Science.gov

Sample records for advanced high-current particle

  1. Advanced electromagnetic design of cavities for high current accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, F.L.

    1995-05-01

    For high-current accelerators such as those proposed for transmutation technologies or spallation sources, preconstruction numerical modeling has a high importance. Non axisymmetric cavities require a full 3-D modeling. A complex analysis of structures beyond tuning and the calculation of Q and shunt impedance is required and also the interaction with the mechanical properties of the structures has to be taken into account. This paper reports on recent work done at LANL for proposed beam funnels, a new normal-conducting medium-energy structure (CCDTL) and superconducting cavities for medium energy. The electromagnetic calculations have been done with MAFIA, Rel 3.2, the thermal and stress analysis results reported come from the ABAQUS engineering code.

  2. A new method of rapid power measurement for MW-scale high-current particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongjian; Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Zhimin; Xie, Yahong; Liu, Sheng; Liang, Lizheng; Jiang, Caichao; Sheng, Peng; Yu, Ling

    2015-09-01

    MW-scale high current particle beams are widely applied for plasma heating in the magnetic confinement fusion devices, in which beam power is an important indicator for efficient heating. Generally, power measurement of MW-scale high current particle beam adopts water flow calorimetry (WFC). Limited by the principles of WFC, the beam power given by WFC is an averaged value. In this article a new method of beam power for MW-scale high-current particle beams is introduced: (1) the temperature data of thermocouples embedded in the beam stopping elements were obtained using high data acquire system, (2) the surface heat flux of the beam stopping elements are calculated using heat transfer, (3) the relationships between positions and heat flux were acquired using numerical simulation, (4) the real-time power deposited on the beam stopping elements can be calculated using surface integral. The principle of measurement was described in detail and applied to the EAST neutral beam injector for demonstration. The result is compared with that measured by WFC. Comparison of the results shows good accuracy and applicability of this measuring method.

  3. Magnetoresistance between oxidized Co-rich particles grown by high current electrochemical deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, M.; Perez, L.; Sanchez, M. C.; Fernández-Pacheco, A.; De Teresa, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    In this work, we present Co-rich particles which have been successfully grown by high current electroplating. This technique produces particles with a Co-Cu core surrounded by an oxidized shell. This shell has two consequences: on the one hand, it electrically isolates the magnetic core and acts as a tunnel barrier; on the other hand, the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic structure causes an exchange bias coupling when cooling the particles in the presence of magnetic field. We also present magnetoresistance measurements up to 9 T. At low field, direct tunnelling between magnetic cores through the insulating layer properly explains the experimental observations, but, at high field, a linear contribution dominates the MR. The latter behaviour can be understood by assuming second-order tunnelling.

  4. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2014-01-01

    Testing was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by Space Systems Loral, LLC (SSL). The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration of flight-type design that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four string currents (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micro-seconds to 2.75 milli-seconds. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-ESD functional testing showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. These test results point to a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission.

  5. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Hoang, B.; Wong, F.

    2014-01-01

    A test was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by SSL. The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array current (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 µs to 2.9 ms. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission application.

  6. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by SSL. The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array current (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micros to 2.9 ms. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission application.

  7. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2014-01-01

    Testing was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by Space Systems/Loral, LLC (SSL). The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array currents (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micro-seconds to 2.75 milli-seconds. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission.

  8. Perspective: Advanced particle imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Chandler, David W.; Houston, Paul L.; Parker, David H.

    2017-05-26

    This study discuss, the first ion imaging experiment demonstrating the capability of collecting an image of the photofragments from a unimolecular dissociation event and analyzing that image to obtain the three-dimensional velocity distribution of the fragments, the efficacy and breadth of application of the ion imaging technique have continued to improve and grow. With the addition of velocity mapping, ion/electron centroiding, and slice imaging techniques, the versatility and velocity resolution have been unmatched. Recent improvements in molecular beam, laser, sensor, and computer technology are allowing even more advanced particle imaging experiments, and eventually we can expect multi-mass imaging with co-variancemore » and full coincidence capability on a single shot basis with repetition rates in the kilohertz range. This progress should further enable “complete” experiments—the holy grail of molecular dynamics—where all quantum numbers of reactants and products of a bimolecular scattering event are fully determined and even under our control.« less

  9. Perspective: Advanced particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, David W.; Houston, Paul L.; Parker, David H.

    2017-07-01

    Since the first ion imaging experiment [D. W. Chandler and P. L. Houston, J. Chem. Phys. 87, 1445-1447 (1987)], demonstrating the capability of collecting an image of the photofragments from a unimolecular dissociation event and analyzing that image to obtain the three-dimensional velocity distribution of the fragments, the efficacy and breadth of application of the ion imaging technique have continued to improve and grow. With the addition of velocity mapping, ion/electron centroiding, and slice imaging techniques, the versatility and velocity resolution have been unmatched. Recent improvements in molecular beam, laser, sensor, and computer technology are allowing even more advanced particle imaging experiments, and eventually we can expect multi-mass imaging with co-variance and full coincidence capability on a single shot basis with repetition rates in the kilohertz range. This progress should further enable "complete" experiments—the holy grail of molecular dynamics—where all quantum numbers of reactants and products of a bimolecular scattering event are fully determined and even under our control.

  10. DARPA Advanced High Current Density Cathodes for Defense Applications: Development Phase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Relevant approximations are applied to these exact solutions in order to extract the general thermodynamic properties without the need for the full...understanding that has been developed in terms of the properties of the advanced cathode materials, the fabrication and optimization processing, and the design...demonstrated that the parameters a and P3 are not constants, and that when a simple account of realistic material properties is included, the variation of a and

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic modes analysis and control of Fusion Advanced Studies Torus high-current scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Villone, F.; Mastrostefano, S.; Calabrò, G.; Vlad, G.; Crisanti, F.; Fusco, V.; Marchiori, G.; Bolzonella, T.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2014-08-15

    One of the main FAST (Fusion Advanced Studies Torus) goals is to have a flexible experiment capable to test tools and scenarios for safe and reliable tokamak operation, in order to support ITER and help the final DEMO design. In particular, in this paper, we focus on operation close to a possible border of stability related to low-q operation. To this purpose, a new FAST scenario has then been designed at I{sub p} = 10 MA, B{sub T} = 8.5 T, q{sub 95} ≈ 2.3. Transport simulations, carried out by using the code JETTO and the first principle transport model GLF23, indicate that, under these conditions, FAST could achieve an equivalent Q ≈ 3.5. FAST will be equipped with a set of internal active coils for feedback control, which will produce magnetic perturbation with toroidal number n = 1 or n = 2. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mode analysis and feedback control simulations performed with the codes MARS, MARS-F, CarMa (both assuming the presence of a perfect conductive wall and using the exact 3D resistive wall structure) show the possibility of the FAST conductive structures to stabilize n = 1 ideal modes. This leaves therefore room for active mitigation of the resistive mode (down to a characteristic time of 1 ms) for safety purposes, i.e., to avoid dangerous MHD-driven plasma disruption, when working close to the machine limits and magnetic and kinetic energy density not far from reactor values.

  12. Westinghouse Advanced Particle Filter System

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Sanjana, Z.N.; Newby, R.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) are being developed and demonstrated for commercial, power generation application. Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful implementation of IGCC and PFBC in power generation gas turbine cycles. The objective of this work is to develop and qualify through analysis and testing a practical hot gas ceramic barrier filter system that meets the performance and operational requirements of PFBC and IGCC systems. This paper reports on the development and status of testing of the Westinghouse Advanced Hot Gas Particle Filter (W-APF) including: W-APF integrated operation with the American Electric Power, 70 MW PFBC clean coal facility--approximately 6000 test hours completed; approximately 2500 hours of testing at the Hans Ahlstrom 10 MW PCFB facility located in Karhula, Finland; over 700 hours of operation at the Foster Wheeler 2 MW 2nd generation PFBC facility located in Livingston, New Jersey; status of Westinghouse HGF supply for the DOE Southern Company Services Power System Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama; the status of the Westinghouse development and testing of HGF`s for Biomass Power Generation; and the status of the design and supply of the HGF unit for the 95 MW Pinon Pine IGCC Clean Coal Demonstration.

  13. Westinghouse advanced particle filter system

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Sanjana, Z.N.; Newby, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and Advanced PFBC (APFB) are being developed and demonstrated for commercial power generation application. Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful implementation of IGCC, PFBC and APFB in power generation gas turbine cycles. The objective of this work is to develop and qualify through analysis and testing a practical hot gas ceramic barrier filter system that meets the performance and operational requirements of these advanced, solid fuel power generation cycles.

  14. Advances in holographic particle velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Scott; Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle; Liu, David

    1993-12-01

    Holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) is a promising technique for 3D flow velocity and hence vorticity measurements to study turbulence, coherent structures and vortex interactions. We discuss various aspects in the development of this technique ranging from hologram recording configurations such as in-line, off-axis and multibeam to data processing. Difficulties in implementation are analyzed and solutions are discussed. We also present preliminary measurement results in a 3D vortex flow using one of our prototype HPV systems.

  15. Particle-in-cell simulation of electron trajectories and irradiation uniformity in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Langping; Zhou, Guangxue; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2017-02-01

    In order to study electron trajectories in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) source based on carbon fiber bunches, the transmission process of electrons emitted from the annular cathode was simulated using a particle-in-cell model with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC). The simulation results show that the intense flow of the electrons emitted from the annular cathode are expanded during the transmission process, and the uniformity of the electron distribution is improved in the transportation process. The irradiation current decreases with the irradiation distance and the pressure, and increases with the negative voltage. In addition, when the irradiation distance and the cathode voltage are larger than 40 mm and -15 kV, respectively, a uniform irradiation current distribution along the circumference of the anode can be obtained. The simulation results show that good irradiation uniformity of circular components can be achieved by this annular cathode HCPEB source.

  16. Advanced analysis methods in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Each generation of high energy physics experiments is grander in scale than the previous - more powerful, more complex and more demanding in terms of data handling and analysis. The spectacular performance of the Tevatron and the beginning of operations of the Large Hadron Collider, have placed us at the threshold of a new era in particle physics. The discovery of the Higgs boson or another agent of electroweak symmetry breaking and evidence of new physics may be just around the corner. The greatest challenge in these pursuits is to extract the extremely rare signals, if any, from huge backgrounds arising from known physics processes. The use of advanced analysis techniques is crucial in achieving this goal. In this review, I discuss the concepts of optimal analysis, some important advanced analysis methods and a few examples. The judicious use of these advanced methods should enable new discoveries and produce results with better precision, robustness and clarity.

  17. High Current Power Controller

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    AFWAL-TR-81- 2016 U iui.N HIGH CURRENT Ŕ POWER CONTROLLER P. E. McCOLLUM Audwo ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL AUTONETICS STRATEGIC SYSTEMS DIVISION 3370...personnel. During norm3l operation, HCP \\.s pose no hazard, bLt unde- certain operating conditions potential noaza-ds do exist. They are: (1) During

  18. High current ion source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.; Galvin, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

  19. Advance particle and Doppler measurement methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, C.

    1985-01-01

    Particle environments, i.e., rain, ice, and snow particles are discussed. Two types of particles addressed are: (1) the natural environment in which airplanes fly and conduct test flights; and (2) simulation environments that are encountered in ground-test facilities such as wind tunnels, ranges, etc. There are characteristics of the natural environment that one wishes to measure. The liquid water content (LWC) is the one that seems to be of most importance; size distribution may be of importance in some applications. Like snow, the shape of the particle may be an important parameter to measure. As one goes on to environment in simulated tests, additional parameters may be required such as velocity distribution, the velocity lag of the particle relative to the aerodynamic flow, and the trajectory of the particle as it goes through the aerodynamic flow and impacts on the test object.

  20. Beam Interaction Measurements with a Retarding Field Analyzer in a High-Current High-Vacuum Positively-Charged Particle Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Seidl, P A; Logan, B G; Baca, D; Vujic, J L

    2006-07-11

    A Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) was inserted in a drift region of a magnetic transport section of the high-current experiment (HCX) that is at high-vacuum to measure ions and electrons resulting from beam interaction with background gas and walls. The ions are expelled during the beam by the space-charge potential and the electrons are expelled mainly at the end of the beam, when the beam potential decays. The ion energy distribution shows the beam potential of {approx} 2100 V and the beam-background gas total cross-section of 1.6x10{sup -20} m{sup 2}. The electron energy distribution reveals that the expelled electrons are mainly desorbed from the walls and gain {approx} 22 eV from the beam potential decaying with time before entering the RFA. Details of the RFA design and of the measured energy distributions are presented and discussed.

  1. Advanced Crew Escape Suits (ACES): Particle Impact Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) requested NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility to assist in determining the effects of impaired anodization on aluminum parts in advanced crew escape suits (ACES). Initial investigation indicated poor anodization could lead to an increased risk of particle impact ignition, and a lack of data was prevalent for particle impact of bare (unanodized) aluminum; therefore, particle impact tests were performed. A total of 179 subsonic and 60 supersonic tests were performed with no ignition of the aluminum targets. Based on the resulting test data, WSTF found no increased particle impact hazard was present in the ACES equipment.

  2. Workshop on advances in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Miller, W.A.

    1993-12-31

    This proceedings contains viewgraphs presented at the 1993 workshop held at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Discussed topics include: negative stress, reactive flow calculations, interface problems, boundaries and interfaces, energy conservation in viscous flows, linked penetration calculations, stability and consistency of the SPH method, instabilities, wall heating and conservative smoothing, tensors, tidal disruption of stars, breaking the 10,000,000 particle limit, modelling relativistic collapse, SPH without H, relativistic KSPH avoidance of velocity based kernels, tidal compression and disruption of stars near a supermassive rotation black hole, and finally relativistic SPH viscosity and energy.

  3. Advanced visualization technology for terascale particle accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, K-L; Schussman, G.; Wilson, B.; Ko, K.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.

    2002-11-16

    This paper presents two new hardware-assisted rendering techniques developed for interactive visualization of the terascale data generated from numerical modeling of next generation accelerator designs. The first technique, based on a hybrid rendering approach, makes possible interactive exploration of large-scale particle data from particle beam dynamics modeling. The second technique, based on a compact texture-enhanced representation, exploits the advanced features of commodity graphics cards to achieve perceptually effective visualization of the very dense and complex electromagnetic fields produced from the modeling of reflection and transmission properties of open structures in an accelerator design. Because of the collaborative nature of the overall accelerator modeling project, the visualization technology developed is for both desktop and remote visualization settings. We have tested the techniques using both time varying particle data sets containing up to one billion particle s per time step and electromagnetic field data sets with millions of mesh elements.

  4. Perihelion advance of a test particle in the Kerr field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Enamul

    2017-01-01

    Here I represent a Perihelion advance of a test particle in the Kerr field. I assume that the spin of the central body to be very small and planar motion occurs only in the equatorial plane. I find some physical picture which is different from the case of Schwarzschild field and can recover the picture for Schwarzschild field. We use perturbation method to solve the equation of motion.

  5. Characterization of the interactions within fine particle mixtures in highly concentrated suspensions for advanced particle processing.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Akira; Bryant, Gary

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to summarize recent investigations into the dispersion of fine particles, and the characterization of their interactions, in concentrated suspensions. This summary will provide a better understanding of the current status of this research, and will provide useful feedback for advanced particle processing. Such processes include the fabrication of functional nanostructures and the sustainable beneficiation of complex ores. For example, there has been increasing demand for complex ore utilization due to the noticeable decrease in the accessibility of high grade and easily extractable ores. In order to maintain the sustainable use of mineral resources, the effective beneficiation of complex ores is urgently required. It can be successfully achieved only with selective particle/mineral dispersion/liberation and the assistance of mineralogical and particle characterization.

  6. Recent advances in neutral particle transport methods and codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmy, Yousry Y.

    1997-02-01

    An overview of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) 3D neural particle transport code, TORT, is presented. Special features of the code that make it invaluable for large applications are summarized for the prospective user. Advanced capabilities currently under development and installation in the production release of TORT are discussed in some detail. These include: multitasking on Cray platforms running the UNICOS operating system; adjacent-cell preconditioning acceleration scheme; and graphics codes for displaying computed quantities such as the flux. Further developments for TORT and its companion codes to enhance its present capabilities, as well as expand its range of applications will be discussed. Speculation on the next generation of neutral particle transport codes at ORNL, especially regarding unstructured grids and high order spatial approximations, will also be mentioned.

  7. High PRF high current switch

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Stuart L.; Hutcherson, R. Kenneth

    1990-03-27

    A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

  8. High current pulse transmission cable

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.

    1990-09-28

    This invention is comprised of a transmission cable for carrying high current pulses in which an even numbered plurality of electrical conductors surrounds a central ground conductor. Each electrical conductor is connected so that it at any instant in time it will carry current of opposite polarity to the polarity carried by adjacent conductors. This arrangement cancels practically all of the external fields generated by current in the conductors.

  9. Behaviour of advanced materials impacted by high energy particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Cerutti, F.; Dallocchio, A.; Garlasché, M.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N.; Marques dos Santos, S. D.; Peroni, L.; Scapin, M.; Boccone, V.

    2013-07-01

    Beam Intercepting Devices (BID) are designed to operate in a harsh radioactive environment and are highly loaded from a thermo-structural point of view. Moreover, modern particle accelerators, storing unprecedented energy, may be exposed to severe accidental events triggered by direct beam impacts. In this context, impulse has been given to the development of novel materials for advanced thermal management with high thermal shock resistance like metal-diamond and metal-graphite composites on top of refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and copper alloys. This paper presents the results of a first-of-its-kind experiment which exploited 440 GeV proton beams at different intensities to impact samples of the aforementioned materials. Effects of thermally induced shockwaves were acquired via high speed acquisition system including strain gauges, laser Doppler vibrometer and high speed camera. Preliminary information of beam induced damages on materials were also collected. State-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes (like Autodyn®), relying on complex material models including equation of state (EOS), strength and failure models, have been used for the simulation of the experiment. Preliminary results confirm the effectiveness and reliability of these numerical methods when material constitutive models are completely available (W and Cu alloys). For novel composite materials a reverse engineering approach will be used to build appropriate constitutive models, thus allowing a realistic representation of these complex phenomena. These results are of paramount importance for understanding and predicting the response of novel advanced composites to beam impacts in modern particle accelerators.

  10. Recent advances in UHV techniques for particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. Rao

    1995-01-01

    The ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) requirements for storage rings and accelerators, and the development of the science and technology of UHV for particle accelerators and magnetic fusion devices have been recently reviewed by N.B. Mistry and H.F. Dylla respectively. In this paper, the latest developments in the advancement of UHV techniques for the vacuum integrity of Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and for successfully dealing with the synchrotron radiation related beam line vacuum problem encountered in the design of the SSC are reviewed: the review includes developments in extreme sensitivity He leak detection technique based on the dynamic adsorption and desorption of He, operation of ionization gauges at Lhe temperatures, metal sponges for the effective cryopumping of H{sup 2} and He to pressures better than 10{sup -14} torr, and low cost and high He sensitivity RGA's. The details of a new extreme sensitivity He leak detector system are also discussed here.

  11. Study of nanoscale structural biology using advanced particle beam microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boseman, Adam J.

    This work investigates developmental and structural biology at the nanoscale using current advancements in particle beam microscopy. Typically the examination of micro- and nanoscale features is performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in order to decrease surface charging, and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface. As magnification increases, this layer begins to limit the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. A new technology, Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), is used to examine uncoated surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant fruit flies. Corneal nanostructures observed with HIM are further investigated by FIB/SEM to provide detailed three dimensional information about internal events occurring during early structural development. These techniques are also used to reconstruct a mosquito germarium in order to characterize unknown events in early oogenesis. Findings from these studies, and many more like them, will soon unravel many of the mysteries surrounding the world of developmental biology.

  12. Performance of Advanced Light Source particle beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, is complete. The particle beam diagnostics have been installed and tested. The beam injection systems have been running for two years. We have performance data on beam position monitors, beam intensity monitors, scintillators, beam collimators, a 50 {Omega} Faraday cup, and broad-band striplines and kickers used in the linac, transport lines, and the booster synchrotron. The single-turn monitoring capability of the booster beam position monitoring system has been particularly useful for studying beam dynamics. Beam diagnostics for the storage ring are being commissioned. In this paper we describe each instrument, show its performance, and outline how the instruments are controlled and their output data displayed.

  13. The "Puck" Energetic Charged Particle Detector: Design, Heritage, and Advancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of approximately 10 kiloelectronvolts to several megaelectronvolts. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of kiloelectronvolts to about 1 megaelectronvolt. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 kiloelectronvolt per nucleon,with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  14. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  15. The "Puck" Energetic Charged Particle Detector: Design, Heritage, and Advancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of approximately 10 kiloelectronvolts to several megaelectronvolts. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of kiloelectronvolts to about 1 megaelectronvolt. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 kiloelectronvolt per nucleon,with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  16. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements.

    PubMed

    Clark, G; Cohen, I; Westlake, J H; Andrews, G B; Brandt, P; Gold, R E; Gkioulidou, M A; Hacala, R; Haggerty, D; Hill, M E; Ho, G C; Jaskulek, S E; Kollmann, P; Mauk, B H; McNutt, R L; Mitchell, D G; Nelson, K S; Paranicas, C; Paschalidis, N; Schlemm, C E

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  17. HIGH CURRENT COAXIAL PHOTOMULTIPLIER TUBE

    DOEpatents

    Glass, N.W.

    1960-01-19

    A medium-gain photomultiplier tube having high current output, fast rise- time, and matched output impedance was developed. The photomultiplier tube comprises an elongated cylindrical envelope, a cylindrical anode supported at the axis of the envelope, a plurality of elongated spaced opaque areas on the envelope, and a plurality of light admitting windows. A photo-cathode is supported adjacent to each of the windows, and a plurality of secondary emissive dynodes are arranged in two types of radial arrays which are alternately positioned to fill the annular space between the anode and the envelope. The dynodes are in an array being radially staggered with respect to the dynodes in the adjacent array, the dynodes each having a portion arranged at an angle with respect to the electron path, such that electrons emitted by each cathode undergo multiplication upon impingement on a dynode and redirected flight to the next adjacent dynode.

  18. High current capacity electrical connector

    DOEpatents

    Bettis, Edward S.; Watts, Harry L.

    1976-01-13

    An electrical connector is provided for coupling high current capacity electrical conductors such as copper busses or the like. The connector is arranged in a "sandwiched" configuration in which a conductor plate contacts the busses along major surfaces thereof clamped between two stainless steel backing plates. The conductor plate is provided with a plurality of contact buttons affixed therein in a spaced array such that the caps of the buttons extend above the conductor plate surface to contact the busses. When clamping bolts provided through openings in the sandwiched arrangement are tightened, Belleville springs provided under the rim of each button cap are compressed and resiliently force the caps into contact with the busses' contacting surfaces to maintain a predetermined electrical contact area provided by the button cap tops. The contact area does not change with changing thermal or mechanical stresses applied to the coupled conductors.

  19. High current transistor pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1991-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current trapezoidally shaped pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in the capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of Darlington transistors. A combination of diodes and Darlington transistors is used to obtain trapezoidal or triangular shaped current pulses into an inductive load and to recover the remaining energy in the same capacitor bank without reversing capacitor voltage. The transistors work in the switch mode, and the power losses are low. The rack mounted pulse generators presently used at SLAC contain a 660 microfarad storage capacitor bank and can deliver 400 amps at 800 volts into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The pulse generators are used in several different power systems, including pulse to pulse bipolar power supplies and in application with current pulses distributed into different inductive loads. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled by the central computer system through a specially developed multichannel controller. Several years of operation with the pulse generators have proven their consistent performance and reliability. 8 figs.

  20. High current metal ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ian G.

    1990-04-01

    This report summarizes the research and development that has been carried out at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to develop a novel kind of high current metal ion source for metallurgical surface modification application. In ion implantation, an energetic ion beam is injected into a solid surface with the result that the surface composition is changed. For the case when the surface is a metal, the tribological properties of the new metallurgical surface can be significantly improved over the unimplanted surface. Previously, however, very intense metal ion beams have not been available, and this has been an impedance to the development of the field. With the MEVVA (Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc) ion source, metal ion beam currents of very high intensity have become available. This report outlines the progress made under the funded program in the four areas addressed: development of the MEVVA ion source for ion implantation application; research on the ion beam characteristics and behavior; development of the ion implantation facility; metallurgical ion implantation research that was performed.

  1. High current transistor pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1991-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current trapezoidally shaped pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in the capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of Darlington transistors. A combination of diodes and Darlington transistors is used to obtain trapezoidal or triangular shaped current pulses into an inductive load and to recover the remaining energy in the same capacitor bank without reversing capacitor voltage. The transistors work in the switch mode, and the power losses are low. The rack mounted pulse generators presently used at SLAC contain a 660 microfarad storage capacitor bank and can deliver 400 amps at 800 volts into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The pulse generators are used in several different power systems, including pulse to pulse bipolar power supplies and in application with current pulses distributed into different inductive loads. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled by the central computer system through a specially developed multichannel controller. Several years of operation with the pulse generators have proven their consistent performance and reliability. 8 figs.

  2. Novel particle and radiation sources and advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mako, Frederick

    2016-03-25

    The influence Norman Rostoker had on the lives of those who had the pleasure of knowing him is profound. The skills and knowledge I gained as a graduate student researching collective ion acceleration has fueled a career that has evolved from particle beam physics to include particle and radiation source development and advanced materials research, among many other exciting projects. The graduate research performed on collective ion acceleration was extended by others to form the backbone for laser driven plasma ion acceleration. Several years after graduate school I formed FM Technologies, Inc., (FMT), and later Electron Technologies, Inc. (ETI). Currently, as the founder and president of both FMT and ETI, the Rostoker influence can still be felt. One technology that we developed is a self-bunching RF fed electron gun, called the Micro-Pulse Gun (MPG). The MPG has important applications for RF accelerators and microwave tube technology, specifically clinically improved medical linacs and “green” klystrons. In addition to electron beam and RF source research, knowledge of materials and material interactions gained indirectly in graduate school has blossomed into breakthroughs in materials joining technologies. Most recently, silicon carbide joining technology has been developed that gives robust helium leak tight, high temperature and high strength joints between ceramic-to-ceramic and ceramic-to-metal. This joining technology has the potential to revolutionize the ethylene production, nuclear fuel and solar receiver industries by finally allowing for the practical use of silicon carbide as furnace coils, fuel rods and solar receptors, respectively, which are applications that have been needed for decades.

  3. Novel particle and radiation sources and advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mako, Frederick

    2016-03-01

    The influence Norman Rostoker had on the lives of those who had the pleasure of knowing him is profound. The skills and knowledge I gained as a graduate student researching collective ion acceleration has fueled a career that has evolved from particle beam physics to include particle and radiation source development and advanced materials research, among many other exciting projects. The graduate research performed on collective ion acceleration was extended by others to form the backbone for laser driven plasma ion acceleration. Several years after graduate school I formed FM Technologies, Inc., (FMT), and later Electron Technologies, Inc. (ETI). Currently, as the founder and president of both FMT and ETI, the Rostoker influence can still be felt. One technology that we developed is a self-bunching RF fed electron gun, called the Micro-Pulse Gun (MPG). The MPG has important applications for RF accelerators and microwave tube technology, specifically clinically improved medical linacs and "green" klystrons. In addition to electron beam and RF source research, knowledge of materials and material interactions gained indirectly in graduate school has blossomed into breakthroughs in materials joining technologies. Most recently, silicon carbide joining technology has been developed that gives robust helium leak tight, high temperature and high strength joints between ceramic-to-ceramic and ceramic-to-metal. This joining technology has the potential to revolutionize the ethylene production, nuclear fuel and solar receiver industries by finally allowing for the practical use of silicon carbide as furnace coils, fuel rods and solar receptors, respectively, which are applications that have been needed for decades.

  4. Advances in sublimation studies for particles of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Nguyen, Viet; Fischer, Thomas; Abrishami, Tara; Papantonakis, Michael; Kendziora, Chris; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    When handling explosives, or related surfaces, the hands routinely become contaminated with particles of explosives and related materials. Subsequent contact with a solid surface results in particle crushing and deposition. These particles provide an evidentiary trail which is useful for security applications. As such, the opto-physico-chemical characteristics of these particles are critical to trace explosives detection applications in DOD or DHS arenas. As the persistence of these particles is vital to their forensic exploitation, it is important to understand which factors influence their persistence. The longevity or stability of explosives particles on a substrate is a function of several environmental parameters or particle properties including: Vapor pressure, particle geometry, airflow, particle field size, substrate topography, humidity, reactivity, adlayers, admixtures, particle areal density, and temperature. In this work we deposited particles of 2,4-dinitrotoluene on standard microscopy glass slides by particle sieving and studied their sublimation as a function of airflow velocity, areal particle density and particle field size. Analysis of 2D microscopic images was used to compute and track particle size and geometrical characteristics. The humidity, temperature and substrate type were kept constant for each experiment. A custom airflow cell, using standard microscopy glass slide, allowed in-situ photomicroscopy. Areal particle densities and airflow velocities were selected to provide relevant loadings and flow velocities for a range of potential applications. For a chemical of interest, we define the radial sublimation velocity (RSV) for the equivalent sphere of a particle as the parameter to characterize the sublimation rate. The RSV is a useful parameter because it is independent of particle size. The sublimation rate for an ensemble of particles was found to significantly depend on airflow velocity, the areal density of the particles, and the

  5. Advances in Bayesian Model Based Clustering Using Particle Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Merl, D M

    2009-11-19

    Recent work by Carvalho, Johannes, Lopes and Polson and Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy introduced a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) alternative to traditional iterative Monte Carlo strategies (e.g. MCMC and EM) for Bayesian inference for a large class of dynamic models. The basis of SMC techniques involves representing the underlying inference problem as one of state space estimation, thus giving way to inference via particle filtering. The key insight of Carvalho et al was to construct the sequence of filtering distributions so as to make use of the posterior predictive distribution of the observable, a distribution usually only accessible in certain Bayesian settings. Access to this distribution allows a reversal of the usual propagate and resample steps characteristic of many SMC methods, thereby alleviating to a large extent many problems associated with particle degeneration. Furthermore, Carvalho et al point out that for many conjugate models the posterior distribution of the static variables can be parametrized in terms of [recursively defined] sufficient statistics of the previously observed data. For models where such sufficient statistics exist, particle learning as it is being called, is especially well suited for the analysis of streaming data do to the relative invariance of its algorithmic complexity with the number of data observations. Through a particle learning approach, a statistical model can be fit to data as the data is arriving, allowing at any instant during the observation process direct quantification of uncertainty surrounding underlying model parameters. Here we describe the use of a particle learning approach for fitting a standard Bayesian semiparametric mixture model as described in Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy. In Section 2 we briefly review the previously presented particle learning algorithm for the case of a Dirichlet process mixture of multivariate normals. In Section 3 we describe several novel extensions to the original

  6. New Pulsed Power Technology for High Current Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2002-06-27

    Recent advances in solid-state modulators now permit the design of a new class of high current accelerators. These new accelerators will be able to operate in burst mode at frequencies of several MHz with unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format. These new modulators can drive accelerators to high average powers that far exceed those of any other technology and can be used to enable precision beam manipulations. New insulator technology combined with novel pulse forming lines and switching may enable the construction of a new type of high gradient, high current accelerator. Recent developments in these areas will be reviewed.

  7. Advanced Handling and Sorting Techniques for Ultrasmall Particles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-15

    Nitrogen Mixtures III-ll Ashing of Inorganic Materials with Oxygen, Hydrogen and Tetrafluoromethane 111-19 Spread in a Particle Beam Diameter IV-14...MATERIALS WITH OXYGEN, HYDROGEN AND TETRAFLUOROMETHANE Sample Material Initial Wt gm Final Wt. gm % Residue A. Ashed with Oxygen 1. Clay... Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) 1. Silica Dust 2. Uranium Dioxide 0.5173 1.4142 1.1845 93.2 4.0943 73.4 0.5601 99.9 4.1506 100.0 0.3409 60.8 2.9834 100.0 0.6301

  8. A Double-Pole High Voltage High Current Switch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A DOUBLE- POLE HIGH...December 2005 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: A Double- Pole High Voltage High Current Switch 6. AUTHOR(S...to divert heavy charged particles, e.g. Cu+. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 68 14. SUBJECT TERMS Double- Pole , Pulse Forming Inductive Network, PFIN

  9. Individual Particle Analysis of Ambient PM 2.5 Using Advanced Electron Microscopy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald J. Keeler; Masako Morishita

    2006-12-31

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate a combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques that can be effectively used to identify and characterize individual particles and their sources. Specific techniques to be used include high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), STEM energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), and energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM). A series of ambient PM{sub 2.5} samples were collected in communities in southwestern Detroit, MI (close to multiple combustion sources) and Steubenville, OH (close to several coal fired utility boilers). High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) -imaging showed a series of nano-metal particles including transition metals and elemental composition of individual particles in detail. Submicron and nano-particles with Al, Fe, Ti, Ca, U, V, Cr, Si, Ba, Mn, Ni, K and S were observed and characterized from the samples. Among the identified nano-particles, combinations of Al, Fe, Si, Ca and Ti nano-particles embedded in carbonaceous particles were observed most frequently. These particles showed very similar characteristics of ultrafine coal fly ash particles that were previously reported. By utilizing HAADF-STEM, STEM-EDX, and EF-TEM, this investigation was able to gain information on the size, morphology, structure, and elemental composition of individual nano-particles collected in Detroit and Steubenville. The results showed that the contributions of local combustion sources - including coal fired utilities - to ultrafine particle levels were significant. Although this combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques by itself can not identify source categories, these techniques can be utilized as complementary analytical tools that are capable of providing detailed information on individual particles.

  10. Design and physicochemical characterization of advanced spray-dried tacrolimus multifunctional particles for inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao; Hayes, Don; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Kuhn, Robert J; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design, develop, and optimize respirable tacrolimus microparticles and nanoparticles and multifunctional tacrolimus lung surfactant mimic particles for targeted dry powder inhalation delivery as a pulmonary nanomedicine. Particles were rationally designed and produced at different pump rates by advanced spray-drying particle engineering design from organic solution in closed mode. In addition, multifunctional tacrolimus lung surfactant mimic dry powder particles were prepared by co-dissolving tacrolimus and lung surfactant mimic phospholipids in methanol, followed by advanced co-spray-drying particle engineering design technology in closed mode. The lung surfactant mimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phosphor-rac-1-glycerol]. Laser diffraction particle sizing indicated that the particle size distributions were suitable for pulmonary delivery, whereas scanning electron microscopy imaging indicated that these particles had both optimal particle morphology and surface morphology. Increasing the pump rate percent of tacrolimus solution resulted in a larger particle size. X-ray powder diffraction patterns and differential scanning calorimetry thermograms indicated that spray drying produced particles with higher amounts of amorphous phase. X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry also confirmed the preservation of the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state for all engineered respirable particles. Furthermore, it was observed in hot-stage micrographs that raw tacrolimus displayed a liquid crystal transition following the main phase transition, which is consistent with its interfacial properties. Water vapor uptake and lyotropic phase transitions in the solid state at varying levels of relative humidity were determined by gravimetric vapor sorption technique. Water content in the various powders was very low and well within the levels necessary

  11. Innovative experimental particle physics through technological advances: Past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Harry W.K.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    This mini-course gives an introduction to the techniques used in experimental particle physics with an emphasis on the impact of technological advances. The basic detector types and particle accelerator facilities will be briefly covered with examples of their use and with comparisons. The mini-course ends with what can be expected in the near future from current technology advances. The mini-course is intended for graduate students and post-docs and as an introduction to experimental techniques for theorists.

  12. Advanced analysis of polymer emulsions: Particle size and particle size distribution by field-flow fractionation and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Makan, Ashwell C; Spallek, Markus J; du Toit, Madeleine; Klein, Thorsten; Pasch, Harald

    2016-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) is an advanced fractionation technique for the analyses of very sensitive particles. In this study, different FFF techniques were used for the fractionation and analysis of polymer emulsions/latexes. As model systems, a pure acrylic emulsion and emulsions containing titanium dioxide were prepared and analyzed. An acrylic emulsion polymerization was conducted, continuously sampled from the reactor and subsequently analyzed to determine the particle size, radius of gyration in specific, of the latex particles throughout the polymerization reaction. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), coupled to a multidetector system, multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI), respectively, were used to investigate the evolution of particle sizes and particle size distributions (PSDs) as the polymerization progressed. The obtained particle sizes were compared against batch-mode dynamic light scattering (DLS). Results indicated differences between AF4 and DLS results due to DLS taking hydration layers into account, whereas both AF4 and SdFFF were coupled to MALLS detection, hence not taking the hydration layer into account for size determination. SdFFF has additional separation capabilities with a much higher resolution compared to AF4. The calculated radii values were 5 nm larger for SdFFF measurements for each analyzed sample against the corresponding AF4 values. Additionally a low particle size shoulder was observed for SdFFF indicating bimodality in the reactor very early during the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, different emulsions were mixed with inorganic species used as additives in cosmetics and coatings such as TiO2. These complex mixtures of species were analyzed to investigate the retention and particle interaction behavior under different AF4 experimental conditions, such as the mobile phase. The AF4 system was coupled online

  13. The Los Alamos Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop and beginning of the advanced accelerator concepts field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.

    2012-12-01

    The first Advanced Acceleration of Particles-AAC-Workshop (actually named Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop) was held at Los Alamos in January 1982. The workshop lasted a week and divided all the acceleration techniques into four categories: near field, far field, media, and vacuum. Basic theorems of particle acceleration were postulated (later proven) and specific experiments based on the four categories were formulated. This landmark workshop led to the formation of the advanced accelerator R&D program in the HEP office of the DOE that supports advanced accelerator research to this day. Two major new user facilities at Argonne and Brookhaven and several more directed experimental efforts were built to explore the advanced particle acceleration schemes. It is not an exaggeration to say that the intellectual breadth and excitement provided by the many groups who entered this new field provided the needed vitality to then recently formed APS Division of Beams and the new online journal Physical Review Special Topics-Accelerators and Beams. On this 30th anniversary of the AAC Workshops, it is worthwhile to look back at the legacy of the first Workshop at Los Alamos and the fine groundwork it laid for the field of advanced accelerator concepts that continues to flourish to this day.

  14. Recent experimental advances for understanding bubble-particle attachment in flotation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yaowen; Gui, Xiahui; Pan, Lei; Pinchasik, Bat-El; Cao, Yijun; Liu, Jiongtian; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2017-08-01

    Bubble-particle interaction is of great theoretical and practical importance in flotation. Significant progress has been achieved over the past years and the process of bubble-particle collision is reasonably well understood. This, however, is not the case for bubble-particle attachment leading to three-phase contact line formation due to the difficulty in both theoretical analysis and experimental verification. For attachment, surface forces play a major role. They control the thinning and rupture of the liquid film between the bubble and the particle. The coupling between force, bubble deformation and film drainage is critical to understand the underlying mechanism responsible for bubble-particle attachment. In this review we first discuss the advances in macroscopic experimental methods for characterizing bubble-particle attachment such as induction timer and high speed visualization. Then we focus on advances in measuring the force and drainage of thin liquid films between an air bubble and a solid surface at a nanometer scale. Advances, limits, challenges, and future research opportunities are discussed. By combining atomic force microscopy and reflection interference contrast microscopy, the force, bubble deformation, and liquid film drainage can be measured simultaneously. The simultaneous measurement of the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the confined liquid film hold great promise to shed new light on flotation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. HIGH CURRENT SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITIES AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    CALAGA,R.BEN-ZVI,I.ZHAO,Y.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    A five-cell high current superconducting cavity for the electron cooling project at RHIC is under fabrication. Higher order modes (HOMs), one of main limiting factors for high current energy-recovery operation, are under investigation. Calculations of HOMs using time-domain methods in Mafia will be discussed and compared to calculations in the frequency domain. Beam breakup thresholds determined from numerical codes for the five-cell cavity will be presented. A possible motivation towards a 2 x 2 superstructure using the current five-cell design will also be discussed.

  16. Single Particle ICP-MS: Advances toward routine analysis of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Manuel D; Olesik, John W; Barber, Angela G; Challis, Katie; Ranville, James F

    2016-07-01

    From its early beginnings in characterizing aerosol particles to its recent applications for investigating natural waters and waste streams, single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) has proven to be a powerful technique for the detection and characterization of aqueous dispersions of metal-containing nanomaterials. Combining the high-throughput of an ensemble technique with the specificity of a single particle counting technique and the elemental specificity of ICP-MS, spICP-MS is capable of rapidly providing researchers with information pertaining to size, size distribution, particle number concentration, and major elemental composition with minimal sample perturbation. Recently, advances in data acquisition, signal processing, and the implementation of alternative mass analyzers (e.g., time-of-flight) has resulted in a wider breadth of particle analyses and made significant progress toward overcoming many of the challenges in the quantitative analysis of nanoparticles. This review provides an overview of spICP-MS development from a niche technique to application for routine analysis, a discussion of the key issues for quantitative analysis, and examples of its further advancement for analysis of increasingly complex environmental and biological samples. Graphical Abstract Single particle ICP-MS workflow for the analysis of suspended nanoparticles.

  17. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J.; Weiland, J.; Zang, Q.

    2013-10-15

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport.

  18. A mesoscopic simulation of material ---Advances in Dissipative particle dynamics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhaolin

    2017-09-01

    A mesoscopic simulation of material --Dissipative particle dynamics(DPD), as the bond between macroscopic and microscopic simulation, had been increasingly draw attention in the research of soft matters, including the flowing condition and the morphological structure. The method of DPD simulation had been applied extensively in the fields of soft matters such as biomacromolecule and the flows of polymers since the DPD simulation has an advantage in time and space scale. In this article, the origin, the theoretical model and the development of dissipative particle dynamics are introduced at first. Subsequently, the advances in the simulation of complex fluids and polymers are reviewed. Finally, the future development and application are concluded.

  19. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  20. Delta-doped hybrid advanced detector for low energy particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A delta-doped hybrid advanced detector (HAD) is provided which combines at least four types of technologies to create a detector for energetic particles ranging in energy from hundreds of electron volts (eV) to beyond several million eV. The detector is sensitive to photons from visible light to X-rays. The detector is highly energy-sensitive from approximately 10 keV down to hundreds of eV. The detector operates with milliwatt power dissipation, and allows non-sequential readout of the array, enabling various advanced readout schemes.

  1. First results from solid state neutral particle analyzer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J. Z.; Zhao, J. L.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Zhu, Y. B. Heidbrink, W. W.

    2016-11-15

    Full function integrated, compact solid state neutral particle analyzers (ssNPA) based on absolute extreme ultraviolet silicon photodiode have been successfully implemented on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak to measure energetic particle. The ssNPA system has been operated in advanced current mode with fast temporal and spatial resolution capabilities, with both active and passive charge exchange measurements. It is found that the ssNPA flux signals are increased substantially with neutral beam injection (NBI). The horizontal active array responds to modulated NBI beam promptly, while weaker change is presented on passive array. Compared to near-perpendicular beam, near-tangential beam brings more passive ssNPA flux and a broader profile, while no clear difference is observed on active ssNPA flux and its profile. Significantly enhanced intensities on some ssNPA channels have been observed during ion cyclotron resonant heating.

  2. First results from solid state neutral particle analyzer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Z.; Zhu, Y. B.; Zhao, J. L.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2016-11-01

    Full function integrated, compact solid state neutral particle analyzers (ssNPA) based on absolute extreme ultraviolet silicon photodiode have been successfully implemented on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak to measure energetic particle. The ssNPA system has been operated in advanced current mode with fast temporal and spatial resolution capabilities, with both active and passive charge exchange measurements. It is found that the ssNPA flux signals are increased substantially with neutral beam injection (NBI). The horizontal active array responds to modulated NBI beam promptly, while weaker change is presented on passive array. Compared to near-perpendicular beam, near-tangential beam brings more passive ssNPA flux and a broader profile, while no clear difference is observed on active ssNPA flux and its profile. Significantly enhanced intensities on some ssNPA channels have been observed during ion cyclotron resonant heating.

  3. First results from solid state neutral particle analyzer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J Z; Zhu, Y B; Zhao, J L; Wan, B N; Li, J G; Heidbrink, W W

    2016-11-01

    Full function integrated, compact solid state neutral particle analyzers (ssNPA) based on absolute extreme ultraviolet silicon photodiode have been successfully implemented on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak to measure energetic particle. The ssNPA system has been operated in advanced current mode with fast temporal and spatial resolution capabilities, with both active and passive charge exchange measurements. It is found that the ssNPA flux signals are increased substantially with neutral beam injection (NBI). The horizontal active array responds to modulated NBI beam promptly, while weaker change is presented on passive array. Compared to near-perpendicular beam, near-tangential beam brings more passive ssNPA flux and a broader profile, while no clear difference is observed on active ssNPA flux and its profile. Significantly enhanced intensities on some ssNPA channels have been observed during ion cyclotron resonant heating.

  4. HIGH CURRENT RADIO FREQUENCY ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to a high current radio frequency ion source. A cylindrical plasma container has a coil disposed around the exterior surface thereof along the longitudinal axis. Means are provided for the injection of an unionized gas into the container and for applying a radio frequency signal to the coil whereby a radio frequency field is generated within the container parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof to ionize the injected gas. Cathode and anode means are provided for extracting transverse to the radio frequency field from an area midway between the ends of the container along the longitudinal axis thereof the ions created by said radio frequency field. (AEC)

  5. Simple, high current, antimony ion source.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, H

    1979-01-01

    A simple metal ion source capable of producing a continuous, uncontaminated, high current beam of Sb ions is presented. It produced a total ion current of 200 muA at 1 kV extraction voltage. A discharge occurred in the source at a pressure of 6x10(-4) Torr. The ion current extracted from the source increased with the 3/2 power of the extraction voltage. The perveance of the source and ion density in the plasma were 8x10(-9) and 1.8x10(11) cm(-3), respectively.

  6. Advanced particle filter. Technical progress report No. 19, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Tidd advanced particle filtration (APF) test runs 25 through 34 were completed during the first quarter of 1995. All Tidd testing was completed with the conclusion of APF test run 34 on 3/30/95. The Westinghouse activities supporting the APF operation during this quarter included processing of test data and participating in one APF borescope inspection. Data is included on the filter operation.

  7. Advanced In-Situ Detection and Chemical Analysis of Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Gemer, A.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Maute, K.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Williams, E.; O'brien, L.; Rocha, J. R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ulysses dust detector discovered that interstellar dust particles pass through the solar system. The Hyperdsut instrument is developed for the in-situ detection and analysis of these particles to determine the elemental, chemical and isotopic compositions. Hyperdust builds on the heritage of previous successful instruments, e.g. the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on Cassini. Hyperdust combines a highly sensitive Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) and the high mass resolution Chemical Analyzer (CA). The DTS will detect dust particles as small as 0.3 μm in radius, and the velocity vector information is used to confirm the interstellar origin and/or reveal the dynamics from the interactions within the solar system. The effective target area of the CA is > 600 cm2 achieves mass resolution in excess of 200, which is considerably higher than that of CDA, and is acheved by advanced ion optics design. The Hyperdust instrument is in the final phases of development to TRL 6.

  8. Space charge templates for high-current beam modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, Leonid G.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    A computational method to evaluate space charge potential and gradients of charged particle beam in the presence of conducting boundaries, has been introduced. The three-dimensional (3D) field of the beam can be derived as a convolution of macro Green's functions (template fields), satisfying the same boundary conditions, as the original beam. Numerical experiments gave a confidence that space charge effects can be modeled by templates with enough accuracy and generality within dramatically faster computational times than standard combination: a grid density + Poisson solvers, realized in the most of Particle in Cell codes. The achieved rapidity may significantly broaden the high-current beam design space, making the optimization in automatic mode possible, which so far was only feasible for simplest self-field formulations such as rms envelope equations. The template technique may be used as a standalone program, or as an optional field solver in existing beam dynamics codes both in one-passage structures and in rings.

  9. High-Current Betatron and Stereobetatron,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-04

    an increase in the accelerated current and intensity of the radiation/emissicn of charged particle acceleratcrs is at present most urgent/actual and...physics, chemistry, etc. LOC = 80171501 PAGE b In proportion to the introduction of accelarators into the national economy the requirements fcr them are...accelerators, fccus special attention on possibility increases in the accelerated current. An increase in the number of accelerated particles and

  10. Comparison of Electron Cloud Simulation and Experiments in the High-Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S M; Molvik, A W; Bieniosek, F M; Seidl, P A; Vay, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-11-11

    Contaminating clouds of electrons are a common concern for accelerators of positive-charged particles, but there are some unique aspects of heavy-ion accelerators for fusion and high-energy density physics which make modeling such clouds especially challenging. In particular, self-consistent electron and ion simulation is required, including a particle advance scheme which can follow electrons in regions where electrons are strongly, weakly, and un-magnetized. We describe our approach to such self-consistency, and in particular a scheme for interpolating between full-orbit (Boris) and drift-kinetic particle pushes that enables electron time steps long compared to the typical gyro period in the magnets. We present tests and applications: simulation of electron clouds produced by three different kinds of sources indicates the sensitivity of the cloud shape to the nature of the source; first-of-a-kind self-consistent simulation of electron-cloud experiments on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL, in which the machine can be flooded with electrons released by impact of the ion beam on an end plate, demonstrate the ability to reproduce key features of the ion-beam phase space; and simulation of a two-stream instability of thin beams in a magnetic field demonstrate the ability of the large-timestep mover to accurately calculate the instability.

  11. High current high accuracy IGBT pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, V.V.; Donaldson, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current triangular or trapezoidal pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in a capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The circuit can then recover the remaining energy and transfer it back to the capacitor bank without reversing the capacitor voltage. A third IGBT device is employed to control the initial charge to the capacitor bank, a command charging technique, and to compensate for pulse to pulse power losses. The rack mounted pulse generator contains a 525 {mu}F capacitor bank. It can deliver 500 A at 900V into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled to 0.02% accuracy by a precision controller through the SLAC central computer system. This pulse generator drives a series pair of extraction dipoles.

  12. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-06-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  13. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  14. Advances and future needs in particle production and transport code developments

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    The next generation of accelerators and ever expanding needs of existing accelerators demand new developments and additions to Monte-Carlo codes, with an emphasis on enhanced modeling of elementary particle and heavy-ion interactions and transport. Challenges arise from extremely high beam energies and beam power, increasing complexity of accelerators and experimental setups, as well as design, engineering and performance constraints. All these put unprecedented requirements on the accuracy of particle production predictions, the capability and reliability of the codes used in planning new accelerator facilities and experiments, the design of machine, target and collimation systems, detectors and radiation shielding and minimization of their impact on environment. Recent advances in widely-used general-purpose all-particle codes are described for the most critical modules such as particle production event generators, elementary particle and heavy ion transport in an energy range which spans up to 17 decades, nuclide inventory and macroscopic impact on materials, and dealing with complex geometry of accelerator and detector structures. Future requirements for developing physics models and Monte-Carlo codes are discussed.

  15. A Robust High Current Density Electron Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mako, F.; Peter, W.; Shiloh, J.; Len, L. K.

