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Sample records for advanced hormone receptor-positive

  1. Current status of hormone therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive (HR+) advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalmau, Elsa; Armengol-Alonso, Alejandra; Muñoz, Montserrat; Seguí-Palmer, Miguel Ángel

    2014-12-01

    The natural history of HR+ breast cancer tends to be different from hormone receptor-negative disease in terms of time to recurrence, site of recurrence and overall aggressiveness of the disease. The developmental strategies of hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer have led to the classes of selective estrogen receptor modulators, selective estrogen receptor downregulators, and aromatase inhibitors. These therapeutic options have improved breast cancer outcomes in the metastatic setting, thereby delaying the need for chemotherapy. However, a subset of hormone receptor-positive breast cancers do not benefit from endocrine therapy (intrinsic resistance), and all HR+ metastatic breast cancers ultimately develop resistance to hormonal therapies (acquired resistance). Considering the multiple pathways involved in the HR network, targeting other components of pathologically activated intracellular signaling in breast cancer may prove to be a new direction in clinical research. This review focuses on current and emerging treatments for HR+ metastatic breast cancer. PMID:25311296

  2. Tolerability of Therapies Recommended for the Treatment of Hormone Receptor-Positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Shinji

    2016-08-01

    For women with hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer, endocrine therapies, including the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen, the aromatase inhibitors anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane, and the selective estrogen receptor degrader fulvestrant, are recommended in clinical guidelines. The addition of targeted agents such as everolimus or palbociclib to aromatase inhibitors are also recommended as treatment options. Chemotherapy remains an option, although clinical guidelines have recommended these agents be reserved for patients with immediately life-threatening disease or if resistance to endocrine therapy is known or suspected. The present review has consolidated the tolerability profiles of the agents approved for use in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive advanced or metastatic breast cancer based on phase III registration trial data. Endocrine therapies are generally well tolerated, although the addition of targeted therapies to aromatase inhibitors or fulvestrant appears to increase the proportion of patients experiencing adverse events, and palbociclib and chemotherapy appear to be more closely associated with serious adverse events, including neutropenia. PMID:27151773

  3. Treatment challenges for community oncologists treating postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gradishar, William J

    2016-01-01

    Community-based oncologists are faced with challenges and opportunities when delivering quality patient care, including high patient volumes and diminished resources; however, there may be the potential to deliver increased patient education and subsequently improve outcomes. This review discusses the treatment of postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative advanced breast cancer in order to illustrate considerations in the provision of pertinent quality education in the treatment of these patients and the management of therapy-related adverse events. An overview of endocrine-resistant breast cancer and subsequent treatment challenges is also provided. Approved treatment options for endocrine-resistant breast cancer include hormonal therapies and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Compounds under clinical investigation are also discussed. PMID:27468248

  4. Treatment challenges for community oncologists treating postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gradishar, William J

    2016-01-01

    Community-based oncologists are faced with challenges and opportunities when delivering quality patient care, including high patient volumes and diminished resources; however, there may be the potential to deliver increased patient education and subsequently improve outcomes. This review discusses the treatment of postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative advanced breast cancer in order to illustrate considerations in the provision of pertinent quality education in the treatment of these patients and the management of therapy-related adverse events. An overview of endocrine-resistant breast cancer and subsequent treatment challenges is also provided. Approved treatment options for endocrine-resistant breast cancer include hormonal therapies and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Compounds under clinical investigation are also discussed. PMID:27468248

  5. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  6. Incidence and time course of everolimus-related adverse events in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer: insights from BOLERO-2

    PubMed Central

    Rugo, H. S.; Pritchard, K. I.; Gnant, M.; Noguchi, S.; Piccart, M.; Hortobagyi, G.; Baselga, J.; Perez, A.; Geberth, M.; Csoszi, T.; Chouinard, E.; Srimuninnimit, V.; Puttawibul, P.; Eakle, J.; Feng, W.; Bauly, H.; El-Hashimy, M.; Taran, T.; Burris, H. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background In the BOLERO-2 trial, everolimus (EVE), an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin, demonstrated significant clinical benefit with an acceptable safety profile when administered with exemestane (EXE) in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+) advanced breast cancer. We report on the incidence, time course, severity, and resolution of treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) as well as incidence of dose modifications during the extended follow-up of this study. Patients and methods Patients were randomized (2:1) to receive EVE 10 mg/day or placebo (PBO), with open-label EXE 25 mg/day (n = 724). The primary end point was progression-free survival. Secondary end points included overall survival, objective response rate, and safety. Safety evaluations included recording of AEs, laboratory values, dose interruptions/adjustments, and study drug discontinuations. Results The safety population comprised 720 patients (EVE + EXE, 482; PBO + EXE, 238). The median follow-up was 18 months. Class-effect toxicities, including stomatitis, pneumonitis, and hyperglycemia, were generally of mild or moderate severity and occurred relatively early after treatment initiation (except pneumonitis); incidence tapered off thereafter. EVE dose reduction and interruption (360 and 705 events, respectively) required for AE management were independent of patient age. The median duration of dose interruption was 7 days. Discontinuation of both study drugs because of AEs was higher with EVE + EXE (9%) versus PBO + EXE (3%). Conclusions Most EVE-associated AEs occur soon after initiation of therapy, are typically of mild or moderate severity, and are generally manageable with dose reduction and interruption. Discontinuation due to toxicity was uncommon. Understanding the time course of class-effect AEs will help inform preventive and monitoring strategies as well as patient education. Trial registration number NCT00863655. PMID:24615500

  7. Exemestane With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer That is Locally Advanced or Metastatic

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  8. Docetaxel, Carboplatin, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab With or Without Estrogen Deprivation in Treating Patients With Hormone Receptor-Positive, HER2-Positive Operable or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Lower-dose (6 mg Daily) versus High-dose (30 mg Daily) Oral Estradiol Therapy of Hormone-receptor-positive, Aromatase-inhibitor-resistant Advanced Breast Cancer: A Randomized Phase 2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Matthew J.; Gao, Feng; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Jeffe, Donna B.; Marcom, P. Kelly; Carey, Lisa A.; Dickler, Maura N.; Silverman, Paula; Fleming, Gini F.; Kommareddy, Aruna; Jamalabadi-Majidi, Shohreh; Crowder, Robert; Siegel, Barry A

    2012-01-01

    Context Estrogen deprivation therapy with aromatase inhibitors (AI) has been hypothesized to paradoxically sensitize hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer tumor cells to low-dose estradiol therapy. Objective To determine if estradiol 6-mg daily is a viable endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with advanced AI-resistant hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. Design, Setting and Patients A randomized Phase 2 trial of 6-mg versus 30-mg oral estradiol daily opened in April 2004 and was closed to enrollment in February 2008 (NCT00324259). Eligible patients had metastatic breast cancer treated with an AI with at least 24 weeks progression-free survival, or relapse after two or more years of adjuvant AI. Patients at high risk of estradiol-related adverse events were excluded. Main Outcome Measures The primary endpoint was clinical benefit rate – CBR (response plus stable disease at 24 weeks). Secondary outcomes included toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), time to treatment failure (TTF), quality of life (QOL) and the predictive properties of the FDG-PET metabolic flare reaction. Results 66 patients were enrolled. The grade 3+ adverse event rate on the 30-mg arm (11/32; 95% CI: 23%–47%) was higher than that in 6-mg arm (4/34; 95% CI: 5%–22%) (P=.03). CBRs were 28% (9/32; 95% CI: 18% – 41%) on the 30-mg arm and 29% (10/34; 95% CI: 19% – 42%) on the 6-mg arm. An estradiol44 stimulated increase in FDG uptake of ≥12% (prospectively defined) was predictive of response (positive predictive value of 80%; 95% CI: 61%–92%). Seven patients with estradiol-sensitive disease were retreated with AI upon estradiol progression, with two PR and one SD, suggesting resensitization to estrogen deprivation. Conclusions In women with advanced breast cancer and acquired resistance to AI, an estradiol dose of 6-mg daily provided a similar CBR as 30-mg daily, with fewer serious adverse events. The efficacy of treatment with the lower dose should be further examined

  10. Overcoming Endocrine Resistance in Hormone-Receptor Positive Advanced Breast Cancer-The Emerging Role of CDK4/6 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Ciara C

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) pathway in cancer cells may inhibit senescence and promote cellular proliferation. By using various different mechanisms, malignant cells may increase cyclin D-dependent activity. The cyclin D-cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4/6)-retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway controls the cell cycle restriction point, and is commonly dysregulated in breast cancer; making it a rational target for anticancer therapy. To date, three oral highly selective cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitors (CDK4/6i) are in various stages of clinical development: PD0332991 (palbociclib), LEE011 (ribociclib) and LY2835219 (abemaciclib). Results from phase I, II and III trials in hormone-receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer have been encouraging, demonstrating convincing efficacy and a tolerable side-effect profile (mainly uncomplicated neutropenia). This article will review the preclinical and clinical development of the CDK4/6i, as well as reviewing the existing preclinical evidence regarding combination of these agents with chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. Future and ongoing clinical trials, which may expand the potential application of these agents, will also be discussed. In summary, CDK4/6i are exciting compounds which may change the therapeutic landscape of HR-positive breast cancer. PMID:26726315

  11. Treatment strategies for advanced hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor 2-negative breast cancer: the role of treatment order.

    PubMed

    Perez, Edith A

    2016-01-01

    Although survival rates among patients with breast cancer have improved in recent years, those diagnosed with advanced disease with distant metastasis face a 5-year survival rate of less than 25%, making the management of these patients an area still in significant need of continued research. Selecting the optimal treatment order from among the variety of currently available therapy options presents a relevant challenge for medical oncologists. With the understanding that the majority of patients with breast cancer and those who succumb to this disease have HR-positive disease, this review will focus on treatment options and treatment order in patients with HR-positive advanced breast cancer. While endocrine therapy is considered the preferred treatment for first-line therapy in HR-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer, selection of the specific agent depends on the menopausal status of the patient. Palbociclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitor, is also recommended as first-line treatment in patients with ER-positive/HER2-negative disease. In patients with endocrine therapy-resistant disease, specific strategies include sequencing of other antiestrogen receptor agents, or agents that target other molecular pathways. Future treatment strategies for patients with primary or secondary resistance to endocrine therapy for advanced disease are discussed. These strategies include first-line therapy with high-dose fulvestrant or everolimus (in combination with exemestane or letrozole or with other endocrine therapies), use of the PI3K inhibitors (e.g., buparlisib, alpelisib, pictilisib, taselisib), entinostat, CDK 4/6 inhibitors (e.g., palbociclib, ribociclib, abemaciclib), and novel selective estrogen receptor degradation agents that may enhance the targeting of acquired mutations in the ESR1 gene. PMID:26830312

  12. Optimal management of hormone receptor positive metastatic breast cancer in 2016

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Tomas; Barrios, Carlos H.

    2015-01-01

    Hormone receptor positive tumors represent the most common form of breast cancer and account for most of the deaths from the disease. Endocrine therapy represents the main initial therapeutic strategy for these patients and has been associated with significant clinical benefits in a majority of patients. While in early stages endocrine therapy is administered as part of a curative approach once clinical metastases develop, the disease is considered incurable and the main management objectives are tumor control and quality of life. The two major clinical paradigms of always indicating endocrine therapy in the absence of visceral crises and sequencing endocrine treatments have been guiding our therapeutic approach to these patients. However, for many decades, we have delivered endocrine therapy with a ‘one size fits all’ approach by applying agents that interfere with hormone receptor signaling equally in every clinical patient scenario. We have been unable to incorporate the well-known biologic principle of different degrees of hormone receptor dependency in our therapeutic recommendations. Recent developments in the understanding of molecular interactions of hormone signaling with other important growth factor, metabolic and cell division pathways have opened the possibility of improving results by modulating hormone signaling and interfering with resistance mechanisms yet to be fully understood. Unfortunately, limitations in the design of trials conducted in this area have made it difficult to develop predictive biomarkers and most of the new combinations with targeted agents, even though showing improvements in clinical endpoints, have been directed to an unselected population of patients. In this review we explore some of the current and most relevant literature in the management of hormone receptor positive advance breast cancer. PMID:26557899

  13. Endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive her2-negative advanced breast cancer after progression or recurrence on nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor therapy: a Canadian consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, K I; Gelmon, K A; Rayson, D; Provencher, L; Webster, M; McLeod, D; Verma, S

    2013-02-01

    Approximately 22,700 Canadian women were expected to be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012. Despite improvements in screening and adjuvant treatment options, a substantial number of postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive (hr+) breast cancer will continue to develop metastatic disease during or after adjuvant endocrine therapy. Guidance on the selection of endocrine therapy for patients with hr+ disease that is negative for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (her2-) and that has relapsed or progressed on earlier nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor (nsai) therapy is of increasing clinical importance. Exemestane, fulvestrant, and tamoxifen are approved therapeutic options in this context. Four phase iii trials involving 2876 patients-efect, sofea, confirm, and bolero-2-have assessed the efficacy of various treatment options in this clinical setting. Data from those trials suggest that standard-dose fulvestrant (250 mg monthly) and exemestane are of comparable efficacy, that doubling the dose of fulvestrant from 250 mg to 500 mg monthly results in a 15% reduction in the risk of progression, and that adding everolimus to exemestane (compared with exemestane alone) results in a 57% reduction in the risk of progression, albeit with increased toxicity. Multiple treatment options are now available to women with hr+ her2- advanced breast cancer recurring or progressing on earlier nsai therapy, although current clinical trial data suggest more robust clinical efficacy with everolimus plus exemestane. Consideration should be given to the patient's age, functional status, and comorbidities during selection of an endocrine therapy, and use of a proactive everolimus safety management strategy is encouraged. PMID:23443928

  14. Clinical and genomic analysis of a randomised phase II study evaluating anastrozole and fulvestrant in postmenopausal patients treated for large operable or locally advanced hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Quenel-Tueux, Nathalie; Debled, Marc; Rudewicz, Justine; MacGrogan, Gaetan; Pulido, Marina; Mauriac, Louis; Dalenc, Florence; Bachelot, Thomas; Lortal, Barbara; Breton-Callu, Christelle; Madranges, Nicolas; de Lara, Christine Tunon; Fournier, Marion; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Soueidan, Hayssam; Nikolski, Macha; Gros, Audrey; Daly, Catherine; Wood, Henry; Rabbitts, Pamela; Iggo, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of neoadjuvant anastrozole and fulvestrant treatment of large operable or locally advanced hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer not eligible for initial breast-conserving surgery, and to identify genomic changes occurring after treatment. Methods: One hundred and twenty post-menopausal patients were randomised to receive 1 mg anastrozole (61 patients) or 500 mg fulvestrant (59 patients) for 6 months. Genomic DNA copy number profiles were generated for a subgroup of 20 patients before and after treatment. Results: A total of 108 patients were evaluable for efficacy and 118 for toxicity. The objective response rate determined by clinical palpation was 58.9% (95% CI=45.0–71.9) in the anastrozole arm and 53.8% (95% CI=39.5–67.8) in the fulvestrant arm. The breast-conserving surgery rate was 58.9% (95% CI=45.0–71.9) in the anastrozole arm and 50.0% (95% CI=35.8–64.2) in the fulvestrant arm. Pathological responses >50% occurred in 24 patients (42.9%) in the anastrozole arm and 13 (25.0%) in the fulvestrant arm. The Ki-67 score fell after treatment but there was no significant difference between the reduction in the two arms (anastrozole 16.7% (95% CI=13.3–21.0) before, 3.2% (95% CI=1.9–5.5) after, n=43; fulvestrant 17.1% (95%CI=13.1–22.5) before, 3.2% (95% CI=1.8–5.7) after, n=38) or between the reduction in Ki-67 in clinical responders and non-responders. Genomic analysis appeared to show a reduction of clonal diversity following treatment with selection of some clones with simpler copy number profiles. Conclusions: Both anastrozole and fulvestrant were effective and well-tolerated, enabling breast-conserving surgery in over 50% of patients. Clonal changes consistent with clonal selection by the treatment were seen in a subgroup of patients. PMID:26171933

  15. Pharmacologic management of bone-related complications and bone metastases in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yardley, Denise A

    2016-01-01

    There is a high risk for bone loss and skeletal-related events, including bone metastases, in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Both the disease itself and its therapeutic treatments can negatively impact bone, resulting in decreases in bone mineral density and increases in bone loss. These negative effects on the bone can significantly impact morbidity and mortality. Effective management and minimization of bone-related complications in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer remain essential. This review discusses the current understanding of molecular and biological mechanisms involved in bone turnover and metastases, increased risk for bone-related complications from breast cancer and breast cancer therapy, and current and emerging treatment strategies for managing bone metastases and bone turnover in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. PMID:27217795

  16. Analysis of Paired Primary-Metastatic Hormone-Receptor Positive Breast Tumors (HRPBC) Uncovers Potential Novel Drivers of Hormonal Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Luis; Mourón, Silvana; Tress, Michael; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Morente, Manuel; Ciruelos, Eva; Rubio-Camarillo, Miriam; Rodriguez-Peralto, Jose Luis; Pujana, Miguel A.; Pisano, David G.; Quintela-Fandino, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We sought to identify genetic variants associated with disease relapse and failure to hormonal treatment in hormone-receptor positive breast cancer (HRPBC). We analyzed a series of HRPBC with distant relapse, by sequencing pairs (n = 11) of tumors (primary and metastases) at >800X. Comparative genomic hybridization was performed as well. Top hits, based on the frequency of alteration and severity of the changes, were tested in the TCGA series. Genes determining the most parsimonious prognostic signature were studied for their functional role in vitro, by performing cell growth assays in hormonal-deprivation conditions, a setting that mimics treatment with aromatase inhibitors. Severe alterations were recurrently found in 18 genes in the pairs. However, only MYC, DNAH5, CSFR1, EPHA7, ARID1B, and KMT2C preserved an independent prognosis impact and/or showed a significantly different incidence of alterations between relapsed and non-relapsed cases in the TCGA series. The signature composed of MYC, KMT2C, and EPHA7 best discriminated the clinical course, (overall survival 90,7 vs. 144,5 months; p = 0.0001). Having an alteration in any of the genes of the signature implied a hazard ratio of death of 3.25 (p<0.0001), and early relapse during the adjuvant hormonal treatment. The presence of the D348N mutation in KMT2C and/or the T666I mutation in the kinase domain of EPHA7 conferred hormonal resistance in vitro. Novel inactivating mutations in KMT2C and EPHA7, which confer hormonal resistance, are linked to adverse clinical course in HRPBC. PMID:27195705

  17. Analysis of Paired Primary-Metastatic Hormone-Receptor Positive Breast Tumors (HRPBC) Uncovers Potential Novel Drivers of Hormonal Resistance.

