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Sample records for advanced high-strength steel

  1. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  2. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Carpenter, Joseph A.; Warren, C. D.; Smith, Mark T.

    2008-12-28

    Experiments are continuing to evaluate the feasibility of friction stir spot welding advanced high-strength steels including, DP780, martensitic hot-stamp boron steel, and TRIP steels. Spot weld lap-shear strengths can exceed those required by industry standards such as AWS D8.1.

  3. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Santella, M. L.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2009-12-28

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  4. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Frederick, D Alan; Dahl, Michael E

    2009-02-01

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  5. New heat treatment process for advanced high-strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bublíková, D.; Jeníček, Š.; Vorel, I.; Mašek, B.

    2017-02-01

    Today’s advanced steels are required to possess high strength and ductility. It can be achieved by choosing an appropriate steel chemistry which has a substantial effect on the properties obtained by heat treatment. Mechanical properties influenced the presence of retained austenite in the final structure. Steels of this group typically require complicated heat treatment which places great demands on the equipment used. The present paper introduces new procedures aimed at simplifying the heat treatment of high-strength steels with the use of material-technological modelling. Four experimental steels were made and cast, whose main alloying additions were manganese, silicon, chromium, molybdenum and nickel. The steels were treated using the Q-P process with subsequent interrupted quenching. The resulting structure was a mixture of martensite and retained austenite. Strength levels of more than 2000 MPa combined with 10-15 % elongation were obtained. These properties thus offer potential for the manufacture of intricate closed-die forgings with a reduced weight. Intercritical annealing was obtained structure not only on the basis of martensite, but also with certain proportion of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite.

  6. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Automotive Advanced High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovicu, Gianfranco; Bottazzi, Mauro; D'Aiuto, Fabio; De Sanctis, Massimo; Dimatteo, Antonella; Santus, Ciro; Valentini, Renzo

    2012-11-01

    Advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have a better combination between strength and ductility than conventional HSS, and higher crash resistances are obtained in concomitance with weight reduction of car structural components. These steels have been developed in the last few decades, and their use is rapidly increasing. Notwithstanding, some of their important features have to be still understood and studied in order to completely characterize their service behavior. In particular, the high mechanical resistance of AHSS makes hydrogen-related problems a great concern for this steel grade. This article investigates the hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of four AHSS steels. The behavior of one transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), two martensitic with different strength levels, and one hot-stamping steels has been studied using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests on electrochemically hydrogenated notched samples. The embrittlement susceptibility of these AHSS steels has been correlated mainly to their strength level and to their microstructural features. Finally, the hydrogen critical concentrations for HE, established by SSRT tests, have been compared to hydrogen contents absorbed during the painting process of a body in white (BIW) structure, experimentally determined during a real cycle in an industrial plant.

  7. Guidelines for Stretch Flanging Advanced High Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, S.; Chintamani, J.

    2005-08-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are currently being considered for use in closure and structural panels in the automotive industry because of their high potential for affordable weight reduction and improved performance. AHSS such as dual phase steels are currently being used in some vehicle platforms. From a manufacturing perspective, stretch flanging during stamping is an important deformation mode requiring careful consideration of geometry and the die process. This paper presents some geometric and process guidelines for stretch flanging AHSS. Hole expansion experiments were conducted to determine the failure limit for a sheared edge condition. Effects of punching clearance, prestrain and prior strain path on hole expansion were explored in these experiments. In addition, dynamic explicit FE calculations using LS-DYNA were also conducted for a typical stretch flange by varying some key geometric parameters. The experimental and FEA results were then analyzed to yield process and geometric guidelines to enable successful stretch flanging of AHSS.

  8. Guidelines for Stretch Flanging Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram, S.; Chintamani, J.

    2005-08-05

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are currently being considered for use in closure and structural panels in the automotive industry because of their high potential for affordable weight reduction and improved performance. AHSS such as dual phase steels are currently being used in some vehicle platforms. From a manufacturing perspective, stretch flanging during stamping is an important deformation mode requiring careful consideration of geometry and the die process. This paper presents some geometric and process guidelines for stretch flanging AHSS. Hole expansion experiments were conducted to determine the failure limit for a sheared edge condition. Effects of punching clearance, prestrain and prior strain path on hole expansion were explored in these experiments. In addition, dynamic explicit FE calculations using LS-DYNA were also conducted for a typical stretch flange by varying some key geometric parameters. The experimental and FEA results were then analyzed to yield process and geometric guidelines to enable successful stretch flanging of AHSS.

  9. Development of third generation advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Meghan Colleen

    Lightweight duplex steels with combinations of either bainite, acicular ferrite, and austenite or martensite and austenite were investigated as third generation advanced high strength steels targeted for automotive applications. Large additions of manganese (> 13 wt%) and carbon (<0.2wt%) were employed to stabilize the austenite phase. Silicon additions between 1 and 2 wt% were added to suppress cementite formation. Strength and ductility were increased while density was decreased with aluminum additions between 2.4 and 5.5 wt% to the steel. This research addressed the dependence of alloying on microstructures and mechanical behavior for high manganese and aluminum duplex steels that were cast and subsequently hot rolled. Duplex steels with different volume fractions of primary delta-ferrite were used to study the crystallography of austenite fanned during the peritectic reaction. Solute profiles across the peritectic interface showed aluminum segregated near the interface which promoted bainitic ferrite formation. Thermal treatments were used to manipulate the concentration and type of oxides and the ferrite plate density was found to correlate with inclusions of low misfit in steels with austenite grain size of 16.5 microm. A steel with bainite and acicular ferrite produced an ultimate tensile strength of 970 MPa and elongation of 40%. The mechanical prope1iies depended on the strengths and size of the microstructural constituents. Work hardening behavior was examined in a steel exhibiting multiple martensitic transformation induced plasticity (gamma-austenite→epsilon-smartensite→alpha-martensite). A strain hardening exponent as high as 1.4 was observed with ultimate tensile strength and elongation as high as 1,165 MPa and 34%.

  10. Development of high strength high toughness third generation advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martis, Codrick John

    Third generation advanced high strength steels (AHSS's) are emerging as very important engineering materials for structural applications. These steels have high specific strength and thus will contribute significantly to weight reduction in automotive and other structural component. In this investigation two such low carbon low alloy steels (LCLA) with high silicon content (1.6-2wt %) has been developed. These two steel alloys were subjected to single step and two step austempering in the temperature range of 260-399°C to obtain desired microstructures and mechanical properties. Austempering heat treatment was carried out for 2 hours in a molten salt bath. The microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and optical metallography. Quantitative analysis was carried out by image analysis technique. The effect of austempering temperature on the mechanical properties of these two alloys was examined. The influence of microstructures on the mechanical properties of alloys was also studied. Austempering heat treatment resulted in fine carbide free bainitic ferrite and high carbon austenite microstructure in the samples austempered above Ms temperature, whereas tempered martensite and austenite microstructure was obtained in samples austempered below Ms temperature. Yield strength, tensile strength and fracture toughness were found to increase as the austempering temperature decreases, whereas ductility increases as the austempering temperature increases. Tensile strength in the range of 1276MPa -1658 MPa and the fracture toughness in the range of 80-141MPa√m were obtained in these two steels. Volume fractions of different phases present and their lath sizes are related to the mechanical properties. Austempered samples consisting of mixed microstructure of bainitic ferrite and tempered martensite phases resulted in the exceptional combination of strength and toughness.

  11. Numerical Design of Drawbeads for Advanced High Strength Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, Y. T.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, G. S.

    2010-06-01

    The map for designing the drawbeads used in the stamping dies for advanced high strength steel (AHSS) sheets is numerically investigated and its application is introduced. The bending limit of AHSS sheet is determined from the extreme R/t's obtained simulating numerically the plane-strain process formed by the cylindrical punches and dies with various radii. In addition, the forming allowance defined by the difference between FLC0 and the strain after passing the drawbead, which is observed by the numerical simulation of drawbead pulling test, is computed. Based on the bending limit and forming allowance, the design map for determining the height, width, and shoulder radius of the drawbead which are key parameters in the drawbead design and depend on the restraining force is constructed by aid of the equivalent drawbead model. A drawbead of the stamping die for forming a channel-typed panel is designed by using the design map, and the formability and springback of the panel to be formed are numerically evaluated, from which the availability of the design map is demonstrated.

  12. Application technologies for effective utilization of advanced high strength steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Suehiro, Masayoshi

    2013-12-16

    Recently, application of high strength steel sheets for automobiles has increased in order to meet a demand of light weighting of automobiles to reduce a carbon footprint while satisfying collision safety. The formability of steel sheets generally decreases with the increase in strength. Fracture and wrinkles tend to occur easily during forming. The springback phenomenon is also one of the issues which we should cope with, because it makes it difficult to obtain the desired shape after forming. Advanced high strength steel sheets with high formability have been developed in order to overcome these issues, and at the same time application technologies have been developed for their effective utilization. These sheets are normally used for cold forming. As a different type of forming, hot forming technique has been developed in order to produce parts with ultra high strength. In this report, technologies developed at NSSMC in this field will be introduced.

  13. Properties of Galvanized and Galvannealed Advanced High Strength Hot Rolled Steels

    SciTech Connect

    V.Y. Guertsman; E. Essadiqi; S. Dionne; O. Dremmailova; R. Bouchard; B. Voyzelle; J. McDermid; R. Fourmentin

    2008-04-01

    The objectives of the project were (i) to develop the coating process information to achieve good quality coatings on 3 advanced high strength hot rolled steels while retaining target mechanical properties, (ii) to obtain precise knowledge of the behavior of these steels in the various forming operations and (iii) to establish accurate user property data in the coated conditions. Three steel substrates (HSLA, DP, TRIP) with compositions providing yield strengths in the range of 400-620 MPa were selected. Only HSLA steel was found to be suitable for galnaizing and galvannealing in the hot rolled condition.

  14. Influence of Manufacturing Processes and Microstructures on the Performance and Manufacturability of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-01

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are performance-based steel grades and their global material properties can be achieved with various steel chemistries and manufacturing processes, leading to various microstructures. In this paper, we investigate the influence of supplier variation and resulting microstructure difference on the overall mechanical properties as well as local formability behaviors of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). For this purpose, we first examined the basic material properties and the transformation kinetics of TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) 800 steels from three different suppliers under different testing temperatures. The experimental results show that there is a significant supplier (i.e., manufacturing process) dependency of the TRIP 800 steel mechanical and microstructure properties. Next, we examined the local formability of two commercial Dual Phase (DP) 980 steels during stamping process. The two commercial DP 980 steels also exhibit noticeably different formability during stamping process in the sense that one of them shows severe tendency for shear fracture. Microstructure-based finite element analyses are carried out next to simulate the localized deformation process with the two DP 980 microstructures, and the results suggest that the possible reason for the difference in formability lies in the morphology of the hard martensite phase in the DP microstructure.

  15. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

  16. Microstructural effects on the springback of advanced high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Wei; Babu, S. S.; Kapustka, Nick; Wagoner, Robert H.

    2006-11-01

    The application of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) has been growing rapidly in the automotive industry. Because of their high-strength, thinner sheet metals can be used for body components to achieve both weight savings and increased safety. However, this will lead to greater springback deviation from design after the forming operation. Fundamental understanding and prediction of springback are required for springback compensation and tooling design. While various types of continuum mechanics based models have been proposed to simulate the mechanical behavior of advanced high-strength steels, few of them consider microstructural effects such as material heterogeneity. In this study, through sheet thickness strength variation has been observed in DP 780 and TRIP 780 steels. Finite-element simulation indicates that the through thickness effect (TTE) can have a significant impact on the springback behavior of these sheet metals. This is verified through our experimental work using draw-bend testing. The results suggest that microstructural effects should be considered to accurately simulate springback of AHSS. Based on these results, implications of different microstructural designs will be discussed.

  17. Galvanizability of Advanced High-Strength Steels 1180TRIP and 1180CP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. S.; Kwak, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Liu, Y. H.; Gao, N.; Tang, N.-Y.

    2009-08-01

    In general, Si-bearing advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) possess excellent mechanical properties but poor galvanizability. The galvanizability of a transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel 1180TRIP containing 2.2 pct Mn and 1.7 pct Si and a complex phase steel 1180CP containing 2.7 pct Mn and 0.2 pct Si was extensively studied using a galvanizing simulator. The steel coupons were annealed at fixed dew points in the simulator. The surface features of the as-annealed steel coupons, together with galvanized and galvannealed coatings, were carefully examined using a variety of advanced analysis techniques. It was found that various oxides formed on the surface of these steels, depending on the steel composition and on the dew point control. Coating quality was good at 0 °C dew point but deteriorated as the dew point decreased to -35 °C and -65 °C. Based on the findings, guidance was provided for improving galvanizability by adjusting the Mn:Si ratio in steel compositions according to the dew point.

  18. Nanocrystalline Advanced High Strength Steel Produced by Cold Rolling and Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Daniel M.; Van Aken, David C.

    2016-05-01

    An advanced high strength steel of composition Fe-0.11C-2.46Si-11.5Mn-0.38Al-0.029N (wt pct) was produced with a yield strength of 790 MPa, an ultimate tensile strength of 1300 MPa, and a total elongation of 28 pct. Conventional processing of hot-band steel by cold rolling and annealing at 873 K (600 °C) was used to produce a nanocrystalline structure with an average grain diameter 112 ± 25 nm (68 pct confidence level). Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were utilized to characterize the nanocrystalline steel, which consisted of γ-austenite, ɛ-martensite, and α-ferrite.

  19. Fatigue Performance of Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) GMAW Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Sang, Yan; Jiang, Cindy; Chiang, Dr. John; Kuo, Dr. Min

    2009-01-01

    The fatigue performance of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joints of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are compared and analyzed. The steel studied included a number of different grades of AHSS and baseline mild steels: DP600, DP780, DP980, M130, M220, solution annealed boron steel, fully hardened boron steels, HSLA690 and DR210 (a mild steel). Fatigue testing was conducted under a number of nominal stress ranges to obtain the S/N curves of the weld joints. A two-phase analytical model is developed to predict the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. It was found that there are appreciable differences in the fatigue S/N curves among different AHSS joints made using the same welding practices, suggesting that the local microstructure in the weld toe and root region plays non-negligible role in the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. Changes in weld parameters can influence the joint characteristics which in turn influence fatigue life of the weld joints, particularly of those of higher strength AHSS. The analytical model is capable of reasonably predicting the fatigue performance of welds made with various steel grades in this study.

  20. On Simulation of Edge Stretchability of an 800MPa Advanced High Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Nikky; Butcher, Cliff; Worswick, Michael

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, the edge stretchability of advanced high strength steel (AHSS) was investigated experimentally and numerically using both a hole expansion test and a tensile specimen with a central hole. The experimental fracture strains obtained using the hole expansion and hole tension test in both reamed and sheared edge conditions were in very good agreement, suggesting the tests are equivalent for fracture characterization. Isotropic finite-element simulations of both tests were performed to compare the stress-state near the hole edge.

  1. Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) for Third Generation Advanced High-Strength Steel Development

    SciTech Connect

    Savic, Vesna; Hector, Louis G.; Ezzat, Hesham; Sachdev, Anil K.; Quinn, James; Krupitzer, Ronald; Sun, Xin

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of a four-year project focused on development of an integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) toolset for third generation advanced high-strength steels (3GAHSS). Following a brief look at ICME as an emerging discipline within the Materials Genome Initiative, technical tasks in the ICME project will be discussed. Specific aims of the individual tasks are multi-scale, microstructure-based material model development using state-of-the-art computational and experimental techniques, forming, toolset assembly, design optimization, integration and technical cost modeling. The integrated approach is initially illustrated using a 980 grade transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel, subject to a two-step quenching and partitioning (Q&P) heat treatment, as an example.

  2. Quasi-static and dynamic responses of advanced high strength steels: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Akhtar; Baig, Muneer; Choi, Shi Hoon; Yang, Hoe Seok; Sun, Xin

    2012-03-01

    Measured responses of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and their tailor welded blanks (TWBs), over a wide range of strain-rates (10*4 to 103 s*1) are presented. The steels investigated include transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), dual phase (DP), and drawing quality (DQ) steels. The TWBs include DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds. A tensile split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was used for the dynamic experiments. AHSS and their TWB's were found to exhibit positive strain-rate sensitivity. The Khan-Huang-Liang (KHL) constitutive model is shown to correlate and predict the observed responses reasonably well. Micro-texture characterization of DQ steels, DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds were performed to investigate the effect of strain-rate on texture evolution of these materials. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique was used to analyze the micro-texture evolution and kernel average misorientation (KAM) map. Measurement of micro-hardness profile across the cross section of tensile samples was conducted to understand the effect of initial microstructure on ductility of laser weld samples.

  3. Analysis of hot forming of a sheet metal component made of advanced high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirkaya, Sinem; Darendeliler, Haluk; Gökler, Mustafa İlhan; Ayhaner, Murat

    2013-05-01

    To provide reduction in weight while maintaining crashworthiness and to decrease the fuel consumption of vehicles, thinner components made of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are being increasingly used in automotive industry. However, AHSS cannot be formed easily at the room temperature (i.e. cold forming). The alternative process involves heating, hot forming and subsequent quenching. A-pillar upper reinforcement of a vehicle is currently being produced by cold forming of DP600 steel sheet with a thickness of 1.8 mm. In this study, the possible decrease in the thickness of this particular part by using 22MnB5 as appropriate AHSS material and applying this alternative process has been studied. The proposed process involves deep drawing, trimming, heating, sizing, cooling and piercing operations. Both the current production process and the proposed process are analyzed by the finite element method. The die geometry, blank holding forces and the design of the cooling channels for the cooling process are determined numerically. It is shown that the particular part made of 22MnB5 steel sheet with a thickness of 1.2 mm can be successfully produced by applying the proposed process sequence and can be used without sacrificing the crashworthiness. With the use of the 22MnB5 steel with a thickness of 1.2 mm instead of DP600 sheet metal with a thickness of 1.8 mm, the weight is reduced by approximately 33%.

  4. Investigations on fracture curves in strain and stress space for advanced high strength steel forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panich, S.; Drotleff, K.; Liewald, M.; Uthaisangsuk, V.

    2016-08-01

    Conventional forming limit curves (FLCs) are inappropriate for describing formability for advanced high strength (AHS) steel sheets, since such steel grades experience fracture without localized necking occurrence. The aim of this work was to develop a fracture curve (FC) for the AHS steel grade DP980. The FC was determined by means of the Nakajima stretch forming test and tensile tests of various sample geometries, by which shear fracture governed. An optical strain measurement system was used to capture strain histories of deformed samples up to failure. From these results, fracture strains were gathered and plotted in a strain space. Subsequently, the strain based curve was transformed to space between stress triaxiality and plastic strain. Hereby, effects of anisotropic yield function, namely, the Hill’48 model on obtained stress fracture loci were investigated. In order to verify applicability of the determined limit curves, a Mini-tunnel part was pressed and simulated. It was found that the stress based FC do predict failure of the DP980 steel sheet more accurately than the strain based F C.

  5. Correlation of microstructure, tensile properties and hole expansion ratio in cold rolled advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrazas, Oscar R.

    The demand for advanced high strength steels (AHSS) with higher strengths is increasing in the automotive industry. While there have been major improvements recently in the trade-off between ductility and strength, sheared-edge formability of AHSS remains a critical issue. AHSS sheets exhibit cracking during stamping and forming operations below the predictions of forming limits. It has become important to understand the correlation between microstructure and sheared edge formability. The present work investigates the effects of shearing conditions, microstructure, and tensile properties on sheared edge formability. Seven commercially produced steels with tensile strengths of 1000 +/- 100 MPa were evaluated: five dual-phase (DP) steels with different compositions and varying microstructural features, one trip aided bainitic ferrite (TBF) steel, and one press-hardened steel tempered to a tensile strength within the desired range. It was found that sheared edge formability is influenced by the martensite in DP steels. Quantitative stereology measurements provided results that showed martensite size and distribution affect hole expansion ratio (HER). The overall trend is that HER increases with more evenly dispersed martensite throughout the microstructure. This microstructure involves a combination of martensite size, contiguity, mean free distance, and number of colonies per unit area. Additionally, shear face characterization showed that the fracture and burr region affect HER. The HER decreases with increasing size of fracture and burr region. With a larger fracture and burr region more defects and/or micro-cracks will be present on the shear surface. This larger fracture region on the shear face facilitates cracking in sheared edge formability. Finally, the sheared edge formability is directly correlated to true fracture strain (TFS). The true fracture strain from tensile samples correlates to the HER values. HER increases with increasing true fracture strain.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Determination of Hot Forming Limit Curve of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, B. L.; Wan, M.; Liu, Z. G.; Li, X. J.; Wu, X. D.; Diao, K. S.

    2017-07-01

    This paper studied the hot formability of the advanced high-strength steel B1500HS. The hot Nakazima tests were conducted to obtain the forming limit curve (FLC), and the sheet temperatures were recorded to analyze temperature distributions during deformation. Meanwhile, the numerical simulations of hot Nakazima tests were performed to compare with the experimental ones. By utilizing the commercial software, Abaqus, the punch force-displacement curve, sheet temperature distribution at the time of the maximum punch load and temperature path of the necked element were investigated from both of experiments and numerical simulations. The FLCs from experiment and numerical simulation showed a good agreement. The temperature path of the necked element on each FLC specimen was different due to the numerical stretching time and stress state. This study demonstrated the predictive capability of finite element simulation on hot stamping.

  7. Nanoscale surface analysis on second generation advanced high strength steel after hot dip galvanizing.

    PubMed

    Arndt, M; Duchoslav, J; Preis, K; Samek, L; Stifter, D

    2013-09-01

    Second generation advanced high strength steel is one promising material of choice for modern automotive structural parts because of its outstanding maximal elongation and tensile strength. Nonetheless there is still a lack of corrosion protection for this material due to the fact that cost efficient hot dip galvanizing cannot be applied. The reason for the insufficient coatability with zinc is found in the segregation of manganese to the surface during annealing and the formation of manganese oxides prior coating. This work analyses the structure and chemical composition of the surface oxides on so called nano-TWIP (twinning induced plasticity) steel on the nanoscopic scale after hot dip galvanizing in a simulator with employed analytical methods comprising scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (SAES), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and focused ion beam (FIB) for cross section preparation. By the combination of these methods, it was possible to obtain detailed chemical images serving a better understanding which processes exactly occur on the surface of this novel kind of steel and how to promote in the future for this material system galvanic protection.

  8. A New Perspective on Fatigue Performance of Advanced High- Strength Steels (AHSS) GMAW Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Chiang, Dr. John; Kuo, Dr. Min; Jiang, Cindy; Sang, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Weld fatigue performance is a critical aspect for application of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) in automotive body structures. A comparative study has been conducted to evaluate the fatigue life of AHSS welds. The material studied included seven AHSS of various strength levels - DP 600, DP 780, DP 980, M130, M220, solution annealed boron and fully hardened boron steels. Two conventional steels, HSLA 590 and DR 210, were also included for baseline comparison. Lap fillet welds were made on 2-mm nominal thick sheets by the gas metal arc welding process (GMAW). Fatigue test was conducted under a number of stress levels to obtain the S/N curves of the weld joints. It was found that, unlike in the static and impact loading conditions, the fatigue performance of AHSS is not influenced by the HAZ softening in AHSS. There are appreciable differences in the fatigue lives among different AHSS. Changes in weld parameters can influence the fatigue life of the weld joints, particularly of these of higher strength AHSS. A model is developed to predict the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. The validity of the model is benchmarked with the experimental results. This model is capable to capture the effects of weld geometry and weld microstructure and strength on the fatigue performance experimentally observed. The theoretical basis and application of the newly developed fatigue modeling methodology will be discussed.

  9. The plane strain shear fracture of the advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li

    2013-12-01

    The "shear fracture" which occurs at the high-curvature die radii in the sheet metal forming has been reported to remarkably limit the application of the advanced high strength steels (AHSS) in the automobile industry. However, this unusual fracture behavior generally cannot be predicted by the traditional forming limit diagram (FLD). In this research, a new experimental system was developed in order to simulate the shear fracture, especially at the plane strain state which is the most common state in the auto-industry and difficult to achieve in the lab due to sample size. Furthermore, the system has the capability to operate in a strain rate range from quasi-static state to the industrial forming state. One kinds of AHSS, Quenching-Partitioning (QP) steels have been performed in this test and the results show that the limiting fracture strain is related to the bending ratio and strain rate. The experimental data support that deformation-induced heating is an important cause of "shear fracture" phenomena for AHSS: a deformation-induced quasi-heating caused by smaller bending ratio and high strain rate produce a smaller limiting plane strain and lead a "shear fracture" in the component.

  10. The plane strain shear fracture of the advanced high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li

    2013-12-16

    The “shear fracture” which occurs at the high-curvature die radii in the sheet metal forming has been reported to remarkably limit the application of the advanced high strength steels (AHSS) in the automobile industry. However, this unusual fracture behavior generally cannot be predicted by the traditional forming limit diagram (FLD). In this research, a new experimental system was developed in order to simulate the shear fracture, especially at the plane strain state which is the most common state in the auto-industry and difficult to achieve in the lab due to sample size. Furthermore, the system has the capability to operate in a strain rate range from quasi-static state to the industrial forming state. One kinds of AHSS, Quenching-Partitioning (QP) steels have been performed in this test and the results show that the limiting fracture strain is related to the bending ratio and strain rate. The experimental data support that deformation-induced heating is an important cause of “shear fracture” phenomena for AHSS: a deformation-induced quasi-heating caused by smaller bending ratio and high strain rate produce a smaller limiting plane strain and lead a “shear fracture” in the component.

  11. Formability Prediction of Advanced High Strength Steel with a New Ductile Fracture Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yanshan; Lim, Sungjun; Huh, Jeehyang; Huh, Hoon

    2011-08-01

    A ductile fracture criterion is newly proposed to accurately predict forming limit diagrams (FLD) of sheet metals. The new ductile fracture criterion is based on the effect of the non-dimensional stress triaxiality, the stress concentration factor and the effective plastic strain on the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids. The new ductile fracture criterion has been applied to estimate the formability of four kind advanced high strength steels (AHSS): DP780, DP980, TRIP590, and TWIP980. FLDs predicted are compared with experimental results and those predicted by other ductile fracture criteria. The comparison demonstrates that FLDs predicted by the new ductile fracture criterion are in better agreement with experimental FLDs than those predicted by other ductile fracture criteria. The better agreement of FLDs predicted by the new ductile fracture criterion is because conventional ductile fracture criteria were proposed for fracture prediction in bulk metal forming while the new one is proposed to predict the onset of fracture in sheet metal forming processes.

  12. Advanced high strength steel (AHSS) TWIP: A door to the future in metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Ferrando, R.; Sánchez-Caballero, S.; Reig, M. J.; Pla, R.; Sellés, M. A.; Seguí, V. J.

    2012-04-01

    The last decades have been characterized by a fast evolution of cars. This work shows the evolution of vehicle weight. It shows the response of car manufacturers using new materials and production methods that allow lighter vehicles with lower consumption, cheaper and with lower influence on the greenhouse effect. One of the materials which means a most interesting change is the TWIP steel. This material is characterized by its high strength, his exceptional strain and excellent formability as well as lower energy consumption in their manufacture. TWIP steel are changing towards cheaper compositions and higher performance, and it's going to be great influence in the vehicle weight reduction in the next years.

  13. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  14. A 3rd Generation Advanced High-Strength Steel (AHSS) Produced by Dual Stabilization Heat Treatment (DSHT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Hao; Michal, Gary M.; Heuer, Arthur H.

    2013-10-01

    A 3rd generation advanced high-strength steel containing, in wt pct, 0.3 C, 4.0 Mn, 1.5 Al, 2.1 Si, and 0.5 Cr has been produced using a dual stabilization heat treatment—a five stage thermal processing schedule compatible with continuous galvanized steel production. In excess of 30 vol pct retained austenite containing at least 0.80 wt pct C was achieved with this alloy, which had tensile strengths up to 1650 MPa and tensile elongations around 20 pct.

  15. Microstructural Developments Leading to New Advanced High Strength Sheet Steels: A Historical Assessment of Critical Metallographic Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, David K

    2015-08-03

    In the past 30+ years significant advancements have been made in the development of higher strength sheet steels with improved combinations of strength and ductility that have enabled important product improvements leading to safer, lighter weight, and more fuel efficient automobiles and in other applications. Properties of the primarily low carbon, low alloy steels are derived through careful control of time-temperature processing histories designed to produce multiphase ferritic based microstructures that include martensite and other constituents including retained austenite. The basis for these developments stems from the early work on dual-phase steels which was the subject of much interest. In response to industry needs, dual-phase steels have evolved as a unique class of advanced high strength sheet steels (AHSS) in which the thermal and mechanical processing histories have been specifically designed to produce constituent combinations for the purpose of simultaneously controlling strength and deformation behavior, i.e. stress-strain curve shapes. Improvements continue as enhanced dual-phase steels have recently been produced with finer microstructures, higher strengths, and better overall formability. Today, dual phase steels are the primary AHSS products used in vehicle manufacture, and several companies have indicated that the steels will remain as important design materials well into the future. In this presentation, fundamental results from the early work on dual-phase steels will be reviewed and assessed in light of recent steel developments. Specific contributions from industry/university cooperative research leading to product improvements will be highlighted. The historical perspective provided in the evolution of dual-phase steels represents a case-study that provides important framework and lessons to be incorporated in next generation AHSS products.

  16. Dissimilar Arc Welding of Advanced High-Strength Car-Body Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo Spena, P.; D'Aiuto, F.; Matteis, P.; Scavino, G.

    2014-11-01

    A widespread usage of new advanced TWIP steel grades for the fabrication of car-body parts is conditional on the employment of appropriate welding methods, especially if dissimilar welding must be performed with other automotive steel grades. Therefore, the microstructural features and the mechanical response of dissimilar butt weld seams of TWIP and 22MnB5 steel sheets after metal-active-gas arc welding are examined. The microstructural and mechanical characterization of the welded joints was carried out by optical metallography, microhardness and tensile testing, and fractographic examination. The heat-affected zone on the TWIP side was fully austenitic and the only detectable effect was grain coarsening, while on the 22MnB5 side it exhibited newly formed martensite and tempered martensite. The welded tensile specimens exhibited a much larger deformation on the TWIP steel side than on the 22MnB5. The fracture generally occurred at the interface between the fusion zone and the heat-affected zones, with the fractures surfaces being predominantly ductile. The ultimate tensile strength of the butt joints was about 25% lower than that of the TWIP steel.

  17. Optimization of Process Parameters for High Efficiency Laser Forming of Advanced High Strength Steels within Metallurgical Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, Ghazal; Griffiths, Jonathan; Dearden, Geoff; Edwardson, Stuart P.

    Laser forming (LF) has been shown to be a viable alternative to form automotive grade advanced high strength steels (AHSS). Due to their high strength, heat sensitivity and low conventional formability show early fractures, larger springback, batch-to-batch inconsistency and high tool wear. In this paper, optimisation of the LF process parameters has been conducted to further understand the impact of a surface heat treatment on DP1000. A FE numerical simulation has been developed to analyse the dynamic thermo-mechanical effects. This has been verified against empirical data. The goal of the optimisation has been to develop a usable process window for the LF of AHSS within strict metallurgical constraints. Results indicate it is possible to LF this material, however a complex relationship has been found between the generation and maintenance of hardness values in the heated zone. A laser surface hardening effect has been observed that could be beneficial to the efficiency of the process.

  18. Development of Appropriate Spot Welding Practice for Advanced High Strength Steels (TRP 0114)

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Girvin; Warren Peterson; Jerry Gould

    2004-09-17

    This program evaluated the effects of common manufacturing variables on spike-tempering effectiveness. The investigation used design-of-experiment (DOE) techniques, and examined both dual-phase and martensitic grades of high-strength steels (HSS). The specific grades chosen for this project were: Dual-phase (DP) 600, galvannealed (GA), 1.55 mm (DP) 600; Dual-phase (DP) 980 (uncoated), 1.55 mm (DP) 980; and Martensitic (M) 1300, 1.55 mm (M) 1300. Common manufacturing conditions of interest included tempering practice (quench and temper time), button size, simulated part fitup (sheet angular misalignment and fitup), and electrode wear (increased electrode face diameter). All of these conditions were evaluated against mechanical performance (static and dynamic tensile shear). Weld hardness data was also used to examine correlations between mechanical performance and the degree of tempering. Mechanical performance data was used to develop empirical models. The models were used to examine the robustness of weld strength and toughness to the selected processing conditions. This was done using standard EWI techniques. Graphical representations of robustness were then coupled with metallographic data to relate mechanical properties to the effectiveness of spike tempering. Mechanical properties for all three materials were relatively robust to variation in tempering. Major deviations in mechanical properties were caused by degradation of the weld itself. This was supported by a lack of correlation between hardness data and mechanical results. Small button sizes and large electrode face diameters (worn electrodes) produced large reductions in both static and dynamic strength levels when compared to standard production setups. Dynamic strength was further degraded by edge-located welds.

  19. Observations on the Nonlinear Unloading Behavior of Advanced High Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlina, Erik J.; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Barlat, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The unloading behavior was compared for three different steel grades: a dual-phase steel, a transformation-induced plasticity steel, and a twinning-induced plasticity steel. Steels that harden by phase transformation or deformation twinning exhibited a smaller component of microplastic strain during unloading and a smaller reduction in the chord modulus compared to the conventional hardening steel. As a result, unloading is closer to pure elastic unloading when the TRIP effect or TWIP effect is active.

  20. Improving the crash behavior of structural components made of advanced high strength steel by local heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrads, L.; Daamen, M.; Hirt, G.; Bambach, M.

    2016-11-01

    High manganese TWIP steel belongs to the second generation of advanced high strength steels. During the production of strip material, the microstructure and hence the mechanical properties of TWIP steel can be adapted to the specific needs of crash relevant structures. Whereas typically the whole steel strip is heat-treated after cold rolling, a local heat treatment can be applied to tailor the properties accordingly. In this work, a method is presented to identify a suitable process window for the local laser heat treatment of TWIP steel. The material is strain hardened and afterwards heat-treated at various temperatures for a short time. The influence of the respective heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties is evaluated and the most appropriate heat treatment is then reproduced using laser heating. To verify the effect of a local laser heat treatment at a structural component, crash boxes with different heat treatment patterns were produced and tested. The dynamic crash tests show that the local heat treatment can be used to improve the crash behavior of structural components. In addition, their deformation path can be influenced by using adapted heat treatment patterns and the crash behavior can be controlled.

  1. Cadmium Alternatives for High-Strength Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-22

    FINAL REPORT Cadmium Alternatives for High-Strength Steel WP-200022 Steven A. Brown Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division Patuxent...ESTCP WP-0022 Final Report “Cadmium Alternatives for High-Strength Steel ” 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Steven...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Testing was conducted for cadmium alternative coating systems IAW the “High Strength Steel Joint Test Protocol for

  2. Evaluation of common tests for fracture characterisation of advanced high-strength sheet steels with the help of the FEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshekhodov, I.; Dykiert, M.; Vucetic, M.; Behrens, B.-A.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents results of evaluation of common tests for fracture characterization of advanced high-strength sheet steels with the help of the FEA. The tests include three in-plane shear tests, two uniaxial tension tests, two plane strain tension tests and two equibiaxial tension tests. Three high-strength steels with different yield loci, strain hardening rates and strengths in three different thicknesses each were used. The evaluation was performed based on the spatial distribution of the equivalent plastic strain and damage variable in the specimen at the moment of crack initiation as well as on the time variation of the stress state at the crack initiation location. For in-plane shear, uniaxial tension and plane strain tension, no test can be unconditionally recommended as disadvantages of all studied tests in these groups cannot be neglected. However, in each of these groups, a test can be chosen, which represents an acceptable compromise between its advantages and disadvantages: the shear test on an IFUM butterfly specimen for in-plane shear, the tensile test on a holed specimen for uniaxial tension and the tensile test on a waisted specimen for plane strain tension. On the contrary, the bulge test on a circular specimen with a punch of Ø 100 mm can be unconditionally recommended for equibiaxial tension. In the future, optimisation of the studied tests for in-plane shear, uniaxial tension and plane strain tension appears to be necessary.

  3. Cyclic Deformation of Advanced High-Strength Steels: Mechanical Behavior and Microstructural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilditch, Timothy B.; Timokhina, Ilana B.; Robertson, Leigh T.; Pereloma, Elena V.; Hodgson, Peter D.

    2009-02-01

    The fatigue properties of multiphase steels are an important consideration in the automotive industry. The different microstructural phases present in these steels can influence the strain life and cyclic stabilized strength of the material due to the way in which these phases accommodate the applied cyclic strain. Fully reversed strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests have been used to determine the mechanical fatigue performance of a dual-phase (DP) 590 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) 780 steel, with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) used to examine the deformed microstructures. It is shown that the higher strain life and cyclic stabilized strength of the TRIP steel can be attributed to an increased yield strength. Despite the presence of significant levels of retained austenite in the TRIP steel, both steels exhibited similar cyclic softening behavior at a range of strain amplitudes due to comparable ferrite volume fractions and yielding characteristics. Both steels formed low-energy dislocation structures in the ferrite during cyclic straining.

  4. High Strength Steels Produced by Advanced Metallurgical Processes (The National Shipbuilding Research Program)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    cracking than the baseline HY80 steel when welded in the controlled thermal severity (CTS) tast. No HAZ cracking (i.e., a...HAZ cracking rating of one (1). For the trithermal test weld (TSN = 24), Steel B developed a HAZ cracking rating of one (1), while the baseline HY80 ...superior to the results for both baseline materials, HY80 and HY1OO. Steel D developed a HAZ cracking rating of one-half (1/2) for the tri- thermal test

  5. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Advanced High-Strength Steels Over a Wide Range of Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingdong, Zhang; Qiang, Cao; Xiaofeng, Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is widely used in automotive industry. In order to investigate the mechanical behaviors of AHSS over a wide range of temperatures, quasi-static tensile experiments were conducted at the temperatures from 298 to 1073 K on a Gleeble-3500 thermo-simulation machine. The results show that flow behaviors are affected by testing temperature significantly. In order to describe the flow features of AHSS, the Johnson-Cook (JC) model is employed. By introducing polynomial functions to consider the effects of temperature on hardening behavior, the JC model is modified and used to predict flow behavior of AHSS at different experimental conditions. The accuracy of the modified JC model is verified and the predicted flow stress is in good agreement with experimental results, which confirms that the modified JC model can give an accurate and precise estimate over a wide range of temperatures.

  6. Development of Advanced High Strength Steel for Improved Vehicle Safety, Fuel Efficiency and CO2 Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Satendra; Singhai, Mrigandra; Desai, Rahul; Sam, Srimanta; Patra, Pradip Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Global warming and green house gas emissions are the major issues worldwide and their impacts are clearly visible as a record high temperatures, rising sea, and severe `flooding and droughts'. Motor vehicles considered as a major contributor on global warming due to its green house gas emissions. Hence, the automobile industries are under tremendous pressure from government and society to reduce green house gas emission to maximum possible extent. In present work, Dual Phase steel with boron as microalloying is manufactured using thermo-mechanical treatment during hot rolling. Dual phase steel with boron microalloying improved strength by near about 200 MPa than dual phase steel without boron. The boron added dual phase steel can be used for manufacturing stronger and a lighter vehicle which is expected to perform positively on green house gas emissions. The corrosion resistance behavior is also improved with boron addition which would further increase the life cycle of the vehicle even under corrosive atmosphere.

  7. Hardening characteristics of CO2 laser welds in advanced high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tae-Kyo; Park, Bong-Gyu; Kang, Chung-Yun

    2012-06-01

    When the CO2 laser welder with 6 kW output was used to weld 4 TRIP steels, 2 DP steels and a precipitation-hardened steel, which have the tensile strength in the range of 600-1000 MPa, the effect of welding speed on hardening characteristics was investigated. In the weld of TRIP steels and DP steels, the maximum hardness was shown in the fusion zone and the HAZ near the bond line, and the hardness was decreased from the HAZ to the base metal. Only in the PH600 steel, the maximum hardness was shown in the fusion zone and the hardness was decreased from bond line to the base metal. The maximum hardness value was not changed due to the variation of the welding speed within a given range of the welding speed. When the correlation with maximum hardness value using 6 known carbon equivalents was examined, those of CEL (=C+Si/50+Mn/25+P/2+Cr/25) and PL (=C+Mn/22+14B) were 0.96 and 0.95 respectively, and CEL was better because it could reflect the contribution of Si and Cr added to AHSS. The maximum hardness value could be calculated by the equation "Hmax=701CEL+281". The phase transformation analysis indicated that only martensitic transformation was expected in the given range of the welding conditions. Therefore, the maximum hardness of the weld was the same as that of water cooled steel and not changed with the variation of the welding speed

  8. Assessment of the Critical Parameters Influencing the Edge Stretchability of Advanced High-Strength Steel Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, N.; Butcher, C.; Worswick, M.

    2016-11-01

    The edge formability of ferritic-martensitic DP (dual-phase) and ferritic-bainitic CP (complex-phase) steels was evaluated using a hole expansion test for different edge conditions. Hole expansion tests involving the standard conical punch as well as a custom flat punch were performed to investigate formability when the hole is expanded out-of-plane (conical punch) and in-plane using the flat punch. A range of edge conditions were considered, in order to isolate the influence of a range of factors thought to influence edge formability. The results demonstrate that work hardening and void damage at the sheared edge govern formability, while the sheared surface quality plays a minor or secondary role. A comparison of the edge stretching limits of DP and CP steels demonstrates the advantages of a ferritic-bainitic microstructure for forming operations with severe local deformation as in a stretch-flanging operation. A comparison of a traditional DP780 steel with a CP steel of similar strength showed that the edge stretching limit of the CP steel was three times larger than that of the DP780.

  9. Effect of microstructure on the fracture response of advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Mark David

    The effect of constituent hardness on formability performance for higher-strength dual phase (DP) steels was evaluated. A commercially-produced DP steel with 1080 MPa ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was processed to create eight additional constituent hardness conditions by tempering and cold-rolling, processes that primarily affected constituent hardness properties. Using nanoindentation, ferrite and martensite hardness values for the nine conditions of the DP steel (as-received, four as-tempered, four temper cold-rolled) provided a range of hardness values to evaluate formability performance. Formability performance for the nine steel conditions was evaluated using tensile and hole expansion testing. A decrease in martensite/ferrite hardness ratio corresponded to an increase in hole expansion ratio (HER), and an increase in yield strength (YS). A lower hardness ratio (increased similarity of ferrite and martensite hardness) was interpreted to increase strain-sharing between ferrite and martensite, which suppressed plastic strain localization to higher stresses for the case of YS, and to higher formability limits for the case of HER. A lower hardness ratio corresponded to a decrease in work-hardening, and was interpreted to be caused by the suppression of strain localization in ferrite. Multiple studies from literature correlated HER to tensile properties, and the nine steel conditions produced consistent trends with the data reported in each study, confirming the experimental HER and tensile properties obtained in the current study are consistent with literature. The microstructural response to plastic deformation was evaluated using two DP steels with equivalent UTS and different hardness ratios. Nanoindentation analyses on tensile specimens deformed to the UTS revealed a greater increase in ferrite hardness for the higher hardness ratio steel, interpreted to be caused by the greater amount of work hardening. EBSD crystallographic orientation maps for the two DP

  10. Analysis of particle size and interface effects on the strength and ductility of advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettehad, Mahmood

    This thesis is devoted to the numerical investigation of mechanical behavior of Dual phase (DP) steels. Such grade of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) is favorable to the automotive industry due the unique properties such as high strength and ductility with low finished cost. Many experimental and numerical studies have been done to achieve the optimized behavior of DP steels by controlling their microstructure. Experiments are costly and time consuming so in recent years numerical tools are utilized to help the metallurgist before doing experiments. Most of the numerical studies are based on classical (local) constitutive models where no material length scale parameters are incorporated in the model. Although these models are proved to be very effective in modeling the material behavior in the large scales but they fail to address some critical phenomena which are important for our goals. First, they fail to address the size effect phenomena which materials show at microstructural scale. This means that materials show stronger behavior at small scales compared to large scales. Another issue with classical models is the mesh size dependency in modeling the softening behavior of materials. This means that in the finite element context (FEM) the results will be mesh size dependent and no converged solution exist upon mesh refinement. Thereby by applying the classical (local) models one my loose the accuracy on measuring the strength and ductility of DP steels. Among the non-classical (nonlocal) models, gradient-enhanced plasticity models which consider the effect of neighboring point on the behavior of one specific point are proved to be numerically effective and versatile tools to accomplish the two concerns mentioned above. So in this thesis a gradient-enhanced plasticity model which incorporates both the energetic and dissipative material length scales is derived based on the laws of thermodynamics. This model also has a consistent yield-like function for the

  11. Numerical and experimental evaluation of the impact performance of advanced high-strength steel sheets based on a damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning; Park, Taejoon; Kim, Dongun; Kim, Chongmin; Chung, Kwansoo

    2010-06-01

    The impact performance in a Charpy impact test was experimentally and numerically studied for the advanced high-strength steel sheets (AHSS) TWIP940 and TRIP590 as well as the high-strength grade known as 340R. To characterize the mechanical properties, uni-axial simple tension tests were conducted to determine the anisotropic properties and strain rate sensitivities of these materials. In particular, the high-speed strain-rate sensitivity of TRIP590 and 340R (rate sensitive) was also characterized to account for the high strain rates involved in the Charpy impact test. To evaluate fracture behavior in the Charpy impact test, a new damage model including a triaxiality-dependent fracture criterion and hardening behavior with stiffness deterioration was introduced. The model was calibrated via numerical simulations and experiments involving simple tension and V-notch tests. The new damage model along with the anisotropic yield function Hill 1948 was incorporated into the ABAQUS/Explicit FEM code, which performed reasonably well to predict the impact energy absorbed during the Charpy impact test.

  12. Electro-hydraulic forming of advanced high-strength steels: Deformation and microstructural characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, Aashish; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Edwards, Danny J.; Smith, Mark T.; Davies, Richard W.

    2012-06-08

    This conference manuscript describes mechanical and microstructural characterization of steel sheets that were deformed via the electro-hydraulic forming technique. The manuscripts shows the importance of the experimental technique developed at PNNL in the sense that the deformation history information enabled by this technique is not obtainable through existing conventional approaches. Additionally, strain-rate effects on texture development during sheet-forming at high-rates are described. Thus, we have demonstrated that it is now possible to correlate deformation history with microstructural development during high-rate forming, a capability that is unique to PNNL.

  13. Ductility of Advanced High-Strength Steel in the Presence of a Sheared Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Tim; Cluff, Stephen; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Daniels, Craig; Avila, Alex; Chen, Ming

    2016-07-01

    The ductility of dual-phase (DP) 980 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted bainitic ferritic (TBF) 980 steels was studied in the presence of a sheared edge. Specimens were tested in uniaxial tension in a standard test frame as well as in situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Incremental tensile straining was done in the SEM with images taken at each strain increment. Then digital image correlation (DIC) was used to compute the effective strain at the level of the individual phases in the microstructure. Shear banding across multiple phases was seen in strained TBF specimens, while the DP specimens exhibited more of a patchwork strain pattern, with high strains concentrated in ferrite and low strains observed in the martensite. Two-point statistics were applied to the strain data from the DIC work and the corresponding microstructure images to evaluate the effect of phase hardness on localization and fracture. It was observed that the DP 980 material had a greater tendency for localization around hard phases compared to the TBF 980. This at least partially explains the greater ductility of the TBF material, especially in specimens where a sheared edge was present.

  14. Twin-spot laser welding of advanced high-strength multiphase microstructure steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grajcar, Adam; Morawiec, Mateusz; Różański, Maciej; Stano, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    The study addresses the results concerning the laser welding of TRIP (TRansformation Induced Plasticity) steel using a beam focused at two spots (also referred to as twin-spot laser welding). The analysis involved the effect of variable welding thermal cycles on the properties and microstructure of welded joints. The tests were performed using a linear energy of 0.048 and 0.060 kJ/mm and the laser beam power distribution of 50%:50%, 60%:40% and 70%:30%. The tests also involved welding performed using a linear energy of 0.150 kJ/mm and the laser beam power distribution of 70%:30%. In addition, the research included observations of the microstructure of the fusion zone, heat affected zone and the transition zone using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The fusion zone was composed of blocky-lath martensite whereas the HAZ (heat-affected zone) was characterised by the lath microstructure containing martensite, bainite and retained austenite. The distribution of twin-spot laser beam power significantly affected the microstructure and hardness profiles of welded joints. The highest hardness (480-505 HV), regardless of welding variants used, was observed in the HAZ.

  15. Effect of microstructure on the fracture response of advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    coalescence) is a rapid event that occurs at failure displacements greater than 95%. Hardness values obtained from nanoindentation were determined to accurately incorporate all strengthening effects present in the constituents. Due to the presence of 5% austenite, TRIP780 and DP980H exhibited different yielding behavior, different tensile stress-strain behavior than the other six DP steels, and had the highest total elongation in their respective strength groups. Austenite appeared to offer increased ductility without sacrificing any other material properties of interest.

  16. Effects of Fusion Zone Size on Failure Modes and Performance of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2006-04-28

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using the limit load based analytical model and the micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that the conventional weld size of 4 t can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials. The results also suggest that performance based spot weld acceptance criteria should be developed for different AHSS spot welds.

  17. Stamping failure analysis of advanced high strength steel sheet based on non-uniform local deformation through thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng; Zhao, Yixi; He, Chunfeng

    2013-12-01

    The phenomenon "Shear fracture" is often observed in the stretch-bending process of stamping over small radius with advanced high strength steels (AHSS). It occurs parallel to and near the die radius in the stretch-bending test. Since traditional Forming Limit Diagram (FLD) is unable to describe this type of failure, experimental and simulation works were constructed in this paper to investigate and predict the shear fracture. Fracture experiments were carried out through a stretch-bending test system, and failure mode was observed. There is no obviously thinning at the shear fracture surface. Further research shows that the initial crack of shear fracture occurs at the outer layer of specimen at die radius position. Finite element (FE) models were built for stretch-bending test with 3D element. The non-uniform local deformation through thickness corresponding to bending position was obtained and analyzed. Cockcroft & Latham fracture criterion is used. The outer layer of specimen at bending position reaches the critical fracture state firstly, which agrees well with experiments. Different fracture criteria are also compared and selected to determine this fracture. Results show that based on the non-uniform local deformation, the initial crack location of shear fracture at small radius can be effectively predicted by fracture criteria related to the maximum principle stress.

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Inclusions and Precipitation Hardening in Metal Matrix Composites: Application to Advanced High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Askari, Hesam; Zbib, Hussein M.; Sun, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the strengthening effect of inclusions and precipitates in metals is investigated within a multiscale approach that utilizes models at various length scales, namely, Molecular Mechanics (MM), discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DD), and an Eigenstrain Inclusion Method (EIM). Particularly, precipitates are modeled as hardsoft particles whose stress fields interact with dislocations. The stress field resulting from the elastic mismatch between the particles and the matrix is accounted for through the EIM. While the MM method is employed for the purpose of developing rules for DD for short range interaction between a single dislocation and an inclusion, the DD method is used to predict the strength of the composite resulting from the interaction between ensembles of dislocations and particles. As an application to this method, the mechanical behavior of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) is investigated and the results are then compared to the experimental data. The results show that the finely dispersive precipitates can strengthen the material by pinning the dislocations up to a certain shear stress and retarding the recovery, as well as annihilation of dislocations. The DD results show that strengthening due to nano sized particles is a function of the density and size of the precipitates. This size effect is then explained using a mechanistic model developed based on dislocation-particle interaction.

  19. Investigation of the Hot-Stamping Process for Advanced High-Strength Steel Sheet by Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. S.; Xing, Z. W.; Bao, J.; Song, B. Y.

    2010-04-01

    Hot forming is a new way to manufacture complex-shaped components of advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) sheet with a minimum of spring-back. Numerical simulation is an effective way to examine the hot-forming process, particularly to determine thermal and thermo-mechanical characteristics and their dependencies on temperature, strain and strain rate. The flow behavior of the 22MnB5 AHSS is investigated through hot tensile tests. A 3D finite element (FE) model of hot-stamping process for the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] shaped part is built under the ABAQUS/Explicit environment based on the solutions of several key problems, such as treatment of contact between blank and tools, determination of material characteristics and meshing, etc. Numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the influence of blank holder force (BHF) and die gap on the hot-forming process for the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] shaped part. Numerical results show the FE model is effective in simulation of hot-forming process. Large BHF reduces the amount of spring-back and improves the contact of flange with tools while avoiding cracking of stamped part. Die gap has a considerable influence on the distribution of temperature on side walls; the larger the die gap, higher is the temperature on the sidewall of [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] shaped part.

  20. Issues associated with the use of Yoshida nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening material model in Advanced High Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ming F.; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Xinhai

    2016-08-01

    The Yoshida nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening material model is often selected in forming simulations where an accurate springback prediction is required. Many successful application cases in the industrial scale automotive components using advanced high strength steels (AHSS) have been reported to give better springback predictions. Several issues have been raised recently in the use of the model for higher strength AHSS including the use of two C vs. one C material parameters in the Armstrong and Frederick model (AF model), the original Yoshida model vs. Original Yoshida model with modified hardening law, and constant Young's Modulus vs. decayed Young's Modulus as a function of plastic strain. In this paper, an industrial scale automotive component using 980 MPa strength materials is selected to study the effect of two C and one C material parameters in the AF model on both forming and springback prediction using the Yoshida model with and without the modified hardening law. The effect of decayed Young's Modulus on the springback prediction for AHSS is also evaluated. In addition, the limitations of the material parameters determined from tension and compression tests without multiple cycle tests are also discussed for components undergoing several bending and unbending deformations.

  1. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, M.; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11-14 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge® software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within 4%, and the position of the joint interface to within 10%, of the experimental results.

  2. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Michael; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Yuri

    2014-10-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11–14 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge* software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within percent, and the position of the joint interface to within 10 percent, of the experimental results.

  3. Formability Characterization of a New Generation High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram Sadagopan; Dennis Urban; Chris Wong; Mai Huang; Benda Yan

    2003-05-16

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are being progressively explored by the automotive industry all around the world for cost-effective solutions to accomplish vehicle lightweighting, improve fuel economy, and consequently reduce greenhouse emissions. Because of their inherent high strength, attractive crash energy management properties, and good formability, the effective use of AHSS such as Duel Phase and TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels, will significantly contribute to vehicle lightweighting and fuel economy. To further the application of these steels in automotive body and structural parts, a good knowledge and experience base must be developed regarding the press formability of these materials. This project provides data on relevant intrinsic mechanical behavior, splitting limits, and springback behavior of several lots of mild steel, conventional high strength steel (HSS), advanced high strength steel (AHSS) and ultra-high strength steel (UHSS), supplied by the member companies of the Automotive Applications Committee (AAC) of the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI). Two lots of TRIP600, which were supplied by ThyssenKrupp Stahl, were also included in the study. Since sheet metal forming encompasses a very diverse range of forming processes and deformation modes, a number of simulative tests were used to characterize the forming behavior of these steel grades. In general, it was found that formability, as determined by the different tests, decreased with increased tensile strength. Consistant with previous findings, the formability of TRIP600 was found to be exceptionally good for its tensile strength.

  4. High Strength Steel Welding Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    22000 C to 15000 C. - Kluken and Gr6ng [57] considered three major growth processes: collision, 0S diffusion, and Ostwald ripening. They excluded...0- zz * 22000 - * 21000 *20000 0 0 0 0 0 .51o.5225o . Figure 4.7 Temperature profiles at indicated heights for a UMAW process with 220-ppm hydrogen...steel weld metal. With increasing S100 -- 1 0.-Pt I -. , -s ll ie (XO oil - a - IS - 3S0 o 0.20 -- 30 t* \\+ 0~4xo- bg s0o 10 10 IV 60o I0D ISO 0o 0o OION

  5. High strength and high toughness steel

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural steel which possess both high strength and high toughness and has particular application of cryogenic uses. The steel is produced by the utilization of thermally induced phase transformation following heating in a three-phase field in iron-rich alloys of the Fe-Ni-Ti system, with a preferred composition of 12% nickel, 0.5% titanium, the remainder being iron.

  6. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  7. High Strength, Weldable Precipitation Aged Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Alexander D.

    1987-03-01

    The family of plate steels represented by ASTM Specification A7101 is finding increasing applications. These low carbon, Cu-Ni-Cr-Mo-Cb, copper precipitation hardened steels have been identified by a number of designations over the years. During early development in the late 1960's and first commercial production in 1970, the steels were known as IN-787 (trademark of International Nickel Company).2 ASTM specifications were subsequently developed for structural (A710) and pressure vessel (A736) applications over ten years ago. More recent interest and application of this family of steels by the U.S. Navy has lead to development of a military specification MIL-S-24645 (SH),3 also initially known as "HSLA-80." Significant tonnage is being produced for the U.S. Navy as a replacement for HY80 (MIL-S-16216) in cruiser deck, bulkhead and hull applications.4 In these applications, the enhanced weldability and requirement of no preheat at this high strength and toughness level has been the main motivation for its use. Over the past 15 years, A710 type steels have also been used in a variety of applications, including off-shore platforms, pressure vessels, arctic linepipe valves and off-highway mining truck frames.

  8. Hydrogen trapping in high-strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, B.G.

    1998-10-09

    Hydrogen trapping in three high-strength steels -- AerMet 100 and AISI 4340 and H11 -- was studied using a potentiostatic pulse technique. Irreversible trapping constants (k) and hydrogen entry fluxes were determined for these alloys in 1 mol/1 acetic acid/1 mol/1 sodium acetate. The order of the k values for the three steels and two 18Ni maraging steels previously studies inversely parallels their threshold stress intensities for stress corrosion cracking (K{sub 1SCC}). Irreversible trapping in AerMet 100 varies with aging temperature and appears to depend on the type of carbide (Fe{sub 3}C or M{sub 2}C) present. For 4340 steel, k can be correlated with K{sub 1SCC} over a range of yield strengths. The change in k is consistent with a change in the principal type of irreversible trap from matrix boundaries to incoherent Fe{sub 3}C. The principal irreversible traps in H11 at high yield strengths are thought to be similar to those in 4340 steel.