    1996-11-01

    Proof-of-principle experiments are proposed to validate a new concept for a robust, high-current density Pierce electron gun (RPG) for use in klystrons and high brightness electron sources for accelerators. This rugged, long-life electron gun avoids the difficulties associated with plasma cathodes, thermionic emitters, and field emission cathodes. The RPG concept employs the emission of secondary electrons in a transmission mode as opposed to the conventional mode of reflection, i.e., electrons exit from the back face of a thin negative electron affinity (NEA) material, and in the same direction as the incident beam. Current amplification through one stage of a NEA material could be over 50 times. The amplification is accomplished in one or more stages consisting of one primary emitter and one or more secondary emitters. The primary emitter is a low current density robust emitter (e.g., thoriated tungsten). The secondary emitters are thin NEA electrodes which emit secondary electrons in the same direction as the incident beam. Specific application is targeted for a klystron gun to be used by SLAC with a cold cathode at 30-40 amps/cm^2 output from the secondary emission stage, a ~2 μs pulse length, and ~200 pulses/second.

  16. Computer automation of high current ion implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, Ollie; Lindsey, Paul; Cecil, Joseph; Pipe, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Complete computer automation of a high current ion implanter has been achieved. Special design considerations were necessary for automation including the development of a simplified ion source, a simplified beam transport control function, and a computer aided real-time feedback dosimetry control system. A special, versatile software architecture was also necessary to allow protected operation by unskilled operators, as well as diagnostic and maintenance modes accessible only to qualified personnel. Integral mounting of the DEC LSI-11 computer in the implanter frame provided additional challenges regarding EMI control and the electrical isolation required. The end result is a system in which all pertinent functions of the implanter are computer monitored and controlled continuously, allowing for automatic set-up, operation, on-line fault detection and diagnostics, with recovery software to correct many transient problems as they occur. This paper will discuss both general and specific solutions to the design problems encountered, and will review the system performance from a user point of view.

  17. High current regimes in RFX-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valisa, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Buratti, P.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Dal Bello, S.; Martin, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Sarff, J. S.; Spolaore, M.; Zanca, P.; Zanotto, L.; Agostini, M.; Alfier, A.; Antoni, V.; Apolloni, L.; Auriemma, F.; Barana, O.; Baruzzo, M.; Bettini, P.; Bonfiglio, D.; Bonomo, F.; Brombin, M.; Buffa, A.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Cavinato, M.; Chitarin, G.; DeLorenzi, A.; DeMasi, G.; Escande, D. F.; Fassina, A.; Franz, P.; Gaio, E.; Gazza, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Gobbin, M.; Grando, L.; Guazzotto, L.; Guo, S. C.; Igochine, V.; Innocente, P.; Lorenzini, R.; Luchetta, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Marrelli, L.; Martini, S.; Martines, E.; McCollam, K.; Milani, F.; Moresco, M.; Novello, L.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Peruzzo, S.; Piovan, R.; Piron, L.; Pizzimenti, A.; Piovesan, P.; Pomaro, N.; Predebon, I.; Puiatti, M. E.; Rostagni, G.; Sattin, F.; Scarin, P.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Soppelsa, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spizzo, G.; Taliercio, C.; Terranova, D.; Toigo, V.; Vianello, N.; Yadikin, D.; Zaccaria, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zilli, E.; Zuin, M.

    2008-12-01

    Optimization of machine operation, including plasma position control, density control and especially feedback control on multiple magnetohydrodynamic modes, has led RFX-mod to operate reliably at 1.5 MA, the highest current ever achieved on a reversed field pinch (RFP). At high current and low density the magnetic topology spontaneously self-organizes in an Ohmical helical symmetry, with the new magnetic axis helically twisting around the geometrical axis of the torus. The separatrix of the island disappears leaving a wide and symmetric thermal structure with large gradients in the electron temperature profile. The new topology still displays an intermittent nature but its overall presence has reached 85% of the current flat-top period. The large gradients in the electron temperature profile appear to be marginal for the destabilization of ion temperature gradient modes on the assumption that ions and electrons have the same gradients. There are indications that higher currents could provide the conditions under which to prove the existence of a true helical equilibrium as the standard RFP configuration.

  18. Advances in associated-particle neutron probe diagnostics for substance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Edgar A.; Dickerman, Charles E.; Frey, Manfred

    1995-09-01

    The development and investigation of a small associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) shows potential to allow the associated-particle diagnostic method to be moved out of the laboratory into field applications. The APSTNG interrogates the inspected object with 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron inside a cone encompassing the region of interest. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify many nuclides. Flight-times determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles can yield a separate course tomographic image of each identified nuclide, from a single orientation. Chemical substances are identified by comparing relative spectral line intensities with ratios of elements in reference compounds. The high-energy neutrons and gamma-rays penetrate large objects and dense materials. Generally, no collimators or radiation shielding are needed. Proof-of-concept laboratory experiments have been successfully performed for simulated nuclear, chemical warfare, and conventional munitions. Most recently, inspection applications have been investigated for radioactive waste characterization, presence of cocaine in propane tanks, and uranium and plutonium smuggling. Based on lessons learned with the present APSTNG system, an advanced APSTNG tube (along with improved high voltage supply and control units) is being designed and fabricated that will be transportable and rugged, yield a substantial neutron output increase, and provide sufficiently improved lifetime to allow operation at more than an order of magnitude increase in neutron flux.

  19. Advances in associated-particle sealed-tube neutron probe diagnostics for substance detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; Frey, M.

    1995-07-01

    The development and investigation of a small associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) shows potential to allow the associated-particle diagnostic method to be moved out of the laboratory into field applications. The APSTNG interrogates the inspected object with 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron inside a cone encompassing the region of interest. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify many nuclides. Flight-times determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles can yield a separate coarse tomographic image of each identified nuclide, from a single orientation. Chemical substances are identified by comparing relative spectral line intensities with ratios of elements in reference compounds. The high-energy neutrons and gamma-rays penetrate large objects and dense materials. Generally no collimators or radiation shielding are needed. Proof-of-concept laboratory experiments have been successfully performed for simulated nuclear, chemical warfare, and conventional munitions. Most recently, inspection applications have been investigated for radioactive waste characterization, presence of cocaine in propane tanks, and uranium and plutonium smuggling. Based on lessons learned with the present APSTNG system, an advanced APSTNG tube (along with improved high voltage supply and control units) is being designed and fabricated that will be transportable and rugged, yield a substantial neutron output increase, and provide sufficiently improved lifetime to allow operation at more than an order of magnitude increase in neutron flux.

  20. Achromatic beam transport of High Current Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-02-01

    The high current injector (HCI) provides intense ion beams of high charge state using a high temperature superconducting ECR ion source. The ion beam is accelerated upto a final energy of 1.8 MeV/u due to an electrostatic potential, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a drift tube linac (DTL). The ion beam has to be transported to superconducting LINAC which is around 50 m away from DTL. This section is termed as high energy beam transport section (HEBT) and is used to match the beam both in transverse and longitudinal phase space to the entrance of LINAC. The HEBT section is made up of four 90 deg. achromatic bends and interconnecting magnetic quadrupole triplets. Two RF bunchers have been used for longitudinal phase matching to the LINAC. The ion optical design of HEBT section has been simulated using different beam dynamics codes like TRACEWIN, GICOSY and TRACE 3D. The field computation code OPERA 3D has been utilized for hardware design of all the magnets. All the dipole and quadrupole magnets have been field mapped and their test results such as edge angles measurements, homogeneity and harmonic analysis etc. are reported. The whole design of HEBT section has been performed such that the most of the beam optical components share same hardware design and there is ample space for beam diagnostics as per geometry of the building. Many combination of achromatic bends have been simulated to transport the beam in HEBT section but finally the four 90 deg. achromatic bend configuration is found to be the best satisfying all the geometrical constraints with simplified beam tuning process in real time.

  1. Advanced laser particle accelerator development at LANL: from fast ignition to radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine A; Offermann, D T; Cobble, J A; Schmitt, M J; Gautier, D C; Kwan, T J T; Montgomery, D S; Kluge, Thomas; Bussmann, Micheal; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Gall, B; Geissel, M; Korgan, G; Kovaleski, S; Lockard, T; Malekos, S; Schollmeier, M; Sentoku, Y; Cowan, T E

    2010-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, SN M detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high current and high energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology in conjunction with our partners at the ForschungsZentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD). Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent etliciencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  2. Advanced Laser Particle Accelerator Development at LANL: From Fast Ignition to Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, K. A.; Offermann, D. T.; Cobble, J. A.; Schmitt, M. J.; Gautier, D. C.; Kwan, T. J.; Montgomery, D. S.; Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Gall, B.; Kovaleski, S.; Geissel, M.; Schollmeier, M.; Korgan, G.; Malekos, S.; Lockard, T.

    2010-11-04

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, Special Nuclear Material (SNM) detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high-current and high-energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology. Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent efficiencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt laser. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world [3]. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  3. Characterization of particle bound organic carbon from diesel vehicles equipped with advanced emission control technologies.

    PubMed

    Pakbin, Payam; Ning, Zhi; Schauer, James J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2009-07-01

    A chassis dynamometer study was carried out by the University of Southern California in collaboration with the Air Resources Board (CARB) to investigate the physical, chemical, and toxicological characteristics of diesel emissions of particulate matter (PM) from heavy-duty vehicles. These heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDV) were equipped with advanced emission control technologies, designed to meet CARB retrofit regulations. A HDDV without any emission control devices was used as the baseline vehicle. Three advanced emission control technologies; continuously regenerating technology (CRT), zeolite- and vanadium-based selective catalytic reduction technologies (Z-SCRT and V-SCRT), were tested under transient (UDDS) (1) and cruise (80 kmph) driving cycles to simulate real-world driving conditions. This paper focuses on the characterization of the particle bound organic species from the vehicle exhaust. Physical and chemical properties of PM emissions have been reported by Biswas et al. Atmos. Environ. 2008, 42, 5622-5634) and Hu et al. (Atmos. Environ. 2008, submitted) Significant reductions in the emission factors (microg/mile) of particle bound organic compounds were observed in HDDV equipped with advanced emission control technologies. V-SCRT and Z-SCRT effectively reduced PAHs, hopanes and steranes, n-alkanes and acids by more than 99%, and often to levels below detection limits for both cruise and UDDS cycles. The CRT technology also showed similar reductions with SCRT for medium and high molecular weight PAHs, acids, but with slightly lower removal efficiencies for other organic compounds. Ratios of particle bound organics-to-OC mass (microg/g) from the baseline exhaust were compared with their respective ratios in diesel fuel and lubricating oil, which revealed that hopanes and steranes originate from lubricating oil, whereas PAHs can either form during the combustion process or originate from diesel fuel itself. With the introduction of emission control

  4. Survey of Digital Feedback Systems in High Current Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Teytelman, Dmitry

    2003-06-06

    In the last decade demand for brightness in synchrotron light sources and luminosity in circular colliders led to construction of multiple high current storage rings. Many of these new machines require feedback systems to achieve design stored beam currents. In the same time frame the rapid advances in the technology of digital signal processing allowed the implementation of these complex feedback systems. In this paper I concentrate on three applications of feedback to storage rings: orbit control in light sources, coupled-bunch instability control, and low-level RF control. Each of these applications is challenging in areas of processing bandwidth, algorithm complexity, and control of time-varying beam and system dynamics. I will review existing implementations as well as comment on promising future directions.

  5. PENETRATION AND DEFECT FORMATION IN HIGH CURRENT ARC WELDING

    SciTech Connect

    MENDEZ,P.F.; EAGAR, T.W.

    2003-01-01

    The work performed during the three previous years can be roughly divided into two main categories: (1) development of advanced modeling techniques; and (2) modeling of arc welding process. The work in the first category comprised the development of the Order of Magnitude Scaling (OMS) technique, which is complementary to numerical modeling techniques such as finite elements, but it provides approximate formulas instead of just numerical results. Borrowing concepts from OMS, another modeling technique based on empirical data was also developed. During this stage special software was also developed. The second category comprised the application of OMS to the three main subsystems of arc welding: the weld pool, the arc, and the electrode. For each of these subsystems they found scaling laws and regimes. With this knowledge, they analyzed the generation of weld pool defects during high current arc welding, proposed a mechanistic description of the process, and possible solutions.

  6. Equipartitioning in a high current proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.

    1997-08-01

    The code PARMILA simulates the beam transmission through the Accelerator for the Production of Tritium (APT) linac. The beam is equipartitioned when the longitudinal and transverse temperatures are equal. This paper explores the consequence of equipartitioning in the APT linac. The simulations begin with a beam that starts at the ion-source plasma surface. PARMILA tracks the particles from the RFQ exit through the 1.7-GeV linac. This paper compares two focusing schemes. One scheme uses mostly equal strength quadrupoles. The equipartitioning scheme uses weaker focusing in the high-energy portion of the linac. The RMS beam size with the equipartitioning scheme is larger, but the relative size of the halo is less than in the equal-strength design.

  7. Polarized light-scattering profile-advanced characterization of nonspherical particles with scanning flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Strokotov, Dmitry I; Moskalensky, Alexander E; Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M; Maltsev, Valeri P

    2011-07-01

    We instrumentally, theoretically, and experimentally demonstrate a new approach for characterization of nonspherical individual particles from light scattering. Unlike the original optical scheme of the scanning flow cytometer that measures an angle-resolved scattering corresponding in general to S₁₁ element of the light-scattering matrix, the modernized instrument allows us to measure the polarized light-scattering profile of individual particles simultaneously. Theoretically, the polarized profile is expressed by the combination of a few light-scattering matrix elements. This approach supports us with additional independent data to characterize a particle with a complex shape and an internal structure. Applicability of the new method was demonstrated from analysis of polymer bispheres. The bisphere characteristics, sizes, and refractive indices of each sphere composing the bisphere were successfully retrieved from the solution of the inverse light-scattering problem. The solution provides determination of the Eulerian angles, which describe the orientation of the bispheres relative to the direction of the incident laser beam and detecting polarizer of the optical system. Both the ordinary and polarized profiles show a perfect agreement with T-matrix simulation resulting to 50-nm precision for sizing of bispheres. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  8. Advances in Single-Particle Electron Cryomicroscopy Structure Determination applied to Sub-tomogram Averaging

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Tanmay A.M.; Russo, Christopher J.; Löwe, Jan; Passmore, Lori A.; Scheres, Sjors H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent innovations in specimen preparation, data collection, and image processing have led to improved structure determination using single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Here we explore some of these advances to improve structures determined using electron cryotomography (cryo-ET) and sub-tomogram averaging. We implement a new three-dimensional model for the contrast transfer function, and use this in a regularized likelihood optimization algorithm as implemented in the RELION program. Using direct electron detector data, we apply both single-particle analysis and sub-tomogram averaging to analyze radiation-induced movements of the specimen. As in single-particle cryo-EM, we find that significant sample movements occur during tomographic data acquisition, and that these movements are substantially reduced through the use of ultrastable gold substrates. We obtain a sub-nanometer resolution structure of the hepatitis B capsid, and show that reducing radiation-induced specimen movement may be central to attempts at further improving tomogram quality and resolution. PMID:26256537

  9. Advances in Quantifying the Radiative Effects of Aerosol Particles on Climate from Airborne Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, K. S.; Coddington, O.; Bergstrom, R.; Redemann, J.

    2007-12-01

    In the fourth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, large uncertainties persist in estimates of climate forcing by aerosol particles. One contributor to this uncertainty is the poorly quantified vertical distribution of solar radiation absorbed by aerosol particles, from the regional to global scale. Another is the spectral and spatial variability of surface albedo, an effect that can dominate the top-of-atmosphere perturbations due to aerosol scattering and absorption, particularly over land. Over the past three years a number of intensive airborne field experiments (ICARTT, MILAGRO, GoMACCS) have contributed significantly to our understanding of the impact of pollution outflow from urban-industrial centers on radiative forcing, using spectrally resolved radiometric measurements and novel observationally-based methods to derive forcing efficiency and flux divergence. We present an overview of some of the most significant advances in direct radiative forcing realized by these studies, and recommendations on where the greatest challenges remain. In addition we present findings from these experiments on the influence of aerosol particles on cloud radiative properties, a potentially greater effect but even more uncertain than direct radiative forcing.

  10. Advancements in the Coupling of State-of-the-Art Energetic Particle and Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advancements in coupling the Earth Moon Mars Radiation Environment Module (EMMREM) and two MHD models, Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS) and ENLIL, have yielded promising results for predicting differential energy flux and radiation doses at 1AU. The EMMREM+MAS coupling focuses on the details of particle acceleration due to CMEs initiated low in the corona (1Rs - 20Rs). The EMMREM+ENLIL coupling gives results for CMEs initiated at ~20Rs and is part of a predictive capability being developed in conjunction with the CCMC. The challenge in forming large solar energetic particle events in both the prompt scenario lower down or for a gradual CME further out is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration regions while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream. We present here details of the MHD parameters and topology of a CME around the acceleration regions in the early evolution (below 2Rs), dose and flux predictions at 1AU, and how compression regions vs. shocks affect the evolution and spectrum of an SEP event.

  11. The movement of particles in liquid metals under gravity forces and the interaction of particles with advancing solid-liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, F.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of shrinkage and gas porosity are discussed. Gravity forces enhance the removal of gas bubbles from a metal melt and contribute to the feeding of shrinkage porosity in castings. Experiments are reviewed which determine how large a density difference is required for metal particles to float or sink in a metal melt and to what extent do factors not considered in Stokes Law influence particle movement in a real system. As to the interaction of particles with an advancing solid-liquid interface, the results indicate that the metal particles are not rejected in a metal melt, and that concentrations of particles in a metal following solidification are due to other factors.

  12. The movement of particles in liquid metals under gravity forces and the interaction of particles with advancing solid-liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, F.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of shrinkage and gas porosity are discussed. Gravity forces enhance the removal of gas bubbles from a metal melt and contribute to the feeding of shrinkage porosity in castings. Experiments are reviewed which determine how large a density difference is required for metal particles to float or sink in a metal melt and to what extent do factors not considered in Stokes Law influence particle movement in a real system. As to the interaction of particles with an advancing solid-liquid interface, the results indicate that the metal particles are not rejected in a metal melt, and that concentrations of particles in a metal following solidification are due to other factors.

  13. Observation of Energetic Particle Driven Modes Relevant to Advanced Tokamak Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    R. Nazikian; B. Alper; H.L. Berk; D. Borba; C. Boswell; R.V. Budny; K.H. Burrell; C.Z. Cheng; E.J. Doyle; E. Edlund; R.J. Fonck; A. Fukuyama; N.N. Gorelenkov; C.M. Greenfield; D.J. Gupta; M. Ishikawa; R.J. Jayakumar; G.J. Kramer; Y. Kusama; R.J. La Haye; G.R. McKee; W.A. Peebles; S.D. Pinches; M. Porkolab; J. Rapp; T.L. Rhodes; S.E. Sharapov; K. Shinohara; J.A. Snipes; W.M. Solomon; E.J. Strait; M. Takechi; M.A. Van Zeeland; W.P. West; K.L. Wong; S. Wukitch; L. Zeng

    2004-10-21

    Measurements of high-frequency oscillations in JET [Joint European Torus], JT-60U, Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, and TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] plasmas are contributing to a new understanding of fast ion-driven instabilities relevant to Advanced Tokamak (AT) regimes. A model based on the transition from a cylindrical-like frequency-chirping mode to the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) has successfully encompassed many of the characteristics seen in experiments. In a surprising development, the use of internal density fluctuation diagnostics has revealed many more modes than has been detected on edge magnetic probes. A corollary discovery is the observation of modes excited by fast particles traveling well below the Alfven velocity. These observations open up new opportunities for investigating a ''sea of Alfven Eigenmodes'' in present-scale experiments, and highlight the need for core fluctuation and fast ion measurements in a future burning-plasma experiment.

  14. Alpha-particle-induced charge collection in scaled dram cells with advanced structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Aoki, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Itoh, K.

    1990-11-01

    Alpha-particle-induced charge collection in scaled DRAM cells with advanced structures are experimentally examined. It is concluded that the storage charge necessary to avoid the soft-errors, QC, is proportional to the diagonal length of the depletion region in most types of scaled DRAM cells including PMOS cells. For some types of DRAM cells, however, additional effects on the QC should be considered: (a) for DRAM cells with LOCOS isolation, the collected charge enhancement caused by the charge multiplication at the LOCOS junction edge becomes prominent with scaling, (b) for substrate-plate SPC (Sheat Plate Capacitor) trench cells, the potential slope towards the surface caused by the p+ plate regions enhance the charge collection, (c) for PMOS cells, the collected charge enhancement through the charge multiplication can be weaker than that in NMOS cells.

  15. Modeling laser produced plasmas with smoothed particle hydrodynamics for next generation advanced light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holladay, Robert; Griffith, Alec; Murillo, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    A computational model has been developed to study the evolution of a plasma generated by next-generation advanced light sources such as SLAC's LCLS and LANL's proposed MaRIE. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to model the plasma evolution because of the ease with which it handles the open boundary conditions and large deformations associated with these experiments. Our work extends the basic SPH method by utilizing a two-fluid model of an electron-ion plasma that also incorporates time dependent ionization and recombination by allowing the SPH fluid particles to have an evolving mass based on the mean ionization state of the plasma. Additionally, inter-species heating, thermal conduction, and electric fields are also accounted for. The effects of various initial conditions and model parameters will be presented, with the goal of using this framework to develop a model that can be used in the design and interpretation of future experiments. This work was supported by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Computational Physics Workshop.

  16. The “Puck” energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low‐resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low‐resource but highly capable, mass‐species‐discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the “Puck” EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high‐voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions. PMID:27867799

  17. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forwardforward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  18. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forward-forward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  19. Advances in 4D Treatment Planning for Scanned Particle Beam Therapy — Report of Dedicated Workshops

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Christoph; Graeff, Christian; Riboldi, Marco; Nill, Simeon; Baroni, Guido; Knopf, Antje-Christin

    2014-01-01

    We report on recent progress in the field of mobile tumor treatment with scanned particle beams, as discussed in the latest editions of the 4D treatment planning workshop. The workshop series started in 2009, with about 20 people from 4 research institutes involved, all actively working on particle therapy delivery and development. The first workshop resulted in a summary of recommendations for the treatment of mobile targets, along with a list of requirements to apply these guidelines clinically. The increased interest in the treatment of mobile tumors led to a continuously growing number of attendees: the 2012 edition counted more than 60 participants from 20 institutions and commercial vendors. The focus of research discussions among workshop participants progressively moved from 4D treatment planning to complete 4D treatments, aiming at effective and safe treatment delivery. Current research perspectives on 4D treatments include all critical aspects of time resolved delivery, such as in-room imaging, motion detection, beam application, and quality assurance techniques. This was motivated by the start of first clinical treatments of hepato cellular tumors with a scanned particle beam, relying on gating or abdominal compression for motion mitigation. Up to date research activities emphasize significant efforts in investigating advanced motion mitigation techniques, with a specific interest in the development of dedicated tools for experimental validation. Potential improvements will be made possible in the near future through 4D optimized treatment plans that require upgrades of the currently established therapy control systems for time resolved delivery. But since also these novel optimization techniques rely on the validity of the 4DCT, research focusing on alternative 4D imaging technique, such as MRI based 4DCT generation will continue. PMID:24354749

  20. Rational design and optimization of downstream processes of virus particles for biopharmaceutical applications: current advances.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Tiago; Mota, José P B; Peixoto, Cristina; Alves, Paula M; Carrondo, Manuel J T

    2011-01-01

    The advent of advanced therapies in the pharmaceutical industry has moved the spotlight into virus-like particles and viral vectors produced in cell culture holding great promise in a myriad of clinical targets, including cancer prophylaxis and treatment. Even though a couple of cases have reached the clinic, these products have yet to overcome a number of biological and technological challenges before broad utilization. Concerning the manufacturing processes, there is significant research focusing on the optimization of current cell culture systems and, more recently, on developing scalable downstream processes to generate material for pre-clinical and clinical trials. We review the current options for downstream processing of these complex biopharmaceuticals and underline current advances on knowledge-based toolboxes proposed for rational optimization of their processing. Rational tools developed to increase the yet scarce knowledge on the purification processes of complex biologicals are discussed as alternative to empirical, "black-boxed" based strategies classically used for process development. Innovative methodologies based on surface plasmon resonance, dynamic light scattering, scale-down high-throughput screening and mathematical modeling for supporting ion-exchange chromatography show great potential for a more efficient and cost-effective process design, optimization and equipment prototyping. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchuk, Kyle

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called "non-blinking" quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  2. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, Kyle

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  3. High-Current Experiments for Accelerator-Based Neutron Capture Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Hughey, B.H.; Shefer, R.E.; Yanch, J.C.; Blackburn, B.W.

    1999-06-06

    Several accelerator-based neutron capture therapy applications are under development. These applications include boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiform and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) for rheumatoid arthritis. These modalities use accelerator-based charged-particle reactions to create a suitable neutron source. Neutrons are produced using a high-current, 2-MV terminal tandem accelerator. For these applications to be feasible, high accelerator beam currents must be routinely achievable. An effort was undertaken to explore the operating regime of the accelerator in the milliampere range. In preparation for high-current operation of the accelerator, computer simulations of charged-particle beam optics were performed to establish high-current operating conditions. Herein we describe high beam current simulations and high beam current operation of the accelerator.

  4. A Dynamic Model for the Interaction Between an Insoluble Particle and an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, A. V.; Mukherjee, S.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    2000-01-01

    Most models that describe the interaction of an insoluble particle with an advancing solid-liquid interface are based on the assumption of steady state. However, as demonstrated by experimental work, the process does not reach steady state until the particle is pushed for a while by the interface. In this work, a dynamic mathematical model was developed. The dynamic model demonstrates that this interaction is essentially non-steady state and that steady state eventually occurs only when solidification is conducted at sub-critical velocities. The model was tested for three systems: aluminum-zirconia particles, succinonitrilepolystyrene particles, and biphenyl-glass particles. The calculated values for critical velocity of the pushing/engulfment transition were in same range with the experimental ones.

  5. Comparison of Electron Cloud Simulation and Experiments in the High-Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S; Molvik, A; Bieniosek, F; Seidl, P; Vay, J; Verboncoeur, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-10-07

    A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability.

  6. Comparison of electron cloud simulation and experiments in the high-current experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Covo, M. Kireeff; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Verboncoeur, J.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2004-08-27

    A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability.

  7. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung

    1992-12-31

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  8. High-Current Energy-Recovering Electron Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolitsa Merminga; David Douglas; Geoffrey Krafft

    2003-12-01

    The use of energy recovery provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices, electron-ion colliders, and other applications in photon science and nuclear and high-energy physics. Energy-recovering electron linear accelerators (called energy-recovering linacs, or ERLs) share many characteristics with ordinary linacs, as their six-dimensional beam phase space is largely determined by electron source properties. However, in common with classic storage rings, ERLs possess a high average-current-carrying capability enabled by the energy recovery process, and thus promise similar efficiencies. The authors discuss the concept of energy recovery and its technical challenges and describe the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Infrared Demonstration Free-Electron Laser (IR Demo FEL), originally driven by a 3548-MeV, 5-mA superconducting radiofrequency (srf) ERL, which provided the most substantial demonstration of energy recovery to date: a beam of 250 kW average power. They present an overview of envisioned ERL applications and a development path to achieving the required performance. They use experimental data obtained at the JLab IR Demo FEL and recent experimental results from CEBAF-ERL GeV-scale, comparatively low-current energy-recovery demonstration at JLab to evaluate the feasibility of the new applications of high-current ERLs, as well as ERLs' limitations and ultimate performance.

  9. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung.

    1992-01-01

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  10. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  11. Stable superconducting magnet. [high current levels below critical temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, R. W. (Inventor)

    1967-01-01

    Operation of a superconducting magnet is considered. A method is described for; (1) obtaining a relatively high current in a superconducting magnet positioned in a bath of a gas refrigerant; (2) operating a superconducting magnet at a relatively high current level without training; and (3) operating a superconducting magnet containing a plurality of turns of a niobium zirconium wire at a relatively high current level without training.

  12. Advancing Water Quality Monitoring and Hydrologic Optics Studies for Inland Waters through An Individual Particle Analysis Technique in Characterizing Suspended Mineral Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, F.

    2016-02-01

    Light attenuation by suspended particles in aquatic systems is an important physical process regulating underwater light field (important to primary production) and water clarity (thus water quality), as well as the magnitudes and the spectral features of remote-sensing reflectance. Mineral (or inorganic) particles are a key component of the optical regimes of inland waters because of their higher refractive indices as compared with algal and detrital particles, and generally much higher concentrations than in open oceans. A unique individual particle analysis (IPA) technique (scanning electron microscopy interfaced with automated image and X-ray analyses) has been used to provide detailed characterizations (size, shape, and composition) of individual mineral particles collected from diverse freshwater systems in North America, including the Great Lakes and the Finger Lakes of New York. A summary metric, the projected area concentrations of mineral particles, has been demonstrated to strongly regulate some critical water quality parameters, such as turbidity, Secchi depth, and particulate phosphorus concentrations. In addition, IPA results can be used as inputs for theoretical calculations of optical coefficients (e.g., absorption, scattering, and backscattering) of the mineral particle populations (i.e., the inherent optical properties, IOPs). Here we present some highlights from our water quality and optics studies supported by this IPA technique: (1) demonstration of the regulating effects of mineral area concentrations on common water quality metrics, (2) partitioning of the bulk particulate IOPs into contributing components (e.g., algal particles, calcite, clay minerals), (3) pursuit of optical modeling (particulate scattering and backscattering) closure with bulk measurements (promising results documented), (4) development of bio-optical models parameterized on particulate organic carbon content for an inland lake, and (5) advancement of remote

  13. High average power, high current pulsed accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Neau, E.L.

    1995-05-01

    Which current pulsed accelerator technology was developed during the late 60`s through the late 80`s to satisfy the needs of various military related applications such as effects simulators, particle beam devices, free electron lasers, and as drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion devices. The emphasis in these devices is to achieve very high peak power levels, with pulse lengths on the order of a few 10`s of nanoseconds, peak currents of up to 10`s of MA, and accelerating potentials of up to 10`s of MV. New which average power systems, incorporating thermal management techniques, are enabling the potential use of high peak power technology in a number of diverse industrial application areas such as materials processing, food processing, stack gas cleanup, and the destruction of organic contaminants. These systems employ semiconductor and saturable magnetic switches to achieve short pulse durations that can then be added to efficiently give MV accelerating, potentials while delivering average power levels of a few 100`s of kilowatts to perhaps many megawatts. The Repetitive High Energy Puled Power project is developing short-pulse, high current accelerator technology capable of generating beams with kJ`s of energy per pulse delivered to areas of 1000 cm{sup 2} or more using ions, electrons, or x-rays. Modular technology is employed to meet the needs of a variety of applications requiring from 100`s of kV to MV`s and from 10`s to 100`s of kA. Modest repetition rates, up to a few 100`s of pulses per second (PPS), allow these machines to deliver average currents on the order of a few 100`s of mA. The design and operation of the second generation 300 kW RHEPP-II machine, now being brought on-line to operate at 2.5 MV, 25 kA, and 100 PPS will be described in detail as one example of the new high average power, high current pulsed accelerator technology.

  14. A Method for Consensus Reaching in Product Kansei Evaluation Using Advanced Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Consumers' opinions toward product design alternatives are often subjective and perceptual, which reflect their perception about a product and can be described using Kansei adjectives. Therefore, Kansei evaluation is often employed to determine consumers' preference. However, how to identify and improve the reliability of consumers' Kansei evaluation opinions toward design alternatives has an important role in adding additional insurance and reducing uncertainty to successful product design. To solve this problem, this study employs a consensus model to measure consistence among consumers' opinions, and an advanced particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm combined with Linearly Decreasing Inertia Weight (LDW) method is proposed for consensus reaching by minimizing adjustment of consumers' opinions. Furthermore, the process of the proposed method is presented and the details are illustrated using an example of electronic scooter design evaluation. The case study reveals that the proposed method is promising for reaching a consensus through searching optimal solutions by PSO and improving the reliability of consumers' evaluation opinions toward design alternatives according to Kansei indexes. PMID:28316619

  15. Recent advances in the modeling of plasmas with the Particle-In-Cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Lehe, Remi; Vincenti, Henri; Godfrey, Brendan; Lee, Patrick; Haber, Irv

    2015-11-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach is the method of choice for self-consistent simulations of plasmas from first principles. The fundamentals of the PIC method were established decades ago but improvements or variations are continuously being proposed. We report on several recent advances in PIC related algorithms, including: (a) detailed analysis of the numerical Cherenkov instability and its remediation, (b) analytic pseudo-spectral electromagnetic solvers in Cartesian and cylindrical (with azimuthal modes decomposition) geometries, (c) arbitrary-order finite-difference and generalized pseudo-spectral Maxwell solvers, (d) novel analysis of Maxwell's solvers' stencil variation and truncation, in application to domain decomposition strategies and implementation of Perfectly Matched Layers in high-order and pseudo-spectral solvers. Work supported by US-DOE Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231 and the US-DOE SciDAC program ComPASS. Used resources of NERSC, supported by US-DOE Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  16. Major findings and recent advances in virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mohsen, Mona O; Zha, Lisha; Cabral-Miranda, Gustavo; Bachmann, Martin F

    2017-09-05

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) have made giant strides in the field of vaccinology over the last three decades. VLPs constitute versatile tools in vaccine development due to their favourable immunological characteristics such as their size, repetitive surface geometry, ability to induce both innate and adaptive immune responses as well as being safe templates with favourable economics. Several VLP-based vaccines are commercially available including vaccines against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) such as Cervarix(®), Gardasil(®) & Gardasil9(®) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) including the 3rd generation Sci-B-Vac™. In addition, the first licensed malaria-VLP-based vaccine Mosquirix™ has been recently approved by the European regulators. Several other VLP-based vaccines are currently undergoing preclinical and clinical development. This review summarizes some of the major findings and recent advances in VLP-based vaccine development and technologies and outlines general principles that may be harnessed for induction of targeted immune responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Method for Consensus Reaching in Product Kansei Evaluation Using Advanced Particle Swarm Optimization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan-Pu

    2017-01-01

    Consumers' opinions toward product design alternatives are often subjective and perceptual, which reflect their perception about a product and can be described using Kansei adjectives. Therefore, Kansei evaluation is often employed to determine consumers' preference. However, how to identify and improve the reliability of consumers' Kansei evaluation opinions toward design alternatives has an important role in adding additional insurance and reducing uncertainty to successful product design. To solve this problem, this study employs a consensus model to measure consistence among consumers' opinions, and an advanced particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm combined with Linearly Decreasing Inertia Weight (LDW) method is proposed for consensus reaching by minimizing adjustment of consumers' opinions. Furthermore, the process of the proposed method is presented and the details are illustrated using an example of electronic scooter design evaluation. The case study reveals that the proposed method is promising for reaching a consensus through searching optimal solutions by PSO and improving the reliability of consumers' evaluation opinions toward design alternatives according to Kansei indexes.

  18. A study of erosive particle rebound parameters. Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kosel, T.H.

    1992-04-29

    The project described in this report has included both computer models and experimental measurements of the rebound velocities of particles during erosion of metals. Computer models were developed for impact of both spherical and idealized two-dimensional particles. Although simplified, the models allowed predictions to be examined for a wide range of experimental conditions, particles and materials. Experimental systems were developed for the measurement of dynamic hardness, single particle rebound of spherical and angular particles, and multiple particle rebound during steady-state erosion. Comparison of experimental results with model predictions shows generally good agreement, and shows that particle rebound is largely determined by particle dynamics. The method developed for measurement of dynamic hardness from rebound velocity alone provides a more rapid unambiguous method than the more common approach in which crater dimensions must be measured after impact.

  19. Advanced multi-frequency radar: Design, preliminary measurements and particle size distribution retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majurec, Ninoslav

    In the spring of 2001 the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory (MIRSL) at the University of Massachusetts began the development of an advanced Multi-Frequency Radar (AMFR) system for studying clouds and precipitation. This mobile radar was designed to consist of three polarimetric Doppler subsystems operating at Ku-band (13.4 GHz), Ka-band (35.6 GHz) and W-band (94.92 GHz). This combination of frequency bands allows a measurement of a wide range of atmospheric targets ranging from weakly reflecting clouds to strong precipitation. The antenna beamwidths at each frequency were intentionally matched, ensuring consistent sampling volume. Multi-frequency radar remote sensing techniques are not widely used because few multi-frequency radars are available to the science community. One exception is the 33 GHz/95 GHz UMass Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS), which AMFR is intended to replace. AMFR's multi-parameter capabilities are designed for characterizing the complex microphysics of layer clouds and precipitation processes in winter storms. AMFR will also play an important role in developing algorithms and validating measurements for an upcoming generation of space-borne radars. The frequency bands selected for AMFR match those of several sensors that have been deployed or are under development. These include the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agencies (JAXA's) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite Ku-band (13 GHz) radar, the CloudSat W-band (95 GHz) radar, and the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) satellite radars at Ku-band and Ka-band. This dissertation describes the AMFR hardware design and development. Compared to CPRS, the addition of one extra frequency band (Ku) will extend AMFR's measurement capabilities towards the larger particle sizes (precipitation). AMFR's design is based around high-power klystron amplifiers. This ensures complete coherency (CPRS uses magnetrons and coherent-on-receive technique). The partial loss in sensitivity due to

  20. Recent Advances in Analytical Methods on Lipoprotein Subclasses: Calculation of Particle Numbers from Lipid Levels by Gel Permeation HPLC Using "Spherical Particle Model".

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Yamashita, Shizuya

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we developed an analytical method for determining the lipid levels and particle numbers in lipoprotein subclasses covering a wide size range from chylomicrons to small high density lipoproteins, by using gel permeation high-performance liquid chromatography (GP-HPLC). The challenges in analytical methods on lipoprotein subclasses have been addressed from 1980 by Hara and Okazaki using commercial TSK gel permeation columns. Later, the improvements in the hardware, separation and detection of lipoproteins, and the data processing software, using a Gaussian distribution approximation to calculate lipid levels of lipoprotein subclasses, have been extensively utilized in these analytical methods for over thirty years. In this review, we describe on the recent advances in analytical methods on lipoprotein subclasses based on various techniques, and the calculation of particle numbers from lipid levels by GPHPLC using the "spherical particle model". Free/ester ratio of cholesterol in particular lipoprotein subclass was accurately estimated from triglyceride, total cholesterol (free and esterified) and the size of the particle based on this model originally proposed by Shen and Kezdy.

  1. Evaluation of Particle Counter Technology for Detection of Fuel Contamination Detection Utilizing Advanced Aviation Forward Area Refueling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-24

    replacement of water bottom removal.  Recirculation – Air was purged from the filter separator vessel and fuel was again pumped from the tank , through...8, Automatic Particle Counter, cleanliness, free water , Diesel 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT none 18. NUMBER OF...Advanced Aviation Forward Area Refueling System Joel Schmitigal U S Army Tank Automotive Research DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release

  2. A new coincidence model for single particle counters, Part II: Advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Knapp, J Z; Lieberman, A; Abramson, L R

    1994-01-01

    Accuracy, acceptance limits and methods for U.S.P. (788) contaminating particle assays published in the XXII Revision are refined in U.S.P. XXIII. In both Revisions, although different numerical values and methods are employed, particle contamination limits remain constants for all S.V.I. container volumes. The effect of this quality standard is high particle concentration acceptance limits in the smallest S.V.I. container sizes. The effect of these high concentrations is to introduce both undercount errors and false counts into U.S.P. (788) SVI contaminating particle assays. There is general agreement that the count of high concentrations of particles by a single particle light extinction counter result in an increase of the average size of the distribution of particles reported and a decrease in their total number. The error mechanism is termed "signal coincidence." Understanding and control of both these problems is unified with the introduction of the count efficiency parameter. Part I of this paper makes available two core concepts with which evaluation and control of coincidence error in single particle counters can be accurately quantified. These two core concepts are the "Particle Triggered Poisson Model," a new more accurate statistical model of the particle counting process and a concentration measure that includes the effect of particle size on the counting capability of a detector. Use of these concepts make it possible to evaluate particle detector count efficiency capability from experimental data of the coincidence effect. This is an application paper. It combines the theory in the Part I paper with the replicability of particle counters into a simple test protocol. The test results can be used to calculate a contour of particle size and count within which both undercount errors and the introduction of false counts into U.S.P. (788) particle assays are controlled. From the data analyzed it can be seen that any single particle size test cannot

  3. Use of advanced particle methods in modeling space propulsion and its supersonic expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borner, Arnaud

    This research discusses the use of advanced kinetic particle methods such as Molecular Dynamics (MD) and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model space propulsion systems such as electrospray thrusters and their supersonic expansions. MD simulations are performed to model an electrospray thruster for the ionic liquid (IL) EMIM--BF4 using coarse-grained (CG) potentials. The model is initially featuring a constant electric field applied in the longitudinal direction. Two coarse-grained potentials are compared, and the effective-force CG (EFCG) potential is found to predict the formation of the Taylor cone, the cone-jet, and other extrusion modes for similar electric fields and mass flow rates observed in experiments of a IL fed capillary-tip-extractor system better than the simple CG potential. Later, one-dimensional and fully transient three-dimensional electric fields, the latter solving Poisson's equation to take into account the electric field due to space charge at each timestep, are computed by coupling the MD model to a Poisson solver. It is found that the inhomogeneous electric field as well as that of the IL space-charge improve agreement between modeling and experiment. The boundary conditions (BCs) are found to have a substantial impact on the potential and electric field, and the tip BC is introduced and compared to the two previous BCs, named plate and needle, showing good improvement by reducing unrealistically high radial electric fields generated in the vicinity of the capillary tip. The influence of the different boundary condition models on charged species currents as a function of the mass flow rate is studied, and it is found that a constant electric field model gives similar agreement to the more rigorous and computationally expensive tip boundary condition at lower flow rates. However, at higher mass flow rates the MD simulations with the constant electric field produces extruded particles with higher Coulomb energy per ion, consistent with

  4. Advanced Electron Microscopy and Micro analytical technique development and application for Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles from the AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Van Rooyen, Isabella Johanna; Lillo, Thomas Martin; Wen, Haiming; Wright, Karen Elizabeth; Madden, James Wayne; Aguiar, Jeffery Andrew

    2017-01-01

    A series of up to seven irradiation experiments are planned for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Quantification Program, with irradiation completed at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the first experiment (i.e., AGR-1) in November 2009 for an effective 620 full power days. The objective of the AGR-1 experiment was primarily to provide lessons learned on the multi-capsule test train design and to provide early data on fuel performance for use in fuel fabrication process development and post-irradiation safety testing data at high temperatures. This report describes the advanced microscopy and micro-analysis results on selected AGR-1 coated particles.

  5. Heavy Charged Particle Radiobiology: Using Enhanced Biological Effectiveness and Improved Beam Focusing to Advance Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B.; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  6. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-03

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation.

  7. The Interaction Between an Insoluble Particle and an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: Micro-Gravity Experiments and Theoretical Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Ssen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of an insoluble particle with an advancing solid/liquid interface (SLI) has been a subject of investigation for the past four decades. While the original interest stemmed from geology applications (e.g., frost heaving in soil), researchers soon realized that the complex science associated with such an interaction is relevant to many other scientific fields encompassing metal matrix composites (MMCs), high temperature superconductors, inclusion management in steel, growth of monotectics, and preservation of biological cells. During solidification of a liquid containing an insoluble particle, three distinct interaction phenomena have been experimentally observed: instantaneous engulfment of the particle, continuous pushing, and particle pushing followed by engulfment. It was also observed that for given experimental conditions and particle size there is a critical solidification velocity, V(sub cr), above which a particle is engulfed. During solidification of MMCs pushing leads to particle agglomeration at the grain boundaries and this has detrimental effects on mechanical properties of the casting. Consequently, the process must be designed for instantaneous engulfment to occur. This implies the development of accurate theoretical models to predict V(sub cr), and perform benchmark experiments to test the validity of such models. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the pushing/engulfment phenomenon (PEP), its quantification in terms of the material and processing parameters remains a focus of research. Since natural convection currents occurring during terrestrial solidification experiments complicate the study of PEP, execution of experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) has been approved and funded by NASA. Extensive terrestrial (1g) experiments and preliminary micro-gravity (mu g) experiments on two space shuttle missions have been conducted in preparation for future experiments on the ISS. The investigated

  8. The Interaction Between an Insoluble Particle and an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: Micro-Gravity Experiments and Theoretical Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Ssen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of an insoluble particle with an advancing solid/liquid interface (SLI) has been a subject of investigation for the past four decades. While the original interest stemmed from geology applications (e.g., frost heaving in soil), researchers soon realized that the complex science associated with such an interaction is relevant to many other scientific fields encompassing metal matrix composites (MMCs), high temperature superconductors, inclusion management in steel, growth of monotectics, and preservation of biological cells. During solidification of a liquid containing an insoluble particle, three distinct interaction phenomena have been experimentally observed: instantaneous engulfment of the particle, continuous pushing, and particle pushing followed by engulfment. It was also observed that for given experimental conditions and particle size there is a critical solidification velocity, V(sub cr), above which a particle is engulfed. During solidification of MMCs pushing leads to particle agglomeration at the grain boundaries and this has detrimental effects on mechanical properties of the casting. Consequently, the process must be designed for instantaneous engulfment to occur. This implies the development of accurate theoretical models to predict V(sub cr), and perform benchmark experiments to test the validity of such models. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the pushing/engulfment phenomenon (PEP), its quantification in terms of the material and processing parameters remains a focus of research. Since natural convection currents occurring during terrestrial solidification experiments complicate the study of PEP, execution of experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) has been approved and funded by NASA. Extensive terrestrial (1g) experiments and preliminary micro-gravity (mu g) experiments on two space shuttle missions have been conducted in preparation for future experiments on the ISS. The investigated

  9. Acceleration and stability of a high-current ion beam in induction fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas', V. I.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Federovskaya, O. V.

    2013-03-01

    A one-dimensional nonlinear analytic theory of the filamentation instability of a high-current ion beam is formulated. The results of 2.5-dimensional numerical particle-in-cell simulations of acceleration and stability of an annular compensated ion beam (CIB) in a linear induction particle accelerator are presented. It is shown that additional transverse injection of electron beams in magnetically insulated gaps (cusps) improves the quality of the ion-beam distribution function and provides uniform beam acceleration along the accelerator. The CIB filamentation instability in both the presence and the absence of an external magnetic field is considered.

  10. Acceleration and stability of a high-current ion beam in induction fields

    SciTech Connect

    Karas', V. I.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Federovskaya, O. V.

    2013-03-15

    A one-dimensional nonlinear analytic theory of the filamentation instability of a high-current ion beam is formulated. The results of 2.5-dimensional numerical particle-in-cell simulations of acceleration and stability of an annular compensated ion beam (CIB) in a linear induction particle accelerator are presented. It is shown that additional transverse injection of electron beams in magnetically insulated gaps (cusps) improves the quality of the ion-beam distribution function and provides uniform beam acceleration along the accelerator. The CIB filamentation instability in both the presence and the absence of an external magnetic field is considered.

  11. Advances in Dusty Plasmas 6.Dusty Plasmas and Carbon Fine Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yasuaki

    Formation and growth process of carbon fine particles in plasmas attract interests of researchers in the field not only of basic science but also of applied science. Since carbon has many bonding states, materials containing carbon could be formed in a variety of structures. Mechanism of the formation of the interstellar dusts and fine particles produced experimentally on earth is not well understood. This paper reports our experimental results on the formation of carbon fine particles in various laboratory conditions. Our results may suggest a mechanism of the formation of the interstellar dusts.

  12. Regression modeling of particle size distributions in urban storm water: advancements through improved sample collection methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, Michael N.; Selbig, William R.

    2012-01-01

    A new sample collection system was developed to improve the representation of sediment entrained in urban storm water by integrating water quality samples from the entire water column. The depth-integrated sampler arm (DISA) was able to mitigate sediment stratification bias in storm water, thereby improving the characterization of suspended-sediment concentration and particle size distribution at three independent study locations. Use of the DISA decreased variability, which improved statistical regression to predict particle size distribution using surrogate environmental parameters, such as precipitation depth and intensity. The performance of this statistical modeling technique was compared to results using traditional fixed-point sampling methods and was found to perform better. When environmental parameters can be used to predict particle size distributions, environmental managers have more options when characterizing concentrations, loads, and particle size distributions in urban runoff.

  13. Advances in Automated QA/QC for TRISO Fuel Particle Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hockey, Ronald L.; Bond, Leonard J.; Batishko, Charles R.; Gray, Joseph N.; Saurwein, John J.; Lowden, Richard A.

    2004-06-30

    Fuel in most Generation IV reactor designs typically encompasses billions of the TRISO particles. Present day QA/QC methods, done manually and in many cases destructively, cannot economically test a statistically significant fraction of the large number of the individual fuel particles required. Fully automated inspection technologies are essential to economical TRISO fuel particle production. A combination of in-line nondestructive (NDE) measurements employing electromagnetic induction and digital optical imaging analysis is currently under investigation and preliminary data indicate the potential for meeting the demands of this application. To calibrate high-speed NDE methods, surrogate fuel particle samples are being coated with layers containing a wide array of defect types found to degrade fuel performance and these are being characterized via high-resolution CT and digital radiographic images.

  14. Interaction of fine particles and nanoparticles with red blood cells visualized with advanced microscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara M; Schürch, Samuel; Haenni, Beat; Kapp, Nadine; Gehr, Peter

    2006-07-15

    So far, little is known about the interaction of nanoparticles with lung cells, the entering of nanoparticles, and their transport through the blood stream to other organs. The entering and localization of different nanoparticles consisting of differing materials and of different charges were studied in human red blood cells. As these cells do not have any phagocytic receptors on their surface, and no actinmyosin system, we chose them as a model for nonphagocytic cells to study how nanoparticles penetrate cell membranes. We combined different microscopic techniques to visualize fine and nanoparticles in red blood cells: (I) fluorescent particles were analyzed by laser scanning microscopy combined with digital image restoration, (II) gold particles were analyzed by conventional transmission electron microscopy and energy filtering transmission electron microscopy, and (III) titanium dioxide particles were analyzed by energy filtering transmission electron microscopy. By using these differing microscopic techniques we were able to visualize and detect particles < or = 0.2 microm and nanoparticles in red blood cells. We found that the surface charge and the material of the particles did not influence their entering. These results suggest that particles may penetrate the red blood cell membrane by a still unknown mechanism different from phagocytosis and endocytosis.

  15. Recent advances in particle methods for simulating solute transport in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, S.

    2012-12-01

    Particle methods such as random walk particle tracking have a long history as numerical tools for simulating solute transport in the subsurface. In the traditional random walk particle tracking algorithm, particles representing packets of solute mass are moved through the velocity field obtained from a numerical flow solution to simulate advection; random spatial displacements are then added to simulate dispersion. The two well-known advantages of the approach are that it is relatively efficient for large problems and free of numerical dispersion. Recent large-scale applications have prompted the development of novel variants of particle methods that offer additional advantages. Interchanging the role of time and space - that is, sampling a residence time with a fixed displacement instead of a random displacement with a fixed time step - leads to a particularly efficient algorithm that also easily accommodates a very wide range of models for solute diffusion/sorption in immobile regions. Algorithms and computer codes that accommodate fully unstructured grids have recently appeared. In applications that involve significant parameter uncertainty, the Monte Carlo sampling of uncertain parameters may be intermingled with the Monte Carlo solution method, which leads to a particularly efficient estimate of the ensemble mean concentration or breakthrough curve. Methods for post-processing relatively simple particle tracking scenarios to include effects of matrix diffusion/sorption also allow uncertainty to be quantified in an efficient way. These and other recent developments will be reviewed; example applications involving radionuclide transport over long time and space scales will also be presented.