    PubMed

    Manso, Luis; Mourón, Silvana; Tress, Michael; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Morente, Manuel; Ciruelos, Eva; Rubio-Camarillo, Miriam; Rodriguez-Peralto, Jose Luis; Pujana, Miguel A; Pisano, David G; Quintela-Fandino, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We sought to identify genetic variants associated with disease relapse and failure to hormonal treatment in hormone-receptor positive breast cancer (HRPBC). We analyzed a series of HRPBC with distant relapse, by sequencing pairs (n = 11) of tumors (primary and metastases) at >800X. Comparative genomic hybridization was performed as well. Top hits, based on the frequency of alteration and severity of the changes, were tested in the TCGA series. Genes determining the most parsimonious prognostic signature were studied for their functional role in vitro, by performing cell growth assays in hormonal-deprivation conditions, a setting that mimics treatment with aromatase inhibitors. Severe alterations were recurrently found in 18 genes in the pairs. However, only MYC, DNAH5, CSFR1, EPHA7, ARID1B, and KMT2C preserved an independent prognosis impact and/or showed a significantly different incidence of alterations between relapsed and non-relapsed cases in the TCGA series. The signature composed of MYC, KMT2C, and EPHA7 best discriminated the clinical course, (overall survival 90,7 vs. 144,5 months; p = 0.0001). Having an alteration in any of the genes of the signature implied a hazard ratio of death of 3.25 (p<0.0001), and early relapse during the adjuvant hormonal treatment. The presence of the D348N mutation in KMT2C and/or the T666I mutation in the kinase domain of EPHA7 conferred hormonal resistance in vitro. Novel inactivating mutations in KMT2C and EPHA7, which confer hormonal resistance, are linked to adverse clinical course in HRPBC. PMID:27195705

  18. Targeted Therapies Overcoming Endocrine Resistance in Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Almstedt, Katrin; Schmidt, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with different molecular subtypes. Most tumours are hormone receptor positive (luminal subtype) with potential endocrine responsiveness. Endocrine therapy is commonly used in these patients. Disease progression caused by endocrine resistance represents a significant challenge in the treatment of breast cancer. To understand the mechanisms of resistance of long-term oestrogen-deprived breast cancer cells, it is important to focus on cross-talk between steroid receptor signalling and other growth factor receptors and intracellular pathways. (Pre-)clinical trials showed that co-targeting these pathways can restore endocrine sensitivity. The focus of the current review is on the intracellular PI3K/AKT/mTOR signalling pathway and cyclin-dependant kinases (CDKs) in oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Study results clearly show that both inhibition of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and CDK4/6 are promising ways to improve the efficacy of endocrine treatment in ER-positive breast cancer patients with comparably few side effects. Further clinical trials are needed to identify the patient population who would benefit most from a dual inhibition. PMID:26557821

  19. Vaginal estrogen products in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients on aromatase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Sulaica, Elisabeth; Han, Tiffany; Wang, Weiqun; Bhat, Raksha; Trivedi, Meghana V; Niravath, Polly

    2016-06-01

    Atrophic vaginitis represents a major barrier to compliance with aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy in breast cancer (BC) survivors. While local estrogen therapy is effective for postmenopausal vaginal dryness, the efficacy of such therapies has not been evaluated systematically in hormone receptor-positive (HR+) BC patients on AI therapy. Furthermore, the potential risk of breast cancer recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy represents a long-term safety concern for the patients with HR + BC. Unfortunately, there is no standardized assay to measure very low concentrations of estradiol (E2) in these women being treated with AI therapy. This makes it difficult to evaluate even indirectly the potential risk of BC recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In this review, we describe available assays to measure very low concentrations of E2, discuss the Food and Drug Administration-approved vaginal estrogen products on the market, and summarize published and ongoing clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of vaginal estrogen in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In the absence of any randomized controlled clinical trials, this review serves as a summary of available clinical data and ongoing studies to aid clinicians in selecting the best available option for their patients. PMID:27178335

  20. The immune system and hormone-receptor positive breast cancer: Is it really a dead end?

    PubMed

    Dieci, Maria Vittoria; Griguolo, Gaia; Miglietta, Federica; Guarneri, Valentina

    2016-05-01

    Even if breast cancer has not been traditionally considered an immunogenic tumor, recent data suggest that immunity, and its interaction with tumor cells and tumor microenvironment, might play an important role in this malignancy, in particular in triple negative and HER2+ subtypes. As no consistent data on the potential clinical relevance of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes have been produced in hormone receptor positive (HR+) HER2- breast cancer, the interest in studying immune aspects in this subtype has become less appealing. Nevertheless, some scattered evidence indicates that immunity and inflammation may be implicated in the biology of this subtype as well. In HR+ breast cancer, the interaction between tumor cells and the immune milieu might rely on different mechanisms than in other BC subtypes, involving the modulation of the tumor microenvironment by mutual interplays of endocrine factors, pro-inflammatory status and immune cells. These subtle mechanisms may require more refined methods of evaluation, such as the assessment of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes subpopulations or gene signatures. In this paper we aim to perform a comprehensive review of pre-clinical and clinical data on the interplay between the immune system and breast cancer in the HR+ subtype, to guide further research in the field. PMID:27055087

  1. Endocrine therapy initiation among Medicaid-insured breast cancer survivors with hormone receptor-positive tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Stephanie Brooke; Kohler, Racquel Elizabeth; Reeder-Hayes, Katherine Elizabeth; Goyal, Ravi K.; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Moore, Alexis; Smith, Timothy W.; Melvin, Cathy L.; Muss, Hyman Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hormone receptor positive (HR+) cancers account for most breast cancer diagnoses and deaths. Among survivors with HR+ breast cancers, endocrine therapy (ET) reduces 5-year risk of recurrence by up to 40%. Observational studies in Medicare and privately-insured survivors suggest under-utilization of ET. We sought to characterize ET use in a low-income Medicaid-insured population in North Carolina. Methods Medicaid claims data were matched to state cancer registry records for survivors ages 18–64 diagnosed with stage 0-II HR+ breast cancer from 2003–2007, eligible for ET, and enrolled in Medicaid for at least 12 of 15 months post-diagnosis. We used multivariable logistic regression to model receipt of any ET medication during 15-months post-diagnosis controlling for age, race, tumor characteristics, receipt of other treatments, co-morbidity, residence, reason for Medicaid eligibility, involvement in the Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program (BCCCP), and diagnosis year. Results Of 222 women meeting inclusion criteria, only 50% filled a prescription for ET. Involvement in BCCCP and earlier year of diagnoses were associated with significantly higher odds of initiating guideline-recommended ET (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] for BCCCP: 3.76, 95%CI: 1.67–8.48; AOR for 2004 relative to 2007: 2.80, 95%CI: 1.03–7.62; AOR for 2005 relative to 2007: 2.11, 95%CI: 0.92–4.85). Conclusions Results suggest substantial under-utilization of ET in this population. Interventions are needed to improve timely receipt of ET and to better support survivors taking ET. Implications of cancer survivors Low-income survivors should be counseled on the importance of ET and offered support services to promote initiation and long-term adherence. PMID:24866922

  2. Dosing and Safety Implications for Oncologists When Administering Everolimus to Patients With Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rugo, Hope S

    2016-02-01

    Aberrations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway are common abnormalities in breast cancer and are associated with the development of resistance to endocrine- and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2-targeted therapies. Because of the significant improvement in progression-free survival for everolimus plus exemestane compared with exemestane plus placebo, everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, was approved in the United States for the treatment of patients with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), HER-negative, advanced breast cancer whose disease had progressed while receiving letrozole or anastrozole. To provide optimal prevention and management strategies, it is crucial that clinicians are aware of the adverse events (AEs) associated with mTOR inhibition. Understanding the appropriate dose modifications will help reduce toxicity and improve drug tolerance, thus achieving the optimal benefit from everolimus. Analyses of data from the Breast Cancer Trials of Oral Everolimus 2 trial have shown that, despite a greater frequency of AEs in the everolimus plus exemestane treatment arm, the AEs were effectively managed with temporary dose reductions or interruptions. In some cases, the full dose of everolimus could be resumed. Despite a lower mean dose and duration of exposure in patients aged ≥ 70 versus < 70 years, everolimus plus exemestane was similarly efficacious, suggesting that appropriate dose reductions for toxicity will not adversely impact efficacy. Appropriate modification of the everolimus dose and dose delay according to the severity of AEs, with resumption of the optimal dose of everolimus when toxicity has improved, will positively affect patient outcomes in HR+ advanced breast cancer. PMID:26507507

  3. Evaluating the Survival Benefit Following Ovarian Function Suppression in Premenopausal Patients with Hormone Receptor Positive Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lin; Fu, Fangmeng; Huang, Meng; Lin, Yuxiang; chen, Yazhen; Chen, Minyan; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    There are divergent opinions regarding the use of ovarian function suppression or ablation (hereafter, OFS) in hormone receptor positive early breast cancer patients. In order to clarify the survival benefit of OFS, a meta-analysis was performed. The result is that use of OFS was more effective than no OFS on DFS (the pooled relative risk (pRR) = 0.86; 95% CI: 0.75–0.96) and on OS (pRR = 0.79; 95% CI: 0.70–0.89). In subgroup analysis, we found that increased DFS was positively associated with patients who had received chemotherapy (pRR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.74–0.96), who were lymph node negative (pRR = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.61–0.91) and were less than 40 years old (pRR = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.59–0.83). There was a significant difference in OS between the groups receiving chemotherapy (pRR = 0.73; 95% CI: 0.58–0.89) or for patients less than 40 years old (pRR = 0.52; 95% CI: 0.18–0.87). The use of OFS also produces statistical differences in the occurrence of the side-effects; severe hot flashes (pRR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.36–3.97), and hypertension (pRR = 1.54; 95% CI: 1.12–2.12). In general, OFS should be considered as one treatment for hormone receptor positive premenopausal early breast cancer patients who have received chemotherapy and are less than 40 years old. We also should pay attention to the side-effects and weigh the advantages and disadvantages before deciding on using OFS. PMID:27230285

  4. Evaluating the Survival Benefit Following Ovarian Function Suppression in Premenopausal Patients with Hormone Receptor Positive Early Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lin; Fu, Fangmeng; Huang, Meng; Lin, Yuxiang; Chen, Yazhen; Chen, Minyan; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    There are divergent opinions regarding the use of ovarian function suppression or ablation (hereafter, OFS) in hormone receptor positive early breast cancer patients. In order to clarify the survival benefit of OFS, a meta-analysis was performed. The result is that use of OFS was more effective than no OFS on DFS (the pooled relative risk (pRR) = 0.86; 95% CI: 0.75-0.96) and on OS (pRR = 0.79; 95% CI: 0.70-0.89). In subgroup analysis, we found that increased DFS was positively associated with patients who had received chemotherapy (pRR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.74-0.96), who were lymph node negative (pRR = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.61-0.91) and were less than 40 years old (pRR = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.59-0.83). There was a significant difference in OS between the groups receiving chemotherapy (pRR = 0.73; 95% CI: 0.58-0.89) or for patients less than 40 years old (pRR = 0.52; 95% CI: 0.18-0.87). The use of OFS also produces statistical differences in the occurrence of the side-effects; severe hot flashes (pRR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.36-3.97), and hypertension (pRR = 1.54; 95% CI: 1.12-2.12). In general, OFS should be considered as one treatment for hormone receptor positive premenopausal early breast cancer patients who have received chemotherapy and are less than 40 years old. We also should pay attention to the side-effects and weigh the advantages and disadvantages before deciding on using OFS. PMID:27230285

  5. A Case of Disease Improvement after Treatment with Everolimus plus Exemestane in a Patient with Hormone Receptor-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer with Bone Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Beck, J. Thaddeus; Mantooth, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers and a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Despite significant advances in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, tumor metastasis occurs frequently and is associated with poor long-term prognosis. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays a central role in cancer cell growth, proliferation, and resistance to endocrine therapies. Therefore, mTOR inhibitors such as everolimus in combination with nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors might reverse endocrine resistance and improve clinical outcomes in patients. Here, we report on a case of infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the breast with metastases to the bone. Histopathologic analysis showed that the patient was estrogen and progesterone receptor positive and human epidermal growth factor-2 negative. This case represents the clinical spectrum of complications caused by metastasis: the patient experienced a considerable amount of skeletal-related complications, had previously received chemotherapy, and experienced disease progression while taking nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors. After treatment with oral everolimus 10 mg daily plus oral exemestane 25 mg daily, the patient's disease was ameliorated. Combination therapy was well tolerated, with minimal adverse effects that were manageable with concomitant medications. Although further analyses in larger populations are necessary, the addition of everolimus to exemestane might provide an effective new treatment option for patients with bone metastasis. PMID:25848360

  6. Reproductive factors and risk of hormone receptor positive and negative breast cancer: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of reproductive factors with hormone receptor (HR)-negative breast tumors remains uncertain. Methods Within the EPIC cohort, Cox proportional hazards models were used to describe the relationships of reproductive factors (menarcheal age, time between menarche and first pregnancy, parity, number of children, age at first and last pregnancies, time since last full-term childbirth, breastfeeding, age at menopause, ever having an abortion and use of oral contraceptives [OC]) with risk of ER-PR- (n = 998) and ER+PR+ (n = 3,567) breast tumors. Results A later first full-term childbirth was associated with increased risk of ER+PR+ tumors but not with risk of ER-PR- tumors (≥35 vs. ≤19 years HR: 1.47 [95% CI 1.15-1.88] ptrend < 0.001 for ER+PR+ tumors; ≥35 vs. ≤19 years HR: 0.93 [95% CI 0.53-1.65] ptrend = 0.96 for ER-PR- tumors; P het = 0.03). The risk associations of menarcheal age, and time period between menarche and first full-term childbirth with ER-PR-tumors were in the similar direction with risk of ER+PR+ tumors (phet = 0.50), although weaker in magnitude and statistically only borderline significant. Other parity related factors such as ever a full-term birth, number of births, age- and time since last birth were associated only with ER+PR+ malignancies, however no statistical heterogeneity between breast cancer subtypes was observed. Breastfeeding and OC use were generally not associated with breast cancer subtype risk. Conclusion Our study provides possible evidence that age at menarche, and time between menarche and first full-term childbirth may be associated with the etiology of both HR-negative and HR-positive malignancies, although the associations with HR-negative breast cancer were only borderline significant. PMID:24321460

  7. Contribution of Estrone Sulfate to Cell Proliferation in Aromatase Inhibitor (AI) -Resistant, Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hanamura, Toru; Gohno, Tatsuyuki; Niwa, Toshifumi; Yamaguchi, Yuri; Horiguchi, Jun; Hayashi, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) effectively treat hormone receptor-positive postmenopausal breast cancer, but some patients do not respond to treatment or experience recurrence. Mechanisms of AI resistance include ligand-independent activation of the estrogen receptor (ER) and signaling via other growth factor receptors; however, these do not account for all forms of resistance. Here we present an alternative mechanism of AI resistance. We ectopically expressed aromatase in MCF-7 cells expressing green fluorescent protein as an index of ER activity. Aromatase-overexpressing MCF-7 cells were cultured in estrogen-depleted medium supplemented with testosterone and the AI, letrozole, to establish letrozole-resistant (LR) cell lines. Compared with parental cells, LR cells had higher mRNA levels of steroid sulfatase (STS), which converts estrone sulfate (E1S) to estrone, and the organic anion transporter peptides (OATPs), which mediate the uptake of E1S into cells. LR cells proliferated more in E1S-supplemented medium than did parental cells, and LR proliferation was effectively inhibited by an STS inhibitor in combination with letrozole and by ER-targeting drugs. Analysis of ER-positive primary breast cancer tissues showed a significant correlation between the increases in the mRNA levels of STS and the OATPs in the LR cell lines, which supports the validity of this AI-resistant model. This is the first study to demonstrate the contribution of STS and OATPs in E1S metabolism to the proliferation of AI-resistant breast cancer cells. We suggest that E1S metabolism represents a new target in AI-resistant breast cancer treatment. PMID:27228187

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of everolimus plus exemestane versus exemestane alone for treatment of hormone receptor positive metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Diaby, Vakaramoko; Adunlin, Georges; Zeichner, Simon B; Avancha, Kiran; Lopes, Gilberto; Gluck, Stefan; Montero, Alberto J

    2014-09-01

    Everolimus in combination with exemestane significantly improved progression-free survival compared to exemestane alone in patients previously treated with non-steroidal aromatase inhibitors in the BOLERO-2 trial. As a result, this combination has been approved by the food and drug administration to treat postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive and HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted to determine whether everolimus represents good value for money, utilizing data from BOLERO-2. A decision-analytic model was used to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio between treatment arms of the BOLERO-2 trial. Costs were obtained from the Center for Medicare Services drug payment table and physician fee schedule. Benefits were expressed as quality-adjusted progression-free survival weeks (QAPFW) and quality-adjusted progression-free years (QAPFY), with utilities/disutilities derived from the literature. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. A willingness to pay threshold of 1-3 times the per capita gross domestic product was adopted, as per the definition of the World Health Organization. The U.S. per capita gross domestic product in 2013 was $49,965; thus, a threshold varying between $49,965 and $149,895 was considered. Everolimus/exemestane had an incremental benefit of 11.88 QAPFW (0.22 QAPFY) compared to exemestane and an incremental cost of $60,574. This translated into an ICER of $265,498.5/QAPFY. Univariate sensitivity analyses showed important variations of the ICER, ranging between $189,836.4 and $530,947/QAPFY. A tornado analysis suggested that the key drivers of our model, by order of importance, included health utility value for stable disease, everolimus acquisition costs, and transition probabilities from the stable to the progression states. The Monte-Carlo simulation showed results that were similar to the base-case analysis. This cost-effectiveness analysis

  9. Hormonal-receptor positive breast cancer: IL-6 augments invasion and lymph node metastasis via stimulating cathepsin B expression.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sherif A; El-Ghonaimy, Eslam A; Hassan, Hebatallah; Mahana, Noha; Mahmoud, Mahmoud Abdelbaky; El-Mamlouk, Tahani; El-Shinawi, Mohamed; Mohamed, Mona M

    2016-09-01

    Hormonal-receptor positive (HRP) breast cancer patients with positive metastatic axillary lymph nodes are characterized by poor prognosis and increased mortality rate. The mechanisms by which cancer cells invade lymph nodes have not yet been fully explored. Several studies have shown that expression of IL-6 and the proteolytic enzyme cathepsin B (CTSB) was associated with breast cancer poor prognosis. In the present study, the effect of different concentrations of recombinant human IL-6 on the invasiveness capacity of HRP breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was tested using an in vitro invasion chamber assay. The impact of IL-6 on expression and activity of CTSB was also investigated. IL-6 treatment promoted the invasiveness potential of MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, MCF-7 cells displayed elevated CTSB expression and activity associated with loss of E-cadherin and upregulation of vimentin protein levels upon IL-6 stimulation. To validate these results in vivo, the level of expression of IL-6 and CTSB in the carcinoma tissues of HRP-breast cancer patients with positive and negative axillary metastatic lymph nodes (pLNs and nLNs) was assessed. Western blot and immunohistochemical staining data showed that expression of IL-6 and CTSB was higher in carcinoma tissues in HRP-breast cancer with pLNs than those with nLNs patients. ELISA results showed carcinoma tissues of HRP-breast cancer with pLNs exhibited significantly elevated IL-6 protein levels by approximately 2.8-fold compared with those with nLNs patients (P < 0.05). Interestingly, a significantly positive correlation between IL-6 and CTSB expression was detected in clinical samples of HRP-breast cancer patients with pLNs (r = 0.78, P < 0.01). Collectively, this study suggests that IL-6-induced CTSB may play a role in lymph node metastasis, and that may possess future therapeutic implications for HRP-breast cancer patients with pLNs. Further studies are necessary to fully identify IL-6/CTSB

  10. Ethnic differences in initiation and timing of adjuvant endocrine therapy among older women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer enrolled in Medicare Part D

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xianglin L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there are racial/ethnic differences in initiation and timing of adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) after Medicare Part D drug coverage. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare-linked data to assess ethnic, socio-demographic, and tumor characteristic variations in the initiation of AET among patients ≥65 with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in 2007–2009 enrolled in Medicare Part D through 2010. Logistic regression models were performed to assess the association between race/ethnicity and the initiation of tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors (AIs), and overall AET (tamoxifen or AIs) within the first 12 months of diagnosis. Of the 12,198 women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, 74.8 % received AET within 12 months of diagnosis, of which 17.3 % received tamoxifen and 82.8 % received AIs. After controlling for all variables, only Asian women were found to have a greater odds of initiation of overall AET compared to non-Hispanic white women (odds ratio (OR): 1.28, 95 % CI: 1.03–1.58). Hispanic Mexicans and non-Hispanic black patients had a significantly lower odds of tamoxifen initiation (0.70, 0.54–0.91; 0.25, 0.10–0.62). For AI initiation, Hispanic Mexicans and Asians had a higher odds compared to non-Hispanic white women (2.06, 1.34–3.10; 1.33, 1.11–1.61). A suboptimal proportion of women (25.2 %) did not initiate AET within 12 months of diagnosis and therefore did not receive the full benefits of treatment to reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence and mortality. Racial/ethnic differences in the initiation of tamoxifen and AIs have important implications that require further investigation. PMID:26786154

  11. Fulvestrant With or Without Lapatinib in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Stage III or Stage IV Breast Cancer That is Hormone Receptor-Positive

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  12. Adjuvant Surgical Oophorectomy Plus Tamoxifen in Premenopausal Women With Operable Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer: A Global Treatment Option.