  9. The Bendability of Ultra High strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, S. K.; Efthymiadis, P.; Alamoudi, A.; Kumar, R. L. V.; Shollock, B.; Dashwood, R.

    2016-08-01

    Automotive manufacturers have been reducing the weight of their vehicles to meet increasingly stringent environmental legislation that reflects public demand. A strategy is to use higher strength materials for parts with reduced cross-sections. However, such materials are less formable than traditional grades. The frequent result is increased processing and piece costs. 3D roll forming is a novel and flexible process: it is estimated that a quarter of the structure of a vehicle can be made with a single set of tooling. Unlike stamping, this process requires material with low work hardening rates. In this paper, we present results of ultra high strength steels that have low elongation in a tension but display high formability in bending through the suppression of the necking response.

  10. High Strength Steel Weldment Reliability: Weld Metal Hydrogen Trapping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    additions to welding consumables to control weld metal hydrogen and thus reduce susceptibility to cold cracking in high strength steel weldments. 14...applying weld metal hydrogen trapping to improve the resistance to hydrogen cracking in welding of high strength steels . Hydrogen cracking in high...requirements which are necessary to prevent hydrogen cracking in high strength steel welding. Common practices to prevent hydrogen cracking in steel

  11. Micromechanics of plastic deformation and phase transformation in a three-phase TRIP-assisted advanced high strength steel: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Ankit; Ghassemi-Armaki, Hassan; Sung, Hyokyung; Chen, Peng; Kumar, Sharvan; Bower, Allan F.

    2015-05-01

    The micromechanics of plastic deformation and phase transformation in a three-phase advanced high strength steel are analyzed both experimentally and by microstructure-based simulations. The steel examined is a three-phase (ferrite, martensite and retained austenite) quenched and partitioned sheet steel with a tensile strength of 980 MPa. The macroscopic flow behavior and the volume fraction of martensite resulting from the austenite-martensite transformation during deformation were measured. In addition, micropillar compression specimens were extracted from the individual ferrite grains and the martensite particles, and using a flat-punch nanoindenter, stress-strain curves were obtained. Finite element simulations idealize the microstructure as a composite that contains ferrite, martensite and retained austenite. All three phases are discretely modeled using appropriate crystal plasticity based constitutive relations. Material parameters for ferrite and martensite are determined by fitting numerical predictions to the micropillar data. The constitutive relation for retained austenite takes into account contributions to the strain rate from the austenite-martensite transformation, as well as slip in both the untransformed austenite and product martensite. Parameters for the retained austenite are then determined by fitting the predicted flow stress and transformed austenite volume fraction in a 3D microstructure to experimental measurements. Simulations are used to probe the role of the retained austenite in controlling the strain hardening behavior as well as internal stress and strain distributions in the microstructure.

  12. Investigations Into the Influence of Weld Zone on Formability of Fiber Laser-Welded Advanced High Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Panda, S. K.; Saha, P.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, two different dual phase steel grades DP980 and DP600, and IFHS steel sheets were laser welded by a 2-kW fiber laser. The weld quality of these three different LWBs was assessed with the help of microstructure, micro-hardness and transverse tensile tests. Tensile testing of longitudinal and miniature samples was performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the weld zone. Formability of parent materials and LWBs were assessed in bi-axial stretch forming condition by Erichsen cupping test. To validate the weld zone properties, 3-D finite element models of Erichsen cupping test of LWBs was developed, and the failures in the deformed cups were predicted using two theoretical forming limit diagrams. It was observed that hardness of the fusion zone and HAZ in laser welded DP600 and IFHS steels was more compared to the respective parent metal. However, 29% reduction in hardness was observed at the outer HAZ of DP980 steel weldments due to tempering of martensite. Reduction of formability was observed for all the LWBs with two distinct failure patterns, and the maximum reduction in formability was observed in the case of DP980 LWBs. The presence of the soft zone is detrimental in forming of welded DP steels.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Heat Affected Zone of High Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefcikova, K.; Brtnik, T.; Dolejs, J.; Keltamaki, K.; Topilla, R.

    2015-11-01

    High Strength Steels became more popular as a construction material during last decade because of their increased availability and affordability. On the other hand, even though general use of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) is expanding, the wide utilization is limited because of insufficient information about their behaviour in structures. The most widely used technique for joining steels is fusion welding. The welding process has an influence not only on the welded connection but on the area near this connection, the so-called heat affected zone, as well. For that reason it is very important to be able to determine the properties in the heat affected zone (HAZ). This area of investigation is being continuously developed in dependence on significant progress in material production, especially regarding new types of steels available. There are currently several types of AHSS on the world market. Two most widely used processes for AHSS production are Thermo-Mechanically Controlled Processing (TMCP) and Quenching in connection with Tempering. In the presented study, TMCP and QC steels grade S960 were investigated. The study is focused on the changes of strength, ductility, hardness and impact strength in heat affected zone based on the used amount of heat input.

  14. Investigation of the plastic fracture of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. B.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    This investigation deals in detail with the three recognized stages of plastic fracture in high strength steels, namely, void initiation, void growth, and void coalescence. The particular steels under investigation include plates from both commercial purity and high purity heats of AISI 4340 and 18 Ni, 200 grade maraging steels. A scanning electron microscope equipped with an X-ray energy dispersive analyzer, together with observations made using light microscopy, revealed methods of improving the resistance of high strength steels to plastic fracture.

  15. Numerical Modeling for Springback Predictions by Considering the Variations of Elastic Modulus in Stamping Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Kimchi, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for predicting springback by considering the variations of elastic modulus on springback in stamping AHSS. Various stamping tests and finite-element method (FEM) simulation codes were used in this study. The cyclic loading-unloading tensile tests were conducted to determine the variations of elastic modulus for dual-phase (DP) 780 sheet steel. The biaxial bulge test was used to obtain plastic flow stress data. The non-linear reduction of elastic modulus for increasing the plastic strain was formulated by using the Yoshida model that was implemented in FEM simulations for springback. To understand the effects of material properties on springback, experiments were conducted with a simple geometry such as U-shape bending and the more complex geometry such as the curved flanging and S-rail stamping. Different measurement methods were used to confirm the final part geometry. Two different commercial FEM codes, LS-DYNA and DEFORM, were used to compare the experiments. The variable elastic modulus improved springback predictions in U-shape bending and curved flanging tests compared to FEM with the constant elastic modulus. However, in S-rail stamping tests, both FEM models with the isotropic hardening model showed limitations in predicting the sidewall curl of the S-rail part after springback. To consider the kinematic hardening and Bauschinger effects that result from material bending-unbending in S-rail stamping, the Yoshida model was used for FEM simulation of S-rail stamping and springback. The FEM predictions showed good improvement in correlating with experiments.

  16. Effects of Fusion Zone Size on Failure Modes and Performance of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds (2006-01-0531)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-03-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using the limit load based analytical model and the micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that the conventional weld size of 4 t1/2 can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials. The results also suggest that performance based spot weld acceptance criteria should be developed for different AHSS spot welds.

  17. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  18. Weldability of Advanced High Strength Steels using Ytterbium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet high power laser for Tailor-Welded Blank applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rajashekhar Shivaram

    Use of a high power Yb:YAG laser is investigated for joining advanced high strength steel materials for use in tailor-welded blank (TWB) applications. TWB's are materials of different chemistry, coating or thicknesses that are joined before metal forming and other operations such as trimming, assembly and painting are carried out. TWB is becoming an important design tool in the automotive industry for reducing weight, improving fuel economy and passenger safety, while reducing the overall costs for the customer. Three advanced high strength steels, TRIP780, DP980 and USIBOR, which have many unique properties that are conducive to achieving these objectives, along with mild steel, are used in this work. The objective of this work is to ensure that high quality welds can be obtained using Yb:YAG lasers which are also becoming popular for metal joining operations, since they produce high quality laser beams that suffer minimal distortion when transported via fiber optic cables. Various power levels and speeds for the laser beam were used during the investigation. Argon gas was consistently used for shielding purposes during the welding process. After the samples were welded, metallographic examination of the fusion and heat-affected zones using optical and scanning electron microscopes were carried out to determine the microstructures as well as weld defects. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were also used to examine the top of welds as well as fracture surfaces. Additionally, cross-weld microhardness evaluations, tensile tests using Instron tester, limited fatigue tests as well as formability evaluations using OSU plane strain evaluation were carried out. The examinations included a 2-factor full factorial design of experiments to determine the impact of coatings on the surface roughness on the top of the welds. Tensile strengths of DP980, TRIP780 and mild steel materials as well as DP980 welded to TRIP780 and mild steel in the rolling direction as well as

  19. TRP 9904 - Constitutive Behavior of High Strength Multiphase Sheel Steel Under High Strain Rate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    David Matlock; John Speer

    2005-03-31

    The focus of the research project was to systematically assess the strain rate dependence of strengthening mechanisms in new advanced high strength sheet steels. Data were obtained on specially designed and produced Duel Phase and TRIP steels and compared to the properties of automotive steels currently in use.

  20. Retention of ductility in high-strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. R.; Zackay, V. F.

    1969-01-01

    To produce high strength alloy steel with retention of ductility, include tempering, cooling and subsequent tempering. Five parameters for optimum results are pretempering temperature, amount of strain, strain rate, temperature during strain, and retempering temperature.

  1. High-strength braze joints between copper and steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, R. F.

    1967-01-01

    High-strength braze joints between copper and steel are produced by plating the faying surface of the copper with a layer of gold. This reduces porosity in the braze area and strengthens the resultant joint.

  2. Improved High Strength Armor Steel through Texturing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    80 I 14 02w INTRODUCTION During metal manufacturing processing, such as rolling of sheet and plate, the polycrystalline aggregate of the material...of the quenched martensite has been documented by previous investigators including Kula and Dhosi who ob- served that thermomechanical processing can...textured armor steel exhibits improved ballistic resistance to conventionally uncontrolled rolled steels of equal hardness at normal obliquity. This

  3. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  4. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature, hydrogen pressure, stress intensity, and yield strength on the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted crack propagation in 18Ni maraging steels were investigated experimentally. It was found that crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity was characterized by an apparent threshold for crack growth, a stage where the growth rate increased sharply, and a stage where the growth rate was unchanged over a significant range of stress intensity. Cracking proceeded on load application with little or no detectable incubation period. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased with increasing yield strength.

  5. Press hardening of alternative high strength aluminium and ultra-high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendiguren, Joseba; Ortubay, Rafael; Agirretxe, Xabier; Galdos, Lander; de Argandoña, Eneko Sáenz

    2016-10-01

    The boron steel press hardening process takes more and more importance on the body in white structure in the last decade. In this work, the advantages of using alternative alloys on the press hardening process is analysed. In particular, the press hardening of AA7075 high strength aluminium and CP800 complex phase ultra-high strength steel is analysed. The objective is to analyse the potential decrease on springback while taking into account the strength change associated with the microstructural modification carried out during the press hardening process. The results show a clear improvement of the final springback in both cases. Regarding the final mechanical properties, an important decrease has been measured in the AA7075 due to the process while an important increase has been found in the CP800 material.

  6. Investigation of the plastic fracture of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. B.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the plastic fracture process to improve tensile strength in high strength steels is presented. Two generic types of steels are considered: a quenched and tempered grade and a maraging grade, in order to compare two different matrix microstructures. Each type of steel was studied in commercial grade purity and in special melted high purity form, low in residual and impurity elements. The specific alloys dealt with include AISI 4340 and 18 Ni, 200 grade maraging steel, both heat treated to the same yield strength level of approximately 200 ksi.

  7. Properties of formable high strength sheet steels for automotive use

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, S.; Kato, T.; Nishida, M.; Obara, T.; Shinozaki, M.; Tosaka, A.

    1983-11-01

    Metallurgical factors affecting the press formability of the newly developed high strength sheet steels have been discussed. Dual phase steels, CHLY (cold-rolled sheet steel) and HTP-D (as-hotrolled sheet steel), produced by control of cooling conditions after intercritical annealing or hot-rolling exhibit very low yield to tensile strength ratio and high n-value. Rephosphorized extralow carbon steel, CHRX, produced by continuous annealing with rapid cooling is characterized by its extremely high r-value and low yield strength. CHLY, HTP-D and CHRX have large bake hardenability. Precipitation hardened steel, HTP-F (hot-rolled sheel steel), produced by adjusting carbon equivalent and sulfur content is suitable for manufacturing wheel rims owing to its good formability after flash butt welding.

  8. Method of making high strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel, particularly suitable for the mining industry, is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other subsitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  9. Thermophysical property measurements on low alloy high strength carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Brooks, J.A.; Atteridge, D.G.; Porter, W.D.

    1997-06-15

    The alloys of interest in this study were AISI Type 4230 and Type 4320 low alloy high strength carbon steels. They are heat-treatable steels and are usually used in the quenched and tempered condition. The Type 4130 has about 0.3% (wt.)C, 0.95%Cr, and 0.2% Mo. The Type 4320 has about 0.2%C, 1.7%Ni, 0.7%Cr, and 0.3% Mo. They are among the most popular alloy steels because of their excellent combination of mechanical properties and are used in both cast and wrought forms for many applications requiring high strength and toughness. However, during the casting operation, carbon segregation to the part surface forms a high carbon content surface layer in the part, which will induce surface cracking in the subsequent quenching process. And, during the welding operation, the critical cooling rate in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) will determine if the weldment is crack-free or not. Thus, the numerical effort to study the thermal history, microstructure evolution and residual stress development during welding and casting is critical to the application of these steels. This modeling effect requires the accurate knowledge of thermophysical properties, such as thermal expansion, solidus and liquidus temperatures, specific heat capacity, and heat of fusion. Unfortunately, these thermophysical properties are unavailable for temperatures over 1,000 C (1,2), thus the need for this study.

  10. Reduced hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility in platinum implanted high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, J. G.; Lowder, L. J.; Culbertson, R. J.; Kosik, W. E.; Brown, R.

    1991-07-01

    High strength steels suffer from a high susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement in a corrosive atmosphere, a factor which limits their usefulness. A good catalyst, such as platinum, present on the surface of the steel may lead to a low value of hydrogen overvoltage, thereby reducing the accumulation and subsequent diffusion of atomic hydrogen into the metal. In the present study, platinum was implanted into high strength electroslag remelted (ESR) 4340 steel specimens to a dose of 10 16 atoms/cm 2. Both Pt-implanted and unimplanted specimens were rate charged with hydrogen. The relative concentration of diffusible hydrogen was determined using an electrochemical measurement device known as a Barnacle Electrode. The specimens implanted with platinum exhibited less diffusible hydrogen than the unimplanted steel. Slow strain rate notched-tensile tests, in an aqueous solution of 3.5 wt.% NaCI, were performed in order to evaluate the effect of hydrogen on strength and ductility. The Pt-implanted specimens were able to sustain significantly higher loads before fracture than their unimplanted counterparts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) verified the presence of brittle cracking typical of hydrogen embrittlement type failures. Degradation of mechanical properties due to hydrogen embrittlement was thus significantly reduced. This suggested that both the electrochemical and catalytic properties of the Pt-implanted surface were responsible for the improvement in properties.

  11. Crack propagation modelling for high strength steel welded structural details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecséri, B. J.; Kövesdi, B.

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays the barrier of applying HSS (High Strength Steel) material in bridge structures is their low fatigue strength related to yield strength. This paper focuses on the fatigue behaviour of a structural details (a gusset plate connection) made from NSS and HSS material, which is frequently used in bridges in Hungary. An experimental research program is carried out at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics to investigate the fatigue lifetime of this structural detail type through the same test specimens made from S235 and S420 steel grades. The main aim of the experimental research program is to study the differences in the crack propagation and the fatigue lifetime between normal and high strength steel structures. Based on the observed fatigue crack pattern the main direction and velocity of the crack propagation is determined. In parallel to the tests finite element model (FEM) are also developed, which model can handle the crack propagation. Using the measured strain data in the tests and the calculated values from the FE model, the approximation of the material parameters of the Paris law are calculated step-by-step, and their calculated values are evaluated. The same material properties are determined for NSS and also for HSS specimens as well, and the differences are discussed. In the current paper, the results of the experiments, the calculation method of the material parameters and the calculated values are introduced.

  12. Damage characterization of high-strength multiphase steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heibel, S.; Nester, W.; Clausmeyer, T.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2016-11-01

    High-strength steels show an entirely different material behavior than conventional deep-drawing steels. This fact is caused among others by the multiphase nature of their structure. The Forming Limit Diagram as the classic failure criterion in forming simulation is only partially suitable for this class of steels. An improvement of the failure prediction can be obtained by using damage mechanics. Therefore, an exact knowledge of the material-specific damage is essential for the application of various damage models. In this paper the results of microstructure analysis of a dual-phase steel and a complex-phase steel with a tensile strength of 1000 MPa are shown comparatively at various stress conditions. The objective is to characterize the basic damage mechanisms and based on this to assess the crack sensitivity of both steels. First a structural analysis with regard to non-metallic inclusions, the microstructural morphology, phase identification and the difference in microhardness between the structural phases is carried out. Subsequently, the development of the microstructure at different stress states between uniaxial and biaxial tension is examined. The damage behavior is characterized and quantified by the increase in void density, void size and the quantity of voids. The dominant damage mechanism of the dual-phase steel is the void initiation at phase boundaries, within harder structural phases and at inclusions. In contrast the complex-phase steel shows a significant growth of a smaller amount of voids which initiate only at inclusions. To quantify the damage tolerance and the susceptibility of cracking the criterion of the fracture forming limit line (FFL) is used. The respective statements are supported by results of investigations regarding the edge-crack sensitivity.

  13. High Strength Stainless Steel Properties that Affect Resistance Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R.

    2001-08-01

    This report discusses results of a study on selected high strength stainless steel alloy properties that affect resistance welding. The austenitic alloys A-286, JBK-75 (Modified A-286), 21-6-9, 22-13-5, 316 and 304L were investigated and compared. The former two are age hardenable, and the latter four obtain their strength through work hardening. Properties investigated include corrosion and its relationship to chemical cleaning, the effects of heat treatment on strength and surface condition, and the effect of mechanical properties on strength and weldability.

  14. Thermal Desorption Analysis of Hydrogen in High Strength Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, M.; Hirakami, D.; Tarui, T.

    2012-02-01

    Thermal desorption analyses (TDA) were conducted in high strength martensitic steels containing carbon from 0.33 to 1.0 mass pct, which were charged with hydrogen at 1223 K (950 °C) under hydrogen of one atmospheric pressure and quenched to room temperature. In 0.33C steel, which had the highest M s temperature, only one desorption peak was observed around 373 K (100 °C), whereas two peaks, one at a similar temperature and the other around and above 573 K (300 °C), were observed in the other steels, the height of the second peak increasing with carbon content. In 0.82C steel, both peaks disappeared during exposure at room temperature in 1 week, whereas the peak heights decreased gradually over 2 weeks in specimens electrolytically charged with hydrogen and aged for varying times at room temperature. From computer simulation, by means of the McNabb-Foster theory coupled with theories of carbon segregation, these peaks are likely to be due to trapping of hydrogen in the strain fields and cores of dislocations, and presumably to a lesser extent in prior austenite grain boundaries. The results also indicate that carbon atoms prevent and even expel hydrogen from trapping sites during quenching and aging in these steels.

  15. Recent Niobium Developments for High Strength Steel Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansto, Steven G.

    Niobium-containing high strength steel materials have been developed for oil and gas pipelines, offshore platforms, nuclear plants, boilers and alternative energy applications. Recent research and the commercialization of alternative energy applications such as windtower structural supports and power transmission gear components provide enhanced performance. Through the application of these Nb-bearing steels in demanding energy-related applications, the designer and end user experience improved toughness at low temperature, excellent fatigue resistance and fracture toughness and excellent weldability. These enhancements provide structural engineers the opportunity to further improve the structural design and performance. For example, through the adoption of these Nb-containing structural materials, several design-manufacturing companies are initiating new windtower designs operating at higher energy efficiency, lower cost, and improved overall material design performance.

  16. Mechanical properties of heat treated high-strength microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol'shakov, V. I.

    1997-04-01

    An international seminar on problems of modern materials science held in April 1997 in Dnepropetrovsk was dedicated to the memory of Academician K. F. Starodubov. His ideas are now implemented by his students and followers. One of them is V. I. Bol'shakov, Doctor of Engineering, member of the International Engineering Academy, the Building Academy of Ukraine, and the Academy of Higher Education, Honored Scientist and Engineer of Ukraine, rector of the Dnieper State Academy of Building and Architecture, and well-known specialist in the physical metallurgy of structural steels. He celebrated his 50th anniversary in 1996. We present an article by V. I. Bol'shakov devoted to the effect of the final rolling temperature and the cooling conditions on the mechanical properties of heat-treated high-strength low-alloy steels.

  17. Dynamic ductile tearing in high strength pipeline steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rivalin, F.; Iung, T.; Di Fant, M.; Pineau, A.

    1996-12-31

    The study of rapid ductile crack propagation and crack arrest is a central point if one wants to reach a higher safety level in pipelines. Correlations between Charpy tests and full scale burst tests proved to be unsuccessful in predicting pipe burst for recent high strength steels. This paper presents an experiment which allows to test large SENT specimens under dynamic loading, and to characterize steel resistance against rapid ductile crack propagation by a classical energetic parameter, called the crack propagation energy, R, proposed by Turner. The R parameter proved to be characteristic of the rapid crack propagation in the material, for a given specimen and loading configuration. Failure of the specimen under dynamic conditions occurs by shearing fracture which is the same as in a full scale burst test. An example is given for an X65 ferritic-pearlitic steel loaded under static and dynamic conditions. A fracture mode transition is shown following the loading rate. From a metallurgical point of view, shearing fracture occurs by nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids, as for classical ductile fracture.

  18. Development of Life Prediction Models for High Strength Steel in a Hydrogen Emitting Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    alternative. Hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steel is the most predominant unforeseen hurdle since high strength materials show sensitivity to...predictive models for each geometry. 15. SUBJECT TERMS hydrogen embrittlement , 4340, corrosion 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...implementation of any potential alternative. Hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steel is the most predominant unforeseen hurdle since high

  19. Effects of flux modifications on high strength steel weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, G.L.

    1994-12-31

    The performance of high strength steel welds is sensitive to the weld metal chemistry, and that, in turn, is dependent on the composition of the welding consumables. In the case of submerged arc welding, the flux plays an important role in determining the chemistry of the resulting weld metal. The u.S. Navy is conducting a program to gain a basic understanding of fluxes used for welding high strength steels in an effort to be able to better select the appropriate flux, or design a new flux, for a given application. The objective of the present work is to analyze the effects of a systematic chance in flux composition on weld metal chemistry and properties The dry mix of a commercial flux was modified with additions of MnO to produce a series of four experimental flux mixes with target MnO levels from 1 wt% to 4 wt%. A fifth experimental flux mix was produced with an addition of 1/2 wt% CeO{sub 2} to examine the effect of rare earth additions to the flux. Tensile and impact properties and weld metal chemistry were tested for each weldment, and correlations were made with flux composition. Weld metal Mn levels from 1.37 wt% (0.76 wt% flux MnO) to 1.75 wt% (4.26 wt% flux MnO) were achieved with the MnO-added fluxes.The small CeO{sub 2} addition appeared to improve weld metal impact performance it was concluded that a more basic knowledge of welding fluxes can be used in selecting or designing appropriate fluxes for Navy applications. Further work is required to characterize the specific effects of other flux constituents and their interactions on weld metal performance.

  20. Anomolous Fatigue Crack Growth Phenomena in High-Strength Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; James, Mark A.; Johnston, William M., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of a fatigue crack through a material is the result of a complex interaction between the applied loading, component geometry, three-dimensional constraint, load history, environment, material microstructure and several other factors. Previous studies have developed experimental and computational methods to relate the fatigue crack growth rate to many of the above conditions, with the intent of discovering some fundamental material response, i.e. crack growth rate as a function of something. Currently, the technical community uses the stress intensity factor solution as a simplistic means to relate fatigue crack growth rate to loading, geometry and all other variables. The stress intensity factor solution is a very simple linear-elastic representation of the continuum mechanics portion of crack growth. In this paper, the authors present fatigue crack growth rate data for two different high strength steel alloys generated using standard methods. The steels exhibit behaviour that appears unexplainable, compared to an aluminium alloy presented as a baseline for comparison, using the stress intensity factor solution.

  1. Third Generation 0.3C-4.0Mn Advanced High Strength Steels Through a Dual Stabilization Heat Treatment: Austenite Stabilization Through Paraequilibrium Carbon Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Hao; Michal, Gary M.; Heuer, Arthur H.

    2014-06-01

    In excess of 30 vol. pct austenite can be retained in 0.3C-4.0Mn steels subjected to a dual stabilization heat treatment (DSHT) schedule—a five stage precisely controlled cooling schedule that is a variant of the quench and partition process. The temperature of the second quench (stage III) in the DSHT process plays an essential role in the retained austenite contents produced at carbon-partitioning temperatures of 723 K or 748 K (450° C or 475 °C) (stage IV). A thermodynamic model successfully predicted the retained austenite contents in heat-treated steels, particularly for a completely austenitized material. The microstructure and mechanical behavior of two heat-treated steels with similar levels of retained austenite (~30 vol. pct) were studied. Optimum properties—tensile strengths up to 1650 MPa and ~20 pct total elongation—were observed in a steel containing 0.3C-4.0Mn-2.1Si, 1.5 Al, and 0.5 Cr.

  2. High Strength Concrete Columns under Axial Compression Load: Hybrid Confinement Efficiency of High Strength Transverse Reinforcement and Steel Fibers.

    PubMed

    Perceka, Wisena; Liao, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Yo-de

    2016-04-01

    Addition of steel fibers to high strength concrete (HSC) improves its post-peak behavior and energy absorbing capability, which can be described well in term of toughness. This paper attempts to obtain both analytically and experimentally the efficiency of steel fibers in HSC columns with hybrid confinement of transverse reinforcement and steel fibers. Toughness ratio (TR) to quantify the confinement efficiency of HSC columns with hybrid confinement is proposed through a regression analysis by involving sixty-nine TRs of HSC without steel fibers and twenty-seven TRs of HSC with hybrid of transverse reinforcement and steel fibers. The proposed TR equation was further verified by compression tests of seventeen HSC columns conducted in this study, where twelve specimens were reinforced by high strength rebars in longitudinal and transverse directions. The results show that the efficiency of steel fibers in concrete depends on transverse reinforcement spacing, where the steel fibers are more effective if the spacing transverse reinforcement becomes larger in the range of 0.25-1 effective depth of the section column. Furthermore, the axial load-strain curves were developed by employing finite element software (OpenSees) for simulating the response of the structural system. Comparisons between numerical and experimental axial load-strain curves were carried out.

  3. High Strength Concrete Columns under Axial Compression Load: Hybrid Confinement Efficiency of High Strength Transverse Reinforcement and Steel Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Perceka, Wisena; Liao, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Yo-de

    2016-01-01

    Addition of steel fibers to high strength concrete (HSC) improves its post-peak behavior and energy absorbing capability, which can be described well in term of toughness. This paper attempts to obtain both analytically and experimentally the efficiency of steel fibers in HSC columns with hybrid confinement of transverse reinforcement and steel fibers. Toughness ratio (TR) to quantify the confinement efficiency of HSC columns with hybrid confinement is proposed through a regression analysis by involving sixty-nine TRs of HSC without steel fibers and twenty-seven TRs of HSC with hybrid of transverse reinforcement and steel fibers. The proposed TR equation was further verified by compression tests of seventeen HSC columns conducted in this study, where twelve specimens were reinforced by high strength rebars in longitudinal and transverse directions. The results show that the efficiency of steel fibers in concrete depends on transverse reinforcement spacing, where the steel fibers are more effective if the spacing transverse reinforcement becomes larger in the range of 0.25–1 effective depth of the section column. Furthermore, the axial load–strain curves were developed by employing finite element software (OpenSees) for simulating the response of the structural system. Comparisons between numerical and experimental axial load–strain curves were carried out. PMID:28773391

  4. Chrome-Free Paint Primer for Zn/Ni Plated High-Strength Steel (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-19

    Chrome-Free Paint Primer for Zn/Ni Plated High- Strength Steel 11-19-14 Presentation at ASETSDefense 2014 George Zafiris Team: Mark Jaworowski, Mike...AND SUBTITLE Chrome-Free Paint Primer for Zn/Ni Plated High-Strength Steel 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...by ANSI Std Z39-18 Background High-Strength Steel (Substrate) LHE Cd layer Cr(VI) Primer CCC High-Strength Steel (Substrate) LHE Zn/Ni layer

  5. Hybrid Welding of 45 mm High Strength Steel Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunaziv, Ivan; Frostevarg, Jan; Akselsen, Odd M.; Kaplan, Alexander F.

    Thick section welding has significant importance for oil and gas industry in low temperature regions. Arc welding is usually employed providing suitable quality joints with acceptable toughness at low temperatures with very limited productivity compared to modern high power laser systems. Laser-arc hybrid welding (LAHW) can enhance the productivity by several times due to higher penetration depth from laser beam and combined advantages of both heat sources. LAHW was applied to join 45 mm high strength steel with double-sided technique and application of metal cored wire. The process was captured by high speed camera, allowing process observation in order to identify the relation of the process stability on weld imperfections and efficiency. Among the results, it was found that both arc power and presence of a gap increased penetration depth, and that higher welding speeds cause unstable processing and limits penetration depth. Over a wide range of heat inputs, the welds where found to consist of large amounts of fine-grained acicular ferrite in the upper 60-75% part of welds. At the root filler wire mixing was less and cooling faster, and thus found to have bainitic transformation. Toughness of deposited welds provided acceptable toughness at -50 °C with some scattering.

  6. Effect of chemical composition on the hardenability of high-strength rail steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonova, K. É.; Velikanov, A. V.

    1981-05-01

    The hardenability nomograms developed for high-strength rail steels make it possible to select the composition of steel with a given hardenability, the minimal permissible value of which depends on the operating conditions.

  7. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting the weld microstructure the Q+P and the QT steels require weld heat treatment. The HSD steel is weldable without. Due to their applications the ultra-high strength steels are welded in as-rolled and strengthened condition. Also the reaction of the weld on hot stamping is reflected for the martensitic grades. The supra-ductile steels are welded as solution annealed and work hardened by 50%. The results show the general suitability for laser beam welding.

  8. Fracture analysis of a high-strength concrete and a high-strength steel-fiber-reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. E. T.

    2007-09-01

    This paper addresses the use of R-curves to study the fracture behavior of high-strength concrete and steel-fiber-reinforced concrete subjected to crack ing in a three-point bending configuration. The R-curves are modeled through an effective approach based on the equations of linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), which relates the applied load to the fundamental displacements of notched-through beams loaded monotonically. It is initially shown that, for quasi-brittle materials, the R-curves responses can be evaluated in a quasi-analytical way, using the load-crack mouth opening, the load-load line displacement, or exclusively the displacement responses obtained experimentally. Afterward, the methodology is used to obtain the fracture responses of high-strength and fiber-reinforced concretes, up to the final stages of rupture.

  9. Advanced characterization techniques in understanding the roles of nickel in enhancing strength and toughness of submerged arc welding high strength low alloy steel multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Kin-Ling

    Striving for higher strength along with higher toughness is a constant goal in material properties. Even though nickel is known as an effective alloying element in improving the resistance of a steel to impact fracture, it is not fully understood how nickel enhances toughness. It was the goal of this work to assist and further the understanding of how nickel enhanced toughness and maintained strength in particular for high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel submerged arc welding multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition. Using advanced analytical techniques such as electron backscatter diffraction, x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermodynamic modeling software, the effect of nickel was studied with nickel varying from one to five wt. pct. in increments of one wt. pct. in a specific HSLA steel submerged arc welding multiple pass weldment. The test matrix of five different nickel compositions in the as-welded and stress-relieved condition was to meet the targeted mechanical properties with a yield strength greater than or equal to 85 ksi, a ultimate tensile strength greater than or equal to 105 ksi, and a nil ductility temperature less than or equal to -140 degrees F. Mechanical testing demonstrated that nickel content of three wt. pct and greater in the as-welded condition fulfilled the targeted mechanical properties. Therefore, one, three, and five wt. pct. nickel in the as-welded condition was further studied to determine the effect of nickel on primary solidification mode, nickel solute segregation, dendrite thickness, phase transformation temperatures, effective ferrite grain size, dislocation density and strain, grain misorientation distribution, and precipitates. From one to five wt. pct nickel content in the as-welded condition, the primary solidification was shown to change from primary delta-ferrite to primary austenite. The nickel partitioning coefficient increased and dendrite/cellular thickness was

  10. Cup-Drawing Behavior of High-Strength Steel Sheets Containing Different Volume Fractions of Martensite

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Shi-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Wan; Yang, Hoe-Seok; Han, Seong-Ho; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2010-06-15

    Planar anisotropy and cup-drawing behavior were investigated for high-strength steel sheets containing different volume fractions of martensite. Macrotexture analysis using XRD was conducted to capture the effect of crystallographic orientation on the planar anisotropy of high-strength steel sheets. A phenomenological yield function, Yld96, which accounts for the anisotropy of yield stress and r-values, was implemented into ABAQUS using the user subroutine UMAT. Cup drawing of high-strength steel sheets was simulated using the FEM code. The profiles of earing and thickness strain were compared with the experimentally measured results.

  11. Corrosion Behavior of High-Strength Bainitic Rail Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, A. P.; Sangal, S.; Layek, S.; Giribaskar, S.; Mondal, Kallol

    2015-04-01

    The present work discusses corrosion behavior of newly developed bainitic steels made by isothermal heat treatment of a new steel composition (0.71 pct C, 1.15 pct Mn, 0.20 pct Ni, 0.59 pct Cr, 0.40 pct Cu, 0.35 pct Si, 0.026 pct S, 0.027 pct P, and rest Fe (weight percent)). Corrosion behavior of the pearlitic steel made by normalization is also studied. Electrochemical polarization and salt fog tests are carried out in 0.6 M NaCl. Steel rusts after salt fog tests are analyzed. Modified composition, finer microstructures, and compact rust morphology attribute to better corrosion resistance of the bainitic steels. Corrosion mechanisms for the pearlitic and bainitic steels are discussed.

  12. Low carbon dual phase steels for high strength wire

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.; Ahn, J.H.

    1985-08-01

    This paper shows that dual phase steels can be designed and processed as new, economical low carbon steels for cold drawing into high tensile strength steel wires. Current work indicates wires of tensile strengths up to 400,000 psi can be obtained. Potential applications for dual phase steel wire include bead wire, tire cord, wire rope and prestressed concrete. It should be possible to produce wire rods in existing rod mills by adapting the controlled rolling and quenching procedures outlined in this paper.

  13. Design of Reforma 509 with High Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stuart; Whitby, William; Easton, Marc

    Reforma 509 is a high-rise building located in the heart of the Central Business District of Mexico City. The building is comprised of office, hotel, residential and parking and forms part of a cluster of tall buildings in the area. If completed today, Reforma 509 would be the tallest building in Mexico, at 238m. All of the building's gravity and lateral (wind and seismic) loads are carried by an architecturally expressed perimeter frame that is formed from highly efficient Steel Reinforced Concrete (SRC) columns coupled together by steel tube perimeter bracing. This paper investigates the implications of substituting a grade 50 (fy=345 MPa) carbon steel with a higher strength micro-alloyed grade 70 (fy=480 MPa) steel in the design of Reforma 509.

  14. Latest Development and Application of High Strength and Heavy Gauge Pipeline Steel in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongqing, Zhang; Aimin, Guo; Chengjia, Shang; Qingyou, Liu; Gray, J. Malcolm; Barbaro, Frank

    Over the past twenty years, significant advances have been made in the field of microalloying and associated application, among which one of the most successful application cases is HTP practice for heavy gauge, high strength pipeline steels. Combined the strengthening effects of TMCP and retardation effects of austenite recrystallization with increasing Nb in austenite region, HTP conception with low carbon and high niobium alloy design has been successfully applied to develop X80 coil with a thickness of 18.4mm used for China's Second West-East pipeline. During this process, big efforts were made to further develop and enrich the application of microalloying technology, and at the same time the strengthening effects of Nb have been completely unfolded and fully utilized with improved metallurgical quality and quantitative analysis of microstructure. In this paper, the existing status and strengthening effect of Nb during reheating, rolling, cooling and welding have been analyzed and characterized based on mass production samples and laboratory analysis. As confirmed, grain refinement remains the most basic strengthening measure to reduce the microstructure gradient along the thickness, which in turn enlarges the processing window to improve upon low temperature toughness, and finally make it possible to develop heavy gauge, high strength pipeline steels with more challenging fracture toughness requirements.

  15. The research on delayed fracture behavior of high-strength bolts in steel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo dong; Li, Nan

    2017-07-01

    High-strength bolts have been widely used in power plants. However, the high-strength bolts which being employed in pumping station, steel structure and pipeline anti-whip structure have been found delayed fracture for many times in a power plant, this will affect the reliability of steel fracture and bring blow risk caused by falling objects. The high-strength bolt with delayed fracture was carried out fracture analysis, metallurgical analysis, chemical analysis, mechanical analysis, as well as bolts installation analysis, it can be comprehensively confirmed that the direct cause of high-strength bolts delayed fracture is the stress corrosion, and the root cause of high-strength bolts delayed fracture should be the improper installation at the initial and the imperfect routine anti-corrosion maintenance.

  16. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda Yan; Dennis Urban

    2003-04-21

    A 2-year project (2001-2002) to generate fatigue and high strain data for a new generation of high strength steels (HSS) has been completed in December 2002. The project tested eleven steel grades, including Dual Phase (DP) steels, Transformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, Bake Hardenable (BH) steels, and conventional High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels. All of these steels are of great interest in automotive industry due to the potential benefit in weight reduction, improved fuel economy, enhanced crash energy management and total system cost savings. Fatigue behavior includes strain controlled fatigue data notch sensitivity for high strength steels. High strain rate behavior includes stress-strain data for strain rates from 0.001/s to 1000/s, which are considered the important strain rate ranges for crash event. The steels were tested in two phases, seven were tested in Phase 1 and the remaining steels were tested in Phase. In a addition to the fatigue data and high st rain rate data generated for the steels studied in the project, analyses of the testing results revealed that Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) exhibit significantly higher fatigue strength and crash energy absorption capability than conventional HSS. TRIP steels exhibit exceptionally better fatigue strength than steels of similar tensile strength but different microstructure, for conditions both with or without notches present

  17. Effect of Cleanliness on Hydrogen Tolerance in High-Strength Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    friendly solvents and coatings. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 4340 steel, hydrogen embrittlement 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...have a common obstacle for implementation of any potential alternative. Hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength steel is the most predominant...coatings that currently have their use limited via the perceived risk of hydrogen embrittlement . 1

  18. Stainless High-Strength Sparingly Alloyed Steel for Operation in Aggressive Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovleva, I. L.; Tereshchenko, N. A.; Smirnov, L. A.; Panfilova, L. M.

    2017-05-01

    Formation of structure and properties is analyzed in a number of stainless high-strength steels used in oil production for shafts of submerged centrifugal electric pumps. The factors elevating the cuttability and corrosion resistance of sparingly alloyed steel 14Cr17Ni2NV are determined.

  19. Controlling Hydrogen Embrittlement in Ultra-High Strength Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    H) can be co-deposited during plating and may enter the steel substrate .𔃽, 4 A post-plating baking process is frequently required to remove this...bias the results presented here. Determination of diffusible hydrogen concentration The Barnacle Electrode method was used to measure diffusible...extraction solution in the Barnacle cell. One hour prior to and during extraction, Ca(OH) 2 solution was deaerated continuously using N2. During

  20. Assessing Hydrogen Assisted Cracking Modes in High Strength Steel Welds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    posed theoretical hydrogen assisted cracking mechanisms. It was found that the microplasticity theory of Beachem can best describe how the stress ...steel and determined the stress corrosion cracking toughness, Kscc. Herman and Campbell found that the fracture toughness of this material was 16 MPa...embrittlement Welding Cracking (fracturing) Implant tests Stress intensity ("T, ) ’ 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side if necessary end identify by

  1. Influence of processing on the cryogenic mechanical properties of high strength high manganese stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, R.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    New high strength structural steels have been required for the large superconducting magnets that will be used for the next step test facility for fusion reactor research. The new materials must have high yield strength accompanied with better toughness and better fatigue resistance compared with the conventional nitrogen-strengthened stainless steels such as AISI 304LN and 316LN that were used for the cases of the toroidal field coils for the Large Coil Project. A number of new high manganese austenitic steels have been proposed for new cryogenic structural alloys since they can offer low cost, stable austenite and high strength.

  2. Optimization of Material Properties of High Strength Multiphase Steels via Microstructure and Phase Transformation Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäumer, Annette; Zimmermann, Eva

    For high strength multiphase steels for structural components in automotive applications many different material properties are required. Consequently, a diverse range of tests are performed to characterize the material properties during development as well as optimization of multiphase steels. These tests include classical tensile tests as well as formability tests which characterize bendability, edge crack sensitivity and deep drawability. All these properties are greatly dependent on the microstructure of the material. In the case of high strength multiphase steels, microstructure characterization involves evaluation of the volume fraction, stability, grain size as well as the distribution of the different phases present. Microstructural modifications — with the aim of obtaining the required material properties — may be achieved by variation of annealing parameters. In this paper it is shown how microstructural modification for high strength TRIP and Dual Phase steels resulted in better formability properties and different strength levels.

  3. Inhibition of Hydrogen Absorption during Plating of High Strength Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    resistor driven by a PbO2 electrode. Voltage across the resistor was recorded versus time on a Soltec Model 1242 strip chart recorder. Most plating...was 2.0 cm2 . This cell is shown in Figure 2. PbO2 Electrode Preparation: A strip of 430 stainless steel, 0.5 inch by three inches was prepared by...150 mL of ether and 0.69 g of hygroscopic, water insoluble viscous oil product was recovered. Prussian Blue: Prussian blue was deposited cathodically

  4. Processing and Characterization of High Strength, High Ductility Hadfield Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    B . Olson and M. Cohen. Constitutive flow relations for austenitic steels during strain-induced martensitic transformation. J . De Phy. 1982, 43: C4-429...structures. The structures developed at low strains in Figure 8 ( b ) have developed at least three deformation systems, and fine twins within some grains are...in Figure 11 ( b ) illustrate the tension tested appearance of material warm rolled to about 0.75 Ee or 50 RT at 343 °C, 399 °C, and 454 °C. All of the

  5. Martensitic transformations in high-strength steels at aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovskaya, V. V.; Bannykh, O. A.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of heat treatment and elastic stresses on the texture of maraging NiTi-steels is studied. The interruption of the decomposition of martensite at the early stages is shown to be accompanied by the γ → α transformation, which proceeds upon cooling from the aging temperature and under elastic (σ < σ0.2) tensile stresses. The martensite has a crystallographic texture, which is caused by the evolution of hot-deformation texture as a result of quenching and decomposition of a supersaturated α solid solution.

  6. Microstructure control for high strength 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Busby, J. T.; Sokolov, M. A.; Klueh, R. L.

    2012-03-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (F-M) steels with 9 wt.%Cr are important structural materials for use in advanced nuclear reactors. Alloying composition adjustment, guided by computational thermodynamics, and thermomechanical treatment (TMT) were employed to develop high strength 9Cr F-M steels. Samples of four heats with controlled compositions were subjected to normalization and tempering (N&T) and TMT, respectively. Their mechanical properties were assessed by Vickers hardness and tensile testing. Ta-alloying showed significant strengthening effect. The TMT samples showed strength superior to the N&T samples with similar ductility. All the samples showed greater strength than NF616, which was either comparable to or greater than the literature data of the PM2000 oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel at temperatures up to 650 °C without noticeable reduction in ductility. A variety of microstructural analyses together with computational thermodynamics provided rational interpretations on the strength enhancement. Creep tests are being initiated because the increased yield strength of the TMT samples is not able to deduce their long-term creep behavior.

  7. Springback Compensation Process for High Strength Steel Automotive Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onhon, M. Fatih

    2016-08-01

    This paper is about an advanced stamping simulation methodology used in automotive industry to shorten total die manufacturing times in a new vehicle project by means of benefiting leading edge virtual try-out technology.

  8. Improvement of formability of high strength steel sheets in shrink flanging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedon, Z.; Abe, Y.; Mori, K.

    2016-02-01

    In the shrinkage flanging, the wrinkling tends to occur due to compressive stress. The wrinkling will cause a difficulty in assembling parts, and severe wrinkling may leads to rupture of parts. The shrinkage flange of the ultra-high strength steel sheets not only defects the product by the occurrence of the wrinkling but also causes seizure and wear of the dies and shortens the life of dies. In the present study, a shape of a punch having gradual contact was optimized in order to prevent the wrinkling in shrinkage flanging of ultra-high strength steel sheets. The sheet was gradually bent from the corner of the sheet to reduce the compressive stress. The wrinkling in the shrink flanging of the ultra-high strength steel sheets was prevented by the punch having gradual contact. It was found that the punch having gradual contact is effective in preventing the occurrence of wrinkling in the shrinkage flanging.

  9. Proceedings: 1986 Workshop on Advanced High-Strength Materials

    SciTech Connect

    1989-05-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has contributed to many in-service failures of high-strength LWR components. In 25 workshop presentations, this report addresses the effects of metallurgical factors, manufacturing processes, design improvements, and installation practices on the resistance of high-strength alloys to SCC.

  10. The effect of surface layer properties on bendability of ultra-high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arola, Anna-Maija; Kaijalainen, Antti; Kesti, Vili

    2016-10-01

    Bendability is an important property for ultra-high strength steel because air-bending is the most common forming process for the material. In this paper the bendability of two ultra-high strength steels with similar mechanical properties but different bendability was investigated using tensile testing with optical strain measurements. The tensile tests were conducted also for specimens cut from the surface layer and the middle layer of the sheet. It was discovered that the mechanical properties of the surface of the sheet affect the bendability in great manner.

  11. Characterization of the hydrogen embrittlement behavior of high strength steels for Army applications

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, P.; Placzankis, B.; Beatty, J.; Brown, R.

    1994-12-31

    The hydrogen embrittlement characterization of LNS G43406 and UNS K92580 was conducted using a rising step load bend test and potentiodynamic scans. A relationship between K{sub Iscc} and open circuit potentials of these steels at similar hardnesses was shown. Potentiodynamic scans were used to explain this relationship in light of the hydrogen ion reaction in acidified environments. Methods for the mitigation of hydrogen embrittlement in high strength steels are discussed.

  12. Submerged Arc Welding Consumables for HSLA (High Strength Low Alloy)-100 Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    0.001 Manganese 0.02 Silicon 0.01 Phosphorus 0.002 Sulfur 0.001 Nickel 0.05 Molybdenum 0.01 Chromium 0.02 Vanadium 0.001 Aluminum 0.002 Titanium 0.002...carbon-manganese steels with small amounts of alloys added such as aluminum, titanium , niobium , or vanadium . Since these steels exhibit high strength...83 Chemical check analysis for boron and phosphorus ................................................. 88 Mechanical property data summary

  13. Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking of Ultra-High Strength AetMet(Trademark) 100 Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    F- A Approved for Public Release Abstract Distribution Unlimited Precipitation hardened martensitic AetMetTM 100 is a high purity ultra-high strength...electron fractography revealed predominantly transgranular cracking at martensite lath and/or packet interfaces for all applied potentials, caused by...resistant steels and coatings. 20060710056 2 I. Introduction Ultrahigh-strength steels (UIISS) with tempered martensitic microstructures are susceptible to

  14. COMMERCIAL SUPERSONIC TRANSPORT PROGRAM. PHASE II-C REPORT. HIGH STRENGTH STEEL EVALUATION FOR SUPERSONIC AIRCRAFT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    following types of tests: tensile, precracked charpy impact , plane strain fracture toughness, stress corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility...heats of 300M were evaluated to provide high strength steel alloy selection data for heavy section aircraft components. The evaluation included the

  15. Kic size effect study on two high-strength steels using notched bend specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonesifer, F. R.

    1974-01-01

    Five methods are used to calculate plane strain fracture toughness (K sub Q) values for bend-specimens of various sizes from two high-strength steels. None of the methods appeared to satisfactorily predict valid stress intensity factor (K sub IC) values from specimens of sizes well below that required by E399 standard tests.

  16. A Study on Forming Characteristics of Roll Forming Process with High Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, ByeongDon; Lee, HyunJong; Kim, DongKyu; Moon, YoungHoon

    2011-08-01

    Roll forming is a kind of sheet metal forming process used to manufacture long sheet metal products with constant cross section. Recently, roll forming technology draws attentions of automotive industries due to its various advantages, such as high production speed, reduced tooling cost and improved quality. In automotive industries, roll formed automotive parts used as structural components in vehicle body frame or sub frame and high strength steel becomes more common to improve safety and fuel efficiency. However, when roll forming process is performed with high strength steel, rolling forming defects, such as spring back, buckling and scratch should be considered more carefully. In this study, efforts to avoid roll forming defects and to optimize forming parameters were performed. FE analysis was performed with high strength steels using commercially available simulation software, COPRA-RF™ and SHAPE-RF™. Forming characteristics were analyzed and roll flower model and proper roll-pass sequences were suggested by analyzing longitudinal strain and deformation behavior. This study provided considerable experience about roll forming process design that using high strength steel.

  17. Brazing process provides high-strength bond between aluminum and stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huschke, E. G., Jr.; Nord, D. B.

    1966-01-01

    Brazing process uses vapor-deposited titanium and an aluminum-zirconium-silicon alloy to prevent formation of brittle intermetallic compounds in stainless steel and aluminum bonding. Joints formed by this process maintain their high strength, corrosion resistance, and hermetic sealing properties.

  18. An investigation of the plastic fracture of high strength steels. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. B.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Three generally recognized stages of plastic fracture in high strength steels are considered in detail. These stages consist of void initiation, void growth, and void coalescence. A brief review of the existing literature on plastic fracture is included along with an outline of the experimental approach used in the investigation.

  19. Effect of Nb on Delayed Fracture Resistance of Ultra-High Strength Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Rongjie; Fonstein, Nina; Pottore, Narayan; Jun, Hyun Jo; Bhattacharya, Debanshu; Jansto, Steve

    Ultra-high strength steels are materials of considerable interest for automotive and structural applications and are increasingly being used in those areas. Higher strength, however, makes steels more prone to hydrogen embrittlement (HE). The effects of Nb and other alloying elements on the hydrogen-induced delayed fracture resistance of cold rolled martensitic steels with ultra-high strength 2000 MPa were studied using an acid immersion test, thermal desorption analysis (TDA) and measuring of permeation. The microstructure was characterized by high resolution field emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). It was shown that the combined addition of Nb significantly improved the delayed fracture resistance of investigated steel. The addition of Nb to alloyed martensitic steels resulted in very apparent grain refinement of the prior austenite grain size. The Nb microalloyed steel contained a lower diffusible hydrogen content during thermal desorption analysis as compared to the base steel and had a higher trapped hydrogen amount after charging. The reason that Nb improved the delayed fracture resistance of steels can be attributed mostly to both hydrogen trapping and grain refinement.

  20. High strength, low carbon, dual phase steel rods and wires and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Nakagawa, Alvin H.

    1986-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility, low carbon, dual phase steel wire, bar or rod and process for making the same is provided. The steel wire, bar or rod is produced by cold drawing to the desired diameter in a single multipass operation a low carbon steel composition characterized by a duplex microstructure consisting essentially of a strong second phase dispersed in a soft ferrite matrix with a microstructure and morphology having sufficient cold formability to allow reductions in cross-sectional area of up to about 99.9%. Tensile strengths of at least 120 ksi to over 400 ksi may be obtained.

  1. Plastic Instabilities and Their Consequences in Steels and Other High Strength Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    rate yes Superalloys * Alloy 600 quasi-static no Rend 41 quasi-static no Steels * HY80 quasi-static no ultra-soft5 no low temperatures no AISI 4340...AD-A240 976 ([f) A Final Technical Report Contract No. N00014-88-K-0111 S PLASTIC INSTABILITIES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES IN STEELS AND OTHER HIGH...PLASTIC INSTABILITIES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES IN STEELS AND OTHER HIGH STRENGTH ALLOYS Submitted to: Office of Naval Research 800 North Quincy Street

  2. High-strength economically alloyed corrosion-resistant steels with the structure of nitrogen martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O.; Blinov, V.; Lukin, E.

    2016-04-01

    The use of nitrogen as the main alloying element allowing one both to increase the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of steels and to improve their processability is a new trend in physical metallurgy of high-strength corrosion resistant steels. The principles of alloying, which are developed for high-nitrogen steel in IMET RAS, ensure the formation of the structure, which contains predetermined amounts of martensite (70-80%) and austenite (20-30%) and is free from δ-ferrite, σ-phase, and Cr23C6 carbide. These principles were used as the base for the creation of new high-strength corrosion-resistant weldable and deformable 0Kh16AN5B, 06Kh16AN4FD, 08Kh14AN4MDB, 09Kh16AN3MF, 27Kh15AN3MD2, 40Kh13AN3M2, and 19Kh14AMB steels, which are operative at temperatures ranging from - 70 to 400°C. The developed nitrogen-containing steels compared with similar carbon steels are characterized by a higher resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion and are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. The new steels successfully passed trial tests as heavy duty articles.

  3. Microstructural, mechanical and magnetic properties of high-strength low-alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, S. Prakash; Rao, V.; Mohanty, O. N.

    1991-06-01

    Studies have been carried out on commercial grade high-strength low-alloy steel, microalloyed with Nb, V and Ti with a view to developing high-strength material with moderate soft magnetic properties. In order to obtain a suitable microstructure necessary for achieving the desired mechanical strength and magnetic properties, spheroidisation annealing (SA) as well as quenching and tempering (QT) treatments have been employed. At longer annealing or tempering time (⩾ 30 h), both the SA and QT samples have shown ample spheroidisation of carbides resulting in considerable improvement in the magnetic properties without much deterioration in mechanical strength.

  4. Grain-refining heat treatments to improve cryogenic toughness of high-strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    The development of two high Reynolds number wind tunnels at NASA Langley Research Center which operate at cryogenic temperatures with high dynamic pressures has imposed severe requirements on materials for model construction. Existing commercial high strength steels lack sufficient toughness to permit their safe use at temperatures approaching that of liquid nitrogen (-320 F). Therefore, a program to improve the cryogenic toughness of commercial high strength steels was conducted. Significant improvement in the cryogenic toughness of commercial high strength martensitic and maraging steels was demonstrated through the use of grain refining heat treatments. Charpy impact strength at -320 F was increased by 50 to 180 percent for the various alloys without significant loss in tensile strength. The grain sizes of the 9 percent Ni-Co alloys and 200 grade maraging steels were reduced to 1/10 of the original size or smaller, with the added benefit of improved machinability. This grain refining technique should permit these alloys with ultimate strengths of 220 to 270 ksi to receive consideration for cryogenic service.

  5. Variable amplitude corrosion fatigue and fracture mechanics of weldable high strength jack-up steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etube, Linus Sone

    The tubular welded joints used in the construction of Offshore structures can experience millions of variable amplitude wave induced stress cycles during their operational life. Fatigue has been identified as the main cause of degradation of structural integrity in these structures. As a result, fatigue is an important consideration in their design. Jack-up legs are made from a range of high strength steels with yield strengths up to TOOMPa. These steels are thought to exhibit fatigue resistance properties which are different when compared with conventional fixed platform steels such as BS 4360 50D and BS 7191 355D. The difference in their behaviour was heightened by the discovery, in the late 80s and early 90s, of extensive cracking around the spud can regions of several Jack-ups operating in the North Sea. It was thought that these steels may be more susceptible to hydrogen cracking and embrittlement. There was the additional requirement to study their behaviour under realistic loading conditions typical of the North Sea environment. This thesis contains results of an investigation undertaken to assess the performance of a typical high strength weldable Jack-up steel under realistic loading and environmental conditions. Details of the methodology employed to develop a typical Jack-up Offshore Standard load History (JOSH) are presented. The factors which influence fatigue resistance of structural steels used in the construction of Jack-up structures are highlighted. The methods used to model the relevant factors for inclusion in JOSH are presented with particular emphasis on loading and structural response interaction. Results and details of experimental variable amplitude corrosion fatigue (VACF) tests conducted using JOSH are reported and discussed with respect to crack growth mechanisms in high strength weldable Jack-up steels. Different fracture mechanics models for VACF crack growth prediction are compared and an improved generalised methodology for fast

  6. Effects of Microstructure on CVN Impact Toughness in Thermomechanically Processed High Strength Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Tao; Zhou, Yanlei; Jia, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Zhaodong

    2017-02-01

    Investigation on the correlation between microstructure and CVN impact toughness is of practical importance for the microstructure design of high strength microalloyed steels. In this work, three steels with characteristic microstructures were produced by cooling path control, i.e., steel A with granular bainite (GB), steel B with polygonal ferrite (PF) and martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent, and steel C with the mixture of bainitic ferrite (BF), acicular ferrite (AF), and M-A constituent. Under the same alloy composition and controlled rolling, similar ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures were obtained for the three steels. Steel A achieved the highest upper shelf energy (USE), while large variation of impact absorbed energy has been observed in the ductile-to-brittle transition region. With apparently large-sized PF and M-A constituent, steel B shows the lowest USE and delamination phenomenon in the ductile-to-brittle transition region. Steel C exhibits an extended upper shelf region, intermediate USE, and the fastest decrease of impact absorbed energy in the ductile-to-brittle transition region. The detailed CVN impact behavior is studied and then linked to the microstructural features.

