the dominant cause of efficiency droop is electron overflow or some other process such as Auger recombination. Calibration structures allowing measurement of the magnitude of the overflow are proposed. Work on deep-ultraviolet, 275 nm, LEDs is also presented. Demonstration of direct-wafer bonded LEDs to beta-Ga2O3 is presented. A SiC substrate removal process is discussed. LEDs fabricated by this flip-chip process exhibited up to 1.8 times greater power compared to LEDs fabricated by a standard process but suffered from increased forward voltage and premature failure. Further process development leading to electrically efficient operation is proposed.

  15. Characterization of plasma ion source utilizing anode spot with positively biased electrode for stable and high-current ion beam extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yeong-Shin; Lee, Yuna; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2011-12-15

    The operating conditions of a rf plasma ion source utilizing a positively biased electrode have been investigated to develop a stably operating, high-current ion source. Ion beam characteristics such as currents and energies are measured and compared with bias currents by varying the bias voltages on the electrode immersed in the ambient rf plasma. Current-voltage curves of the bias electrode and photographs confirm that a small and dense plasma, so-called anode spot, is formed near an extraction aperture and plays a key role to enhance the performance of the plasma ion source. The ion beam currents from the anode spot are observed to be maximized at the optimum bias voltage near the knee of the characteristic current-voltage curve of the anode spot. Increased potential barrier to obstruct beam extraction is the reason for the reduction of the ion beam current in spite of the increased bias current indicating the density of the anode spot. The optimum bias voltage is measured to be lower at higher operating pressure, which is favorable for stable operation without severe sputtering damage on the electrode. The ion beam current can be further enhanced by increasing the power for the ambient plasma without increasing the bias voltage. In the same manner, noble gases with higher atomic number as a feedstock gas are preferable for extracting higher beam current more stably. Therefore, performance of the plasma ion source with a positively biased electrode can be enhanced by controlling the operating conditions of the anode spot in various manners.

  16. Plato's TIMAIOσ (TIMAEUS) and Modern Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machleidt, Ruprecht

    2005-04-01

    It is generally known that the question, ``What are the smallest particles (elementary particles) that all matter is made from?'', was posed already in the antiquity. The Greek natural philosophers Leucippus and Democritus were the first to suggest that all matter was made from atoms. Therefore, most people perceive them as the ancient fathers of elementary particle physics. It will be the purpose of my contribution to point out that this perception is wrong. Modern particle physics is not just a primitive atomism. More important than the materialistic particles are the underlying symmetries (e. g., SU(3) and SU(6)). A similar idea was first advanced by Plato in his dialog TIMAIOσ (Latin translation: TIMAEUS): Geometric symmetries generate the materialistic particles from a few even more elementary items. Plato's vision is amazingly close to the ideas of modern particle physics. This fact, which is unfortunately little known, has been pointed out repeatedly by Heisenberg (see, e. g., Werner Heisenberg, Across the Frontiers, Harper & Row, New York, 1974).

  17. Particle Size Effect on Wetting Kinetics of a Nanosuspension Drop: MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Baiou; Webb, Edmund

    The behavior of nano-fluids, or fluid suspensions containing nanoparticles, has garnered tremendous attention recently for applications in advanced manufacturing. In our previous results from MD simulations, for a wetting system with different advancing contact angles, cases where self-pinning was observed were compared to cases where it was not and relevant forces on particles at the contact line were computed. To advance this work, the roles of particle size and particle loading are examined. Results presented illustrate how particle size affects spreading kinetics and how this connects to dynamic droplet morphology and relevant forces that exist nearby the contact line region. Furthermore, increased particle size in simulations permits a more detailed investigation of particle/substrate interfacial contributions to behavior observed at the advancing contact line. Based on changes in spreading kinetics with particle size, forces between the particle and liquid front are predicted and compared to those computed from simulations. At high loading, particle/particle interactions become relevant and forces computed between particles entrained to an advancing contact line will be presented.

  18. Particle engineering techniques for inhaled biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Shoyele, Sunday A; Cawthorne, Simon

    2006-10-31

    Formulation of biopharmaceuticals for pulmonary delivery is faced with the challenge of producing particles with the optimal properties for deep lung deposition without altering the native conformation of these molecules. Traditional techniques such as milling are continuously being improved while newer and more advanced techniques such as spray drying, spray freeze drying and supercritical fluid technology are being developed so as to optimize pulmonary delivery of biopharmaceuticals. While some of these techniques are quite promising, some are harsh and impracticable. Method scale up, cost-effectiveness and safety issues are important factors to be considered in the choice of a technique. This paper reviews the presently developed techniques for particle engineering biopharmaceuticals.

  19. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  20. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...