    PubMed

    Love, Richard R

    2016-08-01

    One third of annual new cases of breast cancer globally are now hormone receptor-positive tumors in premenopausal women from low- and middle-income countries. For this subgroup of women with breast cancer, high-income country guidelines suggest impractical and unaffordable adjuvant treatments. The balance of clinical trial evidence now suggests that surgical oophorectomy plus tamoxifen is a safe and practical treatment for these women in low- and middle-income countries. Additionally, new randomized trial data suggest that women in the second half of an anovulatory cycle benefit minimally from surgical oophorectomy done at this time, which implies that regularly cycling women will benefit more than has been shown from this procedure. Allred scoring of levels of hormone receptors is a practical and inexpensive approach to the assessment of magnitudes of response to oophorectomy plus tamoxifen. These circumstances suggest that more detailed consideration of this option should characterize clinical practice guidelines in high-income countries because of their global impact. PMID:27117241

  13. The Role of Ovarian Suppression in Premenopausal Women With Hormone Receptor-Positive Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sarika; Santa-Maria, Cesar Augusto; Gradishar, William J

    2015-07-01

    The optimal adjuvant endocrine therapy in premenopausal women with early-stage breast cancer is yet to be elucidated. Studies have demonstrated that women who experience cessation of ovarian function after chemotherapy (chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea) may experience improved survival. These findings, however, have not been replicated when pharmacologic or surgical interventions have been used to stop ovarian function (eg, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, oophorectomy, or ovarian irradiation) in combination with an endocrine agent such as tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor. Recent large phase III clinical trials, including the Austrian Breast and Colorectal Cancer Study Group trial (ABCSG-12), Suppression of Ovarian Function Trial (SOFT), and Tamoxifen and Exemestane Trial (TEXT), did not demonstrate an improvement in disease-free survival with ovarian suppression in the overall population. However, subgroup analyses suggest that women at high risk for recurrence, including very young women or those who have received chemotherapy, may benefit from the addition of ovarian suppression. Still, toxicity and adverse effects on patient-reported outcomes were more frequent in patients who received ovarian suppression; these included more menopausal and sexual dysfunction symptoms, diabetes, hypertension, and osteoporosis. This review will summarize the experience with ovarian suppression in the adjuvant setting for the treatment of premenopausal early-stage breast cancer and offer recommendations for clinical management. PMID:26178334

  14. Advances in male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Antonietta; Gava, Giulia; Berra, Marta; Meriggiola Maria, Cristina

    2014-11-01

    Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials. PMID:25673544

  15. Advances in male hormonal contraception

    PubMed Central

    Antonietta, Costantino; Giulia, Gava; Marta, Berra; Cristina, Meriggiola Maria

    2014-01-01

    Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials. PMID:25673544

  16. CYP19A1 polymorphisms and clinical outcomes in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in the BIG 1–98 trial

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Kathryn P.; Abramovitz, Mark; Bouzyk, Mark; Young, Brandon; Long, Bradley; Kammler, Roswitha; Dell'Orto, Patrizia; Biasi, Maria Olivia; Thürlimann, Beat; Lyng, Maria B.; Ditzel, Henrik J.; Harvey, Vernon J.; Neven, Patrick; Treilleux, Isabelle; Rasmussen, Birgitte Bruun; Maibach, Rudolf; Price, Karen N.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Pagani, Olivia; Viale, Giuseppe; Rae, James M.; Regan, Meredith M.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether CYP19A1 polymorphisms are associated with abnormal activity of aromatase and with musculoskeletal and bone side effects of aromatase inhibitors. DNA was isolated from tumor specimens of 4861 postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer enrolled in the BIG 1–98 trial to receive tamoxifen and/or letrozole for 5 years. Tumors were genotyped for six CYP19A1 polymorphisms using PCR-based methods. Associations with breast cancer-free interval (BCFI), distant recurrence-free interval (DRFI), musculoskeletal and bone adverse events (AEs) were assessed using Cox proportional hazards models. All statistical tests were two-sided. No association between the CYP19A1 genotypes and BCFI or DRFI was observed overall. A reduced risk of a breast cancer event for tamoxifen-treated patients with rs700518 variants was observed (BCFI CC/TC vs. TT: HR 0.53, 95 % CI 0.34–0.82, interaction P = 0.08), but not observed for letrozole-treated patients. There was an increased risk of musculoskeletal AEs for patients with rs700518 variants CC/TC versus TT (HR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.03–1.45, P = 0.02), regardless of treatment. Tamoxifen-treated patients with rs4646 variants had a reduced risk of bone AEs (AA/CA vs. CC: HR 0.76, 95 % CI 0.59–0.98), whereas an increase of minor allele (C) of rs10046 was associated with an increased risk of bone AEs (HR 1.28, 95 % CI 1.07–1.52). rs936308 variants were associated with a reduced risk of bone AEs in letrozole-treated patients (GG/GC vs. CC: HR 0.73, 95 % CI 0.54–0.99), different from in tamoxifen-treated patients (GG/GC vs. CC: HR 1.32, 95 % CI 0.92–1.90, interaction P = 0.01). CYP19A1 rs700518 variants showed associations with BCFI, DRFI, in tamoxifen treated patients and musculoskeletal AEs regardless of treatment. SNPs rs4646, rs10046, and rs936308 were associated with bone AEs. PMID:25935582

  17. CYP19A1 polymorphisms and clinical outcomes in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in the BIG 1-98 trial.

    PubMed

    Leyland-Jones, Brian; Gray, Kathryn P; Abramovitz, Mark; Bouzyk, Mark; Young, Brandon; Long, Bradley; Kammler, Roswitha; Dell'Orto, Patrizia; Biasi, Maria Olivia; Thürlimann, Beat; Lyng, Maria B; Ditzel, Henrik J; Harvey, Vernon J; Neven, Patrick; Treilleux, Isabelle; Rasmussen, Birgitte Bruun; Maibach, Rudolf; Price, Karen N; Coates, Alan S; Goldhirsch, Aron; Pagani, Olivia; Viale, Giuseppe; Rae, James M; Regan, Meredith M

    2015-06-01

    To determine whether CYP19A1 polymorphisms are associated with abnormal activity of aromatase and with musculoskeletal and bone side effects of aromatase inhibitors. DNA was isolated from tumor specimens of 4861 postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer enrolled in the BIG 1-98 trial to receive tamoxifen and/or letrozole for 5 years. Tumors were genotyped for six CYP19A1 polymorphisms using PCR-based methods. Associations with breast cancer-free interval (BCFI), distant recurrence-free interval (DRFI), musculoskeletal and bone adverse events (AEs) were assessed using Cox proportional hazards models. All statistical tests were two-sided. No association between the CYP19A1 genotypes and BCFI or DRFI was observed overall. A reduced risk of a breast cancer event for tamoxifen-treated patients with rs700518 variants was observed (BCFI CC/TC vs. TT: HR 0.53, 95 % CI 0.34-0.82, interaction P = 0.08), but not observed for letrozole-treated patients. There was an increased risk of musculoskeletal AEs for patients with rs700518 variants CC/TC versus TT (HR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.03-1.45, P = 0.02), regardless of treatment. Tamoxifen-treated patients with rs4646 variants had a reduced risk of bone AEs (AA/CA vs. CC: HR 0.76, 95 % CI 0.59-0.98), whereas an increase of minor allele (C) of rs10046 was associated with an increased risk of bone AEs (HR 1.28, 95 % CI 1.07-1.52). rs936308 variants were associated with a reduced risk of bone AEs in letrozole-treated patients (GG/GC vs. CC: HR 0.73, 95 % CI 0.54-0.99), different from in tamoxifen-treated patients (GG/GC vs. CC: HR 1.32, 95 % CI 0.92-1.90, interaction P = 0.01). CYP19A1 rs700518 variants showed associations with BCFI, DRFI, in tamoxifen treated patients and musculoskeletal AEs regardless of treatment. SNPs rs4646, rs10046, and rs936308 were associated with bone AEs. PMID:25935582

  18. Targeting the cyclin D-cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6-retinoblastoma pathway with selective CDK 4/6 inhibitors in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer: rationale, current status, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Spring, Laura; Bardia, Aditya; Modi, Shanu

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the cyclin D-cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6-INK4-retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway is an important contributor to endocrine therapy resistance. Recent clinical development of selective inhibitors of CDK4 and CDK6 kinases has led to renewed interest in cell cycle regulators, following experience with relatively non-selective pan-CDK inhibitors that often resulted in limited activity and poor safety profiles in the clinic. The highly selective oral CDK 4/6 inhibitors palbociclib (PD0332991), ribociclib (LEE011), and abemaciclib (LY2835219) are able to inhibit the proliferation of Rb-positive tumor cells and have demonstrated dose-dependent growth inhibition in ER+ breast cancer models. In metastatic breast cancer, all three agents are being explored in combination with endocrine therapy in Phase III studies. Results so far indicated promising efficacy and manageable safety profiles, and led to the FDA approval of palbociclib. Phase II-III studies of these agents, in combination with endocrine therapy, are also underway in early breast cancer in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. Selective CDK 4/6 inhibitors are also being investigated with other targeted agents or chemotherapy in the advanced setting. This article reviews the rationale for targeting cyclin D-CDK 4/6 in hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer, provides an overview of the available preclinical and clinical data with CDK 4/6 inhibitors in breast cancer to date, and summarizes the main features of ongoing clinical trials of these new agents in breast cancer. Future trials evaluating further combination strategies with CDK 4/6 backbone and translational studies refining predictive biomarkers are needed to help personalize the optimal treatment regimen for individual patients with ER+ breast cancer. PMID:26896604

  19. Emergence of constitutively active estrogen receptor-α mutations in pretreated advanced estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Ferrer-Lozano, Jaime; Perez-Fidalgo, Jose A.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Gómez, Henry; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Giltnane, Jennifer; Balko, Justin M.; Cronin, Maureen T; Jarosz, Mirna; Sun, James; Hawryluk, Matthew; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Ross, Jeffrey S; Dvir, Addie; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Wolf, Ido; Rubinek, Tamar; Gilmore, Lauren; Schnitt, Stuart; Come, Steven E.; Pusztai, Lajos; Stephens, Philip; Brown, Myles; Miller, Vincent A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We undertook this study to determine the prevalence of estrogen receptor (ER) α (ESR1) mutations throughout the natural history of hormone dependent breast cancer and to delineate the functional roles of the most commonly detected alterations. Experimental Design We studied a total of 249 tumor specimens from 208 patients. The specimens include 134 ER positive (ER+/HER2–) and, as controls, 115 ER negative (ER−) tumors. The ER+ samples consist of 58 primary breast cancers and 76 metastatic samples. All tumors were sequenced to high unique coverage using next generation sequencing targeting the coding sequence of the estrogen receptor and an additional 182 cancer-related genes. Results Recurring somatic mutations in codons 537 and 538 within the ligand-binding domain of ER were detected in ER+ metastatic disease. Overall, the frequency of these mutations was 12% (9/76, 95% CI 6%-21%) in metastatic tumors and in a subgroup of patients who received an average of 7 lines of treatment the frequency was 20% (5/25, 95% CI 7%-41%). These mutations were not detected in primary or treatment naïve ER+ cancer or in any stage of ER− disease. Functional studies in cell line models demonstrate that these mutations render estrogen receptor constitutive activity and confer partial resistance to currently available endocrine treatments. Conclusions In this study we show evidence for the temporal selection of functional ESR1 mutations as potential drivers of endocrine resistance during the progression of ER positive breast cancer. PMID:24398047

  20. First-Line Treatment Patterns and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With HER2-Positive and Hormone Receptor-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer From registHER

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Peter A.; Brufsky, Adam M.; Mayer, Musa; Yood, Marianne Ulcickas; Yoo, Bongin; Quah, Cheng; Yardley, Denise; Rugo, Hope S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Limited data are available describing the natural history of patients with HER2-positive and hormone receptor (HR)-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We examined first-line treatment patterns and clinical outcomes in patients with HER2-positive, HR-positive MBC in a real-world setting. Methods. registHER is a prospective, observational cohort of 1,023 patients with HER2-positive MBC diagnosed within 6 months of enrollment and followed until death, disenrollment, or June 2009 (median follow-up time: 27 months). Demographics, first-line treatment patterns, and clinical outcomes were examined for 530 HER2-positive, HR-positive patients. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) times were examined. Multivariate analyses adjusted for baseline demographic and prognostic factors. Results. HER2-positive, HR-positive patients receiving first-line trastuzumab plus hormonal therapy had significantly longer PFS times than patients who received hormonal therapy only (13.8 vs. 4.8 months; adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.37, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.22–0.60); a nonsignificant reduction in OS time was observed (adjusted HR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.27–1.14). Compared with patients who received first-line trastuzumab plus chemotherapy, patients who received first-line trastuzumab plus chemotherapy and hormonal therapy had longer median PFS times (20.4 months vs. 9.5 months; adjusted HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.42–0.68); a statistically significant reduction in risk of death was observed (adjusted HR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.36–0.70). Sequential use of chemotherapy and hormonal therapy was associated with improved OS times when compared with concurrent use (adjusted PFS HR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.54–1.21; adjusted OS HR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.26–0.89). Conclusions. These real-world data in patients with HER2-positive/HR-positive MBC provide evidence that, with or without chemotherapy, dual targeting of HRs and HER2 receptors is associated with significantly prolonged

  1. Endocrine therapy for hormone treatment-naïve advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Miguel; Lopez-Tarruella, Sara; Gilarranz, Yolanda Jerez

    2016-08-01

    A proportion of patients with hormone receptor-positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer will not have received prior endocrine therapy. However, there are limited clinical data specifically in these patients. We conducted a review of randomized phase II and III clinical studies of anastrozole, letrozole, exemestane, palbociclib, and fulvestrant to determine the evidence base supporting use of specific endocrine therapies in this patient population. From our findings, there is a paucity of clinical studies in patients with endocrine therapy-naïve disease; however, it appears that first-line treatment effects are consistent between patients who have and have not received prior endocrine treatment. PMID:27326977

  2. Ki67/SATB1 ratio is an independent prognostic factor of overall survival in patients with early hormone receptor-positive invasive ductal breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Laurinavicius, Arvydas; Green, Andrew R.; Laurinaviciene, Aida; Smailyte, Giedre; Ostapenko, Valerijus; Meskauskas, Raimundas; Ellis, Ian O.