  16. particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-05-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  17. Modeling Combined Chemotherapy and Particle Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Marco; Tommasino, Francesco; Yamada, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the only cancer for which deaths are predicted to increase in 2014 and beyond. Combined radiochemotherapy protocols using gemcitabine and hypofractionated X-rays are ongoing in several clinical trials. Recent results indicate that charged particle therapy substantially increases local control of resectable and unresectable pancreas cancer, as predicted from previous radiobiology studies considering the high tumor hypoxia. Combination with chemotherapy improves the overall survival (OS). We compared published data on X-ray and charged particle clinical results with or without adjuvant chemotherapy calculating the biological effective dose. We show that chemoradiotherapy with protons or carbon ions results in 1 year OS significantly higher than those obtained with other treatment schedules. Further hypofractionation using charged particles may result in improved local control and survival. A comparative clinical trial using the standard X-ray scheme vs. the best current standard with carbon ions is crucial and may open new opportunities for this deadly disease. PMID:26217585

  18. Characterizing the distribution of particles in urban stormwater: advancements through improved sampling technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, William R.

    2014-01-01

    A new sample collection system was developed to improve the representation of sediment in stormwater by integrating the entire water column. The depth-integrated sampler arm (DISA) was able to mitigate sediment stratification bias in storm water, thereby improving the characterization of particle size distribution from urban source areas. Collector streets had the lowest median particle diameter of 8 μm, followed by parking lots, arterial streets, feeder streets, and residential and mixed land use (32, 43, 50, 80 and 95 μm, respectively). Results from this study suggest there is no single distribution of particles that can be applied uniformly to runoff in urban environments; however, integrating more of the entire water column during the sample collection can address some of the shortcomings of a fixed-point sampler by reducing variability and bias caused by the stratification of solids in a water column.

  19. NATO Advanced Research Workshop: Optics of Biological Particles. Held in Novosibirsk, Russia on 3-6 Oct 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    A 3. DATES COVERED - 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE NATO Advanced Research Workshop Optics of Biological Particles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Characterization of Biologi- cal Species” 4 17:20 – 19:00 visit IChK&C 19:00 dinner 2nd day: Tuesday October 4 , 2005 09:00 – 09:30 Virginia Foot...surfaces; (3) erythrocyte lysis in isotonic solution of ammonium chloride; ( 4 ) endocytosis. OPTICS OF RED BLOOD CELLS AND CELL AGGREGATES Alexander V

  20. ADVANCED METHODS FOR THE COMPUTATION OF PARTICLE BEAM TRANSPORT AND THE COMPUTATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND MULTIPARTICLE PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Alex J. Dragt

    2012-08-31

    Since 1980, under the grant DEFG02-96ER40949, the Department of Energy has supported the educational and research work of the University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory (DSAT) Group. The primary focus of this educational/research group has been on the computation and analysis of charged-particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods, and on advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and multiparticle phenomena. This Final Report summarizes the accomplishments of the DSAT Group from its inception in 1980 through its end in 2011.

  1. Particle-vibration coupling: Recent advances in microscopic calculations with the Skyrme Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Colò, G.; Baldo, M.; Bortignon, P. F.; Rizzo, D.; Bocchi, G.

    2016-11-15

    In this contribution, we report some recent progress in our understanding of particle-vibration coupling (PVC) in nuclei. In particular, we first review the formal development that has allowed some of us to deduce the PVC equations within the Green’s functionmethod. Applications are then discussed, both in the case of single-particle states and giant resonances in magic nuclei. We also present a new model that extends the PVC ansatz and is meant to account for the complete low-lying spectra of odd nuclei.

  2. Particle-vibration coupling: Recent advances in microscopic calculations with the Skyrme Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colò, G.; Baldo, M.; Bortignon, P. F.; Rizzo, D.; Bocchi, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this contribution, we report some recent progress in our understanding of particle-vibration coupling (PVC) in nuclei. In particular, we first review the formal development that has allowed some of us to deduce the PVC equations within the Green's functionmethod. Applications are then discussed, both in the case of single-particle states and giant resonances in magic nuclei. We also present a new model that extends the PVC ansatz and is meant to account for the complete low-lying spectra of odd nuclei.

  3. Advanced 3D electromagnetic and particle-in-cell modeling on structured/unstructured hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, D.B.; Pasik, M.F.; Kiefer, M.L.; Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1998-01-01

    New techniques have been recently developed that allow unstructured, free meshes to be embedded into standard 3-dimensional, rectilinear, finite-difference time-domain grids. The resulting hybrid-grid modeling capability allows the higher resolution and fidelity of modeling afforded by free meshes to be combined with the simplicity and efficiency of rectilinear techniques. Integration of these new methods into the full-featured, general-purpose QUICKSILVER electromagnetic, Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code provides new modeling capability for a wide variety of electromagnetic and plasma physics problems. To completely exploit the integration of this technology into QUICKSILVER for applications requiring the self-consistent treatment of charged particles, this project has extended existing PIC methods for operation on these hybrid unstructured/rectilinear meshes. Several technical issues had to be addressed in order to accomplish this goal, including the location of particles on the unstructured mesh, adequate conservation of charge, and the proper handling of particles in the transition region between structured and unstructured portions of the hybrid grid.

  4. Eddy Current, Magnetic Particle and Hardness Testing, Aviation Quality Control (Advanced): 9227.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This unit of instruction includes the principles of eddy current, magnetic particle and hardness testing; standards used for analyzing test results; techniques of operating equipment; interpretation of indications; advantages and limitations of these methods of testing; care and calibration of equipment; and safety and work precautions. Motion…

  5. ADVANCING THE ION BEAM THIN FILM PLANARIZATION PROCESS FOR THE SMOOTHING OF SUBSTRATE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkarimi, P B; Spiller, E; Baker, S L; Robinson, J C; Stearns, D G; Liddle, J A; Salmassi, F; Liang, T; Stivers, A R

    2004-10-19

    For a number of technologies small substrate contaminants are undesirable, and for one technology in particular, extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), they can be a very serious issue. We have demonstrated that the Ion Beam Thin Film Planarization Process, a coating process designed to planarize substrate asperities, can be extended to smooth {approx}70 nm and {approx}80 nm diameter particles on EUVL reticle substrates to a height of {approx}0.5 nm, which will render them noncritical in an EUVL printing process. We demonstrate this smoothing process using controlled nanoscale substrate particles and lines fabricated with an e-beam lithography process. The above smoothing process was also modified to yield an excellent reflectance/wavelength uniformity and a good EUV reflectivity for the multilayer, which is required for EUVL reticles. Cross-sectional TEM on a smoothed substrate line defect shows excellent agreement with results obtained from our multilayer growth model.

  6. The Frontier of Modern Calorimetry: Hardware Advances and Application in Particle Physics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Tatiana

    While the last missing components of the SM puzzle seem to be successfully found, particle physicists remain hungry for what might be there, beyond the cosy boundaries of the well studies elementary particle world. However, the sophisticated technique of data analysis and acute Monte Carlo simulations remain fruitless. It appears that the successful intrusion into the realm, in which we were not welcome so far, may require a very different implication of effort. All those results might suggest, though banal, that we need an improvement on the hardware side. Indeed, the hadronic calorimeter of CMS is no competitor to its other state-of-art components. This obstacle in many cases significantly complicates the flow of the physics analysis. Besides, the era of high luminosity LHC operation in the offing is calling for the same. After exploration of the analysis debri with 8TeV collision data, we investigate various approaches for better calorimetry for the CMS detector.

  7. Current Advances in Virus-Like Particles as a Vaccination Approach against HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chongbo; Ao, Zhujun; Yao, Xiaojian

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates against HIV-1 infection. They are capable of preserving the native conformation of HIV-1 antigens and priming CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses efficiently via cross presentation by both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. Progress has been achieved in the preclinical research of HIV-1 VLPs as prophylactic vaccines that induce broadly neutralizing antibodies and potent T cell responses. Moreover, the progress in HIV-1 dendritic cells (DC)-based immunotherapy provides us with a new vision for HIV-1 vaccine development. In this review, we describe updates from the past 5 years on the development of HIV-1 VLPs as a vaccine candidate and on the combined use of HIV particles with HIV-1 DC-based immunotherapy as efficient prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination strategies. PMID:26805898

  8. Advanced methods in global gyrokinetic full f particle simulation of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ogando, F.; Heikkinen, J. A.; Henriksson, S.; Janhunen, S. J.; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Leerink, S.

    2006-11-30

    A new full f nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation code, named ELMFIRE, has been developed for simulating transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas. The code is based on a gyrokinetic particle-in-cell algorithm, which can consider electrons and ions jointly or separately, as well as arbitrary impurities. The implicit treatment of the ion polarization drift and the use of full f methods allow for simulations of strongly perturbed plasmas including wide orbit effects, steep gradients and rapid dynamic changes. This article presents in more detail the algorithms incorporated into ELMFIRE, as well as benchmarking comparisons to both neoclassical theory and other codes.Code ELMFIRE calculates plasma dynamics by following the evolution of a number of sample particles. Because of using an stochastic algorithm its results are influenced by statistical noise. The effect of noise on relevant magnitudes is analyzed.Turbulence spectra of FT-2 plasma has been calculated with ELMFIRE, obtaining results consistent with experimental data.

  9. Recent advances in Many Body Dissipative Particles Dynamics simulations of liquid-vapor interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Emile, Janine; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Many Body Dissipative Particles Dynamics (MDPD) simulation is a novel promising mesoscopic method to model the liquid-vapor interfaces. Based upon works of Paganobarraga and Frenkel (J. Chem. Phys. 15, 5015 (2001)) and Trofimov (J. Chem. Phys. 117, 9383 (2002)) and of Warren (Phys. Rev. E 68, 066702 (2003)) this method has been critically reviewed during this last decade. We propose here to give an overview of the Many Body Dissipative Particles Dynamic simulation within the framework of the liquid-vapor interfaces. We recall the theoretical background of MDPD and we present some recent results of systems of interest such as water liquid-vapor interfaces and salt effect on water surface tension. Additionally we discuss the ability of MDPD to capture the mechanisms at the mesoscopic scale through the formation of micelles and the coalescence of a nanodroplet water on water surface.

  10. Advances in Thermal Spray Deposition of Billets for Particle Reinforced Light Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzelburger, Martin; Zimmermann, Christian; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-07

    Forming of light-metals in semi-solid state offers some advantages like low process temperatures, improved mould durability, good flow behavior and fine, globular microstructure of the final material. By the introduction of ceramic particles, increased elastic modulus and yield strength as well as wear resistance and creep behavior can be obtained. By semi-solid forging or semi-solid casting, particle reinforced metals (PRM) can be produced with improved matrix microstructure and beneficial forming process parameters compared to conventional MMC manufacturing techniques. The production of this kind of light metal matrix composites requires the supply of dense semi-finished parts with well defined volume fractions of homogeneously distributed particulate reinforcement. A manufacturing method for cylindrical light metal billets is described that applies thermal spraying as a build-up process for simultaneous deposition of matrix and reinforcement phase with cored wires as spraying material. Thermal spraying leads to small grain sizes and prevents dendrite formation. However, long process cycle times lead to billet heating and recrystallization of the matrix microstructure. In order to preserve small grain sizes that enable semi-solid forming, the thermal spraying process was analyzed by in-flight particle analysis and thermography. As a consequence, the deposition process was optimized by adaptation of the thermal spraying parameters and by application of additional cooling, leading to lower billet temperatures and finer PRM billet microstructure.

  11. Advances in Thermal Spray Deposition of Billets for Particle Reinforced Light Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzelburger, Martin; Zimmermann, Christian; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-01

    Forming of light-metals in semi-solid state offers some advantages like low process temperatures, improved mould durability, good flow behavior and fine, globular microstructure of the final material. By the introduction of ceramic particles, increased elastic modulus and yield strength as well as wear resistance and creep behavior can be obtained. By semi-solid forging or semi-solid casting, particle reinforced metals (PRM) can be produced with improved matrix microstructure and beneficial forming process parameters compared to conventional MMC manufacturing techniques. The production of this kind of light metal matrix composites requires the supply of dense semi-finished parts with well defined volume fractions of homogeneously distributed particulate reinforcement. A manufacturing method for cylindrical light metal billets is described that applies thermal spraying as a build-up process for simultaneous deposition of matrix and reinforcement phase with cored wires as spraying material. Thermal spraying leads to small grain sizes and prevents dendrite formation. However, long process cycle times lead to billet heating and recrystallization of the matrix microstructure. In order to preserve small grain sizes that enable semi-solid forming, the thermal spraying process was analyzed by in-flight particle analysis and thermography. As a consequence, the deposition process was optimized by adaptation of the thermal spraying parameters and by application of additional cooling, leading to lower billet temperatures and finer PRM billet microstructure.

  12. Advances and patents about grinding equipments with nano-particle jet minimum quantity lubrication.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongzhou; Li, Changhe; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Qiang; Hou, Yali

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a large number of patents have been devoted to developing minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) grinding techniques that can significantly improve both environmentally conscious and energy saving and costeffective sustainable grinding fluid alternatives. Among them, one patent is about a controllable nano-fluids jet MQL grinding system based on electrostatic atomization. Using the principle of electrostatics, it can achieve the control of droplet transfer by charging the sprayed droplets. This system can improve the uniformity of the droplet spectrum, liquid deposition efficiency and effective utilization of liquid. It can also effectively control the movement patterns of the droplets, thereby reducing the pollution of the environment and providing better health protection for workers. Although researchers accomplished profound and systematic studies on MQL, especially on nano-particles jet MQL. It can solve the shortage of MQL in cooling performance, greatly improve the working environment, save energy and reduce costs to achieve a low-carbon manufacturing. The unique lubricating performance and tribological property of solid nano-particles form nano-particle shearing films at the grinding wheel/workpiece interface, which can enhance the lubricating performance of MQL grinding. Existing studies on MQL grinding equipments, however, cannot meet the needs of the technological development. Therefore, our research provided a general introduction of the latest patients and research progress of nanoparticles jet MQL grinding equipments presented by the research team from Qingdao Technological University.

  13. Remediating radium contaminated legacy sites: Advances made through machine learning in routine monitoring of "hot" particles.

    PubMed

    Varley, Adam; Tyler, Andrew; Smith, Leslie; Dale, Paul; Davies, Mike

    2015-07-15

    The extensive use of radium during the 20th century for industrial, military and pharmaceutical purposes has led to a large number of contaminated legacy sites across Europe and North America. Sites that pose a high risk to the general public can present expensive and long-term remediation projects. Often the most pragmatic remediation approach is through routine monitoring operating gamma-ray detectors to identify, in real-time, the signal from the most hazardous heterogeneous contamination (hot particles); thus facilitating their removal and safe disposal. However, current detection systems do not fully utilise all spectral information resulting in low detection rates and ultimately an increased risk to the human health. The aim of this study was to establish an optimised detector-algorithm combination. To achieve this, field data was collected using two handheld detectors (sodium iodide and lanthanum bromide) and a number of Monte Carlo simulated hot particles were randomly injected into the field data. This allowed for the detection rate of conventional deterministic (gross counts) and machine learning (neural networks and support vector machines) algorithms to be assessed. The results demonstrated that a Neural Network operated on a sodium iodide detector provided the best detection capability. Compared to deterministic approaches, this optimised detection system could detect a hot particle on average 10cm deeper into the soil column or with half of the activity at the same depth. It was also found that noise presented by internal contamination restricted lanthanum bromide for this application.

  14. Heat extraction from targets in high current electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubb, Ernest; Altemus, Rosemary; McCarthy, James; Biron, Don

    1982-12-01

    Various aspects of heat extraction from targets in high current electron beams are examined, among which are the dependences on boundary temperature, beam current density, and convective effects from an ambient gaseous environment. The design of a cooling system which extracts heat by forcing hydrogen (or helium) gas at a pressure of several Torr at near sonic velocities across a target surface is described. Boundary layer theory calculations and empirical measurements of the average heat transfer coefficient for the system are presented.

  15. Application of RF Superconductivity to High Current Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Chan K.C.D.

    1998-09-13

    In 1997, the authors initiated a development program in Los Alamos for high-current superconducting proton-linac technology to build prototypes components of this linac to demonstrate the feasibility. The authors are building 700-MHz niobium cavities with elliptical shapes, as well as power couplers to transfer high RF power to these cavities. The cavities and power couplers will be integrated in cryostats as linac cryomodules. In this paper, they describe the linac design and the status of the development program.

  16. High-current, fast-switching transistor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    The design, wafer-processing techniques, and various measurements which include forward safe operating area, dc characteristics, and switching times are described for a larger-diameter (33) transistor. An improved base contact for equalizing the base-emitter voltage at high currents was developed along with an improved emitter contact preform which increases the silicon area available for current conduction. The electrical performance achieved is consistent with the proposed optimum design.

  17. High current density pulsed cathode experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.; Fant, K.; Vlieks, A.

    1990-06-01

    A 1.9 microperveance beam diode has been constructed to test high current density cathodes for use in klystrons. Several standard and specially coated dispenser cathodes are being tested. Results of tests to date show average cathode current densities in excess of 25 amps/cm, and maximum electric field gradients of more than 450 kV/cm for pulses of the order of 1{mu}sec. 3 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Outward particle transport by coherent mode in the H-mode pedestal in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Han, X.; Gao, X.; Liu, H. Q.; Shi, T. H.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, Y.; Kong, D. F.; Liu, Z. X.; Qu, H.; Xiang, H. M.; Geng, K. N.; Wang, Y. M.; Wen, F.; Zhang, S. B.; Ling, B. L.; the EAST Team

    2017-06-01

    A coherent mode (CM) in the edge pedestal region has been observed on different fluctuation quantities, including density fluctuation, electron temperature fluctuation and magnetic fluctuation in H mode plasma on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) tokamak. Measurements at different poloidal positions show that the local poloidal wavenumber is smallest at the outboard midplane and will increase with poloidal angle. This poloidal asymmetry is consistent with the flute-like assumption (i.e. k// ˜ 0) from which the toroidal mode number of the mode has been estimated as between 12 and 17. It was further found that the density fluctuation amplitude of the CM also demonstrated poloidal asymmetry. The appearance of a CM can clearly decrease or even stop the increase in the edge density, while the disappearance of a CM will lead to an increase in the pedestal density and density gradient. Statistical analysis showed there was a trend that as the CM mode amplitude increased, the rate of increase of the edge density decreased and the particle flux (Γdiv) onto the divertor plate increased. The CM sometimes showed burst behavior, and these bursts led bursts on Γdiv with a time of about 230 μs, which is close to the time for particle flow from the outer midplane to the divertor targets along the scrape-off layer magnetic field line. This evidence showed that the CM had an effect on the outward transport of particles.

  19. Characterization of exposures to nanoscale particles and fibers during solid core drilling of hybrid carbon nanotube advanced composites.

    PubMed

    Bello, Dhimiter; Wardle, Brian L; Zhang, Jie; Yamamoto, Namiko; Santeufemio, Christopher; Hallock, Marilyn; Virji, M Abbas

    2010-01-01

    This work investigated exposures to nanoparticles and nanofibers during solid core drilling of two types of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT)-hybrid composites: (1) reinforced plastic hybrid laminates (alumina fibers and CNT); and (2) graphite-epoxy composites (carbon fibers and CNT). Multiple real-time instruments were used to characterize the size distribution (5.6 nm to 20 microm), number and mass concentration, particle-bound polyaromatic hydrocarbons (b-PAHs), and surface area of airborne particles at the source and breathing zone. Time-integrated samples included grids for electron microscopy characterization of particle morphology and size resolved (2 nm to 20 microm) samples for the quantification of metals. Several new important findings herein include generation of airborne clusters of CNTs not seen during saw-cutting of similar composites, fewer nanofibers and respirable fibers released, similarly high exposures to nanoparticles with less dependence on the composite thickness, and ultrafine (< 5 nm) aerosol originating from thermal degradation of the composite material.

  20. Advances in the field of single-particle cryo-electron microscopy over the last decade.

    PubMed

    Frank, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    In single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), molecules suspended in a thin aqueous layer are rapidly frozen and imaged at cryogenic temperature in the transmission electron microscope. From the random projection views, a three-dimensional image is reconstructed, enabling the structure of the molecule to be obtained. In this article I discuss technological progress over the past decade, which has, in my own field of study, culminated in the determination of ribosome structure at 2.5-Å resolution. I also discuss likely future improvements in methodology.

  1. Sparking limits, cavity loading, and beam breakup instability associated with high-current rf linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Faehl, R.J.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The limitations on high-current rf linacs due to gap sparking, cavity loading, and the beam breakup instability are studied. It appears possible to achieve cavity accelerating gradients as high as 35 MV/m without sparking. Furthermore, a linear analysis, as well as self-consistent particle simulations of a multipulsed 10 kA beam, indicated that only a negligible small fraction of energy is radiated into nonfundamental cavity modes. Finally, the beam breakup instability is analyzed and found to be able to magnify initial radial perturbations by a factor of no more than about 20 during the beam transit time through a 1 GeV accelerator.

  2. Study of energetic particle physics with advanced ECEI system on the HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhongbing; Jiang, Min; Yu, Liming; Chen, Wei; Shi, Peiwan; Zhong, Wulyu; Yang, Zengchen; Zhang, Boyu; Ji, Xiaoquan; Li, Yonggao; Zhou, Yan; Song, Shaodong; Huang, Mei; Song, Xianming; Li, Jiaxuan; Yuan, Baoshan; Fu, Bingzhong; Liu, Zetian; Ding, Xuantong; Xu, Yuhong; Yang, Qingwei; Duan, Xuru

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the physics of energetic particles (EP) is crucial for the burning plasmas in next generation fusion devices such as ITER. In this work, three types of internal kink modes (a saturated internal kink mode (SK), a resonant internal kink mode (RK), and a double e-fishbone) excited by energetic particles in the low density discharges during ECRH/ECCD heating have been studied by the newly developed 24(poloidal) × 16(radial) = 384 channel ECEI system on the HL-2A tokamak. The SK and RK rotate in the electron diamagnetic direction poloidally and are destabilized by the energetic trapped electrons. The SK is destabilized in the case of qmin > 1, while the RK is destabilized in the case of qmin < 1. The double e-fishbone, which has two m/n = 1/1 modes propagating in the opposite directions poloidally, has been observed during plasma current ramp-up with counter-ECCD. Strong thermal transfer and mode coupling between the two m/n = 1/1 modes have been studied.

  3. Advanced oxidation of natural organic matter using hydrogen peroxide and iron-coated pumice particles.

    PubMed

    Kitis, M; Kaplan, S S

    2007-08-01

    The oxidative removal of natural organic matter (NOM) from waters using hydrogen peroxide and iron-coated pumice particles as heterogeneous catalysts was investigated. Two NOM sources were tested: humic acid solution and a natural source water. Iron coated pumice removed about half of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration at a dose of 3000 mg l(-1) in 24 h by adsorption only. Original pumice and peroxide dosed together provided UV absorbance reductions as high as 49%, mainly due to the presence of metal oxides including Al(2)O(3), Fe(2)O(3) and TiO(2) in the natural pumice, which are known to catalyze the decomposition of peroxide forming strong oxidants. Coating the original pumice particles with iron oxides significantly enhanced the removal of NOM with peroxide. A strong linear correlation was found between iron contents of coated pumices and UV absorbance reductions. Peroxide consumption also correlated with UV absorbance reduction. Control experiments proved the effective coating and the stability of iron oxide species bound on pumice surfaces. Results overall indicated that in addition to adsorptive removal of NOM by metal oxides on pumice surfaces, surface reactions between iron oxides and peroxide result in the formation of strong oxidants, probably like hydroxyl radicals, which further oxidize both adsorbed NOM and remaining NOM in solution, similar to those in Fenton-like reactions.

  4. Advances in nuclear data and all-particle transport for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Chadwick, M.B.; Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1994-05-01

    Fast neutrons have been used to treat over 15,000 cancer patients worldwide and proton therapy is rapidly emerging as a treatment of choice for tumors around critical anatomical structures. Neutron therapy requires evaluated data to {approximately}70 MeV while proton therapy requires data to {approximately}250 MeV. Collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the medical physics community has revealed limitations in nuclear cross section evaluations and radiation transport capabilities that have prevented neutron and proton radiation therapy centers from using Monte Carlo calculations to accurately predict dose in patients. These evaluations require energy- and angle-dependent cross sections for secondary neutrons, charged-particles and recoil nuclei. We are expanding the LLNL nuclear databases to higher energies for biologically important elements and have developed a three-dimensional, all-particle Monte Carlo radiation transport code that uses computer-assisted-tomography (CT) images as the input mesh. This code, called PEREGRINE calculates dose distributions in the human body and can be used as a tool to determine the dependence of dose on details of the evaluated nuclear data. In this paper, we will review the status of the nuclear data required for neutron and proton therapy, describe the capabilities of the PEREGRINE package, and show the effects of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution.

  5. Astro-E2 Magnesium Diboride High Current Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, J. S.; Tuttle, J. G.; Riall, S.; Mustafi, S.; Gray, A.; Edmonds, R.; Marrero, V.

    2003-01-01

    The recent discovery of superconducting properties in MgB_2 and rapid development of small diameter steel-clad wires has opened up the possibility of enhancing the design of the baseline Astro-E2 high current lead assembly. Replacing YBCO filaments with MgB_2 wires and modifying the heat sink location can give much higher margins against quench from temperature oscillations of the 4 K heat sink, although wih some overall thermal penalty. The design and performance of a new lead assembly during flight qualification is discussed, with emphasis on thermal, structural, and electrical test results.

  6. Development of RF linac for high-current applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.C.D.; Lawrence, G.P.; Schneider, J.D.

    1997-12-31

    High-current proton linacs are promising sources of neutrons for material processing and research applications. Recently, a linac design that makes use of a combination of normal-conducting (NC) and superconducting (SC) linac technologies has been proposed for the US Accelerator Production of Tritium Project. As a result, a multi-year engineering development and demonstration (ED and D) program is underway. In this paper, the authors will describe the design and merits of the NC/SC hybrid approach. The scope, technology issues, and present status of the ED and D Program, and the participation of industry will also be described.

  7. Pulsed High-Current Experiments at IPP ASci CR Prague

    SciTech Connect

    Kolacek, K.; Schmidt, J.; Prukner, V.; Frolov, O.; Straus, J.; Bohacek, V.; Martinkova, M.

    2006-01-05

    The aim of our first high current capillary discharge was to reach amplified spontaneous emission on neon-like argon ({lambda} = 46.9 nm). This was finally accomplished. Our new capillary discharge experiment has larger transverse dimensions, four-channel laser-triggered spark gap, and free optical access to both capillary ends. At present it is electrically tested. In this apparatus the capillary can be replaced by a device with exploding wire in water locally compressed by focused cylindrical converging shock wave (for soft X-ray lasing at shorter wavelength). This part is also at present tested.

  8. Pulsed High-Current Experiments at IPP ASci CR Prague

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolacek, K.; Schmidt, J.; Prukner, V.; Frolov, O.; Straus, J.; Bohacek, V.; Martinkova, M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our first high current capillary discharge was to reach amplified spontaneous emission on neon-like argon (λ = 46.9 nm). This was finally accomplished. Our new capillary discharge experiment has larger transverse dimensions, four-channel laser-triggered spark gap, and free optical access to both capillary ends. At present it is electrically tested. In this apparatus the capillary can be replaced by a device with exploding wire in water locally compressed by focused cylindrical converging shock wave (for soft X-ray lasing at shorter wavelength). This part is also at present tested.

  9. High Current Cathode Thermal Behavior, Part II: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodfellow, K. D.; Polk, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Cathode erosion is one of the life limiting mechanisms for several classes of electric thrusters. Since cathode erosion is strongly dependent on the cathode temperature, a quantitative understanding of the effects of cathode operation on the cathode temperature is required. The development of a cathode/plasma interaction model for determining the heat loads to the cathode as function of the various free stream plasma parameters is presented. This model is combined with a cathode thermal model in order to provide a complete and integrated picture of high current cathode operation.

  10. High Current Ion Sources and Injectors for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2005-02-15

    Heavy ion beam driven inertial fusion requires short ion beam pulses with high current and high brightness. Depending on the beam current and the number of beams in the driver system, the injector can use a large diameter surface ionization source or merge an array of small beamlets from a plasma source. In this paper, we review the scaling laws that govern the injector design and the various ion source options including the contact ionizer, the aluminosilicate source, the multicusp plasma source, and the MEVVA source.

  11. Astro-E2 Magnesium Diboride High Current Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, J. S.; Tuttle, J. G.; Riall, S.; Mustafi, S.; Gray, A.; Edmonds, R.; Marrero, V.

    2003-01-01

    The recent discovery of superconducting properties in MgB_2 and rapid development of small diameter steel-clad wires has opened up the possibility of enhancing the design of the baseline Astro-E2 high current lead assembly. Replacing YBCO filaments with MgB_2 wires and modifying the heat sink location can give much higher margins against quench from temperature oscillations of the 4 K heat sink, although wih some overall thermal penalty. The design and performance of a new lead assembly during flight qualification is discussed, with emphasis on thermal, structural, and electrical test results.

  12. The Search for Fractional Charge Particles in an Advanced, Automated Variation of the Millikan Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I. T.; Halyo, V.; Lee, E. R.; Loomba, D.; Perl, M. L.

    2001-04-01

    We will present a variation on the Millikan apparatus designed to look for fractionally charged particles in bulk materials, and results from the current run. Oil drops are produced from a drop-on-demand ejector, and imaged by a digital CCD camera and framegrabber combination. A networked Linux cluster is used to simultaneously collect and analyze data, and to monitor and control the apparatus. The experiment is fully automated, and utilizes laminar air flow to make possible the accurate measurements of charge on large (20 micron) fluid drops. The experiment has the capability to process a total of 10^7 to 10^8 drops (20-200 mg), and the ability to use large drops enables the search to be carried out in mineral suspensions.

  13. Particle exhaust schemes in the DIII-D advanced divertor configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    For density control in long-pulse operation, the open divertor on the DIII-D tokamak will be equipped with a baffled chamber and a pumping system. The throat of the baffle chamber is sized to provide optimal pumping for the typical plasma equilibrium configuration. Severe limitations on the toroidal conductance of this baffle chamber require the use of in-vessel pumping to achieve the desired particle exhaust of about 25 Torr{center dot}l/s. Two separate pumping schemes are considered: an array of titanium getter modules based on the design developed by the Tore Supra team and a cryocondensation pump. The merits and demerits of each scheme are analyzed, and the design considerations introduced by the tokamak environment are brought out. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Development of an advanced radioactive airborne particle monitoring system for use in early warning networks.

    PubMed

    Baeza, A; Corbacho, J A; Caballero, J M; Ontalba, M A; Vasco, J; Valencia, D

    2017-09-25

    Automatic real-time warning networks are essential for the almost immediate detection of anomalous levels of radioactivity in the environment. In the case of Extremadura region (SW Spain), a radiological network (RARE) has been operational in the vicinity of the Almaraz nuclear power plant and in other areas farther away since 1992. There are ten air monitoring stations equipped with Geiger-Müller counters in order to evaluate the external ambient gamma dose rate. Four of these stations have a commercial system that provides estimates of the total artificial alpha and beta activity concentrations in aerosols, and of the (131)I activity (gaseous fraction). Despite experience having demonstrated the benefits and robustness of these commercial systems, important improvements have been made to one of these air monitoring systems. In this paper, the analytical and maintenance shortcomings of the original commercial air monitoring system are described first; the new custom-designed advanced air monitoring system is then presented. This system is based mainly on the incorporation of gamma spectrometry using two scintillation detectors, one of NaI:Tl and the other of LaBr3:Ce, and compact multichannel analysers. Next, a comparison made of the results provided by the two systems operating simultaneously at the same location for three months shows the advantages of the new advanced air monitoring system. As a result, the gamma spectrometry analysis allows passing from global alpha and beta activity determinations due to artificial radionuclides in aerosols, and the inaccurate measurement of the gaseous (131)I activity concentration, to the possibility of identifying a large number of radionuclides and quantifying each of their activity concentrations. Moreover, the new station's dual capacity is designed to work in early warning monitoring mode and surveillance monitoring mode. This is based on custom developed software that includes an intelligent system to issue the

  15. Beam Dynamics Aspects of High Current Beams in a Superconducting Proton Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellomo, Giovanni; Pagani, Carlo; Pierini, Paolo

    1997-05-01

    High current CW proton linac accelerators have been recently proposed for nuclear waste transmutation and concurrent energy production. In most of the designs the high energy part (100 MeV up to 1-2 GeV) of the linac employs low frequency superconducting structures (352-700 MHz). Here we present beam dynamics issues for the high current (10-50 mA) beams in the superconducting section of such an accelerator, based on 352 MHz β-graded, LEP style cavities, as proposed at Linac 96(C. Pagani, G. Bellomo, P. Pierini, ``A High Current Proton Linac with 352 MHz SC Cavities'', Proceedings of the XVIII Int. Linear Acc. Conf., eds. C. Hill, M. Vretenar, CERN 96-07, 15 November 1996). In particular, smooth beam propagation along the linac has been reached with decreasing phase advances along the linac, and the design has been updated to match the beam dynamics results. Mismatching oscillations are discussed, as they are considered to cause beam halo and, consequently, beam losses.

  16. High Current Systems for HyperV and PLX Plasma Railguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Messer, S.; Elton, R.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2011-10-01

    HyperV is developing gas fed, pulsed, plasma railgun accelerators for PLX and other high momentum plasma applications. The present 2.5 cm square-bore plasma railgun forms plasma armatures from high density neutral gas (argon), preionizes it electrothermally, and accelerates the armature with 30 cm long parallel-plate railgun electrodes driven by a pulse forming network (PFN). Recent experiments have successfully formed and accelerated plasma armatures of ~4 mg at 40 km/s, with PFN currents of ~400 kA. In order to further increase railgun performance to the PLX design goal of 8 mg at 50 km/s, the PFN was upgraded to support currents of up to ~750 kA. A high voltage, high current linear array spark-gap switch and flexible, low-inductance transmission line were designed and constructed to handle the increased current load. We will describe these systems and present initial performance data from high current operation of the plasma rail gun from spectroscopy, interferometry, and imaging systems as well as pressure, magnetic field, and optical diagnostics. High current performance of railgun bore materials for electrodes and insulators will also be discussed as well as plans for upcoming experimentation with advanced materials. Supported by the U.S. DOE Joint Program in HEDLP.

  17. High Current Ion Source Development for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G A; Grote, D P; Kwan, J W

    2003-09-04

    We are developing high-current-density high-brightness sources for Heavy Ion Fusion applications. Heavy ion driven inertial fusion requires beams of high brightness in order to achieve high power density at the target for high target gain. At present, there are no existing ion source types that can readily meet all the driver HIF requirements, though sources exist which are adequate for present experiments and which with further development may achieve driver requirements. Our two major efforts have been on alumino-silicate sources and RF plasma sources. Experiments being performed on a 10-cm alumino-silicate source are described. To obtain a compact system for a HIF driver we are studying RF plasma sources where low current beamlets are combined to produce a high current beam. A 80-kV 20-{micro}s source has produced up to 5 mA of Ar{sup +} in a single beamlet. The extraction current density was 100 mA/cm{sup 2}. We present measurements of the extracted current density as a function of RF power and gas pressure, current density uniformity, emittance, and energy dispersion (due to charge exchange).

  18. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Modeling ion-induced electrons in the High Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltz, P.H.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Cohen, R.H.; Molvik, A.W.; Vay, J.-L.; Veitzer, S.A.

    2006-05-15

    A primary concern for high current ion accelerators is contaminant electrons. These electrons can interfere with the beam ions, causing emittance growth and beam loss. Numerical simulation is a main tool for understanding the interaction of the ion beam with the contaminant electrons, but these simulations then require accurate models of electron generation. These models include ion-induced electron emission from ions hitting the beam pipe walls or diagnostics. However, major codes for modeling ion beam transport are written in different programming languages and used on different computing platforms. For electron generation models to be maximally useful, researchers should be able to use them easily from many languages and platforms. A model of ion-induced electrons including the electron energy distribution is presented here, including a discussion of how to use the Babel software tool to make these models available in multiple languages and how to use the GNU Autotools to make them available on multiple platforms. An application to simulation of the end region of the High Current Experiment is shown. These simulations show formation of a virtual cathode with a potential energy well of amplitude 12.0 eV, approximately six times the most probable energy of the ion-induced electrons. Oscillations of the virtual cathode could lead to possible longitudinal and transverse modulation of the density of the electrons moving out of the virtual cathode.

  20. Energetic neutral contamination in modern high-current implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherekdjian, S.; Weisenberger, W.

    1991-04-01

    The presence of energetic neutrals in a high-current, high-energy implant can result in nonuniformities on a silicon wafer. A larger concern is when the energetic neutrals are not of the desired energy. This is a major consideration when designing ion implanters with pre- and post-acceleration stages. This paper investigates the levels of pre-accelerated boron neutrals present in a 180 kV boron implant. The machines investigated were a Nova 20A and an Applied Materials PI9000. A comparison of their vacuum systems and their ability to cope with photoresist batches and argon backfill are presented. Silicon wafers were mapped by four-point probe resistivity measurements and the levels of pre-accelerated neutrals were quantified by spreading resistance profiles (SRPs). It is clearly demonstrated that good uniformity on a bare silicon wafer is not an indicator of a clean ion beam. Even though it is well understood that this problem is vacuum-related, modern high-current implanters are still being built and marketed with improper vacuum isolation and insufficient pumping capability.

  1. High current pulse testing for ground rod integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walko, Lawrence C.

    1991-01-01

    A test technique was developed to assess various grounding system concepts used for mobile facilities. The test technique involves applying a high current pulse to the grounding system with the proper waveshape and magnitude to simulate a lightning return stroke. Of concern were the step voltages present along the ground near the point of lightning strike. Step voltage is equated to how fast the current pulse is dissipated by the grounding system. The applied current pulse was produced by a high current capacitor bank with a total energy content of 80 kilojoules. A series of pulse tests were performed on two types of mobile facility grounding systems. One system consisted of an array of four 10 foot copper clad steel ground rods connected by 1/0 gauge wire. The other system was an array of 10 inch long tapered ground rods, strung on stainless steel cable. The focus here is on the pulse test technique used and its relevance to actual lightning strike conditions.

  2. RF Input Power Couplers for High Current SRF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, V. F.; Anders, W.; Burrill, Andrew; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver; Neumann, Axel; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-12-01

    High current SRF technology is being explored in present day accelerator science. The bERLinPro project is presently being built at HZB to address the challenges involved in high current SRF machines with the goal of generating and accelerating a 100 mA electron beam to 50 MeV in continuous wave (cw) mode at 1.3 GHz. One of the main challenges in this project is that of handling the high input RF power required for the photo-injector as well as booster cavities where there is no energy recovery process. A high power co-axial input power coupler is being developed to be used for the photo-injector and booster cavities at the nominal beam current. The coupler is based on the KEK–cERL design and has been modified to minimise the penetration of the coupler tip in the beam pipe without compromising on beam-power coupling (Qext ~105). Herein we report on the RF design of the high power (115 kW per coupler, dual couplers per cavity) bERLinPro (BP) coupler along with initial results on thermal calculations. We summarise the RF conditioning of the TTF-III couplers (modified for cw operation) performed in the past at BESSY/HZB. A similar conditioning is envisaged in the near future for the low current SRF photo-injector and the bERLinPro main linac cryomodule.

  3. Developing High Brightness and High Current Beams for HIF Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L; Kwan, J W

    2002-05-10

    The US Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is continuing research into ion sources and injectors that simultaneously provide high current (0.5-1.0 Amps) and high brightness (normalized emittance better than 1.0 {pi}-mm-mr). The central issue of focus is whether to carry on the traditional approach of large surface ionization sources or to adopt a multi-aperture approach that transports many smaller ''beamlets'' separately at low energies before allowing them to merge. For the large surface source, the recent commissioning of the 2-MeV injector for the High Current experiment has increased our understanding of the beam quality limitations for these sources. We have also improved our techniques for fabricating large diameter aluminosilicate sources to improve lifetime and emission uniformity. For the multi-aperture approach we are continuing to study the feasibility of small surface sources and a RF induced plasma source in preparation for beamlet merging experiments, while continuing to run computer simulations for better understanding of this alternate concept. Experiments into both architectures will be performed on a newly commissioned ion source test stand at LLNL called the STS-500. This stand test provides a platform for testing a variety of ion sources and accelerating structures with 500 kV, 17-microsecond pulses. Recent progress in these areas will be discussed as well as plans for future experiments.

  4. Developing high brightness and high current beams for HIF injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, Larry; Grote, Dave; Kwan, Joe

    2002-05-24

    The US Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is continuing research into ion sources and injectors that simultaneously provide high current (0.5-1.0 Amps) and high brightness (normalized emittance better than 1.0 {pi}-mm-mr). The central issue of focus is whether to continue pursuing the traditional approach of large surface ionization sources or to adopt a multiaperture approach that transports many smaller ''beamlets'' separately at low energies before allowing them to merge. For the large surface source concept, the recent commissioning of the 2-MeV injector for the High Current eXperiment has increased our understanding of the beam quality limitations for these sources. We have also improved our techniques for fabricating large diameter aluminosilicate sources to improve lifetime and emission uniformity. For the multiaperture approach, we are continuing to study the feasibility of small surface sources and a RF induced plasma source in preparation for beamlet merging experiments, while continuing to run computer simulations for better understanding of this alternate concept. Experiments into both architectures will be performed on a newly commissioned ion source test stand at LLNL called STS-500. This stand test provides a platform for testing a variety of ion sources and accelerating structures with 500 kV, 17-microsecond pulses. Recent progress in these areas will be discussed as well as plans for future experiments.

  5. Modeling ion-induced electrons in the High Current Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, P. H.; Verboncoeur, J. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Molvik, A. W.; Vay, J.-L.; Veitzer, S. A.

    2006-05-01

    A primary concern for high current ion accelerators is contaminant electrons. These electrons can interfere with the beam ions, causing emittance growth and beam loss. Numerical simulation is a main tool for understanding the interaction of the ion beam with the contaminant electrons, but these simulations then require accurate models of electron generation. These models include ion-induced electron emission from ions hitting the beam pipe walls or diagnostics. However, major codes for modeling ion beam transport are written in different programming languages and used on different computing platforms. For electron generation models to be maximally useful, researchers should be able to use them easily from many languages and platforms. A model of ion-induced electrons including the electron energy distribution is presented here, including a discussion of how to use the Babel software tool to make these models available in multiple languages and how to use the GNU Autotools to make them available on multiple platforms. An application to simulation of the end region of the High Current Experiment is shown. These simulations show formation of a virtual cathode with a potential energy well of amplitude 12.0eV, approximately six times the most probable energy of the ion-induced electrons. Oscillations of the virtual cathode could lead to possible longitudinal and transverse modulation of the density of the electrons moving out of the virtual cathode.

  6. Incorporating advanced language models into the P300 speller using particle filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speier, W.; Arnold, C. W.; Deshpande, A.; Knall, J.; Pouratian, N.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The P300 speller is a common brain-computer interface (BCI) application designed to communicate language by detecting event related potentials in a subject’s electroencephalogram signal. Information about the structure of natural language can be valuable for BCI communication, but attempts to use this information have thus far been limited to rudimentary n-gram models. While more sophisticated language models are prevalent in natural language processing literature, current BCI analysis methods based on dynamic programming cannot handle their complexity. Approach. Sampling methods can overcome this complexity by estimating the posterior distribution without searching the entire state space of the model. In this study, we implement sequential importance resampling, a commonly used particle filtering (PF) algorithm, to integrate a probabilistic automaton language model. Main result. This method was first evaluated offline on a dataset of 15 healthy subjects, which showed significant increases in speed and accuracy when compared to standard classification methods as well as a recently published approach using a hidden Markov model (HMM). An online pilot study verified these results as the average speed and accuracy achieved using the PF method was significantly higher than that using the HMM method. Significance. These findings strongly support the integration of domain-specific knowledge into BCI classification to improve system performance.

  7. Technical advance: Surface plasmon resonance-based analysis of CXCL12 binding using immobilized lentiviral particles.

    PubMed

    Vega, Beatriz; Muñoz, Laura Martínez; Holgado, Borja L; Lucas, Pilar; Rodríguez-Frade, J M; Calle, Ana; Rodríguez-Fernández, J L; Lechuga, Laura M; Rodríguez, José F; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Mellado, Mario

    2011-08-01

    Use of SPR-based biosensors is an established method for measuring molecular interactions. Their application to the study of GPCRs is nonetheless limited to detergent-solubilized receptors that can then be reconstituted into a lipid environment. Using the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its specific ligand CXCL12, we outline here a highly reproducible biosensor method based on receptor presentation on the surface of lentiviral particles; the approach is simple and does not require the use of antibodies to achieve correct receptor orientation on the sensorchip surface. We measured the kinetic parameters of CXCR4/CXCL12 binding in a single step and in real time and evaluated the effect of GAG presentation of chemokines on this interaction. The data indicate that at low concentrations, soluble heparin modulates CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction and at high concentrations, abrogates binding. These observations suggest that in addition to their known role in modulating local chemokine availability, GAG affect the receptor/ligand interaction, although their influence on affinity parameters is very limited. The method will also be useful for quantifying these biomarkers in biological fluids and for the development of high-throughput screening for their antagonists.

  8. Incorporating advanced language models into the P300 speller using particle filtering

    PubMed Central

    Speier, W; Arnold, CW; Deshpande, A; Knall, J

    2015-01-01

    Objective The P300 speller is a common brain–computer interface (BCI) application designed to communicate language by detecting event related potentials in a subject’s electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. Information about the structure of natural language can be valuable for BCI communication, but attempts to use this information have thus far been limited to rudimentary n-gram models. While more sophisticated language models are prevalent in natural language processing literature, current BCI analysis methods based on dynamic programming cannot handle their complexity. Approach Sampling methods can overcome this complexity by estimating the posterior distribution without searching the entire state space of the model. In this study, we implement sequential importance resampling, a commonly used particle filtering (PF) algorithm, to integrate a probabilistic automaton language model. Main Result This method was first evaluated offline on a dataset of 15 healthy subjects, which showed significant increases in speed and accuracy when compared to standard classification methods as well as a recently published approach using a hidden Markov model (HMM). An online pilot study verified these results as the average speed and accuracy achieved using the PF method was significantly higher than that using the HMM method. Significance These findings strongly support the integration of domain-specific knowledge into BCI classification to improve system performance. PMID:26061188

  9. Recent advances in particle-induced X-ray emission analysis applied to biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangelson, Nolan F.; Hill, Max W.

    1981-03-01

    Papers reporting the application of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis to biological samples continue to appear regularly in the literature. The majority of these papers deal with blood, hair, and other common body organs while a few deal with biological samples from the environment. A variety of sample preparation methods have been demonstrated, a number of which are improvements, refinements and extensions of the thick- and thin-sample preparation methods reported in the early development of PIXE. While many papers describe the development of PIXE techniques some papers are now describing application of the methods to serious biological problems. The following two factors may help to stimulate more consistent use of the PIXE method. First, each PIXE facility should be organized to give rapid sample processing and should have available several sample preparation and handling methods. Second, those with the skill to use PIXE methods need to become closely associated with researchers knowledgeable in medical and biological sciences and they also need to become more involved in project planning and sample handling.

  10. Generation of multi-charged high current ion beams using the SMIS 37 gas-dynamic electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, M. A.; Zorin, V. G.; Sidorov, A. V.; Bokhanov, A. F.; Izotov, I. V.; Razin, S. V.; Skalyga, V. A.

    2013-06-02

    A gas-dynamic ECR ion source (GaDIS) is distinguished by its ability to produce high current and high brightness beams of moderately charged ions. Contrary to a classical ECR ion source where the plasma confinement is determined by the slow electron scattering into an empty loss-cone, the higher density and lower electron temperature in a GaDIS plasma lead to an isotropic electron distribution with the confinement time determined by the prompt gas-dynamic flow losses. As a result, much higher ion fluxes are available, however a decrease in the confinement time of the GaDIS plasma lowers the ion charge state. The gas-dynamic ECR ion source concept has been successfully realized in the SMIS 37 experimental facility operated at the Institute of Applied Physics, Russia. The use of high-power (~100 kW) microwave (37.5 GHz) radiation provides a dense plasma (~1013 cm-3) with a relatively low electron temperature (~50- 100 eV) and allows for the generation of high current (~1 A/cm2) beams of multi-charged ions. In this work we report on the present status of the SMIS 37 ion source and discuss the advanced numerical modeling of ion beam extraction using the particle-in-cell code WARP

  11. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  12. High pressure, high current, low inductance, high reliability sealed terminals

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-03-23

    The invention is a terminal assembly having a casing with at least one delivery tapered-cone conductor and at least one return tapered-cone conductor routed there-through. The delivery and return tapered-cone conductors are electrically isolated from each other and positioned in the annuluses of ordered concentric cones at an off-normal angle. The tapered cone conductor service can be AC phase conductors and DC link conductors. The center core has at least one service conduit of gate signal leads, diagnostic signal wires, and refrigerant tubing routed there-through. A seal material is in direct contact with the casing inner surface, the tapered-cone conductors, and the service conduits thereby hermetically filling the interstitial space in the casing interior core and center core. The assembly provides simultaneous high-current, high-pressure, low-inductance, and high-reliability service.

  13. Method for making a high current fiber brush collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuro, S. J.

    1986-05-01

    An axial-type homopolar motor having high density, high current fiber brush collectors affording efficient, low contact resistance and low operating temperatures is discussed. The collectors include a ring of concentric row of brushes in equally spaced beveled holes soldered in place using a fixture for heating the ring to just below the solder melting point at a soldering iron for the local application of additional heat at each brush. Prior to soldering, an oxide film is formed on the surfaces of the brushes and ring, and the bevels are burnished to form a wetting surface. Flux applied with the solder at each bevel removes to an effective soldering depth the oxide film on the brushes and the holes.

  14. Drift distance survey in DPIS for high current beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue,T.; Okamura, M.; Kondo, K.; Tamura, J.; Kashiwagi, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2009-09-20

    In a laser ion source, plasma drift distance is one of the most important design parameters. Ion current density and beam pulse width are defined by plasma drift distance between laser target and beam extraction position. In direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS), which uses a laser ion source and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac, we can apply relatively higher electric field at the beam extraction due to the unique shape of a positively biased electrode. However, when we aim at very high current acceleration like several tens of mA, we observed mismatched beam extraction conditions. We tested three different ion current at ion extraction region by changing plasma drift distance to study better extraction condition. In this experiment, C{sup 6+} beam was accelerated. We confirmed that the matching condition can be improved by controlling plasma drift distance.

  15. A High-Current, Stable Nonaqueous Organic Redox Flow Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Duan, Wentao; Huang, Jinhua; Zhang, Lu; Li, Bin; Reed, David; Xu, Wu; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2016-10-14

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries are promising in pursuit of high-energy storage systems owing to the broad voltage window, but currently are facing key challenges such as poor cycling stability and lack of suitable membranes. Here we report a new nonaqueous all-organic flow chemistry that demonstrates an outstanding cell cycling stability primarily because of high chemical persistency of the organic radical redox species and their good compatibility with the supporting electrolyte. A feasibility study shows that Daramic® and Celgard® porous separators can lead to high cell conductivity in flow cells thus producing remarkable cell efficiency and material utilization even at high current operations. This result suggests that the thickness and pore size are the key performance-determining factors for porous separators. With the greatly improved flow cell performance, this new flow system largely addresses the above mentioned challenges and the findings may greatly expedite the development of durable nonaqueous flow batteries.