  7. Research on the Optimal Layout of High-strength Steel in the Transmission Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunming, W. EI.; Tingting, S. U.; Bin, M. A.; Jing, Gong

    In order to research on the arrangement way of high-strength steel in ultrahigh voltage transmission towers, the integrated structure and material multi-objective optimization model of ultrahigh voltage transmission towers was established, and the optimization model is solved by using fast non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II). Sectional areas and materials of each bar were regarded as the design variables, the structural min-cost was considered as the objective of the economic optimization, and the min-displacement of the control point was regarded as the objective of structural optimization. Based on the software MATLAB, relevant optimization program was programmed to solve the optimization model. The results show, the optimal results can satisfy the structural requirements and reduce the cost of projects, making the arrangement way of high-strength steel way in ultrahigh voltage transmission towers more reasonable and more economical.

  8. Study on the strength characteristics of High strength concrete with Micro steel fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowdham, K.; Sumathi, A.; Saravana Raja Mohan, K.

    2017-07-01

    The study of High Strength Concrete (HSC) has become interesting as concrete structures grow taller and larger. The usage of HSC in structures has been increased worldwide and has begun to make an impact in India. Ordinary cementitious materials are weak under tensile loads and fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCCs) have been developed to improve this weak point. High Strength concrete containing Alccofine as mineral admixture and reinforced with micro steel fibers were cast and tested to study the mechanical properties. The concrete were designed to have compressive strength of 60 MPa. Mixtures containing 0% and 10% replacement of cement by Alccofine and with 1%, 2% and 3% of micro steel fibers by weight of concrete were prepared. Mixtures incorporating Alccofine with fibers developed marginal increase in strength properties at all curing days when compared to control concrete.

  9. Influence of banded structure on the mechanical properties of a high-strength maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.; Salam, I.; Hashmi, F.H.; Khan, A.Q.

    1997-04-01

    Chemical inhomogeneity results in the formation of banded structure in high-strength maraging steels. Segregation of titanium and molybdenum was found to be the primary cause of banded structure formation. When the concentrations of these elements increased beyond certain critical levels, bands comprising different grain sizes formed. The inclusions existed preferentially along the interface of the bands. A high-temperature homogenization treatment substantially reduced or eliminated the banded structure. The large grain size resulting from the homogenization treatment was subsequently reduced by a grain refinement treatment. The mechanical properties of the steel substantially improved following homogenization and grain refinement.

  10. Weld Metallurgy and Mechanical Properties of High Manganese Ultra-high Strength Steel Dissimilar Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Lindner, Stefan; Monfort, Damien; Petring, Dirk

    The increasing demand for ultra-high strength steels in vehicle manufacturing leads to the application of new alloys. This poses a challenge on joining especially by fusion welding. A stainless high manganese steel sheet with excellent strength and deformation properties stands in the centre of the development. Similar and dissimilar welds with a metastable austenitic steel and a hot formed martensitic stainless steel were performed. An investigation of the mixing effects on the local microstructure and the hardness delivers the metallurgical features of the welds. Despite of carbon contents above 0.4 wt.% none of the welds have shown cracks. Mechanical properties drawn from tensile tests deliver high breaking forces enabling a high stiffness of the joints. The results show the potential for the application of laser beam welding for joining in assembly of structural parts.

  11. Applicability of newly developed 610MPa class heavy thickness high strength steel to boiler pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Norihiko; Kaihara, Shoichiro; Ishii, Jun; Kajigaya, Ichiro; Totsuka, Takehiro; Miyazaki, Takashi

    1995-11-01

    Construction of a 350 MW Class PFBC (Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion) boiler plant is under planning in Japan. Design temperature and pressure of the vessel are maximum 350 C and 1.69 MPa, respectively. As the plate thickness of the vessel exceeds over 100 mm, high strength steel plate of good weldability and less susceptible to reheat cracking was required and developed. The steel was aimed to satisfy the tensile strength over 610 MPa at 350 C after postweld heat treatment (PWHT), with good notch toughness. The authors investigated the welding performances of the newly developed steel by using 150 mm-thick plate welded by pulsed-MAG and SAW methods. It was confirmed that the newly developed steel and its welds possess sufficient strength and toughness after PWHT, and applicable to the actual pressure vessel.

  12. Analysis of local warm forming of high strength steel using near infrared ray energy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W. H.; Lee, K.; Lee, E. H. E-mail: dyyang@kaist.ac.kr; Yang, D. Y. E-mail: dyyang@kaist.ac.kr

    2013-12-16

    The automotive industry has been pressed to satisfy more rigorous fuel efficiency requirements to promote energy conservation, safety features and cost containment. To satisfy this need, high strength steel has been developed and used for many different vehicle parts. The use of high strength steels, however, requires careful analysis and creativity in order to accommodate its relatively high springback behavior. An innovative method, called local warm forming with near infrared ray, has been developed to help promote the use of high strength steels in sheet metal forming. For this method, local regions of the work piece are heated using infrared ray energy, thereby promoting the reduction of springback behavior. In this research, a V-bend test is conducted with DP980. After springback, the bend angles for specimens without local heating are compared to those with local heating. Numerical analysis has been performed using the commercial program, DEFORM-2D. This analysis is carried out with the purpose of understanding how changes to the local stress distribution will affect the springback during the unloading process. The results between experimental and computational approaches are evaluated to assure the accuracy of the simulation. Subsequent numerical simulation studies are performed to explore best practices with respect to thermal boundary conditions, timing, and applicability to the production environment.

  13. Analysis of local warm forming of high strength steel using near infrared ray energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. H.; Lee, K.; Lee, E. H.; Yang, D. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The automotive industry has been pressed to satisfy more rigorous fuel efficiency requirements to promote energy conservation, safety features and cost containment. To satisfy this need, high strength steel has been developed and used for many different vehicle parts. The use of high strength steels, however, requires careful analysis and creativity in order to accommodate its relatively high springback behavior. An innovative method, called local warm forming with near infrared ray, has been developed to help promote the use of high strength steels in sheet metal forming. For this method, local regions of the work piece are heated using infrared ray energy, thereby promoting the reduction of springback behavior. In this research, a V-bend test is conducted with DP980. After springback, the bend angles for specimens without local heating are compared to those with local heating. Numerical analysis has been performed using the commercial program, DEFORM-2D. This analysis is carried out with the purpose of understanding how changes to the local stress distribution will affect the springback during the unloading process. The results between experimental and computational approaches are evaluated to assure the accuracy of the simulation. Subsequent numerical simulation studies are performed to explore best practices with respect to thermal boundary conditions, timing, and applicability to the production environment.

  14. A Study of the Efficiency of High-strength, Steel, Cellular-core Sandwich Plates in Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Aldie E , Jr; Semonian, Joseph W

    1956-01-01

    Structural efficiency curves are presented for high-strength, stainless-steel, cellular-core sandwich plates of various proportions subjected to compressive end loads for temperatures of 80 F and 600 F. Optimum proportions of sandwich plates for any value of the compressive loading intensity can be determined from the curves. The efficiency of steel sandwich plates of optimum proportions is compared with the efficiency of solid plates of high-strength steel and aluminum and titanium alloys at the two temperatures.

  15. Optimization of the heat treatment of ingots of high-strength vessel steel modified by rare-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milyuts, V. G.; Tsukanov, V. V.; Efimov, S. V.; Pavlova, A. G.; Golubtsov, V. A.; Levagin, E. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A process is developed for the production of high-strength vessel steel. It includes the application of a microcrystalline REM-containing modifier and an improved regime of preliminary heat treatment of ingots. This process ensures high hot deformability of ingots and a substantial decrease in the time of production of high-strength vessel steel. The quality of the produced steel meets the requirements of the existing technical forms and records.

  16. Microstructural Features Controlling Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior in High-Strength, Martensitic Steel Weld Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Development Report Microstructural Features Controlling Ductile-to- Brittle Transition Behavior in High-Strength, Martensitic Steel Weld Metals C 0by...Martensitic Steel Weld Metals PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) .J. DeLoach, Jr. .TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 114 DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 1S PAGE COUNT I...if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP High strength steel , Ductile-brittle transition Martensitic Mechanical proper ties

  17. Advanced Gear Alloys for Ultra High Strength Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Tony; Krantz, Timothy; Sebastian, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Single tooth bending fatigue (STBF) test data of UHS Ferrium C61 and C64 alloys are presented in comparison with historical test data of conventional gear steels (9310 and Pyrowear 53) with comparable statistical analysis methods. Pitting and scoring tests of C61 and C64 are works in progress. Boeing statistical analysis of STBF test data for the four gear steels (C61, C64, 9310 and Pyrowear 53) indicates that the UHS grades exhibit increases in fatigue strength in the low cycle fatigue (LCF) regime. In the high cycle fatigue (HCF) regime, the UHS steels exhibit better mean fatigue strength endurance limit behavior (particularly as compared to Pyrowear 53). However, due to considerable scatter in the UHS test data, the anticipated overall benefits of the UHS grades in bending fatigue have not been fully demonstrated. Based on all the test data and on Boeing s analysis, C61 has been selected by Boeing as the gear steel for the final ERDS demonstrator test gearboxes. In terms of potential follow-up work, detailed physics-based, micromechanical analysis and modeling of the fatigue data would allow for a better understanding of the causes of the experimental scatter, and of the transition from high-stress LCF (surface-dominated) to low-stress HCF (subsurface-dominated) fatigue failure. Additional STBF test data and failure analysis work, particularly in the HCF regime and around the endurance limit stress, could allow for better statistical confidence and could reduce the observed effects of experimental test scatter. Finally, the need for further optimization of the residual compressive stress profiles of the UHS steels (resulting from carburization and peening) is noted, particularly for the case of the higher hardness C64 material.

  18. Hydrogen induced cracking tests of high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the bolt-loaded specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Vigilante, G.N.; Underwood, J.H.; Crayon, D.; Tauscher, S.; Sage, T.; Troiano, E.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen induced cracking tests were conducted on high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the constant displacement bolt-loaded compact specimen. The bolt-loaded specimen was subjected to both acid and electrochemical cell environments in order to produce hydrogen. The materials tested were A723, Maraging 200, PH 13-8 Mo, Alloy 718, Alloy 706, and A286, and ranged in yield strength from 760--1400 MPa. The effects of chemical composition, refinement, heat treatment, and strength on hydrogen induced crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and threshold levels. In comparison, the nickel-iron base alloys tested exhibited up to three orders of magnitude lower crack growth rates than the high strength steels tested. It is widely known that high strength steels and nickel base alloys exhibit different crack growth rates, in part, because of their different crystal cell structure. In the high strength steels tested, refinement and heat treatment had some effect on hydrogen induced cracking, though strength was the predominant factor influencing susceptibility to cracking. When the yield strength of one of the high strength steels tested was increased moderately, from 1130 MPa to 1275 MPa, the incubation times decreased by over two orders of magnitude, the crack growth rates increased by an order of magnitude, and the threshold stress intensity was slightly lower.

  19. Surface characteristics and mechanical properties of high-strength steel wires in corrosive conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yang; Li, Shunlong; Li, Hui; Yan, Weiming

    2013-04-01

    Cables are always a critical and vulnerable type of structural components in a long-span cable-stayed bridge in normal operation conditions. This paper presents the surface characteristics and mechanical performance of high-strength steel wires in simulated corrosive conditions. Four stress level (0MPa, 300MPa, 400MPa and 500MPa) steel wires were placed under nine different corrosive exposure periods based on the Salt Spray Test Standards ISO 9227:1990. The geometric feathers of the corroded steel wire surface were illustrated by using fractal dimension analysis. The mechanical performance index including yielding strength, ultimate strength and elastic modulus at different periods and stress levels were tested. The uniform and pitting corrosion depth prediction model, strength degradation prediction model as well as the relationship between strength degradation probability distribution and corrosion crack depth would be established in this study.

  20. Recent Observation of Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Jr, C J; Liu, Xinyu; Kameda, Jun; Morgan, Michael J

    2008-09-14

    The present progress report shows that the ultra-high-strength 4340-type steel, even if ideally pure, cannot safely be used for service in a hydrogen environment. Some of the strength must be given up in favor of more toughness, which can be achieved by reducing the carbon content and increasing the nickel content. The 5%NiCrMoV steel with about 0.1% carbon shows promise in this regard, especially in an aqueous environment and in hydrogen at around atmospheric pressure. However, we have not yet achieved a purity level high enough to establish the baseline behavior of an ideally pure version of this steel in high-pressure hydrogen.

  1. Effect of Cold Drawing on Microstructure and Corrosion Performance of High-Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toribio, J.; Ovejero, E.

    1997-09-01

    This paper deals with the effect of cold drawing on a high-strength steel in wire form with pearlitic microstructure. Cold drawing produces a preferential orientation of the pearlite lamellae aligned parallel to the cold drawing direction, resulting in anisotropic properties with regard to fracture behaviour in air and aggressive environments (stress corrosion cracking). While the hot rolled bar has a randomly oriented microstructure in both transverse and longitudinal sections, the fully drawn wire presents a randomly oriented appearance in the transverse cross-section, but a marked orientation in the longitudinal cross-section. These microstructural characteristics affect the time-dependent behaviour of the steels when a crack is present in a corrosive or hydrogen environment and influences both the subcritical crack growth rate, the time to failure and the crack propagation path. It is shown that in the strongly drawn steels the crack changes its propagation path, and a micromechanical model is proposed to explain this behaviour.

  2. Improving Strength-Ductility Balance of High Strength Dual-Phase Steels by Addition of Vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yu; Hua, M.; Uusitalo, J.; DeArdo, A. J.

    For galvanized or galvannealed steels to be commercially successful, they must exhibit several attributes: (i) easy and inexpensive processing in the hot mill, cold mill and on the coating line, (ii) high strength with good formability and spot weldability, and (iii) good corrosion resistance, especially after cold forming. For good corrosion resistance, the coating must have sufficient coverage, be of uniform thickness, and most importantly, the coating must survive the cold stamping or forming operation. The purpose of this paper is to present research aiming at improving the steel substrate, such that high strength can be obtained while maintaining good global formability (tensile ductility), local formability (sheared-edge ductility), and good spot weldability. It is well-known that the strength of DP steels is controlled by several factors, including the amount of martensite found in the final microstructure. Recent research has revealed that the amount of austenite formed during intercritical annealing can be strongly influenced by the annealing temperature and the pre-annealing conditions of the hot band (coiling temperature) and cold band (% cold reduction). Current experiments have explored the combination of pre-annealing conditions and four annealing practices to help define the best practice to optimize the strength-formability balance in these higher strength DP steels. The steels used in these experiments contained (i) low carbon content for good spot weldability, (ii) the hardenability additions Mo and Cr for strength, and (iii) V for grain refinement, precipitation hardening and temper resistance. When processed correctly, these steels exhibited UTS levels up to 1000MPa, total elongation to 25%, reduction in area to 45%, and Hole Expansion Ratios to 50%. The results of this program will be presented and discussed.

  3. Microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior of a high strength dual-phase steel under monotonic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, E.V.; Bouvier, S.; Bacroix, B.

    2015-02-15

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microstructures of a high-strength dual-phase steel DP800 have been examined after moderate plastic deformations in simple shear and uniaxial tension. Special attention has been paid to the effect of the intergranular hard phase (martensite) on the microstructure evolution in the near-grain boundary regions. Quantitative parameters of dislocation patterning have been determined and compared with the similar characteristics of previously examined single-phase steels. The dislocation patterning in the interiors of the ferrite grains in DP800 steel is found to be similar to that already observed in the single-phase IF (Interstitial Free) steel whereas the martensite-affected zones present a delay in patterning and display very high gradients of continuous (gradual) disorientations associated with local internal stresses. The above stresses are shown to control the work-hardening of dual-phase materials at moderate strains for monotonic loading and are assumed to influence their microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior under strain-path changes. - Highlights: • The microstructure evolution has been studied by TEM in a DP800 steel. • It is influenced by both martensite and dislocations in the initial state. • The DP800 steel presents a high work-hardening rate due to internal stresses.

  4. Initiation and growth of microcracks in high strength steel butt welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Edward

    1993-05-01

    Early tests such as the explosion bulge test created a preference for overmatched welds (welds which are stronger than the base metal) which eventually became codified for many structural applications. While an overmatched system offers advantages such as the shedding of strain to the base plate, it requires the use of expensive fabrication procedures to avoid cracking. Undermatched welding of some high strength steels may offer reductions in welding costs with little sacrifice in weld performance or low cycle fatigue integrity. An experimental study was carried out to observe microcrack initiation and growth of overmatched and undermatched butt welded high strength steel samples using globally elastic low cycle fatigue testing. First, 1 inch thick HY-80 and HY-100 base plates were multipass, spray gas metal arc welded (GMAW) with overmatching and undermatching filler metal using a semiautomatic welding machine. Second, 1/4 inch thick MIL-A-46100 high hardness armor plates (HHA) were manually, two pass spray GMAW welded with two grades of undermatching consumables. Weld reinforcements were removed from all HY specimens and six HHA specimens. All specimens had a crack initiator slit machined in the test section. The specimens were fatigue tested by transverse tensile loading with a 12 to 13 Hz tension-tension profile. The loading range was from 10% to 85% of the tensile strength of the HY steel base plate and HHA weld metal respectively. Crack initiation and propagation was observed in situ using a confocal scanning laser microscope.

  5. A preliminary study on the perforation resistance of high-strength steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Børvik, T.; Dey, S.; Clausen, A. H.

    2006-08-01

    Thin plates of high-strength steel are frequently being used in ballistic protection systems. In this study, the perforation resistance of three different high-strength steel alloys impacted by 7.62 mm AP projectiles has been determined and compared against each other. The considered alloys are Weldox 500 E, Hardox 400 and Domex Protect 500. The yield stress in Domex Protect 500 is almost three times the yield stress in Weldox 500 E, while the opposite trend is found regarding strain to fracture in uniaxial tension. Perforation tests have been carried out using adjusted ammunition to determine the ballistic limit velocity of the steels using 6+6=12 mm thick targets. Moreover, a material test programme including high strain rate tests in a split-Hopkinson tension bar was carried out in order to be able to calibrate a proper constitutive equation and fracture criteria. Here, a simplified identification procedure was used together with a modified Johnson-Cook constitutive relation and the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion since it is considered important to limit the number of material tests in design. Finally, results from 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations using the non-linear FEM code LS-DYNA are included, and the different findings are compared.

  6. Metallurgical control of the ductile-brittle transition in high-strength structural steels

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr. |

    1999-08-01

    The models that have been successfully used to control the ductile-brittle transition in high strength structural steels are qualitative in nature, and address the microstructural control of the mechanisms of brittle fracture. The basic idea is incorporated in the Yoffee diagram, which dates from the 1920`s and attributes the ductile-brittle transition to the competition between deformation and fracture; the more difficult brittle fracture becomes, the lower the temperature at which ductile processes dominate. There are two important brittle fracture modes: intergranular separation and transgranular cleavage. The intergranular mode is usually due to chemical contamination, and is addressed by eliminating or gettering the contaminating species. There are also examples of brittle fracture that is due to inherent grain boundary weakness. In this case the failure mode is overcome by adding beneficial species (glue) to the grain boundary. Transgranular cleavage is made more difficult by refining the effective grain size. In high strength steel this is done by refining the prior austenite grain size, by interspersing islands of metastable austenite that transform martensitically under plastic strain, or by disrupting the crystallographic alignment of ferrite grains or martensite laths. The latter mechanism offers intriguing possibilities for future steels with exceptional toughness.

  7. Effect of Heat-Affected Zone on Spot Weldability in Automotive Ultra High Strength Steel Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaka, Akihiko; Naito, Junya; Chinzei, Shota; Hojo, Tomohiko; Horiguchi, Katsumi; Shimizu, Yuki; Furusawa, Takuro; Kitahara, Yu

    Effect of heat-affected zone (HAZ) on spot weldability in automotive hot stamping (HS) steel sheet was investigated for automotive applications. Tensile test was performed on a tensile testing machine at a crosshead speed of 3 mm/min, using spot welded test specimen (Parallel length: 60 mm, Width: 20 mm, Thickness: 1.4 mm, Tab: 20×20 mm). The spot welding test was carried out using spot welded test specimen with welding current (I) of 6.3 kA to 9.5 kA. Hardness was measured with the dynamic ultra micro Vickers hardness tester. In HS steel, has very high strength of 1 500 MPa, tensile strength (TS) and total elongation (TEl) of the spot welded test specimen of HS steel were lower than those of base metal test specimen. The spot welded test specimen broke in the weld. The Vickers hardnesses (HVs) of base metal and fusion zone of hot stamping steel were around HV500. In addition, the hardness of HAZ was under HV300. The difference of hardness between fusion zone and HAZ was around HV200. The hardness distribution acted as a notch. On the other hand, in dual phase (DP) steel, has low strength of 590 MPa, the TS of spot welded test specimen of DP steel was the same as the base metal test specimen because of the breaking of base metal. The TEl of the spot welded test specimen of DP steel was smaller than that of base metal test specimen. In the spot welded test specimen of DP steel, the hardness of base metal was around HV200 and the fusion zone was around HV500. The hardness distribution did not act as a notch. The difference in hardness between base metal and HAZ acted on a crack initiation at HAZ softening.

  8. Study of Residual Stresses and Distortion in Structural Weldments in High-Strength Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-30

    following students worked on this project. In chronological order: Lipsey , M.D. Coneybear, G.W. Mylonas, G.A. Rogalski, W.J. Marby, J.P. LCoumis, G.A...Officers and so their services were furnished at no cost to the project): lipsey , M.D.: Ocean Engineer, and Master of Science in Naval Architecture and...completed: L. Lipsey , M.D., "Investigation of Welding Thermal Strains in High Strength Quenched and Tempered Steel", Ocean Engineer Thesis, M.[.T., June 1978

  9. Fatigue Life Analysis and Tensile Overload Effects with High Strength Steel Notched Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    versus Aa calculated using K/p42 approach. 13 4. Ratio of fatigue life following an overload to average 14 fatigue life with no overload versus Au relative...dimensions. The material for all tests was ASTh A723, Grade 2, a high strength nickel-chromium-molybdenum steel used for pressure component forgings...results plotted using Eq. (2) to calculate Aa . The (1 + P/no) term, wiLth an arbitrary po - 10 on, was added here so that the data over the whole range

  10. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400–450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0–1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3–5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  11. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-02

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400-450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0-1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3-5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Microalloyed High-Strength Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. D.; Huang, B. X.; Wang, L.; Rong, Y. H.

    2008-01-01

    The high strength of transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels with tensile strength from 800 to 1000 MPa were designed based on grain refinement and precipitation strengthening through microalloying with Nb, Nb/V, and Nb/Mo in a Fe-0.2C-1.5Si-1.5Mn cold-rolled TRIP steel. The origins of alloying strengthening for three grades of 860, 950, and 1010 MPa TRIP steels obtained in this work were revealed by the combination of Thermo-Calc and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The addition of Nb in Nb, Nb/V, and Nb/Mo TRIP steels can effectively refine the austenite grain in the hot-rolled process by the NbC carbides retarding austenite recrystallization and, in turn, refine final microstructure after intercritical annealing. The addition of Nb/V can precipitate partially fine and dispersive (Nb,V)C carbides in ferrite grains instead of coarse NbC carbides; therefore, the precipitation strengthening plays an important role in the increase of TRIP steel strength. The addition of Nb/Mo cannot only precipitate fully fine and dispersive (Nb,Mo)C carbides in ferrite grains but also increase the volume fraction of bainite accompanying the decrease of volume fraction of ferrite, leading to the drastic increase of both the yield strength and tensile strength.

  13. Fabrication of High Strength and Ductile Stainless Steel Fiber Felts by Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. Z.; Tang, H. P.; Qian, M.; Li, A. J.; Ma, J.; Xu, Z. G.; Li, C. L.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Stainless steel fiber felts are important porous stainless steel products for a variety of industry applications. A systematic study of the sintering of 28- µm stainless steel fibers has been conducted for the first time, assisted with synchrotron radiation experiments to understand the evolution of the sintered joints. The critical sintering conditions for the formation of bamboo-like grain structures in the fiber ligaments were identified. The evolution of the number density of the sintered joints and the average sintered neck radius during sintering was assessed based on synchrotron radiation experiments. The optimum sintering condition for the fabrication of high strength and ductile 28- µm-diameter stainless steel fiber felts was determined to be sintering at 1000°C for 900 s. Sintering under this optimum condition increased the tensile strength of the as-sintered stainless steel fiber felts by 50% compared to conventional sintering (1200°C for 7200 s), in addition to much reduced sintering cycle and energy consumption.

  14. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-01-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400–450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0–1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3–5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry. PMID:28150692

  15. Reduction of Residual Stress and Distortion in HY100 and HY130 High Strength Steels During Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    High Yields) Steels for pressure hulls and special applications like flight decks where aluminum is impractical to use. HY80 is the most famous and...most widely used of the HYQ & T steels developed. Interest waned in widely using the steels with strengths above HY80 because of cracking problems...Reduction of Residual Stress and Distortion in HYI00 and HYI30 High Strength Steels During Welding CY) by _RICHARD ALLEN BASS B.S. Electrical

  16. Hybrid laser-arc welding of galvanized high-strength steels in a gap-free lap-joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shanglu

    In order to meet the industry demands for increased fuel efficiency and enhanced mechanical and structural performance of vehicles as well as provided excellent corrosion resistance, more and more galvanized advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have been used to fabricate automobile parts such as panels, bumpers, and front rails. The automotive industry has shown tremendous interest in using laser welding to join galvanized dual phase steels because of lower heat input and higher welding speed. However, the laser welding process tends to become dramatically unstable in the presence of highly pressurized zinc vapor because of the low boiling point of zinc, around 906°C, compared to higher melting point of steel, over 1500°C. A large number of spatters are produced by expelling the liquid metal from the molten pool by the pressurized zinc vapor. Different weld defects such as blowholes and porosities appear in the welds. So far, limited information has been reported on welding of galvanized high strength dual-phase steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. There is no open literature on the successful attainment of defect-free welds from the laser or hybrid welding of galvanized high-strength steels. To address the significant industry demand, in this study, different welding techniques and monitoring methods are used to study the features of the welding process of galvanized DP steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. The current research covers: (i) a feasibility study on the welding of galvanized DP 980 steels in a lap joint configuration using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), laser welding, hybrid laser/arc welding with the common molten pool, laser welding with the assistance of GTAW preheating source and hybrid laser-variable polarity gas tungsten arc welding (Laser-VPGTAW) techniques (Chapter 2-4); (ii) a welding process monitoring of the welding techniques including the use of machine vision and acoustic emission technique (Chapter 5); (iii

  17. Effect of shot peening on hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-feng; Zhang, Jin; Ma, Ming-ming; Song, Xiao-long

    2016-06-01

    The effect of shot peening (SP) on hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steel was investigated by electrochemical hydrogen charging, slow strain rate tensile tests, and hydrogen permeation tests. Microstructure observation, microhardness, and X-ray diffraction residual stress studies were also conducted on the steel. The results show that the shot peening specimens exhibit a higher resistance to hydrogen embrittlement in comparison with the no shot peening (NSP) specimens under the same hydrogen-charging current density. In addition, SP treatment sharply decreases the apparent hydrogen diffusivity and increases the subsurface hydrogen concentration. These findings are attributed to the changes in microstructure and compressive residual stress in the surface layer by SP. Scanning electron microscope fractographs reveal that the fracture surface of the NSP specimen exhibits the intergranular and quasi-cleavage mixed fracture modes, whereas the SP specimen shows only the quasi-cleavage fractures under the same hydrogen charging conditions, implying that the SP treatment delays the onset of intergranular fracture.

  18. Non-proportional/Non-monotonous Deformation Modeling of an Ultra High Strength Automotive Steel Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Rahul K.; Ogihara, Yuki; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Chung, Kwansoo

    2011-08-01

    In this work, as non-proportional/non-monotonous deformation experiments, two-stage and tension-compression-tension uniaxial tests were performed, respectively, for a cold rolled ultra high strength dual phase steel sheet: DP780. Deformation behaviors under such deformation paths were found different than those of the ultra low carbon single phase steels observed by Verma et al. (Int. J. Plast. 2011, 82-101). To model the newly observed deformation behaviors, the combined type constitutive law previously proposed by Verma et al. (Int. J. Plast. 2011, 82-101) was successfully applied here. Permanent softening observed during reverse loading was properly characterized into the isotropic and kinematic hardening parts of the hardening law using tension-compression-tension test data. The cross effect observed in two-stage tests was also effectively incorporated into the constitutive law.

  19. Notch fatigue behavior: Metallic glass versus ultra-high strength steel.

    PubMed

    Wang, X D; Qu, R T; Wu, S J; Duan, Q Q; Liu, Z Q; Zhu, Z W; Zhang, H F; Zhang, Z F

    2016-10-18

    Studying the effect of notch on the fatigue behavior of structural materials is of significance for the reliability and safety designing of engineering structural components. In this work, we conducted notch fatigue experiments of two high-strength materials, i.e. a Ti32.8Zr30.2Ni5.3Cu9Be22.7 metallic glass (MG) and a 00Ni18Co15Mo8Ti ultra-high strength steel (CM400 UHSS), and compared their notch fatigue behavior. Experimental results showed that although both the strength and plasticity of the MG were much lower than those of the UHSS, the fatigue endurance limit of the notched MG approached to that of the notched UHSS, and the fatigue ratio of the notched MG was even higher. This interesting finding can be attributed to the unique shear banding mechanism of MG. It was found that during fatigue process abundant shear bands formed ahead of the notch root and in the vicinity of the crack in the notched MG, while limited plastic deformation was observed in the notched UHSS. The present results may improve the understanding on the fatigue mechanisms of high-strength materials and offer new strategies for structural design and engineering application of MG components with geometrical discontinuities.

  20. Notch fatigue behavior: Metallic glass versus ultra-high strength steel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X. D.; Qu, R. T.; Wu, S. J.; Duan, Q. Q.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhu, Z. W.; Zhang, H. F.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effect of notch on the fatigue behavior of structural materials is of significance for the reliability and safety designing of engineering structural components. In this work, we conducted notch fatigue experiments of two high-strength materials, i.e. a Ti32.8Zr30.2Ni5.3Cu9Be22.7 metallic glass (MG) and a 00Ni18Co15Mo8Ti ultra-high strength steel (CM400 UHSS), and compared their notch fatigue behavior. Experimental results showed that although both the strength and plasticity of the MG were much lower than those of the UHSS, the fatigue endurance limit of the notched MG approached to that of the notched UHSS, and the fatigue ratio of the notched MG was even higher. This interesting finding can be attributed to the unique shear banding mechanism of MG. It was found that during fatigue process abundant shear bands formed ahead of the notch root and in the vicinity of the crack in the notched MG, while limited plastic deformation was observed in the notched UHSS. The present results may improve the understanding on the fatigue mechanisms of high-strength materials and offer new strategies for structural design and engineering application of MG components with geometrical discontinuities. PMID:27752136

  1. Notch fatigue behavior: Metallic glass versus ultra-high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. D.; Qu, R. T.; Wu, S. J.; Duan, Q. Q.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhu, Z. W.; Zhang, H. F.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2016-10-01

    Studying the effect of notch on the fatigue behavior of structural materials is of significance for the reliability and safety designing of engineering structural components. In this work, we conducted notch fatigue experiments of two high-strength materials, i.e. a Ti32.8Zr30.2Ni5.3Cu9Be22.7 metallic glass (MG) and a 00Ni18Co15Mo8Ti ultra-high strength steel (CM400 UHSS), and compared their notch fatigue behavior. Experimental results showed that although both the strength and plasticity of the MG were much lower than those of the UHSS, the fatigue endurance limit of the notched MG approached to that of the notched UHSS, and the fatigue ratio of the notched MG was even higher. This interesting finding can be attributed to the unique shear banding mechanism of MG. It was found that during fatigue process abundant shear bands formed ahead of the notch root and in the vicinity of the crack in the notched MG, while limited plastic deformation was observed in the notched UHSS. The present results may improve the understanding on the fatigue mechanisms of high-strength materials and offer new strategies for structural design and engineering application of MG components with geometrical discontinuities.

  2. Constitutive Modeling of Hot Deformation Behavior of High-Strength Armor Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh; Madhu, Vemuri

    2016-05-01

    The hot isothermal compression tests of high-strength armor steel under a wide range of deformation temperatures (1100-1250 °C) and strain rates of (0.001-1/s) were performed. Based on the experimental data, constitutive models were established using the original Johnson-Cook (JC) model, modified JC model, and strain-compensated Arrhenius model, respectively. The modified JC model considers the coupled effects of strain hardening, strain rate hardening, and thermal softening. Moreover, the prediction accuracy of these developed models was determined by estimating the correlation coefficient ( R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). The results demonstrate that the flow behavior of high-strength armor steel is considerably influenced by the strain rate and temperature. The original JC model is inadequate to provide good description on the flow stress at evaluated temperatures. The modified JC model and strain-compensated Arrhenius model significantly enhance the predictability. It is also observed from the microstructure study that at low strain rates (0.001-0.01/s) and high temperatures (1200-1250 °C), a typical dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurs.

  3. Increasing the fatigue limit of a high-strength bearing steel by a deep cryogenic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerscher, E.; Lang, K.-H.

    2010-07-01

    High-strength steels typically fail from inclusions. Therefore, to increase the fatigue limit of high-strength steels it is necessary to modify the inclusions and/or the surrounding matrix. The goal must be a higher threshold for crack initiation and/or crack propagation. One possibility to reach this goal seems to be a deep cryogenic treatment which is reported to completely transform the retained austenite as well as to facilitate the formation of fine carbides. Therefore, specimens were annealed before or after deep cryogenic treatment, which was carried out with different cooling and heating rates as well as different soaking times at -196° C. Hardness and retained austenite measurements and fatigue experiments were used to evaluate the different sequences of treatments mentioned above. The fatigue limit increases only after some of the sequences. The results show that the soaking times are not relevant for the fatigue limit but it is very important to temper the specimens before the deep cryogenic treatment. Also, repeated deep cryogenic treatments had a positive influence on the fatigue limit.

  4. Latest Development and Application of Nb-Bearing High Strength Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongqing; Shang, Chengjia; Guo, Aimin; Zheng, Lei; Niu, Tao; Han, Xiulin

    In order to solve the pollution problem emerging in China recently, China's central government is making great efforts to raise the percentage of natural gas consumption in the China's primary energy mix, which needs to construct big pipelines to transport natural gas from the nation's resource-rich western regions to the energy-starved east, as well as import from the Central Asia and Russia. With this mainstream trend, high strength, high toughness, heavy gauge, and large diameter pipeline steels are needed to improve the transportation efficiency. This paper describes the latest progresses in Nb-bearing high strength pipeline steels with regard to metallurgical design, development and application, including X80 coil with a thickness up to 22.0mm, X80 plate with a diameter as much as 1422mm, X80 plate with low-temperature requirements and low-Mn sour service X65 for harsh sour service environments. Moreover, based on widely accepted TMCP and HTP practices with low carbon and Nb micro-alloying design, this paper also investigated some new metallurgical phenomena based on powerful rolling mills and heavy ACC equipment.

  5. High-temperature properties and microstructure of Mo microalloyed ultra-high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qi-Hang; Kang, Yong-Lin; Zhao, Xian-Meng; Gao, Lu-Feng; Qiu, Xue-Song

    2011-08-01

    The high-temperature mechanical properties and microstructure of forging billets of C-Si-Mn-Cr and C-Si-Mn-Cr-Mo ultra-high-strength cold-rolled steels (tensile strength≥1000 MPa, elongation≥10%) were studied. Through the comparison of reduction in area and hot deformation resistance at 600-1300°C, the Mo-containing steel was found to possess a higher strength and a better plasticity than the Mo-free one. The equilibrium phase diagram and atom fraction of Mo in different phases at different temperatures were calculated by Thermo-Calc software (TCW). The results analyzed by using transmission electron microscopy and TCW show that precipitates in the Mo-containing steel are primarily M23C6, which promote pearlite formation. The experimental data also show that a lower ductility point existing in the Mo-free steel at 850°C is eliminated in the Mo-containing one. This is mainly due to the segregation of Mo at grain boundaries investigated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), which improves the strength of grain boundaries.

  6. Analytical electron microscopy of grain boundaries in high-strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Skogsmo, J.; Atrens, A. . Dept. of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Phosphorus could be detected at prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGB) in high-strength alloy steels quenched and tempered at 500 C when using a VG's HB 501 dedicated field emission STEM but not with a conventional JEOL 4000FX STEM. No phosphorus was detected at PAGB's in the as-quenched materials or away from PAGB's in tempered materials of either type. The grain boundary coverage of phosphorus was, assuming a specimens thickness of 80nm, 0.7 monolayers for the 3.5NiCrMoV rotor steel and 0.4 monolayers for the AISI 4340 steel. The grain boundary concentration of phosphorus, assuming a specimens thickness of 80 nm and a segregated layer thickness of 1 nm, for the 3.5NiCrMoV rotor steel was 6 wt% and for AISI 4340 4 wt%. Compared to the bulk concentration of about 0.01 wt% this means that the enrichment factor of P to the grain boundaries was several hundred times (610 respectively 370). The measurements showed no correlation between the stress corrosion crack growth rate and the grain boundary phosphorus concentration. The yield strength, however, decreased after tempering while the phosphorus concentration at the grain boundaries increased.

  7. Early stage of crack extension in impact loaded high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Giovanola, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    Measuring accurate dynamic initiation fracture toughness values requires the understanding of the early stage of crack extension to interpret experimental records and determine the initiation point correctly. The early stage of dynamic crack extension in high strength steels was investigated by impacting fatigue-precracked specimens of R{sub C} 50 AISI 4340 and 300M steel in a range of sizes using the one-point-bend test method. By controlling load amplitude (by varying the impact velocity) and load duration (by varying the specimen geometry and dimensions), we were able to control dynamic crack extension to achieve complete fracture of the specimen, or crack arrest after a few tenths of millimeter to several millimeters of propagation. Crack speeds in these experiments did not exceed a few hundred meters per second. A two-dimensional analysis of the experimental results show that the resistance to dynamic crack extension in terms of the stress intensity factor K, increases substantially (30-50% above the value at initiation) during the first millimeters of propagation and that this increase is not directly dependent on crack velocity. Fractographic observations of arrested cracks reveal that even when only small shear lips developed during fracture, the crack front shape is significantly curved, with the front at the center of the specimen leading the front at the surfaces by several millimeters. The good correlation between the distance over which the propagation toughness increases and the depth of the curved crack front suggests that the rise in toughness is associated with the development of the curved Crack front. This study demonstrates that three-dimensional effects are important in dynamic fracture of even such model materials as macroscopically brittle high strength steels. These effects should be carefully considered when analyzing fracture under short duration impulsive loads or interpreting initiation data.

  8. An Investigation of the Role of Second Phase Particles in the Design of Ultra High Strength Steels of Improved Toughness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-20

    examples in the literature. The only example in the literature of blunting to vertices from an initially sharp crack is the blunting of HY80 steel to three...AD-A226 056 AN INVESTIGATION OF THE ROLE OF SECOND PHASE PARTICLES IN THE DESIGN OF ULTRA HIGH STRENGTH STEELS OF IMPROVED TOUGHNESS FINAL REPORT W...THE ROLE OF SECOND PHASE PARTICLES IN THE DESIGN OF ULTRA HIGH STRENGTH STEELS OF IMPROVED TOUGHNESS FINAL REPORT W. M. Garrison, Jr. June 15, 1990 U.S

  9. Evaluation of the stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength low alloy steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance was studied for high strength alloy steels 4130, 4340, for H-11 at selected strength levels, and for D6AC and HY140 at a single strength. Round tensile and C-ring type specimens were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, salt spray, the atmosphere at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the seacoast at Kennedy Space Center. Under the test conditions, 4130 and 4340 steels heat treated to a tensile strength of 1240 MPa (180 ksi), H-11 and D6AC heat treated to a tensile strength of 1450 MPa (210 ksi), and HY140 (1020 MPa, 148 ksi) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking because failures were not encountered at stress levels up to 75 percent of their yield strengths. A maximum exposure period of one month for alternate immersion in salt water or salt spray and three months for seacoast is indicated for alloy steel to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking because of failure resulting from severe pitting.

  10. Low-Temperature Toughening Mechanism in Thermomechanically Processed High-Strength Low-Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Byoungchul; Lee, Chang Gil; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2011-03-01

    High-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels were fabricated by varying thermomechanical processing conditions such as rolling and cooling conditions in the intercritical region, and the low-temperature toughening mechanism was investigated in terms of microstructure and the associated grain boundary characteristics. The steels acceleratedly cooled to relatively higher temperature had lower tensile strength than those acceleratedly cooled to room temperature due to the increased volume fraction of granular bainite or polygonal ferrite (PF) irrespective of rolling in the intercritical region, while the yield strength was dependent on intercritical rolling, and start and finish cooling temperatures, which affected the formation of PF and low-temperature transformation phases. The steel rolled in the intercritical region and cooled to 673 K (400 °C) provided the best combination of high yield strength and excellent low-temperature toughness because of the presence of fine PF and appropriate mixture of various low-temperature transformation phases such as granular bainite, degenerate upper bainite (DUB), lower bainite (LB), and lath martensite (LM). Despite the high yield strength, the improvement of low-temperature toughness could be explained by the reduction of overall effective grain size based on the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis data, leading to the decrease in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

  11. Seismic performance of steel reinforced ultra high-strength concrete composite frame joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Changwang; Jia, Jinqing

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the seismic performance of a composite frame comprised of steel reinforced ultra high-strength concrete (SRUHSC) columns and steel reinforced concrete (SRC) beams, six interior frame joint specimens were designed and tested under low cyclically lateral load. The effects of the axial load ratio and volumetric stirrup ratio were studied on the characteristics of the frame joint performance including crack pattern, failure mode, ductility, energy dissipation capacity, strength degradation and rigidity degradation. It was found that all joint specimens behaved in a ductile manner with flexural-shear failure in the joint core region while plastic hinges appeared at the beam ends. The ductility and energy absorption capacity of joints increased as the axial load ratio decreased and the volumetric stirrup ratio increased. The displacement ductility coefficient and equivalent damping coefficient of the joints fell between the corresponding coefficients of the steel reinforced concrete (SRC) frame joint and RC frame joint. The axial load ratio and volumetric stirrup ratio have less influence on the strength degradation and more influence on the stiffness degradation. The stiffness of the joint degrades more significantly for a low volumetric stirrup ratio and high axial load ratio. The characteristics obtained from the SRUHSC composite frame joint specimens with better seismic performance may be a useful reference in future engineering applications.

  12. The development of high strength corrosion resistant precipitation hardening cast steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahams, Rachel A.

    Precipitation Hardened Cast Stainless Steels (PHCSS) are a corrosion resistant class of materials which derive their properties from secondary aging after a normalizing heat treatment step. While PHCSS materials are available in austenitic and semi-austenitic forms, the martensitic PHCSS are most widely used due to a combination of high strength, good toughness, and corrosion resistance. If higher strength levels can be achieved in these alloys, these materials can be used as a lower-cost alternative to titanium for high specific strength applications where corrosion resistance is a factor. Although wrought precipitation hardened materials have been in use and specified for more than half a century, the specification and use of PHCSS has only been recent. The effects of composition and processing on performance have received little attention in the cast steel literature. The work presented in these investigations is concerned with the experimental study and modeling of microstructural development in cast martensitic precipitation hardened steels at high strength levels. Particular attention is focused on improving the performance of the high strength CB7Cu alloy by control of detrimental secondary phases, notably delta ferrite and retained austenite, which is detrimental to strength, but potentially beneficial in terms of fracture and impact toughness. The relationship between age processing and mechanical properties is also investigated, and a new age hardening model based on simultaneous precipitation hardening and tempering has been modified for use with these steels. Because the CB7Cu system has limited strength even with improved processing, a higher strength prototype Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo-Ti system has been designed and adapted for use in casting. This prototype is expected to develop high strengths matching or exceed that of cast Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Traditional multicomponent constitution phase diagrams widely used for phase estimation in conventional stainless steels

  13. Gradient twinned 304 stainless steels for high strength and high ductility

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Aiying; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; ...

    2016-04-23

    Gradient materials often have attractive mechanical properties that outperform uniform microstructure counterparts. It remains a difficult task to investigate and compare the performance of various gradient microstructures due to the difficulty of fabrication, the wide range of length scales involved, and their respective volume percentage variations. We have investigated four types of gradient microstructures in 304 stainless steels that utilize submicrotwins, nanotwins, nanocrystalline-, ultrafine- and coarse-grains as building blocks. Tensile tests reveal that the gradient microstructure consisting of submicrotwins and nanotwins has a persistent and stable work hardening rate and yields an impressive combination of high strength and high ductility,more » leading to a toughness that is nearly 50% higher than that of the coarse-grained counterpart. Ex- and in-situ transmission electron microscopy indicates that nanoscale and submicroscale twins help to suppress and limit martensitic phase transformation via the confinement of martensite within the twin lamellar. Twinning and detwinning remain active during tensile deformation and contribute to the work hardening behavior. We discuss the advantageous properties of using submicrotwins as the main load carrier and nanotwins as the strengthening layers over those coarse and nanocrystalline grains. Furthermore, our work uncovers a new gradient design strategy to help metals and alloys achieve high strength and high ductility.« less

  14. Gradient twinned 304 stainless steels for high strength and high ductility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aiying; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Jian; Wang, Y. Morris

    2016-04-23

    Gradient materials often have attractive mechanical properties that outperform uniform microstructure counterparts. It remains a difficult task to investigate and compare the performance of various gradient microstructures due to the difficulty of fabrication, the wide range of length scales involved, and their respective volume percentage variations. We have investigated four types of gradient microstructures in 304 stainless steels that utilize submicrotwins, nanotwins, nanocrystalline-, ultrafine- and coarse-grains as building blocks. Tensile tests reveal that the gradient microstructure consisting of submicrotwins and nanotwins has a persistent and stable work hardening rate and yields an impressive combination of high strength and high ductility, leading to a toughness that is nearly 50% higher than that of the coarse-grained counterpart. Ex- and in-situ transmission electron microscopy indicates that nanoscale and submicroscale twins help to suppress and limit martensitic phase transformation via the confinement of martensite within the twin lamellar. Twinning and detwinning remain active during tensile deformation and contribute to the work hardening behavior. We discuss the advantageous properties of using submicrotwins as the main load carrier and nanotwins as the strengthening layers over those coarse and nanocrystalline grains. Furthermore, our work uncovers a new gradient design strategy to help metals and alloys achieve high strength and high ductility.

  15. Gradient twinned 304 stainless steels for high strength and high ductility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aiying; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Jian; Wang, Y. Morris

    2016-04-23

    Gradient materials often have attractive mechanical properties that outperform uniform microstructure counterparts. It remains a difficult task to investigate and compare the performance of various gradient microstructures due to the difficulty of fabrication, the wide range of length scales involved, and their respective volume percentage variations. We have investigated four types of gradient microstructures in 304 stainless steels that utilize submicrotwins, nanotwins, nanocrystalline-, ultrafine- and coarse-grains as building blocks. Tensile tests reveal that the gradient microstructure consisting of submicrotwins and nanotwins has a persistent and stable work hardening rate and yields an impressive combination of high strength and high ductility, leading to a toughness that is nearly 50% higher than that of the coarse-grained counterpart. Ex- and in-situ transmission electron microscopy indicates that nanoscale and submicroscale twins help to suppress and limit martensitic phase transformation via the confinement of martensite within the twin lamellar. Twinning and detwinning remain active during tensile deformation and contribute to the work hardening behavior. We discuss the advantageous properties of using submicrotwins as the main load carrier and nanotwins as the strengthening layers over those coarse and nanocrystalline grains. Furthermore, our work uncovers a new gradient design strategy to help metals and alloys achieve high strength and high ductility.

  16. Influence of Carbide Modifications on the Mechanical Properties of Ultra-High-Strength Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Joo-Young; Park, Soo-Keun; Kwon, Hoon; Cho, Ki-Sub

    2017-10-01

    The mechanical properties of ultra-high-strength secondary hardened stainless steels with varying Co, V, and C contents have been studied. A reduced-Co alloy based on the chemical composition of Ferrium S53 was made by increasing the V and C content. This changed the M2C-strengthened microstructure to a MC plus M2C-strengthened microstructure, and no deteriorative effects were observed for peak-aged and over-aged samples despite the large reduction in Co content from 14 to 7 wt pct. The mechanical properties according to alloying modification were associated with carbide precipitation kinetics, which was clearly outlined by combining analytical tools including small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) as well as an analytical TEM with computational simulation.

  17. Fatigue crack initiation life prediction in high strength structural steel welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricoteaux, A.; Fardoun, F.; Degallaix, S.; Sauvage, F.

    1995-02-01

    The local approach method is used to calculate the fatigue crack initiation/early crack growth lives (N(i)) in high strength structural steel weldments. Weld-toe geometries, welding residual stresses and HAZ (heat affected zone) cyclic mechanical properties are taken into account in the N(i) estimation procedure. Fatigue crack initiation lives are calculated from either a Basquin type or a Manson-Coffin type equation. The local (HAZ) stress and strain amplitudes and the local mean stress are determined from an analysis based on the Neuber rule and the Molski-Glinka energy approach. The accuracy of the different methods is evaluated and discussed. Finally the previous methods are used with HAZ cyclic mechanical properties estimated from hardness measurements.

  18. Effect of Welding Consumables on Fatigue Performance of Shielded Metal Arc Welded High Strength, Q&T Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magudeeswaran, G.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2009-02-01

    Quenched and Tempered (Q&T) steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to their high strength-to-weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen-induced cracking in the heat affected zone (HAZ) after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel consumables to weld the above steel was the only remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. Recent studies proved that high nickel steel and low hydrogen ferritic steel consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. In this investigation an attempt has been made to study the effect of welding consumables on high cycle fatigue properties of high strength, Q&T steel joints. Three different consumables namely (i) austenitic stainless steel, (ii) low hydrogen ferritic steel, and (iii) high nickel steel have been used to fabricate the joints by shielded metal arc (SMAW) welding process. The joints fabricated using low hydrogen ferritic steel electrodes showed superior fatigue properties than other joints.

  19. Effect of microstructure on static and dynamic mechanical properties of high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jinbo

    The high speed deformation behavior of a commercially available dual phase (DP) steel was studied by means of split Hopkinson bar apparatus in shear punch (25m/s) and tension (1000s-1) modes with an emphasis on the influence of microstructure. The cold rolled sheet material was subjected to a variety of heat treatment conditions to produce several different microstructures, namely ferrite plus pearlite, ferrite plus bainite and/or acicular ferrite, ferrite plus bainite and martensite, and ferrite plus different fractions of martensite. Static properties (0.01mm/s for shear punch and 0.001s -1 for tension) of all the microstructures were also measured by an MTS hydraulic machine and compared to the dynamic properties. The effects of low temperature tempering and bake hardening were investigated for some ferrite plus martensite microstructures. In addition, two other materials, composition designed as high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel, were heat treated and tested to study the effect of alloy chemistry on the microstructure and property relationship. A strong effect of microstructure on both static and dynamic properties and on the relationship between static and dynamic properties was observed. According to the variation of dynamic factor with static strength, three groups of microstructures with three distinct behaviors were identified, i.e. classic dual phase (ferrite plus less than 50% martensite), martensite-matrix dual phase (ferrite plus more than 50% martensite), and non-dual phase (ferrite plus non-martensite). Under the same static strength level, the dual phase microstructure was found to absorb more dynamic energy than other microstructures. It was also observed that the general dependence of microstructure on static and dynamic property relationship was not strongly influenced by chemical composition, except the ferrite plus martensite microstructures generated by the TRIP chemistry, which exhibited

  20. Evaluation of Heat-affected Zone Hydrogen-induced Cracking in High-strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xin

    Shipbuilding is heavily reliant on welding as a primary fabrication technique. Any high performance naval steel must also possess good weldability. It is therefore of great practical importance to conduct weldability testing of naval steels. Among various weldability issues of high-strength steels, hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) following welding is one of the biggest concerns. As a result, in the present work, research was conducted to study the HAZ HIC susceptibility of several naval steels. Since the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) is generally known to be the most susceptible to HIC in the HAZ region, the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) behavior of the CGHAZ of naval steels HSLA-65, HSLA-100, and HY-100 was investigated. The CGHAZ microstructure over a range of cooling rates was characterized, and corresponding CCT diagrams were constructed. It was found that depending on the cooling rate, martensite, bainite, ferrite and pearlite can form in the CGHAZ of HSLA-65. For HSLA-100 and HY-100, only martensite and bainite formed over the range of cooling rates that were simulated. The constructed CCT diagrams can be used as a reference to select welding parameters to avoid the formation of high-hardness martensite in the CGHAZ, in order to ensure resistance to hydrogen-induced cracking. Implant testing was conducted on the naval steels to evaluate their susceptibility to HAZ HIC. Stress vs. time to failure curves were plotted, and the lower critical stress (LCS), normalized critical stress ratio (NCSR) and embrittlement index (EI) for each steel were determined, which were used to quantitatively compare HIC susceptibility. The CGHAZ microstructure of the naval steels was characterized, and the HIC fracture behavior was studied. Intergranular (IG), quasi-cleavage (QC) and microvoid coalescence (MVC) fracture modes were found to occur in sequence during the crack initiation and propagation process. This was

  1. Effect of controlled cooling on the formability of TS 590 MPa grade hot-rolled high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yeol-Rae; Chung, Jin-Hwan; Ku, Hwang-Hoe; Kim, In-Bae

    1999-12-01

    The effect of cooling on the mechanical properties of hot-rolled high strength steels was investigated in order to improve the stretch-flangeability of conventional TS 590 MPa grade for the automotive parts through laboratory simulation and mill-scale production. The low temperature coiling method using a 3-step controlled cooling pattern after hot rolling was very effective for producing Nb-bearing high strength steel with high stretch- flangeability. It was suggested that the suppressed precipitation of grain boundary cementites and the decreased hardness difference between the ferrite matrix and bainite phases cause the excellent stretch-flangeability of ferrite-bainite duplex microstructure steel. Therefore, the formation and propagation of microcracks were suppressed relative to conventional HSLA steel with the ferrite and pearlite microstructure. In addition, the elongation improved compared with that of hot-rolled steel sheets using the conventional early cooling pattern because the volume fraction of polygonal ferrite increased.

  2. In situ neutron diffraction of heavily drawn steel wires with ultra-high strength under tensile loading

    SciTech Connect

    Tomota, Y. . E-mail: tomota@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp; Suzuki, T.; Kanie, A.; Shiota, Y.; Uno, M.; Moriai, A.; Minakawa, N.; Morii, Y.

    2005-01-10

    To make clear the strengthening mechanism of heavily drawn steel wires exhibiting ultra-high strength, in situ neutron diffraction during tensile loading was performed. A ferrite steel (FK) subjected to a true strain of 6.6 and a pearlite steel (PS) subjected to 4.0 were extended on a tensile tester and (1 1 0) diffraction profiles were measured at various holding stresses. Tensile strengths of steel FK and PS are 1.7 and 3.7 GPa, respectively. The change in (1 1 0) spacing with tensile stress is reversible, i.e., elastic, close to the relevant tensile strength. A stress versus (1 1 0) lattice plane strain is linear for steel FK while evidently nonlinear at higher stresses for steel PS. In steel PS in which cementite peaks were hardly observed, the strengthening mechanism is postulated to be different from that for as-patented pearlite steels.

  3. Alloy and composition dependence of hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility in high-strength steel fasteners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahimi, S. V.; Yue, S.; Sriraman, K. R.

    2017-06-01

    High-strength steel fasteners characterized by tensile strengths above 1100 MPa are often used in critical applications where a failure can have catastrophic consequences. Preventing hydrogen embrittlement (HE) failure is a fundamental concern implicating the entire fastener supply chain. Research is typically conducted under idealized conditions that cannot be translated into know-how prescribed in fastener industry standards and practices. Additionally, inconsistencies and even contradictions in fastener industry standards have led to much confusion and many preventable or misdiagnosed fastener failures. HE susceptibility is a function of the material condition, which is comprehensively described by the metallurgical and mechanical properties. Material strength has a first-order effect on HE susceptibility, which increases significantly above 1200 MPa and is characterized by a ductile-brittle transition. For a given concentration of hydrogen and at equal strength, the critical strength above which the ductile-brittle transition begins can vary due to second-order effects of chemistry, tempering temperature and sub-microstructure. Additionally, non-homogeneity of the metallurgical structure resulting from poorly controlled heat treatment, impurities and non-metallic inclusions can increase HE susceptibility of steel in ways that are measurable but unpredictable. Below 1200 MPa, non-conforming quality is often the root cause of real-life failures. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  4. Alloy and composition dependence of hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility in high-strength steel fasteners.

    PubMed

    Brahimi, S V; Yue, S; Sriraman, K R

    2017-07-28

    High-strength steel fasteners characterized by tensile strengths above 1100 MPa are often used in critical applications where a failure can have catastrophic consequences. Preventing hydrogen embrittlement (HE) failure is a fundamental concern implicating the entire fastener supply chain. Research is typically conducted under idealized conditions that cannot be translated into know-how prescribed in fastener industry standards and practices. Additionally, inconsistencies and even contradictions in fastener industry standards have led to much confusion and many preventable or misdiagnosed fastener failures. HE susceptibility is a function of the material condition, which is comprehensively described by the metallurgical and mechanical properties. Material strength has a first-order effect on HE susceptibility, which increases significantly above 1200 MPa and is characterized by a ductile--brittle transition. For a given concentration of hydrogen and at equal strength, the critical strength above which the ductile-brittle transition begins can vary due to second-order effects of chemistry, tempering temperature and sub-microstructure. Additionally, non-homogeneity of the metallurgical structure resulting from poorly controlled heat treatment, impurities and non-metallic inclusions can increase HE susceptibility of steel in ways that are measurable but unpredictable. Below 1200 MPa, non-conforming quality is often the root cause of real-life failures.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Optimum Design and Development of High Strength and Toughness Welding Wire for Pipeline Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cuixin; Xue, Haitao; Yin, Fuxing; Peng, Huifen; Zhi, Lei; Wang, Sixu

    Pipeline steel with higher strength(>800MPa) has been gradually used in recent years, so how to achieve good match of base metal and weld deposit is very important for its practical application. Based on the alloy system of 0.02-0.04%C, 2.0%Mn and 0.5%Si, four different kinds of welding wires were designed and produced. The effects of alloy elements on phase transformation and mechanical properties were analyzed. Experimental results show that the designed steels with the addition of 2-4% Ni+Cr+Mo and <0.2% Nb+V+Ti have high strength (>800MPa) and good elongation (>15%). The microstructure of deposits metal is mainly composed of granular bainite and M-A constituents with the mean size of 0.2-07μm are dispersed on ferritic matrix. The deposited metals have good match of strength (>800MPa) and impact toughness (>130J) which well meet the requirement of pipeline welding.