    2015-01-01

    Biological diversity of breast cancer presents challenges for personalized therapy and necessitates multiparametric approaches to understand and manage the disease. Multiple protein biomarkers tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC), followed by digital image analysis and multivariate statistics of the data, have been shown to be effective in exploring latent profiles of tumor tissue immunophenotype. In this study, based on tissue microarrays of 107 patients with hormone receptor (HR) positive invasive ductal breast carcinoma, we investigated the prognostic value of the integrated immunophenotype to predict overall survival (OS) of the patients. A set of 10 IHC markers (ER, PR, HER2, Ki67, AR, BCL2, HIF-1α, SATB1, p53, and p16) was used. The main factor of the variance was characterized by opposite loadings of ER/PR/AR/BCL2 and Ki67/HIF-1α; it was associated with histological grade but did not predict OS. The second factor was driven by SATB1 expression along with moderate positive HIF-1α and weak negative Ki67 loadings. Importantly, this factor did not correlate with any clinicopathologic parameters, but was an independent predictor of better OS. Ki67 and SATB1 did not reach statistical significance as single predictors; however, high Ki67/SATB1 ratio was an independent predictor of worse OS. In addition, our data indicate potential double prognostic meaning of HIF-1α expression in breast cancer and necessitate focused studies, taking into account the immunophenotype interactions and tissue heterogeneity aspects. PMID:26512778

  3. Effects of CDK4/6 Inhibition in Hormone Receptor-Positive/Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Negative Breast Cancer Cells with Acquired Resistance to Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Trapé, Adriana Priscila; Liu, Shuying; Cortes, Andrea Carolina; Ueno, Naoto T.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Among patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer, those with residual disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy have a higher risk of relapse and poorer survival than those with a complete response. Previous studies have revealed a correlation between activation of cell cycle-regulating pathways in HR-positive breast cancer, particularly cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6/cyclin D1 signaling, and resistance to standard therapies. Although CDK4/6 inhibition by palbociclib in combination with endocrine therapy has shown potent antiproliferative effects in HR-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer, the potential role of palbociclib in re-sensitizing chemotherapy-resistant HR-positive breast cancer is not well defined. We hypothesized that CDK4/6 inhibition by palbociclib re-sensitizes HR-positive/HER2-negative residual breast cancer to taxane-based adjuvant therapy. Using cell counting, flow cytometry, and western blotting, we evaluated the efficacy of palbociclib alone and in concurrent or sequential combination with paclitaxel in parental and paclitaxel-resistant T47D HR-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer cells. The CDK4/6 pathway was constitutively active in both parental and paclitaxel-resistant T47D cells; thus, both cell types were highly sensitive to the inhibitory effects of single-agent palbociclib on cell growth and cell cycle progression. However, palbociclib did not re-sensitize resistant cells to paclitaxel-induced G2/M arrest and cell death in any of the combinations tested. Our results suggest that CDK4/6 inhibition by palbociclib does not re-sensitize HR-positive/HER2-negative residual breast cancer to chemotherapy. Nevertheless, the fact that CDK4/6 activation remained intact in paclitaxel-resistant cells indicates that patients who have HR-positive/HER2-negative residual disease after taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy may still benefit from palbociclib in combination with other regimens

  4. Quality of life with palbociclib plus fulvestrant in previously treated hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer: patient-reported outcomes from the PALOMA-3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Harbeck, N.; Iyer, S.; Turner, N.; Cristofanilli, M.; Ro, J.; André, F.; Loi, S.; Verma, S.; Iwata, H.; Bhattacharyya, H.; Puyana Theall, K.; Bartlett, C. H.; Loibl, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the PALOMA-3 study, palbociclib plus fulvestrant demonstrated improved progression-free survival compared with fulvestrant plus placebo in hormone receptor-positive, HER2− endocrine-resistant metastatic breast cancer (MBC). This analysis compared patient-reported outcomes (PROs) between the two treatment groups. Patients and methods Patients were randomized 2 : 1 to receive palbociclib 125 mg/day orally for 3 weeks followed by 1 week off (n = 347) plus fulvestrant (500 mg i.m. per standard of care) or placebo plus fulvestrant (n = 174). PROs were assessed on day 1 of cycles 1–4 and of every other subsequent cycle starting with cycle 6 using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and its breast cancer module, QLQ-BR23. High scores (range 0–100) could indicate better functioning/quality of life (QoL) or worse symptom severity. Repeated-measures mixed-effect analyses were carried out to compare on-treatment overall scores and changes from baseline between treatment groups while controlling for baseline. Between-group comparisons of time to deterioration in global QoL and pain were made using an unstratified log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards model. Results Questionnaire completion rates were high at baseline and during treatment (from baseline to cycle 14, ≥95.8% in each group completed ≥1 question on the EORTC QLQ-C30). On treatment, estimated overall global QoL scores significantly favored the palbociclib plus fulvestrant group [66.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 64.5–67.7 versus 63.0, 95% CI 60.6–65.3; P = 0.0313]. Significantly greater improvement from baseline in pain was also observed in this group (−3.3, 95% CI −5.1 to −1.5 versus 2.0, 95% CI −0.6 to 4.6; P = 0.0011). No significant differences were observed for other QLQ-BR23 functioning domains, breast or arm symptoms. Treatment with palbociclib plus fulvestrant significantly delayed deterioration in global QoL (P < 0.025) and pain (P < 0.001) compared with fulvestrant alone. Conclusion

  5. Impact of palbociclib plus letrozole on pain severity and pain interference with daily activities in patients with estrogen receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer as first-line treatment.

    PubMed

    Bell, T; Crown, J P; Lang, I; Bhattacharyya, H; Zanotti, G; Randolph, S; Kim, S; Huang, X; Huang Bartlett, C; Finn, R S; Slamon, D

    2016-05-01

    Background Palbociclib is a recently approved drug for use in combination with letrozole as initial endocrine-based therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced estrogen receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (ER+/HER2-) breast cancer. This report assesses the impact of palbociclib in combination with letrozole versus letrozole alone on patient-reported outcomes of pain. Methods Palbociclib was evaluated in an open-label, randomized, phase II study (PALOMA-1/TRIO-18) among postmenopausal women with advanced ER+/HER2- breast cancer who had not received prior systemic treatment for their advanced disease. Patients received continuous oral letrozole 2.5 mg daily alone or the same letrozole dose and schedule plus oral palbociclib 125 mg, given once daily for 3 weeks followed by 1 week off over repeated 28-day cycles. The primary study endpoint was investigator-assessed progression-free survival in the intent-to-treat population, and these results have recently been published (Finn et al., Lancet Oncol 2015;16:25-35). One of the key secondary endpoints was the evaluation of pain, as measured using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) patient-reported outcome tool. The BPI was administered at baseline and on day 1 of every cycle thereafter until disease progression and/or treatment discontinuation. Clinical trial registration This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00721409). Results There were no statistically significant differences in Pain Severity or Pain Interference scores of the BPI between the two treatment groups for the overall population or among those with any bone disease at baseline. A limitation of the study is that results were not adjusted for the concomitant use of opioids or other medications used to control pain. Conclusions The addition of palbociclib to letrozole was associated with increased efficacy without negatively impacting pain severity or pain interference with daily activities

  6. [Hormonal therapy of advanced or relapsed ovarian granulosa cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Bai, P

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian granulosa cell tumor is a rare gynecologic malignancy with hormonal activity. Surgical excision is the standard treatment for this disease. Most patients present excellent short term prognosis, however, late relapse often occurs, even after many years. Viable treatments of advanced or relapsed granulosa cell tumor are still limited, and the optimal therapy method has not been established. Compared with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, hormonal therapy is a well-tolerated treatment which can be administrated over a long period of time without serious side effects, and the combined application of hormones may achieve a better outcome. Therefore, hormonal therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment option for patients with advanced or relapsed granulosa cell tumor, and to extend the tumor-free interval and attenuate the disease progression. Future researches should be focused on the identification of the hormonal therapy which may provide the greatest clinical benefit, comparing and analyzing the effects of different combined therapeutic regimens of hormone drugs, and on the synthesis of drugs highly activating estrogen receptor β expressed in the granulosa cell tumor cells. PMID:27531259

  7. Hormonal therapy in advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kokka, Fani; Brockbank, Elly; Oram, David; Gallagher, Chris; Bryant, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is a cancer of the lining of the womb and worldwide is the seventh most common cancer in women. Treatment with hormones is thought to be beneficial in patients with endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess the indications, effectiveness and safety of hormone therapy for advanced or recurrent epithelial endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE up to May 2009 and and CENTRAL (Issue 2, 2009). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies, and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that studied hormonal therapy in adult women diagnosed with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Comparisons were restricted to single-trial analyses so we did not synthesise data in meta-analyses. Main results We found six trials (542 participants) that met our inclusion criteria. These trials assessed the effectiveness of hormonal therapy in women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer as a single agent, as part of combination therapy and as low versus high dose. All comparisons were restricted to single-trial analyses, where we found no evidence that hormonal therapy as a single agent or as a combination treatment prolonged overall or five-year disease-free survival of women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. However, low-dose hormonal therapy may have had a benefit in terms of overall and progression-free survival (PFS) compared to high-dose hormonal therapy (HR 1.31, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.66 and HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.71 for overall and PFS, respectively). Authors’ conclusions We found insufficient evidence that hormonal treatment in any form, dose or as part of combination therapy improves the survival of patients with advanced or

  8. Survival Improvement in Korean Breast Cancer Patients Due to Increases in Early-Stage Cancers and Hormone Receptor Positive/HER2 Negative Subtypes: A Nationwide Registry-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    You, Jee Man; Kim, Yun Gyoung; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jong Won; Lim, Woosung; Lee, Mi-Ri; Noh, Dong-Young

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate whether the observed changes over time in the survival rates vary according to the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer diagnosed. Methods Data from 46,320 breast cancer patients in the Korean Breast Cancer Registry who underwent surgery between 1999 and 2006 were reviewed. Among them, results from 25,887 patients with available data about the status of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) were analyzed. Patients were classified into two cohorts according to the year in which they underwent surgery: 1999-2002 and 2003-2006. Results The patients treated in the latter time period showed significantly better overall survival (OS) compared with those in the former period when adjusted for follow-up duration. The proportion of hormone receptor+/HER2-subtype and stage I breast cancer were significantly higher in the latter period (47.4% vs. 54.6%, p<0.001; 31.0% vs. 39.6%, p<0.001, respectively). Improvement in OS between the former and latter periods was seen in all subtypes of breast cancer, including triple-negative cancers (all p-values <0.001 in univariate and multivariate analyses). Conclusion Improvement in survival in Korean breast cancer patients over the study years is being observed in all subtypes of breast cancer, implying that increases in both early-stage detection and the proportion of less aggressive cancers contribute to this improvement. PMID:25834605

  9. Illicit Use of Androgens and Other Hormones: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Pope, Harrison G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize recent advances in studies of illicit use of androgens and other hormones. Recent findings Androgens and other appearance- and performance-enhancing substances are widely abused worldwide. Three notable clusters of findings have emerged in this field in recent years. First, studies almost unanimously find that androgen users engage in polypharmacy, often ingesting other hormones (e.g., human growth hormone, thyroid hormones, and insulin), ergo/thermogenic drugs (e.g., caffeine, ephedrine, clenbuterol), and classical drugs of abuse (e.g., cannabis, opiates, and cocaine). Second, reports of long-term psychiatric and medical adverse effects of androgens continue to accumulate. In cardiovascular research particularly, controlled studies have begun to supersede anecdotal evidence, strengthening the case that androgens (possibly acting synergistically with other abused drugs) may cause significant morbidity and even mortality. Third, it is increasingly recognized that androgen use may lead to a dependence syndrome with both psychological and physiological origins. Androgen dependence likely affects some millions of individuals worldwide, and arguably represents the least studied major class of illicit drug dependence. Summary Given mounting evidence of the adverse effects of androgens and associated polypharmacy, this topic will likely represent an expanding area of research and an issue of growing public-health concern. PMID:22450858

  10. Phase I/II dose-escalation study of PI3K inhibitors pilaralisib or voxtalisib in combination with letrozole in patients with hormone-receptor-positive and HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer refractory to a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, Kimberly; Burris, Howard; Gomez, Patricia; Lynn Henry, N; Isakoff, Steven; Campana, Frank; Gao, Lei; Jiang, Jason; Macé, Sandrine; Tolaney, Sara M

    2015-11-01

    This phase I/II dose-escalation study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of pilaralisib (SAR245408), a pan-class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, or voxtalisib (SAR245409), a PI3K and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, in combination with letrozole in hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative, non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor-refractory, recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. Maximum tolerated doses (MTDs) were determined using a 3 + 3 design in phase I. Efficacy was evaluated at the MTDs in phase II. Twenty-one patients were enrolled in phase I; MTDs were determined to be pilaralisib tablets 400 mg once daily (QD) or voxtalisib capsules 50 mg twice daily in combination with letrozole tablets 2.5 mg QD. Fifty-one patients were enrolled in phase II; one patient had a partial response in the pilaralisib arm. Rates of progression-free survival at 6 months were 17 and 8 % in the pilaralisib and voxtalisib arms, respectively. The most frequently reported treatment-related grade ≥ 3 adverse events were aspartate aminotransferase increased (5 %) and rash (5 %) in the pilaralisib arm, and alanine aminotransferase increased (11 %) and rash (9 %) in the voxtalisib arm. Pilaralisib and voxtalisib did not interact pharmacokinetically with letrozole. Pilaralisib had a greater pharmacodynamic impact than voxtalisib, as demonstrated by its impact on glucose homeostasis. There was no association between molecular alterations in the PI3K pathway and efficacy. In summary, pilaralisib or voxtalisib, in combination with letrozole, was associated with an acceptable safety profile and limited efficacy in endocrine therapy-resistant HR+ , HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26497877

  11. Delivering non-hormonal contraceptives to men: advances and obstacles

    PubMed Central

    Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    There have been major advances in male contraceptive research during the past two decades. However, for a contraceptive to be used by men, its safety requires more stringent scrutiny than therapeutic compounds for treatment of illnesses because the contraceptives will be used by healthy individuals for an extended period of time, perhaps decades. A wide margin is therefore required between the effective dose range and doses that cause toxicity. It might be preferable that a male contraceptive, in particular a non-hormone-based compound, is delivered specifically and/or directly to the testis and has a rapid metabolic clearance rate, reducing the length of exposure in the liver and kidney. In this article, we highlight the latest developments regarding contraceptive delivery to men and with the aim of providing useful information for investigators in future studies. PMID:18191256

  12. Advances in bioanalytical techniques to measure steroid hormones in serum.

    PubMed

    French, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Steroid hormones are measured clinically to determine if a patient has a pathological process occurring in the adrenal gland, or other hormone responsive organs. They are very similar in structure making them analytically challenging to measure. Additionally, these hormones have vast concentration differences in human serum adding to the measurement complexity. GC-MS was the gold standard methodology used to measure steroid hormones clinically, followed by radioimmunoassay, but that was replaced by immunoassay due to ease of use. LC-MS/MS has now become a popular alternative owing to simplified sample preparation than for GC-MS and increased specificity and sensitivity over immunoassay. This review will discuss these methodologies and some new developments that could simplify and improve steroid hormone analysis in serum. PMID:27217264

  13. Prognostic Significance of Single Progesterone Receptor Positivity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ying; Ding, Xiaoyan; Xu, Binghe; Ma, Fei; Yuan, Peng; Wang, Jiayu; Zhang, Pin; Li, Qing; Luo, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Single progesterone receptor positive (PgR+), especially in form of ER−/PgR+/HER2−, is a nonnegligible phenomenon. Little is known about the characteristics and the role of single PgR positive in this phenotype. Therefore, we explore the significance of single PgR positivity by comparing ER−/PgR+/HER2− breast cancers with triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs). Three thousand nine hundred sixty-six cases of primary invasive breast carcinoma operated consecutively from January 2005 to May 2008 in Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences were examined. Two hundred forty (6%) cases were identified as ER−/PgR+/HER2− breast cancers and 348 (8.8%) cases as TNBCs. Clinicopathological characteristics and survivals were analyzed respectively and then compared between 2 subtypes. Compared with patients with TNBCs, ER−/PgR+/HER2− tumor tended to have lower tumor grade (Grade 3: 45.7% vs. 37.5%, P = 0.051) and smaller tumor size (P = 0.036). However, no differences were found between ER−/PgR+/HER2− and TNBC patients in relapse-free survival (RFS) and OS. The 5-year RFS rates were 80.7% and 77.4%, respectively (P = 0.330) and the 5-year OS rates were 88.0% and 85.2%, respectively (P = 0.290). ER−/PgR+/HER2− patients receiving adjuvant endocrine treatment had better RFS (P = 0.016) and overall survival (OS) (P < 0.0001) than patients receiving no endocrine therapy. This exclusive analysis of patients with ER−/PgR+/HER2− breast cancers showed that this subtype exhibited an aggressive behavior as TNBC, suggesting that it should also be regarded as biologically distinctive group and single PgR positive itself is not a good prognostic factor. However, adjuvant endocrine therapy could still benefit this group of patients. Further investigations should be done to elucidate the underlying mechanism. PMID:26579819

  14. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  15. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Li, Xiaoyan; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 ± 0.013 vs. 0.622 ± 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 ± 0.045 vs. 0.475 ± 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 ± 0.021 vs. 0.380 ± 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT

  16. Targeted Radiotherapy of Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan Rajagopalan

    2006-08-31

    The overall objectives of the proposal were to develop estrogen receptor (ER) binding small molecule radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radiotherapy of ER positive (ER+) tumors. In particular, this proposal focused on embedding a {sup 186,188}Re or a {sup 32}P radionuclide into an estrogen steroidal framework by isosteric substitution such that the resulting structure is topologically similar to the estrogen (estrogen mimic). The estrogen mimic molecules expected to bind to the ER and exhibit biodistribution akin to that of native estrogen due to structural mimicry. It is anticipated that the {sup 186,188}Re- or a {sup 32}P-containing estrogen mimics will be useful for targeted molecular radiotherapy of ER+ tumors. It is well established that the in vivo target tissue uptake of estrogen like steroidal molecules is related to the binding of the steroids to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG is important in the uptake of estrogens and testosterone in target tissues by SHBG receptors on the cell surface. However, hitherto the design of estrogen like small molecule radiopharmaceuticals was focused on optimizing ER binding characteristics without emphasis on SHBG binding properties. Consequently, even the molecules with good ER affinity in vitro, performed poorly in biodistribution studies. Based on molecular modeling studies the proposal focused on developing estrogen mimics 1-3 which were topologically similar to native estrogens, and form hydrogen bonds in ER and SHBG in the same manner as those of native estrogens. To this end the technical objectives of the proposal focused on synthesizing the rhenium-estrone and estradiol mimics 1 and 2 respectively, and phosphorous estradiol mimic 3 and to assess their stability and in vitro binding characteristics to ER and SHBG.

  17. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal ...