  16. Design of a proof of principle high current transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S.M.; Bangerter, R.O.; Barnard, J.J.; Celata, C.M.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Seidl, P.A.

    2000-01-15

    Preliminary designs of an intense heavy-ion beam transport experiment to test issues for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) are presented. This transport channel will represent a single high current density beam at full driver scale and will evaluate practical issues such as aperture filling factors, electrons, halo, imperfect vacuum, etc., that cannot be fully tested using scaled experiments. Various machine configurations are evaluated in the context of the range of physics and technology issues that can be explored in a manner relevant to a full scale driver. it is anticipated that results from this experiment will allow confident construction of next generation ''Integrated Research Experiments'' leading to a full scale driver for energy production.

  17. Ultra-high current density thin-film Si diode

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi [Littleton, CO

    2008-04-22

    A combination of a thin-film .mu.c-Si and a-Si:H containing diode structure characterized by an ultra-high current density that exceeds 1000 A/cm.sup.2, comprising: a substrate; a bottom metal layer disposed on the substrate; an n-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited the bottom metal layer; an i-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the n-layer; a buffer layer of a-Si:H deposited on the i-layer, a p-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the buffer layer; and a top metal layer deposited on the p-layer.

  18. Energetic ion production in high current hollow cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, John; Kovach, Yao; Arthur, Neil; Viges, Eric; Davis, Chris

    2015-09-01

    High power Hall and gridded ion thrusters are being considered as a propulsion option supporting human operations (cargo or tug) to Mars. These engines utilize hollow cathodes for plasma production and beam neutralization. It has now been well documented that these cathodes produce energetic ions when operated at high current densities. Such ions are observed with peak energies approaching 100 eV. Because these ions can drive erosion of the cathode assembly, they represent a credible failure mode. An understanding of energetic ion production and approaches to mitigation is therefore desired. Presented here are data documenting the presence of energetic ions for both a barium oxide and a lanthanum hexaboride cathode as measured using a retarding potential analyzer. Also presented are energetic ion mitigation approaches, which are designed to eliminate the ion energy transfer mechanism. NASA SBIR Contract NNX15CP62P.

  19. Interdigitated back contact solar cell with high-current collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, C. M.; Nasby, R. D.; Sexton, F. W.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Norwood, D. P.

    Internal current collection efficiencies greater than 90% and energy conversion efficiencies of 18 % at 30 suns were measured on a laboratory version of the interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cell. A phosphorous gettering diffusion was performed on the front surface and then etched off to achieve these high current collection efficiencies. Thermal oxides were grown on the front and back of the cell to passivate the silicon surfaces. Although the internal collection efficiencies of the cell were high, series resistance caused the fill factor (FF) to decrease at concentrations above 30 suns. Dark current measurements on cells with a new grid spacing indicate that the series resistance is much lower than in the previous cell design. It is suggested that this should result in higher efficiencies at high concentration.

  20. Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; D.M. Gassner; J.G. Grimes; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; Z. Segalov; K. Smith; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; K. Yip; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; J.R. Delayen; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble

    2005-05-16

    Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

  1. Fast high-temperature superconductor switch for high current applications

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyov, VF; Li, Q

    2013-07-15

    Reversible operation of a high current superconductor switch based on the quench of high-resistance second generation high temperature superconducting wire is demonstrated. The quench is induced by a burst of an ac field generated by an inductively coupled radio-frequency coil. The switch makes a superconducting-to-normal transition within 5 ms and also has a rapid recovery to the superconducting state. The device has potential applications as an active current limiter or as a storage switch for superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. Operation in a full flux penetration/flow regime can effectively minimize the detrimental effects of the intrinsic conductor non-uniformity. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  2. New HOM coupler design for high current SRF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Hahn, H.; Johnson, E.

    2011-03-28

    Damping higher order modes (HOMs) significantly to avoid beam instability is a challenge for the high current Energy Recovery Linac-based eRHIC at BNL. To avoid the overheating effect and high tuning sensitivity, current, a new band-stop HOM coupler is being designed at BNL. The new HOM coupler has a bandwidth of tens of MHz to reject the fundamental mode, which will avoid overheating due to fundamental frequency shifting because of cooling down. In addition, the S21 parameter of the band-pass filter is nearly flat from first higher order mode to 5 times the fundamental frequency. The simulation results showed that the new couplers effectively damp HOMs for the eRHIC cavity with enlarged beam tube diameter and 2 120{sup o} HOM couplers at each side of cavity. This paper presents the design of HOM coupler, HOM damping capacity for eRHIC cavity and prototype test results.

  3. High current beam transport with multiple beam arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.

    1985-05-01

    Highlights of recent experimental and theoretical research progress on the high current beam transport of single and multiple beams by the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are presented. In the single beam transport experiment (SBTE), stability boundaries and the emittance growth of a space charge dominated beam in a long quadrupole transport channel were measured and compared with theory and computer simulations. Also, a multiple beam ion induction linac (MBE-4) is being constructed at LBL which will permit study of multiple beam transport arrays, and acceleration and bunch length compression of individually focused beamlets. Various design considerations of MBE-4 regarding scaling laws, nonlinear effects, misalignments, and transverse and longitudinal space charge effects are summarized. Some aspects of longitudinal beam dynamics including schemes to generate the accelerating voltage waveforms and to amplify beam current are also discussed.

  4. Ultra-high current density thin-film Si diode

    DOEpatents

    Wang; Qi

    2008-04-22

    A combination of a thin-film .mu.c-Si and a-Si:H containing diode structure characterized by an ultra-high current density that exceeds 1000 A/cm.sup.2, comprising: a substrate; a bottom metal layer disposed on the substrate; an n-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited the bottom metal layer; an i-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the n-layer; a buffer layer of a-Si:H deposited on the i-layer, a p-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the buffer layer; and a top metal layer deposited on the p-layer.

  5. Heavy-Ion Injector for the High Current Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J. W.; Prost, L.; Seidl, P.

    2001-10-01

    We report on progress in development of the Heavy-Ion Injector at LBNL, which is being prepared for use as an injector for the High Current Experiment (HCX). It is composed of a 10-cm-diameter surface ionization source, an extraction diode, and an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator, with a typical operating current of 0.6 A of potassium ions at 1.8 MeV, and a beam pulse length of 4.5 microsecs. We have improved the Injector equipment and diagnostics, and have characterized the source emission and radial beam profiles at the diode and ESQ regions. We find improved agreement with EGUN predictions, and improved compatibility with the downstream matching section. Plans are to attach the matching section and the initial ESQ transport section of HCX. Results will be presented and compared with EGUN and WARP simulations.

  6. Superstructure for high current applications in superconducting linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sekutowicz, Jacek; Kneisel, Peter

    2008-03-18

    A superstructure for accelerating charged particles at relativistic speeds. The superstructure consists of two weakly coupled multi-cell subunits equipped with HOM couplers. A beam pipe connects the subunits and an HOM damper is included at the entrance and the exit of each of the subunits. A coupling device feeds rf power into the subunits. The subunits are constructed of niobium and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. The length of the beam pipe between the subunits is selected to provide synchronism between particles and rf fields in both subunits.

  7. Superstructure for high current applications in superconducting linear accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Sekutowicz, Jacek [Elbchaussee, DE; Kneisel, Peter [Williamsburg, VA

    2008-03-18

    A superstructure for accelerating charged particles at relativistic speeds. The superstructure consists of two weakly coupled multi-cell subunits equipped with HOM couplers. A beam pipe connects the subunits and an HOM damper is included at the entrance and the exit of each of the subunits. A coupling device feeds rf power into the subunits. The subunits are constructed of niobium and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. The length of the beam pipe between the subunits is selected to provide synchronism between particles and rf fields in both subunits.

  8. High-Current Particle Beams: Part I. The Western USSR Research Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    with the Scientific Research Institute for Radiophysics, where A. V. Smorgonskiy, M. I. Petelin . and others have been developing the theory of...capable of delivering 150 kW at 54 GHz and 1600 kW at 16 GHz for a 70-kV beam. According to Petelin and Smorgonskiy [63], further increases in the...Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Zhurnal tekhnioheskoy fiziki. Vol. 43, No. 12, 1973, p. 2492. Petelin , M. I., and A. V. Stnorgonakiy, IVUZ

  9. Using advanced dispersion models and mobile monitoring to characterize spatial patterns of ultrafine particles in an urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwack, Leonard M.; Hanna, Steven R.; Spengler, John D.; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2011-09-01

    In urban settings with elevated bridges, buildings, and other complex terrain, the relationship between traffic and air pollution can be highly variable and difficult to accurately characterize. Atmospheric dispersion models are often used in this context, but incorporating background concentrations and characterizing emissions at high spatiotemporal resolution is challenging, especially for ultrafine particles (UFPs). Ambient pollutant monitoring can characterize this relationship, especially when using continuous real-time monitoring. However, it is challenging to quantify local source contributions over background or to characterize spatial patterns across a neighborhood. The goal of this study is to evaluate contributions of traffic to neighborhood-scale air pollution using a combination of regression models derived from mobile UFP monitoring observations collected in Brooklyn, NY and outputs from the Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) model. QUIC is a dispersion model that can explicitly take into account the three-dimensional shapes of buildings. The monitoring-based regression model characterized concentration gradients from a major elevated roadway, controlling for real-time traffic volume, meteorological variables, and other local sources. QUIC was applied to simulate dispersion from this same major roadway. The relative concentration decreases with distance from the roadway estimated by the monitoring-based regression model after removal of background and by QUIC were similar. Horizontal contour plots with both models demonstrated non-uniform patterns related to building configuration and source heights. We used the best-fit relationship between the monitoring-based regression model after removal of background and the QUIC outputs ( R2 = 0.80) to estimate a UFP emissions factor of 5.7 × 10 14 particles/vehicle-km, which was relatively consistent across key model assumptions. Our joint applications of novel techniques for analyzing mobile monitoring

  10. High-current carbon-epoxy capillary cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleizer, J. Z.; Queller, T.; Bliokh, Yu.; Yatom, S.; Vekselman, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Bernshtam, V.

    2012-07-01

    The results of experiments on the reproducible generation of an electron beam having a high current density of up to 300 A/cm2 and a satisfactorily uniform cross-sectional distribution of current density in a ˜200 kV, ˜450 ns vacuum diode with a carbon-epoxy capillary cathode are presented. It was found that the source of the electrons is the plasma formed as a result of flashover inside the capillaries. It is shown that the plasma formation occurs at an electric field ≤15 kV/cm and that the cathode sustains thousands of pulses without degradation in its emission properties. Time- and space-resolved visible light observation and spectroscopy analyses were used to determine the cathode plasma's density, temperature, and expansion velocity. It was found that the density of the cathode plasma decreases rapidly in relation to the distance from the cathode. In addition, it was found that the main reason for the short-circuiting of the accelerating gap is the formation and expansion of the anode plasma. Finally, it was shown that when an external guiding magnetic field is present, the injection of the electron beam into the drift space with a current amplitude exceeding its critical value changes the radial distribution of the current density of the electron beam because the inner electrons are reflected from the virtual cathode.

  11. A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rebai, M.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Cavenago, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M.; Croci, G.; Gervasini, G.; Ghezzi, F.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Murtas, F.; Gorini, G.

    2012-02-15

    A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams is proposed for installation on the spectral shear interferometry for direct electric field reconstruction (SPIDER, Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) test beam facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission on the beam dump surface by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses gas electron multiplier detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. The cathode is made of a thin polythene film and an aluminium film; it is designed for detection of neutrons of energy >2.2 MeV with an incidence angle < 45 deg. CNESM was designed on the basis of simulations of the different steps from the deuteron beam interaction with the beam dump to the neutron detection in the nGEM. Neutron scattering was simulated with the MCNPX code. CNESM on SPIDER is a first step towards the application of this diagnostic technique to the MITICA beam test facility, where it will be used to resolve the horizontal profile of the beam intensity.

  12. High current rf (HCRF) linac program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The High Current Radio Frequency (HCRF) Accelerator program began as an effort funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) through the Office of Naval Research (ONR). The three options carried a negotiated total of $3,731,115 so that the total negotiated amount was $3,950,340. SDIO only provided $600,000 for the effort, and only one of the three options was exercised. An additional $310,000 was provided by DARPA, the Office of Naval Technology (ONT) and the Naval Ocean System Center (NOSC) for a collaborative effort to explore an RF technology application in naval surveillance (ultra-wideband radar), an activity covered by the HCRF statement of work. Technical work on the HCRF program consisted of in-depth technology studies and experimental support on the naval radar task. The overall goal of the HCRF program was to develop an fundamentally new technology for compact (high gradient) electron accelerators that can efficiently drive high gain, single pass FEL amplifiers producing output radiation at a wavelength of approximately one micron or less in a pulsed format for boost phase and mid-course SDIO missions. SDIO mission requirements dictated that the accelerator technology goals be consistent with a laser system that can produce greater than ten megawatts of average optical power during a 200 second battle from a space platform placed in orbit with a single heavy lift booster.

  13. Ionization front in a high-current gas dischargea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Randolph, Thomas M.

    2007-03-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of ion/neutral density ratio profiles are made inside the high-current, low-pressure discharge of a coaxial magnetoplasmadynamic thruster and show the existence of a thin ionization front, upstream in the discharge, that effectively ionizes the incoming gas to ionization levels above 50%. The measurements allow an estimate of the width of this ionization front to be on the order of a few millimeters. Due to the known existence of microturbulence in the plasma, which can produce suprathermal electrons, an explanation of the measurements based on the existence of a suprathermal tail in the electron energy distribution function is sought. A theoretical model for the width of the ionization front is combined with a multilevel excitation model for argon and shows that a Maxwellian electron distribution function cannot account for the small length scale of the ionization front, and that the latter is more consistent with an electron distribution function having a suprathermal population, the magnitude of which is estimated by comparing the model to the experiments.

  14. Ionization front in a high-current gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Randolph, Thomas M.

    2007-02-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of ion/neutral density ratio profiles are made inside the high-current, low-pressure discharge of a coaxial magnetoplasmadynamic thruster and show the existence of a thin ionization front, upstream in the discharge, that effectively ionizes the incoming gas to ionization levels above 50%. The measurements allow an estimate of the width of this ionization front to be on the order of a few millimeters. Due to the known existence of microturbulence in the plasma, which can produce suprathermal electrons, an explanation of the measurements based on the existence of a suprathermal tail in the electron energy distribution function is sought. A theoretical model for the width of the ionization front is combined with a multilevel excitation model for argon and shows that a Maxwellian electron distribution function cannot account for the small length scale of the ionization front, and that the latter is more consistent with an electron distribution function having a suprathermal population, the magnitude of which is estimated by comparing the model to the experiments.

  15. Some Physical and Engineering Aspects of High Current EBIS

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, A; Prelec, K.

    1999-05-21

    Some applications of an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) require intensities of highly charged ions significantly greater than those which have been achieved in present EBIS sources. For example, the ion source for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) must be capable of generating 3 x 10{sup 9} ions of Au{sup 35+} or 2 x 10{sup 9} ions of U{sup 45+} per pulse. In this case, if the fraction of ions of interest is 20% of the total ion space charge, the total extracted charge is {approximately} 5 x 10{sup 11}. It is also desirable to extract these ions in a 10 {micro}s pulse to allow single turn injection into the first synchrotrons. Requirements for an EBIS which could meet the needs of the LHC at CERN are similar ({approximately} 1.5 x 10{sup 9} ions of Pb{sup 54+} in 5.5 {micro}s). This charge yield is about an order of magnitude greater than that achieved in existing EBIS sources, and is what is meant here by high current. This also implies, then, an EBIS with a high electron beam current.

  16. Mevva development for the new GSI high-current injector

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, B.H.; Emig, H.; Spaedtke, P.

    1996-08-01

    To increase the intensity of the heavy ion synchrotron SIS for heavy elements by a factor of {approximately}50, a new prestripper accelerator is planned for Unilac and the heavy ion synchrotron SIS. It is designed to accept ions with mass/charge {le} 65 and an injection energy of 2.2 keV/u. A vacuum arc ion source with a strong axial magnetic field will deliver 15 mA of U{sup 4+} as heaviest element at a repetition rate of 1 Hz and a pulse length of 300 {mu}s. The investigation of the Mevva ion source with pulsed magnetic field of several kGauss have shown that ion currents of 8 mA U{sup 4+} can be measured at the authors test bench after 5m of transport and charge analysis (transmission at the test bench 25% only). The noise on the extracted ion beam was already {le}25%, a value similar to the Pig ion source in the sputter mode, but efficient high current beam transport probably requests further improvements.

  17. A Superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Dietderich, D. R.; Joseph, J. M.; Lizarazo, J.; Prestemon, S. O.; Miller, G.; Weijers, H. W.

    2010-02-15

    This article describes the development of a direct-current (dc) superconducting transformer system for the high current test of superconducting cables. The transformer consists of a core-free 10 464 turn primary solenoid which is enclosed by a 6.5 turn secondary. The transformer is designed to deliver a 50 kA dc secondary current at a dc primary current of about 50 A. The secondary current is measured inductively using two toroidal-wound Rogowski coils. The Rogowski coil signal is digitally integrated, resulting in a voltage signal that is proportional to the secondary current. This voltage signal is used to control the secondary current using a feedback loop which automatically compensates for resistive losses in the splices to the superconducting cable samples that are connected to the secondary. The system has been commissioned up to 28 kA secondary current. The reproducibility in the secondary current measurement is better than 0.05% for the relevant current range up to 25 kA. The drift in the secondary current, which results from drift in the digital integrator, is estimated to be below 0.5 A/min. The system's performance is further demonstrated through a voltage-current measurement on a superconducting cable sample at 11 T background magnetic field. The superconducting transformer system enables fast, high resolution, economic, and safe tests of the critical current of superconducting cable samples.

  18. A superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing.

    PubMed

    Godeke, A; Dietderich, D R; Joseph, J M; Lizarazo, J; Prestemon, S O; Miller, G; Weijers, H W

    2010-03-01

    This article describes the development of a direct-current (dc) superconducting transformer system for the high current test of superconducting cables. The transformer consists of a core-free 10,464 turn primary solenoid which is enclosed by a 6.5 turn secondary. The transformer is designed to deliver a 50 kA dc secondary current at a dc primary current of about 50 A. The secondary current is measured inductively using two toroidal-wound Rogowski coils. The Rogowski coil signal is digitally integrated, resulting in a voltage signal that is proportional to the secondary current. This voltage signal is used to control the secondary current using a feedback loop which automatically compensates for resistive losses in the splices to the superconducting cable samples that are connected to the secondary. The system has been commissioned up to 28 kA secondary current. The reproducibility in the secondary current measurement is better than 0.05% for the relevant current range up to 25 kA. The drift in the secondary current, which results from drift in the digital integrator, is estimated to be below 0.5 A/min. The system's performance is further demonstrated through a voltage-current measurement on a superconducting cable sample at 11 T background magnetic field. The superconducting transformer system enables fast, high resolution, economic, and safe tests of the critical current of superconducting cable samples.

  19. X-Pinch in High-Current Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryunetkin, B. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Ivanenkov, G. V.; Khakhalin, S. Ya.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Pikuz, S. A.; Romanova, V. M.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.

    1994-03-01

    The review of X-pinch investigations in high current diode of BIN facility (250 kA, 100 ns) is presented. The main purposes were to investigate pinch forming processes and hot dense plasma properties. X-pinch is also considered as a source for multiple charged ions spectroscopy and for X-ray optics testing. The set of diagnostics applied in these experiments allowed us to investigate the pinch forming processes in different configurations of crossed wires loads. High spectral and space resolved measurements of plasma radiation in 1-200 Å range, absolute energy measurements and electron beam registration were provided. Plasma parameters were obtained from relative intensities and shapes of multiple charged ions spectral lines. Electron density of plasma with the temperature Te = 0.2-1 keV variated from 1023 cm-3 in hot spot to 1018 cm-3 during plasma expansion. In recombining plasma, an inversion of Al He-like ions levels population was registrated. Total radiation output of 0.5 mm pinch reached hundreds Joules in 2-100 Å range during 100 ns.

  20. High Current Cathodes Fabricated by KrF Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilgenbach, Ronald M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Jones, M. C.; Johnston, M. D.; Jordan, N. M.; Hoff, B. W.

    2010-10-08

    In this paper we review several high power laser ablation techniques that have been utilized to fabricate high current (1-80 kA) electron beam cathodes for accelerators and microwave sources: 1) Projection Ablation Lithography (PAL) cathodes, 2) Ablation Line Focus (ALF) cathodes, and 3) Metal-Oxide-Junction (MOJ) cathodes. Laser-ablative micromachining techniques (PAL and ALF) have been utilized to generate micron-scale features on metal substrates that provide electric field (beta) enhancement for Fowler-Nordheim emission and plasma cathodes. Since these laser-ablated patterns are directly, laser-written on the substrate metal they exhibit much higher thermal conductivity for higher current capability and increased damage thresholds. Metal-Oxide-Junction (MOJ) cathodes exploit the triple-point electron emission that occurs at the interface between metal, insulator and vacuum.The ablation laser is a KrF excimer laser with a pulse energy of 600 mJ and pulselength of 20 ns. Cathode experiments were performed on the MELBA-C accelerator: V = -300 kV, pulselength = 0.5 microsecond. Data will be presented for PAL, ALF and MOJ cathodes.

  1. Anode jet in a high-current vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, S. A.; Schneider, A. V.; Batrakov, A. V.; Sandolache, G.; Rowe, S. W.; Markov, A. B.; Zyul'kova, L. A.

    2012-07-01

    A stable intense jet with a clear-cut bright sheath has been detected on the anode of a 10-ms-long high-current vacuum arc with a current amplitude of 15 kA. The jet is adjacent to the hot spot of a molten metal on the anode surface. The primary light of the jet is emitted by neutrals. The sheath of the jet is surrounded by an ion-induced diffuse glow. The anode jet arises from interaction between the cathode and anode plasmas. Because of this, the size of the jet inversely depends on the current of the arc and the jet becomes observable only by the end of the current pulse. This object (anode jet with a bright sheath) is well reproducible when the arc is initiated between copper-chromium electrodes. In the case of pure copper electrodes, such objects occur randomly and appear at long projections of the molten metal, where heat release is hampered, and at large drops moving in the interelectrode gap. This means that the anode evaporation intensity is crucial for the appearance of bright-sheath jets.

  2. The MEVVA ion source for high current metal ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ian; Washburn, Jack

    The MEVVA (Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc) ion source is a new kind of source which can produce high current beams of metal ions. Beams of a wide range of elements have been produced, spanning the periodic table from lithium up to and including uranium. The source extraction voltage is up to 60 kV, and we are increasing this up to 120 kV. A total ion beam current of over 1 A has been extracted from the present embodiment of the concept, and this is not an inherent limit. The ion charge state distribution varies with cathode material and are current, and beams like Li +, Co +.2+.3+ and U 3+.4+.5+.6+ for example, are typical; thus the implantation energy can be up to several hundred kV without additional acceleration. The ion source has potential applications for ion implantation and ion beam mixing for achievement of improved corrosion resistance or wear resistance in metals or surface modification of ceramic materials and semiconductors. Here we outline the source and its performance, and describe some very preliminary implantation work using this source.

  3. Los Alamos high-current proton storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G. P.; Hardekopf, R. A.; Jason, A. J.; Clout, P. N.; Sawyer, G. A.

    1985-05-01

    The Proton Storage Ring (PSR), whose installation was recently completed at Los Alamos, is a fast-cycling high-current accumulator designed to produce intense 800 MeV proton pulses for driving a spallation neutron source. The ring converts long beam pulses from the LAMPF linear accelerator into short bunches well matched to requirements of a high-resolution neutron-scattering materials science program. The initial performance goal for this program is to provide 100-(MU)A average current at the neutron production target within a 12-Hz pulse rate. Operation at 20 (MU)A is scheduled for September 1985, with full intensity within the next year. The storage ring was originally designed to function in a second mode in which six 1-ns bunches are accumulated and separately extracted every LAMPF macropulse. Implementation of this mode, which would serve a fast-neutron nuclear-physics program, was deferred in favor of initial concentration on the neutron-scattering program. The PSR design and status is summarized. Unique machine features include high peak current, two-step charge-stripping injection, a low-impedance buncher amplifier to counter beam-loading, and a high-repetition-rate strip-line extraction kicker.

  4. Characterization of a High Current, Long Life Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanNoord, Jonathan L.; Kamhawi, Hani; McEwen, Heather K.

    2006-01-01

    The advent of higher power spacecraft makes it desirable to use higher power electric propulsion thrusters such as ion thrusters or Hall thrusters. Higher power thrusters require cathodes that are capable of producing higher currents. One application of these higher power spacecraft is deep-space missions that require tens of thousands of hours of operation. This paper presents the approach used to design a high current, long life hollow cathode assembly for that application, along with test results from the corresponding hollow cathode. The design approach used for the candidate hollow cathode was to reduce the temperature gradient in the insert, yielding a lower peak temperature and allowing current to be produced more uniformly along the insert. The lower temperatures result in a hollow cathode with increased life. The hollow cathode designed was successfully operated at currents from 10 to 60 A with flow rates of 5 to 19 sccm with a maximum orifice temperature measured of 1100 C. Data including discharge voltage, keeper voltage, discharge current, flow rates, and orifice plate temperatures are presented.

  5. Dynamics of a high-current relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Strelkov, P. S.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Ivanov, I. E. Shumeiko, D. V.

    2015-06-15

    The dynamics of a high-current relativistic electron beam is studied experimentally and by numerical simulation. The beam is formed in a magnetically insulated diode with a transverse-blade explosive-emission cathode. It is found experimentally that the radius of a 500-keV beam with a current of 2 kA and duration of 500 ns decreases with time during the beam current pulse. The same effect was observed in numerical simulations. This effect is explained by a change in the shape of the cathode plasma during the current pulse, which, according to calculations, leads to a change in the beam parameters, such as the electron pitch angle and the spread over the longitudinal electron momentum. These parameters are hard to measure experimentally; however, the time evolution of the radial profile of the beam current density, which can be measured reliably, coincides with the simulation results. This allows one to expect that the behavior of the other beam parameters also agrees with numerical simulations.

  6. A high-current pulsed cathodic vacuum arc plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, T. W. H.; Pigott, J.; Mckenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2003-11-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs (CVAs) are well established as a method for producing metal plasmas for thin film deposition and as a source of metal ions. Fundamental differences exist between direct current (dc) and pulsed CVAs. We present here results of our investigations into the design and construction of a high-current center-triggered pulsed CVA. Power supply design based on electrolytic capacitors is discussed and optimized based on obtaining the most effective utilization of the cathode material. Anode configuration is also discussed with respect to the optimization of the electron collection capability. Type I and II cathode spots are observed and discussed with respect to cathode surface contamination. An unfiltered deposition rate of 1.7 nm per pulse, at a distance of 100 mm from the source, has been demonstrated. Instantaneous plasma densities in excess of 1×1019 m-3 are observed after magnetic filtering. Time averaged densities an order of magnitude greater than common dc arc densities have been demonstrated, limited by pulse repetition rate and filter efficiency.

  7. Magnetic particle imaging: advancements and perspectives for real-time in vivo monitoring and image-guided therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablico-Lansigan, Michele H.; Situ, Shu F.; Samia, Anna Cristina S.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging biomedical imaging technology that allows the direct quantitative mapping of the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. MPI's increased sensitivity and short image acquisition times foster the creation of tomographic images with high temporal and spatial resolution. The contrast and sensitivity of MPI is envisioned to transcend those of other medical imaging modalities presently used, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray scans, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this review, we present an overview of the recent advances in the rapidly developing field of MPI. We begin with a basic introduction of the fundamentals of MPI, followed by some highlights over the past decade of the evolution of strategies and approaches used to improve this new imaging technique. We also examine the optimization of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers used for imaging, underscoring the importance of size homogeneity and surface engineering. Finally, we present some future research directions for MPI, emphasizing the novel and exciting opportunities that it offers as an important tool for real-time in vivo monitoring. All these opportunities and capabilities that MPI presents are now seen as potential breakthrough innovations in timely disease diagnosis, implant monitoring, and image-guided therapeutics.

  8. New progress of high current gasdynamic ion source (invited).

    PubMed

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Sidorov, A; Razin, S; Vodopyanov, A; Tarvainen, O; Koivisto, H; Kalvas, T

    2016-02-01

    The experimental and theoretical research carried out at the Institute of Applied Physics resulted in development of a new type of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs)-the gasdynamic ECRIS. The gasdynamic ECRIS features a confinement mechanism in a magnetic trap that is different from Geller's ECRIS confinement, i.e., the quasi-gasdynamic one similar to that in fusion mirror traps. Experimental studies of gasdynamic ECRIS were performed at Simple Mirror Ion Source (SMIS) 37 facility. The plasma was created by 37.5 and 75 GHz gyrotron radiation with power up to 100 kW. High frequency microwaves allowed to create and sustain plasma with significant density (up to 8 × 10(13) cm(-3)) and to maintain the main advantages of conventional ECRIS such as high ionization degree and low ion energy. Reaching such high plasma density relies on the fact that the critical density grows with the microwave frequency squared. High microwave power provided the average electron energy on a level of 50-300 eV enough for efficient ionization even at neutral gas pressure range of 10(-4)-10(-3) mbar. Gasdynamic ECRIS has demonstrated a good performance producing high current (100-300 mA) multi-charged ion beams with moderate average charge (Z = 4-5 for argon). Gasdynamic ECRIS has appeared to be especially effective in low emittance hydrogen and deuterium beams formation. Proton beams with current up to 500 emA and RMS emittance below 0.07 π ⋅ mm ⋅ mrad have been demonstrated in recent experiments.

  9. Electrical and hydrodynamic characterization of a high current pulsed arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Martins, R.; Chemartin, L.; Zaepffel, C.; Lalande, Ph; Soufiani, A.

    2016-05-01

    High current pulsed arcs are of significant industrial interest and, aiming to reduce time and cost, there is progressively more and more need for computation tools that describe and predict the behaviour of these arcs. These simulation codes need inputs and validations by experimental databases, but accurate data is missing for this category of electric discharges. The principal lack of understanding is with respect to the transient phase of the current, which can reach thousands of amperes in a few microseconds. In this paper, we present the work realized on an experimental setup that simulates in the laboratory an arc column subjected to five levels of high pulsed current, ranging from 10 kA to 100 kA, with the last one corresponding to the standard lightning current waveform used in aircraft certification processes. This device was instrumented by high speed video cameras to assess the characteristic sizes of the arc channel and to characterize the shock wave generated by the arc expansion. The arc channel radius was measured over time during the axisymmetric phase and reached 3.2 cm. The position and velocity of the shock wave was determined during the first 140 μs. The background-oriented schlieren method was used to study the shock wave and a model for the light deflection inside the shock wave was developed. The mass density profile of the shock wave was estimated and showed good agreement with Rankine-Hugoniot relations at the wave front. Electrical measurements were also used to estimate the time-dependent resistance and conductivity of the arc for times lasting up to 50 μs.

  10. New progress of high current gasdynamic ion source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Skalyga, V. Sidorov, A.; Vodopyanov, A.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.

    2016-02-15

    The experimental and theoretical research carried out at the Institute of Applied Physics resulted in development of a new type of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs)—the gasdynamic ECRIS. The gasdynamic ECRIS features a confinement mechanism in a magnetic trap that is different from Geller’s ECRIS confinement, i.e., the quasi-gasdynamic one similar to that in fusion mirror traps. Experimental studies of gasdynamic ECRIS were performed at Simple Mirror Ion Source (SMIS) 37 facility. The plasma was created by 37.5 and 75 GHz gyrotron radiation with power up to 100 kW. High frequency microwaves allowed to create and sustain plasma with significant density (up to 8 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}) and to maintain the main advantages of conventional ECRIS such as high ionization degree and low ion energy. Reaching such high plasma density relies on the fact that the critical density grows with the microwave frequency squared. High microwave power provided the average electron energy on a level of 50-300 eV enough for efficient ionization even at neutral gas pressure range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar. Gasdynamic ECRIS has demonstrated a good performance producing high current (100-300 mA) multi-charged ion beams with moderate average charge (Z = 4-5 for argon). Gasdynamic ECRIS has appeared to be especially effective in low emittance hydrogen and deuterium beams formation. Proton beams with current up to 500 emA and RMS emittance below 0.07 π ⋅ mm ⋅ mrad have been demonstrated in recent experiments.

  11. New progress of high current gasdynamic ion source (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Sidorov, A.; Razin, S.; Vodopyanov, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.

    2016-02-01

    The experimental and theoretical research carried out at the Institute of Applied Physics resulted in development of a new type of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs)—the gasdynamic ECRIS. The gasdynamic ECRIS features a confinement mechanism in a magnetic trap that is different from Geller's ECRIS confinement, i.e., the quasi-gasdynamic one similar to that in fusion mirror traps. Experimental studies of gasdynamic ECRIS were performed at Simple Mirror Ion Source (SMIS) 37 facility. The plasma was created by 37.5 and 75 GHz gyrotron radiation with power up to 100 kW. High frequency microwaves allowed to create and sustain plasma with significant density (up to 8 × 1013 cm-3) and to maintain the main advantages of conventional ECRIS such as high ionization degree and low ion energy. Reaching such high plasma density relies on the fact that the critical density grows with the microwave frequency squared. High microwave power provided the average electron energy on a level of 50-300 eV enough for efficient ionization even at neutral gas pressure range of 10-4-10-3 mbar. Gasdynamic ECRIS has demonstrated a good performance producing high current (100-300 mA) multi-charged ion beams with moderate average charge (Z = 4-5 for argon). Gasdynamic ECRIS has appeared to be especially effective in low emittance hydrogen and deuterium beams formation. Proton beams with current up to 500 emA and RMS emittance below 0.07 π ṡ mm ṡ mrad have been demonstrated in recent experiments.

  12. The high current transport experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Baca, D.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Morse, E.

    2004-05-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program to explore heavy-ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high intensity (line charge density {approx} 0.2 {micro}C/m) over long pulse durations (4 {micro}s) in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and steering, envelope matching, image charges and focusing field nonlinearities, halo and, electron and gas cloud effects. We present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K{sup +} ion beam transported through ten electrostatic quadrupoles. The measurements cover two different fill factor studies (60% and 80% of the clear aperture radius) for which the transverse phase-space of the beam was characterized in detail, along with beam energy measurements and the first halo measurements. Electrostatic quadrupole transport at high beam fill factor ({approx}80%) is achieved with acceptable emittance growth and beam loss, even though the initial beam distribution is not ideal (but the emittance is low) nor in thermal equilibrium. We achieved good envelope control, and rematching may only be needed every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor) in a longer lattice of similar design. We also show that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics.

  13. Nuclear microprobe performance in high-current proton beam mode for micro-PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavpetič, P.; Kelemen, M.; Jenčič, B.; Pelicon, P.

    2017-08-01

    The performance of a nuclear microprobe is dominantly determined by the brightness of the injected ion beam. At Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI), negative hydrogen ion beams are created in a multicusp ion source and injected into a 2 MV tandetron accelerator. The output characteristics of the multicusp ion source were tuned in order to obtain matching proton beam intensities for the ion accelerator and for the object slits as well. For the optimal focusing of the proton beam in a high-current mode (I > 100 pA) to the sub-micrometer dimensions, dedicated thin nanostructures with sharp edges have been manufactured. Set of nanostructures was micromachined by focused ion beam (FIB) at film reference material, produced by Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) and constituted of 57 μg/cm2 of titanium on vitreous carbon substrate. The proton beam profiles were measured by beam scans across the nanostructures over long measuring times, indicating eventual slow drifts of the sample from a reference beam direction. Overall, proton beam dimensions of 600 nm were obtained, demonstrating appropriate stability for micro-PIXE (micro-Particle Induced X-ray Emission) at sub-micrometer resolution for elemental analysis of biological tissue samples prepared in a freeze-dried state or in a frozen-hydrated state. The resulting performance required for micro-PIXE analysis in a high current mode with a 3 MeV proton beam is presented.

  14. High-current fast electron beam propagation in a dielectric target.

    PubMed

    Klimo, Ondrej; Tikhonchuk, V T; Debayle, A

    2007-01-01

    Recent experiments demonstrate an efficient transformation of high intensity laser pulse into a relativistic electron beam with a very high current density exceeding 10(12) A cm(-2). The propagation of such a beam inside the target is possible if its current is neutralized. This phenomenon is not well understood, especially in dielectric targets. In this paper, we study the propagation of high current density electron beam in a plastic target using a particle-in-cell simulation code. The code includes both ionization of the plastic and collisions of newborn electrons. The numerical results are compared with a relatively simple analytical model and a reasonable agreement is found. The temporal evolution of the beam velocity distribution, the spatial density profile, and the propagation velocity of the ionization front are analyzed and their dependencies on the beam density and energy are discussed. The beam energy losses are mainly due to the target ionization induced by the self-generated electric field and the return current. For the highest beam density, a two-stream instability is observed to develop in the plasma behind the ionization front and it contributes to the beam energy losses.

  15. High current density stability of ohmic contacts to silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, Brian P.

    The materials properties of SiC, such as wide bandgap, high breakdown electric field, and good thermal conductivity, make it an appealing option for high temperature and high power applications. The replacement of Si devices with SiC components could lead to a reduction in device size, weight, complexity, and cooling requirements along with an increase in device efficiency. One area of concern under high temperature or high current operation is the stability of the ohmic contacts. Ohmic contact degradation can cause an increase in parasitic resistance, which can diminish device performance. While contact studies have primarily focused on the high temperature stability of ohmic contacts to SiC, different failure mechanisms may arise under high current density stressing due to the influence of electromigration. In addition, preferential degradation may occur at the anode or cathode due to the directionality of current flow, known as a polarity effect. The failure mechanisms of ohmic contacts to p-type SiC under high current density stressing are explored. Complementary materials characterization techniques were used to analyze contact degradation, particularly the use of cross-sections prepared by focused ion beam for imaging using field emission scanning electron microscopy and elemental analysis using Auger electron spectroscopy. Initially the degradation of commonly studied Ni and Al-based contacts was investigated under continuous DC current. The contact metallization included a bond pad consisting of a TiW diffusion barrier and thick Au overlayer. The Ni contacts were found to degrade due to the growth of voids within the ohmic contact layer, which were initially produced during the high temperature Ni/SiC ohmic contact anneal. The Al-based contacts degraded due to the movement of Al from the ohmic contact layer to the surface of the Au bond pad, and the movement of Au into the ohmic contact layer from the bond pad. The inequality of Al and Au fluxes generated

  16. Low Impedance Bellows for High-current Beam Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G; Nassiri, A; Waldschmidt, G J; Yang, Y; Feingold, J J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A; Wang, H; Jang, J; Kim, S H

    2012-07-01

    In particle accelerators, bellows are commonly used to connect beamline components. Such bellows are traditionally shielded to lower the beam impedance. Excessive beam impedance can cause overheating in the bellows, especially in high beam current operation. For an SRF-based accelerator, the bellows must also be particulate free. Many designs of shielded bellows incorporate rf slides or fingers that prevent convolutions from being exposed to wakefields. Unfortunately these mechanical structures tend to generate particulates that, if left in the SRF accelerator, can migrate into superconducting cavities, the accelerator's critical components. In this paper, we describe a prototype unshielded bellows that has low beam impedance and no risk of particulate generation.

  17. Plasma Emission Characteristics from a High Current Hollow Cathode in an Ion Thruster Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 5A) has been documented in the literature. In order to further elucidate these findings, an investigation of a high current cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber has been undertaken. Using Langmuir probes, a low energy charged particle analyzer and emission spectroscopy, the behavior of the near-cathode plasma and the emitted ion energy distribution was characterized. The presence of energetic ions was confirmed. It was observed that these ions had energies in excess of the discharge voltage and thus cannot be simply explained by ions falling out of plasma through a potential difference of this order. Additionally, evidence provided by Langmuir probes suggests the existence of a double layer essentially separating the hollow cathode plasma column from the main discharge. The radial potential difference associated with this double layer was measured to be of order the ionization potential.

  18. Electromagnetic Modeling of Cavities and Power Couplers for Sc = High-Current Proton Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Frank

    1998-04-01

    Newly proposed accelerator applications such as Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) or Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) require high-current, high-power proton accelerators. The Los Alamos National Laboratory design of an APT facility, which can easily be adopted to other applications, proposes a linear accelerator with superconducting rf-cavities for particle acceleration. The required high power levels demand a careful design of the rf-components such as cavities and power couplers. Most of the computational work requires state-of-the-art modeling software that can give fields, rf-losses and beam-interaction quantities in 2D and 3D models. This contribution presents the modeling techniques and results of our work with the MAFIA electromagnetic simulator.

  19. Beam physics design strategy for a high-current rf linac

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, M.

    1995-10-01

    The high average beam power of an rf linac system for transmutation of nuclear waste puts very stringent requirements on beam quality and beam control. Fractional beam losses along the accelerator must be kept at extremely low levels to assure {open_quotes}hands-on{close_quotes} maintenance. Hence, halo formation and large-amplitude tails in the particle distribution due to beam mismatch and equipartitioning effects must be avoided. This implies that the beam should ideally be in near-perfect thermal equilibrium from injection to full energy - in contrast to existing rf linacs in which the transverse temperature, T {sub {perpendicular}}, is higher than the longitudinal temperature, T{sub {parallel}}. The physics and parameter scaling for such a system will be reviewed using the results of recent work on high-intensity bunched beams. A design strategy for a high-current rf linac with equilibrated beam will be proposed.

  20. Plasma Emission Characteristics From a High Current Hollow Cathode in an Ion Thruster Discharge Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-11-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 5A) has been documented in the literature. In order to further elucidate these findings, an investigation of a high current cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber has been undertaken. Using Langmuir probes, a low energy charged particle analyzer and emission spectroscopy, the behavior of the near-cathode plasma and the emitted ion energy distribution was characterized. The presence of energetic ions was confirmed. It was observed that these ions had energies in excess of the discharge voltage and thus cannot be simply explained by ions falling out of plasma through a potential difference of this order. Additionally, evidence provided by Langmuir probes suggests the existence of a double layer essentially separating the hollow cathode plasma column from the main discharge. The radial potential difference associated with this double layer was measured to be of order the ionization potential.

  1. Design and study of a high-current 5-cell superconducting rf cavity.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Nassiri, A.; Waldschmidt, G. )

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory is considering the development of a superconducting linac-based fourth-generation hard X-ray source to meet future scientific needs of the hard X-ray user community. This work specifically focuses on the design of an optimized 5-cell superconducting radio-frequency structure well suited for a high-energy, high-beam-current energy recovery linac. The cavity design parameters are based on the APS storage ring nominal 7 GeV and 100 mA beam operation. A high-current 5-cell cw superconducting cavity operating at 1.4 GHz has been designed. In order to achieve a high current, the accelerating cavity shape has been optimized and large end-cell beam pipes have been adopted. The beam break-up threshold of the cavity has been estimated using the code TDBBU, which predicts a high threshold beam current for a 7 GeV energy recovery linac model. A copper prototype cavity has been fabricated that uses half-cell modules, initially assembled by clamping the cells together.

  2. Compact high current generator for x-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlov, A. V.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Zorin, V. B.

    2006-12-01

    We report here a design of the portable high current generator, which can be used for a row of experiments and applications, including, but not limited to, X pinch, plasma focus, vacuum spark, etc. The X generator consists of the capacitor bank, multigap spark switch, load chamber, and built-in high voltage triggering generator. The capacitor bank consists of 12 General Atomics 35404 type capacitors (20nF, 25nH, 0.2Ω, 100kV). It stores ˜0.8kJ at 80kV charging voltage. Each three capacitors are commuted to a load by the multigap spark switch, which is able to commute by eight parallel channels. Switches operate in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. At 76kV charging voltage the generator provides ˜260kA with 120ns rise time and 5nH inductive load and ˜220kA with 145ns rise time and 10nH. Delay of output pulse relative to high voltage triggering pulse is ˜65ns with 5ns jitter. The dimensions of the generator are 1240×1240×225mm3 and the weight is ˜250kg, and only one high voltage power supply is required as additional equipment for the generator. The generator with a pumping system is placed on area about 0.5m2. Operation and handling are very simple, because no oil nor purified gases are required for the generator. The X generator has been successfully employed for experiments on the Ni X pinch load. X-ray pulse duration (full width at half maximum above 1keV) was about 5ns. Radiation yield Wr⩾500mJ was observed in the 1.2-1.5KeV range and Wr⩾20mJ in the 3-5keV energy range, which is comparable to results, obtained on the nanosecond accelerators. Clearly resolved images of 6μm wire indicate micron level size of hot spot. These results demonstrate possibility of this generator for application for x-ray backlighting.

  3. Electron trapping in high-current ion beam pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    2000-03-01

    The space charge voltage depression in a drifting heavy ion beam during the final stages of current pulse compression can be hundreds of kilovolts. For example, a 1kA beam of ions at beta = v/c = 0.4 would have a beam center-to-edge potential difference of 75kV. With suitable clearance from beam edge to the beam pipe, this amount is typically increased by a factor of 2 to 3 by the (1 + 2 ln(b/a)) term that accounts for the ratio of pipe radius to beam radius. Such high voltages, and resulting high electric fields at the pipe wall, will result in electrons being pulled into the beam pipe. These electrons which are emitted from the grounded beam pipe, will pass through the ion beam at high velocity and then turn around without (usually) striking the wall and continue to pass through the beam on repeated oscillations. It is possible to control the longitudinal motion of these trapped electrons by suitably varying the pipe size while considering the beam diameter. A segment of the beam pipe that has a larger diameter will result in a potential well that traps the electrons longitudinally. In a constant current scenario in a uniform pipe, the electrons will drift in the direction of the beam. However, the head and especially the tail of the ion beam will have a dramatic effect on the electrons, causing them to be pulled into the ion beam. These complex processes will continue until the ion beam passes through an optical element such as a beam transport magnet that will effectively block the motion of the electron clouds following the ions. In this paper, the authors will show examples of how electrons can be trapped and controlled by varying the conditions determining their emission and confinement. Ray tracing simulations using the EGN2[1] computer code will be used to model the electron trajectories in the presence of a high current heavy ion beam. The self magnetic field of the ion beam, while not sufficient to affect the ions themselves significantly, has a strong

  4. Application of optical emission spectroscopy to high current proton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, G.; Mazzaglia, M.; Nicolosi, D.; Mascali, D.; Reitano, R.; Zaniol, B.; Celona, L.; Leonardi, O.; Leone, F.; Naselli, E.; Neri, L.; Torrisi, G.; Gammino, S.

    2017-07-01

    Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) represents a very reliable technique to carry out non-invasive measurements of plasma density and plasma temperature in the range of tens of eV. With respect to other diagnostics, it also can characterize the different populations of neutrals and ionized particles constituting the plasma. At INFN-LNS, OES techniques have been developed and applied to characterize the plasma generated by the Flexible Plasma Trap, an ion source used as "testbench" of the proton source built for European Spallation Source. This work presents the characterization of the parameters of a hydrogen plasma in different conditions of neutral pressure, microwave power and magnetic field profile, along with perspectives for further upgrades of the OES diagnostics system.

  5. Recent advances in particle and droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices based on surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuochen; Zhe, Jiang

    2011-04-07

    Manipulation of microscale particles and fluid liquid droplets is an important task for lab-on-a-chip devices for numerous biological researches and applications, such as cell detection and tissue engineering. Particle manipulation techniques based on surface acoustic waves (SAWs) appear effective for lab-on-a-chip devices because they are non-invasive, compatible with soft lithography micromachining, have high energy density, and work for nearly any type of microscale particles. Here we review the most recent research and development of the past two years in SAW based particle and liquid droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices including particle focusing and separation, particle alignment and patterning, particle directing, and liquid droplet delivery.

  6. RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH-DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a two inch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

  7. RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas W. Marshall

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a twoinch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

  8. Stretchable electronics for wearable and high-current applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbich, Daniel; Shannon, Lesley; Gray, Bonnie L.

    2016-04-01

    Advances in the development of novel materials and fabrication processes are resulting in an increased number of flexible and stretchable electronics applications. This evolving technology enables new devices that are not readily fabricated using traditional silicon processes, and has the potential to transform many industries, including personalized healthcare, consumer electronics, and communication. Fabrication of stretchable devices is typically achieved through the use of stretchable polymer-based conductors, or more rigid conductors, such as metals, with patterned geometries that can accommodate stretching. Although the application space for stretchable electronics is extensive, the practicality of these devices can be severely limited by power consumption and cost. Moreover, strict process flows can impede innovation that would otherwise enable new applications. In an effort to overcome these impediments, we present two modified approaches and applications based on a newly developed process for stretchable and flexible electronics fabrication. This includes the development of a metallization pattern stamping process allowing for 1) stretchable interconnects to be directly integrated with stretchable/wearable fabrics, and 2) a process variation enabling aligned multi-layer devices with integrated ferromagnetic nanocomposite polymer components enabling a fully-flexible electromagnetic microactuator for large-magnitude magnetic field generation. The wearable interconnects are measured, showing high conductivity, and can accommodate over 20% strain before experiencing conductive failure. The electromagnetic actuators have been fabricated and initial measurements show well-aligned, highly conductive, isolated metal layers. These two applications demonstrate the versatility of the newly developed process and suggest potential for its furthered use in stretchable electronics and MEMS applications.

  9. Studies in High Current Density Ion Sources for Heavy Ion Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon-Golcher, Edwin

    2002-06-01

    This dissertation develops diverse research on small (diameter ~ few mm), high current density (J ~ several tens of mA/cm2) heavy ion sources. The research has been developed in the context of a programmatic interest within the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program to explore alternative architectures in the beam injection systems that use the merging of small, bright beams. An ion gun was designed and built for these experiments. Results of average current density yield () at different operating conditions are presented for K+ and Cs+ contact ionization sources and potassium aluminum silicate sources. Maximum values for a K+ beam of ~90 mA/cm2 were observed in 2.3 μs pulses. Measurements of beam intensity profiles and emittances are included. Measurements of neutral particle desorption are presented at different operating conditions which lead to a better understanding of the underlying atomic diffusion processes that determine the lifetime of the emitter. Estimates of diffusion times consistent with measurements are presented, as well as estimates of maximum repetition rates achievable. Diverse studies performed on the composition and preparation of alkali aluminosilicate ion sources are also presented. In addition, this work includes preliminary work carried out exploring the viability of an argon plasma ion source and a bismuth metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. For the former ion source, fast rise-times (~ 1 μs), high current densities (~ 100 mA/cm+) and low operating pressures (< 2 mtorr) were verified. For the latter, high but acceptable levels of beam emittance were measured (εn ≤ 0.006 π· mm · mrad) although measured currents differed from the desired ones (I ~ 5mA) by about a factor of 10.