  6. An analytical electron microscopy study of paraequilibrium cementite precipitation in ultra-high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G.; Olson, G. B.; Campbell, C. E.

    1999-03-01

    To support quantitative design of ultra-high-strength (UHS) secondary-hardening steels, the precipitation of cementite prior to the precipitation of the M2C phase is investigated using a model alloy. The microstructure of cementite is investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Consistent with earlier studies on tempering of Fe-C martensite, lattice imaging of cementite suggests microsyntactic intergrowth of M5C2 (Hägg carbide). The concentration of substitutional alloying elements in cementite are quantified by high-resolution analytical electron microscopy (AEM) using extraction replica specimens. Quantification of the substitutional elements in cementite confirms its paraequilibrium (PE) state with ferrite at the very early stage of tempering. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of the thermodynamic driving force for nucleation of the primary-strengthening, coherent M2C carbide phase. The ferrite-cementite PE condition reduces the carbon concentration in the ferrite matrix with a significant reduction of M2C driving force. The kinetics of dissolution of PE cementite and its transition to other intermediate states will also influence the kinetics of secondary hardening behavior in UHS steels.

  7. Orientation dependence of microfracture behavior in a dual-phase high-strength low-alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, D.; Lee, S.; Kim, N.J.; Kwon, D.

    1997-02-01

    In selecting the processing conditions and evaluating the reliability of structural materials, microscopic observations and identification of the fracture mechanisms in local cracking behavior are required. An important instance in the failure of the local brittle zone (LBZ) in the welding zone. The LBZ, which is very brittle, is the coarse-grained heat-affected zone near the fusion line, a zone known to be critical to the fracture toughness of welded parts. Thus, maintaining stable fracture resistance by predicting the microfracture behavior is important when using high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels in offshore structural steel welds. Depending on the thermal cycles involved during welding, the ferrite/martensite structure can have various morphologies of martensite particles, for example, fibrous and blocky martensite. In summary, in situ SEM fracture tests reveal that in the L-oriented IQ DCB specimen, a microcrack tends to propagate relatively uniformly throughout the ferrite and well-distributed fine fibrous martensite, yielding good elongation with high strength level. Also, the IQ structure in the T orientation shows similar microfracture behavior. On the other hand, in the SQ structure, where blocky-type martensite is mixed with ferrite, strain is localized into shear bands mostly in the ferrite region, and a local microcrack propagates along the strain-localized band formed in the ferrite, resulting in the SQ structure in the T orientation, where the ferrite-martensite bands are parallel to the notch direction, the martensite cannot act as an efficient barrier to microcrack advance, and thus the tensile ductility is decreased.

  8. Studies of Evaluation of Hydrogen Embrittlement Property of High-Strength Steels with Consideration of the Effect of Atmospheric Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Eiji; Wang, Maoqiu; Li, Songjie; Zhang, Zuogui; Kimura, Yuuji; Uno, Nobuyoshi; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength steels was investigated by using slow strain rate test (SSRT) of circumferentially notched round bar specimens after hydrogen precharging. On top of that, cyclic corrosion tests (CCT) and outdoor exposure tests were conducted prior to SSRT to take into account the effect of hydrogen uptake under atmospheric corrosion for the evaluation of the susceptibility of high-strength steels. Our studies of hydrogen embrittle properties of high-strength steels with 1100 to 1500 MPa of tensile strength and a prototype ultrahigh-strength steel with 1760 MPa containing hydrogen traps using those methods are reviewed in this article. A power law relationship between notch tensile strength of hydrogen-precharged specimens and diffusible hydrogen content has been found. It has also been found that the local stress and the local hydrogen concentration are controlling factors of fracture. The results obtained by using SSRT after CCT and outdoor exposure test were in good agreement with the hydrogen embrittlement fracture property obtained by means of long-term exposure tests of bolts made of the high-strength steels.

  9. Influence of original microstructure on the transformation behavior and mechanical properties of ultra-high-strength TRIP-aided steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hong-xiang; Zhao, Ai-min; Zhao, Zheng-zhi; Li, Xiao; Li, Shuang-jiao; Hu, Han-jiang; Xia, Wei-guang

    2015-03-01

    The transformation behavior and tensile properties of an ultra-high-strength transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel (0.2C-2.0Si-1.8Mn) were investigated by different heat treatments for automobile applications. The results show that F-TRIP steel, a traditional TRIP steel containing as-cold-rolled ferrite and pearlite as the original microstructure, consists of equiaxed grains of intercritical ferrite surrounded by discrete particles of M/RA and B. In contrast, M-TRIP steel, a modified TRIP-aided steel with martensite as the original microstructure, containing full martensite as the original microstructure is comprised of lath-shaped grains of ferrite separated by lath-shaped martensite/retained austenite and bainite. Most of the austenite in F-TRIP steel is granular, while the austenite in M-TRIP steel is lath-shaped. The volume fraction of the retained austenite as well as its carbon content is lower in F-TRIP steel than in M-TRIP steel, and austenite grains in M-TRIP steel are much finer than those in F-TRIP steel. Therefore, M-TRIP steel was concluded to have a higher austenite stability, resulting in a lower transformation rate and consequently contributing to a higher elongation compared to F-TRIP steel. Work hardening behavior is also discussed for both types of steel.

  10. Detection of stress corrosion cracking of high-strength steel used in prestressed concrete structures by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, S.; Gaillet, L.; Tessier, C.; Idrissi, H.

    2008-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of high-strength steel used in prestressed concrete structures was studied by acoustic emission technique (AE). A simulated concrete pore (SCP) solution at high-alkaline (pH ≈ 12) contaminated by sulphate, chloride, and thiocyanate ions was used. The evolution of the acoustic activity recorded during the tests shows the presence of several stages related respectively to cracks initiation due to the local corrosion imposed by corrosives species, cracks propagation and steel failure. Microscopic examinations pointed out that the wires exhibited a brittle fracture mode. The cracking was found to propagate in the transgranular mode. The role of corrosives species and hydrogen in the rupture mechanism of high-strength steel was also investigated. This study shows promising results for an potential use in situ of AE for real-time health monitoring of eutectoid steel cables used in prestressed concrete structures.

  11. Microstructure, Composition, and Impact Toughness Across the Fusion Line of High-Strength Bainitic Steel Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Liangyun; Kong, Xiangwei; Chang, Zhiyuan; Qiu, Chunlin; Zhao, Dewen

    2017-06-01

    This paper analyzed the evolution of microstructure, composition, and impact toughness across the fusion line of high-strength bainitic steel weldments with different heat inputs. The main purpose was to develop a convenient method to evaluate the HAZ toughness quickly. The compositions of HAZ were insensitive to higher contents of alloy elements (e.g., Ni, Mo) in the weld metal because their diffusion distance is very short into the HAZ. The weld metal contained predominantly acicular ferrite at any a heat input, whereas the main microstructures in the HAZ changed from lath martensite/bainite to upper bainite with the increasing heat input. The evolution of HAZ toughness in relation to microstructural changes can be revealed clearly combined with the impact load curve and fracture morphology, although the results of impact tests do not show an obvious change with heat input because the position of Charpy V notch contains the weld metal, HAZ as well as a part of base metal. As a result, based on the bead-on-plate welding tests, the welding parameter affecting the HAZ toughness can be evaluated rapidly.

  12. Microstructure, Composition, and Impact Toughness Across the Fusion Line of High-Strength Bainitic Steel Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Liangyun; Kong, Xiangwei; Chang, Zhiyuan; Qiu, Chunlin; Zhao, Dewen

    2017-09-01

    This paper analyzed the evolution of microstructure, composition, and impact toughness across the fusion line of high-strength bainitic steel weldments with different heat inputs. The main purpose was to develop a convenient method to evaluate the HAZ toughness quickly. The compositions of HAZ were insensitive to higher contents of alloy elements ( e.g., Ni, Mo) in the weld metal because their diffusion distance is very short into the HAZ. The weld metal contained predominantly acicular ferrite at any a heat input, whereas the main microstructures in the HAZ changed from lath martensite/bainite to upper bainite with the increasing heat input. The evolution of HAZ toughness in relation to microstructural changes can be revealed clearly combined with the impact load curve and fracture morphology, although the results of impact tests do not show an obvious change with heat input because the position of Charpy V notch contains the weld metal, HAZ as well as a part of base metal. As a result, based on the bead-on-plate welding tests, the welding parameter affecting the HAZ toughness can be evaluated rapidly.

  13. Determination of the continuous cooling transformation diagram of a high strength low alloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hun Chul; Park, Bong June; Jang, Ji Hun; Jang, Kwang Soon; Lee, Kyung Jong

    2016-11-01

    The continuous cooling transformation diagram of a high strength low alloyed steel was determined by a dilatometer and microscopic analysis (OM, SEM) as well as thermodynamic analysis. As expected, Widmanstätten ferrite, bainite and martensite coexisted for most cooling rates, which made it difficult to determine the transformation kinetics of individual phases. However, peaks were clearly observed in the dilatometric {d( {LVDT} )}/{dT} curves. By overlapping the {d( {LVDT} )}/{dT} curves, which were determined using various cooling rates, peaks were separated and the peak rate temperatures, as well as the temperature at the start of transformation (5%) and the end of transformation (95%) of an individual phase, were determined. A SEM analysis was also conducted to identify which phase existed and to quantify the volume fraction of each phase. It was confirmed that the additional {d( {LVDT} )}/{dT} curve analysis described the transformation behavior more precisely than the conventional continuous cooling transformation diagram, as determined by the volume measured from the microstructure analysis.

  14. Setting Mechanical Properties of High Strength Steels for Rapid Hot Forming Processes

    PubMed Central

    Löbbe, Christian; Hering, Oliver; Hiegemann, Lars; Tekkaya, A. Erman

    2016-01-01

    Hot stamping of sheet metal is an established method for the manufacturing of light weight products with tailored properties. However, the generally-applied continuous roller furnace manifests two crucial disadvantages: the overall process time is long and a local setting of mechanical properties is only feasible through special cooling techniques. Hot forming with rapid heating directly before shaping is a new approach, which not only reduces the thermal intervention in the zones of critical formability and requested properties, but also allows the processing of an advantageous microstructure characterized by less grain growth, additional fractions (e.g., retained austenite), and undissolved carbides. Since the austenitization and homogenization process is strongly dependent on the microstructure constitution, the general applicability for the process relevant parameters is unknown. Thus, different austenitization parameters are analyzed for the conventional high strength steels 22MnB5, Docol 1400M, and DP1000 in respect of the mechanical properties. In order to characterize the resulting microstructure, the light optical and scanning electron microscopy, micro and macro hardness measurements, and the X-ray diffraction are conducted subsequent to tensile tests. The investigation proves not only the feasibility to adjust the strength and ductility flexibly, unique microstructures are also observed and the governing mechanisms are clarified. PMID:28773354

  15. Microstructure and oxidation behavior of high strength steel AISI 410 implanted with nitrogen ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandriyana, Ismoyo, Agus Hadi; Sujitno, Tjipto; Dimyati, A.

    2016-04-01

    Surface treatment by implantation with nitrogen-ion was performed on the commercial feritic high strength steel AISI 410 which is termed for high temperature applications. The aim of this research was focused on the surface modification to improve its high temperature oxidation property in the early stages. Ion implantation was carried out at acceleration energy of 100 KeV and ion current 10 mA for 30, 60 and 90 minutes. The samples were subjected to the high temperature oxidation test by means of thermogravimetry in a magnetic suspension balance (MSB) at 500 °C for 5 hours. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD) and Vickers Hardness measurement were used for sample characterization. The formation of ferro-nitride phase after implantation did not occur, however a thin layer considered to contain nitrogen interstitials was detected. The oxidation of both samples before and after implantation followed parabolic kinetics indicating inward growth of oxide scale characteristically due to diffusion of oxygen anions towards matrix surface. After oxidation test relativelly stable oxide scales were observed. Oxidation rates decreased proportionally with the increasing of implantation time due to the formation of oxide layer which is considered to be effectiv inhibitor for the oxygen diffusion.

  16. The strain-rate sensitivity of high-strength high-toughness steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmore, M.F.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the strain-rate sensitivity of four high strength, high-toughness alloys at strain rates ranging from 0.0002 s-1 to 200 s-1: Aermet 100, a modified 4340, modified HP9-4-20, and a recently developed Eglin AFB steel alloy, ES-1c. A refined dynamic servohydraulic method was used to perform tensile tests over this entire range. Each of these alloys exhibit only modest strain-rate sensitivity. Specifically, the strain-rate sensitivity exponent m, is found to be in the range of 0.004-0.007 depending on the alloy. This corresponds to a {approx}10% increase in the yield strength over the 7-orders of magnitude change in strain-rate. Interestingly, while three of the alloys showed a concominant {approx}3-10% drop in their ductility with increasing strain-rate, the ES1-c alloy actually exhibited a 25% increase in ductility with increasing strain-rate. Fractography suggests the possibility that at higher strain-rates ES-1c evolves towards a more ductile dimple fracture mode associated with microvoid coalescence.

  17. Finite element analysis of inclusion effects on high strength steel cord wire drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang-liang; Zhao, Tian-Zhang; Zhang, Shi-hong

    2013-05-01

    In wire drawing of high strength steel wire for the application in tier cords, the inclusion plays the key role resulting in wire fractures. The effects of inclusion size, position and shape on wire drawing is investigated via finite element analysis in this paper. A 3D finite element model is developed to analyze the effect of inclusion position on the risk of fracture, and a 2D axisymmetrical finite element model for an inclusion at the wire center is established to investigate the effects of inclusion size and shape on wire fracture. A damage model with the consideration of stress status and plastic strain increment is used to characterize the risk of wire fracture. Finite element analysis results indicate that wire fracture is very critical to the inclusion located at wire core, and inclusion with an elliptical shape and its long axis lining well with the wire axis. Finite element analysis also proves that with the use of 7 degree die instead of 9 degree die is able to reduce the risk of fractures by about 28%.

  18. Microstructure and oxidation behavior of high strength steel AISI 410 implanted with nitrogen ion

    SciTech Connect

    Bandriyana, Ismoyo, Agus Hadi; Dimyati, A.; Sujitno, Tjipto

    2016-04-19

    Surface treatment by implantation with nitrogen-ion was performed on the commercial feritic high strength steel AISI 410 which is termed for high temperature applications. The aim of this research was focused on the surface modification to improve its high temperature oxidation property in the early stages. Ion implantation was carried out at acceleration energy of 100 KeV and ion current 10 mA for 30, 60 and 90 minutes. The samples were subjected to the high temperature oxidation test by means of thermogravimetry in a magnetic suspension balance (MSB) at 500 °C for 5 hours. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD) and Vickers Hardness measurement were used for sample characterization. The formation of ferro-nitride phase after implantation did not occur, however a thin layer considered to contain nitrogen interstitials was detected. The oxidation of both samples before and after implantation followed parabolic kinetics indicating inward growth of oxide scale characteristically due to diffusion of oxygen anions towards matrix surface. After oxidation test relativelly stable oxide scales were observed. Oxidation rates decreased proportionally with the increasing of implantation time due to the formation of oxide layer which is considered to be effectiv inhibitor for the oxygen diffusion.

  19. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel

    PubMed Central

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the laser weldment. A good correlation was found between the microstructural features of the weld joints and their mechanical properties. The highest hardness was found to be in the fusion zone of cap region due to formation of martensite and also enrichment of carbon. The hardness results also showed a narrow soft zone at the heat affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld interface, which has no effect on the weld tensile strength. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints were 338 MPa and 549 MPa, respectively, which were higher than the candidate metal. These tensile results suggested that the laser welding process had improved the weld strength even without any weld preheat treatment and also the fractography of the tensile fractured samples showed the ductile mode of failure. PMID:27222751

  20. The formation mechanisms of interlocked microstructures in low-carbon high-strength steel weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, X.L.; Wang, H.H.; Cheng, L.; Wu, K.M.

    2012-05-15

    Microstructural features and the formation mechanisms of interlocked microstructures of acicular ferrite in a low-carbon high-strength steel weld metal were investigated by means of computer-aided three-dimensional reconstruction technique and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. Multiple nucleation on inclusions, sympathetic nucleation or repeated nucleation, hard impingement, mutual intersection, and fixed orientation relationships of acicular ferrite grains were observed. They were all responsible for the formation of interlocked microstructures in the weld metal. During the process of isothermal transformation, the pre-formed acicular ferrite laths or plates partitioned austenite grains into many small and separate regions, and the growth of later formed acicular ferrite grains was confined in these small regions. Thus, the crystallographic grain size became smaller with the increasing holding time. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acicular ferrite is formed by multiple nucleation and sympathetic nucleation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hard impingement and intersection of ferrite grains occur at later stages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pre-formed ferrite laths partition austenite grains into smaller regions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The growth of later formed ferrite grains is confined in the smaller regions.

  1. Numerical analysis of the flexible roll forming of an automotive component from high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeyrathna, B.; Abvabi, A.; Rolfe, B.; Taube, R.; Weiss, M.

    2016-11-01

    Conventional roll forming is limited to components with uniform cross-section; the recently developed flexible roll forming (FRF) process can be used to form components which vary in both width and depth. It has been suggested that this process can be used to manufacture automotive components from Ultra High Strength Steel (UHSS) which has limited tensile elongation. In the flexible roll forming process, the pre-cut blank is fed through a set of rolls; some rolls are computer-numerically controlled (CNC) to follow the 3D contours of the part and hence parts with a variable cross-section can be produced. This paper introduces a new flexible roll forming technique which can be used to form a complex shape with the minimum tooling requirements. In this method, the pre-cut blank is held between two dies and the whole system moves back and forth past CNC forming rolls. The forming roll changes its angle and position in each pass to incrementally form the part. In this work, the process is simulated using the commercial software package Copra FEA. The distribution of total strain and final part quality are investigated as well as related shape defects observed in the process. Different tooling concepts are used to improve the strain distribution and hence the part quality.

  2. FE Simulation Models for Hot Stamping an Automobile Component with Tailor-Welded High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bingtao; Wang, Qiaoling; Wei, Zhaohui; Meng, Xianju; Yuan, Zhengjun

    2016-05-01

    Ultra-high-strength in sheet metal parts can be achieved with hot stamping process. To improve the crash performance and save vehicle weight, it is necessary to produce components with tailored properties. The use of tailor-welded high-strength steel is a relatively new hot stamping process for saving weight and obtaining desired local stiffness and crash performance. The simulation of hot stamping boron steel, especially tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) stamping, is more complex and challenging. Information about thermal/mechanical properties of tools and sheet materials, heat transfer, and friction between the deforming material and the tools is required in detail. In this study, the boron-manganese steel B1500HS and high-strength low-alloy steel B340LA are tailor welded and hot stamped. In order to precisely simulate the hot stamping process, modeling and simulation of hot stamping tailor-welded high-strength steels, including phase transformation modeling, thermal modeling, and thermal-mechanical modeling, is investigated. Meanwhile, the welding zone of tailor-welded blanks should be sufficiently accurate to describe thermal, mechanical, and metallurgical parameters. FE simulation model using TWBs with the thickness combination of 1.6 mm boron steel and 1.2 mm low-alloy steel is established. In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of the hot stamped automotive component (mini b-pillar), hardness and microstructure at each region are investigated. The comparisons between simulated results and experimental observations show the reliability of thermo-mechanical and metallurgical modeling strategies of TWBs hot stamping process.

  3. Variation in Mechanical Properties and Heterogeneity in Microstructure of High-Strength Ferritic Steel During Mill Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, M.; Barat, K.; Das, S. K.; Ravi Kumar, B.; Pramanick, A. K.; Chakraborty, J.; Das, G.; Hadas, S.; Bharathy, S.; Ray, S. K.

    2014-06-01

    HS600 and HS800 are two new generation, high-strength advanced ferritic steels that find widespread application in automobiles. During commercial production of the same grades with different thicknesses, it has been found that mechanical properties like tensile strength and stretchability varied widely and became inconsistent. In the current endeavor, two different thicknesses have been chosen from a mill trial sample of HS600 and HS800. An in-depth structural characterization was carried out for all four alloys to explain the variation in their respective mechanical and shear punch properties. The carbon content was smaller and Ti + Mo quantity was higher in case of HS800 with respect to HS600. The microstructure of both steels consisted of the dispersion of (Ti,Mo)C in a ferrite matrix. The grain size of HS800 was little larger than HS600 due to an increased coiling temperature (CT) of the former in comparison to the latter. It was found that in case of same grade of steel with a different thickness, a variation in microstructure occurred due to change in strain, CT, and cooling rate. The strength and stretch formability of these two alloys were predominantly governed by a microalloyed carbide. In this respect, carbides with a size range above 5 nm were responsible for loosing coherency with ferrite matrix. In case of HS600, both ≤5 and >5-nm size (Ti,Mo)C precipitates shared a nearly equal fraction of microalloyed precipitates. However, for HS800, >5-nm size (Ti,Mo)C carbide was substantially higher than ≤5-nm size alloy carbides. The ultimate tensile strength and yield strength of HS800 was superior to that of HS600 owing to a higher quantity of microalloyed carbide with a decreased column width and interparticle distance. A higher degree of in-coherency of HS800 made the alloy prone to crack formation with low stretchability.

  4. Shielded Metal Arc Welding Consumables for Advanced High Strength Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    100 ksi) depends on the availability of adequate welding consumables. In the case of shielded metal arc welding, the electrodes must provide...associated with the potassium silicate binder (K2 SiO3 .nH2 0). The fluxes were then crushed and sized to 14# Tyler mesh (1.7 mm screen aperture) to...determined that the hydrated potassium silicate binder (K2 SiO3 .nH20) used in this investi- gation was 50 wt. pct. potassium silicate (K 2SiO 3 ) and

  5. Control of Softening Processes in the Heat-Affected Zone During Welding of High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimenko, L. A.; Kapustin, O. E.; Ramus', A. A.; Ramus', R. O.

    2016-11-01

    The hardness and the structure of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) under welding of tube steels of strength category K60 - K70 are studied. The steels are treated by regimes imitating the thermal cycles of different welding processes applied to tubes starting with manual arc welding and ending with energy-intensive automatic submerged-arc welding. The welding modes causing maximum decrease in the hardness of HAZ regions are determined. The conditions preventing softening under one-pass and multipass welding of high-strength steels are presented.

  6. Development of 690MPa High Strength Steel with Low Yield Ratio and Good Weldability for Building Structures in Wisco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Mingwei; Yuan, Zexi; Zhang, Kaiguang; Fan, Wei

    690MPa high strength steel with low yield ratio for building structure has been developed successfully by micro-alloying design and thermal-mechanical controlled processing in WISCO. The mechanical properties, weldabilities and microstructure of the based steel were studied by means of mechanical property test and microstructural analysis with optical microscope and transmission electron microscope. The results show that the mechanical properties meet the requirement of specification for developed steel, the microstructure of the based steel primarily comprised of fine lath and granular bainite, small fraction of ferrite and martensite—austenite constituent. During the thermal cycle, the austenite grain growth, microstructure coarsening, increasing of volume fraction and grain size of M-A constituent, and blocky M-A constituent in HAZs are the main reasons for deteriorating low temperature toughness. The plates of developed steel have high strength, high toughness, lower yield ratio and good weldability, and the plates will be the suitable high strength materials for fabricating high-rise, super high-rise building structures and large span projects.

  7. Computational design and analysis of high strength austenitic TRIP steels for blast protection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Padmanava

    Recent assessment of material property requirements for blast resistant applications, especially for the naval ship hulls, has defined the need to design steels with high stretch ductility and fragment penetration resistance, along with high strength and adequate toughness. Using a system based computational materials design approach, two series of austenitic (gamma) steels have been designed -- BA120 to exhibit high uniform ductility in tension (>20%) and SA120 to exhibit high tensile (>20%) and shear strains (>50%), with both alloys maintaining high levels of yield strength (120 ksi/827 MPa) at room temperature under Tensile and Shear stress states. BA120 is low chromium (4 wt %) high nickel (23.5 wt %) alloy while the SA120 is a high chromium design (10 wt %), both designed for non-magnetic behavior. The Thermo-Calc computational thermodynamics software in conjunction with a Ni-DATA 7 thermodynamic database has been used to model precipitation strengthening of the alloy, by quantifying the dependence of yield stress of austenitic steels on the mole fraction of the precipitated gamma' (Gamma Prime) Ni3(Ti, Al) phase. The required high strength has been achieved by the precipitation of spheroidal intermetallic gamma' -- phase of optimum diameter (15 nm) in equilibrium with the matrix at the standard aging temperature. Adequate Al and Ti with respect 5 to the Ni in the matrix ensure enough gamma' phase fraction and number density of precipitates to provide the necessary strength. The predicted gamma' precipitation strengthening to 120-130 ksi for both BA120 and SA120 has been validated through both microhardness as well as static and dynamic tensile and shear tests conducted at room temperature. 3-D LEAP analysis of the aged specimens has shown the expected size and distribution of gamma' -- precipitates with good compositional accuracy of predicted values from the thermodynamic models, for both matrix austenite and gamma'. Metastable austenitic steels have been

  8. Individual and Combined Effects of Sulfur and Phosphorus on the Toughness of High Strength Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    phosphorus on low carbon steel was thoroughly studied by Hopkins and Tipler . (3) Enzian (4) also made a similar study, but he investigated the simultaneous...solubility of P in c-Fe is about 0.015% at room temperature. (6,7) However, in the metastable state, Hopkins and Tipler found no evidence of second phase... 1c 1 (2) where G is the modulus of elasticity in shear, b is Burgers vector, Vc is the advancing velocity of the microcrack and 8 is a constant. 6 I

  9. High-strength stainless steels for corrosion mitigation in prestressed concrete: Development and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Robert D.

    Corrosion of prestressing reinforcement in concrete structures exposed to marine environments and/or deicing chemicals is a problem of critical concern. While many corrosion mitigation technologies are available for reinforced concrete (RC), those available for use in prestressed concrete (PSC) are limited and in many cases cannot provide the 100+ year service life needed in new construction, particularly when exposed to severe marine environments. The use of stainless steel alloys in RC structures has shown great success in mitigating corrosion in even the most severe of exposures. However, the use of high-strength stainless steels (HSSSs) for corrosion mitigation in PSC structures has received limited attention. To address these deficiencies in knowledge, an experimental study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using HSSSs for corrosion mitigation in PSC. The study examined mechanical behavior, corrosion resistance, and techniques for the production of HSSS prestressing strands. Stainless steel grades 304, 316, 2101, 2205, 2304, and 17-7 were produced as cold drawn wires with diameters of approximately 4 mm (0.16 in). A 1080 prestressing steel was also included to serve as a control. Tensile strengths of 1250 to 1550 MPa (181 to 225 ksi) were achieved in the cold-drawn candidate HSSSs. Non-ductile failure modes with no post-yield strain hardening were observed in all candidate HSSSs. 1000 hr stress relaxation of all candidate HSSSs was predicted to be between 6 and 8 % based on the results of 200 hr tests conducted at 70 % of the ultimate tensile strength. Residual stresses due to the cold drawing had a significant influence on stress vs. strain behavior and stress relaxation. Electrochemical corrosion testing found that in solutions simulating alkaline concrete, all candidate HSSSs showed exceptional corrosion resistance at chloride (Cl-) concentrations from zero to 0.25 M. However, when exposed to solutions simulating carbonated concrete, corrosion

  10. Fiber optic sensor for diffusible hydrogen determination in high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rodney D., II; Olson, David L.; Wildeman, Tom; Benson, David K.

    2000-03-01

    With the increasing use of higher strength steels, the hydrogen content necessary to promote hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) has become very small. This much lower hydrogen content level is approaching the uncertainty level of present diffusible hydrogen analytical practices, thus requiring the development of new analytical techniques. Efforts are being made to develop more sensitive and less time consuming methods for hydrogen measurement. An advanced design for a transition metal oxide based fiber optic diffusible hydrogen sensor has therefore been developed. The sensor allows measurement of hydrogen content directly from a welded structure, eliminating the need for duplicate welded coupons. The sensor generates the necessary analytical signal in less than one hour, and has been calibrated to yield results in ml H2100 g weld metal. The sensor is also extremely sensitive to hydrogen and relatively inexpensive. The sensor shows excellent promise as an advanced hydrogen measurement technique, and research is continuing to establish procedures for transfer to industry.

  11. Development of Low Carbon Niobium Bearing High Strength F-B Dual Phase Steel with High Hole Expansion Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Xia, Ming-sheng; Xiong, Zi-liu; Du, Yan-bing; Qiao, Zhi-ming; Zhang, Hong-bo

    In the study a low carbon niobium bearing high strength F-B dual phase automobile steel with high hole expansion property has been investigated. Steels of different chemical composition have been investigated by simulation experiments of controlled rolling and cooling process to study the influences of chemical elements, especially for C,Nb and Ti, and cooling pattern on the mechanical properties, flangeability and microstructure of strips. So-called 3-stages cooling pattern was adopted in simulation experiments, combining ultra fast cooling in first stage, air cooling in middle stage and fast cooling in the last stage, and at the end of run-out table the temperature of rolled pieces drop to below Bs point. Optical microstructure and SEM morphology have been observed. Results indicate that it is possible to obtain dual phase microstructure of polygonal ferrite plus bainite in adopting 3-stages cooling pattern. The low temperature coiling method using 3-step controlled cooling pattern after hot rolling is effective to produce low carbon Nb bearing steel with high balance of strength-ductility-flangeability, in addition, higher carbon content of steel tend to be detrimental to flangeability of steel, due to much carbide precipitation at ferrite boundary. Based on the results of simulation experiments mill trial has been carried out and hot rolled high strength steel with tensile strength higher as 600Mpa and hole expansion ratio higher as 100% has been developed successfully.

  12. In vivo evaluation of a high-strength, high-ductility stainless steel for use in surgical implants.

    PubMed

    Syrett, B C; Davis, E E

    1979-07-01

    A high-strength, high-ductility, austenitic stainless steel has been evaluated for use in surgical implants by performing in vivo tests in rats, rabbits, dogs, and rhesus monkeys. This stainless steel, a TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steel containing about 4% Mo, was compared with two alloys in current clinical use: Type 316L stainless steel and cast Vitallium. Compared with the other two alloys, cast Vitallium generally had higher resistance to corrosion and superior biocompatibility in all animals. The tests in rats and dogs indicated that the corrosion resistances of the TRIP steel and the Type 316L stainless steel were similar and that the tissue reactions caused by these alloys were also similar. However, in rhesus monkeys, the TRIP steel was shown to be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking and much more susceptible to crevice corrosion than Type 316L stainless steel. Limited tests in rabbits supported the observation that the TRIP steel is susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking. These inconsistencies in the in vivo tests underline the need for a reevaluation of the popular test techniques and of the animals commonly chosen for assessing the suitability of candidate implant materials. The "worst case" results from the rhesus monkey tests were entirely consistent with previous results obtained from in vitro studies. However, further work must be performed before the behavior of metals in humans, rhesus monkeys, or any other animal, can be predicted with confidence from an in vitro test program.

  13. Effect of Boron Addition on Microstructural Evolution and Room-Temperature Mechanical Properties of Novel Fe66- x CrNiB x Si ( x = 0, 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 Wt Pct) Advanced High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askari-Paykani, Mohsen; Shahverdi, Hamid Reza; Miresmaeili, Reza

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the Vickers hardnesses and room-temperature uniaxial tensile behaviors of four Fe66- x CrNiB x Si ( x = 0 (0B), 0.25 (25B), 0.50 (50B), and 0.75 (75B) wt pct) advanced high-strength steels (AHSSs) in the as-hot-rolled and heat-treated (1373 K (1100 °C)/2 h + 973 K (700 °C)/20 min) conditions were investigated. Microstructural evolution after solidification, hot rolling, heat treatment, and uniaxial tensile tests of 0B, 25B, 50B, and 75B AHSSs was also characterized using field emission gun scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The tensile behaviors of the 0B, 25B, 50B, and 75B AHSSs were manifested by an excellent combination of strength and ductility over 34.7 and 47.1 GPa pct, 36.9 and 42.3 GPa pct, 45.9 and 46.4 GPa pct, and 11.9 and 47.8 GPa pct, respectively, arising from microband-induced plasticity in the 0B, 50B, and 75B AHSSs and transformation-induced plasticity in the 25B specimens. All specimens in the as-hot-rolled and heat-treated states showed an austenitic matrix grain. Adding boron to the base alloy (0B) resulted in grain refinement, M2B dispersion, precipitation hardening, and solid solution strengthening, which led to an increase in strength. The results of the present work show promise for automotive applications that require excellent properties and reduced specific weight.

  14. Fracture Profile and Crack Propagation of Ultra-High Strength Hot-Stamped Boron Steel During Mechanical Trimming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xianhong; Yang, Kun; Chen, Sisi; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical trimming process for ultra-high strength boron steel after hot stamping was carried out in this study. Shear and tensile tests were designed to analyze the influences of stress state on the fracture mode; trimmed fracture surface and profile were observed and compared to other commonly used steels such as DP980 and Q235 etc.; the crack propagation during trimming process was studied through step-by-step tests. The observation and analysis reveal that the fracture mode of hot-stamped boron steel is highly related to the stress state, it belongs to cleavage fracture on low stress triaxiality but dimple fracture on high stress triaxiality. Such phenomenon is reflected in the trimming process, during which the stress state changes from shear-dominated state to tensile-dominated state. In addition, the burnish zone of trimmed boron steel is much smaller than other high strength steels, and the profile of cutting surface shows an `S'-like shape which is destructive to the trimming tool. Moreover, during the trimming process, most martensite laths near the cutting edge are stretched and rotated markedly to the direction of the shear band, and the main crack expands along those grain boundaries, which may penetrate through a few martensite laths and form small crack branches.

  15. Optimised use of High Strength Steels for Pressure Vessels by Application of Modern Design Methods According to European Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenberg, P.

    During the last 40 years, steel industry has developed high strength fine grain steels with excellent material properties and weldability for use in pressure vessels, as well as for structural buildings, offshore platforms, wind mills and ships. Application of such modern steels is often restricted due to lack of knowledge concerning questions of safety and downstream fabrication processes such as welding, bending and PWHT. However, if new toughness-oriented design rules as they were developed in several International research projects are accepted, such modern steels can be applied leading to economic advantages and sustainable use of resources while safety remains on the required level. The predominant question for safe constructions is related to toughness and quality survey during downstream fabrication. This question today is answered with the application of fracture mechanics based safety concepts and a better understanding of fracture and deformation behavior of structural components. In addition it must be underlined that beyond a widely spread understanding of standard C-Mn structural steels, modern micro alloyed structural steels provide far higher quality in terms of toughness, strength, inner soundness and optimal fabrication properties. With this presentation it shall demonstrated how modern micro-alloyed steels and modern toughness-oriented design methods can be applied for pressure vessels steels with thickness up to 200 mm operating at low temperatures.

  16. Study of corrosion behavior of high strength low alloy steel reinforcing bars in industrial and marine environments

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Hocking, M.G.; Jha, R.; Chatterjee, A.; Mukherjee, T.

    1996-11-01

    Mild steel reinforcing bars embedded in concrete exposed to marine environment are prone to severe corrosion leading to serious damage to the structures. The various technologies developed and adopted to reduce the corrosion of steel reinforcement, have been discussed in this paper along with a new high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel reinforcing bar. The bare HSLA rebars have been tested extensively along with mild steel rebars for comparative study in saline and sulfurous electrolytes in the laboratory by Potentiodynamic tests as well as in natural marine and industrial environments. The HSLA and mild steel rebars embedded in concrete were also tested in saline water by alternate immersion test and by impressed anodic current methods. The bare HSLA rebars showed 2--3 and 1.5--1.9 times better corrosion resistance to mild steel rebars in laboratory and field exposure tests respectively. The HSLA rebars embedded in concrete and exposed to saline water with impressed anodic current of 200 {micro}A/sq. cm showed 2.5 times better corrosion resistance to mild steel rebars. The XRD analysis of the rust formed on the samples of field exposure tests conducted in marine and industrial environments, clearly showed the formation of compounds which reduce the corrosion rate of steel.

  17. EIS Behavior of Experimental High-Strength Steel in Near-Neutral pH and Load Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraza-Fierro, Jesus Israel; Serna-Barquera, Sergio Alonso; Campillo-Illanes, Bernardo Fabian; Castaneda, Homero

    2017-04-01

    Two thermomechanical heat treatments were applied to a high-strength low carbon steel with an experimental chemical composition, and as a result two different microstructures were obtained. Steel A had a ferritic microstructure, and steel B had a bainitic-martensitic one. The corrosion behavior was reviewed at long times in samples without load by means of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) in a near-neutral pH (NNpH) environment. The results showed that the quantity and adherence of corrosion products on the sample surface at long times are different. Hence, the impedance was higher for steel B. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was applied to tempered samples of the two steels at 473 K, 673 K, and 873 K (200 °C, 400 °C, and 600 °C), and the corrosion behavior was acquired using EIS at the same time as the SSRT in NNpH conditions. This is a novel result because the tension samples were not electrically isolated from the rest of the load frame. The impedance for the ferritic steel was higher than the bainitic-martensitic one, while it slightly decreased for both steel over time. Tempering improved the corrosion resistance for steel A, while it was not modified for steel B. The corrosion behavior could be associated with the susceptibility of these steels to stress corrosion cracking. A transmission line model was proposed to show qualitatively the corrosion behavior of a crack in the steel, if there is a potential profile inside the crack. A hypothetical potential profile was acquired as well as different impedance behaviors based on electrochemical variables.

  18. EIS Behavior of Experimental High-Strength Steel in Near-Neutral pH and Load Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraza-Fierro, Jesus Israel; Serna-Barquera, Sergio Alonso; Campillo-Illanes, Bernardo Fabian; Castaneda, Homero

    2017-02-01

    Two thermomechanical heat treatments were applied to a high-strength low carbon steel with an experimental chemical composition, and as a result two different microstructures were obtained. Steel A had a ferritic microstructure, and steel B had a bainitic-martensitic one. The corrosion behavior was reviewed at long times in samples without load by means of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) in a near-neutral pH (NNpH) environment. The results showed that the quantity and adherence of corrosion products on the sample surface at long times are different. Hence, the impedance was higher for steel B. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was applied to tempered samples of the two steels at 473 K, 673 K, and 873 K (200 °C, 400 °C, and 600 °C), and the corrosion behavior was acquired using EIS at the same time as the SSRT in NNpH conditions. This is a novel result because the tension samples were not electrically isolated from the rest of the load frame. The impedance for the ferritic steel was higher than the bainitic-martensitic one, while it slightly decreased for both steel over time. Tempering improved the corrosion resistance for steel A, while it was not modified for steel B. The corrosion behavior could be associated with the susceptibility of these steels to stress corrosion cracking. A transmission line model was proposed to show qualitatively the corrosion behavior of a crack in the steel, if there is a potential profile inside the crack. A hypothetical potential profile was acquired as well as different impedance behaviors based on electrochemical variables.

  19. Local heat treatment of high strength steels with zoom-optics and 10kW-diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Markus; Krause, Volker; Bergweiler, Georg; Flaischerowitz, Martin; Banik, Janko

    2012-03-01

    High strength steels enable new solutions for weight optimized car bodies without sacrificing crash safety. However, cold forming of these steels is limited due to the need of high press capacity, increased tool wear, and limitations in possible geometries. One can compensate for these drawbacks by local heat treatment of the blanks. In high-deformation areas the strength of the material is reduced and the plasticity is increased by diode laser irradiation. Local heat treatment with diode laser radiation could also yield key benefits for the applicability of press hardened parts. High strength is not desired all over the part. Joint areas or deformation zones for requested crash properties require locally reduced strength. In the research project "LOKWAB" funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), heat treatment of high strength steels was investigated in cooperation with Audi, BMW, Daimler, ThyssenKrupp, Fraunhofer- ILT, -IWU and others. A diode laser with an output power of 10 kW was set up to achieve acceptable process speed. Furthermore a homogenizing zoom-optics was developed, providing a rectangular focus with homogeneous power density. The spot size in x- and y-direction can be changed independently during operation. With pyrometer controlled laser power the surface temperature is kept constant, thus the laser treated zone can be flexibly adapted to the needs. Deep-drawing experiments show significant improvement in formability. With this technique, parts can be manufactured, which can conventionally only be made of steel with lower strength. Locally reduced strength of press hardened serial parts was demonstrated.

  20. The design of steel for high strength line pipe requiring excellent notch toughness and corrosion properties for arctic applications

    SciTech Connect

    DeCaux, G.; Golini, F.; Rayner, T.J.

    1998-12-31

    Due to the cold climate and environmental requirements of Alaska`s North Slope and Western Canada`s oil production areas, line pipe steels intended for use in these areas must display not only high strength as required, but superior toughness. Additionally,if the line pipe is to be used in aggressive sour gas (i.e., H{sub 2}S containing) environments it must also have excellent resistance to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC). Such a steel has been designed, through selective chemistry, clean steel-making practices, nonmetallic inclusion control, and hot mill process control, that is capable of meeting stringent line pipe specifications covering X65 grade line pipe in Arctic service temperatures. This paper also examined the effect that hot rolling finishing temperature had on notch toughness. Steel-making knowledge developed for lower strength, HIC resistant X52 grade steel has been employed for the development of a X65 grade steel. Results of trial heats will be presented.

  1. Enhancement of Impact Toughness by Delamination Fracture in a Low-Alloy High-Strength Steel with Al Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junjie; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Hongji; Guo, Shengwu; Liu, Yongning

    2016-12-01

    The effect of delamination toughening of martensitic steel was investigated both at room and low temperatures [253 K and 233 K (-20 °C and -40 °C)]. Two low-alloy martensitic steels with and without Al alloying were both prepared. Layered structure with white band and black matrix was observed in Al alloyed steel, while a homogeneous microstructure was displayed in the steel without Al. Both steels achieved high strength (tensile strength over 1600 MPa) and good ductility (elongation over 11 pct), but they displayed stark contrasts on impact fracture mode and Charpy impact energy. Delamination fracture occurred in Al alloyed steel and the impact energies were significantly increased both at room temperature (from 75 to 138 J, i.e., nearly improved up to 2 times) and low temperatures [from 47.9 to 71.3 J at 233 K (-40 °C)] compared with the one without Al. Alloying with Al promotes the segregation of Cr, Mn, Si and C elements to form a network structure, which is martensite with higher carbon content and higher hardness than that of the matrix. And this network structure evolved into a band structure during the hot rolling process. The difference of yield stress between the band structure and the matrix gives rise to a delamination fracture during the impact test, which increases the toughness greatly.

  2. Effect of fine scale microstructure and inclusions on the toughness of ultra high strength low alloy medium carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Pranay

    When fracture is due to micro-void coalescence the toughness of ultra high strength steels is determined by the nature of the inclusions in the steel and by the fine-scale microstructure of the steel. It has been previously shown for the steels HY180 (0.1 wt.% carbon) and AF1410 (0.16 wt.% carbon) that one can improve toughness by increasing inclusion spacing through the use of rare-earths and similarly increase toughness by having inclusion types that are resistant to void nucleation though the use of titanium additions. The purpose of this work has been to determine the extent to which rare-earth additions and titanium additions can be used to control inclusion characteristics and improve the toughness of ultra high strength low alloy steels such as 4340 (0.4 wt.% carbon) and 300M. Because silicon additions on the order of 2 wt.% can be used to increase the strength of 0.4 wt.% carbon low-alloy steels without resorting to increased carbon levels, this work also examined the degree to which silicon content influences the inclusion distributions when rare-earth additions or titanium additions are used to modify inclusion type. Two separate low-alloy systems, 4340 and Base+Ni+Si series alloys were investigated. Extensive mechanical testing was performed by tensile testing, plane strain fracture toughness tests and Charpy impact toughness tests. True stress-true strain curves were obtained by applying the method of Bridgman. The inclusion analysis of the micrographs obtained using SEM was used to obtain the average inclusion radius, inclusion volume fraction and inclusion spacing. Void nucleation curves were obtained to characterize the strain at which inclusions first nucleate voids. Subsequently the critical interfacial stress at which these inclusions nucleate voids was also obtained. The retained austenite content was measured using X-Ray diffraction while analysis of thin foils and extraction replicas was performed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM

  3. Effect of Multistage Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingdong; Wen, Haiming; Zhang, Han; Gu, Jianfeng; Li, Chuanwei; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of Cu-rich precipitates (CRPs) and reverted austenite (RA) on the strength and impact toughness of a Cu-containing 3.5 wt pct Ni high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel after various heat treatments involving quenching (Q), lamellarization (L), and tempering (T) is studied using electron back-scatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography. The QT sample exhibits high strength but low impact toughness, whereas the QL samples mostly possess improved impact toughness but moderate strength, but the QLT samples again have degraded impact toughness due to additional tempering. The dispersion of nanoscale CRPs, which are formed during tempering, is responsible for the enhanced strength but simultaneously leads to the degraded impact toughness. The RA formed during lamellarization contributes to the improved impact toughness. Based on the present study, new heat treatment schedules are proposed to balance strength and impact toughness by optimizing the precipitation of CRPs and RA.

  4. Performance optimization and computational design of ultra-high strength gear steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemens, Benjamin Lee

    Rising power density requirements in transmission gear applications are swiftly outpacing gear redesign alone and will ultimately depend on better materials. Ni-Co secondary hardening steels show great promise for these applications due to their optimized combination of strength and toughness. The commercially available secondary hardening alloys GearMet RTM C61 and C67 have already demonstrated promising contact fatigue resistance, however bending fatigue is anticipated to be the primary failure mode limiting high power density gear applications. Single tooth bending fatigue testing was therefore completed on C61 and C67 spur gears to both assess the optimized performance of these alloys as well as identify defect populations currently limiting further advances. The resultant best-practice C61 spur gears in a shot peened and isotropic superfinished condition outperformed the top-ranking premium gear steel, demonstrating an approximate 15% improvement in bending fatigue endurance limit. Fatigue failures limiting further bending fatigue performance were identified to primarily initiate at three defect classes: shot peening-induced surface damage, subsurface inter-granular cleavage facets and Al2O3 and La2O2S inclusions. C67 spur gears did not show increased performance despite elevated surface hardness levels due to the inability of current shot peening practices to achieve maximum compressive stress in ultra-high hardness materials. In an effort to reduce the material cost of these alloys through minimization/elimination of cobalt alloying additions, BCC Cu precipitation was incorporated to offset ensuing losses in temper resistance by providing additional heterogeneous nucleation sites for the M2C strengthening dispersion. Fifty-pound experimental heats were made of four designed compositions. Peak hardness levels achieved during tempering fell on average 200 VHN short of the 900 VHN designed surface hardness. 3-dimensional local electrode atom probe (LEAP

  5. An investigation of laser cutting quality of 22MnB5 ultra high strength steel using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Abdul Fattah Mohd; Aqida, Syarifah Nur

    2017-07-01

    In hot press forming, changes of mechanical properties in boron steel blanks have been a setback in trimming the final shape components. This paper presents investigation of kerf width and heat affected zone (HAZ) of ultra high strength 22MnB5 steel cutting. Sample cutting was conducted using a 4 kW Carbon Dioxide (CO2) laser machine with 10.6 μm wavelength with the laser spot size of 0.2 mm. A response surface methodology (RSM) using three level Box-Behnken design of experiment was developed with three factors of peak power, cutting speed and duty cycle. The parameters were optimised for minimum kerf width and HAZ formation. Optical evaluation using MITUTOYO TM 505 were conducted to measure the kerf width and HAZ region. From the findings, laser duty cycle was crucial to determine cutting quality of ultra-high strength steel; followed by cutting speed and laser power. Meanwhile, low power intensity with continuous wave contributes the narrowest kerf width formation and least HAZ region.

  6. Crack initiation observation and local stress analysis in shear fracture tests of ultra-high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ninshu; Takada, Kenji; Sugimoto, Nao

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the local strain and stress at the crack initiation position in shear fracture test pieces of ultra-high strength steels, a butterfly shear fracture specimen was employed. The crack initiation position and propagation direction were observed during shear fracture tests by high speed cameras and investigated through analysing the fracture surface by scanning electron microscope. Further, the finite element method was employed and the stress-triaxiality at the crack initiation position was investigated. It can be obtained that the crack initiated at the position where the stress state is close to uniaxial tensile state or plane strain state more than pure shear stress state.

  7. Development of a high recovery SMAW consumable for high strength steels, Re > 690 N/mm2

    SciTech Connect

    Aastroem, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the development of a high recovery Zr-basic electrode, suitable for welding of extra high strength steels. In the first phase of the study the influence of alloying elements (Mn,Cr,Ni,Mo) on mechanical properties were investigated. In the final version of the electrode, Mn-Ni-Mo were used as alloying elements, test electrode nr 17. This electrode has been future tested to study the influence of heat input and welding positions on mechanical properties. Moisture pick up, hydrogen content, productivity and CTOD test results are also reported.

  8. High Strength and Retained Ductility Achieved in a Nitrided Strip Cast Nb-Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Kelvin Y.; Shrestha, Sachin L.; Felfer, Peter J.; Cairney, Julie M.; Killmore, Chris R.; Carpenter, Kristin R.; Kaul, Harold R.; Ringer, Simon P.

    2013-02-01

    The current study investigates the strengthening of an Nb-microallyed CASTRIP® steel at 798 K (525 °C) by nitriding in a KNO3 salt bath. Nitriding up to 1 hour dramatically increased the yield strength of the steel by ~35 pct (from 475 to 645 MPa) with no sacrifice of ductility (~16 pct). Further nitriding led to brittle fracture. Hardness profiles of the nitrided steels through the thickness reveal hard surfaces and a relatively softer core. The hardening of the shell in the nitrided steels is thought to be the combined effect of solid solution strengthening from nitrogen and dispersion strengthening from clusters and precipitates. The retained ductility is attributed to the hard-shell-soft-core structure through nitriding.

  9. Welding of High-Strength Steels for Aircraft and Missile Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1959-10-12

    investigations have been limited to unwelded ma- terial. Conventional impact testing (such as the V-notch Charpy test) of weld metals also has been limited...is X200 and 300M ... ..................... . .. . . . . . ..... . 16 HOT-WORK DIE STEELS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............. 17 Peerless...metal. A survey of the procedures currently being used is presented. Low-Alloy Martensitic Steels AISI 4340, AMS 6434, XZOO, 300M , and 17-Z2AS all are

  10. Ion Vapour Deposited (IVD) Aluminium Coatings for the Corrosion Protection of High Strength Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    4 ARL-MAT-R-123 AR-006-584 AD-A242 738 A ,- "" DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE DEFENCE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ORGANISATION AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY...SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ORGANISATION AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY Aircraft Materials Report 123 ION VAPOUR DEPOSITED (lVD) ALUMINIUM COATINGS FOR...the steel substrate provided the coating was sufficiently thick and its porosity low. Exposure of IID coated steel to aqzeous enviroments was found to

  11. High-strength state of ultrafine-grained martensitic steel produced by high pressure torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavaeva, M. V.; Nikitina, M. A.; Ganeev, A. V.; Islamgaliev, R. K.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the study results on the effect of severe plastic deformation (SPD) via high pressure torsion (HPT) on the structure and properties of martensitic steel. The contribution of different strengthening mechanisms in the strength of steel has been analyzed. It is shown that independently of the deformation temperature the main contribution in hardening belongs to grain boundaries (about 50 %), whereas the dislocation and solid solution components achieve 15 and 25 %, respectively.

  12. Graded High-Strength Spring-Steels by a Special Inductive Heat T reatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tump, A.; Brandt, R.

    2016-03-01

    A method for effective lightweight design is the use of materials with high specific strength. As materials e.g. titanium are very expensive, steel is still the most important material for manufacturing automotive components. Steel is cost efficient, easy to recycle and its tensile strength easily exceeds 2,000 MPa by means of modern QT-technology (Quenched and Tempered). Therefore, lightweight design is still feasible in spite of the high density of steel. However, a further increase of tensile strength is limited, especially due to an increasing notch sensitivity and exposure to a corrosive environment. One solution is a special QT-process for steel, which creates a hardness gradient from the surface to the core of the material. This type of tailored material possesses a softer layer, which improves material properties such as fracture toughness and notch sensitivity. This leads to a better resistance to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. Due to this optimization, a weight reduction is feasible without the use of expensive alloying elements. To understand the damage mechanism a comprehensive testing procedure was performed on homogeneous and gradient steels. Some results regarding the fracture mechanic behavior of such steels will be discussed.

  13. Mixed-mode hydrogen-assisted cracking of high-strength steel: The role of cyclic load history

    SciTech Connect

    Toribio, J.; Ovejero, E.; Kharin, V.

    1999-07-01

    Prestressing steel wires are manufactured from a hot-rolled bar, which is heavily cold drawn to produce a highly resistant material. This manufacturing process generates very intense plastic deformations in the material and causes severe changes in its pearlitic microstructure, thus leading to anisotropic stress corrosion behavior in the form of environmentally assisted longitudinal splitting and, thus, mixed-mode stress corrosion cracking. This work describes experimental evidence of mixed-mode hydrogen-assisted cracking of high-strength steel and discusses the role of cyclic load history, because fatigue precracking is a fundamental technique of crack generation for posterior stress corrosion testing, and it has been reported that fatigue preloading may substantially alter the results from stress corrosion cracking tests, especially in the case of hydrogen-assisted cracking.

  14. Numerical and experimental evaluation of laser forming process for the shape correction in ultra high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Kim, E. Z.; Lee, N. K.; Lee, G. A.; Park, S. J.; Chu, A.

    2013-12-16

    In this paper, laser forming characteristics in ultra high strength steel with ultimate strength of 1200MPa are investigated numerically and experimentally. FE simulation is conducted to identify the response related to deformation and characterize the effect of laser power, beam diameter and scanning speed with respect to the bending angle for a square sheet part. The thermo-mechanical behaviors during the straight-line heating process are presented in terms of temperature, stress and strain. An experimental setup including a fiber laser with maximum mean power of 3.0 KW is used in the experiments. From the results in this work, it would be easily adjustment the laser power and the scanning speed by controlling the line energy for a bending operation of CP1180 steel sheets.

  15. The role of crack tip strain rate in the stress corrosion cracking of high strength steels in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieck, R. M.; Atrens, A.; Smith, I. O.

    1989-05-01

    Creep tests have been performed on fracture mechanics specimens of as-quenched 4340 and 3.5NiCrMoV rotor steel to confirm the importance of crack tip strain rate in causing stress corrosion cracking. By allowing creep in a noncracking environment, dry air for the high strength steels tested, cracking did not occur when water, the corrosive solution, was later added to the system. Thus, it is possible to inhibit stress corrosion in spite of conditions otherwise conducive to crack growth. Conditions necessary to restart cracking were also tested. The importance of this result in terms of the mechanism of stress corrosion and difficulties in measuring KISCC is discussed.

  16. Surface Oxidation of the High-Strength Steels Electrodeposited with Cu or Fe and the Resultant Defect Formation in Their Coating during the Following Galvanizing and Galvannealing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yun-Il; Beom, Won-Jin; Park, Chan-Jin; Paik, Doojin; Hong, Moon-Hi

    2010-12-01

    This study examined the surface oxidation of high-strength steels electrodeposited with Cu or Fe and the resultant defect formation in their coating during the following galvanizing and galvannealing processes. The high-strength steels were coated with an Cu or Fe layer by the electroplating method. Then, the coated steels were annealed in a reducing atmosphere, dipped in a molten zinc, and finally transformed into galvannealed steels through the galvannealing process. The formation of Si and Mn oxides on the surface of the high-strength steel was effectively suppressed, and the density of surface defects on the galvanized steel was significantly reduced by the pre-electrodeposition of Cu and Fe. This effect was more prominent for the steels electrodeposited at higher cathodic current densities. The finer electrodeposit layer formed at higher cathodic current density on the steels enabled the suppression of partial surface oxidation by Mn or Si and better wetting of Zn on the surface of the steels in the following galvanizing process. Furthermore, the pre-electrodeposited steels exhibited a smoother surface without surface cracks after the galvannealing process compared with the untreated steel. The diffusion of Fe and Zn in the Zn coating layer in the pre-electrodeposited steels appears to occur more uniformly during the galvannealing process due to the low density of surface defects induced by oxides.

  17. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chornet, E.

    1973-01-01

    Embrittlement, or the enhancement of crack growth by gaseous hydrogen in high strength alloys, is of primary interest in selecting alloys for various components in the space shuttle. Embrittlement is known to occur at hydrogen gas pressures ranging from fractions to several hundred atmospheres, and is most severe in the case of martensitic high strength steels. Kinetic information on subcritical crack growth in gaseous hydrogen is sparse at this time. Corroborative information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion is inadequate to permit a clear determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism in hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Therefore, coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth, and adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen, using identical materials, have been initiated. Comparable conditions of temperature and pressure will be used in the chemical and mechanical experiments. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel have been selected for these studies. Results from these studies are expected to provide not only a better understanding of the gaseous hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon itself, but also fundamental information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and crack growth information that can be used directly for design.