  18. Phase Ib, Dose Escalation Study of Oral LDE225 in Combination With BKM120 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Dose Escalation; Safety; Preliminary Efficacy; Advanced Solid Tumors; Metastatic Breast Cancer; Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Colorectal Cancer; Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme; Gastric Cancer; Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer; Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Hormone Receptor Positive (ER+/PR+, and Her2-) Metastatic Breast Cancer

  19. Modern reproductive patterns associated with estrogen receptor positive but not negative breast cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Aktipis, C. Athena; Ellis, Bruce J.; Nishimura, Katherine K.; Hiatt, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been accepted that modern reproductive patterns are likely contributors to breast cancer susceptibility because of their influence on hormones such as estrogen and the importance of these hormones in breast cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess whether this ‘evolutionary mismatch hypothesis’ can explain susceptibility to both estrogen receptor positive (ER-positive) and estrogen receptor negative (ER-negative) cancer. Our meta-analysis includes a total of 33 studies and examines parity, age of first birth and age of menarche broken down by estrogen receptor status. We found that modern reproductive patterns are more closely linked to ER-positive than ER-negative breast cancer. Thus, the evolutionary mismatch hypothesis for breast cancer can account for ER-positive breast cancer susceptibility but not ER-negative breast cancer. PMID:25389105

  20. Current medical treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lumachi, Franco; Santeufemia, Davide A; Basso, Stefano MM

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 80% of breast cancers (BC) are estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and thus endocrine therapy (ET) should be considered complementary to surgery in the majority of patients. The advantages of oophorectomy, adrenalectomy and hypophysectomy in women with advanced BC have been demonstrated many years ago, and currently ET consist of (1) ovarian function suppression (OFS), usually obtained using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa); (2) selective estrogen receptor modulators or down-regulators (SERMs or SERDs); and (3) aromatase inhibitors (AIs), or a combination of two or more drugs. For patients aged less than 50 years and ER+ BC, there is no conclusive evidence that the combination of OFS and SERMs (i.e., tamoxifen) or chemotherapy is superior to OFS alone. Tamoxifen users exhibit a reduced risk of BC, both invasive and in situ, especially during the first 5 years of therapy, and extending the treatment to 10 years further reduced the risk of recurrences. SERDs (i.e., fulvestrant) are especially useful in the neoadjuvant treatment of advanced BC, alone or in combination with either cytotoxic agents or AIs. There are two types of AIs: type I are permanent steroidal inhibitors of aromatase, while type II are reversible nonsteroidal inhibitors. Several studies demonstrated the superiority of the third-generation AIs (i.e., anastrozole and letrozole) compared with tamoxifen, and adjuvant therapy with AIs reduces the recurrence risk especially in patients with advanced BC. Unfortunately, some cancers are or became ET-resistant, and thus other drugs have been suggested in combination with SERMs or AIs, including cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitors (palbociclib) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, such as everolimus. Further studies are required to confirm their real usefulness. PMID:26322178

  1. Outcomes of Estrogen Receptor Negative and Progesterone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Melissa; Chang, Martin C.; González, Rosa; Lategan, Belinda; del Barco, Elvira; Vera-Badillo, Francisco; Quesada, Paula; Goldstein, Robyn; Cruz, Ignacio; Ocana, Alberto; Cruz, Juan J.; Amir, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical features and outcomes of estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and progesterone receptor positive (PgR+) breast cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a well-characterized database of sequential patients diagnosed with early stage invasive breast carcinoma. Outcomes of interest were time to relapse (TTR) and overall survival (OS). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis was conducted to assess the association of ER-/PgR+ with TTR and OS in comparison to ER+ and to ER- and PgR negative (ER-/PgR-) tumors irrespective of HER2 status. ER and PgR expression was conservatively defined as 10% or greater staining of cancer cells. Results 815 patients were followed for a median of 40.5 months; 56 patients (7%) had ER-/PgR+, 624 (77%) had ER+ and 136 (17%) had ER-/PgR- phenotypes. Compared with ER+ tumors, ER-/PgR+ tumors were associated with younger age (50 versus 59 years, p=0.03), high grade (50% versus 24%, p<0.001) and more frequent HER2 overexpression/amplification (43% versus 14%, p<0.001). TTR for ER-/PgR+ was intermediate between ER+ and ER-/PgR- tumors, but was not significantly different from ER+ tumors. Recurrences in the ER-/PgR+ and ER-/PgR- groups occurred early in follow-up while in ER+ tumors recurrences continued to occur over the duration of follow-up. OS of ER-/PgR+ was similar to ER+ tumors and better than that of ER-/PgR- tumors. Conclusions The ER-/PgR+ phenotype is associated with higher grade with HER2 overexpression/amplification and occurs more commonly in younger women. Risk of relapse and death more closely resembles ER+ than ER-/PgR- tumors suggesting this phenotype represents a group of more aggressive hormone receptor positive tumors. PMID:26161666

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis comparing degarelix with leuprolide in hormonal therapy for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hatoum, Hind T; Crawford, E David; Nielsen, Sandy Kildegaard; Lin, Swu-Jane; Marshall, Dennis C

    2013-04-01

    Degarelix, approved in the USA in 2008, is a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist, representing one of the latest additions to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). ADT is used as first-line therapy for locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer with the aim to reduce testosterone to castrate levels. Like other gonadotropin-releasing hormone-antagonists, degarelix treatment results in rapid decrease in luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone levels without the associated risk of flare. Using one registration trial for degarelix with leuprolide as the active control, a cost-effectiveness analysis with a Markov model and a 20-year time horizon found the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for degarelix to be US$245/quality-adjusted life years. Degarelix provides a cost-effective treatment for ADT among patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. PMID:23570437

  3. Adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy in locally advanced breast cancer: a randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Schaake-Koning, C.; van der Linden, E.H.; Hart, G.; Engelsman, E.

    1985-10-01

    Between 1977 and 1980, 118 breast cancer patients with locally advanced disease, T3B-4, any N, M0 or T1-3, tumor positive axillary apex biopsy, were randomized to one of three arms: I: radiotherapy (RT) to the breast and adjacent lymph node areas; II: RT followed by 12 cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5 fluorouracil (CMF) and tamoxifen during the chemotherapy period; III: 2 cycles of adriamycin and vincristine (AV), alternated with 2 cycles of CMF, then RT, followed by another 4 cycles of AV, alternated with 4 CMF; tamoxifen during the entire treatment period. The median follow-up period was 5 1/2 years. The adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve the overall survival; the 5-year survival was 37% for all three treatment arms. There was no statistically significant difference in RFS between the three modalities, nor when arm I was compared to arm II and III together. LR was not statistically different over the three treatment arms. In 18 of the 24 patients with LR, distant metastases appeared within a few months from the local recurrence. The menopausal status did not influence the treatment results. Dose reduction in more than 4 cycles of chemotherapy was accompanied by better results. In conclusion: adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve RFS and overall survival. These findings do not support the routine use of adjuvant chemo- and endocrine therapy for inoperable breast cancer.

  4. Pathology, Pathogenesis and Therapy of Growth Hormone (GH)-producing Pituitary Adenomas: Technical Advances in Histochemistry and Their Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Osamura, Robert Y.; Egashira, Noboru; Kajiya, Hanako; Takei, Mao; Tobita, Maya; Miyakoshi, Takashi; Inomoto, Chie; Takekoshi, Susumu; Teramoto, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-producing adenomas (GHomas) are one of the most frequently-occurring pituitary adenomas. Differentiation of hormone-producing cells in the pituitary gland is regulated by transcription factors and co-factors. The transcription factors include Pit-1, Prop-1, NeuroD1, Tpit, GATA-2, SF-1. Aberrant expression of transcription factors such as Pit-1 results in translineage expression of GH in adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing adenomas (ACTHomas). This situation has been substantiated by GFP-Pit-1 transfection expression in the AtT20 cell line. Experimentally, GHomas have been induced in GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) or Prop-1 transgenic animals. Immunohistochemical detection of somatostatin receptor (SSTR2a) has recently emphasized their role in the response of GHomas to somatostatin analogue therapy. In this review, the advances in technology and their contribution to cell biology and medical practice are discussed. PMID:19759870

  5. Optimal management of the premenopausal patient with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chojecki, Aleksander; Wong, Serena; Toppmeyer, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen is the standard of care in the adjuvant treatment of premenopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. Ovarian suppression (OS) is another method of endocrine therapy and has been shown to decrease the risk of recurrence and confer a survival advantage when used as the sole source of hormone therapy. However, there is no evidence that OS is superior to treatment with tamoxifen. Studies comparing OS with or without tamoxifen compared with chemotherapy have demonstrated comparable effects. There does not appear to be any additional benefit when OS is combined with chemotherapy, although there is a suggestion that there may be an effect in the subgroup of young women (aged younger than 40 years) who are least likely to experience chemotherapy-induced cessation of ovarian function. Interpretation of existing data is hampered by the lack of studies incorporating modern chemotherapy regimens and the absence of molecular analyses that would allow us to better define populations most likely to benefit from endocrine therapy. Last, the role of aromatase inhibitors (AI) in the premenopausal setting remains undefined. Two recent studies, SOFT and TEXT, aim to shed light on the effect of OS and AI in premenopausal ER+ breast cancer and are pending analysis. PMID:24857090

  6. 11q13 is a Susceptibility Locus for Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, Diether; Truong, Therese; Justenhoven, Christina; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Jean; Hopper, John L.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; van Hien, Richard; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Milne, Roger L.; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Pérez, José Ignacio; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brüning, Thomas; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Eilber, Ursel; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Menegaux, Florence; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Andrulis, Irene L.; Selander, Teresa; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Muir, Kenneth R.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nicholas; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham; Southey, Melissa; Marmé, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Neven, Patrick; Paridaens, Robert; Wildiers, Hans; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schott, Sarah; Bartram, Claus R.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Elliott, Graeme; Cross, Simon S.; Fasching, Peter A.; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Peto, Julian; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Rogov, Yuri I.; Karstens, Johann H.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Gancev, Shamil; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Lanng, Charlotte; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Hall, Per; Liu, Jianjun; Czene, Kamila; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Easton, Douglas F.; Guénel, Pascal; Brauch, Hiltrud

    2012-01-01

    A recent two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified five novel breast cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 9, 10 and 11. To provide more reliable estimates of the relative risk associated with these loci and investigate possible heterogeneity by subtype of breast cancer, we genotyped the variants rs2380205, rs1011970, rs704010, rs614367, rs10995190 in 39 studies from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), involving 49,608 cases and 48,772 controls of predominantly European ancestry. Four of the variants showed clear evidence of association (P ≤ 3 × 10−9) and weak evidence was observed for rs2380205 (P = 0.06). The strongest evidence was obtained for rs614367, located on 11q13 (per-allele odds ratio 1.21, P = 4 × 10−39). The association for rs614367 was specific to estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease and strongest for ER plus progesterone receptor (PR)-positive breast cancer, whereas the associations for the other three loci did not differ by tumor subtype. PMID:22461340

  7. GABAB Receptor-Positive Modulators: Brain Region-Dependent Effects

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Tushar; Burke, Teresa F.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.; Koek, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the positive modulatory properties of 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-propyl)-phenol (CGP7930) and (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF) at γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) receptors in different brain regions. Using quantitative autoradiography, we measured GABAB receptor-stimulated binding of guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]GTPγS) to G proteins in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), hippocampus, and cerebellum. CGP7930 and rac-BHFF enhanced baclofen-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding similarly in mPFC and hippocampus, but were more effective in cerebellum. CGP7930 (100 μM) increased [35S]GTPγS binding stimulated by baclofen (30 μM) from 29 to 241% above basal in mPFC and from 13 to 1530% above basal in cerebellum. Likewise, rac-BHFF (10 μM) increased baclofen-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding more in cerebellum (from 13 to 1778% above basal) than in mPFC (from 29 to 514% above basal). rac-BHFF (10 μM) in combination with γ-hydroxybutyrate (20 mM) increased [35S]GTPγS binding in cerebellum but not in mPFC. rac-BHFF also enhanced the effects of 3-aminopropyl(diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP35348). Consistent with its partial agonist properties, CGP35348 stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in mPFC when given alone (to 18% above basal), but less extensively than baclofen (140% above basal), and antagonized baclofen when given together. CGP35348 (1 mM) in combination with rac-BHFF (100 μM) produced an increase in [35S]GTPγS binding that was larger in cerebellum (from 61 to 1260% above basal) than in mPFC (from 18 to 118% above basal). Taken together, the results show that GABAB receptor-positive modulators enhance [35S]GTPγS binding stimulated by GABAB receptor agonists in a brain region-dependent manner. This regionally selective enhancement is further evidence of pharmacologically distinct GABAB receptor populations, possibly allowing for more selective therapeutic targeting

  8. An update on the use of degarelix in the treatment of advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rick, Ferenc G; Block, Norman L; Schally, Andrew V

    2013-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy remains the mainstay of medical treatment for advanced prostate cancer. Commonly, this is achieved with medical androgen deprivation rather than surgical intervention as the permanence and psychological effects of the latter are unacceptable for most patients. Degarelix is a third generation antagonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH, also termed gonadotropin-releasing hormone) for the first-line treatment of androgen-dependent advanced prostate cancer. Degarelix acts directly on the pituitary receptors for LHRH, blocking the action of endogenous LHRH. The use of degarelix eliminates the initial undesirable surge in gonadotropin and testosterone levels, which is produced by agonists of LHRH. Degarelix is the most comprehensively studied and widely available LHRH antagonist worldwide. Clinical trials have demonstrated that degarelix has a long-term efficacy similar to the LHRH agonist leuprolide in achieving testosterone suppression in patients with prostate cancer. Degarelix, however, produces a faster suppression of testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA), with no testosterone surges or microsurges, and thus prevents the risk of clinical flare in advanced disease. Recent clinical trials demonstrated that treatment with degarelix results in improved disease control when compared with an LHRH agonist in terms of superior PSA progression-free survival, suggesting that degarelix likely delays progression to castration-resistant disease and has a more significant impact on bone serum alkaline phosphatase and follicle-stimulating hormone. Degarelix is usually well tolerated, with limited toxicity and no evidence of systemic allergic reactions in clinical studies. Degarelix thus represents an important addition to the hormonal armamentarium for therapy of advanced androgen-dependent prostate cancer. PMID:23620672

  9. A Randomised Comparison Evaluating Changes in Bone Mineral Density in Advanced Prostate Cancer: Luteinising Hormone-releasing Hormone Agonists Versus Transdermal Oestradiol

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Ruth E.; Kynaston, Howard G.; Alhasso, Abdulla A.; Duong, Trinh; Paez, Edgar M.; Jovic, Gordana; Scrase, Christopher D.; Robertson, Andrew; Cafferty, Fay; Welland, Andrew; Carpenter, Robin; Honeyfield, Lesley; Abel, Richard L.; Stone, Michael; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Abel, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa), used as androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer (PCa) management, reduce serum oestradiol as well as testosterone, causing bone mineral density (BMD) loss. Transdermal oestradiol is a potential alternative to LHRHa. Objective To compare BMD change in men receiving either LHRHa or oestradiol patches (OP). Design, setting, and participants Men with locally advanced or metastatic PCa participating in the randomised UK Prostate Adenocarcinoma TransCutaneous Hormones (PATCH) trial (allocation ratio of 1:2 for LHRHa:OP, 2006–2011; 1:1, thereafter) were recruited into a BMD study (2006–2012). Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans were performed at baseline, 1 yr, and 2 yr. Interventions LHRHa as per local practice, OP (FemSeven 100 μg/24 h patches). Outcome measurements and statistical analysis The primary outcome was 1-yr change in lumbar spine (LS) BMD from baseline compared between randomised arms using analysis of covariance. Results and limitations A total of 74 eligible men (LHRHa 28, OP 46) participated from seven centres. Baseline clinical characteristics and 3-mo castration rates (testosterone ≤1.7 nmol/l, LHRHa 96% [26 of 27], OP 96% [43 of 45]) were similar between arms. Mean 1-yr change in LS BMD was −0.021 g/cm3 for patients randomised to the LHRHa arm (mean percentage change −1.4%) and +0.069 g/cm3 for the OP arm (+6.0%; p < 0.001). Similar patterns were seen in hip and total body measurements. The largest difference between arms was at 2 yr for those remaining on allocated treatment only: LS BMD mean percentage change LHRHa −3.0% and OP +7.9% (p < 0.001). Conclusions Transdermal oestradiol as a single agent produces castration levels of testosterone while mitigating BMD loss. These early data provide further supporting evidence for the ongoing phase 3 trial. Patient summary This study found that prostate cancer patients treated with transdermal oestradiol

  10. Establishment and characterization of a new human oestradiol- and progesterone-receptor-positive mammary carcinoma serially transplantable in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Naundorf, H; Fichtner, I; Büttner, B; Frege, J

    1992-01-01

    A human mammary carcinoma originating from a postmenopausal patient was successfully transplanted into nude mice. According to the adopted criteria the tumour proved to be oestradiol- and progesterone-receptor-positive. Histological studies of the patient tumour revealed a ductal invasive mammary carcinoma with 80% tubular growth pattern. Following transplantation the adenoid structures decreased to 30%; the mitosis rate and grade of malignancy increased. Treatment of the nude mice with 20 micrograms oestradiol benzoate/mouse caused a loss of the oestradiol receptor of the mammary carcinoma. The mammary carcinoma 3366 can be used for testing of antineoplastic substances, antihormones and for studies in regard to down-regulation or blocking of hormone receptors and possible consequences for therapies. PMID:1400563

  11. Glycone-rich Soy Isoflavone Extracts Promote Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kailee A; Vemuri, Sravan; Alsahafi, Sameerh; Castillo, Rudy; Cheriyath, Venugopalan

    2016-01-01

    Due to the association of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with breast cancer risk, estrogenically active soy isoflavones are considered as an HRT alternative to alleviate menopausal symptoms. However, several recent reports challenged the health benefits of soy isoflavones and associated them with breast cancer promotion. While glyconic isoflavones are the major constituents of soybean seeds, due to their low cell permeability, they are considered to be biologically inactive. The glyconic isoflavones may exert their effects on membrane-bound estrogen receptors or could be converted to aglycones by extracellular β-glucosidases. Therefore, we hypothesized that despite their low cell permeability, soybean cultivars with high glyconic isoflavones may promote breast cancer cell growth. To test this, composition and estrogenic activity of isoflavones from 54 commercial soybean cultivars were determined. Soybean seeds produced in identical climate and growth conditions were used to minimize the effects of extraneous factors on isoflavone profile and concentrations. The glyconic daidzin concentration negatively correlated with genistin and with other aglycones. Relative to control, isoflavone extracts from 51 cultivars were estrogenic and promoted the growth of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cell line MCF-7 from 1.14 to 4.59 folds and other three cultivars slightly reduced the growth. Among these, extracts from three cultivars were highly estrogenic and promoted MCF-7 cell growth by 2.59-4.64 folds (P<0.005). Among six isoflavones, daidzin was positively associated with MCF-7 cell growth (P<0.005, r = 0.13966), whereas the negative correlation between genistin and MCF-7 cell growth was nearly significant (P≤0.0562, r = -0.026141). Furthermore, in drug interaction studies daidzin-rich isoflavone extracts antagonized tamoxifen, an ER inhibitor. Taken together, our results suggest that the glyconic daidzin-rich soy isoflavone extracts may exert estrogenic

  12. Non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for advanced prostate cancer: a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kunath, Frank; Grobe, Henrik R; Rücker, Gerta; Motschall, Edith; Antes, Gerd; Dahm, Philipp; Wullich, Bernd; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2015-07-01

    To assess the effects of non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for treating advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. We searched the Cochrane Prostatic Diseases and Urologic Cancers Group Specialized Register (PROSTATE), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science with Conference Proceedings, three trial registries and abstracts from three major conferences to 23 December 2013, together with reference lists, and contacted selected experts in the field and manufacturers. We included randomized controlled trials comparing non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy with medical or surgical castration monotherapy for men in advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. Two review authors independently examined full-text reports, identified relevant studies, assessed the eligibility of studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias as well as quality of evidence according to the GRADE working group guidelines. We used Review Manager 5.2 for data synthesis and the fixed-effect model as primary analysis (when heterogeneity was low with I(2) < 50%); we used a random-effects model when confronted with substantial or considerable heterogeneity (when I(2) ≥50%). A total of 11 studies involving 3060 randomly assigned participants were included in the present review. Use of non-steroidal antiandrogens resulted in lower overall survival times (hazard ratio [HR] 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.48, six studies, 2712 participants) and greater clinical progression (1 year: risk ratio [RR] 1.25, 95% CI 1.08-1.45, five studies, 2067 participants; 70 weeks: RR 1.26, 95% CI 1.08-1.45, six studies, 2373 participants; 2 years: RR 1.14, 95% CI 1.04-1.25, three studies, 1336 participants), as well as treatment failure (1 year: RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.02-1.38, four studies, 1539 participants; 70 weeks: RR 1