  10. A study of the formation and evolution of aerosols and contrails in aircraft wakes: Development, validation and application of an advanced particle microphysics (APM) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fangqun

    1998-10-01

    The aerosols generated by current and future fleets of subsonic and supersonic aircraft may affect stratosphere ozone abundances by enhancing the particulate surface area on which heterogeneous chemical reactions can occur, and may affect global climate by modifying high-level clouds. A reliable assessment of aviation impacts requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms that control the production and physical properties of the emitted particles. This dissertation discusses the development of an advanced particle microphysics (APM) model, and the application of this model to investigate the formation mechanisms and physical properties of the aviation- generated aerosols. In the model, the composition and size distributions of various categories of particles (electrically charged and uncharged, volatile and nonvolatile, and liquid and solid) are tracked through the different phases of plume evolution, including the condensation and evaporation of contrails when ambient conditions favor ice formation. The APM model is modularized and highly efficient, and may be applied to study a variety of aerosol-related problems. Here, the model is applied to analyze in-situ plume particle observations obtained in several field campaigns. The simulations-constrained by measurements-reveal that the largest volatile particles-those most likely to contribute to the background abundance of condensation nuclei-are dominated by ``ion-mode'' aerosols, which are formed on the chemiions emitted by the aircraft engines. The population of ion-mode aerosols is controlled by the abundance of chemiions which is determined by combustion chemistry and is relatively invariant. The theory of chemiion effects on aircraft plume microphysics is developed here, and the first quantitative calculations of chemiion-influenced plume aerosols are presented. In this work, a molecular kinetic model is used for the first time to interpret in-situ aircraft particle measurements, showing that the

  11. Advances in measurements and simulation of gas-particle flows and coal combustion in burners/combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. X.

    2009-02-01

    Innovative coal combustors were developed, and measurement and simulation of gas-particle flows and coal combustion in such combustors were done in the Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University. LDV/PDPA measurements are made to understand the behavior of turbulent gas-particle flows in coal combustors. Coal combustion test was done for the non-slagging cyclone coal combustor. The full two-fluid model developed by the present author was used to simulate turbulent gas-particle flows, coal combustion and NOx formation. It is found by measurements and simulation that the optimum design can give large-size recirculation zones for improving the combustion performance for all the combustors. The combustion test shows that the nonslagging coal combustor can burn 3-5mm coal particles with good combustion efficiency and low NO emission. Simulation in comparison with experiments indicates that the swirl number can significantly affect the NO formation in the swirl coal combustor.

  12. Experimental study of a high-current FEM with a broadband microwave system

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, G.G.; Bratman, V.L.; Ginzburg, N.S.

    1995-12-31

    One of the main features of FELs and FEMs is the possibility of fast and wideband tuning of the resonant frequency of active media, which can be provided by changing the particle energy. For a frequency adjustable FEM-oscillator, a broadband microwave system, which is simply combined with an electron-optical FEM system and consists of an oversized waveguide and reflectors based on the microwave beams multiplication effect has been proposed and studied successfully in {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} measurements. Here, the operating ability of a cavity, that includes some key elements of the broadband microwave system, was tested in the presence of an electron beam. To provide large particle oscillation velocities in a moderate undulator field and the presence of a guide magnetic field, the FEM operating regime of double resonance was chosen. In this regime the cyclotron as well as undulator resonance conditions were satisfied. The FEM-oscillator was investigated experimentally on a high-current accelerator {open_quotes}Sinus-6{close_quotes} that forms an electron beam with particle energy 500keV and pulse duration 25ns. The aperture with a diameter 2.5mm at the center of the anode allows to pass through only the central fraction of the electron beam with a current about 100A and a small spread of longitudinal velocities of the particles. Operating transverse velocity was pumped into the electron beam in the pulse plane undulator of a 2.4cm period. The cavity with a frequency near 45GHz consists of a square waveguide and two reflectors. The broadband up-stream reflector based on the multiplication effect had the power reflectivity coefficient more than 90% in the frequency band 10% for the H{sup 10} wave of the square waveguide with the maximum about 100% at a frequency 45GHz. The down-stream narrow-band Bragg reflector had the power reflection coefficient approximately 80% in the frequency band of 4% near 45GHz for the operating mode.

  13. Mechanisms for the formation and transport of ion fluxes in the plasma of a high-current vacuum spark

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. N.; Zemchenkova, N. V.; Klyachin, N. A.; Prokhorovich, D. E.

    2010-09-15

    The processes of ion flux formation in the plasma of a high-current vacuum spark were investigated experimentally. It is shown that multicharged ions are generated in the neck formed in the erosion products of the inner electrode. The plasma escaping from the neck region plays a role of a piston dragging particles of the cold peripheral plasma into ambient space. As the discharge current increases, the flux of the evaporated electrode material grows, the degree of ionization of the plasma produced decreases, and the efficiency of plasma heating caused by the pinching effect is reduced.

  14. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  15. Characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of advanced spray-dried chemotherapeutic PEGylated phospholipid particles for dry powder inhalation delivery in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Meenach, Samantha A; Anderson, Kimberly W; Zach Hilt, J; McGarry, Ronald C; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-07-16

    Pulmonary inhalation chemotherapeutic drug delivery offers many advantages for lung cancer patients in comparison to conventional systemic chemotherapy. Inhalable particles are advantageous in their ability to deliver drug deep in the lung by utilizing optimally sized particles and higher local drug dose delivery. In this work, spray-dried and co-spray dried inhalable lung surfactant-mimic PEGylated lipopolymers as microparticulate/nanoparticulate dry powders containing paclitaxel were rationally designed via organic solution advanced spray drying (no water) in closed-mode from dilute concentration feed solution. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine poly(ethylene glycol) (DPPE-PEG) with varying PEG chain length were mixed with varying amounts of paclitaxel in methanol to produce co-spray dried microparticles and nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy showed the spherical particle morphology of the inhalable particles. Thermal analysis and X-ray powder diffraction confirmed the retention of the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid-state following spray drying, the degree of solid-state molecular order, and solid-state phase transition behavior. The residual water content of the particles was very low as quantified analytically Karl Fisher titration. The amount of paclitaxel loaded into the particles was quantified which indicated high encapsulation efficiencies (43-99%). Dry powder aerosol dispersion performance was measured in vitro using the Next Generation Impactor (NGI) coupled with the Handihaler dry powder inhaler device and showed mass median aerodynamic diameters in the range of 3.4-7 μm. These results demonstrate that this novel microparticulate/nanoparticulate chemotherapeutic PEGylated phospholipid dry powder inhalation aerosol platform has great potential in lung cancer drug delivery.

  16. A superconducting quadrupole array for transport of multiple high current beams

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Shuman, D.

    1999-11-01

    We present a conceptual design of a superconducting quadrupole magnet array for the side-by-side transport of multiple high current particle beams in induction linear accelerators. The magnetic design uses a modified cosine 20 current distribution inside a square cell boundary. Each interior magnet's neighbors serve as the return flux paths and the poles are placed as close as possible to each other to facilitate this. No iron is present in the basic 2-D magnetic design; it will work at any current level without correction windings. Special 1/8th quadrupoles are used along the transverse periphery of the array to contain and channel flux back into the array, making every channel look as part of an infinite array. This design provides a fixed dimension array boundary equal to the quadrupole radius that can be used for arrays of any number of quadrupole channels, at any field level. More importantly, the design provides magnetic field separation between the array and the induction cores which may be surrounding it. Flux linkage between these two components can seriously affect the operation of both of them.

  17. Surface composite nanostructures of AZ91 magnesium alloy induced by high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. C.; Hao, S. Z.; Wen, H.; Huang, R. F.

    2014-06-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment was conducted on an AZ91 cast magnesium alloy with accelerating voltage 27 kV, energy density 3 J/cm2 and pulse duration 2.5 μs. The surface microstructure was characterized by optical microscope (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The surface corrosion property was tested with electrochemical method in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. It is found that after 1 pulse of HCPEB treatment, the initial eutectic α phase and Mg17Al12 particles started to dissolve in the surface modified layer of depth ∼15 μm. When using 15 HCPEB pulses, the Al content in surface layer increased noticeably, and the phase structure was modified as composite nanostructures consisted of nano-grained Mg3.1Al0.9 domains surrounded by network of Mg17Al12 phase. The HCPEB treated samples showed an improved corrosion resistance with cathodic current density decreased by two orders of magnitude as compared to the initial AZ91 alloy.

  18. Simulative research on the expansion of cathode plasma in high-current electron beam diode

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Qifu; Liu Lie

    2012-09-15

    The expansion of cathode plasma has long been recognized as a limiting factor in the impedance lifetime of high-current electron beam diode. Realistic modeling of such plasma is of great necessity in order to discuss the dynamics of cathode plasma. Using the method of particle-in-cell, the expansion of cathode plasma is simulated in this paper by a scaled-down diode model. It is found that the formation of cathode plasma increases the current density in the diode. This consequently leads to the decrease of the potential at plasma front. Once the current density has been increased to a certain value, the potential at plasma front would then be equal to or lower than the plasma potential. Then the ions would move towards the anode, and the expansion of cathode plasma is thereby formed. Different factors affecting the plasma expansion velocity are discussed in this paper. It is shown that the decrease of proton genatation rate has the benefit of reducing the plasma expansion velocity.

  19. Model of convection mass transfer in titanium alloy at low energy high current electron beam action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, V. D.; Granovskii, A. Yu; Nevskii, S. A.; Konovalov, S. V.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The convection mixing model is proposed for low-energy high-current electron beam treatment of titanium alloys, pre-processed by heterogeneous plasma flows generated via explosion of carbon tape and powder TiB2. The model is based on the assumption vortices in the molten layer are formed due to the treatment by concentrated energy flows. These vortices evolve as the result of thermocapillary convection, arising because of the temperature gradient. The calculation of temperature gradient and penetration depth required solution of the heat problem with taking into account the surface evaporation. However, instead of the direct heat source the boundary conditions in phase transitions were changed in the thermal conductivity equation, assuming the evaporated material takes part in the heat exchange. The data on the penetration depth and temperature distribution are used for the thermocapillary model. The thermocapillary model embraces Navier-Stocks and convection heat transfer equations, as well as the boundary conditions with the outflow of evaporated material included. The solution of these equations by finite elements methods pointed at formation of a multi-vortices structure when electron-beam treatment and its expansion over new zones of material. As the result, strengthening particles are found at the depth exceeding manifold their penetration depth in terms of the diffusion mechanism.

  20. Investigation of various equations of state for high current, pulsed power load modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luginsland, John; Parkinson, Roland; Rigby, Fred; Toepfer, Alan

    2002-08-01

    A number of technologies utilize the increasing availability of modern pulsed power systems to produce high currents to resistively drive solid, metallic loads into the plasma state. Examples include ablation plasma deposition, circuit breakers, fuses, exploding and imploding wires, and high velocity jet disruption. One important feature in any computational model of these phenomena is the equation of state (EOS). The equations of state used in these models are typically as varied as the range of applications. In this work, using a segmented wire experiment performed at the Army Research Laboratory [1] as a benchmark, we investigate three equations of state [2-4]. We assess the merits of the EOS for both their physical accuracy and easy of use computationally. Finally, we comment on the availability of the information necessary to build the EOS, given the wide variety of materials that are used in this applied field. [1] C.E. Hollandsworth et al., J. Appl. Phys., vol. 84, no. 9, 4992-5000, 1998. [2] SESAME tables, LANL T-1 Division, Equation of State and Strength of Materials. [3] Zhukov, Demidov, and Ryabenko, Fiz. Metal. Metalloved., vol. 57, no. 2, 224-229, 1984. [4] Chittenden et al., Laser and Particle Beams, vol. 19, issue 3, 323-343, 2001, and references therein.

  1. Effect of advanced aftertreatment for PM and NOx reduction on heavy-duty diesel engine ultrafine particle emissions.

    PubMed

    Herner, Jorn Dinh; Hu, Shaohua; Robertson, William H; Huai, Tao; Chang, M-C Oliver; Rieger, Paul; Ayala, Alberto

    2011-03-15

    Four heavy-duty and medium-duty diesel vehicles were tested in six different aftertreament configurations using a chassis dynamometer to characterize the occurrence of nucleation (the conversion of exhaust gases to particles upon dilution). The aftertreatment included four different diesel particulate filters and two selective catalytic reduction (SCR) devices. All DPFs reduced the emissions of solid particles by several orders of magnitude, but in certain cases the occurrence of a volatile nucleation mode could increase total particle number emissions. The occurrence of a nucleation mode could be predicted based on the level of catalyst in the aftertreatment, the prevailing temperature in the aftertreatment, and the age of the aftertreatment. The particles measured during nucleation had a high fraction of sulfate, up to 62% of reconstructed mass. Additionally the catalyst reduced the toxicity measured in chemical and cellular assays suggesting a pathway for an inverse correlation between particle number and toxicity. The results have implications for exposure to and toxicity of diesel PM.

  2. Advances in the simulation and automated measurement of well-sorted granular material: 2. Direct measures of particle properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Rubin, David M.

    2012-01-01

    1. In this, the second of a pair of papers on the structure of well-sorted natural granular material (sediment), new methods are described for automated measurements from images of sediment, of: 1) particle-size standard deviation (arithmetic sorting) with and without apparent void fraction; and 2) mean particle size in material with void fraction. A variety of simulations of granular material are used for testing purposes, in addition to images of natural sediment. Simulations are also used to establish that the effects on automated particle sizing of grains visible through the interstices of the grains at the very surface of a granular material continue to a depth of approximately 4 grain diameters and that this is independent of mean particle size. Ensemble root-mean squared error between observed and estimated arithmetic sorting coefficients for 262 images of natural silts, sands and gravels (drawn from 8 populations) is 31%, which reduces to 27% if adjusted for bias (slope correction between observed and estimated values). These methods allow non-intrusive and fully automated measurements of surfaces of unconsolidated granular material. With no tunable parameters or empirically derived coefficients, they should be broadly universal in appropriate applications. However, empirical corrections may need to be applied for the most accurate results. Finally, analytical formulas are derived for the one-step pore-particle transition probability matrix, estimated from the image's autocorrelogram, from which void fraction of a section of granular material can be estimated directly. This model gives excellent predictions of bulk void fraction yet imperfect predictions of pore-particle transitions.

  3. Advances in the simulation and automated measurement of well-sorted granular material: 2. Direct measures of particle properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, D.; Rubin, D. M.

    2012-06-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the structure of well-sorted natural granular material (sediment), new methods are described for automated measurements from images of sediment, of: 1) particle-size standard deviation (arithmetic sorting) with and without apparent void fraction; and 2) mean particle size in material with void fraction. A variety of simulations of granular material are used for testing purposes, in addition to images of natural sediment. Simulations are also used to establish that the effects on automated particle sizing of grains visible through the interstices of the grains at the very surface of a granular material continue to a depth of approximately 4 grain diameters and that this is independent of mean particle size. Ensemble root-mean squared error between observed and estimated arithmetic sorting coefficients for 262 images of natural silts, sands and gravels (drawn from 8 populations) is 31%, which reduces to 27% if adjusted for bias (slope correction between observed and estimated values). These methods allow non-intrusive and fully automated measurements of surfaces of unconsolidated granular material. With no tunable parameters or empirically derived coefficients, they should be broadly universal in appropriate applications. However, empirical corrections may need to be applied for the most accurate results. Finally, analytical formulas are derived for the one-step pore-particle transition probability matrix, estimated from the image's autocorrelogram, from which void fraction of a section of granular material can be estimated directly. This model gives excellent predictions of bulk void fraction yet imperfect predictions of pore-particle transitions.

  4. High-Current Gain Two-Dimensional MoS₂-Base Hot-Electron Transistors.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos M; Lan, Yann-Wen; Zeng, Caifu; Chen, Jyun-Hong; Kou, Xufeng; Navabi, Aryan; Tang, Jianshi; Montazeri, Mohammad; Adleman, James R; Lerner, Mitchell B; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Li, Lain-Jong; Chen, Chii-Dong; Wang, Kang L

    2015-12-09

    The vertical transport of nonequilibrium charge carriers through semiconductor heterostructures has led to milestones in electronics with the development of the hot-electron transistor. Recently, significant advances have been made with atomically sharp heterostructures implementing various two-dimensional materials. Although graphene-base hot-electron transistors show great promise for electronic switching at high frequencies, they are limited by their low current gain. Here we show that, by choosing MoS2 and HfO2 for the filter barrier interface and using a noncrystalline semiconductor such as ITO for the collector, we can achieve an unprecedentedly high-current gain (α ∼ 0.95) in our hot-electron transistors operating at room temperature. Furthermore, the current gain can be tuned over 2 orders of magnitude with the collector-base voltage albeit this feature currently presents a drawback in the transistor performance metrics such as poor output resistance and poor intrinsic voltage gain. We anticipate our transistors will pave the way toward the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density, low-energy, and high-frequency hot-carrier electronic applications.

  5. High Current Density, Long Life Cathodes for High Power RF Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Collins, George; Falce, Lou; Schwartzkopf, Steve; Busbaher, Daniel

    2014-01-22

    This program was tasked with improving the quality and expanding applications for Controlled Porosity Reservoir (CPR) cathodes. Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) initially developed CPR cathodes on a DOE-funded SBIR program to improve cathodes for magnetron injection guns. Subsequent funding was received from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The program developed design requirements for implementation of the technology into high current density cathodes for high frequency applications. During Phase I of this program, CCR was awarded the prestigious 2011 R&D100 award for this technology. Subsequently, the technology was presented at numerous technical conferences. A patent was issued for the technology in 2009. These cathodes are now marketed by Semicon Associates, Inc. in Lexington, KY. They are the world’s largest producer of cathodes for vacuum electron devices. During this program, CCR teamed with Semicon Associates, Inc. and Ron Witherspoon, Inc. to improve the fabrication processes and expand applications for the cathodes. Specific fabrications issues included the quality of the wire winding that provides the basic structure and the sintering to bond the wires into a robust, cohesive structure. The program also developed improved techniques for integrating the resulting material into cathodes for electron guns.

  6. Advances in understanding the genesis and evolution solar energetic particle events over the last two solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Rami

    2016-04-01

    I will review the observational and modeling efforts related to solar energetic particle (SEP) events over the 23rd and 24th solar cycles. I will concentrate on large SEP events related to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), but discuss observations related to the possible role of flares in the acceleration of particles in those events, as well. The possible roles of various acceleration and transport processes in understanding the characteristics of the events will be discussed. This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA).

  7. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emissions Project (APBF-DEC): 2,000-Hour Performance of a NOx Adsorber Catalyst and Diesel Particle Filter System for a Medium-Duty, Pick-Up Diesel Engine Platform; Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-03-01

    Presents the results of a 2,000-hour test of an emissions control system consisting of a nitrogen oxides adsorber catalyst in combination with a diesel particle filter, advanced fuels, and advanced engine controls in an SUV/pick-up truck vehicle platform.

  8. Research of transportation efficiency of low-energy high- current electron beam in plasma channel in external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagin, E. S.; Grigoriev, V. P.

    2015-11-01

    Effective high current (5-20 kA) and low energy (tens of keV) electrons beam transportation is possible only with almost complete charging neutralization. It is also necessary to use quite high current neutralization for elimination beam self-pinching effect. The research is based on the self-consistent mathematical model that takes into account beam and plasma particles dynamic, current and charge neutralization of electron beam and examines the transportation of electron beam into a chamber with low-pressure plasma in magnetic field. A numerical study was conducted using particle in cell (PIC) method. The study was performed with various system parameters: rise time and magnitude of the beam current, gas pressure and plasma density and geometry of the system. Regularities of local virtual cathode field generated by the beam in the plasma channel, as well as ranges of parameters that let transportation beam with minimal losses, depending on the external magnetic field were determined through a series of numerical studies. In addition, the assessment of the impact of the plasma ion mobility during the transition period and during steady beam was performed.

  9. Bowl-like SnO2 @carbon hollow particles as an advanced anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jin; Yu, Xin-Yao; Zhou, Han; Wu, Hao Bin; Ding, Shujiang; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2014-11-17

    Despite the great advantages of hollow structures as electrodes for lithium-ion batteries, one apparent common drawback which is often criticized is their compromised volumetric energy density due to the introduced hollow interior. Here, we design and synthesize bowl-like SnO2 @carbon hollow particles to reduce the excessive hollow interior space while retaining the general advantages of hollow structures. As a result, the tap density can be increased about 30 %. The as-prepared bowl-like SnO2 @carbon hollow particles with conformal carbon support exhibit excellent lithium storage properties in terms of high capacity, stable cyclability and excellent rate capability. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Development and Characterization of Diamond Film and Compound Metal Surface High Current Photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurter, R. P.; Moir, D. C.; Shurter, R. P.; Moir, D. C.

    1997-05-01

    High current photocathodes operating in vacuum environments as high as 10-5 torr are being developed at Los Alamos for use in a new generation of linear induction accelerators. We report high quantum efficiencies and high current densities in wide bandgap semiconductor and compound metal surface thermally augmented photocathode materials illuminated by ultraviolet laser radiation.

  11. Airborne Particles: What We Have Learned About Their Role in Climate from Remote Sensing, and Prospects for Future Advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Desert dust, wildfire smoke, volcanic ash, biogenic and urban pollution particles, all affect the regional-scale climate of Earth in places and at times; some have global-scale impacts on the column radiation balance, cloud properties, atmospheric stability structure, and circulation patterns. Remote sensing has played a central role in identifying the sources and transports of airborne particles, mapping their three-dimensional distribution and variability, quantifying their amount, and constraining aerosol air mass type. The measurements obtained from remote sensing have strengths and limitations, and their value for characterizing Earths environment is enhanced immensely when they are combined with direct, in situ observations, and used to constrain aerosol transport and climate models. A similar approach has been taken to study the role particles play in determining the climate of Mars, though based on far fewer observations. This presentation will focus what we have learned from remote sensing about the impacts aerosol have on Earths climate; a few points about how aerosols affect the climate of Mars will also be introduced, in the context of how we might assess aerosol-climate impacts more generally on other worlds.

  12. High current density beamlets from RF Argon source for heavy ion fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, J.W.; Grote, D.P.; Westenskow, G.

    2003-08-01

    In a new approach to develop high current beams for heavy ion fusion, beam current at about 0.5 ampere per channel can be obtained by merging an array of high current density beamlets of 5 mA each. We have done computer simulations to study the transport of high current density beamlets and the emittance growth due to this merging process. In our RF multicusp source experiment, we have produced a cluster of 61 beamlets using minimum gas flow. The current density from a 0.25 cm diameter aperture reached 100 mA/cm{sup 2}. The normalized emittance of 0.02 {pi}-mm-mrad corresponds to an equivalent ion temperature of 2.4 eV. These results showed that the RF argon plasma source is suitable for producing high current density beamlets that can be merged to form a high current high brightness beam for HIF application.

  13. High Current Density Beamlets from an RF Argon Source for Heavy Ion Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, J W; Grote, D P; Westenskow, G A

    2003-09-04

    In a new approach to develop high current beams for heavy ion fusion, beam current at about 0.5 ampere per channel can be obtained by merging an array of high current density beamlets of 5 mA each. We have done computer simulations to study the transport of high current density beamlets and the emittance growth due to this merging process. In our RF multicusp source experiment, we have produced a cluster of 61 beamlets using minimum gas flow. The current density from a 0.25 cm diameter aperture reached 100 mA/cm{sup 2}. The normalized emittance of 0.02 {pi}-mm-mrad corresponds to an equivalent ion temperature of 2.4 eV. These results showed that the RF argon plasma source is suitable for producing high current density beamlets that can be merged to form a high current high brightness beam for HIF application.

  14. Advanced zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron particles for acidic magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited ZnS and other IR materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzman, S.; Giannechini, L. J.; Romanofsky, H. J.; Golini, N.; Taylor, B.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a modified version of zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron (CI) particles that were invented at the University of Rochester in 2008. The amount of zirconia on the coating is increased to further protect the iron particles from corrosion when introduced to an acidic environment. Five low-pH, magnetorheological (MR) fluids were made with five acids: acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric, and hydrofluoric. All fluids were based on the modified zirconia-coated CI particles. Off-line viscosity and pH stability were measured for all acidic MR fluids to determine the ideal fluid composition for acidic MR finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (ZnS) and other infrared (IR) optical materials, such as hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) ZnS, CVD zinc selenide (ZnSe), and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). Results show significant reduction in surface artifacts (millimeter-size, pebble-like structures on the finished surface) for several standard-grade CVD ZnS substrates and good surface roughness for the non-CVD MgF2 substrate when MR finished with our advanced acidic MR fluid.

  15. Advances in colloid and biocolloid transport in porous media: particle size-dependent dispersivity and gravity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate prediction of colloid and biocolloid transport in porous media relies heavily on usage of suitable dispersion coefficients. The widespread procedure for dispersion coefficient determination consists of conducting conservative tracer experiments and subsequently fitting the collected breakthrough data with a selected advection-dispersion transport model. The fitted dispersion coefficient is assumed to characterize the porous medium and is often used thereafter to analyze experimental results obtained from the same porous medium with other solutes, colloids, and biocolloids. The classical advection-dispersion equation implies that Fick's first law of diffusion adequately describes the dispersion process, or that the dispersive flux is proportional to the concentration gradient. Therefore, the above-described procedure inherently assumes that the dispersive flux of all solutes, colloids and biocolloids under the same flow field conditions is exactly the same. Furthermore, the available mathematical models for colloid and biocoloid transport in porous media do not adequately account for gravity effects. Here an extensive laboratory study was undertaken in order to assess whether the dispersivity, which traditionally has been considered to be a property of the porous medium, is dependent on colloid particle size, interstitial velocity and length scale. The breakthrough curves were successfully simulated with a mathematical model describing colloid and biocolloid transport in homogeneous, water saturated porous media. The results demonstrated that the dispersivity increases very slowly with increasing interstitial velocity, and increases with column length. Furthermore, contrary to earlier results, which were based either on just a few experimental observations or experimental conditions leading to low mass recoveries, dispersivity was positively correlated with colloid particle size. Also, transport experiments were performed with biocolloids (bacteriophages:

  16. High-current electron gun with a planar magnetron integrated with an explosive-emission cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiziridi, P. P.; Ozur, G. E.

    2017-05-01

    A new high-current electron gun with plasma anode and explosive-emission cathode integrated with planar pulsed powered magnetron is described. Five hundred twelve copper wires 1 mm in diameter and 15 mm in height serve as emitters. These emitters are installed on stainless steel disc (substrate) with 3-mm distance between them. Magnetron discharge plasma provides increased ion density on the periphery of plasma anode formed by high-current Penning discharge ignited within several milliseconds after starting of the magnetron discharge. The increased on the periphery ion density improves the uniformity of high-current electron beam produced in such an electron gun.

  17. Influence of pulse line switch inductance on output characteristics of high-current nanosecond accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashchenko, A. I.; Vintizenko, I. I.

    2016-06-01

    Various types of high-current nanosecond accelerators are simulated numerically using an equivalent circuit representation. The influence of pulse forming line switch inductance on the amplitude and waveform of output voltage and current pulses is analyzed.

  18. High-voltage, high-current, solid-state closing switch

    DOEpatents

    Focia, Ronald Jeffrey

    2017-08-22

    A high-voltage, high-current, solid-state closing switch uses a field-effect transistor (e.g., a MOSFET) to trigger a high-voltage stack of thyristors. The switch can have a high hold-off voltage, high current carrying capacity, and high time-rate-of-change of current, di/dt. The fast closing switch can be used in pulsed power applications.

  19. Caballero: A High Current Flux Compressor System for 100 MJ Solid Liner Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    Caballero : A High Current Flux Compressor System For 100 MJ Solid Liner Experiments" R. E. Reinovsky, I.R. Lindemuth, E. A Lopez J.H. Goforth, S. P...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE JUN 1997 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Caballero : A High Current...To initially explore the performance of the Disk Explosive Magnetic Generator (DEMG), a system ( Caballero -40) was designed with a module diameter of

  20. Current-confinement structure and extremely high current density in organic light-emitting transistors.

    PubMed

    Sawabe, Kosuke; Imakawa, Masaki; Nakano, Masaki; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Takenobu, Taishi

    2012-12-04

    Extremely high current densities are realized in single-crystal ambipolar light-emitting transistors using an electron-injection buffer layer and a current-confinement structure via laser etching. Moreover, a linear increase in the luminance was observed at current densities of up to 1 kA cm(-2) , which is an efficiency-preservation improvement of three orders of magnitude over conventional organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) at high current densities.

  1. Interfacial criterion of spontaneous and forced engulfment of reinforcing particles by an advancing solid/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptay, G.

    2001-04-01

    The sign of the interfacial force acting between a ceramic particle and a solidification front through the thin layer of a liquid metal is determined by the sign of the quantity Δ σ cls. A new, generally valid equation has been developed for this parameter: Δ σ cls = 2 σ cs- σ cl- σ sl(where σ cs, σ cl, and σ slare the interfacial energies in the ceramic/solid metal, in the ceramic/liquid metal, and in the solid metal/liquid metal systems, respectively). The interfacial force is attractive, i.e., spontaneous engulfment of reinforcing particles by the front is expected, if Δ σ cls < 0. A new estimation method has also been developed for the quantity σ cs. Combining this equation with the new equation for Δ σ cls, the approximated expressions with easily available parameters for the parameter Δ σ cls have been obtained for normal metals (Δ σ cls = σ cv- σ lv· (0.08 + 1.22 · cos Θclv)) and for Si and Ge (Δ σ cls = σ cv- σ lv· (0.57 + 1.66 · cos Θclv), where σ cvand σ lvare the surface energy of the ceramic and the surface tension of the liquid metal, respectively, while Θclv is the contact angle of the liquid metal on the ceramics). Calculations performed with these equations are in good qualitative agreement with all known pushing/engulfment experiments for metal/ceramic systems. Particularly, it has been theoretically predicted that, while in the majority of normal metal/ceramic and Ge/ceramic systems pushing (and, at higher solidification rates, forced engulfment) is expected, primary Si crystals (crystallizing from hypereutectic Al-Si and other alloys) will spontaneously engulf the majority of ceramic phases. The so-called “pushing/spontaneous engulfment” (PSE) diagrams have been constructed to help make a quick judgement as to whether spontaneous engulfment or pushing is expected in a given metalceramic system. For systems with Δ σ cls > 0, a new equation (similar to that derived earlier by Chernov et al.) has been derived

  2. Estimating of aquifer parameters from the single-well water-level measurements in response to advancing longwall mine by using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyuk, Ersin; Karaman, Abdullah

    2017-04-01

    We estimated transmissivity and storage coefficient values from the single well water-level measurements positioned ahead of the mining face by using particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique. The water-level response to the advancing mining face contains an semi-analytical function that is not suitable for conventional inversion shemes because the partial derivative is difficult to calculate . Morever, the logaritmic behaviour of the model create difficulty for obtaining an initial model that may lead to a stable convergence. The PSO appears to obtain a reliable solution that produce a reasonable fit between water-level data and model function response. Optimization methods have been used to find optimum conditions consisting either minimum or maximum of a given objective function with regard to some criteria. Unlike PSO, traditional non-linear optimization methods have been used for many hydrogeologic and geophysical engineering problems. These methods indicate some difficulties such as dependencies to initial model, evolution of the partial derivatives that is required while linearizing the model and trapping at local optimum. Recently, Particle swarm optimization (PSO) became the focus of modern global optimization method that is inspired from the social behaviour of birds of swarms, and appears to be a reliable and powerful algorithms for complex engineering applications. PSO that is not dependent on an initial model, and non-derivative stochastic process appears to be capable of searching all possible solutions in the model space either around local or global optimum points.

  3. Physicochemical characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of organic solution advanced spray-dried cyclosporine A multifunctional particles for dry powder inhalation aerosol delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao; Zhang, Weifen; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    In this systematic and comprehensive study, inhalation powders of the polypeptide immunosuppressant drug – cyclosporine A – for lung delivery as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were successfully designed, developed, and optimized. Several spray drying pump rates were rationally chosen. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, Karl Fischer titration, laser size diffraction, and gravimetric vapor sorption. Aerosol dispersion performance was conducted using a next generation impactor with a Food and Drug Administration-approved DPI device. These DPIs displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance with high values in emitted dose, respirable fraction, and fine particle fraction. In addition, novel multifunctional inhalation aerosol powder formulations of cyclosporine A with lung surfactant-mimic phospholipids were also successfully designed and developed by advanced organic solution cospray drying in closed mode. The lung surfactantmimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-snglycero- 3-(phosphor-rac-1-glycerol). These cyclosporine A lung surfactant-mimic aerosol powder formulations were comprehensively characterized. Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state was preserved following advanced organic solution spray drying in closed mode. These novel multifunctional inhalation powders were optimized for DPI delivery with excellent aerosol dispersion performance and high aerosol performance parameters. PMID:23569375

  4. Physicochemical characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of organic solution advanced spray-dried cyclosporine A multifunctional particles for dry powder inhalation aerosol delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Zhang, Weifen; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    In this systematic and comprehensive study, inhalation powders of the polypeptide immunosuppressant drug - cyclosporine A - for lung delivery as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were successfully designed, developed, and optimized. Several spray drying pump rates were rationally chosen. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, Karl Fischer titration, laser size diffraction, and gravimetric vapor sorption. Aerosol dispersion performance was conducted using a next generation impactor with a Food and Drug Administration-approved DPI device. These DPIs displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance with high values in emitted dose, respirable fraction, and fine particle fraction. In addition, novel multifunctional inhalation aerosol powder formulations of cyclosporine A with lung surfactant-mimic phospholipids were also successfully designed and developed by advanced organic solution cospray drying in closed mode. The lung surfactantmimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-snglycero- 3-(phosphor-rac-1-glycerol). These cyclosporine A lung surfactant-mimic aerosol powder formulations were comprehensively characterized. Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state was preserved following advanced organic solution spray drying in closed mode. These novel multifunctional inhalation powders were optimized for DPI delivery with excellent aerosol dispersion performance and high aerosol performance parameters.

  5. Advanced spray-dried design, physicochemical characterization, and aerosol dispersion performance of vancomycin and clarithromycin multifunctional controlled release particles for targeted respiratory delivery as dry powder inhalation aerosols.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Woong; Li, Xiaojian; Vogt, Frederick G; Hayes, Don; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Park, Eun-Seok; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-10-15

    Respirable microparticles/nanoparticles of the antibiotics vancomycin (VCM) and clarithromycin (CLM) were successfully designed and developed by novel organic solution advanced spray drying from methanol solution. Formulation optimization was achieved through statistical experimental design of pump feeding rates of 25% (Low P), 50% (Medium P) and 75% (High P). Systematic and comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hot-stage microscopy (HSM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Karl Fischer titration (KFT), laser size diffraction (LSD), gravimetric vapor sorption (GVS), confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and spectroscopy for chemical imaging mapping. These novel spray-dried (SD) microparticulate/nanoparticulate dry powders displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) with high values in emitted dose (ED), respirable fraction (RF), and fine particle fraction (FPF). VCM DPIs displayed better aerosol dispersion performance compared to CLM DPIs which was related to differences in the physicochemical and particle properties of VCM and CLM. In addition, organic solution advanced co-spray drying particle engineering design was employed to successfully produce co-spray-dried (co-SD) multifunctional microparticulate/nanoparticulate aerosol powder formulations of VCM and CLM with the essential lung surfactant phospholipid, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), for controlled release pulmonary nanomedicine delivery as inhalable dry powder aerosols. Formulation optimization was achieved through statistical experimental design of molar ratios of co-SD VCM:DPPC and co-SD CLM:DPPC. XRPD and DSC confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid-state was preserved following spray drying. Co-SD VCM:DPPC and co-SD CLM:DPPC dry powder aerosols demonstrated controlled release of antibiotic drug that was fitted to various

  6. Technical Advances in Intracellular Detection Using Immuno-Gold Particles: Simple Cryofixation with Metal Contact Quick Freezing.

    PubMed

    Song, Chihong; Lee, Ju Huck; Jun, Sangmi; Chung, Jeong Min; Hyun, Jaekyung; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-05-01

    The preparation of biological specimens using cryofixation techniques ensures excellent visibility of intracellular structures and preserves the antigenic sites of subcellular molecules. Hence, cryofixation is an effective method of preparing samples for analyses using antibodies conjugated to gold nanoparticles that are designed to detect the localization of specific target molecules within cells. However, cryofixation cannot be utilized easily because it requires expensive equipment and skilled technologists, resulting in a high level of expense for researchers. Here, we describe a simple technical approach to cryofixation that uses metal contact quick freezing followed by a modified freeze substitution technique and immuno-gold labeling electron microscopy. Micrograph images of cells prepared using this modified cryofixation method demonstrated its superiority over chemical fixation for high contrast visualization of the morphologies of cellular components and preservation of antigenicity for immuno-gold labeling. This report provides valuable technical information related to the advancement of metal contact quick freezing techniques, which can be used to visualize biomedical events of interest in an easy, simple, and rapid manner.

  7. Strengthening effect of nano-scaled precipitates in Ta alloying layer induced by high current pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guangze; Luo, Dian; Fan, Guohua; Ma, Xinxin; Wang, Liqin

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the combination of magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam are used for surface alloying treatment of Ta film on high speed steel. And the Ta alloying layer is about 6 μm. After tempering treatment, TaC phase forms in Ta alloying layer when the treated temperature is over 823 K. Through the TEM and HRTEM observation, a large amount of nano-scaled precipitates (mean diameter 5-8 nm) form within the δ-Fe grain in Ta alloying layer after tempering treatment and these nano-scaled precipitates are confirmed as TaC particles, which contribute to the strengthening effect of the surface alloying layer. The hardness of tempered alloying layer can reach to 18.1 GPa when the treated temperature is 823 K which increase by 50% comparing with the untreated steel sample before surface alloying treatment.

  8. High-capacity micrometer-sized Li2S particles as cathode materials for advanced rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Misra, Sumohan; Nelson, Johanna; Toney, Michael F; Cui, Yi

    2012-09-19

    Li(2)S is a high-capacity cathode material for lithium metal-free rechargeable batteries. It has a theoretical capacity of 1166 mAh/g, which is nearly 1 order of magnitude higher than traditional metal oxides/phosphates cathodes. However, Li(2)S is usually considered to be electrochemically inactive due to its high electronic resistivity and low lithium-ion diffusivity. In this paper, we discover that a large potential barrier (~1 V) exists at the beginning of charging for Li(2)S. By applying a higher voltage cutoff, this barrier can be overcome and Li(2)S becomes active. Moreover, this barrier does not appear again in the following cycling. Subsequent cycling shows that the material behaves similar to common sulfur cathodes with high energy efficiency. The initial discharge capacity is greater than 800 mAh/g for even 10 μm Li(2)S particles. Moreover, after 10 cycles, the capacity is stabilized around 500-550 mAh/g with a capacity decay rate of only ~0.25% per cycle. The origin of the initial barrier is found to be the phase nucleation of polysulfides, but the amplitude of barrier is mainly due to two factors: (a) charge transfer directly between Li(2)S and electrolyte without polysulfide and (b) lithium-ion diffusion in Li(2)S. These results demonstrate a simple and scalable approach to utilizing Li(2)S as the cathode material for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries with high specific energy.

  9. Influence of High-Current-Density Impulses on the Compression Behavior: Experiments with Iron and a Nickel-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demler, E.; Gerstein, G.; Dalinger, A.; Epishin, A.; Rodman, D.; Nürnberger, F.

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties of processing of high strength and/or brittle materials by plastic deformation, e.g., by forging, require to develop new industrial technologies. In particular, the feasible deformation rates are limited for low-ductile metallic materials. For this reason, processes were investigated to improve the deformability in which electrical impulses are to be applied to lower the yield strength. However, owing to the impulse duration and low current densities, concomitant effects always occur, e.g., as a result of Joule heating. Current developments in power electronics allow now to transmit high currents as short pulses. By reducing the impulse duration and increasing the current density, the plasticity of metallic materials can be correspondingly increased. Using the examples of polycrystalline iron and a single-crystal, nickel-based alloy (PWA 1480), current advances in the development of methods for forming materials by means of high-current-density impulses are demonstrated. For this purpose, appropriate specimens were loaded in compression and, using novel testing equipment, subjected to a current strength of 10 kA with an impulse duration of 2 ms. For a pre-defined strain, the test results show a significant decrease in the compressive stress during the compression test and a significant change in the dislocation distribution following the current impulse treatment.

  10. Influence of High-Current-Density Impulses on the Compression Behavior: Experiments with Iron and a Nickel-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demler, E.; Gerstein, G.; Dalinger, A.; Epishin, A.; Rodman, D.; Nürnberger, F.

    2016-12-01

    Difficulties of processing of high strength and/or brittle materials by plastic deformation, e.g., by forging, require to develop new industrial technologies. In particular, the feasible deformation rates are limited for low-ductile metallic materials. For this reason, processes were investigated to improve the deformability in which electrical impulses are to be applied to lower the yield strength. However, owing to the impulse duration and low current densities, concomitant effects always occur, e.g., as a result of Joule heating. Current developments in power electronics allow now to transmit high currents as short pulses. By reducing the impulse duration and increasing the current density, the plasticity of metallic materials can be correspondingly increased. Using the examples of polycrystalline iron and a single-crystal, nickel-based alloy (PWA 1480), current advances in the development of methods for forming materials by means of high-current-density impulses are demonstrated. For this purpose, appropriate specimens were loaded in compression and, using novel testing equipment, subjected to a current strength of 10 kA with an impulse duration of 2 ms. For a pre-defined strain, the test results show a significant decrease in the compressive stress during the compression test and a significant change in the dislocation distribution following the current impulse treatment.

  11. Analysis of particle size and interface effects on the strength and ductility of advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettehad, Mahmood

    This thesis is devoted to the numerical investigation of mechanical behavior of Dual phase (DP) steels. Such grade of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) is favorable to the automotive industry due the unique properties such as high strength and ductility with low finished cost. Many experimental and numerical studies have been done to achieve the optimized behavior of DP steels by controlling their microstructure. Experiments are costly and time consuming so in recent years numerical tools are utilized to help the metallurgist before doing experiments. Most of the numerical studies are based on classical (local) constitutive models where no material length scale parameters are incorporated in the model. Although these models are proved to be very effective in modeling the material behavior in the large scales but they fail to address some critical phenomena which are important for our goals. First, they fail to address the size effect phenomena which materials show at microstructural scale. This means that materials show stronger behavior at small scales compared to large scales. Another issue with classical models is the mesh size dependency in modeling the softening behavior of materials. This means that in the finite element context (FEM) the results will be mesh size dependent and no converged solution exist upon mesh refinement. Thereby by applying the classical (local) models one my loose the accuracy on measuring the strength and ductility of DP steels. Among the non-classical (nonlocal) models, gradient-enhanced plasticity models which consider the effect of neighboring point on the behavior of one specific point are proved to be numerically effective and versatile tools to accomplish the two concerns mentioned above. So in this thesis a gradient-enhanced plasticity model which incorporates both the energetic and dissipative material length scales is derived based on the laws of thermodynamics. This model also has a consistent yield-like function for the

  12. Wear resistance improvement of a commercially pure titanium by high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong; Wang, Xiaoying; Li, Fangfang; Xiao, Hong

    2017-03-01

    A commercially pure titanium was selected as target material and treated by high current pulsed electron beam. The phase and structure changes occurring in the modified surface layers were observed with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The increase in the wear resistance was observed for the pure titanium samples after pulsed electron beam surface melting. The mechanism for wear resistance modification was discussed. The results indicated that the presence of ultrafine martensite and defects in the treated surface layer were key factors for the improvement of the wear properties of pure titanium treated by high current pulsed beam treatment.

  13. SRRC/ANL high current l-band single cell photocathode rf gun.

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C. H.

    1998-07-16

    A high current L-band photocathode rf gun is under development at SRRC (Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Taiwan) in collaboration with ANL (Argonne National Laboratory, USA). The goal is to produce up to 100 nC charge with the surface field gradient of over 90 MV/m at the center of the photocathode. In this report, they present the detailed design and initial test results. If successful, this gun will be used as the future AWA (Argonne Wakefield Accelerator)[1] high current gun.

  14. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Y; Kiyama, S; Fujiwara, Y; Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm(2)) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E(ib) ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E(ib) is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  15. An annular high-current electron beam with an energy spread in a coaxial magnetically insulated diode

    SciTech Connect

    Grishkov, A. A. Pegel, I. V.

    2013-11-15

    An elementary theory of an annular high-current electron beam in a uniform transport channel and a coaxial magnetically insulated diode is generalized to the case of counterpropagating electron beams with a spread over kinetic energies. Expressions for the sum of the absolute values of the forward and backward currents in a uniform transport channel and for the flux of the longitudinal component of the generalized momentum in a coaxial magnetically insulated diode as functions of the maximum electron kinetic energy are derived for different values of the relative width of the energy distribution function. It is shown that, in a diode with an expanding transport channel and a virtual cathode limiting the extracted current, counterpropagating particle flows are established between the cathode and the virtual cathode within a certain time interval after the beginning of electron emission. The accumulation of electrons in these flows is accompanied by an increase in their spread over kinetic energies and the simultaneous decrease in the maximum kinetic energy. The developed model agrees with the results of particle-in-cell simulations performed using the KARAT and OOPIC-Pro codes.

  16. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Y. E-mail: hirano.yoichi@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2015-11-15

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm{sup 2}) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E{sub ib} ≈ 150–200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E{sub ib} is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  17. Quench protection and design of large high-current-density superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1981-03-01

    Although most large superconducting magnets have been designed using the concept of cryostability, there is increased need for large magnets which operate at current densities above the cryostable limit (greater than 10/sup 8/ Am/sup -2/). Large high current density superconducting magnets are chosen for the following reasons: reduced mass, reduced coil thickness or size, and reduced cost. The design of large high current density, adiabatically stable, superconducting magnets requires a very different set of design rules than either large cryostable superconducting magnets or small self-protected high current density magnets. The problems associated with large high current density superconducting magnets fall into three categories; (a) quench protection, (b) stress and training, and (c) cryogenic design. The three categories must be considered simultaneously. The paper discusses quench protection and its implication for magnets of large stored energies (this includes strings of smaller magnets). Training and its relationship to quench protection and magnetic strain are discussed. Examples of magnets, built at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and elsewhere using the design guidelines given in this report, are presented.

  18. High current electric arcs above the In-Ga-Sn eutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementyeva, I. B.; Pinchuk, M. E.

    2016-11-01

    The results of investigations of high-current dc and ac arc discharges of atmospheric pressure emerging above the free surface of liquid metal (In-Ga-Sn eutectic alloy) are presented in the paper. The mechanism of the arc formation due to pinch-effect is discussed here.

  19. Westinghouse advanced particle filter system

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Sanjana, Z.N.; Newby, R.A.

    1994-10-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) are being developed and demonstrated for commercial, power generation application. Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful implementation of IGCC and PFBC in power generation gas turbine cycles. The objective of this work is to develop and qualify through analysis and testing a practical hot gas ceramic barrier filter system that meets the performance and operational requirements of PFBC and IGCC systems. This paper updates the assessment of the Westinghouse hot gas filter design based on ongoing testing and analysis. Results are summarized from recent computational fluid dynamics modeling of the plenum flow during back pulse, analysis of candle stressing under cleaning and process transient conditions and testing and analysis to evaluate potential flow induced candle vibration.

  20. Investigations of a high current linear aperture radial multichannel pseudospark switch.

    PubMed

    Lamba, R P; Pathania, V; Meena, B L; Rahaman, H; Pal, U N; Prakash, Ram

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a high current linear aperture radial multichannel Pseudospark switch (LARM-PSS) is reported which has been analyzed for its high current characteristics. In order to enhance hold-off voltage and support hollow cathode effect for the ignition of the discharge in this configuration, the field penetration analysis through circular and linear apertures of the electrodes has been carried out. The linear apertures in the electrodes increase the current handling capacity than that of circular aperture electrodes without significant compromise of the hold-off capacity. The developed LARM-PSS switch is capable to hold voltage up to 25 kV at gas pressure between 10 and 50 Pa for hydrogen. The switch has been operated using a 800 nF capacitor bank and conducted an effective charge up to 1.5 C with peak switch current ∼20 kA at applied voltage 19 kV.

  1. Status of high current ion source operation at the GSI accelerator facility.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, R; Galonska, M; Gutermuth, B; Heymach, F; Krichbaum, H; Leible, K-D; Ochs, K; Schäffer, P; Schäffer, S; Spädtke, P; Stork, M; Wesp, A; Mayr, R

    2008-02-01

    Vacuum arc ion sources, Penning ion sources, and filament driven multicusp ion sources are used for the production of high current ion beams of a variety of metallic and gaseous ions at the GSI accelerator facility. For accelerator operation, the ion sources have to provide a stable beam over a long period of time with an energy of 2.2 keV/u and a maximum mass over charge ratio of 65. The status of beam time operation at the high current injector is presented here giving an outline on important ion source data, such as ion beam current, ion beam spectrum, transversal emittance, life time, duty factor, and transmission along the low energy beam transport section.

  2. Status of high current ion source operation at the GSI accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, R.; Galonska, M.; Gutermuth, B.; Heymach, F.; Krichbaum, H.; Leible, K.-D.; Ochs, K.; Schaeffer, P.; Schaeffer, S.; Spaedtke, P.; Stork, M.; Wesp, A.; Mayr, R.

    2008-02-15

    Vacuum arc ion sources, Penning ion sources, and filament driven multicusp ion sources are used for the production of high current ion beams of a variety of metallic and gaseous ions at the GSI accelerator facility. For accelerator operation, the ion sources have to provide a stable beam over a long period of time with an energy of 2.2 keV/u and a maximum mass over charge ratio of 65. The status of beam time operation at the high current injector is presented here giving an outline on important ion source data, such as ion beam current, ion beam spectrum, transversal emittance, life time, duty factor, and transmission along the low energy beam transport section.

  3. MIDOT: A novel probe for monitoring high-current flat transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, K.; Novac, B. M.; Graneau, N.; Senior, P.; Smith, I. R.; Sinclair, M.

    2016-12-01

    A novel inductive probe, termed MIDOT, was developed for monitoring high-current flat transmission lines. While being inexpensive the probe does not require calibration, is resistant to both shock waves and temperature variations, and it is easy to manufacture and mount. It generates strong output signals that are relatively easy to interpret and has a detection region limited to a pre-defined part of the transmission line. The theoretical background related to the MIDOT probes, together with their practical implementation in both preliminary experimentation and high-current tests, is also presented in the paper. The novel probe can be used to benchmark existing 2D numerical codes used in calculating the current distribution inside the conductors of a transmission line but can also easily detect an early movement of a transmission line component. The probe can also find other applications, such as locating the position of a pulsed current flowing through a thin wire.

  4. Status of high current ion source operation at the GSI accelerator facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, R.; Galonska, M.; Gutermuth, B.; Heymach, F.; Krichbaum, H.; Leible, K.-D.; Ochs, K.; Schäffer, P.; Schäffer, S.; Spädtke, P.; Stork, M.; Wesp, A.; Mayr, R.

    2008-02-01

    Vacuum arc ion sources, Penning ion sources, and filament driven multicusp ion sources are used for the production of high current ion beams of a variety of metallic and gaseous ions at the GSI accelerator facility. For accelerator operation, the ion sources have to provide a stable beam over a long period of time with an energy of 2.2keV/u and a maximum mass over charge ratio of 65. The status of beam time operation at the high current injector is presented here giving an outline on important ion source data, such as ion beam current, ion beam spectrum, transversal emittance, life time, duty factor, and transmission along the low energy beam transport section.

  5. Investigations of a high current linear aperture radial multichannel pseudospark switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamba, R. P.; Pathania, V.; Meena, B. L.; Rahaman, H.; Pal, U. N.; Prakash, Ram

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a high current linear aperture radial multichannel Pseudospark switch (LARM-PSS) is reported which has been analyzed for its high current characteristics. In order to enhance hold-off voltage and support hollow cathode effect for the ignition of the discharge in this configuration, the field penetration analysis through circular and linear apertures of the electrodes has been carried out. The linear apertures in the electrodes increase the current handling capacity than that of circular aperture electrodes without significant compromise of the hold-off capacity. The developed LARM-PSS switch is capable to hold voltage up to 25 kV at gas pressure between 10 and 50 Pa for hydrogen. The switch has been operated using a 800 nF capacitor bank and conducted an effective charge up to 1.5 C with peak switch current ˜20 kA at applied voltage 19 kV.