  18. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng

    2013-12-01

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully.

  19. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of TiC/Ti(CN)/TiN multilayer CVD coatings on high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Xue, Qi; Li, Songxia

    2013-09-01

    Titanium carbide/titanium carbonitride/titanium nitride (TiC/Ti(CN)/TiN) multilayer coatings are prepared on the surface of three high-strength steels (35CrMo, 42CrMo, and 40CrNiMo) by chemical vapor deposition method. The fracture morphology, elemental distribution, phase composition, micro-hardness, and adhesion of the multilayer film are analyzed. The hydrogen sulfide stress corrosion resistance of the coating is evaluated by the National Association of Corrosion Engineers saturated hydrogen sulfide solution immersion test. A test simulating the environment of the natural gas wells with high temperature and pressure in Luojiazhai in Sichuan is also performed. The results show that the multilayer coatings have dense structures, ∼11 μm thickness, 24.5 ± 2.0 GPa nano-hardness, and ∼70 N adhesion. The corrosion sample also shows no brittle failure induced by stress corrosion after treatment with the coating. Gravimetric analysis shows that the deposition of TiC/Ti(CN)/TiN multilayer coatings results in a corrosion rate reduction of at least 50 times compared with the high-strength steel substrate. A preliminary analysis on this phenomenon is conducted.

  20. A New Approach to Heat Treatment of High-Strength Powder Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidulský, R.; Bidulská, J.; Grande, M. Actis

    2017-03-01

    Wear (pin-on-disk) tests of low-alloy powder steels (with 0.5 and 0.65% C) are performed after vacuum sintering combined with hardening. The studied alloying systems are 0.65% C + 1.5% Cr + 0.2% Mo, 0.65% C + 0.9% Ni + 0.9% Mo + 0.2% Mn and 0.5% C + 4% Ni + 1.5% Cu + 0.5% Mo. The wear resistance of the steels after the hardening sintering is an order of magnitude higher than after the conventional sintering. The wear resistance of the steels increases in the following order: pearlitic, pearlitic-bainitic, and martensitic structures. Accordingly, the hardness grows from 98 to 105 HRB.

  1. Heterogeneous multi-layered IF steel with simultaneous high strength and good ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Jiang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yuhui; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Yonghong; Huang, Tianlin; Wu, Guilin

    2017-07-01

    Multi-layered IF steel samples were designed and fabricated by hot compression followed by cold forging of an alternating stack of cold-rolled and annealed IF steel sheets, with an aim to improve the strength of the material without losing much ductility. A very good combination of strength and ductility was achieved by proper annealing after deformation. Microstructural analysis by electron back-scatter diffraction revealed that the good combination of strength and ductility is related to a characteristic hierarchical structure that is characterized by layered and lamella structures with different length scales.

  2. The question of increasing the contact life of high-strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zarotskii, G.I.; Katsov, K.B.; Khrunik, R.A.; Kokotailo, I.V.

    1986-01-01

    Comparative investigations were made of the contact life of 00N18KM5T and 00N14Kh5M3T maraging steels and 38KhN3MFA dispersion-hardened steel with different variations of melting and heat and chemicothermal treatment. The contact life investigations were made in the 450-2000-MPa range of stresses with a degree of slippage of 5%. It was established that regardless of the chemical composition and heat treatment, nitriding by ionized nitrogen in the plasma of a glow discharge provides the greatest increase in specimen contact life (210-245%).

  3. High strength bonding of titanium to stainless steel using an Ag interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung G.; Hong, S. J.; Lee, M. K.; Rhee, C. K.

    2009-12-01

    Strong bonding between titanium (Ti) and stainless steel (STS) was achieved by employing a commercially available Ag-28Cu (wt.%) filler, and more importantly with a help of an Ag interlayer. A mass transport of the Ti elements from the substrate into the molten filler was completely prevented through the use of the Ag interlayer, so the resultant brazed joint was free from any brittle Ti-based intermetallic compounds. Notably, this Ti-STS dissimilar joint displayed a remarkable improvement in its bonding strength, demonstrating the potential application of an Ag interlayer for joining Ti and its alloys to various structural steels.

  4. On the impact bending test technique for high-strength pipe steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenkin, A. M.; Odesskii, P. D.; Shabalov, I. P.; Likhachev, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    It is shown that the impact toughness (KCV-40 = 250 J/cm2) accepted for pipe steels of strength class K65 (σy ≥ 550 MPa) intended for large-diameter gas line pipes is ineffective to classify steels in fracture strength. The results obtained upon testing of specimens with a fatigue crack and additional sharp lateral grooves seem to be more effective. In energy consumption, a macrorelief with splits is found to be intermediate between ductile fracture and crystalline brittle fracture. A split formation mechanism is considered and a scheme is proposed for split formation.

  5. Microstructure, properties, and age hardening behavior of a thermomechanically processed ultralow-carbon Cu-bearing high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Mishra, B.; Das, S.; Chatterjee, S.

    2005-03-01

    An ultralow-carbon steel alloyed with Ni, Mn, Mo, and Cu and microalloyed with Nb and Ti was subjected to a three-stage controlled rolling operation followed by water quenching. The effect of thermomechanical processing on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and age-hardening behavior of the steel was evaluated. The precipitation behavior of Cu at different aging temperatures was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The high strength values obtained in the present steel are due to the fine-lath martensite structure along with tiny precipitates of microalloying carbide and carbonitride of Ti and Nb at all finish rolling temperatures (FRTs). The increased strength value at the lower FRT is due to the finer lath width and packet size of martensite. The large TiN particles and the coarse martensite-austenite (MA) constituents impaired the impact-toughness value of the steel at subambient temperature. On aging at different temperatures, a wide variation in structure and properties has been obtained. At low aging temperatures, coherent Cu particles form and a peak strength is obtained due to the formation of fine ɛ-Cu precipitates. On increasing aging temperatures, the Cu particle size increases, with a simultaneous decrease in dislocation density in the matrix resulting in a continuous decrease in strength.

  6. Inhibition of Crack Propagation of High Strength Steels through Single and Multifunctional Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    the borax - nitrite and polyphosphate (Calgon)-chromate systems. Results from crack growth measurements on D6AC steel in distilled water followed by the...COMBINATIONS Polyphosphate-Chromate Polyphosphate-Ferrocyanide Borax -Nitrite Fluoride-Chromate Benzoate-Nitrite Silicate-Chromate FILM FORMERS Emnulsified or

  7. Influence of Oxides on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Steel Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yangchuan; Luo, Zhen; Huang, Zunyue; Zeng, Yida

    2016-11-01

    A comprehensive investigation was conducted into the effect of oxides on penetrations, microstructures and mechanical properties of BS700MC super steel weld bead. Boron oxide changed the penetration of weld bead by changing the Marangoni convection in the weld pool and contracting the welding arc. Chromium oxide only changed the Marangoni convection in the weld pool to increase the penetration of super steel. Thus, the super steel weld bead has higher penetration coated with flux boron oxide than that coated with chromium oxide. In other words, the activating flux TIG (A-TIG) welding with flux boron oxide has less welding heat input than the A-TIG welding with flux chromium oxide. As a result, on the one hand, there existed more fine and homogeneous acicular ferrites in the microstructure of welding heat-affected zone when the super steel was welded by A-TIG with flux boron oxide. Thus, the weld beads have higher value of low-temperature impact toughness. On the other hand, the softening degree of welding heat-affected zone, welded by A-TIG with flux boron oxide, will be decreased for the minimum value of welding heat input.

  8. Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking of Modern Ultra-High Strength Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioszak, Greger L.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    2017-07-01

    Martensitic steels (Aermet®100, Ferrium®M54™, Ferrium®S53®, and experimental CrNiMoWV at ultra-high yield strength of 1550 to 1725 MPa) similarly resist hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC) in aqueous NaCl. Cracking is transgranular, ascribed to increased steel purity and rare earth addition compared to intergranular HEAC in highly susceptible 300M. Nano-scale precipitates ((Mo,Cr)2C and (W,V)C) reduce H diffusivity and the K-independent Stage II growth rate by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude compared to 300M. However, threshold K TH is similarly low (8 to 15 MPa√m) for each steel at highly cathodic and open circuit potentials. Transgranular HEAC likely occurs along martensite packet and {110}α'-block interfaces, speculatively governed by localized plasticity and H decohesion. Martensitic transformation produces coincident site lattice interfaces; however, a connected random boundary network persists in 3D to negate interface engineering. The modern steels are near-immune to HEAC when mildly cathodically polarized, attributed to minimal crack tip H production and uptake. Neither reduced Co and Ni in M54 and CrNiMoWV nor increased Cr in S53 broadly degrade HEAC resistance compared to baseline AM100. The latter suggests that crack passivity dominates acidification to widen the polarization window for HEAC resistance. Decohesion models predict the applied potential dependencies of K TH and da/dt II with a single-adjustable parameter, affirming the importance of steel purity and trap sensitive H diffusivity.

  9. Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking of Modern Ultra-High Strength Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioszak, Greger L.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    2017-09-01

    Martensitic steels (Aermet®100, Ferrium®M54™, Ferrium®S53®, and experimental CrNiMoWV at ultra-high yield strength of 1550 to 1725 MPa) similarly resist hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC) in aqueous NaCl. Cracking is transgranular, ascribed to increased steel purity and rare earth addition compared to intergranular HEAC in highly susceptible 300M. Nano-scale precipitates ((Mo,Cr)2C and (W,V)C) reduce H diffusivity and the K-independent Stage II growth rate by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude compared to 300M. However, threshold K TH is similarly low (8 to 15 MPa√m) for each steel at highly cathodic and open circuit potentials. Transgranular HEAC likely occurs along martensite packet and {110}α'-block interfaces, speculatively governed by localized plasticity and H decohesion. Martensitic transformation produces coincident site lattice interfaces; however, a connected random boundary network persists in 3D to negate interface engineering. The modern steels are near-immune to HEAC when mildly cathodically polarized, attributed to minimal crack tip H production and uptake. Neither reduced Co and Ni in M54 and CrNiMoWV nor increased Cr in S53 broadly degrade HEAC resistance compared to baseline AM100. The latter suggests that crack passivity dominates acidification to widen the polarization window for HEAC resistance. Decohesion models predict the applied potential dependencies of K TH and d a/d t II with a single-adjustable parameter, affirming the importance of steel purity and trap sensitive H diffusivity.

  10. Influence of cooling rate and boron content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of hot-rolled high strength interstitial-free steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. I.; Lee, Y.

    2012-10-01

    A pilot hot strip rolling and cooling test that simulates an actual hot strip rolling and continuous cooling process was performed. We then examined the effect of cooling rates ranging from 0.1 °Cs-1 to 100 °Cs-1 on the microstructure and mechanical properties of high strength interstitial-free (IF) steels containing 0.003 wt% of boron, 0.0005 wt% of boron and no boron. The mechanical properties and microstructures of the boron-added high strength IF steels were analyzed using uni-axial tensile test and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) following the pilot hot strip rolling and cooling test. Results show that the microstructure of high strength IF steel with no boron is influenced significantly by cooling rates. There is a critical cooling rate for building up polygonal ferrite (PF) grains. PF grains do not occur when high strength IF steels with a boron content of 0.0005 wt% and 0.003 wt% undergo a cooling rate of 5.0 °Cs-1, however widmanstätten ferrite (WF), granular ferrite (GF) and quasi-polygonal ferrite (QF) grains are present. Under the same hot rolling and slow cooling conditions, high strength IF steel with no boron has recrystallized PF grains. On the contrary, high strength IF steel with boron cooled at above 3 °Cs-1 doesn't have GF or QF grains, and subsequently generates the unrecrystallized ferritic grains and WF grains, which increase the yield and tensile strengths. It is deduced that we need to control both the cooling rate and coiling temperature when boron-added high strength IF steel sheet is manufactured in an actual hot strip rolling mill.

  11. Laser Beam Welding of Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. Strengths of up to 2 GPa at fracture elongations of 15% can be attained through this. Welding of these materials, as a result, became a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply efficient heat control. For two application cases, tailored blank production in as-rolled condition and welding during assembly in hot stamped condition, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown through metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KS-II concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method.

  12. Strength Recovery in a High-Strength Steel During Multiple Weld Thermal Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xinghua; Caron, Jeremy L.; Babu, S. S.; Lippold, John C.; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.

    2011-12-01

    BlastAlloy 160 (BA160) is a low-carbon martensitic steel strengthened by copper and M2C precipitates. Heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructure evaluation of BA160 exhibited softening in samples subjected to the coarse-grained HAZ thermal simulations of this steel. This softening is partially attributed to dissolution of copper precipitates and metal carbides. After subjecting these coarse-grained HAZs to a second weld thermal cycle below the A c1 temperature (at which austenite begins to form on heating), recovery of strength was observed. Atom-probe tomography and microhardness analyses correlated this strength recovery to re-precipitation of copper precipitates and metal carbides. A continuum model is proposed to rationalize strengthening and softening in the HAZ regions of BlastAlloy 160.

  13. Method for the preparation of high-strength fine wire of high-carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, Shuji; Izumisano-shi; Osaka-fu; Nishiura, Yoshitaka.

    1993-06-22

    In a method for the manufacture of a fine high-carbon steel wire having a diameter not exceeding 50[mu]m by repeating a plural number of cycles each consisting of a cold die-drawing treatment and a patenting treatment of a steel wire ending in a final cold die-drawing to successively reduce the diameter of the wire in each cold die-drawing, the improvement is described which comprises heating the wire having a diameter reduced to 100 to 500 [mu]m, prior to the final cold die-drawing treatment, in an atmosphere of a gaseous mixture consisting of from 90 to 98% by volume of nitrogen and from 10 to 2% by volume of hydrogen at a temperature in the range from 750 to 900 C for a length of time in the range from 1 to 30 seconds.

  14. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Cadmium-Plated Ultra-High Strength Steels in Paint Strippers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    steady - state) I3 Cadmium 5 9 10 11pH1 FIG. 6 POURBAIX DIAGRAM FOR STEEL AND CADMIUM IN PAINT STRIPPERS. Fa 0.3 CE 0.2 I uu01 AO OD CO cca B -0.1...K. Reddy, Modern Electrochemistry, p. 1233, Plenum Press, New York, 1970. 7. M. Pourbaix , Corrosion Science, 1972, 12, 161. 8. R. Driver and R. J

  15. Study of Residual Stresses and Distortion in Structural Weldments in High-Strength Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-30

    extended to include any similar nucleation and growth transformation, such as the ferritic one. As far as the martensite transformation is concerned...provides the typical chemical composition ranges for Ni-Al bronze. A comparison of the mechanical and physical properties of cold rolled Ni-Al bronze...hot rolled AISI-SAE-1035 steel, and cold rolled - copper is shown in Table 4.2 for reference purposes. TABLE 4.1 CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF Ni-Al BRONZE

  16. Electroactive Polymers as Environmentally Benign Coating Replacements for Cadmium Plating on High Strength Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-11

    and refining of zinc, lead, copper ores, electroplating , welding, manufacture of pigments, plastic stabilizers and nickel-cadmium batteries has...Specialty Metals), Aermet7 100, E4340, M50, 300M, PH 13-8Mo stainless steel, and maraging Grades 200 – 250. The most common method of electroplating ...aluminum Air Force Coating tends to gall Tin/Zinc electroplating Air Force Difficult to control process Zinc/nickel electroplating Army Nickel is an EPA

  17. Electroactive Polymers as Environmentally Benign Coating Replacements for Cadmium Plating on High Strength Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    and refining of zinc, lead, copper ores, electroplating , welding, manufacture of pigments, plastic stabilizers and nickel-cadmium batteries has... electroplated from aqueous 0.3M KNO3 Figure 44. Neutral Salt Fog Results of Polypyrrole p. 45 electroplated from aqueous 0.1M Oxalic Acid Figure 45...Neutral Salt Fog Results of Polypyrrole p. 46 electroplated onto “pickled” Steel from aqueous 0.3M KNO3 Solutions Figure 46. Polypyrrole

  18. Microstructural Evolution during the Dynamic Deformation of High Strength Navy Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-19

    reveal reverse contrast images as expected. Thus, the presence of equiaxed austenite grains in the shear band suggests that the martensite ...The transformation is thought to be austenite to martensite , due to quenching by the surrounding colder steel although all evidence to date is indirect...transformed to austenite during the shearing process. It is interesting to note that the austenite did not revert back to martensite upon cooling although this

  19. Tendency of high-strength bolt steel toward corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Shlyafirner, A.M.; Sotskov, N.I.; Panfilova, L.M.; Podol'skaya, E.P.

    1987-11-01

    The authors assess the following chromium alloys and steels--40KhSMTAR, 40Kh2NMFTAR, 40KhSNMFTAR, 40Kh2SNMFTAR, 30Kh3MAFTs, 30KhMAFE, 30Kh2NMAF, 20Kh2SNMFTAR, 20Kh2NMFTAR, and 20KhSMTAR--under a variety of different alloying conditions and materials for corrosion fatigue, crack propagation, and hydrogen embrittlement and the dependence of these characteristics on metallurgical composition and content.

  20. P/M Processing of Rare Earth Modified High Strength Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    residual oxygen in the vacuum induction melting atmosphere and were not dispersed by extensive hot working of the steel ingots . The concentration of the...in the microstructure, as well as the degree of chemical segregation and the presence of impurities. 4 $ Material Processing Study Powder Production... segregation in the powder . This process allows the addition of greater quantities of alloying elements without the accompanying segregation effects

  1. Micromechanisms of Fracture and Crack Arrest in Two High Strength Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    stress corrosion cracking susceptibility were conducted on materials after plastic strain levels of 1, 3, and 5% were achieved in tensile blanks...impact toughness, fracture toughness, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking and weldability of ASTM A710 Grade A Class 3 steel plate in thicknesses...Caustics Measurements 6. Crack Velocity as a Function of the Instantaneous Stress Intensity Factor for HOMALITE-100 7. Crack Arrest Toughness Plotted as

  2. Research on High-Strength Steels with an Improved Resistance against Weld Cracking.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    sticks are crayons which melt at a predetermined temperature, and can be applied to a piece of steel in order to monitor its temperature as it is...them from getting too close to those areas which might be melted by the actual welding process. As described previously temperature indicating crayons ...pure sample of metal will melt and solidify at a single temperature for any uniform set of testing conditions. When alloying elements are added to the

  3. Austenitic stainless steels and high strength copper alloys for fusion components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowcliffe, A. F.; Zinkle, S. J.; Stubbins, J. F.; Edwards, D. J.; Alexander, D. J.

    1998-10-01

    An austenitic stainless steel (316LN), an oxide-dispersion-strengthened copper alloy (GlidCop Al25), and a precipitation-hardened copper alloy (Cu-Cr-Zr) are the primary structural materials for the ITER first wall/blanket and divertor systems. While there is a long experience of operating 316LN stainless steel in nuclear environments, there is no prior experience with the copper alloys in neutron environments. The ITER first wall (FW) consists of a stainless steel shield with a copper alloy heat sink bonded by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The introduction of bi-layer structural material represents a new materials engineering challenge; the behavior of the bi-layer is determined by the properties of the individual components and by the nature of the bond interface. The development of the radiation damage microstructure in both classes of materials is summarized and the effects of radiation on deformation and fracture behavior are considered. The initial data on the mechanical testing of bi-layers indicate that the effectiveness of GlidCop Al25 as a FW heat sink material is compromised by its strongly anisotropic fracture toughness and poor resistance to crack growth in a direction parallel to the bi-layer interface.

  4. Formation Energies and Electronic Properties of Vanadium Carbides Found in High Strength Steel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, Krista; Medvedeva, Julia

    2013-03-01

    Carbide formation and stabilization in steels is of great interest owing to its effect on the microstructure and properties of the Fe-based alloys. The appearance of carbides with different metal/C ratios strongly depends on the carbon concentration, alloy composition as well as the heat treatment. Strong carbide-forming elements such as Ti, V, and Nb have been used in microalloyed steels; with VC showing an increased solubility in the iron matrix as compared with TiC and NbC. This allows for dissolution of the VC into the steel during heating and fine precipitation during cooling. In addition to VC, the primary vanadium carbide with cubic structure, a wide range of non-stoichiometric compositions VCy with y varying from 0.72 to 0.88, has been observed. This range includes two ordered compounds, V8C7 and V6C5. In this study, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) is employed to examine the stability of the binary carbides by calculating their formation energies. We compare the local structures (atomic coordination, bond distances and angles) and the density of states in optimized geometries of the carbides. Further, the effect of alloying additions, such as niobium and titanium, on the carbide stabilization is investigated. We determine the energetically preferable substitutional atom location in each carbide and study the impurity distribution as well as its role in the carbide formation energy and electronic structure.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Laser Beam Welded Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. A strength of up to 2 GPa at a fracture strain of 15% can be attained. Welding of these materials became apparently a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply an efficient heat control. For two application cases, production of tailored blanks in as-rolled condition and welding in assembly in hot stamped conditions, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown in metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KSII concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method. For the case of assembly also joining with deep drawing and manganese boron steel was taken into consideration. The strength of the joint is determined by the weaker partner but can benefit from its ductility.

  6. A New Method to Calculate Threshold Values of Ductile Fracture Criteria for Advanced High-Strength Sheet Blanking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changsheng; Chen, Jun; Xia, Cedric; Ren, Feng; Chen, Jieshi

    2014-04-01

    A new approach is presented in this paper to calculate the critical threshold value of fracture initiation. It is based on the experimental data for forming limit curves and fracture forming limit curves. The deformation path for finally a fractured material point is assumed as two-stage proportional loading: biaxial loading from the beginning to the onset of incipient necking, followed plane strain deformation within the incipient neck until the final fracture. The fracture threshold value is determined by analytical integration and validated by numerical simulation. Four phenomenological models for ductile fracture are selected in this study, i.e., Brozzo, McClintock, Rice-Tracey, and Oyane models. The threshold value for each model is obtained through best-fitting of experimental data. The results are compared with each other and test data. These fracture criteria are implemented in ABAQUS/EXPLICIT through user subroutine VUMAT to simulate the blanking process of advanced high-strength steels. The simulated fracture surfaces are examined to determine the initiation of ductile fracture during the process, and compared with experimental results for DP780 sheet steel blanking. The comparisons between FE simulated results coupled with different fracture models and experimental one show good agreements on punching edge quality. The study demonstrates that the proposed approach to calculate threshold values of fracture models is efficient and reliable. The results also suggest that the McClintock and Oyane fracture models are more accurate than the Rice-Tracey or Brozzo models in predicting load-stroke curves. However, the predicted blanking edge quality does not have appreciable differences.

  7. The influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Qiang; Zou, Yan; Kong, Xiangfeng; Gao, Yang; Dong, Sheng; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The high strength low-alloy steels are welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes. The micro-structural and electrochemical corrosion study of base metal (BM), weld zone (WZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) are carried out to understand the influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes, methods used including, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicate that the WZ acts as a cathode and there is no corrosion product on it throughout the immersion period in seawater. The HAZ and BM acts as anodes. The corrosion rates of the HAZ and BM change with the immersion time increasing. In the initial immersion period, the HAZ has the highest corrosion rate because it has a coarse tempered martensite structure and the BM exhibites a microstructure with very fine grains of ferrite and pearlite. After a period of immersion, the BM has the highest corrosion rate. The reason is that the corrosion product layer on the HAZ is dense and has a better protective property while that on the BM is loose and can not inhibit the diffusion of oxygen.

  8. Light weight and high strength materials made of recycled steel and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nounezi, Thomas

    Recycling has proven not only to address today's economical, environmental and social issues, but also to be imperative for the sustainability of human technology. The current thesis has investigated the feasibility of a new philosophy for Recycling (Alloying-Recycling) using steel 1020 and aluminum 6061T6. The study was limited to the metallurgical aspects only and has highlighted the potential of recycled alloys made of recycled aluminum and steel to exhibit substantially increased wear resistance and strength-to-weight ratio as compared to initial primary materials. Three alloy-mixtures are considered: TN3 (5wt% 1020 +95wt% 6061T6); TN5 (0.7wt% 1020 + 99.3wt% 6061T6); and TN4 (10wt% 6061T6 + 90wt% 1020). A Tucker induction power supply system (3kW; 135-400 kHz) is used to melt the alloy mixtures for casting in graphite crucibles. Heat treatment of the cast samples is done using a radiation box furnace. Microscopy, Vickers hardness and pin-on-disc abrasive wear tests are performed. Casting destroyed the initial microstructures of the alloys leading to a hardness reduction in the as-cast and solution heat-treated aluminum rich samples to 60 Hv from 140 Hv. Ageing slightly increased the hardness of the cast samples and provided a wear resistance two times higher than that of the initial 6061T6 material. On the steel rich side, the hardness of the as-cast TN4 was 480 Hv, which is more than twice as high as the initial hardness of steel 1020 of 202 Hv; this hints to strong internal and residual stress, probably martensite formation during fast cooling following casting. Solution heat treatment lowered the hardness to the original value of steel 1020, but provided about ten (10) times higher wear resistance; this suggests higher ductility and toughness of normalised TN4 as compared to 1020. In addition, TN4 exhibits about 25% weight reduction as compared to 1020. The actual recycling process and the effect of non-metallic impurities shall be investigated in future

  9. Nanoscale Analyses of High-Nickel Concentration Martensitic High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isheim, Dieter; Hunter, Allen H.; Zhang, Xian J.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-07-01

    Austenite reversion in martensitic steels is known to improve fracture toughness. This research focuses on characterizing mechanical properties and the microstructure of low-carbon, high-nickel steels containing 4.5 and 10 wt pct Ni after a QLT-type austenite reversion heat treatment: first, martensite is formed by quenching ( Q) from a temperature in the single-phase austenite field, then austenite is precipitated by annealing in the upper part of the intercritical region in a lamellarization step ( L), followed by a tempering ( T) step at lower temperatures. For the 10 wt pct Ni steel, the tensile strength after the QLT heat treatment is 910 MPa (132 ksi) at 293 K (20 °C), and the Charpy V-notch impact toughness is 144 J (106 ft-lb) at 188.8 K (-84.4 °C, -120 °F). For the 4.5 wt pct Ni steel, the tensile strength is 731 MPa (106 ksi) at 293 K (20 °C) and the impact toughness is 209 J (154 ft-lb) at 188.8 K (-84.4 °C, -120 °F). Light optical microscopy, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopies, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, and local-electrode atom-probe tomography (APT) are utilized to determine the morphologies, volume fractions, and local chemical compositions of the precipitated phases with sub-nanometer spatial resolution. The austenite lamellae are up to 200 nm in thickness, and up to several micrometers in length. In addition to the expected partitioning of Ni to austenite, APT reveals a substantial segregation of Ni at the austenite/martensite interface with concentration maxima of 10 and 23 wt pct Ni for the austenite lamellae in the 4.5 and 10 wt pct Ni steels, respectively. Copper-rich and M2C-type metal carbide precipitates were detected both at the austenite/martensite interface and within the bulk of the austenite lamellae. Thermodynamic phase stability, equilibrium compositions, and volume fractions are discussed in the context of Thermo-Calc calculations.

  10. Advanced steel reheat furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Moyeda, D.; Sheldon, M.; Koppang, R.; Lanyi, M.; Li, X.; Eleazer, B.

    1997-10-01

    Energy and Environmental Research Corp. (EER) under a contract from the Department of Energy is pursuing the development and demonstration of an Advanced Steel Reheating Furnace. This paper reports the results of Phase 1, Research, which has evaluated an advanced furnace concept incorporating two proven and commercialized technologies previously applied to other high temperature combustion applications: EER`s gas reburn technology (GR) for post combustion NOx control; and Air Product`s oxy-fuel enrichment air (OEA) for improved flame heat transfer in the heating zones of the furnace. The combined technologies feature greater production throughput with associated furnace efficiency improvements; lowered NOx emissions; and better control over the furnace atmosphere, whether oxidizing or reducing, leading to better control over surface finish.

  11. Ultrasonic Spot Welding of Aluminum to High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel: Microstructure, Tensile and Fatigue Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, V. K.; Bhole, S. D.; Chen, D. L.

    2014-04-01

    The structural applications of lightweight aluminum alloys inevitably involve dissimilar welding with steels and the related durability issues. This study was aimed at evaluating the microstructural change, lap shear tensile load, and fatigue resistance of dissimilar ultrasonic spot-welded joints of aluminum-to-galvanized high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel. Two non-uniform layers were identified in between Al and HSLA steel via SEM/EDS and XRD. One was an Al-Zn eutectic layer and the other was a thin (<2 μm) layer of intermetallic compound (IMC) of Al and Fe in the nugget zone. The lap shear tensile testing gave a maximum load of 3.7 kN and the sample failed initially in between the Al-Zn eutectic film and Al-Fe IMC, and afterward from the region containing Al on both matching fracture surfaces. The fatigue test results showed a fatigue limit of about 0.5 kN (at 1 × 107 cycles). The maximum cyclic stress at which transition of the fatigue fracture from transverse through-thickness crack growth mode to the interfacial failure mode occurs increases with increasing energy input.

  12. Effect of vanadium on the precipitation strengthening upon tempering of a high-strength pipe steel with different initial structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, O. V.; Kruglova, A. A.; Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Tabatchikova, T. I.; Yakovleva, I. L.

    2016-12-01

    Methods of metallography, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopies were used to study the structure of two pipe steels (without vanadium and with 0.03% vanadium) subjected to γ → α isothermal transformation at temperatures of 400-600°C (initial structure) and tempering at 600-650°C. It has been found that the addition of 0.03% vanadium intensifies the process of the precipitation of ferrite and contributes to the formation of a granular structure. It has been shown that, in high-strength pipe steels with 0.03% vanadium, which have bainitic granular-type structures, the effect of the precipitation strengthening is effected upon subsequent high-temperature tempering at 600-630°; the addition of vanadium leads to an increase in the hardness by 16 HV. In the presence of bainite of the lath type in the initial structure, the subsequent tempering leads to a softening associated with the processes of the recovery, polygonization, and initial stages of recrystallization in situ, which develops at temperatures above 640°C. It has been found that the hardness of the steel without vanadium upon additional tempering decreases regardless of the morphology of structural constituents in the initial structure.

  13. Factors Affecting the Inclusion Potency for Acicular Ferrite Nucleation in High-Strength Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Kang, Joo-Hee; Lee, Changhee

    2016-06-01

    Factors affecting the inclusion potency for acicular ferrite nucleation in high-strength weld metals were investigated and the contribution of each factor was qualitatively evaluated. Two kinds of weld metals with different hardenabilities were prepared, in both, MnTi2O4-rich spinel formed as the predominant inclusion phase. To evaluate the factors determining the inclusion potency, the inclusion characteristics of size, phase distribution in the multiphase inclusion, orientation relationship with ferrite, and Mn distribution near the inclusion were analyzed. Three factors affecting the ferrite nucleation potency of inclusions were evaluated: the Baker-Nutting (B-N) orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion; the formation of an Mn-depleted zone (MDZ) near the inclusion; and the strain energy around the inclusion. Among these, the first two factors were found to be the most important. In addition, it was concluded that the increased chemical driving force brought about by the formation of an MDZ contributed more to the formation of acicular ferrite in higher-strength weld metals, because the B-N orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion was less likely to form as the transformation temperature decreased.

  14. Evaluation of low hydrogen welding processes for pipeline construction in high strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Howse, D S; Jones, R L

    1996-08-01

    Low hydrogen manual welding processes, suitable for pipeline girth welding, have been available for some time for the lower strength pipe grades, and latterly, for high strength pipelines (up to and including X80). Despite their availability and advantages in terms of reduced crack susceptibility, they have been rarely used in production up to the present time. Basic coated shielded metal arc (SMA) electrodes, suitable for vertical-down welding, are produced by some manufacturers at the strength level required for both the root welding and filling of pipeline girth welds. Self-shielded flux-cored wires (SSFCA) are also available for both root and fill welding, and in addition to the low hydrogen levels, these have the advantage of increased productivity. Both of these processes require different methods of deposition compared to welding using cellulosic electrodes, which necessitates specialized training of welders. It is thought that this, along with doubts concerning the reliability and speed of the processes in site conditions, has made contractors reluctant to adopt them. Furthermore, there was a dearth of independently produced information on the welding production performance of low hydrogen processes. Therefore, the primary aim of the present work was to generate data to enable users to make an informed judgment regarding the practical application of low hydrogen processes. Furthermore, it was intended to develop improved root welding procedures, which had been recognized as being significant process limitation. The conclusions and recommendations from this work are discussed.

  15. The fabrication and characterization of high strength copper/stainless steel conductors for pulsed magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Van Cleemput, M.; Jones, H.; Burgt, M. van der; Eyssa, Y.M.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.

    1996-07-01

    Calculations have indicated that the simple macro composite conductor that comprises copper with a stainless steel sheath may be the best to use in high field pulsed magnets >50 T. The recently commissioned wire fabrication facility of the Clarendon Laboratory can finish this type of conductors to the required size and cold work, after industrial preprocessing. The conductors have strengths in excess of 1.2 GPa. In this paper the authors describe the facility and the mechanical and electrical characterization of the wires. They also report on their measurements of the temperature distribution in a macro composite wire during and after a typical pulse.

  16. Low cycle notched fatigue behavior and life predictions of A723 high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Troiano, E.; Underwood, J.H.; Crayon, D.

    1995-12-31

    Two types of ASTM A723 steels have been investigated for their low cycle fatigue behavior. Specimens were tested in four-point bending, both with and without notches, and the measured fatigue lives were compared with those predicted by Neubers notch analysis, and standard fracture mechanics life prediction techniques. Comparison of measured and predicted lives indicate that the elastic/plastic Neuber analysis under predicts the measured fatigue life by as much as 67% at large strains, and becomes a better predictor of life as the applied strains decrease. The elastic Neubers analysis also under predicts the measured fatigue lives by 45% at large applied strains, but seems to accurately predict lives at reversals to failure greater than 100. The fracture mechanics approach assumes elastic stresses at the crack tip, and predicts lives within 30% over the full range of strains investigated. The results show that the Neuber notch analysis is not as good an indicator of the low cycle fatigue behavior of A723 steels as is the fracture mechanics life prediction techniques. As the life cycles to failure decreases, the Neubers analysis predicts lives that are two to three times more conservative than those experimentally measured.

  17. Advanced oxidation treatment of high strength bilge and aqueous petroleum waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hulsey, R.A.; Kobylinski, E.A.; Leach, B.; Pearce, L.

    1996-11-01

    The Craney Island Fuel Depot is the largest US Navy fuel terminal in the continental US. Services provided at this facility include fuel storage (current capacity is 1.5 million barrels), fuel reclamation (recovery of oil from oily wastewater), and physical/chemical treatment for the removal of residual oil from bilge water and from aqueous petroleum waste. Current wastewater treatment consists of storage/equalization, oil/water separation, dissolved air flotation, sand filtration, and carbon adsorption. The Navy initiated this study to comply with the State requirement that its existing physical/chemical oily wastewater treatment plant be upgraded to remove soluble organics and produce an effluent which would meet acute toxicity limits. The pilot tests conducted during the study included several variations of chemical and biological wastewater treatment processes. While biological treatment alone was capable of meeting the proposed BOD limit of 26 mg/L, the study showed that the effluent of the biological process contained a high concentration of refractory (nonbiodegradable) organics and could not consistently meet the proposed limits for COD and TOC when treating high-strength wastewater. Additional tests were conducted with advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). AOPs were evaluated for use as independent treatment processes as well as polishing processes following biological treatment. The AOP processes used for this study included combinations of ozone (O{sub 3}) ultraviolet radiation (UV), and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}).

  18. Orthotropic damage in high-strength steel sheets. An elasto-viscoplastic material model with mixed hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omerspahic, E.; Mattiasson, K.

    2003-09-01

    Within the scope of thermodynamics with internal variables, constitutive and evolution equations (representing ductile deformation of sheets made of high strength steel alloys) with mixed hardening and damage have been derived. As a result of the derivation, the rate-dependent elastoplastic constitutive model is identified. The material is assumed to be oriented in the principal damage directions, indicating orthotropic damage. Owing to postulates within continuum damage mechanics, a general expression for degradation of elastic properties in materials has been obtained. A numerical algorithm for the integration of the constitutive equations has been developed as well, based on an elastic predictor plastic/damage corrector procedure. The plastic/damage corrector is based on a fully implicit backward Euler scheme. In order to consider viscoplastic material properties, the overstress (in the definition of the plastic multiplier) is a function of the plastic yield function.

  19. Fracture Prediction for High-strength Steel Sheet Subjected to Draw-bending Using Forming Limit Stress Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, C.; Hakoyama, T.; Kuwabara, T.; Fukiharu, H.

    2016-08-01

    A fracture criterion for sheet metals subjected to draw-bending is investigated using the concept of the forming limit stress criterion. The test material used is a 1.0-mm-thick high- strength steel sheet with a tensile strength of 590MPa. The specimen undergoes bendingunbending under tension when passing over the die profile. The drawing speed was set to 5-100 mm • s-1. The magnitude of true stress σDB when a specimen fractured has been precisely determined. Moreover, multiaxial tube expansion tests of the test material are performed to measure the forming limit stress σPT of the test material under plane-strain tension. It is found that σDB is larger than σPT by 2.8-6.3%. Therefore, it is concluded that the forming limit stress criterion is effective as a fracture criterion in draw-bending.

  20. GMA-laser Hybrid Welding of High-strength Fine-grain Structural Steel with an Inductive Preheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahdo, Rabi; Seffer, Oliver; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan; Overmeyer, Ludger

    The industrial useof GMA-laser hybrid welding has increased in the last 10 years, due to the brilliant quality of the laser beam radiation, and higher laser output powers. GMA-laser hybrid welding processes operate in a common molten pool. The combination of the laser beam and the arc results in improved welding speed, penetration depth, heat affected zone and gap bridgeability. Single-layer, GMA-laser hybrid welding processes have been developed for high-strength fine-grain structural steels with a grade of S690QL and a thickness of 15 mm and 20 mm. In addition, the welding process is assisted by an integrated, inductive preheating process to improve the mechanical properties of the welding seam. By using the determined parameters regarding the energy per unit length, and the preheating temperature, welding seams with high quality can be achieved.

  1. Hydrogen-induced cold cracking in heat-affected zone of low-carbon high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Liangyun; Kong, Xiangwei; Hu, Zhiyong; Qiu, Chunlin

    2014-12-01

    The Y-groove cracking test by submerged arc welding was employed to study the susceptibility of a low-carbon high-strength steel to hydrogen-induced cold cracking (HICC). The morphology of hydrogen cracks was observed using an electron probe microscope. The results showed that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) has a higher susceptibility to HICC than the weld metal and that increasing heat input can improve the HICC resistance of the weldment. The intergranular microcracking is the main HICC mode at the lowest heat input condition, accompanied with some transgranular microcracks attached to complex inclusions. In combination with phase transformation behaviour in sub-zones, the effect of the phase transformation sequence is proposed to try to illustrate the fact that the fine-grained HAZ has higher probability of hydrogen cracking than the coarse-grained HAZ owing to the occurrence of hydrogen enrichment in the fine-grained HAZ after the transformation.

  2. Austenite stabilization and high strength-elongation product of a low silicon aluminum-free hot-rolled directly quenched and dynamically partitioned steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Yun-Bo; Yang, Xiao-Long; Hu, Zhi-Ping; Peng, Fei; Ju, Xiao-Wei; Wu, Di

    2015-06-15

    Microstructures composed of lath martensite and retained austenite with volume fraction between 8.0 vol.% and 12.0 vol.% were obtained in a low-C low-Si Al-free steel through hot-rolling direct quenching and dynamical partitioning (HDQ&DP) processes. The austenite stabilization mechanism in the low-C low-Si Al-free steel under the special dynamical partitioning processes is investigated by analyzing the carbon partition behavior from martensite to austenite and the carbide precipitation-coarsening behavior in martensite laths combining with the possible hot rolling deformation inheritance. Results show that the satisfying retained austenite amount in currently studied low-Si Al-free HDQ&DP steel is caused by the high-efficiency carbon enrichment in the 30–80 nm thick regions of austenite near the interfaces in the hot-rolled ultra-fast cooled structure and the avoidance of serious carbides coarsening during the continuous cooling procedures. The excellent strength-elongation product reaching up to 26,000 MPa% shows that the involved HDQ&DP process is a promising method to develop a new generation of advanced high strength steel. - Highlights: • HDQ&DP processes were applied to a low-C low-Si Al-free steel. • Effective partitioning time during the continuous cooling processes is 1–220 s. • Retained austenite with volume fraction between 8.0 vol. % and 12.0 vol. % has been obtained. • The special austenite stabilization mechanism has been expounded.

  3. Fracture toughness evaluation of high-strength cold-drawn eutectoid steel wires used in wire ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourladian, Bamdad

    High carbon (eutectoid) steel wires are used in many modern engineering applications which require high strength and durability. The most demanding applications are those for wire ropes, tire reinforcements, engine valve springs, and structural strands used for long span cable stayed bridges. In this study, a test method based on Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) was used to evaluate fracture toughness, KC, for various grades of wire which were of 0.072″ nominal diameter. An extensive review of literature on mechanical behavior of wire ropes is presented. Also a very thorough review of technical literature on the applications of LEFM in high strength rods and wires is provided. Various stress intensity factor solutions (K-solutions) are evaluated and compared. The most applicable K-solutions for application in KC determination in circular rods and wires with semi-elliptical surface cracks are recommended. Plane-stress K-solutions for straight-edge surface cracks in 0.072″ diameter steel wire were also developed by a 3D FEA model. An experimental fracture toughness test procedure based on principles of LEFM is described in detail. Experimental tensile fracture data is presented for 285 pre-cracked fracture samples. SEM fractographs documenting fracture surface topography of various fracture modes are described and characterized. For each wire grade and condition an average value of KC was determined. Statistical treatment of data and 90% confidence intervals are also provided. Average KC values ranged from 52Ksiin to 60Ksiin for wires ranging in tensile strength from 289 Ksi to 336 Ksi. Delamination toughening phenomenon was observed in some wire fracture samples and documented. As high as 60% increase in KC value was observed for some delaminated wires. The effect of crack aspect ratio in semi-elliptical cracks was considered and found to be very significant.

  4. A Crystal Plasticity Approach for Shear Banding in Hot Rolled High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Matti; Laukkanen, Anssi; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    2017-08-01

    A crystal plasticity approach with a phenomenological shear banding mechanism incorporated in a conventional dislocation crystal plasticity model is presented. In the developed framework, the hardening and softening relations are considered both within and between the deformation mechanisms. The study aims to increase the understanding of the importance of hot rolling texture to the shear banding propensity in martensitic steels. In the single crystal simulations performed for selected common rolling textures, it was found that shear band activation and the magnitude of softening are dependent on the initial orientation of the crystal. In general, softening-related shear banding in single crystals was shown to be well reproduced by the model at high plastic strains and high strain rates.

  5. Precipitation of aluminum nitride in a high strength maraging steel with low nitrogen content

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanmaire, G.; Dehmas, M.; Redjaïmia, A.; Puech, S.; Fribourg, G.

    2014-12-15

    In the present work, aluminum nitride (AlN) precipitation was investigated in a X23NiCoCrMoAl13-6-3 maraging steel with low nitrogen content (wt.% N = 5.5 ppm). A reliable and robust automatic method by scanning electron microscopy observations coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was developed for the quantification of AlN precipitates. The first stage was to identify the solvus temperature and to develop a heat treatment able to dissolve the AlN precipitates. The experimental determination of equilibrium conditions and solvus temperature show good agreement with ThermoCalc® simulation. Then, from this AlN-free state, the cooling rate, isothermal holding time and temperature were the subject of an intensive investigation in the austenite region of this maraging steel. In spite of the high temperatures used during heat treatments, the growth kinetic of the largest AlN precipitates (> 1 μm) is slow. The cooling rate has a major effect on the size and the number density of AlN due to a higher driving force for nucleation at low temperatures. At last, quenching prior to isothermal annealing at high temperatures leads to fine and dense AlN precipitation, resulting from the martensite to austenite transformation. Experimental results will be discussed and compared with kinetic data obtained with the mobility database MobFe2 implemented in Dictra® software. - Highlights: • Slow dissolution kinetic of AlN precipitates due to both their large size and small chemical driving force • Significant effects of cooling rate prior isothermal heat treatment, holding time and temperature on AlN precipitation • Size of AlN precipitates can be reduced by quenching prior isothermal holding. • Fine precipitation of AlN related to the α → γ transformation.

  6. The effect of plasma nitriding and post oxidation on fretting wear behaviour of a high strength alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, N. Arun; Bennett, C. J.

    2017-05-01

    The fretting wear performance of the non-nitrided, nitrided and nitrided-post oxidized high strength alloy steel, W460 were investigated in the gross slip regime at ambient condition. Fretting wear tests were performed with an applied normal load of 250 and 650 N at a displacement amplitude of 100 μm using a cylinder-on-flat configuration. X-ray analysis (XRD) revealed the formation of the iron-nitrided Fe3N and Fe4N during plasma nitriding and iron oxide phases of hematite (Fe2O3) and magnetite (Fe3O4) during post-oxidation of the cylindrical steel samples. The steady state tangential force coefficient decreases when the nitrided and post-oxidized samples were fretted against the non-nitrided steel material when compared to the non-nitrided steel contact pair. The steady state tangential force coefficient decreased with an increase in applied normal load across all of the fretting conditions. The total dissipated energy and the total wear volume increased with an increase in applied normal load with total wear volume of the non-nitrided vs nitrided and non-nitrided vs nitrided post-oxidized sample pairs, showing a reduction in the wear volume of approximately 50% compared to the non-nitrided vs non-nitrided combination under the fretting conditions examined. The worn surface morphology of the fretted samples examined using a scanning electron microscope showed the presence of loose wear debris in the wear track, fragmented wear debris, delamination cracks, delamination with large discontinuities, plate-like wear debris, oxide patches and formation of large cavities.

  7. Fatigue Fracture Behavior of High-Strength Steel in Super Long Life Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Ri-Ichi; Yonekura, Daisuke; Ni, Zhengdong

    Long term cantilever-type rotational bending fatigue tests of up to 109 cycles were carried out on high carbon chromium bearing steel, SUJ2. The fatigue fracture behavior of SUJ2 in the super long life range was discussed based on scanning electron microscope observations and fracture mechanics. Fatigue failure occurred when the number of cycles exceeded 107. In the super long life range, the fish-eye-type fracture and the subsurface-type fracture were observed. In the fish-eye-type fracture, the stress intensity factor calculated from the area of the facet region was independent of the number of cycles to failure and was almost constant at 5.4MPa• m1/2. In the subsurface-type fracture, high carbon segregation was observed at the crack initiation area. The stress intensity factor for the carbon segregation area was close to 5.0MPam1/2. Pure fatigue crack was initiated from the area outside the facet region or the high carbon segregation area.

  8. Weldability Evaluation of a Cu-Bearing High-Strength Blast-Resistant Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Jeremy L.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Lippold, John C.

    2011-12-01

    BlastAlloy160 (BA-160) steel, with a nominal composition of Fe-0.05C-3.65Cu-6.5Ni-1.84Cr-0.6Mo-0.1V (wt pct), is strengthened by Cu-rich precipitates and M2C carbides. This alloy was subjected to several weldability tests to assess its susceptibility to certain weld cracking mechanisms. Hot ductility testing revealed a liquation cracking temperature range (LCTR) of 148 K (-125 °C), which suggested moderate susceptibility to heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation cracking. The enrichment of Ni and Cu was measured along the prior austenite grain boundaries in the simulated partially melted zone (PMZ) and was consistent with similar enrichment at interdendritic boundaries of the simulated fusion zone (FZ). Good wetting and penetration of liquid films along the austenite grain boundaries of the PMZ was also observed. Associated with that finding were thermodynamic calculations indicating a completely austenitic (face-centered cubic) microstructure at elevated temperatures. In testing to determine reheat cracking susceptibility, ductility values of 41 to 78 pct RA were established for the 723 K to 973 K (450 °C to 700 °C) temperature range. The good ductility values precluded susceptibility to reheat cracking according to the test criterion. Dilatometric measurements and thermodynamic calculations revealed the formation of austenite in the reheat cracking temperature range, which was attributed to the high Ni content of the BA-160 alloy.

  9. Prediction of diffusion assisted hydrogen embrittlement failure in high strength martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Zikry, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    A stress assisted hydrogen diffusion transport model, a dislocation-density-based multiple-slip crystalline plasticity formulation, and an overlapping fracture method were used to investigate hydrogen diffusion and embrittlement in lath martensitic steels with distributions of M23C6 carbide precipitates. The formulation accounts for variant morphologies based on orientation relationships (ORs) that are uniquely inherent to lath martensitic microstructures. The interrelated effects of martensitic block and packet boundaries and carbide precipitates on hydrogen diffusion, hydrogen assisted crack nucleation and growth, are analyzed to characterize the competition between cleavage fracture and hydrogen diffusion assisted fracture along preferential microstructural fracture planes. Stresses along the three cleavage planes and the six hydrogen embrittlement fracture planes are monitored, such that crack nucleation and growth can nucleate along energetically favorable planes. High pressure gradients result in the accumulation of hydrogen, which embrittles martensite, and results in crack nucleation and growth along {110} planes. Cleavage fracture occurs along {100} planes when there is no significant hydrogen diffusion. The predictions indicate that hydrogen diffusion can suppress the emission and accumulation of dislocation density, and lead to fracture with low plastic strains.

  10. Control of Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement of Ultra-High Strength Steel for Naval Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Superalloys 6.03.5.3 7000 Series Aluminum Alloys 6.03.5.4 Beta Titanium Alloys 6.03.6 IMPORTANT VARIABLES AFFECTING HYDROGEN CRACKING 6.03.6.1 Fracture...Assisted Damage in Stress Corrosion Cracking 6.03.7.1.1 Example Experiments for 7000 Series Aluminum Alloys 6.03.7.1.2 Crack Chemistry Advances...hardened aluminum alloys, precipitation hardened body-centered cubic titanium (P-Ti) alloys, and precipitation hardened austenitic superalloys

  11. Influence of local mechanical properties of high strength steel from large size forged ingot on ultrasonic wave velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont-Marillia, Frederic; Jahazi, Mohamad; Lafreniere, Serge; Belanger, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    In the metallurgical industry, ultrasonic inspection is routinely used for the detection of defects. For the non-destructive inspection of small high strength steel parts, the material can be considered isotropic. However, when the size of the parts under inspection is large, the isotropic material hypothesis does not necessarily hold. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the variation in mechanical properties such as grain size, Young's modulus, Poissons ratio, chemical composition on longitudinal and transversal ultrasonic wave velocities. A 2 cm thick slice cut from a 40-ton bainitic steel ingot that was forged and heat treated was divided into 875 parallelepiped samples of 2x4x7 cm3. A metallurgical study has been performed to identify the phase and measure the grain size. Ultrasonic velocity measurements at 2.25 MHz for longitudinal and transversal waves were performed. The original location of the parallelepiped samples in the large forged ingot, and the measured velocities were used to produce an ultrasonic velocity map. Using a local isotropy assumption as well as the local density of the parallelepiped samples calculated from the chemical composition of the ingot provided by a previously published study, Youngs modulus and Poissons ratio were calculated from the longitudinal and transversal wave velocities. Micro-tensile test was used to validate Youngs modulus obtained by the ultrasonic wave velocity and an excellent agreement was observed.

  12. Corrosion Behavior of Metal Active Gas Welded Joints of a High-Strength Steel for Automotive Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Mainã Portella; Mantovani, Gerson Luiz; Vasant Kumar, R.; Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the corrosion behavior of metal active gas-welded joints of a high-strength steel with tensile yield strength of 900 MPa was investigated. The welded joints were obtained using two different heat inputs. The corrosion behavior has been studied in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization tests. Optical microscopy images, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray revealed different microstructural features in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and the weld metal (WM). Before and after the corrosion process, the sample was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy to measure the depth difference between HAZ and WM. The results showed that the heat input did not play an important role on corrosion behavior of HSLA steel. The anodic and cathodic areas of the welded joints could be associated with depth differences. The HAZ was found to be the anodic area, while the WM was cathodic with respect to the HAZ. The corrosion behavior was related to the amount and orientation nature of carbides in the HAZ. The microstructure of the HAZ consisted of martensite and bainite, whereas acicular ferrite was observed in the weld metal.

  13. Reason for high strength and good ductility in dual phase steels composed of soft ferrite and hard martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Daisuke; Ikeda, Gosuke; Park, Myeong-heom; Shibata, Akinobu; Tsuji, Nobuhiro

    2017-07-01

    Dual phase (DP) steels in which the microstructures are composed of a soft ferrite phase and a hard martensite phase are known to show good strain-hardening, high strength and large elongation, but reasons for their superior mechanical properties are still unclear. In the present study, two types of DP structures, having either networked martensite or isolated martensite were fabricated in a low-carbon steel by different heat treatment routes, and their tensile deformation behavior was analyzed using the digital image correlation (DIC) technique. It was revealed that the DP specimens having networked martensite microstructures showed a better strength-ductility balance than the DP specimens with isolated martensite structures. The microscopic DIC analysis of identical areas showed that the strain distribution within the DP microstructures was not uniform and the plastic strain was localized in soft ferrite grains. The strain localized regions tended to detour around hard martensite but eventually propagated across the martensite. It was found also from the DIC analysis that the degree of strain partitioning between ferrite and martensite in the networked DP structure was lower than that in the isolated DP structure. The deformation became more homogeneous when the hard phase (martensite) was connected to form a network structure, which could be one of the reasons for the better strength-ductility balance in the networked DP structure compared to that in the isolated DP structure.

  14. Investigation of Clusters in Medium Carbon Secondary Hardening Ultra-high-strength Steel After Hardening and Aging Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerababu, R.; Balamuralikrishnan, R.; Muraleedharan, K.; Srinivas, M.

    2015-06-01

    Clusters, containing between 10 and 1000 atoms, have been investigated in a martensitic secondary hardening ultra-high-strength steel austenitized at 1173 K (900 °C) for 1 hour and tempered at either 768 K or 783 K (495 °C or 510 °C) for 4 or 8 hours using 3D atom probe. The presence of clusters was unambiguously established by comparing the observed spatial distribution of the different alloying elements against the corresponding distribution expected for a random solid solution. Maximum separation envelope method has been used for delineating the clusters from the surrounding "matrix." Statistical analysis was used extensively for size and composition analyses of the clusters. The clusters were found to constitute a significant fraction accounting for between 1.14 and 2.53 vol pct of the microstructure. On the average, the clusters in the 783 K (510 °C) tempered sample were coarser by ~65 pct, with an average diameter of 2.26 nm, relative to the other samples. In all samples, about 85 to 90 pct of the clusters have size less than 2 nm. The percentage frequency histograms for carbon content of the clusters in 768 K and 783 K (495 °C and 510 °C) tempered samples revealed that the distribution shifts toward higher carbon content when the tempering temperature is higher. It is likely that the presence of these clusters exerts considerable influence on the strength and fracture toughness of the steel.

  15. Gigacycle Fatigue Properties of High-Strength Steels According to Inclusion and ODA Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Y.; Hirukawa, H.; Kimura, T.; Hayaishi, M.

    2007-08-01

    Gigacycle fatigue tests were conducted for several versions of JIS-SCM440 low-alloy and JIS-SUJ2 bearing steels using 20-kHz ultrasonic fatigue testing to elucidate the relationship of the inclusion size and type to fish-eye fracture properties. The total number of tested specimens was over 200. Most of the specimens revealed Al2O3 or (Cr, Fe)3C inclusion-originating types of fish-eye fractures, while TiN inclusions and the matrix also caused fish-eye fractures in some specimens. Based on these fatigue test results, 109-cycle fatigue limits were estimated according to inclusion size by resorting the obtained data points according to their inclusion sizes at the fish-eye fracture origin. The estimated fatigue limits revealed saturation when the inclusion sizes were smaller than 15 μm, while those fatigue limits depended on the inclusion sizes to the -1/6th power in the case of inclusions above 15 μm in size. The saturation of the 109-cycle fatigue limits was considered to be caused by the effects of the optically dark areas (ODAs). Moreover, the fatigue limits also depended on inclusion type. In comparing the Al2O3 and (Cr, Fe)3C inclusions, the key features causing the difference in the fatigue limits were likely to be bonding between the inclusion and the matrix, i.e., the (Cr, Fe)3C inclusions were tightly bonded to the matrix, unlike the Al2O3 inclusions, although both inclusions were of the hard type.

  16. Low friction and high strength of 316L stainless steel tubing for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Amanov, Auezhan; Lee, Soo-Wohn; Pyun, Young-Sik

    2017-02-01

    We propose herein a nondestructive surface modification technique called ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) to increase the strength and to improve the tribological performance of 316L stainless steel (SS) tubing. Nanocrystallization along nearly the complete tube thickness of 200μm was achieved by UNSM technique that was confirmed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Nano-hardness of the untreated and UNSM-treated specimens was measured using a nanoindentation. Results revealed that a substantial increase in hardness was obtained for the UNSM-treated specimen that may be attributed to the nanocrystallization and refined grains. Stress-strain behavior of the untreated and UNSM-treated specimens was assessed by a 3-point bending test. It was found that the UNSM-treated specimen exhibited a much higher strength than that of the untreated specimen. In addition, the tribological behavior of the untreated and UNSM-treated specimens with an outer diameter (OD) of 1.6mm and an inner diameter (ID) of 1.2mm was investigated using a cylinder-on-cylinder (crossed tubes of equal radius) tribo-tester against itself under dry conditions at ambient temperature. The friction coefficient and wear resistance of the UNSM-treated specimen were remarkably improved compared to that of the untreated specimen. The significant increase in hardness after UNSM treatment is responsible for the improved friction coefficient and wear resistance of the tubing. Thus, the UNSM technique was found to be beneficial to improving the mechanical and tribological properties of 316L SS tubing for various potential biomedical applications, in particular for coronary artery stents.