  13. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  14. Impact of hormonal treatment duration in combination with radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: Meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hormone therapy plus radiotherapy significantly decreases recurrences and mortality of patients affected by locally advanced prostate cancer. In order to determine if difference exists according to the hormonal treatment duration, a literature-based meta-analysis was performed. Methods Relative risks (RR) were derived through a random-effect model. Differences in primary (biochemical failure, BF; cancer-specific survival, CSS), and secondary outcomes (overall survival, OS; local or distant recurrence, LR/DM) were explored. Absolute differences (AD) and the number needed to treat (NNT) were calculated. Heterogeneity, a meta-regression for clinic-pathological predictors and a correlation test for surrogates were conducted. Results Five trials (3,424 patients) were included. Patient population ranged from 267 to 1,521 patients. The longer hormonal treatment significantly improves BF (with significant heterogeneity) with an absolute benefit of 10.1%, and a non significant trend in CSS. With regard to secondary end-points, the longer hormonal treatment significantly decrease both the LR and the DM with an absolute difference of 11.7% and 11.5%. Any significant difference in OS was observed. None of the three identified clinico-pathological predictors (median PSA, range 9.5-20.35, Gleason score 7-10, 27-55% patients/trial, and T3-4, 13-77% patients/trial), did significantly affect outcomes. At the meta-regression analysis a significant correlation between the overall treatment benefit in BF, CSS, OS, LR and DM, and the length of the treatment was found (p≤0.03). Conclusions Although with significant heterogeneity (reflecting different patient' risk stratifications), a longer hormonal treatment duration significantly decreases biochemical, local and distant recurrences, with a trend for longer cancer specific survival. PMID:21143897

  15. Cytoxan, epirubicin, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil with hormonal synchronization (tamoxifen/premarin) in advanced breast cancer. Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, A; Simoncini, E; Marpicati, P; Gorni, F; Cervi, G C; Marini, G

    1986-10-01

    Thirty-three patients with advanced breast cancer were treated with combination chemotherapy and hormonal synchronization in an attempt to increase the overall response rate generally obtained with traditional modalities of treatment. Among the 31 evaluable patients 1 complete (3%), 7 partial (22%), 13 stable disease (42%) and 10 progression of disease (53%) were obtained. Side effects were quite manageable although there were two episodes of life-threatening hematological toxicity. Taking into account the poor prognostic characteristics of our patients (high percentage of dominant visceral disease, 21/31 previously treated patients), our preliminary results with this regimen are interesting and the treatment deserves further evaluation. PMID:3024851

  16. Identification and clinical implications of circulating microRNAs for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, In Hae; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Keun Seok; Nam, Seungyoon; Ro, Jungsil; Kim, Joo-Hang

    2014-12-01

    Cancer-associated microRNAs have been stably detected in blood. The objective of this study was to identify a panel of circulating microRNAs with the potential to serve as biomarkers for estrogen receptor-positive (ER+)/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)- breast cancer. We used microarray-based expression profiling to compare the levels of circulating microRNAs in blood samples from 11 ER+/HER2- advanced breast cancer patients plus 5 age-matched controls. MicroRNA levels were validated by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 40 control subjects, 187 early breast cancer patients, and 45 metastatic breast cancer patients. Then, we assessed the association between the levels of microRNA and clinical outcomes of ER+/HER2- metastatic breast cancer. Initially, we found that miR-1280, miR-1260, and miR-720 were up-regulated in blood from breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). In validation, miR-1280 levels significantly increased in breast cancer patients and reflected tumor status (control

  17. Phase II Trial of Exemestane in Combination With Fulvestrant in Postmenopausal Women With Advanced, Hormone-Responsive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mrózek, Ewa; Layman, Rachel; Ramaswamy, Bhuvaneswari; Schaaf, Larry; Li, Xiaobai; Ottman, Susan; Shapiro, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Exemestane, the irreversible steroidal aromatase inhibitor, and fulvestrant, the pure estrogen antagonist, are active as single drugs in postmenopausal women with advanced hormone-responsive breast cancer. We designed a phase II study with the purpose of determining whether combining these 2 drugs with different and potentially complementary mechanisms of action will improve the clinical benefit. Patients and Methods Forty postmenopausal women with hormone-responsive advanced breast cancer received intramuscular injection of fulvestrant 250 mg every 28 days in combination with daily exemestane 25 mg until disease progression. We examined the influence of fulvestrant on exemestane pharmacokinetics and the effect of exemestane and fulvestrant on serum IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) and IGFBP-3 (IGF-binding protein 3) levels. Results The observed proportion of patients free of progressive disease at 6 months after the initiation of treatment with exemestane and fulvestrant was 50%, a rate similar to that achieved with single-agent exemestane or fulvestrant in the first- or second-line setting. Pharmacokinetics parameters showed that coadministration of fulvestrant did not result in clinically relevant changes in exemestane plasma concentrations. A comparison of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels demonstrated the increase of 35% and 12%, respectively, in mean levels from baseline to day 120. Conclusions The combination of exemestane and fulvestrant did not improve clinical benefit. The observed lack of improved efficacy was not related to altered drug exposure. PMID:22444722

  18. Review of the economic evaluations of hormonal therapy for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hatoum, Hind T; Crawford, E David; Nielsen, Sandy Kildegaard; Lin, Swu-Jane; Marshall, Dennis C

    2013-04-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is used as first-line therapy for locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer aiming to reduce testosterone to castrate levels. The authors present an overview of the existing cost-effectiveness studies of ADT in prostate cancer. Cost-effectiveness of ADT was reviewed using a systematic search of the peer-reviewed literature, as well as research abstracts presented at various scientific and industry meetings. Most cost-effectiveness analyses of ADT reported results within the accepted societal threshold of US$50,000 cost/quality-adjusted life year needed to adopt new technology. PMID:23570436

  19. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  20. PI3K inhibition results in enhanced estrogen receptor function and dependence in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Ana; Li, Zhiqiang; Bergamaschi, Anna; Ellis, Haley; Toska, Eneda; Prat, Aleix; Tao, Jessica J.; Spratt, Daniel E.; Viola-Villegas, Nerissa T.; Castel, Pau; Minuesa, Gerard; Morse, Natasha; Rodón, Jordi; Ibrahim, Yasir; Cortes, Javier; Perez-Garcia, Jose; Galvan, Patricia; Grueso, Judit; Guzman, Marta; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Kharas, Michael; Lewis, Jason S.; Dickler, Maura; Serra, Violeta; Rosen, Neal; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Baselga, José

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of PIK3CA are the most frequent genomic alterations in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast tumors, and selective PI3Kα inhibitors are in clinical development. The activity of these agents, however, is not homogeneous, and only a fraction of patients bearing PIK3CA-mutant ER-positive tumors benefit from single agent administration. Searching for mechanisms of resistance, we observed that suppression of PI3K signaling results in induction of ER-dependent transcriptional activity, as demonstrated by changes in expression of genes containing ER binding sites and increased occupancy by the ER of promoter regions of upregulated genes. Furthermore, expression of ESR1 mRNA and ER protein were also increased upon PI3K inhibition. These changes in gene expression were confirmed in vivo in xenografts and patient-derived models and in tumors from patients undergoing treatment with the PI3Kα inhibitor BYL719. The observed effects on transcription were enhanced by the addition of estradiol and suppressed by the anti-ER therapies fulvestrant and tamoxifen. Fulvestrant markedly sensitized ER-positive tumors to PI3Kα inhibition, resulting in major tumor regressions in vivo. We propose that increased ER transcriptional activity may be a reactive mechanism that limits the activity of PI3K inhibitors, and that combined PI3K and ER inhibition is a rational approach to target these tumors. PMID:25877889

  1. Everolimus and Letrozole in Treating Patients With Recurrent Hormone Receptor Positive Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-14

    Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  2. New insights on the role of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonists in premenopausal early breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Del Mastro, Lucia; Rossi, Giovanni; Lambertini, Matteo; Poggio, Francesca; Pronzato, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Luteinising hormone releasing hormone agonists (LH-RHa) are effective in the treatment of advanced endocrine-sensitive breast cancer in premenopausal patients, but their role in the adjuvant setting has remained controversial for a long time. Tamoxifen for 5 years has been traditionally considered the standard endocrine therapy for premenopausal patients and this is still valid for many patients. However, the recently reported SOFT trial has suggested that adding ovarian function suppression (OFS) to tamoxifen could improve DFS in women at sufficient risk to warrant adjuvant chemotherapy and who remained premenopausal after this therapy. The administration of an aromatase inhibitor plus OFS represents an additional therapeutic option for hormone-receptor positive premenopausal breast cancer patients, according to the combined analysis of the SOFT and TEXT trials. Temporary ovarian suppression induced by LH-RHa has been recognized as an effective strategy to preserve ovarian function from the toxic effects of chemotherapy and is now recommended in young breast cancer patients with endocrine-insensitive tumors. In this review, we discuss recent data on the role of LH-RHa in combination with tamoxifen or with an aromatase inhibitor, and we comment on its role as a strategy to preserve ovarian function in young patients candidates for adjuvant or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26613834

  3. Clinical significance of SPRR1A expression in progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanglei; Li, Gang; Luo, Minna; Wei, Xiaofei; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, Xinhan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Caigang

    2015-04-01

    Small proline-rich repeat protein 1A (SPRR1A) is a marker for terminal squamous cell differentiation. Previous studies showed that SPRR1A expression increases in squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, but decreases in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. This study focuses on the expression of SPRR1A protein in breast cancers (BCs) in China. A total of 111 patients with histologically confirmed BC, who underwent radical surgery between January 2006 and September 2007 in China Medical University, were enrolled. The relationship between SPRR1A expression and clinicopathological factors as well as BC prognoses was also determined. Overall, SPRR1A expression was detected in more than half of the BC specimens by immunohistochemistry (56/111, 53.8%), but there was no significant difference between age groups (≥50 vs. <50 years) in terms of SPRR1A expression (P = 0.915), as well as no differences between SPRR1A expression and the clinical stage (0-I vs. II-III) or nodal status (P = 0.234 and 0.632, respectively). Moreover, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpression was not correlated with SPRR1A expression, whereas Ki67 was associated with SPRR1A expression (P = 0.155 and 0.028, respectively). Interestingly, SPRR1A expression was significantly associated with progesterone receptor-positive (P = 0.010) rather than estrogen receptor-positive (0.778) BCs. The 5-year survival rate in patients did not differ with the presence or absence of SPRR1A expression (P = 0.753), whereas the combination of SPRR1A expression, progesterone receptor status, and menopausal status allowed identification of a subgroup of BC patients with a good long-term prognosis. Thus, the SPRR1A status might play an important role in the prognosis of postmenopausal breast carcinoma patients, especially that of progesterone receptor-positive subgroups. PMID:25424702

  4. GABAB Receptor-Positive Modulators: Enhancement of GABAB Receptor Agonist Effects In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    France, Charles P.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo effects of GABAB receptor-positive modulators suggest that they have therapeutic potential for treating central nervous system disorders such as anxiety, depression, and drug abuse. Although these effects generally are thought to be mediated by positive modulation of GABAB receptors, such modulation has been examined primarily in vitro. The present study was aimed at further examining the in vivo positive modulatory properties of the GABAB receptor-positive modulators, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropyl) phenol (CGP7930) and (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF). Both compounds enhanced loss of righting induced by baclofen in mice. However, CGP7930 was less effective and rac-BHFF was less potent for enhancing loss of righting induced by γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), which, like baclofen, has GABAB receptor agonist properties. In contrast with baclofen- and GHB-induced loss of righting, the hypothermic effects of baclofen and GHB were not enhanced by rac-BHFF but were enhanced by CGP7930 only at doses that produced hypothermia when given alone. CGP7930-induced hypothermia was not attenuated by the GABAB receptor antagonist 3-aminopropyl(diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP35348), at doses that blocked baclofen-induced hypothermia, and was not increased by the nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, at doses that increased the hypothermic effects of baclofen and GHB. The results provide evidence that CGP7930 and rac-BHFF act in vivo as positive modulators at GABAB receptors mediating loss of righting, but not at GABAB receptors mediating hypothermia. Conceivably, CGP7930, but not rac-BHFF, acts as an allosteric agonist at these latter receptors. Taken together, the results provide further evidence of pharmacologically distinct GABAB receptor subtypes, possibly allowing for a more selective therapeutic interference with the GABAB system. PMID:20628000

  5. Placental Kisspeptins Differentially Modulate Vital Parameters of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Rasoulzadeh, Zahra; Ghods, Roya; Kazemi, Tohid; Mirzadegan, Ebrahim; Ghaffari-Tabrizi-Wizsy, Nassim; Rezania, Simin; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Arefi, Soheila; Ghasemi, Jamileh; Vafaei, Sedigheh; Mahmoudi, Ahmad-Reza; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins (KPs) are major regulators of trophoblast and cancer invasion. Thus far, limited and conflicting data are available on KP-mediated modulation of breast cancer (BC) metastasis; mostly based on synthetic KP-10, the most active fragment of KP. Here, we report for the first time comprehensive functional effects of term placental KPs on proliferation, adhesion, Matrigel invasion, motility, MMP activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and MCF-7 (estrogen receptor-positive). KPs were expressed at high level by term placental syncytiotrophoblasts and released in soluble form. Placental explant conditioned medium containing KPs (CM) significantly reduced proliferation of both cell types compared to CM without (w/o) KP (CM-w/o KP) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, placental KPs significantly reduced adhesive properties, while increased MMP9 and MMP2 activity and stimulated invasion. Increased invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 cells after CM treatment was inhibited by KP receptor antagonist, P-234. CM significantly reduced motility of MCF-7 cells at all time points (2-30 hr), while it stimulated motility of MDA-MB-231 cells. These effects were reversed by P-234. Co-treatment with selective ER modulators, Tamoxifen and Raloxifene, inhibited the effect of CM on motility of MCF-7 cells. The level of IL-6 in supernatant of MCF-7 cells treated with CM was higher compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Both cell types produced more IL-8 after treatment with CM compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Taken together, our observations suggest that placental KPs differentially modulate vital parameters of estrogen receptor-positive and -negative BC cells possibly through modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:27101408

  6. Placental Kisspeptins Differentially Modulate Vital Parameters of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasoulzadeh, Zahra; Ghods, Roya; Kazemi, Tohid; Mirzadegan, Ebrahim; Ghaffari-Tabrizi-Wizsy, Nassim; Rezania, Simin; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Arefi, Soheila; Ghasemi, Jamileh; Vafaei, Sedigheh; Mahmoudi, Ahmad-Reza; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins (KPs) are major regulators of trophoblast and cancer invasion. Thus far, limited and conflicting data are available on KP-mediated modulation of breast cancer (BC) metastasis; mostly based on synthetic KP-10, the most active fragment of KP. Here, we report for the first time comprehensive functional effects of term placental KPs on proliferation, adhesion, Matrigel invasion, motility, MMP activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and MCF-7 (estrogen receptor-positive). KPs were expressed at high level by term placental syncytiotrophoblasts and released in soluble form. Placental explant conditioned medium containing KPs (CM) significantly reduced proliferation of both cell types compared to CM without (w/o) KP (CM-w/o KP) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, placental KPs significantly reduced adhesive properties, while increased MMP9 and MMP2 activity and stimulated invasion. Increased invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 cells after CM treatment was inhibited by KP receptor antagonist, P-234. CM significantly reduced motility of MCF-7 cells at all time points (2–30 hr), while it stimulated motility of MDA-MB-231 cells. These effects were reversed by P-234. Co-treatment with selective ER modulators, Tamoxifen and Raloxifene, inhibited the effect of CM on motility of MCF-7 cells. The level of IL-6 in supernatant of MCF-7 cells treated with CM was higher compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Both cell types produced more IL-8 after treatment with CM compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Taken together, our observations suggest that placental KPs differentially modulate vital parameters of estrogen receptor-positive and -negative BC cells possibly through modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:27101408

  7. Degarelix monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists plus anti-androgen flare protection in advanced prostate cancer: an analysis of two randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Peter; Damber, Jan-Erik; Malmberg, Anders; Persson, Bo-Eric; Klotz, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess differences in efficacy outcomes between luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist plus antiandrogen (AA) flare protection and monotherapy with the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonist degarelix in patients with prostate cancer. Methods: Data from 1455 patients were pooled from two prospective, phase III randomized 1-year clinical trials of degarelix versus LHRH agonist with or without AA. The AA bicalutamide was administered at the investigator’s discretion. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model and a conditional logistic regression model was used for a case-control analysis of odds ratios (ORs). Results: Patients received degarelix monotherapy (n = 972) or LHRH agonist (n = 483) of whom 57 also received AA. Overall, prostate-specific antigen progression-free survival (PSA PFS) was improved with degarelix versus LHRH agonist + AA (Cox proportional hazards regression model-adjusted HR for PSA PFS failure was 0.56 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.33–0.97, p = 0.038]). To compensate for a higher proportion of patients with metastases, Gleason score 7–10, and PSA >20 ng/ml in the LHRH agonist + AA group, a case-control analysis using a conditional logistic regression model was utilized. This resulted in an OR for PSA PFS of 0.42 (95% CI 0.20–0.89; p = 0.023) in the overall population, and 0.35 (95% CI 0.13–0.96; p = 0.042) in patients with PSA >50 ng/ml at baseline, when treated with degarelix versus LHRH agonists + AA. There were a small number of deaths, 1.9% with degarelix and 7% with LHRH agonists + AA (case-control analysis OR = 0.37; p = 0.085). Conclusions: Degarelix monotherapy produced a more favorable effect on PSA PFS outcomes than a LHRH agonist + AA flare protection therapy in patients with prostate cancer when a case-control analysis was used to compensate for differences between treatment groups. PMID:27034720

  8. The thyroid hormone receptor gene (c-erbA alpha) is expressed in advance of thyroid gland maturation during the early embryonic development of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Banker, D E; Bigler, J; Eisenman, R N

    1991-01-01

    The c-erbA proto-oncogene encodes the thyroid hormone receptor, a ligand-dependent transcription factor which plays an important role in vertebrate growth and development. To define the role of the thyroid hormone receptor in developmental processes, we have begun studying c-erbA gene expression during the ontogeny of Xenopus laevis, an organism in which thyroid hormone has well-documented effects on morphogenesis. Using polymerase chain reactions (PCR) as a sensitive assay of specific gene expression, we found that polyadenylated erbA alpha RNA is present in Xenopus cells at early developmental stages, including the fertilized egg, blastula, gastrula, and neurula. By performing erbA alpha-specific PCR on reverse-transcribed RNAs from high-density sucrose gradient fractions prepared from early-stage embryos, we have demonstrated that these erbA transcripts are recruited to polysomes. Therefore, erbA is expressed in Xenopus development prior to the appearance of the thyroid gland anlage in tailbud-stage embryos. This implies that erbA alpha/thyroid hormone receptors may play ligand-independent roles during the early development of X. laevis. Quantitative PCR revealed a greater than 25-fold range in the steady-state levels of polyadenylated erbA alpha RNA across early stages of development, as expressed relative to equimolar amounts of total embryonic RNA. Substantial increases in the levels of erbA alpha RNA were noted at stages well after the onset of zygotic transcription at the mid-blastula transition, with accumulation of erbA alpha transcripts reaching a relative maximum in advance of metamorphosis. We also show that erbA alpha RNAs are expressed unequally across Xenopus neural tube embryos. This differential expression continues through later stages of development, including metamorphosis. This finding suggests that erbA alpha/thyroid hormone receptors may play roles in tissue-specific processes across all of Xenopus development. Images PMID:1656222

  9. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Treatment of Localized and Locally Advanced Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer: 2,5 Year Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovov, V. A.; Dvoynikov, S. Y.; Vozdvizhenskiy, M. O.