  6. A High-Gradient CW R Photo-Cathode Electron Gun for High Current Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer

    2005-05-01

    The paper describes the analysis and preliminary design of a high-gradient photo-cathode RF gun optimized for high current CW operation. The gun cell shape is optimized to provide maximum acceleration for the newly emitted beam while minimizing wall losses in the structure. The design is intended for use in future high-current high-power CW FELs but the shape optimization for low wall losses may be advantageous for other applications such as XFELs or Linear Colliders using high peak power low duty factor guns where pulse heating is a limitation. The concept allows for DC bias on the photocathode in order to repel ions and improve cathode lifetime.

  7. Large area polycrystalline diamond films as high current photocathodes for linear induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shurter, R.P.; Moir, D.C.; Devlin, D.J.; Springer, R.W.

    1997-08-01

    Investigations are underway at Los Alamos to develop a new generation of high current, low source temperature photo cathodes able to operate in vacuum environments with pressures above 10e-6 torr without poisoning or degradation of emission properties. Polycrystalline diamond films are emerging as the ideal material for these photocathodes. Robustness, high quantum efficiency and high thermal conductivity are fundamental necessary attributes that are found in diamond. The high electron/hole mobility in the boron doped diamond lattice and the ability to create a negative electron affinity surface through downward band bending allow for high current density emission with quantum efficiencies of 0.5% when illuminated by a ArF laser. We report the results to date toward the development of a four kiloampere photocathode with a source temperature below 5eV for the DARHT linear induction Accelerator

  8. Progress on the high-current 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Xu W.; Astefanous, C.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; et al

    2012-05-20

    The 704 MHz high current superconducting cavity has been designed with consideration of both performance of fundamental mode and damping of higher order modes. A copper prototype cavity was fabricated by AES and delivered to BNL. RF measurements were carried out on this prototype cavity, including fundamental pass-band and HOM spectrum measurements, HOM studies using bead-pull setup, prototyping of antenna-type HOM couplers. The measurements show that the cavity has very good damping for the higher-order modes, which was one of the main goals for the high current cavity design. 3D cavity models were simulated with Omega3P code developed by SLAC to compare with the measurements. The paper describes the cavity design, RF measurement setups and results for the copper prototype. The progress with the niobium cavity fabrication will also be described.

  9. Enhanced D-T supershot performance at high current using extensive lithium conditioning in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.K.; Strachan, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Scott, S.D.; Budny, R.; Bell, R.E.; Bitter, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.; Grek, B.

    1995-05-01

    A substantial improvement in supershot fusion plasma performance has been realized by combining the enhanced confinement due to tritium fueling with the enhanced confinement due to extensive Li conditioning of the TFTR limiter. This combination has resulted in not only significantly higher global energy confinement times than had previously been obtained in high current supershots, but also the highest ratio of central fusion output power to input power observed to date.

  10. Longitudinal and Transverse Instabilities in a High Current Modified Betatron Electron Accelerator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-17

    Conlinuod) image charges and currents on the toroidal chamber walls. The electron ring, which is assumed to have an energy spread, is taken to be located...We find an unstable hybrid mode of oscillation which is a coupled azimuthal and longitudinal mode and exists at beam energies below the transition... energy . The negative mass/kink instability associated with an ultra high current (I - 10 kA) modified beta- tron electron accelerator is analyzed and

  11. New computer control system for the high current ion implanter PR-80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunouchi, T.; Sasaki, M.; Sato, S.; Harada, M.

    1989-02-01

    For a current semiconductor fabrication line, an ion implanter should have the versatility to handle different types of process menus and it should be FA compatible. An optical loopway linked microprocessor control system has been developed for our high current ion implanter. The system is compatible with SECS-II, and its preventive maintenance program is a powerful tool for efficient operation of the implanter.

  12. Surface modification of structural materials by low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, A. V. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Kazachenok, M. S. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Sinyakova, E. A.; Borodovitsina, O. M.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2014-11-14

    Microstructure formation in surface layers of pure titanium and ferritic-martensitic steel subjected to electron beam treatment is studied. It is shown that low energy high-current pulsed electron beam irradiation leads to the martensite structure within the surface layer of pure titanium. Contrary, the columnar ferrite grains grow during solidification of ferritic-martensitic steel. The effect of electron beam energy density on the surface morphology and microstructure of the irradiated metals is demonstrated.

  13. Conversion of high explosive chemical energy into energy of powerful nanosecond high-current pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, K. V.; Mikhaylov, V. M.; Nesterov, E. V.; Stroganov, V. A.; Chernykh, E. V.

    2015-01-01

    This study is a contribution into the development of physicotechnical foundations for generation of powerful nanosecond high-current pulses on the basis of explosively driven magnetic flux compression generators. This problem is solved by using inductive storage of energy for matching comparatively low-voltage explosively driven magnetic flux compression generators and high-impedance loads; short forming lines and vacuum diodes. Experimental data of charging of forming lines are given.

  14. A mechanical connector design for high-current, high-coulomb pulsed power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Leighton, K.S.

    1992-02-25

    A technique to make reliable high-current, high-coulomb electrical contact was developed for transmitting power into railguns. The method uses spring loaded removable connectors that are installed independently from the launcher. The simple rod-type design and absence of fastener holes allow maximum utilization of material mechanical properties. Repeated experiments with 9.5-mm diameter connectors demonstrated reliable pulsed charge transfer of 200 coulombs at currents of over 400kA. 20 refs.

  15. Influence of the Thomson effect on the pulse heating of high-current electrical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkushev, A. G.; Pavleino, M. A.; Pavleino, O. M.; Pavlov, V. A.

    2014-09-01

    Pulse heating of high-current contacts is notable for the presence of considerable temperature gradients in the contact area, which cause the Thomson effect—the appearance of thermoelectric currents. The amount of this effect against conventional Joule heat release is quantitatively estimated. Pulse heating of electrical contacts is numerically simulated with the use of the Comsol program package. It is demonstrated that thermoelectric currents make a negligible contribution to heating in the case of copper contacts.

  16. High-power Čerenkov microwave oscillators utilizing High-Current nanosecond Electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, S. D.; Polevin, S. D.; Rostov, V. V.

    1996-12-01

    A short review is given of results obtained at the Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences on generating high-power microwave radiation. Most of the research was devoted to a study of stimulated Čerenkov radiation from relativistic electron beams. It is shown that the efficiency of a relativistic 3-cm backward wave tube with a nonuniform coupling resistance can reach 35%. High-frequency radiation was discovered in the emission spectrum of the Čerenkov oscillators and it was shown that the nature of the radiation was associated with the stimulated scattering of low-frequency radiation by the relativistic electrons. Radiation with a power of 500 MW was obtained in the 8-mm wavelength range using a two-beam Čerenkov oscillator. High-current pulse-periodic nanosecond accelerators with a charging device utilizing a Tesla transformer were used in the experiments. The possibility was demonstrated of generating high-power microwave radiation with a pulse-repetition frequency of up to 100 Hz. An average power of ˜500 W was achieved from the relativistic oscillators. A relativistic backward wave tube with a high-current electron beam was used to make a prototype nanosecond radar device. Some of the results presented were obtained jointly with the Russian Academy of Sciences Institute of Applied Physics. Questions concerning multiwave Čerenkov interaction are not considered in this paper.

  17. The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. , Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. , Tomsk, RUSSIA); Wakeland, Peter Eric; McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

    2010-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory.

  18. High Current Systems for HyperV and PLX Plasma Railguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Samuel; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Wu, Linchun; Elton, Raymond; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2010-11-01

    HyperV has been developing coaxial pulsed, plasma railgun accelerators for PLX and other high momentum plasma experiments. The full scale HyperV coaxial gun accelerates plasma armatures using a contoured electrode gap designed to mitigate the blow-by instability. Previous experiments with the full scale gun successfully formed and accelerated annular plasma armatures, but were limited to currents of up to only ˜400 kA. In order to increase full scale gun performance to the design goal of 200 μg at 200 km/s, the pulse forming networks required upgrading to support currents up to ˜1 MA. A high voltage, high current field-effect sparkgap switch and low inductance transmission line were designed and constructed to handle the increased current pulse. We will describe these systems and present initial test data from high current operation of the full-scale coax gun along with plans for future testing. Similar high current accelerator banks, switches, and TM lines will also be required to power PLX railguns which are planned to operate at 8000 μg at 50 km/s. The design of that experiment may require the capacitor banks to be located as much as 10 feet from the gun. We discuss the available options for low inductance connections for these systems.

  19. Optimization of the epitaxial design of high current density resonant tunneling diodes for terahertz emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Razvan; Stevens, Benjamin J.; Mukai, Toshikazu; Hogg, Richard A.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the numerical simulation of high current density InGaAs/AlAs/InP resonant tunneling diodes with a view to their optimization for application as THz emitters. We introduce a figure of merit based upon the ratio of maximum extractable THz power and the electrical power developed in the chip. The aim being to develop high efficiency emitters as output power is presently limited by catastrophic failure. A description of the interplay of key parameters follows, with constraints on strained layer epitaxy introduced. We propose an optimized structure utilizing thin barriers paired with a comparatively wide quantum well that satisfies strained layer epitaxy constraints.

  20. Methods of high current magnetic field generator for transcranial magnetic stimulation application

    SciTech Connect

    Bouda, N. R. Pritchard, J.; Weber, R. J.; Mina, M.

    2015-05-07

    This paper describes the design procedures and underlying concepts of a novel High Current Magnetic Field Generator (HCMFG) with adjustable pulse width for transcranial magnetic stimulation applications. This is achieved by utilizing two different switching devices, the MOSFET and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Results indicate that currents as high as ±1200 A can be generated with inputs of +/−20 V. Special attention to tradeoffs between field generators utilizing IGBT circuits (HCMFG{sub 1}) and MOSFET circuits (HCMFG{sub 2}) was considered. The theory of operation, design, experimental results, and electronic setup are presented and analyzed.

  1. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, A.; Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Saini, A.; Solyak, N.; Yostrikov, A.

    2012-09-01

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  2. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, Alexander; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Gonin, Ivan; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Lunin, Andrei; Saini, Arun; Solyak, Nikolay; Vostrikov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  3. ACCELERATORS: Design and simulation of a beam position monitor for the high current proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Yu-Fang; Xu, Tao-Guang; Fu, Shi-Nian

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, the 2-D electrostatic field software, POISSON, is used to calculate the characteristic impedance of a BPM (beam position monitor) for a high current proton linac. Furthermore, the time-domain 3-D module of MAFIA with a beam microbunch at a varying offset from the axis is used to compute the induced voltage on the electrodes as a function of time. Finally, the effect of low β beams on the induced voltage, the sensitivity and the signal dynamic range of the BPM are discussed.

  4. Beamline considerations for a compact, high current, high power linear RF electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Marder, B.

    1987-06-01

    A design for a compact, high current, high power linear electron accelerator using an rf power source is investigated. It consists of adjacent cavities into which rf power is injected and through which electron pulses pass. The source is assumed to be capable of delivering sufficient rf power to the desired location at the proper phase. Beamline issues such as cavity loading, energy extraction, longitudinal and transverse pulse focusing, and beam breakup are considered. A device which, given the required source, can deliver beam parameters comparable to existing induction accelerators but which is more than an order of magnitude smaller appears feasible.

  5. Efficiency of pulse high-current generator energy transfer into plasma liner energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    The efficiency of capacitor-bank energy transfer from a high-current pulse generator into kinetic energy of a plasma liner has been analyzed. The analysis was performed using a model including the circuit equations and equations of the cylindrical shell motion. High efficiency of the energy transfer into kinetic energy of the liner is shown to be achieved only by a low-inductance generator. We considered an "ideal" liner load in which the load current is close to zero in the final of the shell compression. This load provides a high (up to 80%) efficiency of energy transfer and higher stability when compressing the liner.

  6. High current Cu3P liquid metal ion source using a novel extractor configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi-Rusli, R. H.; Corelli, J. C.

    1987-12-01

    It has been found that by utilizing a sharp needle for the extractor electrode in close proximity to the source tip wetted with Cu3P liquid alloy, a large increase (factor ˜300) in ion current is observed in comparison to standard liquid metal ion sources (LMIS's). In standard previously used LMIS's the extractor electrode was a flat plane with a circular hole centered on the source needle tip. This new high current source has important applications in focused and broad ion beam deposition systems.

  7. Methods of high current magnetic field generator for transcranial magnetic stimulation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouda, N. R.; Pritchard, J.; Weber, R. J.; Mina, M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the design procedures and underlying concepts of a novel High Current Magnetic Field Generator (HCMFG) with adjustable pulse width for transcranial magnetic stimulation applications. This is achieved by utilizing two different switching devices, the MOSFET and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Results indicate that currents as high as ±1200 A can be generated with inputs of +/-20 V. Special attention to tradeoffs between field generators utilizing IGBT circuits (HCMFG1) and MOSFET circuits (HCMFG2) was considered. The theory of operation, design, experimental results, and electronic setup are presented and analyzed.

  8. Productivity Improvement for the SHX--SEN's Single-Wafer High-Current Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Ninomiya, Shiro; Ochi, Akihiro; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Yumiyama, Toshio; Kudo, Tetsuya; Kurose, Takeshi; Kariya, Hiroyuki; Tsukihara, Mitsukuni; Ishikawa, Koji; Ueno, Kazuyoshi

    2011-01-07

    Equipment productivity is a critical issue for device fabrication. For ion implantation, productivity is determined both by ion current at the wafer and by utilization efficiency of the ion beam. Such improvements not only result in higher fabrication efficiency but also reduce consumption of both electrical power and process gases. For high-current ion implanters, reduction of implant area is a key factor to increase efficiency. SEN has developed the SAVING system (Scanning Area Variation Implantation with Narrower Geometrical pattern) to address this opportunity. In this paper, three variations of the SAVING system are introduced along with discussion of their effects on fab productivity.

  9. Modelling of a high-current magnetron discharge in a plasma electron emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovichenko, S. Yu; Kostrin, D. K.; Lisenkov, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    An analytical model of a high-current form of a low-pressure glow discharge in an inverted cylindrical magnetron, which performs the function of plasma electron emitter, is shown. Were found conditions of the discharge self-sustaining, allowing to estimate the voltage of the discharge and determine the critical value of the magnetic field and residual gas pressure below which the existence of this type of discharge is impossible. A comparison of the calculated discharge characteristics with experimental data obtained on the setup for studying the emission properties of the magnetron discharge was carried out.

  10. High-current lanthanum-hexaboride electron emitter for a quasi-stationary arc plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V. I. Ivanov, A. A. Shul’zhenko, G. I.

    2015-11-15

    A high-current electron emitter on the basis of lanthanum hexaboride is developed for quasi-stationary arc plasma generators of ion sources. The emitter consists of a set of LaB{sub 6} washers interleaved with washers made of thermally extended graphite. The emitter is heated by the current flowing through the graphite washers. The thermal regime of emitter operation during plasma generation is considered. The emitter has been successfully used in the ion sources of the diagnostic injectors of fast hydrogen atomic beams.

  11. High-field, high-current-density, stable superconducting magnets for fusion machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Lubell, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Designs for large fusion machines require high-performance superconducting magnets to reduce cost or increase machine performance. By employing force-flow cooling, cable-in-conduit conductor configuration, and NbTi superconductor, it is now possible to design superconducting magnets that operate a high fields (8-12 T) with high current densities (5-15 kA/cm/sup 2/ over the winding pack) in a stable manner. High current density leads to smaller, lighter, and thus less expensive coils. The force-flow cooling provides confined helium, full conductor insulation, and a rigid winding pack for better load distribution. The cable-in-conduit conductor configuration ensures a high stability margin for the magnet. The NbTi superconductor has reached a good engineering material standard. Its strain-insensitive critical parameters are particularly suitable for complex coil windings of a stellarator machine. The optimization procedure for such a conductor design, developed over the past decade, is summarized here. If desired a magnet built on the principles outlines in this paper can be extended to a field higher than the design value without degrading its stability by simply lowering the operating temperature below 4.2 K. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Development and Testing of High Current Hollow Cathodes for High Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Van Noord, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist In-Space Propulsion project is sponsoring the testing and development of high power Hall thrusters for implementation in NASA missions. As part of the project, NASA Glenn Research Center is developing and testing new high current hollow cathode assemblies that can meet and exceed the required discharge current and life-time requirements of high power Hall thrusters. This paper presents test results of three high current hollow cathode configurations. Test results indicated that two novel emitter configurations were able to attain lower peak emitter temperatures compared to state-of-the-art emitter configurations. One hollow cathode configuration attained a cathode orifice plate tip temperature of 1132 degC at a discharge current of 100 A. More specifically, test and analysis results indicated that a novel emitter configuration had minimal temperature gradient along its length. Future work will include cathode wear tests, and internal emitter temperature and plasma properties measurements along with detailed physics based modeling.

  13. Characterisation of high current density resonant tunneling diodes for THz emission using photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Kristof J. P.; Baba, Razvan; Stevens, Benjamin J.; Mukai, Toshikazu; Ohnishi, Dai; Hogg, Richard A.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) provide high speed current oscillation which is applicable to THz generation when coupled to a suitably designed antenna. For this purpose, the InGaAs/AlAs/InP materials have been used, as this system offers high electron mobility, suitable band-offsets, and low resistance contacts. However for high current density operation (~MA/cm2) the epitaxial structure is challenging to characterize using conventional techniques as it consists of a single, very thin AlAs/InGaAs quantum well (QW). Here, we present a detailed low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopic study of high current density RTDs that allow the non-destructive mapping of a range of critical parameters for the device. We show how the doping level of the emitter/collector and contact layers in the RTD structure can be measured using the Moss-Burstein effect. For the full device structure, we show how emission from the QW may be identified, and detail how the emission changes with differing indium composition and well widths. We show that by studying nominally identical, un-doped structures, a type-II QW emission is observed, and explain the origin of the type-I emission in doped devices. This observation opens the way for a new characterization scheme where a "dummy" RTD active element is incorporated below the real RTD structure. This structure allows significantly greater control in the epitaxial process.

  14. R & D on Very-High-Current Superconducting Proton Linac, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2013-03-31

    The aim of this R&D project was to develop a superconducting cavity for a very-­ high-current proton accelerator. The particular application motivating the proposal was a LHC upgrade called the Superconducting Proton Linac, or SPL. Under the grant awarded to Stony Brook University the cavity was designed, a prototype copper cavity, followed by the niobium cavity, were built. A new set of HOM dampers was developed. The cavity has outstanding RF performance parameters – low surface fields, low power loss and all HOMs are fully damped. In fact, it is a “universal cavity” in the sense that it is suited for the acceleration of high-­current protons and well as high current electrons. Its damping of HOM modes is so good that it can see service in a multi-pass linac or an Energy Recovery Linac in addition to the easier service in a single-pass linac. Extensive measurements were made on the cavities and couplers, with the exception of the cold test of the niobium cavity. At the time of this report the cavity has been chemically processed and is ready for vertical testing which will be carried out shortly.

  15. Progress and future developments of high current ion source for neutral beam injector in the ASIPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Liu, Zhimin; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Sheng, Peng; Jiang, Caichao

    2015-04-01

    A high current hot cathode bucket ion source, which based on the US long pulse ion source is developed in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The ion source consists of a bucket plasma generator with multi-pole cusp fields and a set of tetrode accelerator with slit apertures. So far, four ion sources are developed and conditioned on the ion source test bed. 4 MW hydrogen beam with beam energy of 80 keV is extracted. In Aug. 2013, EAST NBI 1 with two ion source installed on the EAST, and achieved H-mode plasma with NBI injection for the first time. In order to achieve stable long pulse operation of high current ion source and negative ion source research, the RF ion source with 200 mm diameter and 120 mm depth driver is designed and developed. The first RF plasma generated with 2 kW power of 1 MHz frequency. More of the RF plasma tests and negative source relative research need to do in the future.

  16. Aperture Test for Internal Target Operation in the JLAB High-current ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-01

    A high current beam transmission test has been successfully completed at the JLAB FEL Facility, culminating in very low-loss transmission of a high current CW beam through a small aperture. The purpose of this test was to determine if an ERL is capable of meeting the stringent requirements imposed by the use of a 1018/cm3 internal gas target proposed for the DarkLight experiment*. Minimal beamline modifications were made to create a machine configuration that is substantially different from those used in routine UV or IR FEL operation. A sustained (8 hour) high power beam run was performed, with clean transmission through a 2 mm transverse aperture of 127 mm length simulating the target configuration. A beam size of 50 um (rms) was measured near the center of the aperture. Experimental data from a week-long test run consistently exhibited beam loss of only a few ppm on the aperture while running 4.5 mA current at 100 MeV -- or nearly 0.5 MW beam power. This surpassed the users? expectation and demonstrated a unique capability of an ERL for this type of experiments. This report presents a summary of the experiment, a brief overview of our activities, and outlines future plans.

  17. REVIEW OF VARIOUS APPROACHES TO ADDRESS HIGH CURRENTS IN SRF ELECTRON LINACS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.

    2005-07-10

    The combination of high-brightness electron sources and high-current SRF Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) leads to a new emerging technology: High-power, high-brightness electron beams. This technology enables extremely high average power Free-Electron Lasers, a new generation of extreme brightness light sources, electron coolers of high-energy hadron storage rings, polarized electron-hadron colliders of very high luminosity, compact Thomson scattering X-ray sources, terahertz radiation generators and much more. What is typical for many of these applications is the need for very high current, defined here as over 100 mA average current, and high brightness, which is charge dependant, but needs to be in the range of between sub micron up to perhaps 50 microns, usually the lower--the better. Suffice it to say that while there are a number of projects aiming at this level of performance, none is anywhere near it. This work will review the problems associated with the achievement of such performance and the various approaches taken in a number of laboratories around the world to address the issues.

  18. Progress and future developments of high current ion source for neutral beam injector in the ASIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Liu, Zhimin; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Sheng, Peng; Jiang, Caichao

    2015-04-08

    A high current hot cathode bucket ion source, which based on the US long pulse ion source is developed in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The ion source consists of a bucket plasma generator with multi-pole cusp fields and a set of tetrode accelerator with slit apertures. So far, four ion sources are developed and conditioned on the ion source test bed. 4 MW hydrogen beam with beam energy of 80 keV is extracted. In Aug. 2013, EAST NBI 1 with two ion source installed on the EAST, and achieved H-mode plasma with NBI injection for the first time. In order to achieve stable long pulse operation of high current ion source and negative ion source research, the RF ion source with 200 mm diameter and 120 mm depth driver is designed and developed. The first RF plasma generated with 2 kW power of 1 MHz frequency. More of the RF plasma tests and negative source relative research need to do in the future.

  19. Gyrotron-driven high current ECR ion source for boron-neutron capture therapy neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Sidorov, A.; Maslennikova, A.; Volovecky, A.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O.

    2014-12-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a perspective treatment method for radiation resistant tumors. Unfortunately its development is strongly held back by a several physical and medical problems. Neutron sources for BNCT currently are limited to nuclear reactors and accelerators. For wide spread of BNCT investigations more compact and cheap neutron source would be much more preferable. In present paper an approach for compact D-D neutron generator creation based on a high current ECR ion source is suggested. Results on dense proton beams production are presented. A possibility of ion beams formation with current density up to 600 mA/cm2 is demonstrated. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron target bombarded by such deuteron beams would theoretically yield a neutron flux density up to 6·1010 cm-2/s. Thus, neutron generator based on a high-current deuteron ECR source with a powerful plasma heating by gyrotron radiation could fulfill the BNCT requirements significantly lower price, smaller size and ease of operation in comparison with existing reactors and accelerators.

  20. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Alexander, Joshua B.; Cardenas, Henry E.; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    2008-01-01

    This work examines field performance of nanoscale pozzolan treatments delivered el ctrokinetically to suppress chloride induced corrosion of concrete reinforcement. The particles are 20 nm silica spheres coated with 2 nm alumina particles that carry a net positive charge. Earlier work demonstrated that the alumina particles were stripped from the silica carriers and formed a dense phase with an interparticle spacing that is small enough to inhibit the transport of solvated chlorides. A D.C. field was used to inject the particles into the pores of concrete specimens, directly toward the mild steel bars that were embedded within each 3 inch diameter by 6 inch length concrete specimen. The voltage was held constant at 25 v per inch of concrete cover for a period of 7 days. These voltages permitted current densities as high as 3 A/sq m. During the final 3 days, a 1 molar solution of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate was used to provide a source of calcium to facilitate stronger and more densified phase formation within the pores. In a departure from prior work the particle treatments were started concurrent with chloride extraction in order to determine if particle delivery would inhibit chloride transport. Following treatment the specimens were immersed in seawater for 4 weeks. After this posttreatment exposure, the specimens were tested for tensile strength and the steel reinforcement was examined for evidence of corrosion. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted to assess impact on microstructure.

  1. Particle Accelerators in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  2. Development and fabrication of low ON resistance high current vertical VMOS power FETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, S.

    1979-01-01

    The design of a VMOS Power FET exhibiting low ON resistance, high current as well as high breakdown voltage and fast switching speeds is described. The design which is based on a 1st-order device model, features a novel polysilicon-gate structure and fieldplated groove termination to achieve high packing density and high breakdown voltage, respectively. One test chip, named VNTKI, can block 180 V at an ON resistence of 2.5 ohm. A 150 mil x 200 mil (.19 sq cm) experimental chip has demonstrated a breakdown voltage of 200v, an ON resistance of 0.12 ohm, a switching time of less than 100 ns, and a pulse drain - current of 50 A with 10 V gate drive.

  3. Optimal conditions for high current proton irradiations at the university of Wisconsin's ion beam laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetteland, C. J.; Field, K. G.; Eiden, T. J.; Gerczak, T. J.; Maier, B. R.; Albakri, O.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-04-01

    The National Electrostatics Corporation's (NEC) Toroidal Volume Ion Source (TORVIS) source is known for exceptionally high proton currents with minimal service downtime as compared to traditional sputter sources. It has been possible to obtain over 150μA of proton current from the source, with over 70μA on the target stage. However, beam fluxes above ˜1×1017/m2-s may have many undesirable effects, especially for insulators. This may include high temperature gradients at the surface, sputtering, surface discharge, cracking or even disintegration of the sample. A series of experiments were conducted to examine the role of high current fluxes in a suite of ceramics and insulating materials. Results will show the optimal proton irradiation conditions and target mounting strategies needed to minimize unwanted macro-scale damage, while developing a procedure for conducting preliminary radiation experiments.

  4. Evidence for large-area superemission into a high-current glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, W.; Dominic, V.; Kirkman, G. F.; Gundersen, M. A.

    1988-10-01

    This letter presents evidence for large-area (≊1 cm2) cathode superemission (˜10 000 A/cm2) into a high-current glow discharge in a pseudospark or back lighted thyratron switch. Cathodes studied with a scannning electron microscope following operation at 6-8 kA, ≊1 μs pulse length, and 105 pulses in a low-pressure H2 discharge show evidence of melting of a thin surface layer within a radius of ˜4 mm, indicating that the discharge is a superdense glow with a cross-sectional area of the order of 1 cm2, rather than an arc. Further supporting evidence is provided by streak camera data. An ion beam present during the avalanche phase of the discharge is responsible for heating the cathode surface resulting in a significant field-enhanced thermionic emission.

  5. A study of (cold fusion) in deuterated titanium subjected to high-current densities

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.B. ); Perkins, L.J. )

    1989-11-01

    In response to the startling announcement of fusion reactions occurring at room temperature by Fleischmann and Pons (F-P), the possible role of high-current densities in producing neutrons and excess heat in deuterated titanium maintained near ambient temperatures and pressures is examined. The apparatus used consists of a balanced resistive circuit containing a deuterated active element and a hydrogenated control element. The use of a simple electrical circuit (no electrolysis) with elements made of chemically stable TiD{sub x}, X = 0.9, removes the complications involved in distinguishing between heat released by chemical versus nuclear process in an electrolytic cell. In this paper, it is concluded that the large quantity of excess heat reported by Fleischmann and Pons is due to the presence of factors other than the current density.

  6. Highly efficient organic light-emitting devices beyond theoretical prediction under high current density.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaomiao; Luo, Jinsong; Liu, Xingyuan

    2009-11-23

    We develop a simple method to improve external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) of OLEDs under a wide range of current density. An insulating inorganic ultrathin layer (LiF) was sandwiched between exciton formation layer and electron transporting layer. A maximal EQE of 5.9% in a DCM based fluorescent OLED, which far exceeds the theoretical upper limit of 3.7%, was obtained under the current density of 487 mA/cm(2) with a brightness maximum of 76740 cd/m(2). The similar electroluminescence properties were also obtained in a C545T based green OLED using this method. The overall enhancement of EQE, and the nonlinear enhancement of EQE at high current density in these devices are attributed to the effect of electrical field on excitons.

  7. Enabling cost-effective high-current burst-mode operation in superconducting accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting (SC) accelerators are very efficient for CW or long-pulse operation, and normal conducting (NC) accelerators are cost effective for short-pulse operation. The addition of a short NC linac section to a SC linac can correct for the energy droop that occurs when pulsed high-current operation is required that exceeds the capability of the klystrons to replenish the cavity RF fields due to the long field fill-times of SC structures, or a requirement to support a broad range of beam currents results in variable beam loading. This paper describes the implementation of this technique to enable microseconds of high beam-current,more » 90 mA or more, in a 12 GeV SC long-pulse accelerator designed for the MaRIE 42-keV XFEL proposed for Los Alamos National Laboratory.« less

  8. High-Current Pulsed Electron Treatment of Hypoeutectic Al-10Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diankun, Lu; Bo, Gao; Guanglin, Zhu; Jike, Lv; Liang, Hu

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, an analysis of the effect of high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) on a hypoeutectic Al-10Si alloy. The Al-10Si alloy was treated by HCPEB in order to see the potential of this fairly recent technique in modifying its wear resistance. For the beam energy density of 3 J/cm2 used in the present work, the melting mode was operative and led to the formation of a "wavy" surface and the absence of mass primary Si phase and eutectic microstructure. The surface nanocrystallization of primary and eutectic Si phases led to the increase in macro-hardness of the top surface layer, and the wear resistance was drastically improved with a factor of 4.

  9. A new high current laboratory and pulsed homopolar generator power supply at the University of Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, J. E.; Aanstoos, T. A.

    1984-03-01

    The University of Texas at Austin is constructing a facility for research in pulse power technology for the Center for Electromechanics at the Balcones Research Center. The facility, designed to support high-current experiments, will be powered by six homopolar generators, each rated at 10 MJ and arranged to allow matching the requirements of resistive and inductive loads at various voltage and current combinations. Topics covered include the high bay, the power supply configuration and parameters, the speed and field control, and the magnetic circuit. Also considered are the removable air-cooled brushes, the water-cooled field coils, the hydraulic motor sizing and direct coupling, the low-impedance removable field coils, and the hydrostatic bearing design.

  10. High ion charge states in a high-current, short-pulse, vacuum ARC ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Brown, I.; MacGill, R.; Dickinson, M.

    1996-08-01

    Ions of the cathode material are formed at vacuum arc cathode spots and extracted by a grid system. The ion charge states (typically 1-4) depend on the cathode material and only little on the discharge current as long as the current is low. Here the authors report on experiments with short pulses (several {mu}s) and high currents (several kA); this regime of operation is thus approaching a more vacuum spark-like regime. Mean ion charge states of up to 6.2 for tungsten and 3.7 for titanium have been measured, with the corresponding maximum charge states of up to 8+ and 6+, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of Saha calculations and freezing of the charge state distribution.

  11. Anodic Oxidation of Carbon Steel at High Current Densities and Investigation of Its Corrosion Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Khan, Hamid Yazdani

    2017-02-01

    This work aims at studying the influence of high current densities on the anodization of carbon steel. Anodic protective coatings were prepared on carbon steel at current densities of 100, 125, and 150 A/dm2 followed by a final heat treatment. Coatings microstructures and morphologies were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The corrosion resistance of the uncoated carbon steel substrate and the anodic coatings were evaluated in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The results showed that the anodic oxide coatings which were prepared at higher current densities had thicker coatings as a result of a higher anodic forming voltage. Therefore, the anodized coatings showed better anti-corrosion properties compared to those obtained at lower current densities and the base metal.

  12. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration.

    PubMed

    Margarone, D; Krasa, J; Prokupek, J; Velyhan, A; Torrisi, L; Picciotto, A; Giuffrida, L; Gammino, S; Cirrone, P; Cutroneo, M; Romano, F; Serra, E; Mangione, A; Rosinski, M; Parys, P; Ryc, L; Limpouch, J; Laska, L; Jungwirth, K; Ullschmied, J; Mocek, T; Korn, G; Rus, B

    2012-02-01

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10(16)-10(19) W∕cm(2). The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  13. High current gain 4H-SiC bipolar junction transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yourun, Zhang; Jinfei, Shi; Ying, Liu; Chengchun, Sun; Fei, Guo; Bo, Zhang

    2016-04-01

    A novel 4H-SiC BJT of high current gain with a suppressing surface traps effect has been proposed. It is effective to improve the current gain due to the lower electrons density in the surface region by extending the emitter metal to overlap the passivation layer on the extrinsic base surface. The electrons trapped in the extrinsic base surface induce the degeneration of SiC BJTs device performance. By modulating the electron recombination rate, the novel structure can increase the current gain to 63.2% compared with conventional ones with the compatible process technology. Optimized sizes are an overlapped metal length of 4 μm, as well as an oxide layer thickness of 50 nm. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61306093, 61401075).

  14. Optimization of Superconducting Focusing Quadrupoles for the HighCurrent Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbi, GianLuca; Gourlay, Steve; Gung, Chen-yu; Hafalia, Ray; Lietzke, Alan; Martovetski, Nicolai; Mattafirri, Sara; Meinke, Rainer; Minervini, Joseph; Schultz, Joel; Seidl, Peter

    2005-09-16

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program is progressing through a series of physics and technology demonstrations leading to an inertial fusion power plant. The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physics of intense beams with high line-charge density. Superconducting focusing quadrupoles have been developed for the HCX magnetic transport studies. A baseline design was selected following several pre-series models. Optimization of the baseline design led to the development of a first prototype that achieved a conductor-limited gradient of 132 T/m in a 70 mm bore, without training, with measured field errors at the 0.1% level. Based on these results, the magnet geometry and fabrication procedures were adjusted to improve the field quality. These modifications were implemented in a second prototype. In this paper, the optimized design is presented and comparisons between the design harmonics and magnetic measurements performed on the new prototype are discussed.

  15. The GSI 36 MHz high-current IH-type RFQ and HIIF-relevant extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratzinger, U.; Kaspar, K.; Malwitz, E.; Minaev, S.; Tiede, R.

    The GSI High-Current Injector linac for ions with mass to charge ratios up to 65 and beam intensities up to 16 mA is under construction and will deliver beam in 1999. The first section of that linac is a 36 MHz RFQ cavity with a total length of 9.2 m and an energy range from 2.2 to 120 keV/u. It will be the first RFQ in H110-mode operation. The advantages of that RF structure for the acceleration of very heavy ion beams are outlined. MAFIA calculations are compared with the results from bead pull measurements of the completed cavity. Possible extensions of that type of RF structure towards a multibeam cavity are discussed.

  16. Switch contact device for interrupting high current, high voltage, AC and DC circuits

    DOEpatents

    Via, Lester C.; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Ryan, John M.

    2005-01-04

    A high voltage switch contact structure capable of interrupting high voltage, high current AC and DC circuits. The contact structure confines the arc created when contacts open to the thin area between two insulating surfaces in intimate contact. This forces the arc into the shape of a thin sheet which loses heat energy far more rapidly than an arc column having a circular cross-section. These high heat losses require a dramatic increase in the voltage required to maintain the arc, thus extinguishing it when the required voltage exceeds the available voltage. The arc extinguishing process with this invention is not dependent on the occurrence of a current zero crossing and, consequently, is capable of rapidly interrupting both AC and DC circuits. The contact structure achieves its high performance without the use of sulfur hexafluoride.

  17. A high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet and its beam emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Zeen; Tan Xinjian; Du Hongxin; Luo Ben; Liu Zhanwen

    2008-07-15

    The progress of a 2.45 GHz high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet for T(d,n){sup 4}He reaction neutron generator is reported in this paper. At 600 W microwave power and 22 kV extraction voltage, 90 mA peak hydrogen ion beam is extracted from a single aperture of 6 mm diameter. The beam emittance is measured using a simplified pepper-pot method. The (x,x{sup '}) emittance and the (y,y{sup '}) emittance for 14 keV hydrogen ion beam are 55.3{pi} and 58.2{pi} mm mrad, respectively. The normalized emittances are 0.302{pi} and 0.317{pi} mm mrad, respectively.

  18. High current density and low turn-on field from aligned Cd(OH)2 nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagal, Vivekanand S.; Patil, Girish P.; Deore, Amol B.; Baviskar, Prashant K.; Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; More, Mahendra A.; Chavan, Padmakar G.

    2016-04-01

    High current density of 9.8 mA/cm2 was drawn at an applied field of 4.1 V/μm from aligned Cd(OH)2 nanosheets and low turn-on field of 1.4 V/μm was found for the emission current density of 10 μA/cm2. The aligned Cd(OH)2 nanosheets were synthesized by CBD technique on Cadmium foil. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the field emission studies of Cd(OH)2 nanosheets. Simple synthesis route coupled with superior field emission properties indicate the possible use of Cd(OH)2 nanosheets for micro/nanoelectronic devices.

  19. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven accelerationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Krasa, J.; Prokupek, J.; Velyhan, A.; Torrisi, L.; Picciotto, A.; Giuffrida, L.; Gammino, S.; Cirrone, P.; Cutroneo, M.; Romano, F.; Serra, E.; Mangione, A.; Rosinski, M.; Parys, P.; Ryc, L.; Limpouch, J.; Laska, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Ullschmied, J.; Mocek, T.; Korn, G.; Rus, B.

    2012-02-01

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 1016-1019 W/cm2. The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  20. A diagnostic system for electrical faults in a high current discharge plasma setup.

    PubMed

    Nigam, S; Aneesh, K; Navathe, C P; Gupta, P D

    2011-02-01

    A diagnostic system to detect electrical faults inside a coaxial high current discharge device is presented here. This technique utilizes two biconical antennas picking up electromagnetic radiation from the discharge device, a voltage divider sensing input voltage, and a Rogowski coil measuring the main discharge current. A computer program then analyses frequency components in these signals and provides information as to whether the discharge event was normal or any breakdown fault occurred inside the coaxial device. The diagnostic system is developed for a 450 kV and 50 kA capillary discharge plasma setup. For the setup various possible faults are analyzed by electrical simulation, followed by experimental results. In the case of normal discharge through the capillary load the dominant frequency is ∼4 MHz. Under faulty conditions, the peak in magnitude versus frequency plot of the antenna signal changes according to the fault position which involves different paths causing variation in the equivalent circuit elements.

  1. Update on the high-current injector for the Stanford Linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.B.; Clendenin, J.E.; Ecklund, S.D.; Miller, R.H.; Sheppard, J.C.; Sinclair, C.K.; Sodja, J.

    1983-03-01

    The high current injector has become operational. There are two crucial areas where improvements must be made to meet collider specifications: while the injector can produce up to 10/sup 11/ e/sup -/ in a single S-band bucket, initially much of this charge was captured in a low energy tail and was this not suitable for transport through the accelerator and injection into the damping ring. Pulse to pulse position jitter has been observed, resulting in transverse wake field which increases beam emittance. The problems described above contribute to substantial current loss during transport from the injector (40 MeV) to the SLC damping ring (1.2 GeV). Experimental studies are continuing with the aim of understanding and improving beam characteristics including bunch length, pulse to pulse stability and emittance. The present status of these studies is reported.

  2. Superconducting Accelerating Structure for High-Current Cyclotrons for Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Nathaniel; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2011-10-01

    An accelerator driven molten salt fission core is being designed to provide reliable power by subcritical nuclear fission for the next few millennia. Fission is driven by proton beams from a flux-coupled stack of three high-current cyclotrons. A key innovation in attaining the needed beam current and efficiency is a superconducting Niobium rf accelerating cavity that can accelerate bunches in the 200 orbits uniformly. The unique design allows for several cavities to be stacked, and also provides uniform acceleration and eliminates higher order modes in the cyclotron. The design and properties of the superconducting cavity will increase the efficiency of the cyclotron and the overall energy amplification from the molten salt core by an order of magnitude compared to conventional designs.

  3. Mechanisms of microstructure formations in M50 steel melted layer by high current pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guangze; Xu, Fangjun; Fan, Guohua; Ma, Xinxin; Wang, Liqin

    2012-10-01

    In the present paper, surface melting of the M50 steel was carried out by high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB). The microstructure evolution in the melted layer was observed using TEM. It is confirmed that the dissolution of the carbides and the diffusion of alloy elements play a determining role on the microstructure evolution. After one pulse irradiation, a mixture of twinned martensite and irregular cellular domains of austenite is observed in the melted layer due to the insufficient diffusion of alloy elements around initial carbides. The zone around initial carbides with high alloy elements content keeps as residual austenite, the zone with low alloy elements content transform into twinned martensite. When the irradiation number increases to 30 pulses, the alloy elements will diffuse into the whole melted layer. And the melted layer consists completely of cellular austenite grains with a diameter of about 150 nm. The boundary between austenite grains is amorphous structure with little higher alloy elements content.

  4. Drift distance survey in direct plasma injection scheme for high current beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.; Kondo, K.; Tamura, J.; Kashiwagi, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2010-02-15

    In a laser ion source, plasma drift distance is one of the most important design parameters. Ion current density and beam pulse width are defined by plasma drift distance between a laser target and beam extraction position. In direct plasma injection scheme, which uses a laser ion source and a radio frequency quadrupole linac, we can apply relatively higher electric field at beam extraction due to the unique shape of a positively biased electrode. However, when we aim at very high current acceleration such as several tens of milliamperes, we observed mismatched beam extraction conditions. We tested three different ion current at ion extraction region by changing plasma drift distance to study better extraction condition. In this experiment, C{sup 6+} beam was accelerated. We confirmed that matching condition can be improved by controlling plasma drift distance.

  5. Electro-mechanical properties of composite materials for high-current contact applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaćimović, J.; Felberbaum, L.; Giannini, E.; Teyssier, J.

    2014-03-01

    We report a detailed study that compares various composite materials (CM): Ag/ZnO, Ag/SnO2, Ag/C, Ag/WC, Ag/WC-C and Ag/Ni used in high-current dc circuit breaker applications. Their structural, mechanical, electrical and wetting properties were investigated. In parallel, switching operation tests on the same compounds were performed on commercial high-speed circuit breakers under real conditions (30 kA-900 V). A correlation between the microscopic variables and switching performances of the CMs was established. Materials like Ag/WC and Ag/WC-C were found to be unsuitable for the reliable functionality of the device. In contrast, Ag/C and Ag/SnO2 materials with high electrical and high thermal conductivity revealed remarkably good behaviour during switching operation tests.

  6. Mathematical modeling of SF{sub 6} puffer circuit breakers. 1: High current region

    SciTech Connect

    Park, K.Y.; Fang, M.T.C.

    1996-04-01

    A mathematical arc model based on the integral method has been developed to study the arc behavior of SF{sub 6} puffer circuit breakers during high current region. The interaction between the compression chamber and the arc interrupter plays a critical role in determining the arc behavior. Computations have been carried out for the puffer circuit breaker of Noeske et al. The aerodynamic behavior and electrical characteristics of the puffer circuit breaker have been investigated. In addition, the pressure rise in the compression chamber and arc voltage have been computed and the results compared with the available experimental results of Noeske et al. Special attention has been paid to the presence of the shock.

  7. Transport and Measurements of High-Current Electron Beams from X pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonov, Alexey V.; Mingaleev, Albert R.; Romanova, Vera M.; Tarakanov, Vladimir P.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Blesener, Isaac C.; Kusse, Bruce R.; Hammer, David A.

    2009-01-21

    Generation of electron beams is an unavoidable property of X-pinches and other pulsed-power-driven pinches of different geometry. Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups with different geometry's are discussed. Of particular interest is the partially neutralized nature of the beam propagating from the X-pinch to a diagnostic system. Two scenarios of electron beam propagation from X-pinch to Faraday cup are analyzed by means of computer simulation using the PIC-code KARAT. The first is longitudinal neutralization by ions extracted from plasma at an output window of the X-pinch diode; the second is the beam transport through a plasma background between the diode and a diagnostic system.

  8. Microstructure Analysis of HPb59-1 Brass Induced by High Current Pulsed Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Jike; Gao, Bo; Hu, Liang; Lu, Shuaidan; Tu, Ganfeng

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effects of high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) on the microstructure evolution of casting HPb59-1 (Cu 57.1 mass%, Pb 1.7 mass% and Zn balance) alloy were investigated. The results showed a "wavy" surface which was formed with Pb element existing in the forms of stacking block and microparticles on the top surface layer after treatment. Nanocrystalline structures including Pb grains and two phases (α and β) were formed on the top remelted layer and their sizes were all less than 100 nm. The disordered β phase was generated in the surface layer after HCPEB treatment, which is beneficial for the improvement of surface properties. Meanwhile, there was a large residual stress on the alloy surface, along with the appearance of microcracks, and the preferred orientations of grains also changed.

  9. Enabling cost-effective high-current burst-mode operation in superconducting accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting (SC) accelerators are very efficient for CW or long-pulse operation, and normal conducting (NC) accelerators are cost effective for short-pulse operation. The addition of a short NC linac section to a SC linac can correct for the energy droop that occurs when pulsed high-current operation is required that exceeds the capability of the klystrons to replenish the cavity RF fields due to the long field fill-times of SC structures, or a requirement to support a broad range of beam currents results in variable beam loading. This paper describes the implementation of this technique to enable microseconds of high beam-current, 90 mA or more, in a 12 GeV SC long-pulse accelerator designed for the MaRIE 42-keV XFEL proposed for Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  10. Optimal conditions for high current proton irradiations at the university of Wisconsin's ion beam laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wetteland, C. J.; Field, K. G.; Gerczak, T. J.; Eiden, T. J.; Maier, B. R.; Albakri, O.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-04-19

    The National Electrostatics Corporation's (NEC) Toroidal Volume Ion Source (TORVIS) source is known for exceptionally high proton currents with minimal service downtime as compared to traditional sputter sources. It has been possible to obtain over 150{mu}A of proton current from the source, with over 70{mu}A on the target stage. However, beam fluxes above {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}/m2-s may have many undesirable effects, especially for insulators. This may include high temperature gradients at the surface, sputtering, surface discharge, cracking or even disintegration of the sample. A series of experiments were conducted to examine the role of high current fluxes in a suite of ceramics and insulating materials. Results will show the optimal proton irradiation conditions and target mounting strategies needed to minimize unwanted macro-scale damage, while developing a procedure for conducting preliminary radiation experiments.

  11. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P. Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  12. Neutron generator for BNCT based on high current ECR ion source with gyrotron plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Razin, S; Sidorov, A; Maslennikova, A; Volovecky, A; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O

    2015-12-01

    BNCT development nowadays is constrained by a progress in neutron sources design. Creation of a cheap and compact intense neutron source would significantly simplify trial treatments avoiding use of expensive and complicated nuclear reactors and accelerators. D-D or D-T neutron generator is one of alternative types of such sources for. A so-called high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source with plasma heating by millimeter wave gyrotron radiation is suggested to be used in a scheme of D-D neutron generator in the present work. Ion source of that type was developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). It can produce deuteron ion beams with current density up to 700-800 mA/cm(2). Generation of the neutron flux with density at the level of 7-8·10(10) s(-1) cm(-2) at the target surface could be obtained in case of TiD2 target bombardment with deuteron beam accelerated to 100 keV. Estimations show that it is enough for formation of epithermal neutron flux with density higher than 10(9) s(-1) cm(-2) suitable for BNCT. Important advantage of described approach is absence of Tritium in the scheme. First experiments performed in pulsed regime with 300 mA, 45 kV deuteron beam directed to D2O target demonstrated 10(9) s(-1) neutron flux. This value corresponds to theoretical estimations and proofs prospects of neutron generator development based on high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Patil, D. S.; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10-3 mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  14. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Mishra, L; Kewlani, H; Patil, D S; Mittal, K C

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10(-3) mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  15. HIGH-CURRENT COLD CATHODE FIELD EMISSION ARRAY FOR ELECTRON LENS APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2012-12-28

    During Phase I, the following goals were achieved: (1) design and fabrication of a novel, nano-dimensional CNT field emitter assembly for high current density application, with high durability; (2) fabrication of a ceramic based micro channel plate (MCP) and characterization of its secondary electron emission; and (3) characterizing the CNT/MCP cathode for high field emission and durability. As a result of these achievements, a relatively high current density of ~ 1.2 A/cm2 from a CNT cathode and single channel MCP were measured. The emission current was also extremely stable with a peak-to-peak variation of only 1.8%. The emission current could be further enhanced to meet requirements for electron lens applications by increasing the number of MCP channels. A calculation for maximum possible current density with a 1200 channel/cm2 MCP, placed over a cathode with 1200 uniformly functioning CNTs, would be ~1.46 kA/cm2, neglecting space charge limitations. Clearly this level of emission is far greater than what is needed for the electron lens application, but it does offer a highly comforting margin to account for sub-standard emitters and/or to allow the lesser challenge of building a cathode with fewer channels/cm2. A satisfactory goal for the electron lens application would be a controllable emission of 2-4 mA per channel in an ensemble of 800-1200 uniformly-functioning channels/cm2, and a cathode with overall area of about 1 cm2.

  16. Transition from Beam-Target to Thermonuclear Fusion in High-Current Deuterium Z-Pinch Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermann, Dustin; Welch, Dale; Rose, Dave; Thoma, Carsten; Clark, Robert; Mostrom, Chris; Schmidt, Andrea; Link, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    Fusion yields from dense, Z-pinch plasmas are known to scale with the drive current, which is favorable for many potential applications. Decades of experimental studies, however, show an unexplained drop in yield for currents above a few mega-ampere (MA). In this work, simulations of DD Z-Pinch plasmas have been performed in 1D and 2D for a constant pinch time and initial radius using the code LSP, and observations of a shift in scaling are presented. The results show that yields below 3 MA are enhanced relative to pure thermonuclear scaling by beamlike particles accelerated in the Rayleigh-Taylor induced electric fields, while yields above 3 MA are reduced because of energy lost by the instability and the inability of the beamlike ions to enter the pinch region. This research was developed with funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

  17. Biomimetic particles as therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Randall A; Sunshine, Joel C; Green, Jordan J

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in the development of novel nanoparticle- and microparticle-based therapeutics. An emerging paradigm is the incorporation of biomimetic features into these synthetic therapeutic constructs to enable them to better interface with biological systems. Through the control of size, shape, and material consistency, particle cores have been generated that better mimic natural cells and viruses. In addition, there have been significant advances in biomimetic surface functionalization of particles through the integration of bio-inspired artificial cell membranes and naturally derived cell membranes. Biomimetic technologies enable therapeutic particles to have increased potency to benefit human health.