  17. Enhancement of Upper Shelf Energy through Delamination Fracture in 0.05 pct P Doped High-Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Meysam; Kimura, Yuuji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2012-07-01

    An ultrafine elongated grain (UFEG) structure with strong <110>//rolling direction (RD) fiber deformation texture was produced by warm-caliber rolling at 773 K (500 °C) and final tempering at 823 K (550 °C), namely tempforming in the 1200 MPa-class, medium-carbon, low-alloy steel with phosphorus (P) content of 0.053 wt pct. Charpy impact tests and tensile tests were performed at a temperature range of 77 K (-196 °C) to 623 K (350 °C) on the tempformed (TF) samples along with a conventional quenched and tempered (QT) samples. The QT structure showed a low upper shelf energy of 70 J and a high ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of 373 K (100 °C) as a result of P segregation and intergranular fracture. A remarkable increase in the upper shelf energy to 150 J from 70 J and a low DBTT of approximately 103 K (-170 °C) were obtained in the UFEG structure. P segregation embrittlement disappeared completely in the UFEG structure, and ductile fracture on the planes normal to RD along with delamination fracture on the planes along RD were observed at a temperature range of 123 K (-150 °C) to 423 K (150 °C). The enhanced delamination occurred because of the microstructural anisotropy of the UFEG structure, a strong <110>//RD fiber deformation texture, and interfaces ( i.e. ferrite grain boundaries and cementite particles-ferrite matrix interfaces) weakened by P segregation as feasible crack propagation paths. We studied the delamination (crack-arrester-type) fracture in 0.053 pct P doped high-strength steel along with upper shelf energy and DBTT obtained from the UFEG structure.

  18. Welding-Induced Microstructure Evolution of a Cu-Bearing High-Strength Blast-Resistant Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Jeremy L.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Lippold, John C.

    2011-12-01

    A new high strength, high toughness steel containing Cu for precipitation strengthening was recently developed for naval, blast-resistant structural applications. This steel, known as BlastAlloy160 (BA-160), is of nominal composition Fe-0.05C-3.65Cu-6.5Ni-1.84Cr-0.6Mo-0.1V (wt pct). The evident solidification substructure of an autogenous gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld suggested fcc austenite as the primary solidification phase. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) hardness ranged from a minimum of 353 HV in the coarse-grained HAZ (CGHAZ) to a maximum of 448 HV in the intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ). After postweld heat treatment (PWHT) of the spot weld, hardness increases were observed in the fusion zone (FZ), CGHAZ, and fine-grained HAZ (FGHAZ) regions. Phase transformation and metallographic analyses of simulated single-pass HAZ regions revealed lath martensite to be the only austenitic transformation product in the HAZ. Single-pass HAZ simulations revealed a similar hardness profile for low heat-input (LHI) and high heat-input (HHI) conditions, with higher hardness values being measured for the LHI samples. The measured hardness values were in good agreement with those from the GTA weld. Single-pass HAZ regions exhibited higher Charpy V-notch impact toughness than the BM at both test temperatures of 293 K and 223 K (20 °C and -50 °C). Hardness increases were observed for multipass HAZ simulations employing an initial CGHAZ simulation.

  19. Defect Prediction and Control for Ultra-high-strength Steel Complex Structure in Hot Forming Based on FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xin; Zhou, Jie; Zhuo, Fang; Luo, Yan; Li, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Cracking is the main defect in ultra-high-strength steel (UHSS) forming products. In order to avoid cracking, either adjusting process parameters or changing die's design is usually applied. However, under the condition of forming parts with unreasonable structure design, it makes little difference through the traditional methods of modifying process parameters. In this paper, true stress-strain curves under different strain rates and temperatures are obtained via the hot tensile tests. Then, the material constitutive model of UHSS is introduced into software CAE; this step is used to analyze and predict defects of UHSS hot forming complex structural parts based on FEM. In addition, simulation results of changed structure (open end) are compared with original structure (closed end). The results have shown that both maximum reduction ratio and stress in all directions are sharply reduced, i.e., the forming quality is improved significantly after changing the end structure. Finally, the prediction and control methods of forming defects are verified to be feasible in actual production.

  20. Experimental research on behavior of 460 MPa high strength steel I-section columns under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiaojiao; Shi, Gang; Shi, Yongjiu

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the seismic behavior of I-section columns made of 460 MPa high strength steel (HSS), six specimens were tested under constant axial load and cyclic horizontal load. The specimens were designed with different width-to-thickness ratios and loaded under different axial load ratios. For each specimen, the failure mode was observed and hysteretic curve was measured. Comparison of different specimens on hysteretic characteristic, energy dissipation capacity and deformation capacity were further investigated. Test results showed that the degradation of bearing capacity was due to local buckling of flange and web. Under the same axial load ratio, as width-to-thickness ratio increased, the deformation area of local buckling became smaller. And also, displacement level at both peak load and failure load became smaller. In addition, the full extent of hysteretic curve, energy dissipation capacity, ultimate story drift angle decreased, and capacity degradation occurred more rapidly with the increase of width-to-thickness ratio or axial load ratio. Based on the capacity of story drift angle, limiting values which shall not be exceeded are suggested respectively for flange and web plate of 460 MPa HSS I-section columns when used in SMFs and in IMFs in the case of axial load ratio no more than 0.2. Such values should be smaller when the axial load ratio increases.

  1. A Study at the Workability of Ultra-High Strength Steel Sheet by Processing Maps on the Basis of DMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu Feng; Long, Shuai; Wang, Tian-Yu; Zhao, Jia

    2017-07-01

    The hot workability of the ultra-high strength steel BR1500HS has been investigated by processing maps. A series of hot deformation tensile tests were carried out on a Gleeble-3500 thermal simulator in the deformation temperature range of 773-1,223 K and strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1. The obtained flow stress curves reveal that the peak stress increases with the rising of strain rate and decreases with the rising of temperature. Based on dynamic materials model (DMM), the processing maps at the strains of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15 were developed, and the optimum hot working conditions were recommended as the temperature range of 1,200-1,223 K and the strain rate range of 0.01-0.1 s-1, where the peak power dissipation efficiency is about 37 % revealing the occurrence of typical dynamic recrystallization (DRX). The main instability defects are deformation twinning and micro-crack occurring mainly at the temperature range of 773-873 K with the strain rate higher than 1 s-1. In order to deeply understand the microstructure mechanisms, the Zener-Hollomon parameter is solved, and then the self-diffusion activation energy is compared with the apparent activation energy Q at different deformation temperatures and strain rates.

  2. Deformation and Recrystallization Behavior of the Cast Structure in Large Size, High Strength Steel Ingots: Experimentation and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadha, K.; Shahriari, D.; Tremblay, R.; Bhattacharjee, P. P.; Jahazi, M.

    2017-07-01

    Constitutive modeling of the ingot breakdown process of large size ingots of high strength steel was carried out through comprehensive thermomechanical processing using Gleeble 3800® thermomechanical simulator, finite element modeling (FEM), optical and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD). For this purpose, hot compression tests in the range of 1473 K to 1323 K (1200 °C to 1050 °C) and strain rates of 0.25 to 2 s-1 were carried out. The stress-strain curves describing the deformation behavior of the dendritic microstructure of the cast ingot were analyzed in terms of the Arrhenius and Hansel-Spittel models which were implemented in Forge NxT 1.0® FEM software. The results indicated that the Arrhenius model was more reliable in predicting microstructure evolution of the as-cast structure during ingot breakdown, particularly the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) process which was a vital parameter in estimating the optimum loads for forming of large size components. The accuracy and reliability of both models were compared in terms of correlation coefficient (R) and the average absolute relative error (ARRE).

  3. Parameter Identification of GTN Model Using Response Surface Methodology for High-Strength Steel BR1500HS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-yong; Li, Le

    2017-08-01

    In order to investigate the damage evolution of ultra-high-strength steels at different temperatures, a series of the uniaxial tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (20-800 °C) with a constant true strain rate (1 s-1). And then, two different deformation mechanisms were employed to describe the flow behaviors of BR1500HS. It is found that dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurs during the deformation process at high temperatures (600-800 °C), while the tensile flow behaviors exhibit a very long work hardening period before a short flow softening stages without DRX at lower temperatures of 20-400 °C Furthermore, the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) damage model was employed in this work to evaluate the ductile damage phenomena of BR1500HS. To determine the four vital parameters in GTN model, several numerical simulations were designed by central composite design and conducted by finite element simulation, and then the error evaluation functions ( R) were established using four GTN parameters. Thereafter, the four parameters of GTN model were determined along with four minimum values of R by use of response surface methodology (RSM) and least square method. The results show that temperature affects the microvoid volume fraction significantly. Additionally, the parameters of GTN model were applied in the finite element simulation model and a comparison between the simulation results and the scanning electron microscopic observations was conducted.

  4. Voltage-pulsed and laser-pulsed atom probe tomography of a multiphase high-strength low-carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, Michael D; Seidman, David N

    2011-12-01

    The differences in artifacts associated with voltage-pulsed and laser-pulsed (wavelength = 532 or 355 nm) atom-probe tomographic (APT) analyses of nanoscale precipitation in a high-strength low-carbon steel are assessed using a local-electrode atom-probe tomograph. It is found that the interfacial width of nanoscale Cu precipitates increases with increasing specimen apex temperatures induced by higher laser pulse energies (0.6-2 nJ pulse(-1) at a wavelength of 532 nm). This effect is probably due to surface diffusion of Cu atoms. Increasing the specimen apex temperature by using pulse energies up to 2 nJ pulse(-1) at a wavelength of 532 nm is also found to increase the severity of the local magnification effect for nanoscale M2C metal carbide precipitates, which is indicated by a decrease of the local atomic density inside the carbides from 68 ± 6 nm(-3) (voltage pulsing) to as small as 3.5 ± 0.8 nm(-3). Methods are proposed to solve these problems based on comparisons with the results obtained from voltage-pulsed APT experiments. Essentially, application of the Cu precipitate compositions and local atomic density of M2C metal carbide precipitates measured by voltage-pulsed APT to 532 or 355 nm wavelength laser-pulsed data permits correct quantification of precipitation.

  5. Kinetics and formation mechanisms of intragranular ferrite in V-N microalloyed 600 MPa high strength rebar steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Fu-ming; Li, Chang-rong

    2016-04-01

    To systematically investigate the kinetics and formation mechanisms of intragranular ferrite (IGF), isothermal heat treatment in the temperature range of 450°C to 600°C with holding for 30 s to 300 s, analysis of the corresponding microstructures, and observation of the precipitated particles were conducted in V-N microalloyed 600 MPa high strength rebar steel. The potency of V(C,N) for IGF nucleation was also analyzed statistically. The results show that the dominant microstructure transforms from bainite (B) and acicular ferrite (AF) to grain boundary ferrite (GBF), intragranular polygonal ferrite (IPF), and pearlite (P) as the isothermal temperature increases from 450°C to 600°C. When the holding time at 600°C is extended from 30 s to 60 s, 120 s, and 300 s, the GBF content ranges from 6.0vol% to 6.5vol% and the IPF content increases from 0.5vol% to 2.8vol%, 13.1vol%, and 13.5vol%, respectively, because the ferrite transformation preferentially occurs at the grain boundaries and then occurs at the austenite grains. Notably, V(C,N) particles are the most effective nucleation site for the formation of IPF, accounting for 51% of the said formation.

  6. Investigation on Twisting and Side Wall Opening Occurring in Curved Hat Channel Products Made of High Strength Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, Masato; Fukui, Ayako; Yano, Hiroshi; Hama, Takayuki; Sunaga, Hideyuki; Makinouchi, Akitake; Asakawa, Motoo

    2011-08-01

    High strength steel sheets are becoming increasingly important for the weight reduction of automotive bodies to meet the requirements for reduced environmental impact. However, dimensional defects resulting from springback are serious issues, and effective methods of predicting and reducing such defects are necessary. In this study, we numerically and experimentally analyzed the mechanisms of dimensional inaccuracies caused by springback occurring in curved hat channel deep drawing products. The analysis was based on the static explicit FEM software "TP-STRUCT" (the solver part is known as "STAMP3D"). The results of the experiments and simulations similarly show that the twist angle is positive (right-hand system) when the drawing height is relatively large. We calculated the twist torque around the longitudinal axis using the stress distributions obtained by FE analysis. Through the investigation of twist torque and its transition during the drawing and die removal processes, we found that the negative torque generated by side wall opening occurring in the die removal process is the dominant factor of the positive twist. Knowing such mechanisms of twist in cases with a relatively large drawing height, we attempted to explore methods of reducing side wall opening by giving the side wall a stepped shape with the eventual aim of reducing twist. Consequently, we concluded that the stepped shape on the side wall has marked effects of reducing side wall opening, mainly through the elimination of bending-unbending effects on die shoulders, which was verified by observing the stress distribution obtained by FE analysis.

  7. Parameter Identification of GTN Model Using Response Surface Methodology for High-Strength Steel BR1500HS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-yong; Li, Le

    2017-06-01

    In order to investigate the damage evolution of ultra-high-strength steels at different temperatures, a series of the uniaxial tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (20-800 °C) with a constant true strain rate (1 s-1). And then, two different deformation mechanisms were employed to describe the flow behaviors of BR1500HS. It is found that dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurs during the deformation process at high temperatures (600-800 °C), while the tensile flow behaviors exhibit a very long work hardening period before a short flow softening stages without DRX at lower temperatures of 20-400 °C Furthermore, the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) damage model was employed in this work to evaluate the ductile damage phenomena of BR1500HS. To determine the four vital parameters in GTN model, several numerical simulations were designed by central composite design and conducted by finite element simulation, and then the error evaluation functions (R) were established using four GTN parameters. Thereafter, the four parameters of GTN model were determined along with four minimum values of R by use of response surface methodology (RSM) and least square method. The results show that temperature affects the microvoid volume fraction significantly. Additionally, the parameters of GTN model were applied in the finite element simulation model and a comparison between the simulation results and the scanning electron microscopic observations was conducted.

  8. Deformation and Recrystallization Behavior of the Cast Structure in Large Size, High Strength Steel Ingots: Experimentation and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadha, K.; Shahriari, D.; Tremblay, R.; Bhattacharjee, P. P.; Jahazi, M.

    2017-09-01

    Constitutive modeling of the ingot breakdown process of large size ingots of high strength steel was carried out through comprehensive thermomechanical processing using Gleeble 3800® thermomechanical simulator, finite element modeling (FEM), optical and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD). For this purpose, hot compression tests in the range of 1473 K to 1323 K (1200 °C to 1050 °C) and strain rates of 0.25 to 2 s-1 were carried out. The stress-strain curves describing the deformation behavior of the dendritic microstructure of the cast ingot were analyzed in terms of the Arrhenius and Hansel-Spittel models which were implemented in Forge NxT 1.0® FEM software. The results indicated that the Arrhenius model was more reliable in predicting microstructure evolution of the as-cast structure during ingot breakdown, particularly the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) process which was a vital parameter in estimating the optimum loads for forming of large size components. The accuracy and reliability of both models were compared in terms of correlation coefficient (R) and the average absolute relative error (ARRE).

  9. Cracking Prediction in Hot Stamping of High-Strength Steel by a Temperature-Dependent Forming Limit Surface Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongsheng; Cui, Junjia; Jiang, Kaiyong; Zhou, Guangtao

    2016-11-01

    Hot stamping of high-strength steel (HSS) can significantly improve ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of hot-stamped part and thus meet the increasing demands for weight reduction and safety standards in vehicles. However, the prediction of forming defect such as cracking in hot stamping using traditional forming limit curve (FLC) is still challenging. In this paper, to predict HSS BR1500HS cracking in hot stamping, a temperature-dependent forming limit surface (FLS) is developed by simulations combined with experiments of biaxial tension of the plate with a groove at different temperatures. Different from the FLC, the newly developed FLS in which temperature is included suits the hot stamping of HSS. Considering the interplay among phase transformation, stress and strain, a finite element (FE)-coupled thermo-mechanical model of the hot stamping is developed and implemented under ABAQUS/Explicit platform where the developed FLS is built-in to predict strain distributions and HSS BR1500HS cracking in the hot stamping. Finally, the developed FLS is used to evaluate hot formability of HSS BR1500HS by using a hot stamping experiment for forming a box-shaped part. Results confirm that the developed FLS can accurately predict HSS BR1500HS cracking occurrence in the hot stamping.

  10. Study of Secondary Phase Particle Dissolution and Austenite Grain Growth on Heating Fine-Grained High-Strength IF-Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Hong-bin; Zhang, Hong-mei; Sun, Cheng-qian

    2016-09-01

    Dissolution of particles of second phase and growth of austenite grains in high-strength fine-grained IF-steel (0.0057% C, 0.0023% N) on heating is studied. Metallographic analysis of flat steel specimens cut from plates prepared by hot and cold rolling is performed. Steel structure is studied after holding for 10 - 60 min at different temperatures and water quenching. The quenching parameters at which the microalloying elements (Ti, Nb) dissolve completely with retention of fine-grained austenite are determined. Amathematical model of austenite grain growth is developed by nonlinear regression analysis of experimental data.

  11. Effect of notch location on fatigue crack growth behavior of strength-mismatched high-strength low-alloy steel weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Nasser, S. Nemat

    2004-12-01

    Welding of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels involves the use of low-strength, equal-strength, and high-strength filler materials (electrodes) compared with the parent material, depending on the application of the welded structures and the availability of filler material. In the present investigation, the fatigue crack growth behavior of weld metal (WM) and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of undermatched (UM), equally matched (EM), and overmatched (OM) joints has been studied. The base material used in this investigation is HSLA-80 steel of weldable grade. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) has been used to fabricate the butt joints. A center-cracked tension (CCT) specimen has been used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of welded joints, utilizing a servo-hydraulic-controlled fatigue-testing machine at constant amplitude loading (R=0). The effect of notch location on the fatigue crack growth behavior of strength mismatched HSLA steel weldments also has been analyzed.

  12. Influence of weld metal alloying additions to extend the heat input range for the submerged arc welding of high strength steels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ramirez, J.E.

    1993-12-16

    Weld metal microstructural development for high strength steels when welded with submerged arc welding process was investigated as a function of consumable composition and thermal experience. Of specific interest is the effect of systematic variations of microalloying additions on broadening of applicable heat input range. Controlled weld metal oxygen content, particularly in the range of 300 to 400 ppm, has been found to improve HY-130 steel weld metal toughness. Molybdenum additions was found to increase the strength of the HY-130 steel weld deposits. Copper additions up to 3.5 wt.pct. were found to strengthen the high strength steel weld metals, in particular, those of higher heat input, 3.6 kJ/mm. Niobium additions alone did not provide as powerful strengthening effect in the high heat input weld metals as the copper additions. In the case of copper-enriched welds, multi-pass welding induced both the precipitation and overaging of epsilon copper precipitates in the reheated weld metal which resulted in non-uniform mechanical properties. When added together, copper and niobium produced the synergistic effect of dual precipitation (Epsilon copper and niobium carbides) which provided the needed strength and thermal stability to the reheated weld metal even at high heat inputs. With this novel approach, the applicable heat input range to produce both adequate weld metal strength and toughness in high strength steels (Sigma y > 690 MPa) can be extended significantly. The optimal additions for copper and niobium were found to be 3.3 and up to 0. 1 wt. pct., Heat input, High strength steel, Precipitation strengthening, Copper, Niobium, Single and multi-pass welding.

  13. Formation of Nanostructures in Severely Deformed High-Strength Steel Induced by High-Frequency Ultrasonic Impact Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, R. K.; Malet, L.; Gao, H.; Hermans, M. J. M.; Godet, S.; Richardson, I. M.

    2015-02-01

    Surface modification by the generation of a nanostructured surface layer induced via ultrasonic impact treatment was performed at the weld toe of a welded high-strength quenched and tempered structural steel, S690QL1 (Fe-0.16C-0.2Si-0.87Mn-0.33Cr-0.21Mo (wt pct)). Such high-frequency peening techniques are known to improve the fatigue life of welded components. The nanocrystallized structure as a function of depth from the top-treated surface was characterized via a recently developed automated crystal orientation mapping in transmission electron microscopy. Based on the experimental observations, a grain refinement mechanism induced by plastic deformation during the ultrasonic impact treatment is proposed. It involves the formation of low-angle misoriented lamellae displaying a high density of dislocations followed by the subdivision of microbands into blocks and the resulting formation of polygonal submicronic grains. These submicronic grains further breakdown into nano grains. The results show the presence of retained austenite even after severe surface plastic deformation. The average grain size of the retained austenite and martensite is 17 and 35 nm, respectively. The in-grain deformation mechanisms are different in larger and smaller grains. Larger grains show long-range lattice rotations, while smaller grains show plastic deformation through grain rotation. Also the smaller nano grains exhibit the presence of short-range disorder. Surface nanocrystallization also leads to an increased fraction of low angle and low energy coincident site lattice boundaries especially in the smaller grains ( nm).

  14. Effect of different stages of tensile deformation on micromagnetic parameters in high-strength, low-alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Moorthy, V.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, B.

    1999-08-01

    The influence of tensile deformation on the magnetic Barkhausen emissions (MBE) and hysteresis loop has been studied in a high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA) and its weldment. The magnetic measurements were made both in loaded and unloaded conditions for different stress levels. The root-mean-square (RMS) voltage of the MBE has been used for analysis. This study shows that the preyield and postyield deformation can be identified from the change in the MBE profile. The initial elastic deformation showed a linear increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition, and the MBE level remained constant in the unloaded condition. The microplastic yielding, well below the macroyield stress, significantly reduces the MBE, indicating the operation of grain-boundary dislocation sources below the macroyield stress. This is indicated by the slow increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition and the decrease in the MBE level in the unloaded condition. The macroyielding resulted in a significant increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition and, more clearly, in the unloaded condition. The increase in the MBE level during macroyielding has been attributed to the grain rotation phenomenon, in order to maintain the boundary integrity between adjacent grains, which would preferentially align the magnetic domains along the stress direction. This study shows that MBE during tensile deformation can be classified into four stages: (1) perfectly elastic, (2) microplastic yielding, (3) macroyielding, and (4) progressive plastic deformation. A multimagnetic parameter approach, combining the hysteresis loop and MBE, has been suggested to evaluate the residual stresses.

  15. Niobium Solar Mobile Project — High Strength Niobium Microalloyed Steel as a Solution to Improve Electric Super Scooter and Motorcycle Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Terry; Kauppi, Erik; Flanagan, Lauren; Ribeio, Eduardo A. A. G.; Nogueira, Marcos A. Stuart; McCourtney, Ian

    This paper presents the advantages of replacing mild steel with high strength niobium microalloyed steel in the structure of Electric Super Scooters, Electric Cargo Motorcycles and Solar Charging Stations. The Mini-Fleet-in-a-Box concept was developed by Current Motor to guarantee mobility, efficiency and solar generated electricity. With the adoption of niobium microalloyed high strength steel for more than 90% of the Super Scooter and Motorcycle structures, it was possible to redesign the frame, resulting in a 31% weight reduction and a very modern and functional body. Together with a new powertrain, these changes were responsible for increasing Motorcycle autonomy by more than 15%, depending on average speed. The new frame design reduced the number of high strain points in the frame, increasing the safety of the project. The Solar Charging Station was built using the container concept and designed with high strength niobium microalloyed steel, which resulted in a weight reduction of 25%. CBMM's facility in Araxá, Brazil was selected in the second half of 2013 as the demonstration site to test the efficiency of the Super Scooter and Solar Charging Station. Each Super Scooter has run more than 2,000 km maintenance-free with an autonomy of more than 100 km per charge.

  16. Advanced reactor vessel steels for reactors with supercritical coolant parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, S. I.; Dub, V. S.; Lebedev, A. G.; Kuleshova, E. A.; Balikoev, A. G.; Makarycheva, E. V.; Tolstykh, D. S.; Frolov, A. S.; Krikun, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    A set of studies, tests, and technological works is performed to design promising high-strength vessel steels for reactors with supercritical coolant parameters. Compositions and technological parameters are proposed for the production of reference steel (within the limits of the grade composition of 15Kh2NMFA-A steel) and high-nickel steel. These steels are characterized by high properties, including metallurgical quality and service and technological parameters. Steel of the reference composition has high (higher by 15%) strength properties, improved viscoplastic properties, and ductile-brittle transition temperature t c of at most-125°C. The strength properties of the high-nickel steel are higher than those of the existing steels by 40-50% and higher than those of advanced foreign steels by 15-20% at ductile-brittle transition temperature t c of at most-165°C. Moreover, the designed steels are characterized by a low content of harmful impurity elements and nonmetallic inclusions, a fine-grained structure, and a low susceptibility to thermal embrittlement.

  17. Conservation Research and Development/ New Ultra-Low Carbon High Strength Steels with Improved Bake Hardenability for Enhanced Stretch Formability and Dent Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony J. DeArdo; C. Isaac Garcia

    2003-12-15

    Conservation Research and Development/New Ultra-Low Carbon High Strength Steels with Improved Bake Hardenability for Enhanced Stretch Formability and Dent Resistance. The experimental work can be divided into four phases. In each phase, the materials were received or designed, processed and tested, to evaluate the BH increment or response, as a function of compositions and processing conditions. Microstructural characterization by various techniques was performed in order to gain insights into the mechanisms of flow stress increment by bake hardening.

  18. Slow strain rate fracture of high-strength steel at controlled electrochemical potentials in ammonium chloride, potassium chloride, and ammonium nitrate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.; Nichols, D.E.; Daniels, R.D.

    1992-08-15

    Slow strain rate testing has been undertaken to determine the effects of individual chemical species on the fracture process of high-strength 4340 steel. Test environments included potassium chloride, ammonium nitrate, and ammonium chloride at concentrations from 0.001 to 1.0 mole por liter at ambient temperature. Tests were performed at cathodic and anodic controlled potentials, as well as at the open-circuit potential, to delineate the stress corrosion cracking range.

  19. Corrosion Behavior of E690 High-Strength Steel in Alternating Wet-Dry Marine Environment with Different pH Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Hao, W. K.; Liu, Z. Y.; Li, X. G.; Du, C. W.; Liao, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    The corrosion behavior and mechanism of E690 high-strength steel in marine environment with different pH values were studied through electrochemical technology and long-term alternating wet-dry cycle experiments combined with SEM and XRD. Results showed that the corrosion current density of E690 high-strength steel gradually increased with decreased pH. After long-term tests in alternating wet-dry marine environment with various pH values, uniform corrosion mainly occurred on E690 steel, accompanied by vast corrosion pitting. Weight loss analysis demonstrated that corrosion rate decreased with increased pH. Moreover, corrosion mechanism varied with pH, and hydrogen-evolution reaction greatly increased the E690 steel corrosion rate at low pH. Meanwhile, the compositions of corrosion products slightly differed with pH; these products consisted of Fe3O4, Fe2O3, α-FeOOH, β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, and amorphous substances. However, the rust-layer density varied. Cr in the rust layer promoted the densification of rust layer and improved the decay resistance of E690 steel.

  20. Texture analysis of tinplate steel and its application in production of double reduced high strength tinplate grades with controlled earing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černík, M.; Gburík, R.; Hrabčáková, L.; Vranec, P.

    2015-04-01

    Several years of texture investigation via X-ray Diffraction and EBSD techniques clearly highlight the effect of steel chemistry and processing on the final texture development in individual tinplate grades produced by U.S. Steel Košice. The influence of chemical composition, degree of deformation, and the annealing process on the texture development in tinplate steel is presented for selected grades processed in production and using the material controlled laboratory experiments. “Non-earing and Ultra-low Earing” tinplate materials provide a good case study where the desired final texture, which contains a strong γ fiber along with other texture component, is achieved with precise control of key processing variables. Development and production of high strength double reduced material with isotropic properties can be achieved by detailed study of crystallographic texture. As-measured Inverse Pole Figure (IPF) maps and calculated Orientation Distribution Functions (ODFs) were used to characterize the strength of the γ fiber and selected texture components. Calculation of the normal anisotropy index, r, from the acquired texture information, was accomplished for these steels using available crystal plasticity models. Achieved results of detailed texture analysis of tinplate in the manufacture of double reduced high strength tinplate steel grades have been successfully applied.

  1. Effects of High Rate Shear on the Microstructure and Deformation and Fracture Behavior of Two High Strength Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    Nickel (Ni) content between the steels. As shown in Table 1, the Q&T steel had 5% Ni while the DQ steel had only 1% Ni. Nickel in alpha iron has been...Yield and Fracture Behavior of Alpha Iron ," Trans. Met. Soc. of AIME, Vol. 242, pp. 306 - 314, February, 1968 Kalthoff, J.F. and Winkler, S., "Fracture

  2. Corrosion inhibition in 2.0 M sulfuric acid solutions of high strength maraging steel by aminophenyl tetrazole as a corrosion inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, El-Sayed M.

    2014-02-01

    The corrosion of high strength maraging steel after varied immersion times in concentrated solution, 2.0 M, of sulfuric acid has been investigated. The work was also extended to study the effect of 5-(3-aminophenyl)-tetrazole (APTA) on the inhibition of the steel corrosion. The study has been carried out using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization and scanning electron microscope (SEM) along with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) investigations. EIS spectra showed that the corrosion and polarization resistances decrease with increasing the immersion time of the steel before measurement and increase in the presence of APTA and the increase of its concentration. Polarization data agreed with the EIS measurements and indicated that the increase of immersion time increases the corrosion of steel by increasing its corrosion current and corrosion rate and lowering its polarization resistance. On the other hand, the addition of APTA and the increase of its concentration minimized the corrosion of steel through decreasing the corrosion current and corrosion rate and increasing the polarization resistance at all exposure test periods. SEM and EDX investigations confirmed that the inhibition of the maraging steel in the 2.0 M H2SO4 solutions is achieved via the adsorption of the APTA molecules onto the steel protecting its surface from being dissolved easily.

  3. Development of Fine-Grained, Low-Carbon Bainitic Steels with High Strength and Toughness Produced Through the Conventional Hot-Rolling and Air-Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhua, Sanjay Kumar; Sarkar, Partha Pratim; Saxena, Atul; Jha, Bimal Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Low-carbon bainitic steels have created enormous interest among scientists across the world in the past few decades because of their high strength, toughness, and weldability replacing the conventional quenched and tempered medium-carbon steels. Three experimental steels with varying alloy additions were made in a 100-kg laboratory induction furnace and cast into 100-mm-diameter cylindrical ingots. These ingots were hot-rolled and air-cooled to 6-mm plates in an experimental rolling mill with selected thermomechanical parameters. Steels processed through this process provided an ultrafine low-carbon bainitic microstructure with maximum yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) 575 and 705 MPa, respectively. The Charpy impact toughness of the experimental steels was excellent, and at 253 K (-20 °C), it varied from 114 to 170 Joules. Cu-B-added steel was found to give an optimum combination of strength, YS-575 MPa, and toughness, 114 J at 253 K (-20 °C). Thus, fine-grained, low-carbon bainitic steels could be developed with a proper combination of alloying elements and thermomechanical parameters even by air-cooling.

  4. Lightweight, High Strength Metals With Enhanced Radiation Shielding - Technology Advancing Partnerships Challenge Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Maria Clara (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The Technology Advancing Partnership (TAP) Challenge will seek to foster innovation throughout the Center by allowing the KSC workforce to identify a specific technology idea that needs improvement and to then work with an external partner to develop that technology. This Challenge will enable competitive partnerships with outside entities that will increase the value by bringing leveraged resources. The selected proposal from the University of Florida will develop new lightweight technologies with radiation mitigation for spacecraft.

  5. Integrated anaerobic ammonium oxidization with partial denitrification process for advanced nitrogen removal from high-strength wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shenbin; Du, Rui; Niu, Meng; Li, Baikun; Ren, Nanqi; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a novel integrated anaerobic ammonium oxidization with partial denitrification process (termed as ANAMMOX-PD) was developed for advanced nitrogen removal from high-strength wastewater, which excess NO3(-)-N produced by ANAMMOX was fed into PD reactor for NO2(-)-N production and then refluxing to ANAMMOX reactor for further removal. Results showed that total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency as high as 97.8% was achieved and effluent TN-N was below 20mg/L at influent TN-N of 820mg/L. Furthermore, the feasibility of simultaneously treating domestic wastewater was demonstrated in ANAMMOX-PD process, and NH4(+)-N removal efficiency of 96.7% was obtained. The nitrogen removal was mainly carried out through ANAMMOX pathway, and high-throughput sequencing revealed that Candidatus_Brocadia was the major ANAMMOX species. The presented process could effectively solve the problem of excess nitrate residual in ANAMMOX effluent, which hold a great potential in application of currently ANAMMOX treating high-strength wastewater (e.g. sludge digestion supernatant).

  6. Some properties of an advanced boron fiber. [high strength, splittable fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    An advanced coreless boron fiber exhibits tensile strengths which are more than twice that of the normal CVD B/W fibers. The coreless fiber is made by the chemical removal of the tungsten boride core exposed by splitting the as-grown fiber. The easily splittable fiber is made by the chemical vapor deposition of boron on a larger than usual tungsten substrate. It is expected that the ease of splitting is related to residual stresses in these fibers. Measurements of the axial residual stresses in both the normal and the splittable fibers are presented and the results compared. Differences in these stresses are discussed in connection with the ease of splitting in the splittable fibers.

  7. Development of advanced high strength tantalum base alloys. Part 2: Scale-up investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ammon, R. L.; Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Three experimental tantalum alloy compositions containing 14-16% W, 1% Re, 0.7% Hf, 0.025% C or 0.015% C and 0.015% N were prepared as two inch diameter ingots by consumable electrode vacuum arc melting. The as-cast ingots were processed by extrusion and swaging to one inch and 0.4 inch diameter rod and evaluated. Excellent high temperature forging behavior was exhibited by all three compositions. Creep strength at 2000 F to 2400 F was enhanced by higher tungsten additions as well as substitution of nitrogen for carbon. Weldability of all three compositions was determined to be adequate. Room temperature ductility was retained in the advanced tantalum alloy compositions as well as a notched/unnotched strength ratio of 1.4 for a notched bar having a K sub t = 2.9.

  8. The Interplay between Grain Size and Austenite Stability on Deformation Behavior of High Strength-High Ductility Combination Nanostructured Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Venkata Sai Ananth

    The concept of phase reversion involving severe cold deformation of metastable austenite to generate strain-induced martensite, followed by temperature-time annealing sequence, was used to obtain varying grain size from nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) to coarse-grained (CG) regime. This concept was used to obtain "high strength-high ductility" combination in nano/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) austenitic stainless steel. Using this concept, the objective of the study is to elucidate the dependence of grain size on deformation mechanisms and deformation-induced microstructural changes. The objective was accomplished by combining depth-sensing nanoindentation experiments conducted at various strain rates, and interrupted tensile testing at various strain and post-mortem analyses of deformed Fe-17Cr-7Ni (AISI 301LN) austenite alloy using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the high strength NG/UFG steel, deformation twinning contributed to excellent ductility, while in the low strength coarse-grained (CG) steel, ductility was also good, but due to strain-induced martensite, implying clear distinction and fundamental transition in the deformation behavior of NG/UFG and CG austenitic stainless steels. The study underscores that irrespective of the grain structure and operating deformation mechanisms (twinning versus strain-induced martensite), the generic nature of strain hardening is unaltered. In the NG/UFG structure, there was marked increase in stacking faults and twin density at high strain rates, and high strains. TWIP effect was observed in NG/UFG steel, whereas TRIP effect was evidenced in CG alloy. The observed change in the deformation mechanism with change in grain size is attributed to increased stability of austenite with decrease in grain size, and is explained in terms of austenite stability-strain energy relationship. The insights on the relationship between grain structure (and strength) and deformation mechanisms are envisaged to be important

  9. The role of phosphorus in cold work embrittlement in Ti and Ti+Nb stabilized high strength ultra-low carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rege, Jayanta Shantaram

    The new generation of ultra low carbon (ULC) steels used in the automotive industry requires both good formability and high strength. Good formability is essential for aerodynamic vehicle bodies while high strength is essential for weight reduction purposes and dent resistance. It is known that the lowering of the interstitial elements, such as C and N, results in higher formability. However, the reduction of the interstitial elements also results in a decrease in their strength. One of the ways of increasing the strength without considerably affecting the formability is by the addition of phosphorus (P) to the ULC steels, which is believed to increase the strength by the solid solution strengthening mechanism. The addition of P increases the strength, but it causes the problem of cold-work embrittlement (CWE) in the steels. Cold-work embrittlement is defined as the susceptibility of the sheet material to intergranular fracture during the secondary working of a deeply drawn part or while in service. Although, the problem of CWE is believed to be due to the segregation of P to the ferrite grain boundaries, it was not clear at what state of processing does the segregation occur. Furthermore, although it has been shown that the Nb-containing ULC steels exhibit better CWE resistance than the Ti-containing ULC steels, the effect of Nb on the segregation behavior of P is not known. The major objective of this study was to understand the segregation behavior of P during the different stages of thermomechanical processing in the high P-containing Ti and Ti+Nb stabilized ULC steels. Two techniques, the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and the atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM), were used in conjunction to study the segregation behavior of P in the steels. These studies revealed that the segregation of P to the ferrite grain boundaries primarily occurred during the coiling process in the Ti stabilized steel. The Ti+Nb stabilized steels showed lower

  10. The Role of Vanadium Carbide Traps in Reducing the Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of High Strength Alloy Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    A723 steel was not sufficient to induce any appreciable embrittlement. 7.0 4.0 HY80 X 0.0i-r 50 4340 r—,—,—|—i—i—i—r—t—i—i—i—i—I—i—’—’—> l...carbide, V4C3) was identified in the A723 steel by x- ray diffraction. V4C3 traps effectively reduced the hydrogen concentrations at the crack ...ALLOY STEELS G. L. SPENCER D. J. DUQUETTE AUGUST 1998 US ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER CLOSE COMBAT ARMAMENTS CENTER

  11. Understanding dual precipitation strengthening in ultra-high strength low carbon steel containing nano-sized copper precipitates and carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phaniraj, M. P.; Shin, Young-Min; Jung, Woo-Sang; Kim, Man-Ho; Choi, In-Suk

    2017-07-01

    Low carbon ferritic steel alloyed with Ti, Mo and Cu was hot rolled and interrupt cooled to produce nano-sized precipitates of copper and (Ti,Mo)C carbides. The steel had a tensile strength of 840 MPa, an increase in yield strength of 380 MPa over that of the plain carbon steel and reasonable ductility. Transmission electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering were used to characterize size and volume fraction of the precipitates in the steels designed to form only copper precipitates and only (Ti,Mo)C carbides. The individual and combined precipitation strengthening contributions was calculated using the size and volume fraction of precipitates and compared with the measured values.

  12. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high-strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth and of hydrogen adsorption and diffusion were initiated to develop information that is needed for a clearer determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism for hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel were selected for these studies. 18Ni(250) maraging steel, 316 stainless steel, and iron single crystal of (111) orientation were also included in the chemistry studies. Crack growth data on 18Ni(250) maraging steel from another program are included for comparison. No sustained-load crack growth was observed for the Inconel 718 alloy in gaseous hydrogen. Gaseous hydrogen assisted crack growth in the 18Ni maraging steels were characterized by K-independent (Stage 2) extension over a wide range of hydrogen pressures (86 to 2000 torr or 12 kN/m2 to 266 kN/m2) and test temperatures (-60 C to +100 C). The higher strength 18Ni(250) maraging steel was more susceptible than the lower strength 200 grade. A transition temperature was observed, above which crack growth rates became diminishingly small.

  13. Influence of Hot Plastic Deformation in γ and (γ + α) Area on the Structure and Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) Steel

    PubMed Central

    Sas, Jan; Kvačkaj, Tibor; Milkovič, Ondrej; Zemko, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop a new processing technology for a high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel in order to maximize the mechanical properties attainable at its low alloy levels. Samples of the steel were processed using thermal deformation schedules carried out in single-phase (γ) and dual-phase (γ + α) regions. The samples were rolled at unconventional finishing temperatures, their final mechanical properties were measured, and their strength and plasticity behavior was analyzed. The resulting microstructures were observed using optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They consisted of martensite, ferrite and (NbV)CN precipitates. The study also explored the process of ferrite formation and its influence on the mechanical properties of the material. PMID:28774093

  14. Optimization of quenching process in hot press forming of 22MnB5 steel for high strength properties for publication in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Nuraini; Aqida, S. N.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents hot press forming of 22MnB5 steel blanks for high strength automotive components. The hot press forming was performed using Schenck press PEZ0673 machine with maximum press force of 1000 kN. Samples were square 22MnB5 blanks, of 50 × 60 mm dimension. A high temperature furnace was used to heat up the blanks to austenite temperature of 950°C. Samples were held at the austenite temperature prior to forming and quenching process. Three independent controlled parameters were cooling water temperature, press holding time and flow rate of water. Pressed samples were characterized for metallographic study, hardness properties and tensile properties. Metallographic study was conducted using Meiji optical microscope. Hardness was measured using Vickers indenter with load 1000gf. From metallographic study, the hot pressed 22MnB5 boron steel samples produced lath martensitic microstructure. Hardness of hot pressed samples increased with decreasing cooling time. The yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength of samples after hot forming were between 1546 and 1923 N/mm2. These findings were important to design tailored ultra-high strength in automotive components at different process parameter settings.

  15. Austenite Grain Structures in Ti- and Nb-Containing High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel During Slab Reheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Chakrabarti, D.; Dey, G. K.

    2013-02-01

    Austenite-grain growth was investigated in a couple of microalloyed steels, one containing Ti and the other containing Nb, Ti, and V, using different reheating temperatures between 1273 K and 1523 K (1000 °C and 1250 °C). Nature and distribution of microalloy precipitates were quantitatively analyzed before and after reheating. Interdendritic segregation (or microsegregation) during casting can result in an inhomogeneous distribution of microalloy precipitates in the as-cast slabs, which can create austenite grain size variation (even grain size bimodality) after reheating. Ti addition reduced the grain size variation; however, it could not eliminate the grain size bimodality in Nb-containing steel, due to the differential pinning effect of Nb precipitates. A model was proposed for the prediction of austenite grain size variation in reheated steel by combining different models on microsegregation during solidification, thermodynamic stability, and dissolution of microalloy precipitates and austenite grain growth during reheating.

  16. Development of low-temperature high-strength integral steel castings for offshore construction by casting process engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sang-Sub; Mun, Jae-Chul; Kim, Tae-Won; Kang, Chung-Gil

    2014-12-01

    In casting steels for offshore construction, manufacturing integral casted structures to prevent fatigue cracks in the stress raisers is superior to using welded structures. Here, mold design and casting analysis were conducted for integral casting steel. The laminar flow of molten metal was analyzed and distributions of hot spots and porosities were studied. A prototype was subsequently produced, and air vents were designed to improve the surface defects caused by the release of gas. A radiographic test revealed no internal defects inside the casted steel. Evaluating the chemical and mechanical properties of specimens sampled from the product revealed that target values were quantitatively satisfied. To assess weldability in consideration of repair welding, the product was machined with grooves and welded, after which the mechanical properties of hardness as well as tensile, impact, and bending strengths were evaluated. No substantive differences were found in the mechanical properties before and after welding.

  17. Double Sided Irradiation for Laser-assisted Shearing of Ultra High Strength Steels with Process Integrated Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus; Weinbach, Matthias

    Most small or medium sized parts produced in mass production are made by shearing and forming of sheet metal. This technology is cost effective, but the achievable quality and geometrical complexity are limited when working high and highest strength steel. Based on the requirements for widening the process limits of conventional sheet metal working the Fraunhofer IPT has developed the laser-assisted sheet metal working technology. With this enhancement it is possible to produce parts made of high and highest strength steel with outstanding quality, high complexity and low tool wear. Additionally laser hardening has been implemented to adjust the mechanical properties of metal parts within the process. Currently the process is limited to lower sheet thicknesses (<2 mm) to maintain short cycle times. To enable this process for larger geometries and higher sheet thicknesses the Fraunhofer IPT developed a system for double sided laser-assisted sheet metal working within progressive dies.

  18. High-throughput design of low-activation, high-strength creep-resistant steels for nuclear-reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Xu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are prime candidate materials for structural applications in nuclear power reactors. However, their creep strength is much lower than that of creep-resistant steel developed for conventional fossil-fired power plants as alloying elements with a high neutron activation cannot be used. To improve the creep strength and to maintain a low activation, a high-throughput computational alloy design model coupling thermodynamics, precipitate-coarsening kinetics and an optimization genetic algorithm, is developed. Twelve relevant alloying elements with either low or high activation are considered simultaneously. The activity levels at 0-10 year after the end of irradiation are taken as optimization parameter. The creep-strength values (after exposure for 10 years at 650 °C) are estimated on the basis of the solid-solution strengthening and the precipitation hardening (taking into account precipitate coarsening). Potential alloy compositions leading to a high austenite fraction or a high percentage of undesirable second phase particles are rejected automatically in the optimization cycle. The newly identified alloys have a much higher precipitation hardening and solid-solution strengthening at the same activity level as existing reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels.

  19. Damage and fracture loci for a dual-phase steel and a high-strength low-alloyed steel: Revealing the different plastic localization-damage-ductile fracture pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Junhe; Münstermann, Sebastian; Bleck, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    The ductile fracture locus has been developed in the recent years as a relevant tool to predict the ductile fracture and assess the structure safety. In the various developed models, the occurrence of the final fracture or the initiation of the fracture is considered as the critical phase of deformation for materials or structures. However, in the application of high-strength steels, the damage onset and evolution are of significant importance in the forming processes, as they are naturally interacting with the plastic localization and ductile fracture and eventually creating various possible failure patterns. The present study contributes to a demonstration of the differences of these features in different steels by quantitatively comparing the material parameters of a hybrid damage mechanics model. A dual-phase steel sheet (DP600) and a high-strength low-alloy steel plate (S355J2+N), which show very different relation patterns between damage and fracture, are investigated. The aim of this study is to compare the plastic localization, damage and fracture loci of them and reveal the differences in their localization-damage initiation-ductile fracture patterns. The reasons for the observed different patterns are discussed and it is concluded that the microstructural features are ultimately contributing to the different patterns and the criteria for evaluating the cold formability of these steels shall be varied depending on their failure patterns.

  20. The Mechanism of High Strength-Ductility Steel Produced by a Novel Quenching-Partitioning-Tempering Process and the Mechanical Stability of Retained Austenite at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Zhang, K.; Wang, Y.; Gu, J. F.; Rong, Y. H.

    2012-03-01

    The designed steel of Fe-0.25C-1.5Mn-1.2Si-1.5Ni-0.05Nb (wt pct) treated by a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process demonstrates an excellent product of strength and elongation (PSE) at deformed temperatures from 298 K to 573 K (25 °C to 300 °C) and shows a maximum value of PSE (over 27,000 MPa pct) at 473 K (200 °C). The results fitted by the exponent decay law indicate that the retained austenite fraction with strain at a deformed temperature of 473 K (200 °C) decreases slower than that at 298 K (25 °C); namely, the transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) effect occurs in a larger strain range at 473 K (200 °C) than at 298 K (25 °C), showing better mechanical stability. The work-hardening exponent curves of Q-P-T steel further indicate that the largest plateau before necking appears at the deformed temperature of 473 K (200 °C), showing the maximum TRIP effect, which is due to the mechanical stability of considerable retained austenite. The microstructural characterization reveals that the high strength of Q-P-T steels results from dislocation-type martensite laths and dispersively distributed fcc NbC or hcp ɛ-carbides in martensite matrix, while excellent ductility is attributed to the TRIP effect produced by considerable retained austenite.

  1. In-situ observation of grain refinement in the simulated heat-affected zone of high-strength low-alloy steel by Zr-Ti combined deoxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bowen; Li, Guangqiang; Wan, Xiangliang; Li, Yu; Wu, Kaiming

    2016-03-01

    The effect of Zr-Ti combined deoxidation on the grain refinement in the simulated coarse-grained heat-affected zone of a high-strength low-alloy steel was investigated by means of analytical characterization techniques such as in-situ microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. Owing to the Zr-Ti combined deoxidation, a large amount of fine Zr-Ti oxide particles were formed in the steel and retarded the austenite grain growth during simulated welding thermal cycle. The austenite grains were small and uniform. The Mn can diffuse spontaneously from austenite to Zr-Ti oxide inclusion and MnS precipitated on ZrO2, which can form Mn depleted zone in the vicinity of inclusion. The acicular ferrite grains nucleated on intragranular Zr-Ti oxide inclusions in austenite grains grew in different directions and effectively divided the austenite grain into several finer and separate regions at intermediate temperature. The crystallographic grain size became small in the simulated coarse-grained heat-affected zone of Zr-Ti-killed steel due to the effective pinning effect by Zr-Ti oxide particles and acicular ferrite formation.

  2. Influence of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria on the Corrosion Behavior of High Strength Steel EQ70 under Cathodic Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Fang; Zhai, Xiaofan; Duan, Jizhou; Zhang, Meixia; Hou, Baorong

    2016-01-01

    Certain species of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) use cathodes as electron donors for metabolism, and this electron transfer process may influence the proper protection potential choice for structures. The interaction between SRB and polarized electrodes had been the focus of numerous investigations. In this paper, the impact of cathodic protection (CP) on Desulfovibrio caledoniens metabolic activity and its influence on highs trength steel EQ70 were studied by bacterial analyses and electrochemical measurements. The results showed that EQ70 under -0.85 VSCE CP had a higher corrosion rate than that without CP, while EQ70 with -1.05 VSCE had a lower corrosion rate. The enhanced SRB metabolic activity at -0.85 VSCE was most probably caused by the direct electron transfer from the electrode polarized at -0.85 VSCE. This direct electron transfer pathway was unavailable in -1.05 VSCE. In addition, the application of cathodic protection led to the transformation of sulfide rusts into carbonates rusts. These observations have been employed to provide updated recommendations for the optimum CP potential for steel structures in the presence of SRB. PMID:27603928

  3. Stress Corrosion Cracking of SA-543 High-Strength Steel in All-Volatile Treatment Boiler Feed Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, R.; Basha, M.; Al-Meshari, A.; Bayramov, A.; van Zyl, G.; Dafalla, H.; Mohamed, A. I.

    2015-10-01

    Susceptibility of SA-543 steel, its welds (with and without stress relief treatment), and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was investigated in de-aerated and aerated boiler feed water subjected to the all-volatile treatment (AVT-BFW), and distilled water at 275 °C using the slow strain rate testing (SSRT) technique. The SSRT specimens were tested at three extension rates (3.50 × 10-6, 9.00 × 10-6, and 7.50 × 10-5 mm/s) using a novel SCC testing rig capable of testing at high temperatures and pressures. There are no significant differences in the time-to-failure among the four tested specimens. The elongation of the specimens at the time of failure is in the range of 10-23%. The reduction of the cross-sectional area of the failed specimens is large (45-77%) and the absence of any signs of intergranular propagation in fractured specimens, determined by scanning electron microscopy, indicates that the failure is due to mechanical load and not due to SCC. Dissolved oxygen does not affect the susceptibility of the specimens to SCC, which could be due to the inhibition effect of the test solution. SA-543 steel as the base metal, its welds (with and without stress relief treatment), and the HAZ are suitable for use in hot AVT-BFW and distilled water.

  4. Influence of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria on the Corrosion Behavior of High Strength Steel EQ70 under Cathodic Polarization.

    PubMed

    Guan, Fang; Zhai, Xiaofan; Duan, Jizhou; Zhang, Meixia; Hou, Baorong

    2016-01-01

    Certain species of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) use cathodes as electron donors for metabolism, and this electron transfer process may influence the proper protection potential choice for structures. The interaction between SRB and polarized electrodes had been the focus of numerous investigations. In this paper, the impact of cathodic protection (CP) on Desulfovibrio caledoniens metabolic activity and its influence on highs trength steel EQ70 were studied by bacterial analyses and electrochemical measurements. The results showed that EQ70 under -0.85 VSCE CP had a higher corrosion rate than that without CP, while EQ70 with -1.05 VSCE had a lower corrosion rate. The enhanced SRB metabolic activity at -0.85 VSCE was most probably caused by the direct electron transfer from the electrode polarized at -0.85 VSCE. This direct electron transfer pathway was unavailable in -1.05 VSCE. In addition, the application of cathodic protection led to the transformation of sulfide rusts into carbonates rusts. These observations have been employed to provide updated recommendations for the optimum CP potential for steel structures in the presence of SRB.

  5. Effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on tensile properties of laser welded joint of high strength steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Daimaruya, M.; Tsuda, H.; Horikawa, K.

    2006-08-01

    The impact tensile properties of laser welded butt joints of two kinds of high strength steel plates with the tensile strength level of 590 MPa and 780 MPa (denoted by HR590 and HR780, respectively), were investigated using split Hopkinson bar tensile testing apparatus. Impact tension tests for the joint specimens pre-fatigued were also carried out to examine the effect of pre-fatigue. There were no significant effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on the dynamic and quasi-static tensile strength of laser welded butt joints. However, the decrease in the elongation of HR780 welded joints subjected high cycle pre-fatigue was observed only at a high strain-rate. From the observation of fracture surface, it was found that the decrease in the elongation may be caused by a number of damages due to the combination of high cycle pre-fatigue and high strain-rate.

  6. Surface Modification of Micro-Alloyed High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel by Controlled TIG Arcing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P. K.; Kumar, Ravindra

    2015-02-01

    Surface modification of micro-alloyed HSLA steel plate has been carried out by autogenous conventional and pulse current tungsten inert gas arcing (TIGA) processes at different welding parameters while the energy input was kept constant. At a given energy input the influence of pulse parameters on the characteristics of surface modification has been studied in case of employing single and multi-run procedure. The role of pulse parameters has been studied by considering their summarized influence defined by a factor Φ. The variation in Φ and pulse frequency has been found to significantly affect the thermal behavior of fusion and accordingly the width and penetration of the modified region along with its microstructure, hardness and wear characteristics. It is found that pulsed TIGA is relatively more advantageous over the conventional TIGA process, as it leads to higher hardness, improved wear resistance, and a better control over surface characteristics.

  7. Correlation of inclusion size and chemistry with weld metal composition and microstructure arc weldments of high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakes, Mark W.

    1994-12-01

    Non-metallic inclusions are crucial to the development of acicular ferrite, the desired microstructure for optimal strength and toughness in weld metal. This study focused on obtaining correlation between the size and chemistry of inclusions and weld metal properties, especially the amount of acicular ferrite, in Gas Metal Arc (GMA) and Submerged Arc (SA) weldments in HY-100 and HSLA-100 steel. A strong correlation was found between the amount of acicular ferrite, flux basicity and inclusion composition and volume fraction in SAW weld metal samples. An index developed to consider the effect of chemistry and volume fraction of inclusions on acicular ferrite showed good correlation. The GMA weld samples were found to contain less acicular ferrite than the SAW samples, principally because of their lower oxygen content. However, it was again found possible to correlate inclusion chemistry and volume fraction with acicular ferrite formation. Unfortunately, the large amount of data scatter precluded the development of an index in this case.

  8. High strength steels, stiffness of vehicle front-end structure, and risk of injury to rear seat occupants.

    PubMed

    Sahraei, Elham; Digges, Kennerly; Marzougui, Dhafer; Roddis, Kim

    2014-05-01

    Previous research has shown that rear seat occupant protection has decreased over model years, and front-end stiffness is a possible factor causing this trend. In this research, the effects of a change in stiffness on protection of rear seat occupants in frontal crashes were investigated. The stiffness was adjusted by using higher strength steels (DP and TRIP), or thicker metal sheets. Finite element simulations were performed, using an LS Dyna vehicle model coupled with a MADYMO dummy. Simulation results showed that an increase in stiffness, to the extent it happened in recent model years, can increase the risk of AIS3+ head injuries from 4.8% in the original model (with a stiffness of 1,000 N/mm) to 24.2% in a modified model (with a stiffness of 2,356 N/mm). The simulations also showed an increased risk of chest injury from 9.1% in the original model to 11.8% in the modified model. Distribution of injuries from real world accident data confirms the findings of the simulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Theoretical and experimental study of the rule for heat transfer coefficient in hot stamping of high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xianhong; Hao, Xin; Yang, Kun; Zhong, Yaoyao

    2013-12-01

    Heat transfer is a crucial aspect for hot stamping process, the fully austenitized boron steel blank with temperature about 900°C is transferred to the tool, then formed rapidly and quenched in the cooled tool. The desired fully martensitic transformation will happen only if the cooling rate exceeds a critical value approximately 27 K/s. During such process, the heat transfer coefficient (abbreviated as HTC) between the tool and blank plays a decisive role for the variation of the blank temperature. In this work, a theoretical formula based on the joint-roughness model is presented to describe the law of HTC, which relies on the roughness, hardness, and other material parameters of the tool and blank. Moreover, a non-contact temperature measuring system based on the infrared thermal camera is built to catch the temperature change course, and then the HTC value is derived through the inverse analysis. Based on the theoretical and experimental results, the change rule of HTC especially its dependence on the process pressure will be discussed in detail.

  10. Inclusion phases and the nucleation of acicular ferrite in submerged arc welds in high strength low alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, J. M.; Corbett, J. M.; Kerr, H. W.

    1986-09-01

    Series of submerged arc welds of HSLA steel made with three different fluxes and metallic additions of Ti, Mo, and Cr have been examined to study the inclusions and their role in the nucleation of acicular ferrite. Inclusion phases and compositions have been analyzed by electron diffraction and X-ray microanalysis. These analyses have shown that the inclusions contained many different compounds, the proportions of each depending upon both the flux and metallic additions. Six inclusion phases have been identified: galaxite (Al2O3 ṡ MnO), a titanium-rich compound (probably TiO), a copper sulfide, a manganese sulfide, a silica, and an aluminum-rich phase. No correlation was found between the amount of acicular ferrite in the weld metal and either average inclusion composition or individual inclusion phases. No epitaxial relationships between inclusions and adjacent ferrite grains could be identified. It has been concluded that inclusions nucleate acicular ferrite by acting as inert substrates according to the classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation. Because most inclusions are multi-phase and are touched by several ferrite grains, it has also been concluded that each inclusion can nucleate several ferrite grains, due to local regions of high surface energy on the inclusion.