    2011-09-01

    Introduction & Objectives: High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to be a successful treatment for localised prostate cancer (PC). Here we have explored the effectiveness of the HIFU treatment for hormone-resistant prostate cancer (HRPC). Materials & Methods: 341 patients were treated in our center between September 2007 and December 2009; all of them showed treatment failure following hormone ablation. The median time before hormone-resistance was 20 (3-48) months. In the group with localised PC: number of patients 237, Gleason score ≤7, stage T1-2N0M0, age 69 (60-89) years, mean PSA before treatment 40,0 (5,8-92,9) ng/ml, mean prostate volume—39,3 (28-92) cc; in the group with locally advanced PC: number of patients 104, Gleason score ≤9, stage T2-3N0M0, age 72 (52-83) years, PSA before treatment 30,3 (20,1-60) ng/ml, mean prostate volume—41,2 (25-198) cc. HIFU was delivered under spinal anesthesia using the Ablatherm HIFU device (EDAP, France). Pre HIFU transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was performed for all patients. Mean follow-up time 18 months (3-30). Results: The median PSA level 12 months after HIFU treatment was 0,04 (0-2,24) ng/ml—localised PC, and for locally advanced disease—0,05 (0-48,4) ng/ml, at 18 months after HIFU treatment this was 0,2 (0,02-2,0) ng/ml for localised PC, and for locally advanced disease 0,18 (0,04-7,45) ng/ml. Patients with localised PC has 4,5% recurrence, those with locally advanced PC 20%. Kaplan-Meir analyses of the total group indicated that the risk of recurrence after 1 year follow-up was 10%, the risk of recurrence was 19% after 2 years of follow-up. Conclusions: Our initial experience shows that ultrasound ablation is safe, minimally invasive and effective as a treatment for localised and locally advanced hormone-resistant prostate cancer.

  10. Aromatase inhibition remodels the clonal architecture of estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher A; Gindin, Yevgeniy; Lu, Charles; Griffith, Obi L; Griffith, Malachi; Shen, Dong; Hoog, Jeremy; Li, Tiandao; Larson, David E; Watson, Mark; Davies, Sherri R; Hunt, Kelly; Suman, Vera J; Snider, Jacqueline; Walsh, Thomas; Colditz, Graham A; DeSchryver, Katherine; Wilson, Richard K; Mardis, Elaine R; Ellis, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oestrogen-deprivation therapy is common in oestrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. To better understand the contributions of tumour heterogeneity and evolution to resistance, here we perform comprehensive genomic characterization of 22 primary tumours sampled before and after 4 months of neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitor (NAI) treatment. Comparing whole-genome sequencing of tumour/normal pairs from the two time points, with coincident tumour RNA sequencing, reveals widespread spatial and temporal heterogeneity, with marked remodelling of the clonal landscape in response to NAI. Two cases have genomic evidence of two independent tumours, most obviously an ER- 'collision tumour', which was only detected after NAI treatment of baseline ER+ disease. Many mutations are newly detected or enriched post treatment, including two ligand-binding domain mutations in ESR1. The observed clonal complexity of the ER+ breast cancer genome suggests that precision medicine approaches based on genomic analysis of a single specimen are likely insufficient to capture all clinically significant information. PMID:27502118

  11. Characterization of macrophage - cancer cell crosstalk in estrogen receptor positive and triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollmén, Maija; Roudnicky, Filip; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity may broadly influence the activation of tumor-associated macrophages. We aimed to dissect how breast cancer cells of different molecular characteristics contribute to macrophage phenotype and function. Therefore, we performed whole transcriptome sequencing of human monocytes that were co-cultured with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) or triple-negative (TNBC) breast cancer cell lines and studied the biological responses related to the differential gene activation in both monocytes and cancer cells by pathway analysis. ER+ and TNBC cancer cell lines induced distinctly different macrophage phenotypes with different biological functions, cytokine and chemokine secretion, and morphology. Conversely, ER+ and TNBC breast cancer cell lines were distinctly influenced by the presence of macrophages. ER+ cells demonstrated up-regulation of an acute phase inflammatory response, IL-17 signaling and antigen presentation pathway, whereas thioredoxin and vitamin D3 receptor pathways were down-regulated in the respective macrophages. The TNBC educated macrophages down-regulated citrulline metabolism and differentiated into M2-like macrophages with increased MMR protein expression and CCL2 secretion. These data demonstrate how different cancer cells educate the host cells to support tumor growth and might explain why high infiltration of macrophages in TNBC tumors associates with poor prognosis. PMID:25776849

  12. Aromatase inhibition remodels the clonal architecture of estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christopher A.; Gindin, Yevgeniy; Lu, Charles; Griffith, Obi L; Griffith, Malachi; Shen, Dong; Hoog, Jeremy; Li, Tiandao; Larson, David E.; Watson, Mark; Davies, Sherri R; Hunt, Kelly; Suman, Vera J.; Snider, Jacqueline; Walsh, Thomas; Colditz, Graham A.; DeSchryver, Katherine; Wilson, Richard K.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Ellis, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oestrogen-deprivation therapy is common in oestrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. To better understand the contributions of tumour heterogeneity and evolution to resistance, here we perform comprehensive genomic characterization of 22 primary tumours sampled before and after 4 months of neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitor (NAI) treatment. Comparing whole-genome sequencing of tumour/normal pairs from the two time points, with coincident tumour RNA sequencing, reveals widespread spatial and temporal heterogeneity, with marked remodelling of the clonal landscape in response to NAI. Two cases have genomic evidence of two independent tumours, most obviously an ER− ‘collision tumour', which was only detected after NAI treatment of baseline ER+ disease. Many mutations are newly detected or enriched post treatment, including two ligand-binding domain mutations in ESR1. The observed clonal complexity of the ER+ breast cancer genome suggests that precision medicine approaches based on genomic analysis of a single specimen are likely insufficient to capture all clinically significant information. PMID:27502118

  13. Targeting BCL-2 to enhance vulnerability to therapy in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Merino, D; Lok, S W; Visvader, J E; Lindeman, G J

    2016-04-14

    The last three decades have seen significant progress in our understanding of the role of the pro-survival protein BCL-2 and its family members in apoptosis and cancer. BCL-2 and other pro-survival family members including Mcl-1 and BCL-XL have been shown to have a key role in keeping pro-apoptotic 'effector' proteins BAK and BAX in check. They also neutralize a group of 'sensor' proteins (such as BIM), which are triggered by cytotoxic stimuli such as chemotherapy. BCL-2 proteins therefore have a central role as guardians against apoptosis, helping cancer cells to evade cell death. More recently, an increasing number of BH3 mimetics, which bind and neutralize BCL-2 and/or its pro-survival relatives, have been developed. The utility of targeting BCL-2 in hematological malignancies has become evident in early-phase studies, with remarkable clinical responses seen in heavily pretreated patients. As BCL-2 is overexpressed in ~75% of breast cancer, there has been growing interest in determining whether this new class of drug could show similar promise in breast cancer. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of BCL-2 and its family members in mammary gland development and breast cancer, recent progress in the development of new BH3 mimetics as well as their potential for targeting estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. PMID:26257067

  14. The Intestinal Microbiome and Estrogen Receptor-Positive Female Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwa, Maryann; Plottel, Claudia S; Blaser, Martin J; Adams, Sylvia

    2016-08-01

    The huge communities of residential microbes, including bacteria, viruses, Archaea, and Eukaryotes, that colonize humans are increasingly recognized as playing important roles in health and disease. A complex populous ecosystem, the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract harbors up to 10(11) bacterial cells per gram of luminal content, whose collective genome, the gut metagenome, contains a vastly greater number of individual genes than the human genome. In health, the function of the microbiome might be considered to be in dynamic equilibrium with the host, exerting both local and distant effects. However, 'disequilibrium' may contribute to the emergence of disease, including malignancy. In this review, we discuss how the intestinal bacterial microbiome and in particular how an 'estrobolome,' the aggregate of enteric bacterial genes capable of metabolizing estrogens, might affect women's risk of developing postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Estrobolome composition is impacted by factors that modulate its functional activity. Exploring variations in the composition and activities of the estrobolome in healthy individuals and in women with estrogen-driven breast cancer may lead to development of microbiome-based biomarkers and future targeted interventions to attenuate cancer risk. PMID:27107051

  15. Hormonal therapy for acne.

    PubMed

    George, Rosalyn; Clarke, Shari; Thiboutot, Diane

    2008-09-01

    Acne affects more than 40 million people, of which more than half are women older than 25 years of age. These women frequently fail traditional therapy and have high relapse rates even after isotretinoin. Recent advances in research have helped to delineate the important role hormones play in the pathogenesis of acne. Androgens such as dihydrotestosterone and testosterone, the adrenal precursor dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, estrogens, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factors may all contribute to the development of acne. Hormonal therapy remains an important part of the arsenal of acne treatments available to the clinician. Women dealing with acne, even those without increased serum androgens, may benefit from hormonal treatments. The mainstays of hormonal therapy include oral contraceptives and antiandrogens such as spironolactone, cyproterone acetate, or flutamide. In this article, we discuss the effects of hormones on the pathogenesis of acne, evaluation of women with suspected endocrine abnormalities, and the myriad of treatment options available. PMID:18786497

  16. Human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Strobl, J S; Thomas, M J

    1994-03-01

    The study of human growth hormone is a little more than 100 years old. Growth hormone, first identified for its dramatic effect on longitudinal growth, is now known to exert generalized effects on protein, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. Additional roles for growth hormone in human physiology are likely to be discovered in the areas of sleep research and reproduction. Furthermore, there is some indication that growth hormone also may be involved in the regulation of immune function, mental well-being, and the aging process. Recombinant DNA technology has provided an abundant and safe, albeit expensive, supply of human growth hormone for human use, but the pharmacological properties of growth hormone are poor. Most growth hormone-deficient individuals exhibit a secretory defect rather than a primary defect in growth hormone production, however, and advances in our understanding of the neuroendocrine regulation of growth hormone secretion have established the basis for the use of drugs to stimulate release of endogenously synthesized growth hormone. This promises to be an important area for future drug development. PMID:8190748

  17. HER-2/neu protein-receptor-positive breast carcinoma: an immunologic perspective.

    PubMed

    Brown, R E; Bernath, A M; Lewis, G O

    2000-07-01

    Immunotherapy using a monoclonal antibody against the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 protein, HER-2/neu, has proven to be clinically efficacious in about one-half of breast cancer patients who exhibit strong (3+) plasmalemmal immunoreactivity for this protein. The tumoricidal effect of this antibody relies in part upon antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. This report provides observations on certain factors or circumstances which could have an impact on this aspect of the therapeutic approach. These include: (1) concurrent medications; (2) the composition (immunophenotype) of peritumoral lymphocytes and the generally limited numbers of intratumoral T-lymphocytes/natural killer (NK) cells, monocytes, and neutrophilic granulocytes; (3) the presence of circulating HER-2/neu antigens which might bind the exogenous antibody and lead to immune complex formation; (4) the variable co-expression in the tumor of cytokines known to downregulate NK cell function (ie, transforming growth factor-beta1 [TGF-beta1] and platelet-derived growth factor [PDGF]-AB); and (5) the tumoral and/or stromal immunoreactivity for angiotensin-converting enzyme, which forms a part of one of the pathways for the activation of latent TGF-beta1 and for the biosynthesis of PDGF-AB. These observations provide an immunologic perspective for the use of monoclonal antibody therapy in HER-2/neu protein-receptor-positive breast carcinoma and suggest a role for the clinical laboratory in identifying potential avenues for additional manipulations of the immune system in individual cases in order to enhance the therapeutic response. PMID:10945564

  18. Predicting prognosis using molecular profiling in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer treated with tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    Loi, Sherene; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Desmedt, Christine; Wirapati, Pratyaksha; Lallemand, Françoise; Tutt, Andrew M; Gillet, Cheryl; Ellis, Paul; Ryder, Kenneth; Reid, James F; Daidone, Maria G; Pierotti, Marco A; Berns, Els MJJ; Jansen, Maurice PHM; Foekens, John A; Delorenzi, Mauro; Bontempi, Gianluca; Piccart, Martine J; Sotiriou, Christos

    2008-01-01

    Background Estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers (BC) are heterogeneous with regard to their clinical behavior and response to therapies. The ER is currently the best predictor of response to the anti-estrogen agent tamoxifen, yet up to 30–40% of ER+BC will relapse despite tamoxifen treatment. New prognostic biomarkers and further biological understanding of tamoxifen resistance are required. We used gene expression profiling to develop an outcome-based predictor using a training set of 255 ER+ BC samples from women treated with adjuvant tamoxifen monotherapy. We used clusters of highly correlated genes to develop our predictor to facilitate both signature stability and biological interpretation. Independent validation was performed using 362 tamoxifen-treated ER+ BC samples obtained from multiple institutions and treated with tamoxifen only in the adjuvant and metastatic settings. Results We developed a gene classifier consisting of 181 genes belonging to 13 biological clusters. In the independent set of adjuvantly-treated samples, it was able to define two distinct prognostic groups (HR 2.01 95%CI: 1.29–3.13; p = 0.002). Six of the 13 gene clusters represented pathways involved in cell cycle and proliferation. In 112 metastatic breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen, one of the classifier components suggesting a cellular inflammatory mechanism was significantly predictive of response. Conclusion We have developed a gene classifier that can predict clinical outcome in tamoxifen-treated ER+ BC patients. Whilst our study emphasizes the important role of proliferation genes in prognosis, our approach proposes other genes and pathways that may elucidate further mechanisms that influence clinical outcome and prediction of response to tamoxifen. PMID:18498629

  19. ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide, a potential radiopharmaceutical for imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors: Synthesis, radiolabeling and in vitro validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Albert, R.; Bruns, C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Hofland, L.J.; Marbach, P.; Pless, J.; Pralet, D.; Stolz, B.; Koper, J.W.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Visser, T.J.; Krenning, E.P. Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    As starting material for a potentially convenient radiopharmaceutical, a diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (DTPA) conjugated derivative of octreotide (SMS 201-995) was prepared. This peptide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide (SDZ 215-811) binds more than 95% of added {sup 111}In in an easy, single-step labeling procedure without necessity of further purification. The specific somatostatin-like biologic effect of these analogues was proven by the inhibition of growth hormone secretion by cultured rat pituitary cells in a dose-dependent fashion by octreotide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide and non-radioactive ({sup 115}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide. The binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to rat brain cortex membranes proved to be displaced similarly by natural somatosatin as well as by octreotide, suggesting specific binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to somatostatin receptors. The binding of the indium-labeled compound showed a somewhat lower affinity when compared with the iodinated (Tyr{sup 3})-octreotide, but indium-labeled (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide still binds with nanomolar affinity. In conjunction with in vivo studies, these results suggest that ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a promising radiopharmaceutical for scintigraphic imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors.

  20. Hormonal therapies in young breast cancer patients: when, what and for how long?

    PubMed

    Christinat, Alexandre; Di Lascio, Simona; Pagani, Olivia

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer in young women (<40 years) is a rare and complex clinical and psychosocial condition, which deserves multidisciplinary and personalized approaches. In young women with hormone-receptor positive disease, 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen, with or without ovarian suppression/ablation, is considered the standard endocrine therapy. The definitive role of adjuvant aromatase inhibitors has still to be elucidated: the upcoming results of the Tamoxifen and EXemestane Trial (TEXT) and Suppression of Ovarian Function Trial (SOFT) trials will help understanding if we can widen our current endocrine therapeutic options. The optimal duration of adjuvant endocrine therapy in young women also remains an unresolved issue. The recently reported results of the ATLAS and aTToM trials represent the first evidence of a beneficial effect of extended endocrine therapy in premenopausal women and provide an important opportunity in high-risk young patients. In the metastatic setting, endocrine therapy should be the preferred choice for endocrine responsive disease, unless there is evidence of endocrine resistance or need for rapid disease and/or symptom control. Tamoxifen in combination with ovarian suppression/ablation remains the 1st-line endocrine therapy of choice. Aromatase inhibitors in combination with ovarian suppression/ablation can be considered after progression on tamoxifen and ovarian suppression/ablation. Fulvestrant has not yet been studied in pre-menopausal women. Specific age-related treatment side effects (i.e., menopausal symptoms, change in body image and weight gain, cognitive function impairment, fertility damage/preservation, long-term organ dysfunction, sexuality) and the social impact of diagnosis and treatment (i.e., job discrimination, family management) should be carefully addressed when planning long-lasting endocrine therapies in young women with hormone-receptor positive early and advanced breast cancer. PMID:23819026

  1. Delaying Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Hormone Receptor–Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Negative Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brufsky, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    Global guidelines for the management of locally advanced or metastatic hormone receptor–positive (HR-positive), human epidermal growth factor 2–negative (HER2-negative) breast cancer recommend endocrine therapy as first-line treatment for all patients, regardless of age or postmenopausal status. However, current practice patterns in the United States and Europe suggest that these modes of therapy are not being used as recommended, and many patients with advanced HR-positive, HER2-negative disease are being treated first-line with chemotherapy or switched to chemotherapy after a single endocrine therapy. Given that chemotherapy is associated with increased toxicity and reduced quality of life (QOL) compared with endocrine therapy, prolonging the duration of response obtained with endocrine therapy may help delay chemotherapy and its attendant toxicities. Several strategies to delay or overcome endocrine resistance and thereby postpone chemotherapy have been explored, including the use of second-line endocrine agents with different mechanisms of action, adding targeted agents that inhibit specific resistance pathways, and adding agents that act in complementary or synergistic ways to inhibit tumor cell proliferation. This review analyzes the different therapy options available to HR-positive, HER2-negative patients with advanced breast cancer that can be used to delay chemotherapy and enhance QOL. PMID:26793013

  2. Breast density and parenchymal texture measures as potential risk factors for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Chen, Jinbo; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2014-03-01

    Accurate assessment of a woman's risk to develop specific subtypes of breast cancer is critical for appropriate utilization of chemopreventative measures, such as with tamoxifen in preventing estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer. In this context, we investigate quantitative measures of breast density and parenchymal texture, measures of glandular tissue content and tissue structure, as risk factors for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. Mediolateral oblique (MLO) view digital mammograms of the contralateral breast from 106 women with unilateral invasive breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Breast density and parenchymal texture were analyzed via fully-automated software. Logistic regression with feature selection and was performed to predict ER+ versus ER- cancer status. A combined model considering all imaging measures extracted was compared to baseline models consisting of density-alone and texture-alone features. Area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and Delong's test were used to compare the models' discriminatory capacity for receptor status. The density-alone model had a discriminatory capacity of 0.62 AUC (p=0.05). The texture-alone model had a higher discriminatory capacity of 0.70 AUC (p=0.001), which was not significantly different compared to the density-alone model (p=0.37). In contrast the combined density-texture logistic regression model had a discriminatory capacity of 0.82 AUC (p<0.001), which was statistically significantly higher than both the density-alone (p<0.001) and texture-alone regression models (p=0.04). The combination of breast density and texture measures may have the potential to identify women specifically at risk for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer and could be useful in triaging women into appropriate risk-reduction strategies.