  18. Biomimetic Particles as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in the development of novel nanoparticle and microparticle-based therapeutics. An emerging paradigm is the incorporation of biomimetic features into these synthetic therapeutic constructs to enable them to better interface with biological systems. Through the control of size, shape, and material consistency, particle cores have been generated that better mimic natural cells and viruses. In addition, there have been significant advances in biomimetic surface functionalization of particles through the integration of bio-inspired artificial cell membranes and naturally derived cell membranes. Biomimetic technologies enable therapeutic particles to have increased potency to benefit human health. PMID:26277289

  19. High-Current Density, High-Brightness Electron Beams from Large-Area Lanthanum Hexaboride Cathodes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-13

    Clarendon, Oxford, 1977), Chaps. 4.3-4.4. 15. Claude Lejeune and Jean Aubert, in Applied Charged Particle Optics, edited by A. Septier (Academic, New...Applications Intl. Corp. 1710 Goodridge Drive McLean, VA 22102 Dr. Charles C. Damm Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory P.O. Box 808 Livermore, CA 94550

  20. Modeling of the anode surface deformation in high-current vacuum arcs with AMF contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaolong; Wang, Lijun; Deng, Jie; Jia, Shenli; Qin, Kang; Shi, Zongqian

    2016-02-01

    A high-current vacuum arc subjected to an axial magnetic field is maintained in a diffuse status. With an increase in arc current, the energy carried by the arc column to the anode becomes larger and finally leads to the anode temperature exceeding the melting point of the anode material. When the anode melting pool is formed, and the rotational plasma of the arc column delivers its momentum to the melting pool, the anode melting pool starts to rotate and also flow outwards along the radial direction, which has been photographed by some researchers using high-speed cameras. In this paper, the anode temperature and melting status is calculated using the melting and solidification model. The swirl flow of the anode melting pool and deformation of the anode is calculated using the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model with the volume of fraction (VOF) method. All the models are transient 2D axial-rotational symmetric models. The influence of the impaction force of the arc plasma, electromagnetic force, viscosity force, and surface tension of the liquid metal are all considered in the model. The heat flux density injected into the anode and the arc pressure are obtained from the 3D numerical simulation of the high-current vacuum arc using the MHD model, which gives more realistic parameters for the anode simulation. Simulation results show that the depth of the anode melting pool increases with an increase in the arc current. Some droplets sputter out from the anode surface, which is caused by the inertial centrifugal force of the rotational melting pool and strong plasma pressure. Compared with the previous anode melting model without consideration of anode deformation, when the deformation and swirl flow of the anode melting pool are considered, the anode temperature is relatively lower, and just a little more than the melting point of Cu. This is because of liquid droplets sputtering out of the anode surface taking much of the energy away from the anode surface. The

  1. Characterization of Prototype Superconducting Magnetic Quadrupolesfor the High Current Transport Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Sabbi, GianLuca; Seidl, Peter

    2001-02-22

    Later phases of the High Current Transport Experiment (HCX) at LBNL will employ superconducting magnetic quadrupole lenses to focus an intense, heavy-ion beam over approximately 50 lattice periods (100 quadrupoles). Here they present a characterization of a baseline quadrupole design suitable for transporting a single, low-energy ({approx} 2 MeV), high-current ({approx} 800 mA) heavy-ion (K{sup +}) beam that will be provided from an existing injector and beam matching section. For optimal performance in this application, a compact quadrupole magnet providing high focusing strength and high field quality is required. The reference parameters that they have chosen take into account magnet development work by AML, LLNL, and MIT and result in a transport lattice well matched to programmatic needs with a lattice period of approximately 50 cm. The goal of this note is to introduce a common framework where the magnetic performance of different designs can be compared. In that regard, they try to avoid the details of an earlier parameter note [1] where provisions for tweaks in magnet excitation, cryostat assembly, etc. were discussed in fairly general terms. This note is not intended to be a final specification for the HCX quadrupoles to be constructed or to be the sole basis on which competing magnet designs will be compared. Other aspects such as prototype test results, economic considerations, and attractiveness within the context of ultimate applications in multi-beam drivers for heavy-ion fusion (i.e, compatibility with magnet arrays, etc.) will all factor in the selection of the appropriate design option. This note is organized as follows. Magnet characterizations including geometric and conductor parameters are given in Sec II. Performance parameters to be reported that quantify the magnet properties are outlined in Sec III. Supporting information is included in appendices. A reference coordinate system to be employed in field calculations is defined in Appendix A

  2. Electrically exploded opening switches in high-current explosive magnetic generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyko, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of publications on the use of electrically exploded foil opening switches to form current pulses up to 100 MA (up to 45 MA in experiments) with a rise time of 0.1-10.0 µs. Physical schemes and models are considered, and the efficiency of foil opening switches for existing and advanced facilities is analyzed.

  3. Incorporation of Ca and P on anodized titanium surface: Effect of high current density.

    PubMed

    Laurindo, Carlos A H; Torres, Ricardo D; Mali, Sachin A; Gilbert, Jeremy L; Soares, Paulo

    2014-04-01

    This study systematically evaluated the surface and corrosion characteristics of commercially pure titanium (grade 2) modified by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) with high current density. The anodization process was carried out galvanostatically (constant current density) using a solution containing calcium glycerophosphate (0.02mol/L) and calcium acetate (0.15mol/L). The current densities applied were 400, 700, 1000 and 1200mA/cm(2) for a period of 15s. Composition, crystalline structure, morphology, roughness, wettability and "in-vitro" bioactivity test in SBF of the anodized layer were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, profilometry and contact angle measurements. Corrosion properties were evaluated by open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The results show that the TiO2 oxide layers present an increase of thickness, porosity, roughness, wettability, Ca/P ratio, and bioactivity, with the applied current density up to 1000mA/cm(2). Corrosion resistance also increases with applied current density. It is observed that for 1200mA/cm(2), there is a degradation of the oxide layer. In general, the results suggest that the anodized TiO2 layer with better properties is formed with an applied current of 1000mA/cm(2).

  4. Gamma-resonance Contraband Detection using a high current tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, B. F.; Beis, J.; Dale, D.; Rogers, J.; Ruegg, R.; Debiak, T.; Kamykowski, E.; Melnychuk, S.; Rathke, J.; Sredniawski, J.

    1999-04-26

    TRIUMF and Northrop Grumman have developed a new system for the detection of concealed explosives and drugs. This Contraband Detection System (CDS) is based on the resonant absorption by {sup 14}N of gammas produced using {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N. The chosen reaction uses protons at 1.75 MeV and the gammas have an energy of 9.17 MeV. By measuring both the resonant and the non-resonant absorption using detectors with good spatial resolution, and applying standard tomographic techniques, we are able to produce 3D images of both the nitrogen partial density and the total density. The images together may be utilized with considerable confidence to determine if small amounts of nitrogen based explosives, heroin or cocaine are present in the interrogated containers. Practical Gamma Resonant Absorption (GRA) scanning requires an intense source of protons. However this proton source must also be very stable, have low energy spread, and have good spatial definition. These demands suggested a tandem as the accelerator of choice. We have therefore constructed a 2 MeV H{sup -} tandem optimized for high current (10 mA) operation, while minimizing the overall size of the accelerator. This has required several special innovations which will be presented in the paper. We will also present initial commissioning results.

  5. Integrating a Machine Protection System for High-Current Free Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; James Coleman; Richard Evans; Al Grippo; Kevin Jordan

    2002-09-01

    A fully integrated Machine Protection System (MPS) is critical to efficient commissioning and safe operation of all high-current accelerators. The MPS needs to monitor the status of all devices that could enter the beam path, the beam loss monitors (BLMs), magnet settings, beam dump status, etc. This information is then presented to the electron source controller, which must limit the beam power or shut down the beam completely. The MPS for the energy recovery linac (ERL) at the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser [1] generates eight different power limits, or beam modes, which are passed to the drive laser pulse controller (DLPC) (photocathode source controller). These range from no beam to nearly 2 megawatts of electron beam power. Automatic masking is used for the BLMs during low-power modes when one might be using beam viewers. The system also reviews the setup for the two different beamlines, the IR path or the UV path, and will allow or disallow operations based on magnet settings and valve positions. This paper will describe the approach taken for the JLab 10-kW FEL. Additional details can be found on our website http://laser.jlab.org [2].

  6. Deformation of contact surfaces in a vacuum interrupter after high-current interruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoran; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhou, Zhipeng; Jiang, Yanjun; Wang, Jianhua; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2016-08-01

    In a high-current interruption, the contact surface in a vacuum interrupter might be severely damaged by constricted vacuum arcs causing a molten area on it. As a result, a protrusion will be initiated by a transient recovery voltage after current zero, enhancing the local electric field and making breakdowns occur easier. The objective of this paper is to simulate the deformation process on the molten area under a high electric field by adopting the finite element method. A time-dependent Electrohydrodynamic model was established, and the liquid-gas interface was tracked by the level-set method. From the results, the liquid metal can be deformed to a Taylor cone if the applied electric field is above a critical value. This value is correlated to the initial geometry of the liquid metal, which increases as the size of the liquid metal decreases. Moreover, the buildup time of a Taylor cone obeys the power law t = k × E-3, where E is the initial electric field and k is a coefficient related to the material property, indicating a temporal self-similar characteristic. In addition, the influence of temperature has little impact on the deformation but has great impact on electron emission. Finally, the possible reason to initiate a delayed breakdown is associated with the deformation. The breakdown does not occur immediately when the voltage is just applied upon the gap but is postponed to several milliseconds later when the tip is formed on the liquid metal.

  7. High current multicharged metal ion source using high power gyrotron heating of vacuum arc plasma.

    PubMed

    Vodopyanov, A V; Golubev, S V; Khizhnyak, V I; Mansfeld, D A; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu

    2008-02-01

    A high current, multi charged, metal ion source using electron heating of vacuum arc plasma by high power gyrotron radiation has been developed. The plasma is confined in a simple mirror trap with peak magnetic field in the plug up to 2.5 T, mirror ratio of 3-5, and length variable from 15 to 20 cm. Plasma formed by a cathodic vacuum arc is injected into the trap either (i) axially using a compact vacuum arc plasma gun located on axis outside the mirror trap region or (ii) radially using four plasma guns surrounding the trap at midplane. Microwave heating of the mirror-confined, vacuum arc plasma is accomplished by gyrotron microwave radiation of frequency 75 GHz, power up to 200 kW, and pulse duration up to 150 micros, leading to additional stripping of metal ions by electron impact. Pulsed beams of platinum ions with charge state up to 10+, a mean charge state over 6+, and total (all charge states) beam current of a few hundred milliamperes have been formed.

  8. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2013-07-15

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar and 400–1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 3.8 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and 4–14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  9. Design and characterization of the annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam source for circular components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Langping; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-01

    In order to irradiate circular components with high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB), an annular cathode based on carbon fiber bunches was designed and fabricated. Using an acceleration voltage of 25 kV, the maximum pulsed irradiation current and energy of this annular cathode can reach 7.9 kA and 300 J, respectively. The irradiation current density distribution of the annular cathode HCPEB source measured along the circumferential direction shows that the annular cathode has good emission uniformity. In addition, four 9310 steel substrates fixed uniformly along the circumferential direction of a metal ring substrate were irradiated by this annular cathode HCPEB source. The surface and cross-section morphologies of the irradiated samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM images of the surface reveal that crater and surface undulation have been formed, which hints that the irradiation energy of the HCPEB process is large enough for surface modification of 9310 steel. Meanwhile, SEM cross-section images exhibit that remelted layers with a thickness of about 5.4 μm have been obtained in all samples, which proves that a good practical irradiation uniformity can be achieved by this annular cathode HCPEB source.

  10. A cookbook for building a high-current dimpled H– magnetron source for accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Bollinger, Daniel S.; Karns, Patrick R.; Tan, Cheng -Yang

    2015-10-30

    A high-current (>50 mA) dimpled H– magnetron source has been built at Fermilab for supplying H– beam to the entire accelerator complex. Despite many decades of expertise with slit H– magnetron sources at Fermilab, we were faced with many challenges from the dimpled H– magnetron source, which needed to be overcome in order to make it operational. Dimpled H– sources for high-energy physics are not new: Brookhaven National Laboratory has operated a dimpled H- source for more than two decades. However, the transference of that experience to Fermilab took about two years because a cookbook for building this type ofmore » source did not exist and seemingly innocuous or undocumented choices had a huge impact on the success or failure for this type of source. Moreover, it is the goal of this paper to document the reasons for these choices and to present a cookbook for building and operating dimpled H– magnetron sources.« less

  11. NOx Removal by Pulsed High Current Electron Beam in Combination with Photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Yoshiro; Mannami, Atushi; Natsuno, Hideshi; Nishikata, Satoshi

    2002-03-01

    A new flue gas treatment device using a pulsed high current electron beam in combination with a photocatalyst (TiO2) was investigated. When the pulsed electron beam (100 keV, 120 A, 1 μs and 4.7 J/pulse) was injected into the gas chamber with a TiO2 sheet on the inner wall, NOx in a 5% oxygen mixed NO (=200 ppm)/N2 gas was removed with the energy efficiency of removal as high as 1010 nmol/J at a removal ratio of 83%, in which the amount of NOx removed in 10 min without any radiation, about 25% of the initial NO concentration, was not included in the energy efficiency calculation. The concentration of NO2 was below about 3 ppm in this process, which was a significant characteristic of NOx removal in this device. When the flowing 4% oxygen mixed NO (=200 ppm)/N2 gas at a flow rate 1.4 L/min was irradiated by successive pulses of the electron beam, the energy efficiency of removal of 864 nmol/J at the removal ratio of 41% was obtained.

  12. Development and fabrication of a high current, fast recovery power diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. H.; Balodis, V.; Devance, D. C.; Gaugh, C. E.; Karlsson, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    A high voltage (VR = 1200 V), high current (IF = 150 A), fast recovery ( 700 ns) and low forward voltage drop ( 1.5 V) silicon rectifier was designed and the process developed for its fabrication. For maximum purity, uniformity and material characteristic stability, neutron transmutation n-type doped float zone silicon is used. The design features a hexagonal chip for maximum area utilization of space available in the DO-8 diode package, PIN diffused junction structure with deep diffused D(+) anode and a shallow high concentration n(+) cathode. With the high temperature glass passivated positive bevel mesa junction termination, the achieved blocking voltage is close to the theoretical limit of the starting material. Gold diffusion is used to control the lifetime and the resulting effect on switching speed and forward voltage tradeoff. For solder reflow assembly, trimetal (Al-Ti-Ni) contacts are used. The required major device electrical characteristics were achieved. Due to the tradeoff nature of forward voltage drop and reverse recovery time, a compromise was reached for these values.

  13. Thermal instability induced by high current densities in high-Tc coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maza, J.; Ferro, G.; Veira, J. A.; Vidal, F.

    2013-10-01

    By using a 1 ms pulse technique, the current-voltage curves (CVC) under zero-applied magnetic field have been measured in practical high-Tc superconducting wires based on coated (RE)BCO. The measurements extend up to the so-called supercritical current intensity, I*, at which superconductivity disappears accompanied by an abrupt jump in the voltage. The resulting CVC, including the temperature dependence of I*, were analysed at a quantitative level in terms of a thermal instability model proposed recently. An attractive aspect of our thermal instability approach is that in spite of the complexity of the coated layered structure, in its simpler formulation all the geometric and thermal variables are encapsulated into a single characteristic parameter r with units of thermal resistance. All the experimental results for I* from 76 to 86 K are quantitatively, within 2%, accounted for by the thermal instability analysis. Furthermore, the best-fit value of r is found to be quite consistent with the inner geometry and composition of the wires. Another remarkable result of our analysis is that the temperature T* reached by the wire at I*, i.e., the temperature triggering the thermal runaway, is less than one kelvin above the bath temperature. These results further support the universality of the thermal instability mechanism of superconductivity quenching by high current densities.

  14. High current metal ion implantation to synthesize some conducting metal-silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B. X.; Gao, K. Y.

    1999-06-10

    High current metal-ion implantation by a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source was conducted to synthesize some conducting metal-silicides. It was found that C54-TiSi{sub 2}, ZrSi{sub 2}, NiSi{sub 2}, CoSi{sub 2}, {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}, NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2} layers on Si wafers with good electric properties could be obtained directly after implantation. In comparison, the formation of some other silicides like {alpha}-FeSi{sub 2}, NbSi{sub 2}, TaSi{sub 2}, tetragonal-WSi{sub 2} and tetragonal-MoSi{sub 2} required an additional post-annealing to improve their crystallinity and thus their electric properties. Interestingly, the NiSi{sub 2} layers of superior electric properties were obtained at a selected Ni-ion current density of 35 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. At this current, a beam heating raised the Si wafer to a specific temperature of 380 deg. C, at which the size difference between NiSi{sub 2} and Si lattices was nil. The resistivity of the NiSi{sub 2} layers so obtained was much lower than that of the Ni-disilicide formed by solid-state reaction at >750 deg. C. The formation mechanism of the above metal-silicides and the associated electric properties will also be discussed.

  15. High current SRF cavity design for SPL and eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomenstnykh, S.; Calaga, R.; Hahn, H.; Johnson, E.; Kewisch, J.

    2011-03-28

    A high current five-cell Nb superconducting cavity, called BNL3 cavity, was optimized and designed for the SPL and eRHIC. For the fundamental mode, the optimization process aimed at maximizing the R/Q of the fundamental mode and the geometry factor G under an acceptable RF field ratio level of B{sub peak}/E{sub acc} and E{sub peak}/E{sub acc}. For higher order modes, the optimization is to lower (R/Q)Q{sub ext} for dipole and quadrupole modes to suppress the beam-break-up (BBU). To extract the HOM power out of the cavity, the BNL3 cavity employs a larger beam pipe, allowing the propagation of HOMs, but not the fundamental mode. Six HOM couplers (three at each end) are used to extract large HOM power. To avoid the cross-talk between cavities, tapers are employed between the cavities. This paper presents the design of the BNL3 cavity, end groups and BBU simulation results.

  16. STUDY OF HIGHER ORDER MODES IN HIGH CURRENT MULTICELL SRF CAVITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    CALAGA,R.BEN-ZVI,I.ZHAO,Y.WANG,D.SEKUTOWICZ,J.WU,G.

    2003-09-08

    The electron cooling project for RHIC luminosity upgrade and future projects such as eRHIC (electron-ion collider) demand cavities operating at high average current and high bunch charge in CW energy recovery mode. This paper describes the investigation of Higher Order Modes (HOMs) in such a cavity. This work is part of an ongoing effort to develop a 5-cell superconducting cavity for such high current and high bunch charge energy-recovery superconducting linac. The frequency of the cavity is 703.75 MHz with an iris of 17cm and two ferrite absorbers for HOM damping. The main focus of this paper is to identify and investigate possible trapped HOM modes that might result in multibunch instabilities. Detailed MAFIA calculations were performed using the e-module for different end cell geometries. Results from these calculations will be presented. Beam breakup results using TDBBU due to dipole HOM's will also be presented. A beam breakup threshold of above 1.8 A was calculated.

  17. Evaluation of conductor stresses in a pulsed high-current toroidal transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Peter J; Rousculp, Chritopher L; Reass, William A; Oro, David M; Merrill, Frank E; Greigo, Jeffery R; Reinovsky, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    The Precision, High-Energy Density, Liner Implosion Experiment (PHELIX) pulsed power driver is currently under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. When operational PHELIX will provide 5-10 MAmps of peak current with pulse rise-time of {approx} 5-10 ms. Crucial to the performance of PHELIX is a multi-turn primary, single-turn secondary, current step-up toroidal transformer, R{sub major} {approx} 30 cm, R{sub minor} {approx} 10 cm. The transformer lifetime should exceed 100 shots. Therefore it is essential that the design be robust enough to survive the magnetic stresses produced by high currents. In order to evaluate their design, two methods have been utilized. First, an analytical evaluation has been performed. By identifying the magnetic forces as J{sub 1}{sup 2}/2 {del}L{sub 1} + J{sub 1}J{sub 2}{del}M{sub 12}, where J{sub 1} and J{sub 2} are currents in two circuits, coupled by mutual inductance M{sub 12} and L{sub 1} is the self-inductance of the circuit carrying current J{sub 1}, analytical estimates of stress can be obtained. These results are then compared to a computational MHD model of the same system and to a full finite-element, electromagnetic simulation.

  18. Hybrid monitor for both beam position and tilt of pulsed high-current beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, J. He, X.; Ma, C.; Zhao, L.; Li, Q.; Dai, Z.

    2014-09-15

    A Hybrid beam monitor, integrated with both azimuthal and axial B-dot probes, was designed for simultaneous measurement of both beam position and beam angle for pulsed high-current beams at the same location in beam pipe. The output signals of axial B-dot probes were found to be mixed with signals caused by transverse position deviation. In order to eliminate the unwanted signals, an elimination method was developed and its feasibility tested on a 50-Ω coaxial line test stand. By this method, a waveform, shape-like to that of input current and proportional to the tilt angle, was simulated and processed by following integration step to achieve the tilt angle. The tests showed that the measurement error of displacement and tilt angle less than 0.3 mm and 1.5 mrad, respectively. The latter error could be reduced with improved probes by reducing the inductance of the axial B-dot probe, but the improvement reached a limit due to some unknown systemic mechanism.

  19. Rare Earth Metal Silicides Synthesized by High Current Metal Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X. Q.; Wang, R. S.; Tang, X. J.; Liu, B. X.

    2003-08-01

    The YSi2, LaSi2, CeSi2, PrSi2, NdSi2, SmSi2, GdSi2, TbSi2, DySi2, and ErSi2 layers were formed on Si wafers by respective high current metal-ion implantation using a metal vacuum vapor arc (MEVVA) ion source and the formation temperature was considerable lower than the critical temperatures (300-350°C) required for the rare earth metal silicides by solid-state reaction. It was found that the crystalline structures could be improved with increasing slightly the formation temperature as well as the implantation dose. Concerning the growth kinetics, in some cases, fractal patterns were observed on Si surfaces and the branches of the fractals consisted of the grains of respective precipitated silicides. Interestingly, the fractal dimension increased with formation temperature and eventually approached to a value of 2.0, corresponding to a continuous layer, which was required in practical application. The formation mechanism as well as the growth kinetics was discussed in terms of the far-from-equilibrium process involved in the MEVVA ion implantation.

  20. Probe characterization of high-current driven metal plasma in a vacuum-arc rail gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, T.; Roychowdhury, P.; Venkatramani, N.

    2004-10-01

    The characteristics of metal plasma launched by high-current electric arc in a vacuum-arc rail gun are determined by employing electrical and magnetic probes. These measurements are validated by results from theoretical simulations. The arc coupled nonlinear circuit equations are solved simultaneously with the Newtonian arc motion and revealed the undercritically damped behavior of the arc current identical to the arc-current signal recorded by the Rogowski magnetic probe. Similarly the arc velocity and displacement derived from the signatures of B-dot probes are shown to concur closely with the results of J ×B propulsion from simulation. The heating of plasma is formulated in a three-electron population regime with direct arc energy coupling through magnetohydrodynamic, ion-acoustic, Coulomb, and neutral interactions. This results in high temperature (Te) of hundreds of eV in the arc as revealed by the simulation. Hence Te of the rapidly cooling and equilibrating plasma that emerged from the muzzle is high around 80-90eV, which is confirmed by Langmuir electric probe measurements. Density ne of this metal plasma is shown to be in the range 4×1021-6×1021m-3 and includes multiple ion charge states. The exit velocity of the plasma measured by a pair of Langmuir probes is close to 2.2×106cm/s and matched well with the arc velocity determined by the B-dot probes and the results from simulation.

  1. Current halo structures in high-current plasma experiments: {theta}-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, Yu. V.

    2007-03-15

    Experimental data elucidating mechanisms for halo formation in {theta}-pinch discharges are presented and discussed. The experiments were performed with different gases (H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, He, and Ar) in a theta-pinch device with a porcelain vacuum chamber and an excitation coil 15 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length. The stored energy, the current in the excitation coil, and the current half-period were W = 10 kJ, I = 400 kA, and T/2 = 14 {mu}s, respectively. It is found that the plasma rings (halos) surrounding the pinch core arise as a result of coaxial pinch stratification due to both the excitation of closed currents (inductons) inside the pinch and the radial convergence of the plasma current sheaths produced after the explosion of T-layers formed near the wall in the initial stage of the discharge. It is concluded that halo structures observed in pinches, tokamaks, and other high-current devices used in controlled fusion research have the same nature.

  2. High current pulsed electron beam treatment of AZ31 Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Bo; Hao Shengzhi; Zou Jianxin; Grosdidier, Thierry; Jiang Limin; Zhou Jiyang; Dong Chuang

    2005-11-15

    This paper reports, for the first time, an analysis of the effect of High Current Pulsed Electron Beam (HCPEB) on a Mg alloy. The AZ31 alloy was HCPEB treated in order to see the potential of this fairly recent technique in modifying its wear resistance. For the 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} beam energy density used in the present work, the evaporation mode was operative and led to the formation of a ''wavy'' surface and the absence of eruptive microcraters. The selective evaporation of Mg over Al led to an Al-rich melted surface layer and precipitation hardening from the over saturated solid solution. Due to the increase in hardness of the top surface layer, the friction coefficient values were lowered by more than 20% after the HCPEB treatments, and the wear resistance was drastically (by a factor of 6) improved. The microhardness of the HCPEB samples was also increased significantly down to a depth of about 500 {mu}m, far exceeding the heat-affected zone (about 40 {mu}m). This is due to the effect of the propagation of the shockwave associated with this HCPEB treatment.

  3. Crystallization of Ti33Cu67 metallic glass under high-current density electrical pulses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the phase and structure evolution of the Ti33Cu67 amorphous alloy subjected to electrical pulses of high current density. By varying the pulse parameters, different stages of crystallization could be observed in the samples. Partial polymorphic nanocrystallization resulting in the formation of 5- to 8-nm crystallites of the TiCu2 intermetallic in the residual amorphous matrix occurred when the maximum current density reached 9.7·108 A m-2 and the pulse duration was 140 μs, though the calculated temperature increase due to Joule heating was not enough to reach the crystallization temperature of the alloy. Samples subjected to higher current densities and higher values of the evolved Joule heat per unit mass fully crystallized and contained the Ti2Cu3 and TiCu3 phases. A common feature of the crystallized ribbons was their non-uniform microstructure with regions that experienced local melting and rapid solidification. PACS: 81; 81.05.Bx; 81.05.Kf. PMID:21871070

  4. A strong-focusing 800 MeV cyclotron for high-current applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, N.; Assadi, S.; Badgley, K.; Comeaux, J.; Kellams, J.; McInturff, A.; McIntyre, P.; Sattarov, A.

    2013-04-01

    A superconducting strong-focusing cyclotron (SFC) is being developed for high-current applications. It incorporates four innovations. Superconducting quarter-wave cavities are used to provide >20 MV/turn acceleration. The orbit separation is thereby opened so that bunch-bunch interactions between successive orbits are eliminated. Quadrapole focusing channels are incorporated within the sectors so that alternating-gradient strong-focusing transport is maintained throughout. Dipole windings on the inner and outer orbits provide enhanced control for injection and extraction of bunches. Finally each sector magnet is configured as a flux-coupled stack of independent apertures, so that any desired number of independent cyclotrons can be integrated within a common footprint. Preliminary simulations indicate that each SFC should be capable of accelerating 10 mA CW to 800 MeV with very low loss and >50% energy efficiency. A primary motivation for SFC is as a proton driver for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core. The cores are fueled solely with the transuranics from spent nuclear fuel from a conventional nuclear power plant. The beams from one SFC stack would destroy all of the transuranics and long-lived fission products that are produced by a GWe reactor [1]. This capability offers the opportunity to close the nuclear fuel cycle and provide a path to green nuclear energy.

  5. A high-current rail-type gas switch with preionization by an additional corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, E. I.; Belozerov, O. S.; Krastelev, E. G.

    2016-12-01

    The characteristics of a high-current rail-type gas switch with preionization of the gas (air) in a spark gap by an additional corona discharge are investigated. The experiments were performed in a voltage range of 10-45 kV using a two-electrode switch consisting of two cylindrical electrodes with a diameter of 22 mm and a length of 100 mm and a set of laterally located corona-discharge needles. The requirements for the position and size of the needles are defined for which a corona discharge is ignited before a breakdown of the main gap and does not change to a sparking form, and the entire length of the rail electrodes is efficiently used. The fulfillment of these requirements ensures stable operation of the switch with a small variation of the pulse breakdown voltage, which is not more than 1% for a fixed voltage-pulse rise time in the range from 150 ns to 3.5 μs. A short delay time of the switch breakdown makes it possible to control the two-electrode switch by an overvoltage pulse of nanosecond duration.

  6. Magnetic field measurements of quadrupoles in the High-Current Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, P. A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Baca, D.; Faltens, A.; Molvik, A. W.; Ritchie, G.; Sabbi, G.; Shuman, D.

    2005-05-01

    The High-Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program to explore heavy-ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. Four pulsed magnetic quadrupoles are being used to study gas and electron effects with a 0.2 A, 1-MeV K + beam. The magnets, originally designed and built for a prototype pulsed magnetic quadrupole array, have an elliptical beam tube (6×10 cm) and iron yoke. The magnet coil and field length are ≈31 cm, and operating gradients are 10-40 T/m. To establish that the field quality of the prototype quadrupoles is satisfactory for the experiments, a 1-cm pickup loop was used to measure the flux Br( θ) at the magnet mid-plane and also at the lead and return ends. A longer probe was used to measure the integrated flux of B θ( θ) along the magnet. The field quality appears satisfactory for the short transport experiments through these quadrupoles.

  7. A high-current rail-type gas switch with preionization by an additional corona discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, E. I.; Belozerov, O. S.; Krastelev, E. G.

    2016-12-15

    The characteristics of a high-current rail-type gas switch with preionization of the gas (air) in a spark gap by an additional corona discharge are investigated. The experiments were performed in a voltage range of 10–45 kV using a two-electrode switch consisting of two cylindrical electrodes with a diameter of 22 mm and a length of 100 mm and a set of laterally located corona-discharge needles. The requirements for the position and size of the needles are defined for which a corona discharge is ignited before a breakdown of the main gap and does not change to a sparking form, and the entire length of the rail electrodes is efficiently used. The fulfillment of these requirements ensures stable operation of the switch with a small variation of the pulse breakdown voltage, which is not more than 1% for a fixed voltage-pulse rise time in the range from 150 ns to 3.5 μs. A short delay time of the switch breakdown makes it possible to control the two-electrode switch by an overvoltage pulse of nanosecond duration.

  8. Detection and clearing of trapped ions in the high current Cornell photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Full, S.; Bartnik, A.; Bazarov, I. V.; Dobbins, J.; Dunham, B.; Hoffstaetter, G. H.

    2016-03-01

    We have recently performed experiments to test the effectiveness of three ion-clearing strategies in the Cornell high intensity photoinjector: DC clearing electrodes, bunch gaps, and beam shaking. The photoinjector reaches a new regime of linac beam parameters where high continuous wave beam currents lead to ion trapping. Therefore ion mitigation strategies must be evaluated for this machine and other similar future high current linacs. We have developed several techniques to directly measure the residual trapped ions. Our two primary indicators of successful clearing are the amount of ion current removed by a DC clearing electrode, and the absence of bremsstrahlung radiation generated by beam-ion interactions. Measurements were taken for an electron beam with an energy of 5 MeV and continuous wave beam currents in the range of 1-20 mA. Several theoretical models have been developed to explain our data. Using them, we are able to estimate the clearing electrode voltage required for maximum ion clearing, the creation and clearing rates of the ions while employing bunch gaps, and the sinusoidal shaking frequency necessary for clearing via beam shaking. In all cases, we achieve a maximum ion clearing of at least 70% or higher, and in some cases our data is consistent with full ion clearing.

  9. Metal based gas diffusion layers for enhanced fuel cell performance at high current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Nabeel; Van Steen, Eric; Tanaka, Shiro; Levecque, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    The gas diffusion layer strongly influences the performance and durability of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. A major drawback of current carbon fiber based GDLs is the non-controlled variation in porosity resulting in a random micro-structure. Moreover, when subjected to compression these materials show significant reduction in porosity and permeability leading to water management problems and mass transfer losses within the fuel cell. This study investigated the use of uniform perforated metal sheets as GDLs in conjunction with microchannel flowfields. A metal sheet design with a pitch of 110 μm and a hole diameter of 60 μm in combination with an MPL showed superior performance in the high current density region compared to a commercially available carbon paper based GDL in a single cell environment. Fuel cell testing with different oxidants (air, heliox and oxygen) indicate that the metal sheet offers both superior diffusion and reduced flooding in comparison to the carbon based GDL. The presence of the MPL has been found to be critical to the functionality of the metal sheet suggesting that the MPL design may represent an important optimisation parameter for further improvements in performance.

  10. Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Fibers and Sheets for a High Current Electron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Larry

    Field emission (FE) properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers from Rice University and the University of Cambridge have been studied for use within a high current electron source for a directed energy weapon. Upon reviewing the performance of these two prevalent CNT fibers, cathodes were designed with CNT fibers from the University of Cincinnati Nanoworld Laboratory. Cathodes composed of a single CNT fiber, an array of three CNT fibers, and a nonwoven CNT sheet were investigated for FE properties; the goal was to design a cathode with emission current in excess of 10 mA. Once the design phase was complete, the cathode samples were fabricated, characterized, and then analyzed to determine FE properties. Electrical conductivity of the CNT fibers was characterized with a 4-probe technique. FE characteristics were measured in an ultra-high vacuum chamber at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The arrayed CNT fiber and the enhanced nonwoven CNT sheet emitter design demonstrated the most promising FE properties. Future work will include further analysis and cathode design using this nonwoven CNT sheet material to increase peak current performance during electron emission.

  11. High yield neutron generator based on a high-current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Skalyga, V.; Sidorov, A.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Strelkov, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.

    2015-09-07

    In present paper, an approach for high yield compact D-D neutron generator based on a high current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source is suggested. Results on dense pulsed deuteron beam production with current up to 500 mA and current density up to 750 mA/cm{sup 2} are demonstrated. Neutron yield from D{sub 2}O and TiD{sub 2} targets was measured in case of its bombardment by pulsed 300 mA D{sup +} beam with 45 keV energy. Neutron yield density at target surface of 10{sup 9} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} was detected with a system of two {sup 3}He proportional counters. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron yield from a high quality TiD{sub 2} target bombarded by D{sup +} beam demonstrated in present work accelerated to 100 keV could reach 6 × 10{sup 10} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. It is discussed that compact neutron generator with such characteristics could be perspective for a number of applications like boron neutron capture therapy, security systems based on neutron scanning, and neutronography.

  12. Deformation of contact surfaces in a vacuum interrupter after high-current interruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haoran; Wang, Zhenxing Zhou, Zhipeng; Jiang, Yanjun; Wang, Jianhua; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2016-08-07

    In a high-current interruption, the contact surface in a vacuum interrupter might be severely damaged by constricted vacuum arcs causing a molten area on it. As a result, a protrusion will be initiated by a transient recovery voltage after current zero, enhancing the local electric field and making breakdowns occur easier. The objective of this paper is to simulate the deformation process on the molten area under a high electric field by adopting the finite element method. A time-dependent Electrohydrodynamic model was established, and the liquid-gas interface was tracked by the level-set method. From the results, the liquid metal can be deformed to a Taylor cone if the applied electric field is above a critical value. This value is correlated to the initial geometry of the liquid metal, which increases as the size of the liquid metal decreases. Moreover, the buildup time of a Taylor cone obeys the power law t = k × E{sup −3}, where E is the initial electric field and k is a coefficient related to the material property, indicating a temporal self-similar characteristic. In addition, the influence of temperature has little impact on the deformation but has great impact on electron emission. Finally, the possible reason to initiate a delayed breakdown is associated with the deformation. The breakdown does not occur immediately when the voltage is just applied upon the gap but is postponed to several milliseconds later when the tip is formed on the liquid metal.

  13. Sharp burnout failure observed in high current-carrying double-walled carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li; Toth, Geza; Wei, Jinquan; Liu, Zheng; Gao, Wei; Ci, Lijie; Vajtai, Robert; Endo, Morinobu; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the current-carrying capability and the high-current-induced thermal burnout failure modes of 5-20 µm diameter double-walled carbon nanotube (DWNT) fibers made by an improved dry-spinning method. It is found that the electrical conductivity and maximum current-carrying capability for these DWNT fibers can reach up to 5.9 × 105 S m - 1 and over 1 × 105 A cm - 2 in air. In comparison, we observed that standard carbon fiber tended to be oxidized and burnt out into cheese-like morphology when the maximum current was reached, while DWNT fiber showed a much slower breakdown behavior due to the gradual burnout in individual nanotubes. The electron microscopy observations further confirmed that the failure process of DWNT fibers occurs at localized positions, and while the individual nanotubes burn they also get aligned due to local high temperature and electrostatic field. In addition a finite element model was constructed to gain better understanding of the failure behavior of DWNT fibers.

  14. Design of conduction cooling system for a high current HTS DC reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Van Quan; Kim, Taekue; Le Tat, Thang; Sung, Haejin; Choi, Jongho; Kim, Kwangmin; Hwang, Chul-Sang; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun

    2017-07-01

    A DC reactor using a high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet reduces the reactor’s size, weight, flux leakage, and electrical losses. An HTS magnet needs cryogenic cooling to achieve and maintain its superconducting state. There are two methods for doing this: one is pool boiling and the other is conduction cooling. The conduction cooling method is more effective than the pool boiling method in terms of smaller size and lighter weight. This paper discusses a design of conduction cooling system for a high current, high temperature superconducting DC reactor. Dimensions of the conduction cooling system parts including HTS magnets, bobbin structures, current leads, support bars, and thermal exchangers were calculated and drawn using a 3D CAD program. A finite element method model was built for determining the optimal design parameters and analyzing the thermo-mechanical characteristics. The operating current and inductance of the reactor magnet were 1,500 A, 400 mH, respectively. The thermal load of the HTS DC reactor was analyzed for determining the cooling capacity of the cryo-cooler. The study results can be effectively utilized for the design and fabrication of a commercial HTS DC reactor.

  15. Inclusive Focus Particles in English and Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Sang-gu

    2011-01-01

    When discussing focus particles, it has been common practice to rely on the dichotomy of inclusive vs. exclusive particles, "a la" Konig (1991). Inclusive focus particles are often further divided into scalar particles, such as "also", "too", and "either", and non-scalar particles, such as "even". In this thesis, I advance a comparative analysis…

  16. Inclusive Focus Particles in English and Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Sang-gu

    2011-01-01

    When discussing focus particles, it has been common practice to rely on the dichotomy of inclusive vs. exclusive particles, "a la" Konig (1991). Inclusive focus particles are often further divided into scalar particles, such as "also", "too", and "either", and non-scalar particles, such as "even". In this thesis, I advance a comparative analysis…

  17. Non-local microscopic view of signal propagation times in BJTs biased up to high currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palestri, P.; Selmi, L.

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents a microscopic analysis of signal propagation delay in bipolar transistors featuring relevant non-equilibrium transport effects. First, the physical mechanisms responsible of signal delay are reviewed. A novel technique to extract signal delays from self-consistent Monte Carlo device simulations is presented. These results are then used for a physically based comparison between compact quasi-static delay formulas and more accurate particle simulations carried out over a broad range of collector currents.

  18. Chemistry of atmospheric nucleation: on the recent advances on precursor characterization and atmospheric cluster composition in connection with atmospheric new particle formation.

    PubMed

    Kulmala, M; Petäjä, T; Ehn, M; Thornton, J; Sipilä, M; Worsnop, D R; Kerminen, V-M

    2014-01-01

    The recent development in measurement techniques and theoretical understanding has enabled us to study atmospheric vapor, cluster and nanoparticle concentrations, dynamics, and their connection to atmospheric nucleation. Here we present a summary of the chemistry of atmospheric clustering, growing nanoparticles, and their precursors. In this work, we focus particularly on atmospheric gas-to-particle conversion and recent progress in its understanding.

  19. The effect of asphaltene particle size and distribution on the temporal advancement of the asphaltene deposition profile in the well column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinali Hasanvand, Mahdi; Mosayebi Behbahani, Reza; Feyzi, Farzaneh; Ali Mousavi Dehghani, Seyed

    2016-05-01

    Asphaltene deposition in oil wells is an inconvenient production problem. Generating a precise deposition model for the well column is essential for optimal well design and prevention/reduction of deposition-associated difficulties. The goal of this study is to determine the effects of various parameters on the deposition process. These parameters include oil viscosity, temperature, flow velocity, well diameter and asphaltene particle size and particle size distribution. The first five parameters are analyzed using Escobedo and Mansoori (2010), Cleaver and Yates (1975) and Friedlander and Johnstone (1957) asphaltene deposition models. The last parameter (asphaltene particle size distribution) is not directly included in the asphaltene deposition models. Therefore, a dynamic well column model is generated by combining transport phenomena (mass, heat and momentum transfer) equations with thermodynamic models. The model is fine-tuned and verified based on field data from an Iranian producing oil well with frequent asphaltene deposition problem and subsequently used for predicting the time-dependent development of the asphaltene deposition profile in the well column for a series of asphaltene particle size distributions. The results show the effect of the said parameters depends on how the buffer layer and Brownian motion are defined. The Escobedo and Mansoori (2010) model is found to make better predictions of deposited asphaltene in the studied well.

  20. Quasi-1D van der Waals materials as high current-density local interconnects (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyarov, Maxim; Aytan, Ece; Bloodgood, Matthew; Salguero, Tina T.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-09-01

    The continuous downscaling of interconnect dimensions in combination with the introduction of low-k dielectrics has increased the number of heat dissipation, integration and reliability challenges in modern electronics. As a result, there is a strong need for new materials that have high current-carrying capacity for applications as nanoscale interconnects. In this presentation, we show that quasi-one-dimensional (1D) van der Waals metals such as TaSe3 have excellent breakdown current density exceeding that of 5 MA/cm2. This value is above that currently achievable in conventional copper or aluminum wires. The quasi-1D van der Waals materials are characterized by strong bonds along one dimension and weak van der Waals bonds along two other dimensions. The material for this study was grown by the chemical vapor transport (CVT) method. Both mechanical and chemical exfoliation methods were used to fabricate nanowires with lateral dimensions below 100 nm. The dimensions of the quasi-1D nanowires were verified with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The metal (Ti/Au) contacts for the electrical characterization were deposited using electron beam evaporation (EBE). The measurements were conducted on a number of prototype interconnects with multiple electric contacts to ensure reproducibility. The obtained results suggest that quasi-1D van der Waals metals present a feasible alternative to conventional copper interconnects in terms of the current-carrying capacity and the breakdown current-density. This work was supported, in part, by the SRC and DARPA through STARnet Center for Function Accelerated nanoMaterial Engineering (FAME).

  1. Effects of Neutral Density on Energetic Ions Produced Near High-Current Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kameyama, Ikuya

    1997-01-01

    Energy distributions of ion current from high-current, xenon hollow cathodes, which are essential information to understand erosion phenomena observed in high-power ion thrusters, were obtained using an electrostatic energy analyzer (ESA). The effects of ambient pressure and external flow rate introduced immediately downstream of hollow cathode on ion currents with energies greater than that associated with the cathode-to-anode potential difference were investigated. The results were analyzed to determine the changes in the magnitudes of ion currents to the ESA at various energies. Either increasing the ambient pressure or adding external flow induces an increase in the distribution of ion currents with moderate energies (epsilon less than 25 to 35 eV) and a decrease in the distribution for high energies (epsilon greater than 25 to 35 eV). The magnitude of the current distribution increase in the moderate energy range is greater for a cathode equipped with a toroidal keeper than for one without a keeper, but the distribution in the high energy range does not seem to be affected by a keeper. An MHD model, which has been proposed to describe energetic-ion production mechanism in hollow cathode at high discharge currents, was developed to describe these effects. The results show, however, that this model involves no mechanism by which a significant increase of ion current could occur at any energy. It was found, on the other hand, that the potential-hill model of energetic ion production, which assumes existence of a local maximum of plasma potential, could explain combined increases in the currents of ions with moderate energies and decreases in high energy ions due to increased neutral atom density using a charge-exchange mechanism. The existing, simplified version of the potential-hill model, however, shows poor quantitative agreement with measured ion-current-energy-distribution changes induced by neutral density changes.

  2. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry; Alexander, Joshua; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Calle, Luz marina

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatment was used as a rapid repair measure to mitigate chloride induced corrosion of reinforced concrete in the field. EN treatment uses an electric field to transport positively charged nanoparticles to the reinforcement through the concrete capillary pores. Cylindrical reinforced concrete specimens were batched with 4.5 wt % salt content (based on cement mass). Three distinct electrokinetic treatments were conducted using high current density (up to 5 A/m2) to form a chloride penetration barrier that was established in 5 days, as opposed to the traditional 6-8 weeks, generally required for electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). These treatments included basic EN treatment, EN with additional calcium treatment, and basic ECE treatment. Field exposures were conducted at the NASA Beachside Corrosion Test Site, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. The specimens were subjected to sea water immersion at the test site as a posttreatment exposure. Following a 30-day post-treatment exposure period, the specimens were subjected to indirect tensile testing to evaluate treatment impact. The EN treated specimens exhibited 60% and 30% increases in tensile strength as compared to the untreated controls and ECE treated specimens respectively. The surfaces of the reinforcement bars of the control specimens were 67% covered by corrosion products. In contrast, the EN treated specimens exhibited corrosion coverage of only 4%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a dense concrete microstructure adjacent to the bars of the treated specimens as compared to the control and ECE specimens. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis of the polished EN treated specimens showed a reduction in chloride content by a factor of 20 adjacent to the bars. This study demonstrated that EN treatment was successful in forming a chloride penetration barrier rapidly. This work also showed that the chloride barrier was effective when samples were exposed to

  3. Characterization of a high current pulsed arc using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Martins, R.; Zaepffel, C.; Chemartin, L.; Lalande, Ph; Soufiani, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present the investigation realized on an experimental setup that simulates an arc column subjected to the transient phase of a lightning current waveform in laboratory conditions. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to assess space- and time-resolved properties of this high current pulsed arc. Different current peak levels are utilised in this work, ranging from 10 kA to 100 kA, with a peak time around 15 µs. Ionic lines of nitrogen and oxygen are used to determine the radial profiles of temperature and electron density of the arc channel over time from 2 µs to 36 µs. A combination of 192 N II and O II lines is considered in the calculation of the bound-bound contribution of the absorption coefficient of the plasma channel. Calculations of the optical thickness showed that self-absorption of these ionic lines in the arc column is important. To obtain temperature and electron density profiles in the arc, we solved the radiative transfer equation across the channel under an axisymmetric assumption and considering the channel formed by uniform concentric layers. For the 100 kA current peak level, the temperature reaches more than 38 000 K and the electron density reaches 5  ×  1018 cm-3. The pressure inside the channel is calculated using the air plasma composition at local thermodynamic equilibrium, and reaches 45 bar. The results are discussed and utilised to estimate the electrical conductivity of the arc channel.

  4. A time-resolved imaging and electrical study on a high current atmospheric pressure spark discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomares, J. M.; Kohut, A.; Galbács, G.; Engeln, R.; Geretovszky, Zs.

    2015-12-01

    We present a time-resolved imaging and electrical study of an atmospheric pressure spark discharge. The conditions of the present study are those used for nanoparticle generation in spark discharge generator setups. The oscillatory bipolar spark discharge was generated between two identical Cu electrodes in different configurations (cylindrical flat-end or tipped-end geometries, electrode gap from 0.5 to 4 mm), in a controlled co-axial N2 flow, and was supplied by a high voltage capacitor. Imaging data with nanosecond time resolution were collected using an intensified CCD camera. This data were used to study the time evolution of plasma morphology, total light emission intensity, and the rate of plasma expansion. High voltage and high current probes were employed to collect electrical data about the discharge. The electrical data recorded allowed, among others, the calculation of the equivalent resistance and inductance of the circuit, estimations for the energy dissipated in the spark gap. By combining imaging and electrical data, observations could be made about the correlation of the evolution of total emitted light and the dissipated power. It was also observed that the distribution of light emission of the plasma in the spark gap is uneven, as it exhibits a "hot spot" with an oscillating position in the axial direction, in correlation with the high voltage waveform. The initial expansion rate of the cylindrical plasma front was found to be supersonic; thus, the discharge releases a strong shockwave. Finally, the results on equivalent resistance and channel expansion are comparable to those of unipolar arcs. This shows the spark discharge has a similar behavior to the arc regime during the conductive phase and until the current oscillations stop.

  5. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  6. High current density PQQ-dependent alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase bioanodes.

    PubMed

    Aquino Neto, Sidney; Hickey, David P; Milton, Ross D; De Andrade, Adalgisa R; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we explore the bioelectrooxidation of ethanol using pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH and AldDH) enzymes for biofuel cell applications. The bioanode architectures were designed with both direct electron transfer (DET) and mediated electron transfer (MET) mechanisms employing high surface area materials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and MWCNT-decorated gold nanoparticles, along with different immobilization techniques. Three different polymeric matrices were tested (tetrabutyl ammonium bromide (TBAB)-modified Nafion; octyl-modified linear polyethyleneimine (C8-LPEI); and cellulose) in the DET studies. The modified Nafion membrane provided the best electrical communication between enzymes and the electrode surface, with catalytic currents as high as 16.8 ± 2.1 µA cm(-2). Then, a series of ferrocene redox polymers were evaluated for MET. The redox polymer 1,1'-dimethylferrocene-modified linear polyethyleneimine (FcMe2-C3-LPEI) provided the best electrochemical response. Using this polymer, the electrochemical assays conducted in the presence of MWCNTs and MWCNTs-Au indicated a Jmax of 781 ± 59 µA cm(-2) and 925 ± 68 µA cm(-2), respectively. Overall, from the results obtained here, DET using the PQQ-dependent ADH and AldDH still lacks high current density, while the bioanodes that operate via MET employing ferrocene-modified LPEI redox polymers show efficient energy conversion capability in ethanol/air biofuel cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Control of coupled-bunch instabilities in high current storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertson, G.

    1991-04-01

    Intense particle beams may be subject to coupled-bunch instabilities that would grow at rates greater than the bunch oscillation frequencies. The suppression of the growth requires both reduction of the driving impedances and active feedback of bunch motions. The shunt impedances of higher-order cavity resonances can be reduced by passive dampers and the beam impedance within the band of the fundamental resonance can be reduced by rf feedback around the cavity and power amplifier. The feedback of bunch motions composed of numerous coupled-bunch modes requires broad-band systems for which the amplifiers are costly. Examples proposed for electron storage rings are presented. 10 refs, 5 figs.

  8. An experimental investigation of cathode erosion in high current magnetoplasmadynamic arc discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codron, Douglas A.