  11. Theoretical and experimental study of the rule for heat transfer coefficient in hot stamping of high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Xianhong; Hao, Xin; Yang, Kun; Zhong, Yaoyao

    2013-12-16

    Heat transfer is a crucial aspect for hot stamping process, the fully austenitized boron steel blank with temperature about 900°C is transferred to the tool, then formed rapidly and quenched in the cooled tool. The desired fully martensitic transformation will happen only if the cooling rate exceeds a critical value approximately 27 K/s. During such process, the heat transfer coefficient (abbreviated as HTC) between the tool and blank plays a decisive role for the variation of the blank temperature. In this work, a theoretical formula based on the joint-roughness model is presented to describe the law of HTC, which relies on the roughness, hardness, and other material parameters of the tool and blank. Moreover, a non-contact temperature measuring system based on the infrared thermal camera is built to catch the temperature change course, and then the HTC value is derived through the inverse analysis. Based on the theoretical and experimental results, the change rule of HTC especially its dependence on the process pressure will be discussed in detail.

  12. Forming Limits of Weld Metal in Aluminum Alloys and Advanced High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Smith, Mark T.; Grant, Glenn J.; Davies, Richard W.

    2010-10-25

    This work characterizes the mechanical properties of DP600 laser welded TWBs (1 mm-1.5 mm) near and in the weld, as well as their limits of formability. The approach uses simple uniaxial experiments to measure the variability in the forming limits of the weld region, and uses a theoretical forming limit diagram calculation to establish a probabilistic distribution of weld region imperfection using an M-K method approach

  13. Modeling the Hot Tensile Flow Behaviors at Ultra-High-Strength Steel and Construction of Three-Dimensional Continuous Interaction Space for Forming Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Zhan, Zong-yang; Wang, Tong; Xia, Yu-feng

    2017-01-01

    The response of true stress to strain rate, temperature and strain is a complex three-dimensional (3D) issue, and the accurate description of such constitutive relationships significantly contributes to the optimum process design. To obtain the true stress-strain data of ultra-high-strength steel, BR1500HS, a series of isothermal hot tensile tests were conducted in a wide temperature range of 973-1,123 K and a strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1 on a Gleeble 3800 testing machine. Then the constitutive relationships were modeled by an optimally constructed and well-trained backpropagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN). The evaluation of BP-ANN model revealed that it has admirable performance in characterizing and predicting the flow behaviors of BR1500HS. A comparison on improved Arrhenius-type constitutive equation and BP-ANN model shows that the latter has higher accuracy. Consequently, the developed BP-ANN model was used to predict abundant stress-strain data beyond the limited experimental conditions. Then a 3D continuous interaction space for temperature, strain rate, strain and stress was constructed based on these predicted data. The developed 3D continuous interaction space for hot working parameters contributes to fully revealing the intrinsic relationships of BR1500HS steel.

  14. Analysis of a New High-Toughness Ultra-high-Strength Martensitic Steel by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartshorne, Matthew I.; McCormick, Caroline; Schmidt, Michael; Novotny, Paul; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2016-04-01

    The microstructure of a new martensitic high-strength steel (Fe-0.40C-3.81Ni-1.31Cr-1.50Si-0.75Mn-0.52Mo-0.51Cu-0.30V) with high fracture toughness is characterized by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography (APT). MC, M6C, and M23C6 precipitates form inside the martensitic lath matrix. The fracture toughness is insensitive to the dissolution of M23C6 precipitates at austenitizing temperatures above 1164 K (891 °C). APT reveals that solute segregation at the prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGB) is not uniform, with C, Mo, Si, Ni, and/or P enrichment varying at different areas of the PAGB. Si depletion is detected in the same area as the highest C enrichment. Carbon also segregates at lath boundaries. Segregation of C indicates the presence of retained austenite films at both PAGB and lath boundaries. Regions enriched in C up to 10 pct were found within the laths; however, no regions were enriched to the level expected of cementite or ɛ-carbide. The observed C distribution and high fracture toughness indicates that the tempering behavior is significantly different than that observed in 300M steel. The effect of Si, Ni, and Cu on the formation and stabilization of the regions of C enrichment and retained austenite require further study, as it may be key to the increased toughness.

  15. Role of the adsorption factor in reduction of the long-term static crack resistance of high-strength steel in gaseous media

    SciTech Connect

    Romaniv, O.N.; Nikiforchin, G.N.; Tsirul'nik, A.T.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to establish the role of the adsorption layer in subcritical crack growth in high-strength steel subject to long-term static loading in controlled-composition gaseous media. Investigations of long-term crack resistance were made in a sealed chamber on 45KhN2MFA steel with an edge crack loaded by four-point bending. The gaseous media were commercially pure hydrogen and helium. The most aggressive medium was deoxygenated and dried hydrogen and the least aggressive helium. The effect of helium moisture content on crack growth kinetics was evaluated. Subcritical crack growth mechanisms were determined, by fractography with a scanning electron microscope, to be typically intergranular. Hydrogen embrittlement occurred in three stages: establishment of adsorption equilibrium, adsorbed molecule dissociation into atomic hydrogen, and transport of hydrogen atoms into the prefailure zone. Local fracture occurred as a result of a reduction in critical stress in connection with hydrogen impregnation of the prefailure zone.

  16. Multicomponent High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel Precipitation-Strengthened by Sub-nanometric Cu Precipitates and M2C Carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Divya; Isheim, Dieter; Hunter, Allen H.; Seidman, David N.

    2016-08-01

    HSLA-115 is a novel high-strength low-alloy structural steel derived from martensitic Cu-bearing HSLA-100. HSLA-100 is typically used in conditions with overaged Cu precipitates, to obtain acceptable impact toughness and ductility. Present work on HSLA-115 demonstrates that incorporating sub-nanometric-sized M2C carbides along with Cu precipitates produces higher strength steels that still meet impact toughness and ductility requirements. Isothermal aging at 823 K (550 °C) precipitates M2C carbides co-located with the Cu precipitates and distributed heterogeneously at lath boundaries and dislocations. 3D atom-probe tomography is used to characterize the evolution of these precipitates at 823 K (550 °C) in terms of mean radii, number densities, and volume fractions. These results are correlated with microhardness, impact toughness, and tensile strength. The optimum combination of mechanical properties, 972 MPa yield strength, 24.8 pct elongation to failure, and 188.0 J impact toughness at 255 K (-18 °C), is attained after 3-hour aging at 823 K (550 °C). Strengthening by M2C precipitates offsets the softening due to overaging of Cu precipitates and tempering of martensitic matrix. It is shown that this extended yield strength plateau can be used as a design principle to optimize strength and toughness at the same time.

  17. Ultra-High-Strength Interstitial-Free Steel Processed by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing at Large Equivalent Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Deepa; Mukhopadhyay, N. K.; Sastry, G. V. S.; Manna, R.

    2016-04-01

    The billets of interstitial-free (IF) steel are deformed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) at 298 K (25 °C) adopting the route BC up to an equivalent strain ( ɛ vm) of 24. The evolution of microstructures and their effects on the mechanical properties are examined. The microstructural refinement involves the elongation of grains, the subdivision of grains to the bands with high dislocation density, and the splitting of bands into the cell blocks and then cell blocks into the cells. The widths of the bands and the size of cells decrease with strain. The degree of reduction in the grain size is highest at the low strain level. However, most of the boundaries at this stage are of low-angle boundaries (at ɛ vm = 3). Thereafter, the misorientation angle increases by progressive lattice rotation with strain. The coarse bands transform step by step from the lamellar structure to the ribbon-shaped grains and finally to the near-equiaxed grain structures with the subgrains of a saturated low-angle grain boundary fraction of 0.34 at very large strain >15. The as-received coarse-grained microstructure (grain size of 57.6 ± 21 µm) has been refined to 257 ± 48 nm at an equivalent strain of 24. The strength increases considerably up to ɛ vm = 3 due to grain refinement and high dislocation density. However, the strengthening at later stages is mainly due to the increase in misorientation angle and refinement. Initial yield strength of 227 MPa is increased to a record value of 895 MPa on straining up to ɛ vm = 24 at 298 K (25 °C). Uniform elongation decreases drastically at low equivalent strain but it regains marginally later. The ECAPed sample fails by a ductile fracture at ɛ vm = 0.6 to 6 but by a mixed mode of ductile-brittle fracture at larger strain of 9 to 24.

  18. Development of High-Strength Bulk Ultrafine-Grained Low Carbon Steel Produced by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raj Bahadur; Mukhopadhyay, N. K.; Sastry, G. V. S.; Manna, R.

    2017-08-01

    Low carbon steel (LCS) workpieces have been deformed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) at a large equivalent strain of 16.8 at room temperature. The mechanisms of microstructural refinement, strengthening, hardening, and fracture behavior are investigated. LCS becomes refined by a sequence of mechanisms of elongation of grains, splitting of elongated grains to bands at low strain, subdivision of bands to cells at intermediate strain, elongation of bands to ribbon grains, and breaking of ribbons to near-equiaxed grains at a high strain level. ECAP of LCS at ɛ vm = 16.8 refines the material to near-equiaxed grains of size 0.2 µm having a high-angle grain boundary fraction of 82.4 pct and average misorientation angle of 40.8 deg. The ultrafine-grained (UFG) LCS contains a dislocation density of 1.7 × 1015 m2. In the initial passes of ECAP, the yield and tensile strengths increase rapidly due to rapid grain refinement, reduction in domain size, and increase in dislocation density. At high strain levels, strengthening can be attributed to a combination of grain refinement, dissolution of cementite in the ferrite matrix, and increase in misorientation angle. At ɛ vm = 16.8, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) reaches >1000 MPa with a consequent drop in ductility to ≈10.6 pct. Reduction in ductility is found to be due to high dislocation density, high stored energy in the matrix, and occurrence of nonequilibrium grain boundaries. The LCS at low equivalent strain fails by ductile fracture. The dimple size and its volume fraction decrease, but their number density and stored energy increase with increasing equivalent strain. Beyond a critical equivalent strain of 9, the material fails by ductile-brittle fracture. At ɛ vm = 16.8, equal-channel angular pressed UFG LCS fails mainly by cleavage fracture.

  19. Characterization of welded HP 9-4-30 steel for the advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watt, George William

    1990-01-01

    Solid rocket motor case materials must be high-strength, high-toughness, weldable alloys. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) cases currently being developed will be made from a 9Ni-4Co quench and temper steel called HP 9-4-30. These ultra high-strength steels must be carefully processed to give a very clean material and a fine grained microstructure, which insures excellent ductility and toughness. The HP 9-4-30 steels are vacuum arc remelted and carbon deoxidized to give the cleanliness required. The ASRM case material will be formed into rings and then welded together to form the case segments. Welding is the desired joining technique because it results in a lower weight than other joining techniques. The mechanical and corrosion properties of the weld region material were fully studied.

  20. Comparison of microstructure and mechanical properties of ultra-narrow gap laser and gas-metal-arc welded S960 high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Lin; Dong, Shiyun; Crowther, Dave; Thompson, Alan

    2017-04-01

    The microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties, including micro-hardness, tensile properties, three-point bending properties and Charpy impact toughness at different test temperatures of 8 mm thick S960 high strength steel plates were investigated following their joining by multi-pass ultra-narrow gap laser welding (NGLW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) techniques. It was found that the microstructure in the fusion zone (FZ) for the ultra-NGLW joint was predominantly martensite mixed with some tempered martensite, while the FZ for the GMAW joint was mainly consisted of ferrite with some martensite. The strength of the ultra-NGLW specimens was comparable to that of the base material (BM), with all welded specimens failed in the BM in the tensile tests. The tensile strength of the GMAW specimens was reduced approximately by 100 MPa when compared with the base material by a broad and soft heat affected zone (HAZ) with failure located in the soft HAZ. Both the ultra-NGLW and GMAW specimens performed well in three-point bending tests. The GMAW joints exhibited better impact toughness than the ultra-NGLW joints.

  1. Interfacial Characterization of Dissimilar Joints Between Al/Mg/Al-Trilayered Clad Sheet to High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macwan, A.; Jiang, X. Q.; Chen, D. L.

    2015-07-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys are increasingly used in the automotive and aerospace sectors to reduce vehicle weight. Al/Mg/Al tri-layered clad sheets are deemed as a promising alternative to improve the corrosion resistance and formability of Mg alloys. The structural application of Al/Mg/Al tri-layered clad sheets inevitably involves welding and joining in the multi-material vehicle body manufacturing. This study aimed to characterize the bonding interface microstructure of the Al/Mg/Al-clad sheet to high-strength low-alloy steel with and without Zn coating using ultrasonic spot welding at different levels of welding energy. It was observed that the presence of Zn coating improved the bonding at the interface due to the formation of Al-Zn eutectic structure via enhanced diffusion. At a higher level of welding energy, characteristic flow patterns of Zn into Al-clad layer were observed with an extensive penetration mainly along some high angle grain boundaries. The dissimilar joints without Zn coating made at a high welding energy of 800 J failed partially from the Al/Fe weld interface and partially from the Al/Mg clad interface, while the joints with Zn coating failed from the Al/Mg clad interface due to the presence of brittle Al12Mg17 phase.

  2. Effect of clearance on wrinkling of 21-6-9 high-strength stainless steel tubes in numerical control rotary draw bending process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lu; Fang, Jun; Li, Yuan; Dai, Li; Xiong, Mengsi; Lu, Shiqiang

    2017-03-01

    Clearance between tube and all kinds of dies has a significant and complicated influence on wrinkling of 21-6-9 high-strength stainless steel tubes (HSST) during numerical control (NC) rotary draw bending process. To explore the effect of that, a three dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model of the whole process for 21-6-9 HSST was build based on FE platform of ABAQUS and validated by the experiment. Then, simulation and study of the process was carried out based on the FE model and the influence laws of clearance on wrinkling of 21-6-9 HSST in NC rotary draw bending were obtained. The results show that the wrinkling wave degree increases obviously with the increase of clearance between mandrel and tube Cm and clearance between bending die and tube Cb, while decreases with increase of clearance between pressure die and tube Cp; the wrinkling wave degree decreases sharply when clearance between wiper die and tube Cw is less than 0.2mm, and the wrinkling wave degree hardly has no variation when Cw is greater than 0.2mm.

  3. High-Cycle Fatigue of High-Strength Low Alloy Steel Q345 Subjected to Immersion Corrosion for Mining Wheel Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicecco, Sante; Altenhof, William; Hu, Henry; Banting, Richard

    2017-03-01

    In an effort to better understand the impact of material degradation on the fatigue life of mining wheels made of a high-strength low alloy carbon steel (Q345), this study seeks to evaluate the effect of surface corrosion on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of the Q345 alloy. The fatigue behavior of the polished and corroded alloy was investigated. Following exposure to a 3.5 wt.% NaCl saltwater solution, polished and corroded fatigue specimens were tested using an R.R. Moore rotating-bending fatigue apparatus. Microstructural analyses via both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that one major phase, α-iron phase, ferrite, and one minor phase, colony pearlite, existed in the extracted Q345 alloy. The results of the fatigue testing showed that the polished and corroded specimens had an endurance strength of approximately 295 and 222 MPa, respectively, at 5,000,000 cycles. The corroded surface condition resulted in a decrease in the fatigue strength of the Q345 alloy by 24.6%. Scanning electron microscope fractography indicated that failure modes for polished and corroded fatigue specimens were consistent in the high-cycle low loading fatigue regime. Conversely, SEM fractography of low-cycle high-loading fatigue specimens found considerable differences in fracture surfaces between the corroded and polished fatigue specimens.

  4. High-Cycle Fatigue of High-Strength Low Alloy Steel Q345 Subjected to Immersion Corrosion for Mining Wheel Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicecco, Sante; Altenhof, William; Hu, Henry; Banting, Richard

    2017-04-01

    In an effort to better understand the impact of material degradation on the fatigue life of mining wheels made of a high-strength low alloy carbon steel (Q345), this study seeks to evaluate the effect of surface corrosion on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of the Q345 alloy. The fatigue behavior of the polished and corroded alloy was investigated. Following exposure to a 3.5 wt.% NaCl saltwater solution, polished and corroded fatigue specimens were tested using an R.R. Moore rotating-bending fatigue apparatus. Microstructural analyses via both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that one major phase, α-iron phase, ferrite, and one minor phase, colony pearlite, existed in the extracted Q345 alloy. The results of the fatigue testing showed that the polished and corroded specimens had an endurance strength of approximately 295 and 222 MPa, respectively, at 5,000,000 cycles. The corroded surface condition resulted in a decrease in the fatigue strength of the Q345 alloy by 24.6%. Scanning electron microscope fractography indicated that failure modes for polished and corroded fatigue specimens were consistent in the high-cycle low loading fatigue regime. Conversely, SEM fractography of low-cycle high-loading fatigue specimens found considerable differences in fracture surfaces between the corroded and polished fatigue specimens.

  5. Carbon Redistribution and Carbide Precipitation in a High-Strength Low-Carbon HSLA-115 Steel Studied on a Nanoscale by Atom Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Divya; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.

    2017-07-01

    HSLA-115 is a newly developed Cu-bearing high-strength low-carbon martensitic steel for use in Naval structural applications. This research provides, for the first time, a comprehensive compositional analysis of carbon redistribution and associated complex phase transformations in an isothermal aging study of HSLA-115 at 823 K (550 °C). Specifically, we characterize carbon segregation at lath boundaries, grain-refining niobium carbonitrides, cementite, and secondary hardening M2C carbides, in addition to copper precipitation, by 3D atom probe tomography (APT). Segregation of carbon (3 to 6 at. pct C) is observed at martensitic lath boundaries in the as-quenched and 0.12-hour aged microstructures. On further aging, carbon redistributes itself forming cementite and M2C carbides. Niobium carbonitride precipitates do not dissolve during the austenitizing treatment and are inherited in the as-quenched and aged microstructures; these are characterized along with cementite by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and APT. Sub-nanometer-sized M2C carbide precipitates are observed after the formation of Cu precipitates, co-located with the latter, indicating heterogeneous nucleation of M2C. The temporal evolution of the composition and morphology of M2C carbides at 823 K (550 °C) is described using APT; their precipitation kinetics is intertwined with Cu precipitates, affecting the bulk mechanical properties of HSLA-115. Phase compositions determined by APT are compared with computed compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium using ThermoCalc.

  6. Influence of density and porosity size and shape on fatigue and fracture toughness of high strength FL4405 P/M steel

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.I.; Horn, J.J.; Poland, D.D.; Sager, E.A.

    1998-12-31

    Density and sintering temperature effects were investigated with FL4405 low alloy P/M high strength steel. Monotonic tensile stress-strain, plane strain fracture toughness and fatigue behavior of smooth, notched and cracked specimens were investigated under both constant and variable amplitude loading. Two density levels, 7.0 and 7.4 g/cm{sup 3} and two sintering temperatures, 1120 and 1315 C, were evaluated. The increased density resulted in smaller pore size and pore volume and the increased sintering temperature resulted in greater pore roundness. All final fracture surfaces were brittle at the macro level while containing ductile dimples at the micro level. Fatigue surfaces contained cleavage only, ductile dimples only or mixed cleavage and ductile dimple morphology with no striations nor beachmarks. Increasing the density resulted in significant higher tensile strength, elastic modulus, ductility, fracture toughness and fatigue resistance. Increasing the sintering temperature, and hence increasing pore roundness, resulted in additional enhancement of these properties. However, this increase was not as significant as that of the density increase.

  7. Elastic Properties in Tension and Shear of High Strength Nonferrous Metals and Stainless Steel - Effect of Previous Deformation and Heat Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mebs, R W; Mcadam, D J

    1947-01-01

    A resume is given of an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation and of annealing temperature on the tensile and shear elastic properties of high strength nonferrous metals and stainless steels in the form of rods and tubes. The data were obtained from earlier technical reports and notes, and from unpublished work in this investigation. There are also included data obtained from published and unpublished work performed on an independent investigation. The rod materials, namely, nickel, monel, inconel, copper, 13:2 Cr-Ni steel, and 18:8 Cr-Ni steel, were tested in tension; 18:8 Cr-Ni steel tubes were tested in shear, and nickel, monel, aluminum-monel, and Inconel tubes were tested in both tension and shear. There are first described experiments on the relationship between hysteresis and creep, as obtained with repeated cyclic stressing of annealed stainless steel specimens over a constant load range. These tests, which preceded the measurements of elastic properties, assisted in devising the loading time schedule used in such measurements. From corrected stress-set curves are derived the five proof stresses used as indices of elastic or yield strength. From corrected stress-strain curves are derived the secant modulus and its variation with stress. The relationship between the forms of the stress-set and stress-strain curves and the values of the properties derived is discussed. Curves of variation of proof stress and modulus with prior extension, as obtained with single rod specimens, consist in wavelike basic curves with superposed oscillations due to differences of rest interval and extension spacing; the effects of these differences are studied. Oscillations of proof stress and modulus are generally opposite in manner. The use of a series of tubular specimens corresponding to different amounts of prior extension of cold reduction gave curves almost devoid of oscillation since the effects of variation of rest interval and extension spacing were

  8. Microstructural studies of advanced austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, J. A.; Ren, Jyh-Ching

    1989-11-15

    This report presents the first complete microstructural and analytical electron microscopy study of Alloy AX5, one of a series of advanced austenitic steels developed by Maziasz and co-workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for their potential application as reheater and superheater materials in power plants that will reach the end of their design lives in the 1990's. The advanced steels are modified with carbide forming elements such as titanium, niobium and vanadium. When combined with optimized thermo-mechanical treatments, the advanced steels exhibit significantly improved creep rupture properties compared to commercially available 316 stainless steels, 17--14 Cu--Mo and 800 H steels. The importance of microstructure in controlling these improvements has been demonstrated for selected alloys, using stress relaxation testing as an accelerated test method. The microstructural features responsible for the improved creep strengths have been identified by studying the thermal aging kinetics of one of the 16Ni--14Cr advanced steels, Alloy AX5, in both the solution annealed and the solution annealed plus cold worked conditions. Time-temperature-precipitation diagrams have been developed for the temperature range 600 C to 900 C and for times from 1 h to 3000 h. 226 refs., 88 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Synergic Adsorption-Biodegradation by an Advanced Carrier for Enhanced Removal of High-Strength Nitrogen and Refractory Organics.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muhammad; Liu, Sitong; Mahmood, Nasir; Mahmood, Asif; Ali, Muhammad; Zheng, Maosheng; Ni, Jinren

    2017-04-06

    Coking wastewater contains not only high-strength nitrogen but also toxic biorefractory organics. This study presents simultaneous removal of high-strength quinoline, carbon, and ammonium in coking wastewater by immobilized bacterial communities composed of a heterotrophic strain Pseudomonas sp. QG6 (hereafter referred as QG6), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), and anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria (anammox). The bacterial immobilization was implemented with the help of a self-designed porous cubic carrier that created structured microenvironments including an inner layer adapted for anaerobic bacteria, a middle layer suitable for coaggregation of certain aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, and an outer layer for heterotrophic bacteria. By coating functional polyurethane foam (FPUF) with iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs), the biocarrier (IONPs-FPUF) could provide a good outer-layer barrier for absorption and selective treatment of aromatic compounds by QG6, offer a conducive environment for anammox in the inner layer, and provide a mutualistic environment for AOB in the middle layer. Consequently, simultaneous nitrification and denitrification were reached with the significant removal of up to 322 mg L(-1) (98%) NH4, 311 mg L(-1) (99%) NO2, and 633 mg L(-1) (97%) total nitrogen (8 mg L(-1) averaged NO3 concentration was recorded in the effluent), accompanied by an efficient removal of chemical oxygen demand by 3286 mg L(-1) (98%) and 350 mg L(-1) (100%) quinoline. This study provides an alternative way to promote synergic adsorption and biodegradation with the help of a modified biocarrier that has great potential for treatment of wastewater containing high-strength carbon, toxic organic pollutants, and nitrogen.

  10. Elemental segregation and subsequent precipitation during solidification of continuous cast Nb–V–Ti high-strength low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Shuguo; Davis, Claire; Strangwood, Martin

    2014-09-15

    In this study, elemental segregation during solidification and subsequent precipitation behaviour in a continuous cast Nb–V–Ti high-strength low-alloy steel was investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and thermodynamic modelling. It is known that for steels with low carbon contents the pearlite that forms on slow cooling does so where the interdendritic liquid was present prior to final solidification. The alloying elements of Nb, Ti, Mn and V segregate into the interdendritic liquid during solidification, while Al preferentially segregates into the solidifying solid phase. The composition analysis on the slab samples verified the predicted element segregation behaviour, with a smaller difference in the concentrations of Mn and V in the pearlite and dendritic ferrite regions being observed compared to the Nb levels. Small (30–100 nm) spherical or irregular shaped Nb-rich precipitates (Nb(C, N) and (Nb, V)(C, N)) were mainly found in the pearlite regions, while angular Al-rich (60–300 nm) precipitates were found in the dendritic ferrite regions, in the form of AlN and complex AlN–V(C, N) precipitates. Small isolated ferrite regions surrounded by pearlite were observed in the microstructure and has two origins: one type is dendritic ferrite that appears as an isolated island due to a sectioning effect when observing the two-dimensional microstructure; the other is a ferrite idiomorph that forms in the interdendritic region due to the low carbon content of the steel. Accordingly, in these isolated ferrite islands two different precipitation behaviours are found; predominantly Al-rich particles in the dendritic regions or predominantly Nb-rich precipitates in the interdendritic ferrite idiomorphs. No Al-rich precipitates were observed in the interdendritic regions (pearlite or isolated ferrite idiomorphs) despite the Thermo-Calc predictions indicating a higher volume fraction of AlN in these

  11. Thermodynamic Evaluation and Optimization of the MnO-B2O3 and MnO-B2O3-SiO2 Systems and Its Application to Oxidation of High-Strength Steels Containing Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Min; Jung, In-Ho

    2015-06-01

    A complete literature review, critical evaluation, and thermodynamic optimization of phase equilibrium and thermodynamic properties of all available oxide phases in the MnO-B2O3 and MnO-B2O3-SiO2 systems at 1 bar pressure are presented. Due to the lack of the experimental data in these systems, the systematic trend of CaO- and MgO-containing systems were taken into account in the optimization. The molten oxide phase is described by the Modified Quasichemical Model. A set of optimized model parameters of all phases is obtained which reproduces all available and reliable thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data. The unexplored binary and ternary phase diagrams of the MnO-B2O3 and MnO-B2O3-SiO2 systems have been predicted for the first time. The thermodynamic calculations relevant to the oxidation of advanced high-strength steels containing boron were performed to find that B can form liquid B2O3-SiO2-rich phase in the annealing furnace under reducing N2-H2 atmosphere, which can significantly influence the wetting behavior of liquid Zn in Zn galvanizing process.

  12. The effect of aqueous phase inhibitors on mitigating potential-dependent hydrogen environments assisted cracking of an ultra-high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, Sami M.

    Low alloy ultra-high strength alloy steel (UHSS) suffer from hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC) limiting their use in marine environments. Minimum HEAC susceptibility is observed at intermediate potentials. Models explain this by a reduction in crack tip diffusible hydrogen concentration (CH,diff), enhancing threshold stress intensity (KTH) and reducing stage-II crack growth rate (da/dtII). This research seeks to extend the reduced HEAC susceptibility region by reducing C H,diff using aqueous-phase inhibitors. A multi-facetted approach was used to quantitatively study the effect of inhibitors on reducing CH,diff. Initial tests were conducted on planar electrodes in molybdate solutions at anodic potentials and in cerium solutions at cathodic potentials; however, rescaled crevices of larger dimensions were used to measure local potential and pH as a function of applied potentials and crevice dimensions. H-uptake models were used to predict local C H,diff as a function of local potential, pH and scaling factor in the anodic and cathodic tests. Micro-mechanical models were used to predict the effects of inhibition on HEAC susceptibility. Results were related to real-size cracks using scaling factors. Last, fracture experiments were undertaken to verify predicted KTH and da/dtII obtained from the integrated investigation approach. The addition of molybdate reduced da/dtII to 1 nm/s, expanding the reduced HEAC region to more anodic potentials. The enhanced mitigation was possibly due to forming a surface film more resistant to crack tip dissolution in addition to molybdate-induced chemical buffering of acidification both leading to reduced CH,diff. The addition of cerium reduced da/dt II to 9 and 32 nm/s at etaH = -0.35 and -0.47 V, respectively, compared to 50 and 500 nm/s at similar cathodic conditions in uninhibited tests. Cerium chemically forms an insoluble film that can reduce CH,diff by reducing hydrogen absorption, enhancing hydrogen desorption, and

  13. Springback Simulation and Compensation for High Strength Parts Using JSTAMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, Terumasa; Sugitomo, Nobuhiko; Ma, Ninshu

    2011-08-01

    The stamping parts made from high strength steel have a large springback which is difficult to control. With the development of simulation technology, the springback can be accurately predicted using advanced kinematic material models and CAE systems. In this paper, a stamping process for a pillar part made from several classes of high strength steel was simulated using a Yoshida-Uemori kinematic material model and the springback was well predicted. To obtain the desired part shape, CAD surfaces of the stamping tools were compensated by a CAE system JSTAMP. After applying the compensation 2 or 3 times, the dimension accuracy of the simulation for the part shape achieved was about 0.5 mm. The compensated CAD surfaces of the stamping tools were directly exported from JSTAMP to CAM for machining. The effectiveness of the compensation was verified by an experiment using the compensated tools.

  14. Standard specification for steel, sheet and strip, high-strength, low-alloy, columbium or vanadium, or both, hot-rolled and cold-rolled. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    DoD adopted. This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A05.19 on Steel Sheet and Strip. Current edition approved Jun. 10, 1998 and published September 1998. Originally published as A 607-70. Last previous edition was A 607-96.

  15. Influence of the temperature and strain rate on the structure and fracture mode of high-strength steels upon the simulation of the thermal cycle of welding and post-welding tempering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazilova, U. A.; Il'in, A. V.; Kruglova, A. A.; Motovilina, G. D.; Khlusova, E. I.

    2015-06-01

    Structural changes and the main features of the fracture of the base metal and the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone of the welded joints of high-strength steels have been studied by simulating the thermal cycle of welding and post-welding heat treatment. The effects of the simultaneous action of heating for high-temperature tempering and of deformation allowing the estimation of the impact of residual welding stresses have been studied. The probable reasons of the formation of cracks in welds upon the postwelding tempering have been determined.

  16. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  17. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  18. High strength composites evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, S.M.

    1992-02-01

    A high-strength, thick-section, graphite/epoxy composite was identified. The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate candidate materials and provide LANL with engineering properties. Eight candidate materials (Samples 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1600, and 1700) were chosen for evaluation. The Sample 1700 thermoplastic material was the strongest overall.

  19. Design principles for advanced carburized bearing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, James Anthony

    Rolling contact fatigue behavior of carburized C69-1 steel was measured and analyzed using an NTN rolling contact fatigue tester. Core precipitation of nanoscale 6 phase in C69-2 steel was measured with 1DAP microanalysis. Precipitation behavior in M50NiL-0.38C was examined using small angle neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy, one-dimensional atom probe microanalysis, three-dimensional atom probe microanalysis, Vickers microhardness, and ThermoCalc thermodynamic modeling software. Five different carbide phases were tentatively identified as Fe3C, M2C, MC, M6C, and M 23C6. The hardness evolution was modeled with the measured microstructural data and scaled to measured microhardness. A multiphase precipitation model was developed to predict the volume fraction of each phase during tempering. Stress relaxation during tempering of M50NiL-0.38C was shown to be controlled by carbide precipitation kinetics using tensile and split-ring methods. From these experiments design principles for advanced carburized steels were deduced. Because of their role in fatigue nucleation, no primary carbides should be present after solution treatment. A single phase M2C precipitate dispersion should be over-aged to be slightly larger than its peak strength state to avoid cyclic shearing and improve rolling contact fatigue resistance. Other carbide phases can be avoided because they are less efficient strengtheners than the M2C phase. The embrittling sigma phase should be avoided in the low carbon core by reducing the driving force for precipitation. The steel should have some residual austenite in the carburized case after quenching from the solution treatment; this retained austenite should be completely transformed upon a cryogenic treatment after tempering to restore favorable, residual compressive stress in the case.

  20. Microstructure correlation in high-strength steels with continuous stiffness mode nanoindentation results. High-resolution vs. low-resolution nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, Stephen A.; Bradley, John R.; Wood, Thomas D.; Miskioglu, Ibrahim

    2013-04-01

    This study utilizes instrumented nanoindentation to compare the mechanical response of a transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel to that of a quench and partition steel (QP). The nanoindenter was operated using continuous stiffness mode, and the microstructure under the indent revealed by chemical etching was examined. Examination of the microstructure in the indents by scanning electron microscopy allows a direct correlation with nanoindentation properties. It is found that the hardness measured at an indentation depth of 1.1 μm is, on average, significantly greater in the QP steel than in the TRIP steel. The continuous hardness measurement also allows the microstructure observed at the center of the indent to be correlated with the hardness values when indentation depths are <0.1 μm. This high-resolution hardness measurement allows for a direct comparison of mechanical response for the individual retained austenite phase particles in the TRIP steel with the strengthening microconstituent in the QP steel. With this methodology, the surprising result is that the TRIP retained austenite particles have a higher hardness than the QP hardening microconstituent. It is proposed that the resolution of the apparent disagreement between the hardness measurements obtained at 1.1 μm depth (QP has the higher hardness) and the 0.1-μm depth hardness measurements of the microconstituents containing retained austenite (TRIP has the higher hardness) lies in the volume fraction of the microconstituent as the QP has a two- to threefold higher volume fraction of hardening phase as compared to TRIP.

  1. Effect of chromium additions on the mechanical and physical properties and microstructure of Fe-Co-Ni-Cr-Mo-C ultra-high strength steel: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machmeier, P.; Matuszewski, T.; Jones, R.; Ayer, R.

    1997-06-01

    The effect of chromium additions to an Fe-14Co-10Ni-0.1Mo-0.16C (AF1410 based) secondary hardening steel was evaluated by mechanical and physical properties and by microstructural examination. This unique behavior was extended to encompass a large range of aging temperatures and times that may be encountered during commercial thermal treatment and/or welding. In the aging range of 482 to 550 °C, an increase in chromium from 2 to 3% in the AF1410 based steel resulted in a substantial strength decrease concomitant with an increase in toughness. This behavior is related to a peak hardening shift, early M2C carbide coarsening, and an increase in reverted austenite for the 1 wt% Cr increase. The increased aging kinetics resulting from the 3Cr steel caused a faster dissolution of Fe3C and rapid changes in chromium partitioning in the (Mo,Cr)2C carbide resulting in a coherency loss with a corresponding decrease in lattice parameter. The kinetics of the secondary hardening reaction, for the two steels, was determined by resistivity data for changes in aging parameters (time/temperature).

  2. Principles and Application of Magnetic Rubber Testing for Crack Detection in High-Strength Steel Components: II. Residual-Field Inspection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    would remove much of the uncertainty surrounding the technique. In the past, FEM software developed in- house at Colorado State University was...Steel Components: I. Active-Field Inspection, Defence Science and Technology Organisation, DSTO–TR–3032, Melbourne , Australia. [2] Harding CA and...0206 Melbourne , Australia. [3] Weltman HJ, Carroll MT, Halkias JT, Kaarlela WT, and Reynolds JT (1975), ’Method and Composition for Detecting Flaws

  3. Effect of Boron on the Strength and Toughness of Direct-Quenched Low-Carbon Niobium Bearing Ultra-High-Strength Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannula, Jaakko; Kömi, Jukka; Porter, David A.; Somani, Mahesh C.; Kaijalainen, Antti; Suikkanen, Pasi; Yang, Jer-Ren; Tsai, Shao-Pu

    2017-08-01

    The effect of boron on the microstructures and mechanical properties of laboratory-control-rolled and direct-quenched 6-mm-thick steels containing 0.08 wt pct C and 0.02 wt pct Nb were studied. The boron contents were 24 ppm and a residual amount of 4 ppm. Two different finish rolling temperatures (FRTs) of 1093 K and 1193 K (820 °C and 920 °C) were used in the hot rolling trials to obtain different levels of pancaked austenite prior to DQ. Continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams were constructed to reveal the effect of boron on the transformation behavior of these steels. Microstructural characterization was carried out using various microscopy techniques, such as light optical microscopy (LOM) and scanning electron microscopy-electron backscatter diffraction (SEM-EBSD). The resultant microstructures after hot rolling were mixtures of autotempered martensite and lower bainite (LB), having yield strengths in the range 918 to 1067 MPa with total elongations to fracture higher than 10 pct. The lower FRT of 1093 K (820 °C) produced better combinations of strength and toughness as a consequence of a higher degree of pancaking in the austenite. Removal of boron lowered the 34 J/cm2 Charpy-V impact toughness transition temperature from 206 K to 158 K (-67 °C to -115 °C) when the finishing rolling temperature of 1093 K (820 °C) was used without any loss in the strength values compared to the boron-bearing steel. This was due to the finer and more uniform grain structure in the boron-free steel. Contrary to expectations, the difference was not caused by the formation of borocarbide precipitates, as verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations, but through the grain coarsening effect of boron.

  4. Application of the Materials-by-Design Methodology to Redesign a New Grade of the High-Strength Low-Alloy Class of Steels with Improved Mechanical Properties and Processability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.

    2016-01-01

    An alternative to the traditional trial-and-error empirical approach for the development of new materials is the so-called materials-by-design approach. Within the latter approach, a material is treated as a complex system and its design and optimization is carried out by employing computer-aided engineering analyses, predictive tools, and available material databases. In the present work, the materials-by-design approach is utilized to redesign a grade of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) class of steels with improved mechanical properties (primarily strength and fracture toughness), processability (e.g., castability, hot formability, and weldability), and corrosion resistance. Toward that end, a number of material thermodynamics, kinetics of phase transformations, and physics of deformation and fracture computational models and databases have been developed/assembled and utilized within a multi-disciplinary, two-level material-by-design optimization scheme. To validate the models, their prediction is compared against the experimental results for the related steel HSLA100. Then the optimization procedure is employed to determine the optimal chemical composition and the tempering schedule for a newly designed grade of the HSLA class of steels with enhanced mechanical properties, processability, and corrosion resistance.

  5. Numerical Modeling for Hole-Edge Cracking of Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) Components in the Static Bend Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Mohr, William; Yang, Yu-Ping; Zelenak, Paul; Kimchi, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    Numerical modeling of local formability, such as hole-edge cracking and shear fracture in bending of AHSS, is one of the challenging issues for simulation engineers for prediction and evaluation of stamping and crash performance of materials. This is because continuum-mechanics-based finite element method (FEM) modeling requires additional input data, "failure criteria" to predict the local formability limit of materials, in addition to the material flow stress data input for simulation. This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for predicting hole-edge failures during static bend tests of AHSS structures. A local-strain-based failure criterion and a stress-triaxiality-based failure criterion were developed and implemented in LS-DYNA simulation code to predict hole-edge failures in component bend tests. The holes were prepared using two different methods: mechanical punching and water-jet cutting. In the component bend tests, the water-jet trimmed hole showed delayed fracture at the hole-edges, while the mechanical punched hole showed early fracture as the bending angle increased. In comparing the numerical modeling and test results, the load-displacement curve, the displacement at the onset of cracking, and the final crack shape/length were used. Both failure criteria also enable the numerical model to differentiate between the local formability limit of mechanical-punched and water-jet-trimmed holes. The failure criteria and static bend test developed here are useful to evaluate the local formability limit at a structural component level for automotive crash tests.

  6. Experimental determination of TRIP-parameter K for mild- and high-strength low-alloy steels and a super martensitic filler material.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Sebastian; Pittner, Andreas; Rethmeier, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A combined experimental numerical approach is applied to determine the transformation induced plasticity (TRIP)-parameter K for different strength low-alloy steels of grade S355J2+N and S960QL as well as the super martensitic filler CN13-4-IG containing 13 wt% chromium and 4 wt% nickel. The thermo-physical analyses were conducted using a Gleeble (®) 3500 facility. The thermal histories of the specimens to be tested were extracted from corresponding simulations of a real gas metal arc weldment. In contrast to common TRIP-experiments which are based on complex specimens a simple flat specimen was utilized together with an engineering evaluation method. The evaluation method was validated with literature values for the TRIP-parameter. It could be shown that the proposed approach enables a correct description of the TRIP behavior.

  7. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  8. Microstructure and fatigue resistance of high strength dual phase steel welded with gas metal arc welding and plasma arc welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahiale, Godwin Kwame; Oh, Yong-Jun; Choi, Won-Doo; Lee, Kwang-Bok; Jung, Jae-Gyu; Nam, Soo Woo

    2013-09-01

    This study presents the microstructure and high cycle fatigue performance of lap shear joints of dual phase steel (DP590) welded using gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and plasma arc welding (PAW) processes. High cycle fatigue tests were conducted on single and double lap joints under a load ratio of 0.1 and a frequency of 20 Hz. In order to establish a basis for comparison, both weldments were fabricated to have the same weld depth in the plate thickness. The PAW specimens exhibited a higher fatigue life, a gentle S-N slope, and a higher fatigue limit than the GMAW specimens. The improvement in the fatigue life of the PAW specimens was primarily attributed to the geometry effect that exhibited lower and wider beads resulting in a lower stress concentration at the weld toe where cracks initiate and propagate. Furthermore, the microstructural constituents in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the PAW specimens contributed to the improvement. The higher volume fraction of acicular ferrite in the HAZ beneath the weld toe enhanced the PAW specimen's resistance to fatigue crack growth. The double lap joints displayed a higher fatigue life than the single lap joints without changing the S-N slope.

  9. An Experimental Investigation on the Effect of Addition of Ternary Blend on the Mix Design Characteristics of High Strength Concrete using Steel Fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Deepa A., Dr; Verma, A. K., Dr

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the results of M60 grade of concrete. M60 grade of concrete is achieved by maximum density technique. Concrete is brittle and weak in tension and develops cracks during curing and due to thermal expansion / contraction over a period ot time. Thus the effect of addition of 1% steel fibre is studied. For ages, concrete has been one of the widely used materials for construction. When cement is manufactured, every one ton of cement produces around one ton of carbon dioxide leading to global warming and also as natural resources are finishing, so use of supplementary cementitious material like alccofine and flyash is used as partial replacement of cement is considered. The effect of binary and ternary blend on the strength characteristics is studied. The results indicate that the concrete made with alccofine and flyash generally show excellent fresh and hardened properties. The ternary system that is Portland cement-fly ash-Alccofine concrete was found to increase the strength of concrete when compared to concrete made with Portland cement or even from Portland cement and fly ash.

  10. Environmentally Friendly Anticorrosion Coating for High Strength Fasteners

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    prevent corrosion of the bare steel and subsequent creep . However, this does not necessarily explain why this would affect the notched area where...303 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT Arlington, VA 22203 NUMBER(Sl 12 . DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT There...alternative replacement coatings would provide high-strength, corrosion resistant fasteners for use in weapon systems. Traditionally, high-strength steels

  11. High Strength-High Ductility Combination Ultrafine-Grained Dual-Phase Steels Through Introduction of High Degree of Strain at Room Temperature Followed by Ultrarapid Heating During Continuous Annealing of a Nb-Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yonggang; Di, Hongshuang; Hu, Meiyuan; Zhang, Jiecen; Misra, R. D. K.

    2017-07-01

    Ultrafine-grained dual-phase (UFG-DP) steel consisting of ferrite (1.2 μm) and martensite (1 μm) was uniquely processed via combination of hot rolling, cold rolling and continuous annealing of a low-carbon Nb-microalloyed steel. Room temperature tensile properties were evaluated and fracture mechanisms studied and compared to the coarse-grained (CG) counterpart. In contrast to the CG-DP steel, UFG-DP had 12.7% higher ultimate tensile strength and 10.7% greater uniform elongation. This is partly attributed to the increase in the initial strain-hardening rate, decrease in nanohardness ratio of martensite and ferrite. Moreover, a decreasing number of ferrite grains with {001} orientation increased the cleavage fracture stress and increased the crack initiation threshold stress with consequent improvement in ductility UFG-DP steel.

  12. Effects of chloride ion concentration and pH values on the corrosion behavior of Cr12Ni3Co12Mo4W ultra-high-strength martensitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-yan; Dong, Chao-fang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiao-gang; Zhong, Ping

    2016-11-01

    The effects of Cl- ion concentration and pH values on the corrosion behavior of Cr12Ni3Co12Mo4W ultra-high-strength martensitic stainless steel (UHSMSS) were investigated by a series of electrochemical tests combined with observations by stereology microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A critical Cl- ion concentration was found to exist (approximately 0.1wt%), above which pitting occurred. The pitting potential decreased with increasing Cl- ion concentration. A UHSMSS specimen tempered at 600°C exhibited a better pitting corrosion resistance than the one tempered at 400°C. The corrosion current density and passive current density of the UHSMSS tempered at 600°C decreased with increasing pH values of the corrosion solution. The pits developed a shallower dish geometry with increasing polarization potential. A lacy cover on the pits of the UHSMSS tempered at 400°C accelerated pitting, whereas corrosion products deposited in the pits of the UHSMSS tempered at 600°C hindered pitting.

  13. Effects of welding and post-weld heat treatments on nanoscale precipitation and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel hardened by NiAl and Cu nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Z. B.; Luan, J. H.; Guo, W.; Poplawsky, J. D.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-09-01

    The effects of welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on nanoscale co-precipitation, grain structure, and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel were studied through a combination of atom probe tomography (APT) and mechanical tests. Our results indicate that the welding process dissolves all pre-existing nanoparticles and causes grain coarsening in the fusion zone, resulting in a soft and ductile weld without any cracks in the as-welded condition. A 550 °C PWHT induces fine-scale re-precipitation of NiAl and Cu co-precipitates with high number densities and ultra-fine sizes, leading to a large recovery of strength but a loss of ductility with intergranular failure, whereas a 600 °C PWHT gives rise to coarse-scale re-precipitation of nanoparticles together with the formation of a small amount of reverted austenite, resulting in a great recovery in both strength and ductility. Our analysis indicates that the degree of strength recovery is dependent mainly upon the re-precipitation microstructure of nanoparticles, together with grain size and reversion of austenite, while the ductility recovery is sensitive to the grain-boundary structure. In conclusion, APT reveals that the grain-boundary segregation of Mn and P may be the main reason for the 550 °C embrittlement, and the enhanced ductility at 600 °C is ascribed to a possible reduction of the segregation and reversion of austenite.

  14. Effects of welding and post-weld heat treatments on nanoscale precipitation and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel hardened by NiAl and Cu nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Z. B.; Luan, J. H.; Guo, W.; Poplawsky, J. D.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-09-01

    The effects of welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on nanoscale co-precipitation, grain structure, and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel were studied through a combination of atom probe tomography (APT) and mechanical tests. Our results indicate that the welding process dissolves all pre-existing nanoparticles and causes grain coarsening in the fusion zone, resulting in a soft and ductile weld without any cracks in the as-welded condition. A 550 °C PWHT induces fine-scale re-precipitation of NiAl and Cu co-precipitates with high number densities and ultra-fine sizes, leading to a large recovery of strength but a loss of ductility with intergranular failure, whereas a 600 °C PWHT gives rise to coarse-scale re-precipitation of nanoparticles together with the formation of a small amount of reverted austenite, resulting in a great recovery in both strength and ductility. Our analysis indicates that the degree of strength recovery is dependent mainly upon the re-precipitation microstructure of nanoparticles, together with grain size and reversion of austenite, while the ductility recovery is sensitive to the grain-boundary structure. In conclusion, APT reveals that the grain-boundary segregation of Mn and P may be the main reason for the 550 °C embrittlement, and the enhanced ductility at 600 °C is ascribed to a possible reduction of the segregation and reversion of austenite.

  15. Systems design of advanced gear steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, John Patrick

    A new generation of Ni-Co secondary hardening gear steels has been developed using a systems approach. These high toughness ultrahigh-strength martensitic steels show great promise for demanding gear applications. Quantitative science-based modeling was used to create prototype alloys of superior strength and fatigue resistance over conventional steels. Carburizing and strengthening models were developed to relate processing parameters to microstructure and microstructure to strength. The failure of the DICTRA software to accurately predict the carburizing behavior of Ni-Co steels led to a series of experiments to refine its kinetic database. New carbon diffusivities were calculated from the concentration gradients of carburized model alloys, resulting in a significant improvement of simulation accuracy. A structure/property model was created to equate the strength of a secondary hardening steel to the sum of the effects of solid solution, precipitates, dislocation density, and the substructure of the lath martensite matrix. The strengthening model was subsequently combined with the carburizing simulations to predict the hardness gradient in a case-hardened alloy based upon initial carburizing conditions. In addition, existing precipitation theory was used in conjunction with the microstructure/strength relationship to simulate the evolution of material hardness during secondary hardening. The creation of three prototype gear steels began with the use of the strengthening model to establish the carbon and alloying element contents required to reach the core and case hardness objectives of 50 and 70 HRC respectively. The design approach also included the establishment of proper transformation and solution temperatures and the maximization of the efficiency of the Msb2C carbide strengthening dispersion. The core hardnesses of the C3-A and B prototypes significantly exceeded the design goal. A reduction in core carbon content from 0.16 to 0.12 weight percent was

  16. An Overview of Dual-Phase Steels: Advances in Microstructure-Oriented Processing and Micromechanically Guided Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasan, C. C.; Diehl, M.; Yan, D.; Bechtold, M.; Roters, F.; Schemmann, L.; Zheng, C.; Peranio, N.; Ponge, D.; Koyama, M.; Tsuzaki, K.; Raabe, D.

    2015-07-01

    Dual-phase (DP) steel is the flagship of advanced high-strength steels, which were the first among various candidate alloy systems to find application in weight-reduced automotive components. On the one hand, this is a metallurgical success story: Lean alloying and simple thermomechanical treatment enable use of less material to accomplish more performance while complying with demanding environmental and economic constraints. On the other hand, the enormous literature on DP steels demonstrates the immense complexity of microstructure physics in multiphase alloys: Roughly 50 years after the first reports on ferrite-martensite steels, there are still various open scientific questions. Fortunately, the last decades witnessed enormous advances in the development of enabling experimental and simulation techniques, significantly improving the understanding of DP steels. This review provides a detailed account of these improvements, focusing specifically on (a) microstructure evolution during processing, (b) experimental characterization of micromechanical behavior, and (c) the simulation of mechanical behavior, to highlight the critical unresolved issues and to guide future research efforts.

  17. Advanced steel reheat furnaces: Research and development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Q.; Koppang, R.; Maly, P.; Moyeda, D.; Li, X.

    1999-01-14

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of two phases of a three-phase project to develop and evaluate an Advanced Steel Reheat Furnace (SSRF) concept which incorporates two proven and commercialized technologies, oxy-fuel enriched air (OEA) combustion and gas reburning (GR). The combined technologies aim to improve furnace productivity with higher flame radiant heat transfer in the heating zones of a steel reheat furnace while controlling potentially higher NOx emissions from these zones. The project was conducted under a contract sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). Specifically, this report summarizes the results of a modeling study and an experimental study to define and evaluate the issues which affect the integration and performance of the combined technologies. Section 2.0 of the report describes the technical approach uses in the development and evaluation of the advanced steel reheat furnace. Section 3.0 presents results of the modeling study applied to a model steel furnace. Experimental validation of the modeling results obtained from EER`s Fuel Evaluation Facility (FEF) pilot-scale furnace discussed in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides an economic evaluation on the cost effectiveness of the advanced reheat furnace concept. Section 6.0 concludes the report with recommendations on the applicability of the combined technologies of steel reheat furnaces.

  18. Effects of welding and post-weld heat treatments on nanoscale precipitation and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel hardened by NiAl and Cu nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Jiao, Z. B.; Luan, J. H.; Guo, W.; ...

    2016-09-01

    The effects of welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on nanoscale co-precipitation, grain structure, and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel were studied through a combination of atom probe tomography (APT) and mechanical tests. Our results indicate that the welding process dissolves all pre-existing nanoparticles and causes grain coarsening in the fusion zone, resulting in a soft and ductile weld without any cracks in the as-welded condition. A 550 °C PWHT induces fine-scale re-precipitation of NiAl and Cu co-precipitates with high number densities and ultra-fine sizes, leading to a large recovery of strength but a loss of ductility withmore » intergranular failure, whereas a 600 °C PWHT gives rise to coarse-scale re-precipitation of nanoparticles together with the formation of a small amount of reverted austenite, resulting in a great recovery in both strength and ductility. Our analysis indicates that the degree of strength recovery is dependent mainly upon the re-precipitation microstructure of nanoparticles, together with grain size and reversion of austenite, while the ductility recovery is sensitive to the grain-boundary structure. In conclusion, APT reveals that the grain-boundary segregation of Mn and P may be the main reason for the 550 °C embrittlement, and the enhanced ductility at 600 °C is ascribed to a possible reduction of the segregation and reversion of austenite.« less

  19. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  20. Performance Steel Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    alloys , foundry, muzzle brake, supply center, tooling, sources Notice Distribution Statement A Format Information Report created in Microsoft Word...Development of Sand Properties 103 Advanced Modeling Dataset.. 105 High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) Steels 107 Steel Casting and Engineering Support...University, University of Northern Iowa, Non- Ferrous Founders’ Society, QuesTek, buyCASTINGS.com, Spokane Industries, Nova Precision Casting, Waukesha

  1. High-Strength, Superelastic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Malcolm; Noebe, Ronald; Dellacorte, Christopher; Bigelow, Glen; Thomas, Fransua

    2013-01-01

    can be used in the heat treatment process, less energy will be consumed, and there will be less dimensional distortion and quench cracking. This results in fewer scrap parts, less material waste from large amounts of material removal, and fewer machining steps to rework parts that are out of specification. This material has a combination of properties that have been previously unobtainable. The material has a Young s modulus of approximately 95 GPa (about half that of conventional steels), moderate density (10 to 15% lower than conventional steels), excellent corrosion resistance, and high hardness (58 to 62 HRC). These properties make this material uniquely suited for advanced bearings.

  2. Development of Advanced 9Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and Austenitic Stainless Steels for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Tan, Lizhen; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel Grade 92, with or without thermomechanical treatment (TMT), and austenitic stainless steels HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine precipitate strengthening) and NF709 were selected as potential candidate structural materials in the U.S. Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) program. The objective is to develop advanced steels with improved properties as compared with reference materials such as Grade 91 and Type 316H steels that are currently in nuclear design codes. Composition modification and/or processing optimization (e.g., TMT and cold-work) were performed to improve properties such as resistance to thermal aging, creep, creep-fatigue, fracture, and sodium corrosion. Testings to characterize these properties for the advanced steels were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the U.S. SFR program. This paper focuses on the resistance to thermal aging and creep of the advanced steels. The advanced steels exhibited up to two orders of magnitude increase in creep life compared to the reference materials. Preliminary results on the weldment performance of the advanced steels are also presented. The superior performance of the advanced steels would improve reactor design flexibility, safety margins and economics.

  3. Effect of heat treatment on the structure and the mechanical and technological properties of corrosion-resistant nitrogen-bearing 0Kh16N4AFD steel for high-strength welding constructions of railway engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O. A.; Blinov, V. M.; Kostina, M. V.; Lukin, E. I.; Blinov, E. V.; Rigina, L. G.

    2015-07-01

    The problems of applying a new nitrogen-alloyed martensitic corrosion-resistant 0Kh16N4AFD steel as a promising material for manufacturing car bodies are considered. The microstructure and properties of the steel after various heat treatments have been studied. It is shown that the steel is not behind 12Kh18N9T steel in the characteristics of ductility and corrosion resistance and significantly exceeds it in the static and cyclic strengths.

  4. High-strength rolled sections with structural anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odesskii, P. D.; Chernenko, V. T.

    1992-08-01

    The article investigates the properties of high-strength sections .for building structures. It examines theinfluence of structural anisotropy on the operational properties of profiles of steel St3ps strengthened fromthe rolling heat on a high-speed mill. It is shown that the use of such rolled sections in industo, is promising.

  5. An advanced cavitation resistant austenitic stainless steel for pumps

    SciTech Connect

    McCaul, C.

    1996-10-01

    Cavitation damage is a chronic problem leading to impaired pump performance, and eventual failure in a wide range of industrial applications. Pump manufacturers recognize that cavitation damage can be minimized by utilizing advanced hydraulic designs and employing new state-of-the-art materials. The materials solution is particularly attractive because it does not involve detailed engineering studies, new pattern equipment, or long lead times. This paper traces the development, over the past decade, of a new class of cavitation resistant stainless steels. The properties and engineering characteristics of these alloys are described, and several initial field applications are discussed.

  6. Corrosion fatigue of high strength fastener materials in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipton, D. G.

    1983-12-01

    Environmental effects which significantly reduce the fatigue life of metals are discussed. Corrosion fatigue is a major concern in the engineering application of high strength fasteners in marine environments. The corrosion fatigue failure of an AISI 41L4O high strength steel blade to hub attachment bolt at the MOD-OA 200 kW wind turbine generator was investigated. The reduction of fatigue strength of AISI 41L4O in marine environments and to obtain similar corrosion fatigue data for candidate replacement materials was studied. The AISI 4140, PH 13-8Mo stainless steel, alloy 718 and alloy MP-35N were tested in axial fatigue at a frequency of 20 Hz in dry air and natural seawater. The fatigue data are fitted by regression equations to allow determination of fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure.