    Since the early to mid 1960's, laboratory studies have demonstrated the unique ability of magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters to deliver an exceptionally high level of specific impulse and thrust at large power processing densities. These intrinsic advantages are why MPD thrusters have been identified as a prime candidate for future long duration space missions, including piloted Mars, Mars cargo, lunar cargo, and other missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The large total impulse requirements inherent of the long duration space missions demand the thruster to operate for a significant fraction of the mission burn time while requiring the cathodes to operate at 50 to 10,000 kW for 2,000 to 10,000 hours. The high current levels lead to high operational temperatures and a corresponding steady depletion of the cathode material by evaporation. This mechanism has been identified as the life-limiting component of MPD thrusters. In this research, utilizing subscale geometries, time dependent cathode axial temperature profiles under varying current levels (20 to 60 A) and argon gas mass flow rates (450 to 640 sccm) for both pure and thoriated solid tungsten cathodes were measured by means of both optical pyrometry and charged-coupled (CCD) camera imaging. Thoriated tungsten cathode axial temperature profiles were compared against those of pure tungsten to demonstrate the large temperature reducing effect lowered work function imparts by encouraging increased thermionic electron emission from the cathode surface. Also, Langmuir probing was employed to measure the electron temperature, electron density, and plasma potential near the "active zone" (the surface area of the cathode responsible for approximately 70% of the emitted current) in order to characterize the plasma environment and verify future model predictions. The time changing surface microstructure and elemental composition of the thoriated tungsten cathodes were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope

  9. Progress in Nanoengineered Microstructures for Tunable High-Current, High-Temperature Superconducting Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T. G.; Civale, L.; Maiorov, B.; Feldmann, D. M.; Coulter, Yates; Miller, D. J.; Maroni, Victor A.; Chen, Zhijun; Larbalestier, D. C.; Feenstra, Roeland; Li, Xiaoping; Huang, Y.; Kodenkandath, Thomas; Zhang, W.; Rupich, Marty; Malozemoff, Alex

    2008-01-01

    High critical current densities (J{sub c}) in thick films of the Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO, {Tc}{approx}92 K) superconductor directly depend upon the types of nanoscale defects and their densities within the films. A major challenge for developing a viable wire technology is to introduce nanoscale defect structures into the YBCO grains of the thick film suitable for flux pinning and the tailoring of the superconducting properties to specific, application-dependent, temperature and magnetic field conditions. Concurrently, the YBCO film needs to be integrated into a macroscopically defect-free conductor in which the grain-to-grain connectivity maintains levels of inter-grain J{sub c} that are comparable to the intra-grain J{sub c}. That is, high critical current (I{sub c}) YBCO coated conductors must contain engineered in homogeneities on the nanoscale, while being homogeneous on the macroscale. An analysis is presented of the advances in high-performance YBCO coated-conductors using chemical solution deposition (CSD) based on metal trifluoroacetates and the subsequent processing to nano-engineer the microstructure for tunable superconducting wires. Multi-scale structural, chemical, and electrical investigations of the CSD film processes, thick film development, key microstructural features, and wire properties are presented. Prospects for further development of much higher I{sub c} wires for large-scale, commercial application are discussed within the context of these recent advances.

  10. Simulating Electron Clouds in High-Current Ion Accelerators with Solenoid Focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W; Grote, D; Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Vay, J; Seidl, P; Roy, P; Coleman, J; Armijo, J; Haber, I

    2006-08-15

    Contamination from electrons is a concern for the solenoid-focused ion accelerators being developed for experiments in high-energy-density physics (HEDP). These electrons are produced directly by beam ions hitting lattice elements and intercepting diagnostics, or indirectly by ionization of desorbed neutral gas, and they are believed responsible for time dependence of the beam radius, emittance, and focal distance seen on the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The electrostatic particle-in-cell code WARP has been upgraded to included the physics needed to simulate electron-cloud phenomena. We present preliminary self-consistent simulations of STX experiments suggesting that the observed time dependence of the beam stems from a complicated interaction of beam ions, desorbed neutrals, and electrons.

  11. Simulating Electron Clouds in High-Current Ion Accelerators withSolenoid Focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Grote, D.P.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Vay, J.-L.; Seidl, P.A.; Roy, P.K.; Coleman, J.E.; Armijo, J.; Haber, I.

    2006-09-20

    Contamination from electrons is a concern for the solenoid-focused ion accelerators being developed for experiments in high-energy-density physics (HEDP). These electrons are produced directly by beam ions hitting lattice elements and intercepting diagnostics, or indirectly by ionization of desorbed neutral gas, and they are believed responsible for time dependence of the beam radius, emittance, and focal distance seen on the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The electrostatic particle-in-cell code WARP has been upgraded to included the physics needed to simulate electron-cloud phenomena. We present preliminary self-consistent simulations of STX experiments suggesting that the observed time dependence of the beam stems from a complicated interaction of beam ions, desorbed neutrals, and electrons.

  12. Three-dimensional simulations of high-current beams in induction accelerators with WARP3d

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D.P.; Friedman, A.; Haber, I.

    1995-09-01

    For many issues relevant to acceleration and propagation of heavy-ion beams for inertial confinement fusion, understanding the behavior of the beam requires the self-consistent inclusion of the self-fields of the beams in multiple dimensions. For these reasons, the three-dimensional simulation code WARP3d A.Friedman was developed. The code combines the particle-in-cell plasma simulation technique with a realistic description of the elements which make up an accelerator. In this paper, the general structure of the code is reviewed and details of two ongoing applications are presented along with a discussion of simulation techniques used. The most important results of this work are presented.

  13. RESULTS OF BEAM TESTS ON A HIGH CURRENT EBIS TEST STAND.

    SciTech Connect

    BEEBE,E.; ALESSI,J.; BELLAVIA,S.; HERSHCOVITCH,A.; KPONOU,A.; LOCKEY,R.; PIKIN,A.; PRELEC,K.; KUZNETSOV,G.; TIUNOV,M.

    1999-03-29

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory there is an R&D program to design an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) for use in a compact ion injector to be developed for the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC). The BNL effort is directed at developing an EBIS with intensities of 3 x 10{sup 9} particles/pulse of ions such as Au{sup 35+} and U{sup 45+}, and requires an electron beam on the order of 10A. The construction of a test stand (EBTS) with the full electron beam power and 1/3 the length of the EBIS for RHIC is nearing completion. Initial commissioning of the EBTS was made with pulsed electron beams of duration < 1ms and current up to 13 A. Details of the EBTS construction, results of the pulse tests, and preparations for DC electron beam tests are presented.

  14. Proceedings of NATO Advanced Research Workshop on the Formation, Transport and Consequences of Particles in Plasmas Held in Castera-Verduzan, France on 30 August-3 September 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-03

    round ýheld Si ower Heari--O Particle r ii rri Cide Wafer -Trap I’articie Trap * Quartz Rirrg Electrde Ex tesi n / itower Electrode Divrren, with Grrrurir...etched Gas-only Plasiria-on \\%a, tesied fir 11,101A. %Is-. s ii Y.r 1 ri’l :1 ht 1 I’ii i t’lsi ii~i Oln .111t ntis Ill- 11 ’I’ isit"I. \\1 I i t) 11i 11t

  15. Design of high-energy high-current linac with focusing by superconducting solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Batskikh, G.I.; Belugin, V.M.; Bondarev, B.I.

    1995-10-01

    The advancement of MRTI design for 1.5 GeV and 250 mA ion CW linac was presented in a previous report. In this new linac version all the way from input to output the ions are focused by magnetic fields of superconducting solenoids. The ion limit current is far beyond the needed value. The linac focusing channel offers major advantages over the more conventional ones. The acceptance is 1.7 times as large for such focusing channel as for quadrupole one. Concurrently, a random perturbation sensitivity for such channel is one order of magnitude smaller than in quadrupole channel. These focusing channel features allow to decrease beam matched radius and increase a linac radiation purity without aperture growth. {open_quotes}Regotron{close_quotes} is used as high power generator in linac main part. But D&W cavities need not be divided into sections connected by RF-bridges which denuded them of high coupling factor.

  16. Robust, easily shaped, and epoxy-free carbon-fiber-aluminum cathodes for generating high-current electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lie; Li, Limin; Wen, Jianchun; Wan, Hong

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the construction of carbon-fiber-aluminum (CFA) cathode by squeezing casting and its applications for generating high-current electron beams to drive high-power microwave sources. The fabrication process avoided using epoxy, a volatile deteriorating the vacuum system. These cathodes had a higher hardness than conventional aluminum, facilitating machining. After surface treatment, carbon fibers became the dominator determining emission property. A multineedle CFA cathode was utilized in a triode virtual cathode oscillator (vircator), powered by a ˜450 kV, ˜400 ns pulse. It was found that 300-400 MW, ˜250 ns microwave was radiated at a dominant frequency of 2.6 GHz. Further, this cathode can endure high-current-density emission without detectable degradation in performance as the pulse shot proceeded, showing the robust nature of carbon fibers as explosive emitters. Overall, this new class of cold cathodes offers a potential prospect of developing high-current electron beam sources.

  17. Robust, easily shaped, and epoxy-free carbon-fiber-aluminum cathodes for generating high-current electron beams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lie; Li, Limin; Wen, Jianchun; Wan, Hong

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the construction of carbon-fiber-aluminum (CFA) cathode by squeezing casting and its applications for generating high-current electron beams to drive high-power microwave sources. The fabrication process avoided using epoxy, a volatile deteriorating the vacuum system. These cathodes had a higher hardness than conventional aluminum, facilitating machining. After surface treatment, carbon fibers became the dominator determining emission property. A multineedle CFA cathode was utilized in a triode virtual cathode oscillator (vircator), powered by a approximately 450 kV, approximately 400 ns pulse. It was found that 300-400 MW, approximately 250 ns microwave was radiated at a dominant frequency of 2.6 GHz. Further, this cathode can endure high-current-density emission without detectable degradation in performance as the pulse shot proceeded, showing the robust nature of carbon fibers as explosive emitters. Overall, this new class of cold cathodes offers a potential prospect of developing high-current electron beam sources.

  18. Demonstration of high current carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors at industrially relevant voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Mitchell

    lifetime and the potential for an all transparent display. And because carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and organics are used, CN-VFET and CN-VOLET devices are compatible with flexible displays. This dissertation describes the first ever demonstration of CN-VFETs and CN-VOLETs and relates their performance to the specific properties of the CNTs and the new device architecture. In the work that followed, the CN-VFET was systematically optimized overcoming the problems revealed in the demonstration devices. The large undesired hysteresis was decreased by 96%, the on/off ratio was improved three orders of magnitude and the operating voltages were reduced to state of the art values. Additionally, the current output per device area of the CN-VFET was demonstrated to be greater than any other low resolution patterned organic transistor by a factor of 3.9. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the CNTs induce a reorientation of the high mobility plane in small molecule organics like pentacene to coincide with the vertical direction, giving additional explanation for the large currents observed in the CN-VFET. The ability to drive high currents and potentially inexpensive fabrication may provide the solution for the AMOLED backplane problem.

  19. Space-charge effects in ultra-high current electron bunches generated by laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Grinner, F. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Maier, A. R.; Becker, S.; Mikhailova, J. M.

    2009-02-11

    Recent advances in laser-plasma accelerators, including the generation of GeV-scale electron bunches, enable applications such as driving a compact free-electron-laser (FEL). Significant reduction in size of the FEL is facilitated by the expected ultra-high peak beam currents (10-100 kA) generated in laser-plasma accelerators. At low electron energies such peak currents are expected to cause space-charge effects such as bunch expansion and induced energy variations along the bunch, potentially hindering the FEL process. In this paper we discuss a self-consistent approach to modeling space-charge effects for the regime of laser-plasma-accelerated ultra-compact electron bunches at low or moderate energies. Analytical treatments are considered as well as point-to-point particle simulations, including the beam transport from the laser-plasma accelerator through focusing devices and the undulator. In contradiction to non-self-consistent analyses (i.e., neglecting bunch evolution), which predict a linearly growing energy chirp, we have found the energy chirp reaches a maximum and decreases thereafter. The impact of the space-charge induced chirp on FEL performance is discussed and possible solutions are presented.

  20. Study of the possibility to control ion generation and transport in a high-current vacuum spark

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. N.; Zemchenkova, N. V.; Prokhorovich, D. E.

    2011-06-15

    The possibilities of optimizing a high-current vacuum spark as a source of metal ions are discussed. The influence of the shape and size of the electrodes on both the depth to which the hot plasma region is immersed in the surrounding cold matter and the plasma state in the hot spot, which is the source of multicharged ions, is demonstrated. Methods for optimization of the design of the discharge device for increasing the ion yield from a high-current vacuum spark are considered.

  1. Advanced biostack experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors; (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars; (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness); and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  2. Advanced biostack experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, H.

    1981-11-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness) and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  3. Advanced biostack experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors; (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars; (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness); and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  4. An Advanced Coarse-Grained Nucleosome Core Particle Model for Computer Simulations of Nucleosome-Nucleosome Interactions under Varying Ionic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K+), divalent (Mg2+) or trivalent (Co(NH3)63+) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K+, to partial aggregation with Mg2+ and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex3+. The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions. PMID:23418426

  5. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+)), divalent (Mg(2+)) or trivalent (Co(NH(3))(6) (3+)) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+), to partial aggregation with Mg(2+) and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+). The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions.

  6. High brightness, high current injector design for the ATF upgrade at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-04-01

    Brookhaven National Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is in the process of moving to a new place and upgrading its major capabilities: The electron beam energy and CO2 laser power. Specifically, the maximum electron beam energy will be first projected to 100-150 MeV and then upgraded to 500 MeV while at the same time the laser power will increase 100 fold, thus making the new ATF a powerful tool in advanced accelerator concept research. The bright electron bunch produced by the new state-of-the-art photocathode rf gun will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. The injector is a key element of this accelerator upgrade. It must deliver a high average current beam with very small transverse and longitudinal emittances, at a sufficiently high energy that space charge effects are under control. We review here the detailed injector design and present first results from beam dynamics simulations. We give emphasis in the production of compressed flat beams which have important applications in novel light-source concepts and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. We present a theoretical model and with the aid of simulation examine the influence of space charge, bunch compression and suggest a operating regime with minimal phase space dilutions.

  7. Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This section of the publication includes papers entitled: (1) Coupled growth in hypermonotectics; (2) Directional solidification of refined Al-4 wt.% Cu alloys; (3) Effects of convection on interface curvature during growth of concentrated ternary compounds; (4) Directional solidification of Al-1.5 wt.% Ni alloys; (5) Interactive response of advancing phase boundaries to particles; (6) INTeractive Response of Advancing Phase boundaries to Particles-INTRAPP; and (7) Particle engulfment and pushing by solidifying interfaces.

  8. Double disordered YBCO coated conductors of industrial scale: high currents in high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraimov, D.; Ballarino, A.; Barth, C.; Bottura, L.; Dietrich, R.; Francis, A.; Jaroszynski, J.; Majkic, G. S.; McCallister, J.; Polyanskii, A.; Rossi, L.; Rutt, A.; Santos, M.; Schlenga, K.; Selvamanickam, V.; Senatore, C.; Usoskin, A.; Viouchkov, Y. L.

    2015-11-01

    A significant increase of critical current in high magnetic field, up to 31 T, was recorded in long tapes manufactured by employing a double-disorder route. In a double-disordered high-temperature superconductor (HTS), a superimposing of intrinsic and extrinsic disorder takes place in a way that (i) the intrinsic disorder is caused by local stoichiometry deviations that lead to defects of crystallinity that serve as pining centers in the YBa2Cu3O x-δ matrix and (ii) the extrinsic disorder is introduced via embedded atoms or particles of foreign material (e.g. barium zirconate), which create a set of lattice defects. We analyzed possible technological reasons for this current gain. The properties of these tapes over a wider field-temperature range as well as field anisotropy were also studied. Record values of critical current as high as 309 A at 31 T, 500 A at 18 Tm and 1200 A at 5 T were found in 4 mm wide tape at 4.2 K and B perpendicular to tape surface. HTS layers were processed in medium-scale equipment that allows a maximum batch length of 250 m while 22 m long batches were provided for investigation. Abnormally high ratios (up to 10) of critical current density measured at 4.2 K, 19 T to critical current density measured at 77 K, self-field were observed in tapes with the highest in-field critical current. Anisotropy of the critical current as well as angular dependences of n and α values were investigated. The temperature dependence of critical current is presented for temperatures between 4.2 and 40 K. Prospects for the suppression of the dog-bone effect by Cu plating and upscale of processing chain to >500 m piece length are discussed.

  9. Three-dimensional hollow-structured binary oxide particles as an advanced anode material for high-rate and long cycle life lithium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Deli; Wang, Jie; He, Huan; ...

    2015-12-30

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising anode candidates for next-generation lithium-ion batteries for their high theoretical capacity. However, the large volume expansion and low lithium ion diffusivity leading to a poor charging/discharging performance. In this study, we developed a surfactant and template-free strategy for the synthesis of a composite of CoxFe3–xO4 hollow spheres supported by carbon nanotubes via an impregnation–reduction–oxidation process. The synergy of the composite, as well as the hollow structures in the electrode materials, not only facilitate Li ion and electron transport, but also accommodate large volume expansion. Using state-of-the-art electron tomography, we directly visualize themore » particles in 3-D, where the voids in the hollow structures serve to buffer the volume expansion of the material. These improvements result in a high reversible capacity as well as an outstanding rate performance for lithium-ion battery applications. As a result, this study sheds light on large-scale production of hollow structured metal oxides for commercial applications in energy storage and conversion.« less

  10. Three-dimensional hollow-structured binary oxide particles as an advanced anode material for high-rate and long cycle life lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deli; Wang, Jie; He, Huan; Han, Lili; Lin, Ruoqian; Xin, Huolin L.; Wu, Zexing; Liu, Hongfang

    2015-12-30

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising anode candidates for next-generation lithium-ion batteries for their high theoretical capacity. However, the large volume expansion and low lithium ion diffusivity leading to a poor charging/discharging performance. In this study, we developed a surfactant and template-free strategy for the synthesis of a composite of CoxFe3–xO4 hollow spheres supported by carbon nanotubes via an impregnation–reduction–oxidation process. The synergy of the composite, as well as the hollow structures in the electrode materials, not only facilitate Li ion and electron transport, but also accommodate large volume expansion. Using state-of-the-art electron tomography, we directly visualize the particles in 3-D, where the voids in the hollow structures serve to buffer the volume expansion of the material. These improvements result in a high reversible capacity as well as an outstanding rate performance for lithium-ion battery applications. As a result, this study sheds light on large-scale production of hollow structured metal oxides for commercial applications in energy storage and conversion.

  11. Advanced Penning-type ion source development and passive beam focusing techniques for an associated particle imaging neutron generator with enhanced spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sy, Amy Vong

    The use of accelerator-based neutron generators for non-destructive imaging and analysis in commercial and security applications is continuously under development, with improvements to available systems and combinations of available techniques revealing new capabilities for real-time elemental and isotopic analysis. The recent application of associated particle imaging (API) techniques for time- and directionally-tagged neutrons to induced fission and transmission imaging methods demonstrates such capabilities in the characterization of fissile material configurations and greatly benefits from improvements to existing neutron generator systems. Increased neutron yields and improved spatial resolution can enhance the capabilities of imaging methods utilizing the API technique. The work presented in this dissertation focused on the development of components for use within an API neutron generator with enhanced system spatial resolution. The major focus areas were the ion source development for plasma generation, and passive ion beam focusing techniques for the small ion beam widths necessary for the enhanced spatial resolution. The ion source development focused on exploring methods for improvement of Penning-type ion sources that are used in conventional API neutron generator systems, while the passive beam focusing techniques explored both ion beam collimation and ion guiding with tapered dielectric capillaries for reduced beam widths at the neutron production target.

  12. A facile hydrothermal recovery of nano sealed MnO2 particle from waste batteries: An advanced material for electrochemical and environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylarappa, M.; Venkata Lakshmi, V.; Vishnu Mahesh, K. R.; Nagaswarupa, H. P.; Raghavendra, N.

    2016-09-01

    This work deliberates a method for manganese (Mn) recovery as manganese oxide obtained by leaching of waste batteries with 3M sulphuric acid. The Experimental test for the recovery of Mn present within the waste dry cell batteries were carried out by a reductive leachant. Elemental composition of leached sample was confirmed by Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and Surface morphology of the recovered MnO2 was examined by using Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM). Phase composition was confirmed from X-ray Diffractro meter (XRD). The obtained leached solution was treated with 4M NaOH, yielded to Manganese Dioxide with high extraction degree, while it do not touches the Zn content within the solutions. The recovered samples were characterized using XRD, EDAX, SEM and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The electrochemical properties of the as-recovered sample from leached solution was examined used cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Remarkably, the 80 wt.% MnO2 displays reversibility, diffusion constant, smaller equivalent series resistance and charge transfer resistance in 0.5M NaOH showed superior results as compared to alternative electrolytes. The ideal capacitive behaviour of MnO2 electrode and nano particle was applied to photocatalytic degradation of dyes.

  13. Development of advanced model catalysts: A study of catalysis over epitaxially grown titanium oxide films, palladium foils and platinum nano-particle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Peter W.

    1997-11-01

    Titania overlayers were grown in two different ordered structures on Pt(111) as seen by Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED). Fully oxidized, films maintain the symmetry of top layer of the substrate and form a coincident 18.2 A unit cell. These overlayers could be grown in monolayer and multi-layer coverages. They are seen by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to have TiOsb2 stoichiometry. Above 400sp°C the oxide disproportionates and titanium migrates into the bulk to form an alloy. The LEED and XPS data are consistent with the model of a close-packed lattice of oxygen anions with titanium cations in the octahedral sites. Vacuum annealing above 600sp°C forms a partially reduced monolayer with the stoichiometry Tisb4Osb7. This overlayer does not have the symmetry of the substrate. The unit cell is given by the coincidence of the substrate lattice with a rectangular cell of 3.5 A x 4.2 A. Ion Scattering Spectroscopy data suggests the structure is formed upon creating oxygen vacancies. Ethane oxidation was performed over palladium foils under a wide range of reactant concentrations to produce COsb2, Hsb2O, CHsb4 and Csb2Hsb4. The foils required an initial activation period at high temperature (>400sp°C) under fuel rich reaction conditions. Methane and COsb2 displayed similar kinetics although methane was produced with ˜1/85spth the rate. Ethylene was a reaction intermediate and eventually converted to COsb2. Depending on their concentration, water and oxygen inhibited combustion. A mechanism consistent with the observed kinetics is proposed in which the rate determining step is ethyl formation on a Pd-PdO or PdO-PdO two-atom site. Electron Beam Lithography was used to fabricate nanometer-scale arrays of platinum particles on an oxidized silicon wafer. Low energy ion bombardment was used to clean the array, which was then active for ethylene hydrogenation with rates comparable to the literature. Thermal desorption experiments demonstrated the possibility of

  14. Issues concerning high current lower energy electron beams required for ion cooling between EBIS LINAC and booster

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2009-03-01

    Some issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that will be needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, are examined. Options for propagating such an electron beam, as well as the effect of neutralizing background plasma on electron and ion beam parameters are calculated. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper.

  15. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a high-current electric discharge in a closed volume

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Gritsinin, S. I.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kuleshov, P. S.; Popov, N. A.; Starik, A. M.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2009-06-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies and numerical calculations of the ignition of a stoichiometric CH{sub 4}: O{sub 2} gas mixture by a high-current gliding discharge. It is shown that this type of discharge generates an axially propagating thermal wave (precursor) that penetrates into the gas medium and leads to fast gas heating. This process is followed by an almost simultaneous ignition of the gas mixture over the entire reactor volume.

  16. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a high-current electric discharge in a closed volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Gritsinin, S. I.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kuleshov, P. S.; Popov, N. A.; Starik, A. M.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2009-06-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies and numerical calculations of the ignition of a stoichiometric CH4: O2 gas mixture by a high-current gliding discharge. It is shown that this type of discharge generates an axially propagating thermal wave (precursor) that penetrates into the gas medium and leads to fast gas heating. This process is followed by an almost simultaneous ignition of the gas mixture over the entire reactor volume.

  17. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans [Reno, NV; Chakrabarty, Rajan K [Reno, NV; Arnott, W Patrick [Reno, NV

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  18. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  19. High Current Responsivity and Wide Modulation Bandwidth Terahertz Detector Using High-Electron-Mobility Transistor for Wireless Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Nukariya, T.; Ueda, Y.; Otsuka, T.; Asada, M.

    2016-07-01

    A high-current-responsivity terahertz (THz) detector was fabricated using a broadband bow-tie antenna and an InAlAs/InGaAs high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) with a short gate length. High-current responsivity can be achieved by using a short gate length; the resulting high transconductance exhibited ballistic transport in the channel. We fabricated the HEMT detector with a 50-nm-long channel; the transconductance was 1.2 S/mm and the subthreshold slope was 120 mV/dec, yielding a high-current responsivity (˜5 A/W) and a cutoff frequency of 460 GHz. We also measured the modulation bandwidth of the THz detector using a heterodyne mixing technique with a uni-traveling carrier photodiode (UTC-PD) for providing the radio frequency (RF) and a frequency multiplier as a local oscillator. The intensity of the intermediate signal (IF) was measured by changing the frequency of the UTC-PD; very high bandwidths of up to 26 GHz were obtained. The experimental results agree well with electromagnetic simulations, which indicate that the bandwidth is determined by the external circuit. The conversion gain from RF to IF was -2 dB in the heterodyne mixing by using the HEMT detector.

  20. High gain GaAs Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches (PCSS): Device lifetime, high current testing, optical pulse generators

    SciTech Connect

    Zutavern, F.J.; Loubriel, G.M.; Helgeson, W.D.; O`Malley, M.W.; Gallegos, R.R.; Hjalmarson, H.P.; Baca, A.G.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents results from three areas of GaAs PCSS research and development: device lifetime, high current switching, and PCSS-driven laser diode arrays (LDA). The authors have performed device lifetime tests on both lateral and vertical switches as a function of current amplitude, pulse width, and charging time. At present, their longest-lived switch reached 4 {times} 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show damage near the contacts even after only 5 pulses. They are presently searching for the threshold at which no damage is evident after a single shot. In high current tests, they have reached 5.2 kA at 4.2 kV. This was achieved using twenty fiber-optic coupled lasers to distribute current filaments over a 5 mm wide PCSS. Current waveforms and images of the current filaments as a function of current amplitude will be presented. The lasers used to trigger the high current PCSS were driven with a miniature PCSS. Low inductance, high speed GaAs PCSS are very effective as short pulse laser diode array drivers. Some types of arrays gain switch, producing a compressed optical pulse which is only 75 ps wide. Results from tests with a variety of laser diode arrays will be presented.

  1. The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia Laboratories and HCEI.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. , Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. , Tomsk, Russia); Wakeland, Peter Eric; McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

    2010-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory. An extensive evaluation of the LTD technology is being performed at SNL and the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI) in Tomsk Russia. Two types of High Current LTD cavities (LTD I-II, and 1-MA LTD) were constructed and tested individually and in a voltage adder configuration (1-MA cavity only). All cavities performed remarkably well and the experimental results are in full agreement with analytical and numerical calculation predictions. A two-cavity voltage adder is been assembled and currently undergoes evaluation. This is the first step towards the completion of the 10-cavity, 1-TW module. This MYKONOS voltage adder will be the first ever IVA built with a transmission line insulated with deionized water. The LTD II cavity renamed LTD III will serve as a test bed for evaluating a number of different types of switches, resistors, alternative capacitor configurations, cores

  2. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  3. Effect of Fe and Zr ion implantation and high-current electron irradiation treatment on chemical and mechanical properties of Ti-V-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnjak, Alexander D.; Kobzev, Alexander P.; Gritsenko, Boris P.; Sokolov, Sergey; Bazyl, Elena; Sviridenko, Nikolai V.; Valyaev, Alexander N.; Ivanov, Yurii F.

    2000-03-01

    Using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, nuclear elastic resonance analysis, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and wear resistance and microhardness tests, the alloy Ti41-V41-Al18 was investigated after Fe ion (60 kV) and Zr (40 kV) ion implantation and subsequent high-current electron beam (HCEB) irradiation at an energy flow density of 6 J/cm2, called duplex treatment. Profiles show that the maximum concentration of Fe ions was 16.5 at. % at 85 nm from sample surface and that of Zr ions was 0.85 at. % at 56 nm. The maximum of the Fe concentration profile was found to shift to the large sample depth toward after increasing the implantation dose. The surface alloy layer is composed of a number of structures: grains of dislocation substructure (2×1010 cm-2), grains with plates, and grains with packed martensite. The disorientation of regions is observed. After HCEB treatment, the disorientation of microregions increases (Δα=7.5°) and particles of Ti2Fe are formed. After double implantation, the dry friction wear and the friction coefficient decreased. After the duplex treatment, the thickness of the hardened layer and the wear resistance increased.

  4. High current pulse striplines

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Bourkland et al.

    2001-06-22

    There are two different horn systems under construction at Fermilab for neutrino beamlines. The NuMI project requires a power supply that operates at 970 V, 205 kA, 2.6 ms, and 0.53 pps. The MiniBooNE project requires a power supply that operates at 5.5 kV, 170 kA, 140 {micro}s and 5 pps. Both require long low inductance connections between the power supply and horn; 60 feet for MiniBooNE and 230 feet for NuMI. This paper discusses several electrical and mechanical design requirements that have been overcome. These include low impedance, radiation hardness, voltage holdoff, clamping for electrical and mechanical connections and humidity and dust control. Measurements of the inductance of the striplines and voltage holdoff will be compared to calculations. The results of some tests will be discussed.

  5. The structure and properties of boron carbide ceramics modified by high-current pulsed electron-beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Yuri; Tolkachev, Oleg Petyukevich, Maria Polisadova, Valentina; Teresov, Anton; Ivanova, Olga Ikonnikova, Irina

    2016-01-15

    The present work is devoted to numerical simulation of temperature fields and the analysis of structural and strength properties of the samples surface layer of boron carbide ceramics treated by the high-current pulsed electron-beam of the submillisecond duration. The samples made of sintered boron carbide ceramics are used in these investigations. The problem of calculating the temperature field is reduced to solving the thermal conductivity equation. The electron beam density ranges between 8…30 J/cm{sup 2}, while the pulse durations are 100…200 μs in numerical modelling. The results of modelling the temperature field allowed ascertaining the threshold parameters of the electron beam, such as energy density and pulse duration. The electron beam irradiation is accompanied by the structural modification of the surface layer of boron carbide ceramics either in the single-phase (liquid or solid) or two-phase (solid-liquid) states. The sample surface of boron carbide ceramics is treated under the two-phase state (solid-liquid) conditions of the structural modification. The surface layer is modified by the high-current pulsed electron-beam produced by SOLO installation at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia. The elemental composition and the defect structure of the modified surface layer are analyzed by the optical instrument, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties of the modified layer are determined measuring its hardness and crack resistance. Research results show that the melting and subsequent rapid solidification of the surface layer lead to such phenomena as fragmentation due to a crack network, grain size reduction, formation of the sub-grained structure due to mechanical twinning, and increase of hardness and crack resistance.

  6. The structure and properties of boron carbide ceramics modified by high-current pulsed electron-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yuri; Tolkachev, Oleg; Petyukevich, Maria; Teresov, Anton; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Polisadova, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    The present work is devoted to numerical simulation of temperature fields and the analysis of structural and strength properties of the samples surface layer of boron carbide ceramics treated by the high-current pulsed electron-beam of the submillisecond duration. The samples made of sintered boron carbide ceramics are used in these investigations. The problem of calculating the temperature field is reduced to solving the thermal conductivity equation. The electron beam density ranges between 8…30 J/cm2, while the pulse durations are 100…200 μs in numerical modelling. The results of modelling the temperature field allowed ascertaining the threshold parameters of the electron beam, such as energy density and pulse duration. The electron beam irradiation is accompanied by the structural modification of the surface layer of boron carbide ceramics either in the single-phase (liquid or solid) or two-phase (solid-liquid) states. The sample surface of boron carbide ceramics is treated under the two-phase state (solid-liquid) conditions of the structural modification. The surface layer is modified by the high-current pulsed electron-beam produced by SOLO installation at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia. The elemental composition and the defect structure of the modified surface layer are analyzed by the optical instrument, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties of the modified layer are determined measuring its hardness and crack resistance. Research results show that the melting and subsequent rapid solidification of the surface layer lead to such phenomena as fragmentation due to a crack network, grain size reduction, formation of the sub-grained structure due to mechanical twinning, and increase of hardness and crack resistance.

  7. A new range of high-current Tandetron TM accelerator systems with terminal voltages of 1-6 MV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mous, D. J. W.; Visser, J.; Gottdang, A.; Haitsma, R. G.

    2004-06-01

    HVE has designed a range of high-current Tandetrons TM with terminal voltages of 1 MV up to 6 MV. Characteristic for the accelerator design is the coaxial construction of the all-solid-state power supply that is wrapped around the high-energy acceleration tube. Equipped with a new all-solid-state RF driver, the Tandetrons TM are able to provide ion beams with output powers in excess of 10 kW and are as such suitable for applications like neutron production in biomedical research, boron neutron capture therapy, isotope production for positron emission tomography, as well as explosives detection using pulsed fast neutron analysis. Recently, a 1.25 MV version has passed the pre-delivery factory tests during which it was conditioned up to 1.5 MV and has delivered more than 1 mA target current. It will be used as a source of intermediate energy neutrons for the quantification of Al in human tissues. This specific application draws on the high-current capability of the Tandetron TM. The injector is equipped with one multi-cusp ion source, but injectors can comprise two multi-cusp ion sources with output currents of up to several mA's for H/D and more than 100 μA for He. A 2 MV/1 mA version of the high-current range is currently under construction for the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A recently installed 5 MV version of this range of Tandetrons TM dedicated to scientific research has demonstrated terminal voltage ripple below 10 -5 as well as an extremely fast transient response.

  8. Radiation damage in single crystal CVD diamond material investigated with a high current relativistic 197Au beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietraszko, J.; Galatyuk, T.; Grilj, V.; Koenig, W.; Spataro, S.; Träger, M.

    2014-11-01

    Single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition (ScCVD) diamond based prototype detectors have been constructed for the high intensity heavy ion experiments HADES and CBM at the future FAIR facility at GSI Darmstadt. Their properties have been studied with a high current density beam (about 2-3×106/s/mm2) of 1.25A GeV Au69+197 ions. Details of the design, the intrinsic properties of the detectors and their performance after irradiation with such a beam are reported.

  9. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of the high- current emission lanthanum and niobium contained ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolmatov, O. Yu; Shamanin, I. V.; Chursin, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the production of metal-ceramic high-current emitters containing lanthanum hexaboride LaB6 by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis. Tests of emitters as explosive-emission cathodes in an OMEGA-350 microsecond accelerator are presented. Experiments show that when a metal-ceramic cathode is used, the emitted energy was 12-17% higher than that produced by tungsten and graphite cathodes and the beam “signature” is a circle with a small (∼ 15%) variation in radius.

  10. Deep-blue efficient OLED based on NPB with little efficiency roll-off under high current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian

    2017-03-01

    NPB usually is used as a hole-transport layer in OLED. In fact, it is a standard pure blue-emission material. However, its light-emitting efficiency in OLED is low due to emissive nature of organic material. Herein, a deep-blue OLDE based on NPB was fabricated. The light-emitting efficiency of the device demonstrates a moderate value, and efficiency roll-off is little under high current density. The device demonstrates that the electroplex's emission decreases with increasing electric field intensity.

  11. Study of the contributions of the electrode materials to the plasma of a high-current vacuum spark

    SciTech Connect

    Bashutin, O. A.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Dodulad, E. I.; Savjolov, A. S.; Sarantsev, S. A.

    2012-03-15

    The contribution of the electrode material to the formation of the plasma of a low-inductive high-current vacuum spark and its influence on the process of discharge micropinching were studied using X-ray spectroscopy and laser diagnostics. Electrode system configurations are determined in which the contributions of the materials of both electrodes to the plasma emitting X-rays are comparable and in which the contribution of one electrode is dominating. It is found that discharge pinching occurs primarily in the vapor of the pointed electrode independently of its polarity. The experimental results indicate the formation of a suprathermal electron beam in the micropinch region.

  12. Influence of irradiation number of high current pulsed electron beam on the structure and properties of M50 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fangjun; Tang, Guangze; Guo, Guangwei; Ma, Xinxin; Ozur, G. E.

    2010-08-01

    The influence of high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation numbers on the microstructure, wear and corrosion resistance properties of M50 steel was studied. The crystallize phase, surface morphology, hardness, oxidation wear and corrosion resistance of samples were analyzed using XRD, SEM, nanoindenter, wear tester and electrochemical corrosion tests. The results reveal that the hardness and wear resistance of irradiated samples decrease compared with untreated sample because of the increasing of austenite content in the melted layer; while the corrosion resistance of irradiated samples is higher than untreated sample.

  13. Microstructural, textural and hardness evolution of commercially pure Zr surface-treated by high current pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Linjiang; Chen, Baofeng; Wang, Shuyan; Zhang, Zhuo; Murty, Korukonda L.

    2016-12-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatments were performed for a commercially pure Zr sheet, with remarkable surface modifications demonstrated. After the HCPEB treatments, the prior equiaxed grains with a bimodal basal texture are replaced by ultra fine plates with dense nanotwins and an unusual fiber texture of < 11 2 bar 0 > normal to the sheet surface. Increased number of pulses leads to further refined microstructures and intensified textures, jointly resulting in continuous increase of hardness. Reasons for such modifications could mainly be attributed to ultra fast heating/cooling and strong variant selection due to presence of complex thermal and stress fields.

  14. Perspective: Dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Español, Pep; Warren, Patrick B.

    2017-04-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) belongs to a class of models and computational algorithms developed to address mesoscale problems in complex fluids and soft matter in general. It is based on the notion of particles that represent coarse-grained portions of the system under study and allow, therefore, reaching time and length scales that would be otherwise unreachable from microscopic simulations. The method has been conceptually refined since its introduction almost twenty five years ago. This perspective surveys the major conceptual improvements in the original DPD model, along with its microscopic foundation, and discusses outstanding challenges in the field. We summarize some recent advances and suggest avenues for future developments.

  15. Perspective: Dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Warren, Patrick B

    2017-04-21

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) belongs to a class of models and computational algorithms developed to address mesoscale problems in complex fluids and soft matter in general. It is based on the notion of particles that represent coarse-grained portions of the system under study and allow, therefore, reaching time and length scales that would be otherwise unreachable from microscopic simulations. The method has been conceptually refined since its introduction almost twenty five years ago. This perspective surveys the major conceptual improvements in the original DPD model, along with its microscopic foundation, and discusses outstanding challenges in the field. We summarize some recent advances and suggest avenues for future developments.

  16. The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP) commercial payload is making use of major advances in separation technology: The Phase Partitioning Experiment (PPE); the Micorencapsulation experiment; and the Hemoglobin Separation Experiment (HSE). Using ADSEP, commercial researchers will attempt to determine the partition coefficients for model particles in a two-phase system. With this information, researchers can develop a higher resolution, more effective cell isolation procedure that can be used for many different types of research and for improved health care. The advanced separation technology is already being made available for use in ground-based laboratories.

  17. The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP) commercial payload is making use of major advances in separation technology: The Phase Partitioning Experiment (PPE); the Micorencapsulation experiment; and the Hemoglobin Separation Experiment (HSE). Using ADSEP, commercial researchers will attempt to determine the partition coefficients for model particles in a two-phase system. With this information, researchers can develop a higher resolution, more effective cell isolation procedure that can be used for many different types of research and for improved health care. The advanced separation technology is already being made available for use in ground-based laboratories.

  18. Specific and efficient electrochemical selection of Geoalkalibacter subterraneus and Desulfuromonas acetoxidans in high current-producing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pierra, Mélanie; Carmona-Martínez, Alessandro A; Trably, Eric; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Bernet, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Two different saline sediments were used to inoculate potentiostatically controlled reactors (a type of microbial bioelectrochemical system, BES) operated in saline conditions (35 gNaCl l(-1)). Reactors were fed with acetate or a mixture of acetate and butyrate at two pH values: 7.0 or 5.5. Electroactive biofilm formation lag-phase, maximum current density production and coulombic efficiency were used to evaluate the overall performance of reactors. High current densities up to 8.5 A m(-2) were obtained using well-defined planar graphite electrodes. Additionally, biofilm microbial communities were characterized by CE-SSCP and 454 pyrosequencing. As a result of this procedure, two anode-respiring bacteria (ARB) always dominated the anodic biofilms: Geoalkalibacter subterraneus and/or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans. This suggests that a strong electrochemically driven selection process imposed by the applied potential occurs in the BES system. Moreover, the emergence of Glk. subterraneus in anodic biofilms significantly contributes to broaden the spectrum of high current producing microorganisms electrochemically isolated from environmental samples.

  19. A high-current electron gun for the electron beam ion trap at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, S. Baumann, T. M.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Snyder, A.

    2014-02-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) in NSCL’s reaccelerator ReA uses continuous ion injection and accumulation. In order to maximize capture efficiency and minimize breeding time into high charge states, the EBIT requires a high-current/high current-density electron beam. A new electron gun insert based on a concave Ba-dispenser cathode has been designed and built to increase the current transmitted through the EBIT’s superconducting magnet. With the new insert, stable EBIT operating conditions with 0.8 A of electron beam have been established. The design of the electron gun is presented together with calculated and measured perveance data. In order to assess the experimental compression of the electron beam, a pinhole CCD camera has been set up to measure the electron beam radius. The camera observes X-rays emitted from highly charged ions, excited by the electron beam. Initial tests with this camera setup will be presented. They indicate that a current density of 640 A/cm{sup 2} has been reached when the EBIT magnet was operated at 4 T.

  20. A high-current electron gun for the electron beam ion trap at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, S.; Baumann, T. M.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Snyder, A.

    2014-02-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) in NSCL's reaccelerator ReA uses continuous ion injection and accumulation. In order to maximize capture efficiency and minimize breeding time into high charge states, the EBIT requires a high-current/high current-density electron beam. A new electron gun insert based on a concave Ba-dispenser cathode has been designed and built to increase the current transmitted through the EBIT's superconducting magnet. With the new insert, stable EBIT operating conditions with 0.8 A of electron beam have been established. The design of the electron gun is presented together with calculated and measured perveance data. In order to assess the experimental compression of the electron beam, a pinhole CCD camera has been set up to measure the electron beam radius. The camera observes X-rays emitted from highly charged ions, excited by the electron beam. Initial tests with this camera setup will be presented. They indicate that a current density of 640 A/cm2 has been reached when the EBIT magnet was operated at 4 T.

  1. Does lightning destroy rocks?: Results from a laboratory lightning experiment using an impulse high-current generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakasa, Sachi A.; Nishimura, Seisuke; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Matsukura, Yukinori

    2012-08-01

    To understand the destruction of rocks and changes to landforms by lightning strikes, laboratory experiments of lightning strikes were performed using three kinds of rock samples as targets. Artificial lightning with known electric current was simulated by an impulse high-current generator in the laboratory. The artificial lightning is different to natural lightning. The high-current generator can generate up to 20 kA of electric current equal to 50% of the value of natural lightning, but up to 50 kV of electric voltage which is a tenth to hundredth that of natural lightning. Experimental results showed that the rock samples with low mechanical resistance, tuff and rhyolite, were destroyed, while the rock sample with high mechanical resistance, i.e., granite, was not broken by lightning strikes. These results indicate that natural lightning causes rocks and bedrock to break. These imply that lightning might change landforms, for example gnammas and fractures on tors and mountain peaks where lightning tends to strike.

  2. Time and space resolved spectroscopic investigation during anode plume formation in a high-current vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakpour, A.; Methling, R.; Uhrlandt, D.; Franke, St.; Gortschakow, S.; Popov, S.; Batrakov, A.; Weltmann, K. D.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents time and space resolved results of spectroscopic measurements during the formation of an anode plume in the late current pulse phase of a high-current vacuum arc. The formation of the anode plume is investigated systematically based on the occurrence of high-current anode spots, depending on gap distance and current for AC 100 Hz and CuCr7525 butt contacts with a diameter of 10 mm. The anode plume is observed after the extinction of anode spot type 2 in which both the anode and cathode are active. It is concluded from the spatial profiles of the atomic and ionic radiation, parallel and perpendicular to anode surface, that the inner part of the plume is dominated by Cu I radiation, whereas a halo of light emitted by Cu II covers the plume. The radiation intensity of Cu III lines is quite low across the whole anode plume. Upper level excited state densities corresponding to Cu I lines at 510.55, 515.32, 521.82, 578.21 nm are determined. The temporal evolution of the resulting excitation temperature in the centre of the plume varies from 8500 K to 6000 K at 500 µs to 100 µs before current zero, respectively. The density calculated for Cu I at position in the plume is in the range of 1-5  ×  1019 m-3.

  3. Recent trends in particle size analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    Recent advances and developments in the particle-sizing technologies are briefly reviewed in accordance with three operating principles including particle size and shape descriptions. Significant trends of the particle size analysing equipment recently developed show that compact electronic circuitry and rapid data processing systems were mainly adopted in the instrument design. Some newly developed techniques characterizing the particulate system were also introduced.

  4. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  5. Particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10) are provided for separating and classifying particles (48,50,56) by dispersing the particles within a fluid (52) that is upwardly flowing within a cone-shaped pipe (12) that has its large end (20) above its small end (18). Particles of similar size and shape (48,50) migrate to individual levels (A,B) within the flowing fluid. As the fluid is deflected by a plate (42) at the top end of the pipe (12), the smallest particles are collected on a shelf-like flange (40). Ever larger particles are collected as the flow rate of the fluid is increased. To prevent particle sticking on the walls (14) of the pipe (12), additional fluid is caused to flow into the pipe (12) through holes (68) that are specifically provided for that purpose. Sticking is further prevented by high frequency vibrators (70) that are positioned on the apparatus (10).

  6. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  7. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  8. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  9. A HIGH CURRENT, HIGH VOLTAGE SOLID-STATE PULSE GENERATOR FOR THE NIF PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; Barbosa, F; Cook, E G; Hickman, B C; Akana, G L; Brooksby, C A

    2007-07-27

    A high current, high voltage, all solid-state pulse modulator has been developed for use in the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) subsystem in the National Ignition Facility. The MOSFET-switched pulse generator, designed to be a more capable plug-in replacement for the thyratron-switched units currently deployed in NIF, offers unprecedented capabilities including burst-mode operation, pulse width agility and a steady-state pulse repetition frequency exceeding 1 Hz. Capable of delivering requisite fast risetime, 17 kV flattop pulses into a 6 {Omega} load, the pulser employs a modular architecture characteristic of the inductive adder technology, pioneered at LLNL for use in acceleration applications, which keeps primary voltages low (and well within the capabilities of existing FET technology), reduces fabrication costs and is amenable to rapid assembly and quick field repairs.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of high current-density, submicron, NbN/MgO/NbN tunnel junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. A.; Leduc, Henry G.; Judas, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    At near-millimeter wavelengths, heterodyne receivers based on SIS tunnel junctions are the most sensitive available. However, in order to scale these results to submillimeter wavelengths, certain device properties should be scaled. The tunnel-junction's current density should be increased to reduce the RC product. The device's area should be reduced to efficiently couple power from the antenna to the mixer. Finally, the superconductor used should have a large energy gap to minimize RF losses. Most SIS mixers use Nb or Pb-alloy tunnel junctions; the gap frequency for these materials is approximately 725 GHz. Above the gap frequency, these materials exhibit losses similar to those in a normal metal. The gap frequency in NbN films is as-large-as 1440 GHz. Therefore, we have developed a process to fabricate small area (down to 0.13 sq microns), high current density, NbN/MgO/NbN tunnel junctions.

  11. Cathode performance during two beam operation of the high current high polarization electron gun for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, O.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Degen, C.; Gassner, D. M.; Lambiase, R.; Meng, W.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, E.; Pietz, J.; Ackeret, M.; Yeckel, C.; Miller, R.; Dobrin, E.; Thompson, K.

    2015-05-03

    Two electron beams from two activated bulk GaAs photocathodes were successfully combined during the recent beam test of the High Current High Polarization Electron gun for eRHIC. The beam test took place in Stangenes Industries in Palo Alto, CA, where the cathodes were placed in diagonally opposite locations inside the high voltage shroud. No significant cross talking between the cathodes was found for the pertinent vacuum and low average current operation, which is very promising towards combining multiple beams for higher average current. This paper describes the cathode preparation, transport and cathode performance in the gun for the combining test, including the QE and lifetimes of the photocathodes at various steps of the experiment.

  12. Characterization of High Current RRP(R) Wires as a Function of Magnetic Field, Temperature and Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Mentink, M.G.T.; Dietderich, D. R.; den Ouden, A.

    2009-08-16

    A new instrument for the characterization of superconducting materials as a function of Magnetic Field, Temperature and Strain, was designed, constructed and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). A U-shaped bending spring was selected, since that design has proven to enable accurate characterizations of a multitude of superconducting materials for more than a decade. The new device is validated though measurements on very high current Rod Restack Processed (RRP) Internal-Tin (IT) wires, for which we will present initial results, including parameterizations of the superconducting phase boundaries and comparisons with other wire types. Accurate parametrization of modern high magnetic field conductors is important for the analysis of the performance of magnet systems.

  13. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr

    2000-07-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a previous screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  14. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1998-12-29

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents. 3 figs.

  15. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  16. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  17. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2005-09-20

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  18. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of repulsive particle-particle and particle-wall interactions: Coughing and choking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başaǧaoǧlu, Hakan; Succi, Sauro

    2010-04-01

    We propose and numerically investigate a new particle retention mechanism for particle entrapment in creeping flows in a constricted section of a saturated rough-walled narrow flow channel. We hypothesize that particles, whose size is smaller than channel width, can be temporarily or permanently immobilized in a flow channel away from channel walls due to particle-particle and particle-wall repulsive potentials, and, consequently, the flow field is clogged temporarily (coughing) or permanently (choking). Two mathematically simplified repulsive particle-particle and particle-wall interaction potentials are incorporated into a two-dimensional colloidal lattice-Boltzmann model. These potentials are two-body Lennard-Jones 12 and screened electrostatic repulsive potentials. Numerical simulations reveal that unlike in smooth-walled flow channels, particles are entrapped away from rough-walled channel walls and subsequently clog the flow field if fluid-drag and repulsive forces on particles are in balance. Off-balance forces, however, could result in temporary clogging if repulsive forces are stronger on the advancing edge of a particle than on its trailing edge. The new conceptualization and two-particle numerical simulations successfully captured (i) temporary entrapment of two particles (coughing), (ii) temporary entrapment of one of the particles with permanent entrapment of the other particle (coughing-choking), and (iii) permanent entrapment of both particles (choking) as a function of repulsive interaction strength.

  19. Advanced stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Arnulf

    1983-03-01

    Toroidal confinement of a plasma by an external magnetic field is not compatible with axisymmetry, in contrast to confinement by the pinch effect of induced electric currents as in a tokomak or by the reversed field pinch configuration. The existence of magnetic surfaces throughout the region in which grad p ≠ 0 is therefore not guaranteed in such configurations, though it is necessary for MHD-equilibrium when the lines of force possess a finite twist (or "rotational transform"). These twisted equilibria are called stellarators. The other type of external confinement requires all lines of force to be closed upon themselves and p to be function of the well defined quantity Q = φ d l/ B only. The resulting "bumpy" tori are sometimes also referred to as being M + S like. By discussing specific examples it is shown that stellarator configurations exist which retain as much as possible the properties of M + S like configurations, combine these with the magnetic well, and with an approximation to the isodynamic requirement of D. Palumbo. These so-called Advanced Stellarators shown an improvement in predicted particle confinement and beta-limit compared to the classical stellarators. They can also be viewed as forming a system of linked stabilized mirrors of small mirror ratio. These fields can be produced by modular coils. A prototype of such a configuration is being designed by the stellarator division of IPP under the name of Wendelstein VII-AS. Expected physical data and technical details of W VII-AS are given.

  20. Elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsch, Harald; Heusch, Karin

    Introduction -- Electrons and atomic nuclei -- Quantum properties of atoms and particles -- The knives of Democritus -- Quarks inside atomic nuclei -- Quantum electrodynamics -- Quantum chromodynamics -- Mesons, baryons, and quarks -- Electroweak interactions -- Grand unification -- Conclusion.