  7. Corrosion fatigue of high strength fastener materials in seawater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental effects which significantly reduce the fatigue life of metals are discussed. Corrosion fatigue is a major concern in the engineering application of high strength fasteners in marine environments. The corrosion fatigue failure of an AISI 41L4O high strength steel blade to hub attachment bolt at the MOD-OA 200 kW wind turbine generator was investigated. The reduction of fatigue strength of AISI 41L4O in marine environments and to obtain similar corrosion fatigue data for candidate replacement materials was studied. The AISI 4140, PH 13-8Mo stainless steel, alloy 718 and alloy MP-35N were tested in axial fatigue at a frequency of 20 Hz in dry air and natural seawater. The fatigue data are fitted by regression equations to allow determination of fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure.

  8. The Effect of Nitrogen and Titanium on the Toughness of High Strength Saw Weld Deposits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-12

    for joining high strength steels . In this endeavor, ten butt-welded HY-100 sample plates were produced using the submerged arc welding process. With...was shown to degrade toughness. In this case, the DBTT increased at a rate of +11C for every 0.01 weight percent increase in titanium. Examination of...to degrade toughness through precipitation and dispersion hardening effects. It is concluded that for the welding of high strength steels , nitrogen

  9. A universal fracture criterion for high-strength materials

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Rui Tao; Zhang, Zhe Feng

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed advanced high-strength materials like metallic glasses, nanocrystalline metallic materials, and advanced ceramics usually fracture in a catastrophic brittle manner, which makes it quite essential to find a reasonable fracture criterion to predict their brittle failure behaviors. Based on the analysis of substantial experimental observations of fracture behaviors of metallic glasses and other high-strength materials, here we developed a new fracture criterion and proved it effective in predicting the critical fracture conditions under complex stress states. The new criterion is not only a unified one which unifies the three classical failure criteria, i.e., the maximum normal stress criterion, the Tresca criterion and the Mohr-Coulomb criterion, but also a universal criterion which has the ability to describe the fracture mechanisms of a variety of different high-strength materials under various external loading conditions.

  10. Deformation and fracture of a composite material based on a high-strength maraging steel covered with a melt-quenched Co69Fe4Cr4Si12B11 alloy layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevost'yanov, M. A.; Kolmakov, A. G.; Molokanov, V. V.; Zabolotnyi, V. T.; Umnov, P. P.; Umnova, N. V.

    2011-04-01

    Multifractal analysis is used to study the deformation and fracture of a promising composite material consisting of a wire base made of K17N9M14 maraging steel covered with a surface layer made from a Co69Fe4Cr4Si12B11 amorphous alloy. As compared to its components, this material has a substantially better set of the mechanical properties.

  11. Gas-Solid Interactions During Nonisothermal Heat Treatment of a High-Strength CrMnCN Austenitic Steel Powder: Influence of Atmospheric Conditions and Heating Rate on the Densification Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasokha, Nikolaj; Weber, Sebastian; Huth, Stephan; Zumsande, Kathrin; Theisen, Werner

    2012-11-01

    This work deals with gas-solid interactions between a high-alloyed steel powder and the surrounding atmosphere during continuous heating. It is motivated by the recently developed corrosion-resistant CrMnCN austenitic cast steels. Here, powder metallurgical processing would be desirable to manufacture highly homogeneous parts and/or novel corrosion-resistant metal-matrix composites. However, the successful use of this new production route calls for a comprehensive investigation of interactions between the sintering atmosphere and the metallic powder to prevent undesirable changes to the chemical composition, e.g., degassing of nitrogen or evaporation of manganese. In this study, dilatometric measurements combined with residual gas analysis, high-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations provided detailed information about the influence of different atmospheric conditions on the microstructure, constitution, and densification behavior of a gas-atomized CrMnCN steel powder during continuous heating. Intensive desorption of nitrogen led to the conclusion that a vacuum atmosphere is not suitable for powder metallurgical (PM) processing. Exposure to an N2-containing atmosphere resulted in the formation of nitrides and lattice expansion. Experimental findings have shown that the N content can be controlled by the nitrogen partial pressure. Furthermore, the reduction of surface oxides because of a carbothermal reaction at elevated temperatures and the resulting enhancement of the powder's densification behavior are discussed in this work.

  12. Prediction of Microstructure in High-Strength Ductile Forging Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, M.; Back, A.; Hirt, G.; Keul, C.; Bleck, W.

    2010-06-15

    Governmental, environmental and economic demands call for lighter, stiffer and at the same time cheaper products in the vehicle industry. Especially safety relevant parts have to be stiff and at the same time ductile. The strategy of this project was to improve the mechanical properties of forging steel alloys by employing a high-strength and ductile bainitic microstructure in the parts while maintaining cost effective process chains to reach these goals for high stressed forged parts. Therefore, a new steel alloy combined with an optimized process chain has been developed. To optimize the process chain with a minimum of expensive experiments, a numerical approach was developed to predict the microstructure of the steel alloy after the process chain based on FEM simulations of the forging and cooling combined with deformation-time-temperature-transformation-diagrams.

  13. Clean Steel: Advancing the State of the Art (TRP 0003)

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar Seetharaman; Alan W. Cramb

    2004-05-19

    This project had 3 objectives: (1) to determine the kinetic factors governing inclusion removal from liquid steels at a slag metal interface; (2) to develop a methodology to enable steels of less than 1 ppm total oxygen to be produced with an average inclusion diameter of less than 5 {micro}m; and, (3) to determine the slag-metal interface conditions necessary for ultra clean steels. In objectives 1, and 3, the major finding was that dissolution rates of solid particles in slags were found to be significant in both ladle and tundish slags and must be included in a model to predict steel cleanliness. The work towards objective 2 indicated that liquid steel temperature was a very significant factor in our understanding of clean steel potential and that undercooled steels equilibrated with low oxygen potential inert gases have the potential to be significantly cleaner than current steels. Other work indicated that solidification front velocity could be used to push particles to produce clean steels and that reoxidation must be severely curtailed to allow the potential for clean steels to be realized.

  14. Thermal helium desorption behavior in advanced ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Akihiko; Sugano, R.; Matsushita, Y.; Ukai, S.

    2005-02-01

    Thermal helium desorption measurements were performed to investigate the difference in the helium trapping and accumulation behavior among a reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel and oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) steels after implantation of He+ ions at room temperature. Thermal helium desorption spectra (THDS) were obtained during annealing to 1200 °C at a heating rate of 1 °C/s. The THDS of the ODS steels are very similar to that of the RAF steel, except for the presence of the peak in the temperature range from 800 to 1000 °C, where the α γ transformation related helium desorption from the γ-phase is considered to occur in the 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels. The fraction of helium desorption becomes larger at higher temperatures, and this trend is increased with the amount of implanted helium. In the 9Cr-ODS steels, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration mechanism was smaller than that in the RAF steel. This suggests that the bubble formation was suppressed in the ODS steels. In the 12Cr-ODS steel, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration reached more than 90%, suggesting that the trapping capacity of martensite phase in the 9Cr-ODS steel is rather large.

  15. Evaluation of a Diffusion/Trapping Model for Hydrogen Ingress in High-Strength Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-14

    to apply a diffusion/trapping model for hydrogen ingress in three high-strength alloys, AISI 4340 steel , Monel K500, and MP35N. The model is coupled to...rate of H ingress into the metal is determined by the flux across the metal surface. The 4340 steel was tested at yield strengths of approximately 175...5 AISI 4340 Steel ....................................................... 5 Monel K(500

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  17. Mechanical behavior study of laser welded joints for DP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi

    2008-03-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are gaining considerable market shares in the automotive industry. The development and application of Dual Phase (DP) steel is just a consistent step towards high-strength steel grades with improved mechanical behavior. Tailor welded blanks with DP steel are promoted in the application of Body-In-White (BIW) structure by the automotive industry. A tailor welded blank consists of several flat sheets that are laser welded together before stamping. Applied cases of tailor welded blanks of high strength steels on the automotive structural parts are investigated in this paper. The mechanical behavior of laser welded joints for DP steel is studied. Microstructure of laser welded joints for DP steel was observed by SEM. Martensite in the weld seam explains the higher strength of welded joints than the base metal. Results show that the strain safety tolerance of laser welded seam for high strength steel can meet the requirement of automobile parts for stamping if the location of laser welded seam is designed reasonably.

  18. Effects of retained austenite on the tensile properties and toughness of ultra-high strength martensitic precipitation hardened stainless steels. Final technical report, 1 April 1997--31 March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W.M.

    1998-12-14

    The purpose of this work was to assess the effects of the amount of retained austenite content on the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of martensitic precipitation strengthened stainless steels for four different precipitation strengthening systems, one utilizing NiTi strengthening and three utilizing R-phase strengthening. The retained austenite contents in the four systems were varied by varying composition. The austenite content in the NiTi strengthened system was varied by varying the chromium content and the austenite content in the R-phase strengthened Systems was varied by varying the nickel content. The room temperature toughness levels of the NiTi strengthened system were quite low and it was decided not to pursue this system further. The three R-phase strengthened systems had sufficient room temperature toughness and strength to be of further interest. Of these three systems the primary focus was on the 12Cr/12Co/5Mo system. In this system four alloys, identical except for variations in nickel content, were the primary focus of the work. These alloys achieved, on tempering at 5250 C for 3.16 hours, yield strengths on the order of 210 ksi and ultimate tensile strengths of 235 ksi. The effect of test temperature on the Charpy impact energy was investigated for two tempering temperatures for these four alloys. It was found for both tempering conditions that lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures were favored by increasing amounts of austenite in the structure. In fact, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature was quite low, about -750 C, for the tempered at 5250 C for 3.16 hours microstructure of the alloy in this series which contained the highest nickel and the highest amount of retained austenite after quenching. At this point it is believed the austenite content is an important contributor to the low ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of this microstructure.

  19. Advancements in Steel for Weight Reduction of P900 Armor Plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    were investigated as alternatives to MIL-PRF- 32269 steel alloys for application in P900 perforated armor currently used for Army ground combat...ADVANCEMENTS IN STEEL FOR WEIGHT REDUCTION OF P900 ARMOR PLATE R. A. Howell*, J. S. Montgomery Survivability Materials Branch Army Research Lab...Aberdeen Proving Grounds , MD 21001 D.C. Van Aken Missouri University for Science and Technology Rolla, MO 65401 ABSTRACT Ballistic tests

  20. Multiscale Modeling of the Deformation of Advanced Ferritic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr M. Ghoniem; Nick Kioussis

    2009-04-18

    The objective of this project is to use the multi-scale modeling of materials (MMM) approach to develop an improved understanding of the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of high-temperature structural materials that are being developed or proposed for Gen IV applications. In particular, the research focuses on advanced ferritic/ martensitic steels to enable operation up to 650-700°C, compared to the current 550°C limit on high-temperature steels.

  1. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 6 of 6: Temperature Measurement of Galvanneal Steel

    SciTech Connect

    S.W. Allison; D.L. Beshears; W.W. Manges

    1999-06-30

    This report describes the successful completion of the development of an accurate in-process measurement instrument for galvanneal steel surface temperatures. This achievement results from a joint research effort that is a part of the American Iron and Steel Institute's (AISI) Advanced Process Control Program, a collaboration between the U.S> Department of Energy and fifteen North American Steelmakers. This three-year project entitled ''Temperature Measurement of Galvanneal Steel'' uses phosphor thermography, and outgrowth of Uranium enrichment research at Oak Ridge facilities. Temperature is the controlling factor regarding the distribution of iron and zinc in the galvanneal strip coating, which in turn determines the desired product properties

  2. Reliable Welding of HSLA Steels by Square Wave Pulsing Using an Advanced Sensing (EDAP) Technique.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-30

    situation is the result of welding on A710 steel . (A similar effect on welding on HY80 ?) The following is offered by Woods and Milner (Ref. 12): "The...AD-R69 762 RELIABLE MELDING OF HSLA STEELS BY SQUARE MAVE PULSING 1/2 USING AN ADV NCED.. (U) APPLIED FUSION TECHNOLOGIES INC FORT COLLINS CO C...6 p . 0 Report 0001 AZ AD-A 168 762 I "RELIABLE WELDING OF HSLA STEELS BY SQUARE WAVE PULSING USING AN ADVANCED SENSING (EDAP) TECHNIQUE- Preliminary

  3. Advances in energy conservation of China steel industry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenqiang; Cai, Jiuju; Ye, Zhu

    2013-01-01

    The course, technical progresses, and achievements of energy conservation of China steel industry (CSI) during 1980-2010 were summarized. Then, the paper adopted e-p method to analyze the variation law and influencing factors of energy consumptions of large- and medium-scale steel plants within different stages. It is pointed out that energy consumption per ton of crude steel has been almost one half lower in these thirty years, with 60% as direct energy conservation owing to the change of process energy consumption and 40% as indirect energy conservation attributed to the adjustment of production structure. Next, the latest research progress of some key common technologies in CSI was introduced. Also, the downtrend of energy consumption per ton of crude steel and the potential energy conservation for CSI during 2011-2025 were forecasted. Finally, it is indicated that the key topic of the next 15 years' research on the energy conservation of CSI is the synergistic operation of material flow and energy flow. It could be achieved by the comprehensive study on energy flow network optimization, such as production, allocation, utilization, recovery, reuse, and resource, according to the energy quantity, quality, and user demand following the first and second laws of thermodynamics.

  4. Advances in Energy Conservation of China Steel Industry

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenqiang; Cai, Jiuju; Ye, Zhu

    2013-01-01

    The course, technical progresses, and achievements of energy conservation of China steel industry (CSI) during 1980–2010 were summarized. Then, the paper adopted e-p method to analyze the variation law and influencing factors of energy consumptions of large- and medium-scale steel plants within different stages. It is pointed out that energy consumption per ton of crude steel has been almost one half lower in these thirty years, with 60% as direct energy conservation owing to the change of process energy consumption and 40% as indirect energy conservation attributed to the adjustment of production structure. Next, the latest research progress of some key common technologies in CSI was introduced. Also, the downtrend of energy consumption per ton of crude steel and the potential energy conservation for CSI during 2011–2025 were forecasted. Finally, it is indicated that the key topic of the next 15 years' research on the energy conservation of CSI is the synergistic operation of material flow and energy flow. It could be achieved by the comprehensive study on energy flow network optimization, such as production, allocation, utilization, recovery, reuse, and resource, according to the energy quantity, quality, and user demand following the first and second laws of thermodynamics. PMID:23533344

  5. High strength high modulus ceramic fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterolf, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Low cost method was developed for producing high strength, high modulus, continuous ceramic oxide fibers. Process transforms inexpensive metallic salts into syrup-like liquids that can be fiberized at room temperatures. Resulting salt fibers are then converted to oxides by calcination at relatively low temperatures.

  6. Welding high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, P. G.; Hoppes, R. V.; Hasemeyer, E. A.; Masubuchi, K.

    1974-01-01

    Handbook has been published which integrates results of 19 research programs involving welding of high-strength aluminum alloys. Book introduces metallurgy and properties of aluminum alloys by discussing commercial alloys and heat treatments. Several current welding processes are reviewed such as gas tungsten-arc welding and gas metal-arc welding.

  7. High strength composites evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, S.M.

    1992-02-01

    A high-strength, thick-section, graphite/epoxy composite was identified. The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate candidate materials and provide LANL with engineering properties. Eight candidate materials (Samples 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1600, and 1700) were chosen for evaluation. The Sample 1700 thermoplastic material was the strongest overall.

  8. STRESS CORROSION OF HIGH STRENGTH STEELS AND ALLOYS; ARTIFICIAL ENVIRONMENT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Ladish D6Ac, 300M, Vascojet 100, AM355 , PH15-7Mo, B120VCA, 4137Co, Rocoly 270, and Ardeform 301. U-bend stress corrosion tests are progressing on 4137...Co, AM355 115-8Mo. B120VCA, and Ardeform 301. Bent specimens of 4137 Co and AM 355 are still under test. No failures were observed on bent beam...specimens of AM355 (secondary direction) cold-rolled to 250, 261, 302 Kpsi strength levels. Little change was noted in the bent beam specimens of 4137 Co

  9. Investigation of Solidification of High Strength Steel Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1961-12-01

    2U9-259. 23. A. Kohn: "Etude de I’homogeneisation des segregations dendritiques de phosphore et ’ rsenic dans les aciers ...de la structure en bandes dans 1’ acier forge", Memoires Scientifiques de la Revue de Metallurgie, v. «j£, 6, I96I, pp. 423-^3...dans les aciers ". Revue de Metallurgie, February i960, pp. 117-134. 35. R. Castro and A. Gueussier: "La fragilite des aciers speciaux

  10. Cadmium Alternatives for High-Strength Steel JTP. Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-24

    repair coatings): • Brush Zn-Ni (SIFCO 4018) • Brush Sn-Zn (LDC 5030) • Spray Aluminum- ceramic (Sermetel 249/273) Coatings tested during Phase I Tests...Aluminum- Ceramic Repair Coating (Sermetel) • Zinc-nickel brush repair • Tin-Zinc brush repair • Control – Cd Brush All Phase II testing methods will be...coating applied to bare substrate and tested – Final qualification – candidate primary coating of choice is abraded to generate a bare area and then

  11. Cadmium Alternatives for High-Strength Steel JTP - Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-27

    Seattle) • Sn-Zn (Dipsol) – Repair coatings: • Brush Zn-Ni (SIFCO 4018) • Brush SN-ZN (LDC 5030) • Spray Aluminum- ceramic (Sermetel 249/273...IVD Al: Cametoid fasteners, washers and HE bars – Repair test coatings (Cd brush control) • Aluminum- Ceramic Repair Coating (Sermetel) • Zinc-nickel...qualification – coating applied to bare substrate and tested – Final qualification – candidate primary coating of choice is abraded to generate a bare area

  12. Cadmium Coating Alternatives for High- Strength Steel JTP - Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-03

    Acidic Zn-Ni (Boeing, Seattle) • Sn-Zn (Dipsol) – Repair coatings: • Brush Zn-Ni (SIFCO 4018) • Brush Sn-Zn (LDC 5030) • Spray Aluminum- ceramic ...dark brown area through the center of the panel; the coating is smooth and adherent, but has excessive powder 0.5 mils +/- 0.06 Sprayed Al - ceramic ...AIR FORCE Repair Coating Bend Adhesion Test Results Brush Plated Cd (baseline) Sprayed Aluminum - ceramic • Brush plated Cd and sprayed Aluminum

  13. Hydrogen Assisted Cracking of High Strength Steel Welds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    AG . 69 floveof Shieldin~ga % i.* *i • f, s’ eiettrode gop3.5mm 9 ti ’s I *eloirrae~ gap 1.2 3𔃿f’. - apa 71.. 6- ID , --- A - - -- - - 10 12 I 1 18...Institute of Technology, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Chicago, IL 60616 1 ATTN: Dr. Norma ’ Breyer Director, U.S. Army Materials

  14. Navy High-Strength Steel Corrosion-Fatigue Modeling Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    assist in the establishment of maintenance options for corroded components. Experimental and analytical tools have been developed to classify corrosion...5.2.2 kteff Extraction Using Laser Profilometry Surface Mapping and Stress Check...Polarization Measurement of AF1410 in Deaerated 3.5% NaCl.......................83 4.2.4 -1 (a) Typical Laser Profilometery Measurement and (b) the

  15. Compatibility Assessment of Advanced Stainless Steels in Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Type 316L stainless steel capsules containing commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS (austenitic, 14Cr-16Ni), NF-616 (ferritic/martensitic, 9Cr-2W-0.5Mo), or 316L (austenitic, 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo) stainless steel were exposed at 600 or 700 C for 100 and 400 h as a screening test for compatibility. Using weight change, tensile testing, and metallographic analysis, HT-UPS and 316L were found to be largely immune to changes resulting from sodium exposure, but NF-616 was found susceptible to substantial decarburization at 700 C. Subsequently, two thermal convection loops (TCLs) constructed of 316L and loaded with commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS and 316L were operated for 2000 h each one between 500 and 650 C, the other between 565 and 725 C at a flow rate of about 1.5 cm/s. Changes in specimen appearance, weight, and tensile properties were observed to be very minor in all cases, and there was no metallographic evidence of microstructure changes, composition gradients, or mass transfer resulting from prolonged exposure in a TCL. Thus, it appears that HT-UPS and 316L stainless steels are similarly compatible with commercially pure sodium under these exposure conditions.

  16. Marketing research for EE G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shackson, R.H.

    1991-10-09

    This report summarizes research conducted by ITI to evaluate the commercialization potential of EG G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials. The remainder of the report describes the nature of demand for maraging steel, extent of demand, competitors, environmental trends, technology life cycle, industry structure, and conclusion. (JL)

  17. Preparation of high-strength nanometer scale twinned coating and foil

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Xinghang; Misra, Amit; Nastasi, Michael A.; Hoagland, Richard G.

    2006-07-18

    Very high strength single phase stainless steel coating has been prepared by magnetron sputtering onto a substrate. The coating has a unique microstructure of nanometer spaced twins that are parallel to each other and to the substrate surface. For cases where the coating and substrate do not bind strongly, the coating can be peeled off to provide foil.

  18. Aircraft Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-19

    NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders 19 February 2009...MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 19 February 2009 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 ii SUMMARY Five high strength and four stainless steels have been studied, identifying their

  19. Development of New Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Buck

    2005-08-30

    A new family of innovative martensitic stainless steels, 521-A, 521-B, and 521-C has been developed by Advanced Steel Technology, LLC (Trafford, PA) as high strength fastener (bolt) materials for use at moderate temperatures in turbine engines, including steam turbines, gas turbines, and aircraft engines. The primary objective of the development program was to create a martensitic stainless steel with high strength at moderate temperatures, and which could replace the expensive nickel-based superalloy IN 718 in some fasteners applications. A secondary objective was to replace conventional 12Cr steels such as AISI 422 used as blades, buckets and shafts that operate at intermediate temperatures in turbine engines with stronger steel. The composition of the new alloys was specifically designed to produce excellent mechanical properties while integrating heat treatment steps into production to reduce energy consumption during manufacturing. As a result, production costs and energy consumption during production of rolled bar products is significantly lower than conventional materials. Successful commercialization of the new alloys would permit the installed cost of certain turbine engines to be reduced without sacrificing high availability or operational flexibility, thereby enhancing the global competitiveness of U.S. turbine engine manufacturers. Moreover, the domestic specialty steel industry would also benefit through increased productivity and reduced operating costs, while increasing their share of the international market for turbine engine fasteners, blades, buckets and shafts.

  20. Development of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Improvement in the high-pressure turbopumps, both fuel and oxidizer, in the Space Shuttle main engine were considered. The operation of these pumps is limited by temperature restrictions of the metallic components used in these pumps. Ceramic materials that retain strength at high temperatures and appear to be promising candidates for use as turbine blades and impellers are discussed. These high strength materials are sensitive to many related processing parameters such as impurities, sintering aids, reaction aids, particle size, processing temperature, and post thermal treatment. The specific objectives of the study were to: (1) identify and define the processing parameters that affect the properties of Si3N4 ceramic materials, (2) design and assembly equipment required for processing high strength ceramics, (3) design and assemble test apparatus for evaluating the high temperature properties of Si3N4, and (4) conduct a research program of manufacturing and evaluating Si3N4 materials as applicable to rocket engine applications.

  1. Advancing density functional theory to finite temperatures: methods and applications in steel design.

    PubMed

    Hickel, T; Grabowski, B; Körmann, F; Neugebauer, J

    2012-02-08

    The performance of materials such as steels, their high strength and formability, is based on an impressive variety of competing mechanisms on the microscopic/atomic scale (e.g. dislocation gliding, solid solution hardening, mechanical twinning or structural phase transformations). Whereas many of the currently available concepts to describe these mechanisms are based on empirical and experimental data, it becomes more and more apparent that further improvement of materials needs to be based on a more fundamental level. Recent progress for methods based on density functional theory (DFT) now makes the exploration of chemical trends, the determination of parameters for phenomenological models and the identification of new routes for the optimization of steel properties feasible. A major challenge in applying these methods to a true materials design is, however, the inclusion of temperature-driven effects on the desired properties. Therefore, a large range of computational tools has been developed in order to improve the capability and accuracy of first-principles methods in determining free energies. These combine electronic, vibrational and magnetic effects as well as structural defects in an integrated approach. Based on these simulation tools, one is now able to successfully predict mechanical and thermodynamic properties of metals with a hitherto not achievable accuracy.

  2. Advancing density functional theory to finite temperatures: methods and applications in steel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickel, T.; Grabowski, B.; Körmann, F.; Neugebauer, J.

    2012-02-01

    The performance of materials such as steels, their high strength and formability, is based on an impressive variety of competing mechanisms on the microscopic/atomic scale (e.g. dislocation gliding, solid solution hardening, mechanical twinning or structural phase transformations). Whereas many of the currently available concepts to describe these mechanisms are based on empirical and experimental data, it becomes more and more apparent that further improvement of materials needs to be based on a more fundamental level. Recent progress for methods based on density functional theory (DFT) now makes the exploration of chemical trends, the determination of parameters for phenomenological models and the identification of new routes for the optimization of steel properties feasible. A major challenge in applying these methods to a true materials design is, however, the inclusion of temperature-driven effects on the desired properties. Therefore, a large range of computational tools has been developed in order to improve the capability and accuracy of first-principles methods in determining free energies. These combine electronic, vibrational and magnetic effects as well as structural defects in an integrated approach. Based on these simulation tools, one is now able to successfully predict mechanical and thermodynamic properties of metals with a hitherto not achievable accuracy.

  3. A new high strength alloy for hydrogen fueled propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a high-strength alloy (1241 MPa ultimate and 1103 MPa yield, with little or no degradation in hydrogen) for application in advanced hydrogen-fueled rocket engines. Various compositions of the Fe-Ni-Co-Cr system with elemental additions of Cb, Ti and Al are discussed. After processing, notched tensile specimens were tested in 34.5-MPa hydrogen at room temperature, as the main screening test. The H2/air notch tensile ratio was used as the selection/rejection criterion. The most promising alloys are discussed.

  4. Weldability and Strength Recovery of NUCu-140 Advanced Naval Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Jason T.

    NUCu-140 is a ferritic copper-precipitation strengthened steel that is a candidate material for use in many naval and structural applications. Previous work has shown that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) of NUCu-140 exhibit softening that is due to dissolution of the copper-rich precipitates. This study aims to recover the FZ and HAZ strength by re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates through either multiple weld passes or an isothermal post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). The potential use of multiple thermal cycles was investigated with HAZ simulations using a Gleeble thermomechanical simulator. The HAZ simulations represented two weld thermal cycles with different combinations of peak temperatures during the initial and secondary weld passes. To investigate the potential for a PWHT for strength recovery, gas tungsten arc weld (GTAW) samples were isothermally heated for various times and temperatures. Microhardness measurements revealed no strength recovery in the multipass HAZ samples. The time dependent precipitate characteristics were modeled under the HAZ thermal cycle conditions, and the results showed that the lack of strength recovery could be attributed to insufficient time for re-precipitation during the secondary weld pass. Conversely, full strength recovery in the HAZ was observed in the isothermally heat treated samples. Atom-probe tomography (APT) analysis correlated this strength recovery to re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates during the isothermal PWHT. The experimental naval steel known as NUCu-140 and an established naval steel HSLA-100 were subjected to stress-relief cracking (SRC) and hot-ductility testing to assess their relative cracking susceptibilities during the welding process and post weld heat treatment. NUCu-140 exhibited a longer time-to-failure (TTF) and a lower temperature of minimum TTF during SRC testing when compared to HSLA-100, indicating better resistance to SRC for the NUCu-140 steel. The

  5. Optimization of a Hybrid-Fiber-Reinforced High-Strength Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. E. T.; de Hanai, J. B.; Ferrari, V. J.

    2016-07-01

    The fracture performance of a high-strength concrete reinforced with steel fibers was studied. Tests of notched beams subjected to fracture in the three-point bend configuration were conducted in accordance with RILEM recommendations TC 162-TDF. The R-curve concepts based on load-CMOD responses and the RILEM criteria were used for the performance evaluation of concrete beams reinforced with steel fiber mixtures and loaded up to fracture. Steel fibers of different types (regular and microfibers), in different proportions were employed as the reinforcement. The hybrid-fiber-reinforced concrete demonstrated a superior performance regarding their resistance and toughness properties as a result of interaction between the fibers.

  6. Texture developed during deformation of Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, M.; Shanta, C.; Asim, T.; Sushil, M.

    2015-04-01

    Automotive industry is currently focusing on using advanced high strength steels (AHSS) due to its high strength and formability for closure applications. Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel is promising material for this application among other AHSS. The present work is focused on the microstructure development during deformation of TRIP steel sheets. To mimic complex strain path condition during forming of automotive body, Limit Dome Height (LDH) tests were conducted and samples were deformed in servo hydraulic press to find the different strain path. FEM Simulations were done to predict different strain path diagrams and compared with experimental results. There is a significant difference between experimental and simulation results as the existing material models are not applicable for TRIP steels. Micro texture studies were performed on the samples using EBSD and X-RD techniques. It was observed that austenite is transformed to martensite and texture developed during deformation had strong impact on limit strain and strain path.

  7. Differences between Laser and Arc Welding of HSS Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němeček, Stanislav; Mužík, Tomáš; Míšek, Michal

    Conventional welding processes often fail to provide adequate joints in high strength steels with multiphase microstructures. One of the promising techniques is laser beam welding: working without filler metal and with sufficient capacity for automotive and transportation industry (where the amount of AHSS steels increases each year, as well as the length of laser welds). The paper compares microstructures and properties of HSS (high strength steel) joints made by MAG (Metal Active Gas) and laser welding. The effects of main welding parameters (heat input, welding speed and others) are studied on multiphase TRIP 900 steel tubes and martensitic sheets DOCOL 1200, advanced materials for seat frames and other automotive components. Whereas the strength of conventional welds is significantly impaired, laser welding leaves strength of the base material nearly unaffected. As the nature of fracture changes during loading and depending on the welding method, failure mechanisms upon cross tension tests have been studied as well.

  8. High-strength mineralized collagen artificial bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Tao, Chun-Sheng; Cui, Helen; Wang, Chang-Ming; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2014-03-01

    Mineralized collagen (MC) is a biomimetic material that mimics natural bone matrix in terms of both chemical composition and microstructure. The biomimetic MC possesses good biocompatibility and osteogenic activity, and is capable of guiding bone regeneration as being used for bone defect repair. However, mechanical strength of existing MC artificial bone is too low to provide effective support at human load-bearing sites, so it can only be used for the repair at non-load-bearing sites, such as bone defect filling, bone graft augmentation, and so on. In the present study, a high strength MC artificial bone material was developed by using collagen as the template for the biomimetic mineralization of the calcium phosphate, and then followed by a cold compression molding process with a certain pressure. The appearance and density of the dense MC were similar to those of natural cortical bone, and the phase composition was in conformity with that of animal's cortical bone demonstrated by XRD. Mechanical properties were tested and results showed that the compressive strength was comparable to human cortical bone, while the compressive modulus was as low as human cancellous bone. Such high strength was able to provide effective mechanical support for bone defect repair at human load-bearing sites, and the low compressive modulus can help avoid stress shielding in the application of bone regeneration. Both in vitro cell experiments and in vivo implantation assay demonstrated good biocompatibility of the material, and in vivo stability evaluation indicated that this high-strength MC artificial bone could provide long-term effective mechanical support at human load-bearing sites.

  9. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  10. HIGH STRENGTH CONTROL RODS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Cohen, I.

    1961-07-11

    Nuclear reactor control rods comprised of highly compressed and sintered finely divided metal alloy panticles and fine metal oxide panticles substantially uniformly distributed theretbrough are described. The metal alloy consists essentially of silver, indium, cadmium, tin, and aluminum, the amount of each being present in centain percentages by weight. The oxide particles are metal oxides of the metal alloy composition, the amount of oxygen being present in certain percentages by weight and all the oxygen present being substantially in the form of metal oxide. This control rod is characterized by its high strength and resistance to creep at elevated temperatures.

  11. Advances in the production and use of steel with improved internal cleanliness. ASTM special technical publication 1361

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaney, J.K. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    From earliest times, the presence of nonmetallic inclusion has been a major source of problems and failures. Failures due to inclusions have been seen in major structures and boilers as well as the inability to successfully form material into usable shapes and parts. The conference sought to determine the status of the state of the art of inclusion identification and prevention, as well as the relative status of different parts of the industry in the attempt to produce material with improved internal cleanliness. The papers presented in this book cover areas from bearing steels to castings. The various authors clearly show that level of inclusion identification and control through processing improvements is greatly dependent upon the sector of the industry. The level of inclusions desired in bearings is several orders of magnitude from the majority of the casting industry. At the same time, manufacturing methods such as continuous casting and other tonnage industry methods are not available in the discrete steel and iron casting segments of the metal melting industry. The papers in the Special Technical Publication show the state of the art in inclusion identification, prevention, and understanding of the deleterious effects of those inclusions. Products covered include bearing steels, high-strength plates, steel castings, stainless steel medical implants, and test methods to determine the presence and effect of nonmetallic inclusions in the steel products. The papers emphasize the effect on the products rather than manufacturing methods.

  12. High strength ferritic alloy-D53

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic alloy is described having from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight nickel, from about 2.5% to about 3.6% by weight chromium, from about 2.5% to about 3.5% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight vanadium, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight silicon, from about 0.1% to about 0.6% by weight manganese, from about 0.12% to about 0.20% by weight carbon, from about 0.02% to about 0.1% by weight boron, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, and the balance iron.

  13. Mechanical properties of high-strength concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtarzadeh, Alireza

    This report summarizes an experimental program conducted to investigate production techniques and mechanical properties of high strength concrete in general and to provide recommendations for using these concretes in manufacturing precast/prestressed bridge girders. Test variables included total amount and composition of cementitious material (portland cement, fly ash, and silica fume), type and brand of cement, type of silica fume (dry densified and slurry), type and brand of high-range water-reducing admixture, type of aggregate, aggregate gradation, maximum aggregate size, and curing. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of these variables on changes in compressive strength and modulus of elasticity over time, splitting tensile strength, modulus of rupture, creep, shrinkage, and absorption potential (as an indirect indicator of permeability). Also investigated were the effects of test parameters such as mold size, mold material, and end condition. Over 6,300 specimens were cast from approximately 140 mixes over a period of 3 years.

  14. High strength air-dried aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2012-11-06

    A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

  15. Achieving large linear elasticity and high strength in bulk nanocompsite via synergistic effect

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Guo, Fangmin; Liu, Yinong; Shi, Xiaobin; Jiang, Daqiang; Brown, Dennis E.; Ren, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Elastic strain in bulk metallic materials is usually limited to only a fraction of 1%. Developing bulk metallic materials showing large linear elasticity and high strength has proven to be difficult. Here, based on the synergistic effect between nanowires and orientated martensite NiTi shape memory alloy, we developed an in-situ Nb nanowires -orientated martensitic NiTi matrix composite showing an ultra-large linear elastic strain of 4% and an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.8 GPa. This material also has a high mechanical energy storage efficiency of 96% and a high energy storage density of 36 J/cm3 that is almost one order of larger than that of spring steel. It is demonstrated that the synergistic effect allows the exceptional mechanical properties of nanowires to be harvested at macro scale and the mechanical properties of matrix to be greatly improved, resulting in these superior properties. This study provides new avenues for developing advanced composites with superior properties by using effective synergistic effect between components. PMID:25749549

  16. Achieving large linear elasticity and high strength in bulk nanocompsite via synergistic effect

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Guo, Fangmin; Liu, Yinong; Shi, Xiaobin; Jiang, Daqiang; Brown, Dennis E.; Ren, Yang

    2015-03-09

    Elastic strain in bulk metallic materials is usually limited to only a fraction of 1%. Developing bulk metallic materials showing large linear elasticity and high strength has proven to be difficult. Here, based on the synergistic effect between nanowires and orientated martensite NiTi shape memory alloy, we developed an in-situ Nb nanowires -orientated martensitic NiTi matrix composite showing an ultra-large linear elastic strain of 4% and an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.8 GPa. This material also has a high mechanical energy storage efficiency of 96% and a high energy storage density of 36 J/cm³ that is almost one order of larger than that of spring steel. It is demonstrated that the synergistic effect allows the exceptional mechanical properties of nanowires to be harvested at macro scale and the mechanical properties of matrix to be greatly improved, resulting in these superior properties. This study provides new avenues for developing advanced composites with superior properties by using effective synergistic effect between components.

  17. Achieving large linear elasticity and high strength in bulk nanocompsite via synergistic effect

    DOE PAGES

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Guo, Fangmin; ...

    2015-03-09

    Elastic strain in bulk metallic materials is usually limited to only a fraction of 1%. Developing bulk metallic materials showing large linear elasticity and high strength has proven to be difficult. Here, based on the synergistic effect between nanowires and orientated martensite NiTi shape memory alloy, we developed an in-situ Nb nanowires -orientated martensitic NiTi matrix composite showing an ultra-large linear elastic strain of 4% and an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.8 GPa. This material also has a high mechanical energy storage efficiency of 96% and a high energy storage density of 36 J/cm³ that is almost one order ofmore » larger than that of spring steel. It is demonstrated that the synergistic effect allows the exceptional mechanical properties of nanowires to be harvested at macro scale and the mechanical properties of matrix to be greatly improved, resulting in these superior properties. This study provides new avenues for developing advanced composites with superior properties by using effective synergistic effect between components.« less

  18. Achieving large linear elasticity and high strength in bulk nanocompsite via synergistic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Guo, Fangmin; Liu, Yinong; Shi, Xiaobin; Jiang, Daqiang; Brown, Dennis E.; Ren, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Elastic strain in bulk metallic materials is usually limited to only a fraction of 1%. Developing bulk metallic materials showing large linear elasticity and high strength has proven to be difficult. Here, based on the synergistic effect between nanowires and orientated martensite NiTi shape memory alloy, we developed an in-situ Nb nanowires -orientated martensitic NiTi matrix composite showing an ultra-large linear elastic strain of 4% and an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.8 GPa. This material also has a high mechanical energy storage efficiency of 96% and a high energy storage density of 36 J/cm3 that is almost one order of larger than that of spring steel. It is demonstrated that the synergistic effect allows the exceptional mechanical properties of nanowires to be harvested at macro scale and the mechanical properties of matrix to be greatly improved, resulting in these superior properties. This study provides new avenues for developing advanced composites with superior properties by using effective synergistic effect between components.

  19. Achieving large linear elasticity and high strength in bulk nanocompsite via synergistic effect.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Guo, Fangmin; Liu, Yinong; Shi, Xiaobin; Jiang, Daqiang; Brown, Dennis E; Ren, Yang

    2015-03-09

    Elastic strain in bulk metallic materials is usually limited to only a fraction of 1%. Developing bulk metallic materials showing large linear elasticity and high strength has proven to be difficult. Here, based on the synergistic effect between nanowires and orientated martensite NiTi shape memory alloy, we developed an in-situ Nb nanowires -orientated martensitic NiTi matrix composite showing an ultra-large linear elastic strain of 4% and an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.8 GPa. This material also has a high mechanical energy storage efficiency of 96% and a high energy storage density of 36 J/cm(3) that is almost one order of larger than that of spring steel. It is demonstrated that the synergistic effect allows the exceptional mechanical properties of nanowires to be harvested at macro scale and the mechanical properties of matrix to be greatly improved, resulting in these superior properties. This study provides new avenues for developing advanced composites with superior properties by using effective synergistic effect between components.

  20. Product Design and Production Practice of 700MPa High Strength Hot Rolled Strip for Auto Axle Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Pan; Zhao-dong, Wang; Ya-jun, Hui; Yang, Cui; Xiang-tao, Deng; Chun-lin, Bao

    According to the technical specifications of 700MPa high strength automotive axle tube steel, a low cost of 0.07%C+1.5%Mn+0.05%Nb+0.10%Ti was designed. The high strength mainly relies on grain refinement strengthening and precipitation strengthening. The recrystallization, precipitation, and CCT curves of the 700MPa grade axle tube steel were studied in order to determine a reasonable TMCP process. By controlling the low level segregation band, low level of C and N content, 700MPa grade high strength automotive axle tube steel is successfully developed with excellent mechanical property, welding property, flattening and flaring property, torsion fatigue property, static torsional property and surface quality.

  1. HYDROTHERMALLY SELF-ADVANCING HYBRID COATINGS FOR MITIGATING CORROSION OF CARBON STEEL.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA, T.

    2006-11-22

    Hydrothermally self-advancing hybrid coatings were prepared by blending two starting materials, water-borne styrene acrylic latex (SAL) as the matrix and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) as the hydraulic filler, and then their usefulness was evaluated as the room temperature curable anti-corrosion coatings for carbon steel in CO{sub 2}-laden geothermal environments at 250 C. The following two major factors supported the self-improving mechanisms of the coating during its exposure in an autoclave: First was the formation of a high temperature stable polymer structure of Ca-complexed carboxylate groups containing SAL (Ca-CCG-SAL) due to hydrothermal reactions between SAL and CAC; second was the growth with continuing exposure time of crystalline calcite and boehmite phases coexisting with Ca-CCG-SAL. These two factors promoted the conversion of the porous microstructure in the non-autoclaved coating into a densified one after 7 days exposure. The densified microstructure not only considerably reduced the conductivity of corrosive ionic electrolytes through the coatings' layers, but also contributed to the excellent adherence of the coating to underlying steel' s surface that, in turn, retarded the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction at the corrosion site of steel. Such characteristics including the minimum uptake of corrosive electrolytes by the coating and the retardation of the cathodic corrosion reaction played an important role in inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel in geothermal environments.

  2. The new low nitrogen steel LNS -- A material for advanced aircraft engine and aerospace bearing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Berns, H.; Ebert, F.J.

    1998-12-31

    Development tendencies for future aircraft jet engines require new design concepts for rolling element bearings because of an overall increase of loads, temperatures, rotational speeds and the use of new high temperature lubricants. This paper reviews some of the key parameters which in the past led to the development and application of the known aircraft bearing steels such as M50, M50 NiL and recently Cronidur 30{reg_sign} (AMS 5898). The performance limits of the currently used aerospace bearing steels and the increasing demands on bearing performance for future aerospace applications gave the impact to the design of a new corrosion resistant steel grade of the nitrogen alloyed type, which is suitable for case hardening by nitrogen--the so called Low nitrogen steel (LNS). The development of the alloy (US pat. 5,503,797), the attainable properties and the corresponding heat treatment process are presented. Achievable hardness, case depth, residual stress pattern and corrosion resistance prove the new LNS to be a promising candidate for the next generation of aircraft engine bearings and for advanced, integrated bearing-gear-shaft design concepts.

  3. Advanced TEM specimen preparation methods for replication of P91 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.R.G. . E-mail: drm@ansto.gov.au; Sulaiman, S.

    2006-01-15

    A range of advanced transmission electron microscopy specimen preparation methods, based on replication, have been developed for P91 steel. The results obtained have been compared with conventional replication and thin foil methods. The aim has been to obtain complimentary information from thin foil and replica specimens from the same region of interest either sequentially or simultaneously. The effects of various reagents for dissolution of the steel matrix and replica release have been investigated, and chemical methods for removing amorphous iron oxide contaminants from replicas have been identified. A method of region-specific replication is demonstrated whereby regions of thin foils previously characterised by TEM, can be subsequently replicated. This enables the former location of extracted particles, such as on grain/lath/subgrain boundaries etc., to be determined prior to microanalysis. It also permits the identification of artefacts such as stray particles and failed extractions. A second method of thin foil partial replication was developed in which both replica and thin foil are present on the same specimen. At the interface between the two regions, thin foil information such as dislocation interactions with fine scale particles and replica information such as microanalysis of particles within the same grain or lath can be obtained. Double replication of thin foils has also been successfully demonstrated. These methods are applied to a creep resistant martensitic steel (P91), but should be broadly applicable to a wide range of alloy steels.

  4. In vitro electrochemical investigations of advanced stainless steels for applications as orthopaedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, M.; Mudali, U. Kamachi; Rajeswari, S.

    1994-12-01

    Potentiodynamic anodic polarization experiments on advanced stainless steels (SS), such as nitrogenbearing type 316L and 317L SS, were carried out in Hank’s solution (8 g NaCl, 0.14 g CaCl2, 0.4 g KC1, 0.35 g NaHCO3, 1 g glucose, 0.1 g NaH2PO4, 0.1 g MgCl2, 0.06 g Na2HPO4 2H2O, 0.06 g MgSO4 7H2O/1000 mL) in order to assess the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance. The results showed a significant improvement in the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance than the commonly used type 316L stainless steel implant material. The corrosion resistance was higher in austenitic stainless steels containing higher amounts of nitrogen. The pit-protection potential for nitrogen-bearing stainless steels was more noble than the corrosion potential indicating the higher repassivation tendency of actively growing pits in these alloys. The accelerated leaching study conducted for the above alloys showed very little tendency for leaching of metal ions, such as iron, chromium, and nickel, at different impressed potentials. This may be due to the enrichment of nitrogen and molybdenum at the passive film and metal interface, which could have impeded the releasing of metal ions through passive film.

  5. Corrosion fatigue of high strength fastener materials in seawater. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, D.G.

    1983-12-01

    Environmental effects can significantly reduce the fatigue life of metals. As such, corrosion fatigue is a major concern in the engineering application of high strength fasteners in marine environments. The corrosion fatigue failure of an AISI 41L40 high strength steel blade-to-hub attachment bolt at the MOD-0A 200 kW wind turbine generator in Oahu, Hawaii prompted the current test program. Tests were undertaken to confirm the dramatic reduction of fatigue strength of AISI 41L40 in marine environments and to obtain similar corrosion fatigue data for candidate replacement materials. AISI 41L40, AISI 4140, PH 13-8Mo stainless steel, alloy 718 and alloy MP-35N were tested in axial fatigue at a frequency of 20 Hz in dry air and natural seawater. The fatigue data were fitted by regression equations to allow determination of fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure.

  6. Steam Oxidation Behavior of Advanced Steels and Ni-Based Alloys at 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Boroń, L.; Deodeshmukh, V.; Sobczak, J.; Sobczak, N.; Witkowska, M.; Ratuszek, W.; Chruściel, K.

    2017-02-01

    This publication studies the steam oxidation behavior of advanced steels (309S, 310S and HR3C) and Ni-based alloys (Haynes® 230®, alloy 263, alloy 617 and Haynes® 282®) exposed at 800 °C for 2000 h under 1 bar pressure, in a pure water steam system. The results revealed that all exposed materials showed relatively low weight gain, with no spallation of the oxide scale within the 2000 h of exposure. XRD analysis showed that Ni-based alloys developed an oxide scale consisting of four main phases: Cr2O3 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282®, alloy 263 and Haynes® 230®), MnCr2O4 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282® and Haynes® 230®), NiCr2O4 (alloy 617) and TiO2 (alloy 263, Haynes® 282®). In contrast, advanced steels showed the development of Cr2O3, MnCr2O4, Mn7SiO12, FeMn(SiO4) and SiO2 phases. The steel with the highest Cr content showed the formation of Fe3O4 and the thickest oxide scale.

  7. Steam Oxidation Behavior of Advanced Steels and Ni-Based Alloys at 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Boroń, L.; Deodeshmukh, V.; Sobczak, J.; Sobczak, N.; Witkowska, M.; Ratuszek, W.; Chruściel, K.

    2017-03-01

    This publication studies the steam oxidation behavior of advanced steels (309S, 310S and HR3C) and Ni-based alloys (Haynes® 230®, alloy 263, alloy 617 and Haynes® 282®) exposed at 800 °C for 2000 h under 1 bar pressure, in a pure water steam system. The results revealed that all exposed materials showed relatively low weight gain, with no spallation of the oxide scale within the 2000 h of exposure. XRD analysis showed that Ni-based alloys developed an oxide scale consisting of four main phases: Cr2O3 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282®, alloy 263 and Haynes® 230®), MnCr2O4 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282® and Haynes® 230®), NiCr2O4 (alloy 617) and TiO2 (alloy 263, Haynes® 282®). In contrast, advanced steels showed the development of Cr2O3, MnCr2O4, Mn7SiO12, FeMn(SiO4) and SiO2 phases. The steel with the highest Cr content showed the formation of Fe3O4 and the thickest oxide scale.

  8. Behavior of noncompacted high strength bolted joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckelbridge, A. A., Jr.; Miller, C. J.; Burkhart, R. A.; Asante, K.

    1980-03-01

    All tests were continued until failure of the joint; all joints were of a butt type utilizing double lap plates and 3/4 inch A325 high strength bolts. Noncompaction ranged from the fully compacted state up to 1/8 inch difference in thickness of connected plates. Noncompaction was observed to significantly reduce the load level at which joints slip into bearing. Ultimate static loads were not affected by noncompaction, however. Under repeated loads the joints tended to slip into bearing even though nominally designed as friction connections. Fatigue failures were observed to occur through the minimum net section, usually, though not always, in the lap plates. The greatest reduction in slip load was in the shorter non-compacted joints; those with two or three bolts/row only. It is recommended that non-compaction be accounted for in these types of joints if it is necessary to maintain a friction-type connection. Non-compaction would not seem to be significant for bearing type connections.

  9. Microstructure of high-strength foam concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Just, A.; Middendorf, B.

    2009-07-15

    Foam concretes are divided into two groups: on the one hand the physically foamed concrete is mixed in fast rotating pug mill mixers by using foaming agents. This concrete cures under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand the autoclaved aerated concrete is chemically foamed by adding aluminium powder. Afterwards it is cured in a saturated steam atmosphere. New alternatives for the application of foam concretes arise from the combination of chemical foaming and air curing in manufacturing processes. These foam concretes are new and innovative building materials with interesting properties: low mass density and high strength. Responsible for these properties are the macro-, meso- and microporosity. Macropores are created by adding aluminium powder in different volumes and with different particle size distributions. However, the microstructure of the cement matrix is affected by meso- and micropores. In addition, the matrix of the hardened cement paste can be optimized by the specific use of chemical additives for concrete. The influence of aluminium powder and chemical additives on the properties of the microstructure of the hardened cement matrices were investigated by using petrographic microscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy.

  10. High-Strength Bolt Corrosion Fatigue Life Model and Application

    PubMed Central

    Hui-li, Wang; Si-feng, Qin

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue performance of high-strength bolt was studied. Based on the fracture mechanics theory and the Gerberich-Chen formula, the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture crack model and the fatigue life model were established. The high-strength bolt crack depth and the fatigue life under corrosion environment were quantitatively analyzed. The factors affecting high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life were discussed. The result showed that the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture biggest crack depth reduces along with the material yield strength and the applied stress increases. The material yield strength was the major factor. And the high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life reduced along with the increase of material strength, the applied stress or stress amplitude. The stress amplitude influenced the most, and the material yield strength influenced the least. Low bolt strength and a low stress amplitude level could extend high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life. PMID:25152916

  11. High-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life model and application.

    PubMed

    Hui-li, Wang; Si-feng, Qin

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue performance of high-strength bolt was studied. Based on the fracture mechanics theory and the Gerberich-Chen formula, the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture crack model and the fatigue life model were established. The high-strength bolt crack depth and the fatigue life under corrosion environment were quantitatively analyzed. The factors affecting high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life were discussed. The result showed that the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture biggest crack depth reduces along with the material yield strength and the applied stress increases. The material yield strength was the major factor. And the high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life reduced along with the increase of material strength, the applied stress or stress amplitude. The stress amplitude influenced the most, and the material yield strength influenced the least. Low bolt strength and a low stress amplitude level could extend high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life.

  12. Cleavage fracture in high strength low alloy weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, W.W.; Bowen, P.; Strangwood, M.

    1996-12-31

    The present investigation gives an evaluation of the effect of microstructure on the cleavage fracture process of High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) multipass weld metals. With additions of alloying elements, such as Ti, Ni, Mo and Cr, the microstructure of C-Mn weld metal changes from the classical composition, i.e., allotriomorphic ferrite with acicular ferrite and Widmanstaetten ferrite, to bainite and low carbon martensite. Although the physical metallurgy of some HSLA weld metals has been studied before, more work is necessary to correlate the effect of the microstructure on the fracture behavior of such weld metals. In this work detailed microstructural analysis was carried out using optical and electron (SEM and TEM) microscopy. Single edge notched (SEN) bend testpieces were used to assess the cleavage fracture stress, {sigma}{sub F}. Inclusions beneath the notch surface were identified as the crack initiators of unstable cleavage fracture. From the size of such inclusions and the value of tensile stress predicted at the initiation site, the effective surface energy for cleavage was calculated using a modified Griffth energy balance for a penny shape crack. The results suggest that even though inclusions initiate cleavage fracture, the local microstructure may play an important role in the fracture process of these weld metals. The implications of these observations for a quantitative theory of the cleavage fracture of ferritic steels is discussed.

  13. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0--20Fe, 10--30Cr, 2--12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05--3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01--0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni. 3 figs.

  14. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0-20Fe, 10-30Cr, 2-12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05-3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01-0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni.

  15. Advanced Processes for High-Strength Titanium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The following advantages, as compared to Vacuum Arc Remelting (VAR), are expected: - full dissolution of LDl due to higher temperature and longer...times in melt condition; - essential elimination of HDl by means of intermediate bath’ application; - employment of cheaper initial materials, such as

  16. Advances in Low Carbon, High Strength Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    TMCP, "controlled rolling" (CR) is con- ducted and relies on microalloying ; small amounts (0.001 to 0.5%) of elements such as niobium , vanadium ...28] where the system was enhanced by microalloying with boron and titanium . The addition of a small amount of titanium (0.012 to 0.016%) increased the...sections, while vanadium provided resistance to softening at the temperatures required to achieve optimum toughness. Also, low sulphur and phosphorus

  17. Stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lula, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the stainless steels for high-strength, heat-resistant or corrosion-resistant applications. It is a treatment of the properties and selection of stainless steels. Up-to-date information covers physical, mechanical and chemical properties of all stainless grades, including the new ferritic and duplex grades. The book covers physical metallurgy as well as processing and service characteristics, including service in corrosive environments. It deals with wrought and cast stainless steels and reviews fabrication from cold-forming to powder metallurgy.

  18. High strength cast aluminum alloy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschitz, Edward A.

    The goal of this research was to understand how chemistry and processing affect the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties of high strength cast aluminum alloys. Two alloy systems were investigated including the Al-Cu-Ag and the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu systems. Processing variables included solidification under pressure (SUP) and heat treatment. This research determined the range in properties that can be achieved in BAC 100(TM) (Al-Cu micro-alloyed with Ag, Mn, Zr, and V) and generated sufficient property data for design purposes. Tensile, stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue testing were performed. CuAl2 and Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallics were identified as the ductility limiting flaws. A solution treatment of 75 hours or longer was needed to dissolve most of the intermetallic CuAl 2. The Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallic was unaffected by heat treatment. These results indicate that faster cooling rates, a reduction in copper concentration and a reduction in iron concentration might increase the ductility of the alloy by decreasing the size and amount of the intermetallics that form during solidification. Six experimental Al-Zn-Mg-Cu series alloys were produced. Zinc concentrations of 8 and 12wt% and Zn/Mg ratios of 1.5 to 5.5 were tested. Copper was held constant at 0.9%. Heat treating of the alloys was optimized for maximum hardness. Al-Zn-Mg-Cu samples were solution treated at 441°C (826°F) for 4 hours before ramping to 460°C (860°F) for 75 hours and then aged at 120°C (248°F) for 75 hours. X-ray diffraction showed that the age hardening precipitates in most of these alloys was the T phase (Mg32Zn 31.9Al17.1). Tensile testing of the alloys showed that the best mechanical properties were obtained in the lowest alloy condition. Chilled Al-8.2Zn-1.4Mg-0.9Cu solidified under pressure resulted in an alloy with a yield strength of 468MPa (68ksi), tensile strength of 525MPa (76ksi) and an elongation of 9%.

  19. Application of advanced austenitic alloys to fossil power system components

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    Most power and recovery boilers operating in the US produce steam at temperatures below 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) and pressures below 24 MPa (3500 psi). For these operating conditions, carbon steels and low alloy steels may be used for the construction of most of the boiler components. Austenitic stainless steels often are used for superheater/reheater tubing when these components are expected to experience temperatures above 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) or when the environment is too corrosive for low alloys steels. The austenitic stainless steels typically used are the 304H, 321H, and 347H grades. New ferritic steels such as T91 and T92 are now being introduced to replace austenitic: stainless steels in aging fossil power plants. Generally, these high-strength ferritic steels are more expensive to fabricate than austenitic stainless steels because the ferritic steels have more stringent heat treating requirements. Now, annealing requirements are being considered for the stabilized grades of austenitic stainless steels when they receive more than 5% cold work, and these requirements would increase significantly the cost of fabrication of boiler components where bending strains often exceed 15%. It has been shown, however, that advanced stainless steels developed at ORNL greatly benefit from cold work, and these steels could provide an alternative to either conventional stainless steels or high-strength ferritic steels. The purpose of the activities reported here is to examine the potential of advanced stainless steels for construction of tubular components in power boilers. The work is being carried out with collaboration of a commercial boiler manufacturer.

  20. Fusion welding of advanced borated stainless steels. Final report: CRADA No. CR1042

    SciTech Connect

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J.

    1994-02-01

    This work addressed two major areas concerning joining of advanced borated stainless steels. These areas included the development of a understanding of the physical metallurgy of borated stainless steels and the development of welding processes and post-weld heat treatments for these alloys. Differential thermal analysis experiments were conducted on ten heats of borated stainless steel to determine the transformation temperatures and melting behavior of the alloys. On-heating solidus temperatures were measured for all of the alloys and were used to define the temperatures associated with the fusion line during welding. Isothermal heat treatments designed to evaluate the effects of elevated temperature exposures on the toughness of the borated grades were conducted. These tests were used to determine if significant changes in the microstructure or mechanical properties of weld heat-affected zones (HAZ) occur. Specifically, the tests addressed the solid-state region of the HAZ. The test matrix included a variety of alloy compositions and thermal exposures at temperatures near the on-heating solidus (as determined by the DTA experiments). Welding experiments designed to assess the mechanical properties and microstructure of gas-tungsten arc and electron beam welds were conducted.