  3. Differential Effect of Phosphorylation-Defective Survivin on Radiation Response in Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Larson, Richard; Xu, Wei; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Survivin is a key member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, and is considered a promising therapeutic target due to its universal overexpression in cancers. Survivin is implicated in cellular radiation response through its role in apoptosis, cell division, and DNA damage response. In the present study, analysis of publically available data sets showed that survivin gene expression increased with breast cancer stage (p < 0.00001) and was significantly higher in estrogen receptor-negative cancers as compared to estrogen receptor-positive cancers (p = 9e-46). However, survivin was prognostic in estrogen receptor-positive tumors (p = 0.03) but not in estrogen receptor-negative tumors (p = 0.28). We assessed the effect of a survivin dominant-negative mutant on colony-formation (2D) and mammosphere-formation (3D) efficiency, and radiation response in the estrogen receptor-positive MCF7 and estrogen receptor-negative SUM149 breast cancer cell lines. The colony-formation efficiency was significantly lower in the dominant-negative survivin-transduced cells versus control MCF7 cells (0.42 vs. 0.58, p < 0.01), but it was significantly higher in dominant-negative population versus control-transduced SUM149 cells (0.29 vs. 0.20, p < 0.01). A similar, non-significant, trend in mammosphere-formation efficiency was observed. We compared the radiosensitivity of cells stably expressing dominant-negative survivin with their controls in both cell lines under 2D and 3D culture conditions following exposure to increasing doses of radiation. We found that the dominant-negative populations were radioprotective in MCF7 cells but radiosensitive in SUM149 cells compared to the control-transduced population; further, Taxol was synergistic with the survivin mutant in SUM149 but not MCF7. Our data suggests that survivin modulation influences radiation response differently in estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer subtypes, warranting further

  4. Study to Assess Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Oral CC-223 for Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    Multiple Myeloma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Neuroendocrine Tumors of Non-Pancreatic Origin; Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

  5. Identification of Potential Glycoprotein Biomarkers in Estrogen Receptor Positive (ER+) and Negative (ER-) Human Breast Cancer Tissues by LC-LTQ/FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Semaan, Suzan M.; Wang, Xu; Marshall, Alan G.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most fatal cancer in American women. To increase the life expectancy of patients with breast cancer new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and drug targets must be identified. A change in the glycosylation on a glycoprotein often causes a change in the function of that glycoprotein; such a phenomenon is correlated with cancerous transformation. Thus, glycoproteins in human breast cancer estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tissues and those in the more advanced stage of breast cancer, estrogen receptor negative (ER-) tissues, were compared. Glycoproteins showing differences in glycosylation were examined by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis with double staining (glyco- and total protein staining) and identified by reversed-phase nano-liquid chromatography coupled with a hybrid linear quadrupole ion trap/ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Among the identified glycosylated proteins are alpha 1 acid glycoprotein, alpha-1-antitrypsin, calmodulin, and superoxide dismutase mitochondrial precursor that were further verified by Western blotting for both ER+ and ER- human breast tissues. Results show the presence of a possible glycosylation difference in alpha-1-antitrypsin, a potential tumor-derived biomarker for breast cancer progression, which was expressed highest in the ER- samples. PMID:22773931

  6. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. A meta-analysis and systematic review of randomized controlled trials with degarelix versus gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sciarra, Alessandro; Fasulo, Andrea; Ciardi, Antonio; Petrangeli, Elisa; Gentilucci, Alessandro; Maggi, Martina; Innocenzi, Michele; Pierella, Federico; Gentile, Vincenzo; Salciccia, Stefano; Cattarino, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Our aim was to systematically evaluate the benefits of degarelix as antagonist versus agonists of gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer (PC). This comparison was performed either in terms of biochemical or oncological or safety profiles. To this end we, carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature.We selected only studies directly and prospectively analyzing the two treatments in the same population (randomized phase III studies). We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and meta-analyses process for reporting studies.After we eliminated studies according to the exclusion criteria, 9 publications were considered relevant to this review. These articles described 5 clinical trials that were eligible for inclusion. The follow-up duration in all trials did not exceed 364 days. This meta-analysis and review comprised a total of 1719 men, 1061 randomized to degarelix versus 658 to GnRH agonists treatment for advanced PC. Oncological results were evaluated only in 1 trial (CS21:408 cases) and they were not the primary endpoints of the study. Treatment emerging adverse events were reported in 61.4% and 58.8% of patients in the degarelix and GnRH agonists group, respectively (odds ratio, OR = 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI: 0.78-1.77, P > 0.1). Treatment related severe cardiovascular side effects were reported (trial CS21-30-35) in 1.6% and 3.6% of patients in the degarelix and GnRH agonists group, respectively (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.26-1.14, P > 0.1).Our analysis evidences relevant limitations in particular for the comparative evaluation of the efficacy and the oncological results related to degarelix. PMID:27399062

  8. Body Mass Index is Associated with Gene Methylation in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Brionna Y.; Troester, Melissa A.; Edmiston, Sharon N.; Parrish, Eloise A.; Robinson, Whitney R.; Wu, Michael C.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Swift-Scanlan, Theresa; Conway, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Background Although obesity is associated with breast cancer incidence and prognosis, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Identification of obesity-associated epigenetic changes in breast tissue may advance mechanistic understanding of breast cancer initiation and progression. The goal of this study, therefore, was to investigate associations between obesity and gene methylation in breast tumors. Methods Using the Illumina GoldenGate Cancer I Panel, we estimated the association between body mass index (BMI) and gene methylation in 345 breast tumor samples from Phase I of the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population based case-control study. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify sites that were differentially methylated by BMI. Stratification by tumor estrogen receptor status was also conducted. Results In the majority of the 935 probes analyzed (87%), the average beta value increased with obesity (BMI ≥ 30). Obesity was significantly associated with differential methylation (false discovery rate q-value < 0.05) in just 2 gene loci in breast tumor tissue overall and in 21 loci among estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Obesity was associated with methylation of genes that function in immune response, cell growth, and DNA repair. Conclusions Obesity is associated with altered methylation overall, and with hypermethylation among ER-positive tumors in particular, suggesting that obesity may influence the methylation of genes with known relevance to cancer. Some of these differences in methylation by obese status may influences levels of gene expression within breast cells. Impact If our results are validated, obesity-associated methylation sites could serve as targets for prevention and treatment research. PMID:25583948

  9. Ki67 Heterogeneity in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancers: Which Tumor Type Has the Most Heterogeneity?

    PubMed

    Himuro, Takanori; Horimoto, Yoshiya; Arakawa, Atsushi; Tanabe, Masahiko; Saito, Mitsue

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneity of Ki67 expression, often seen in breast cancer, can make evaluation of the expression of this marker difficult and give rise to confusion when considering adjuvant treatments for patients. Herein, we investigated estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers to reveal the tumor characteristics associated with Ki67 heterogeneity. Surgical specimens from 85 invasive ductal carcinomas of no special type and 13 invasive lobular carcinomas were examined. We first calculated the differences between Ki67 expression in a hot spot and those in 4 random fields on the same slide. We then evaluated Ki67 heterogeneity within the tumor, based on these differences. Among clinicopathological factors, solid-tubular carcinoma, an architectural growth pattern subtype of invasive ductal carcinoma, correlated with high Ki67 heterogeneity (P < .05). Our results indicate that we might need to be aware of histological patterns when selecting appropriate microscopic fields for evaluating Ki67 expression. PMID:26353854

  10. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists versus standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer A systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kunath, Frank; Borgmann, Hendrik; Blümle, Anette; Keck, Bastian; Wullich, Bernd; Schmucker, Christine; Sikic, Danijel; Roelle, Catharina; Schmidt, Stefanie; Wahba, Amr; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate efficacy and safety of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists compared to standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer. Setting The international review team included methodologists of the German Cochrane Centre and clinical experts. Participants We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE, trial registries and conference books for randomised controlled trials (RCT) for effectiveness data analysis, and randomised or non-randomised controlled studies (non-RCT) for safety data analysis (March 2015). Two authors independently screened identified articles, extracted data, evaluated risk of bias and rated quality of evidence according to GRADE. Results 13 studies (10 RCTs, 3 non-RCTs) were included. No study reported cancer-specific survival or clinical progression. There were no differences in overall mortality (RR 1.35, 95% CI 0.63 to 2.93), treatment failure (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.17) or prostate-specific antigen progression (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.64 to 1.06). While there was no difference in quality of life related to urinary symptoms, improved quality of life regarding prostate symptoms, measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), with the use of GnRH antagonists compared with the use of standard androgen suppression therapy (mean score difference −0.40, 95% CI −0.94 to 0.14, and −1.84, 95% CI −3.00 to −0.69, respectively) was found. Quality of evidence for all assessed outcomes was rated low according to GRADE. The risk for injection-site events was increased, but cardiovascular events may occur less often by using GnRH antagonist. Available evidence is hampered by risk of bias, selective reporting and limited follow-up. Conclusions There is currently insufficient evidence to make firm conclusive statements on the efficacy of GnRH antagonist compared to standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer. There is need for further high-quality research on

  11. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dose of glucose. Growth hormone stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) . ... regular intervals for years afterward to monitor GH production and to detect tumor recurrence. Other blood tests ...

  12. Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... based lubricants include petroleum jelly, baby oil, or mineral oil. Oil-based types should not be used ... caused by low levels of these hormones. Hysterectomy: Removal of the uterus. Menopause: The time in a ...

  13. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. PMID:26374891

  14. Network-based approach to identify prognostic biomarkers for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer treatment with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Guo, Cheng-Xian; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify effective gene networks and prognostic biomarkers associated with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer using human mRNA studies. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis was performed with a complex ER+ breast cancer transcriptome to investigate the function of networks and key genes in the prognosis of breast cancer. We found a significant correlation of an expression module with distant metastasis-free survival (HR = 2.25; 95% CI .21.03-4.88 in discovery set; HR = 1.78; 95% CI = 1.07-2.93 in validation set). This module contained genes enriched in the biological process of the M phase. From this module, we further identified and validated 5 hub genes (CDK1, DLGAP5, MELK, NUSAP1, and RRM2), the expression levels of which were strongly associated with poor survival. Highly expressed MELK indicated poor survival in luminal A and luminal B breast cancer molecular subtypes. This gene was also found to be associated with tamoxifen resistance. Results indicated that a network-based approach may facilitate the discovery of biomarkers for the prognosis of ER+ breast cancer and may also be used as a basis for establishing personalized therapies. Nevertheless, before the application of this approach in clinical settings, in vivo and in vitro experiments and multi-center randomized controlled clinical trials are still needed. PMID:25756514

  15. In vivo use of a radioiodinated somatostatin analogue: dynamics, metabolism, and binding to somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in man

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Krenning, E.P.; Breeman, W.A.; Kooij, P.P.; Reubi, J.C.; Koper, J.W.; de Jong, M.; Lameris, J.S.; Visser, T.J.; Lamberts, S.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Somatostatin analogues, labeled with gamma-emitting radionuclides, are of potential value in the localization of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors with gamma camera imaging. We investigated the application in man of a radioiodinated analogue of somatostatin, 123I-Tyr-3-octreotide, which has similar biologic characteristics as the native peptide. The radiopharmaceutical is cleared rapidly from the circulation (up to 85% of the dose after 10 min) mainly by the liver. Liver radioactivity is rapidly excreted into the biliary system. Until 3 hr after injection, radioactivity in the circulation is mainly in the form of 123I-Tyr-3-octreotide. Thereafter, plasma samples contain increasing proportions of free iodide. Similarly, during the first hours after injection, radioactivity in the urine exists mainly in the form of the unchanged peptide. Thereafter, a progressive increase in radioiodide excretion is observed, indicating degradation of the radiopharmaceutical in vivo. Fecal excretion of radioactivity amounts to only a few percent of the dose. The calculated median effective dose equivalent is comparable with values for applications of other 123I-radiopharmaceuticals (0.019 mSv/MBq).

  16. Effects of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator on lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammatory pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Muzaffar; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2016-07-15

    Evidence indicates that microglial activation contributes to the pathophysiology and maintenance of neuroinflammatory pain involving central nervous system alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of 3a,4,5,9b-Tetrahydro-4-(1-naphthalenyl)-3H-cyclopentan[c]quinoline-8-sulfonamide (TQS), an alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM), on tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia following lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation in hippocampus, a neuroinflammatory pain model in mice. In addition, we examined the effects of TQS on microglial activation marker, an ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1), in the hippocampus may be associated with neuroinflammatory pain. Pretreatment of TQS (4mg/kg) significantly reduced LPS (1mg/kg)-induced tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Moreover, pretreatment of methyllycaconitine (3mg/kg) significantly reversed TQS-induced antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic responses indicating the involvement of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Pretreatment of TQS significantly decreased LPS-induced increased in hippocampal Iba-1 expression. Overall, these results suggest that TQS reduces LPS-induced neuroinflammatory pain like symptoms via modulating microglial activation likely in the hippocampus and/or other brain region by targeting alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Therefore, alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor PAM such as TQS could be a potential drug candidate for the treatment of neuroinflammatory pain. PMID:27154173

  17. Recurrent ESR1-CCDC170 rearrangements in an aggressive subset of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Tan, Ying; Cao, Xi-Xi; Kim, Jin-Ah; Wang, Xian; Chamness, Gary C.; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Edwards, Dean P.; Contreras, Alejandro; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Chang, Eric C.; Schiff, Rachel; Wang, Xiao-Song

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing the genetic alterations leading to the more aggressive forms of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers are of critical significance in breast cancer management. Here we identify recurrent rearrangements between estrogen receptor gene ESR1 and its neighbor CCDC170, which are enriched in the more aggressive and endocrine-resistant luminal-B tumors, through large-scale analyses of breast cancer transcriptome and copy number alterations. Further screening of 200 ER+ breast cancers identifies eight ESR1-CCDC170 positive tumors. These fusions encode N-terminally truncated CCDC170 proteins (ΔCCDC170). When introduced into ER+ breast cancer cells, ΔCCDC170 leads to markedly increased cell motility and anchorage-independent growth, reduced endocrine sensitivity, and enhanced xenograft tumor formation. Mechanistic studies suggest that ΔCCDC170 engages Gab1 signalosome to potentiate growth factor signaling and enhance cell motility. Together, this study identifies neoplastic ESR1-CCDC170 fusions in a more aggressive subset of ER+ breast cancer, which suggests a new concept of ER pathobiology in breast cancer. PMID:25099679

  18. STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF ADENOVIRAL TRANSDUCTION OF AN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR POSITIVE CELL LINE WITH AN MMTV-LUC REPORTER FOR ENDOCRINE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standardization and Validation of Adenoviral Transduction of an Androgen Receptor Positive Cell Line with an MMTV-Luc Reporter for Endocrine Screening P. Hartig, K . Bobseine,
    M. Cardon, C. Lambright and L. E. Gray, Jr. USEPA, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC...

  19. Discriminative Stimulus Effects of the GABAB Receptor-Positive Modulator rac-BHFF: Comparison with GABAB Receptor Agonists and Drugs of Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.

    2013-01-01

    GABAB receptor-positive modulators are thought to have advantages as potential medications for anxiety, depression, and drug addiction. They may have fewer side effects than GABAB receptor agonists, because selective enhancement of activated receptors could have effects different from nonselective activation of all receptors. To examine this, pigeons were trained to discriminate the GABAB receptor-positive modulator (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF) from its vehicle. The discriminative stimulus effects of rac-BHFF were not mimicked by the GABAB receptor agonists baclofen and γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), not by diazepam, and not by alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine, whose self-administration has been reported to be attenuated by GABAB receptor-positive modulators. The discriminative stimulus effects of rac-BHFF were not antagonized by the GABAB receptor antagonist 3-aminopropyl (diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP35348) but were attenuated by the less efficacious GABAB receptor-positive modulator 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropyl)phenol (CGP7930), suggesting the possibility that rac-BHFF produces its discriminative stimulus effects by directly activating GABAB2 subunits of GABAB receptors. At a dose 10-fold lower than the training dose, rac-BHFF enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of baclofen, but not of GHB. This study provides evidence that the effects of GABAB receptor-positive modulators are not identical to those of GABAB receptor agonists. In addition, the results suggest that positive modulation of GABAB receptors does not produce discriminative stimulus effects similar to those of benzodiazepines, alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine. Finally, the finding that rac-BHFF enhanced effects of baclofen but not of GHB is consistent with converging evidence that the populations of GABAB receptors mediating the effects of baclofen and GHB are not identical. PMID:23275067

  20. Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine Alters Ca2+ Dynamics in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons: Mitigation by NMDA Receptor Blockade and GABAA Receptor-Positive Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Pessah, Isaac N.

    2012-01-01

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) is a potent convulsant that is considered a chemical threat agent. We characterized TETS as an activator of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations and electrical burst discharges in mouse hippocampal neuronal cultures at 13–17 days in vitro using FLIPR Fluo-4 fluorescence measurements and extracellular microelectrode array recording. Acute exposure to TETS (≥ 2µM) reversibly altered the pattern of spontaneous neuronal discharges, producing clustered burst firing and an overall increase in discharge frequency. TETS also dramatically affected Ca2+ dynamics causing an immediate but transient elevation of neuronal intracellular Ca2+ followed by decreased frequency of Ca2+ oscillations but greater peak amplitude. The effect on Ca2+ dynamics was similar to that elicited by picrotoxin and bicuculline, supporting the view that TETS acts by inhibiting type A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor function. The effect of TETS on Ca2+ dynamics requires activation of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, because the changes induced by TETS were prevented by MK-801 block of NMDA receptors, but not nifedipine block of L-type Ca2+ channels. Pretreatment with the GABAA receptor-positive modulators diazepam and allopregnanolone partially mitigated TETS-induced changes in Ca2+ dynamics. Moreover, low, minimally effective concentrations of diazepam (0.1µM) and allopregnanolone (0.1µM), when administered together, were highly effective in suppressing TETS-induced alterations in Ca2+ dynamics, suggesting that the combination of positive modulators of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors may have therapeutic potential. These rapid throughput in vitro assays may assist in the identification of single agents or combinations that have utility in the treatment of TETS intoxication. PMID:22889812

  1. The GABA(B) receptor positive modulator BHF177 attenuated anxiety, but not conditioned fear, in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Kaczanowska, Katarzyna; Finn, M G; Markou, Athina; Risbrough, Victoria B

    2015-10-01

    GABAB (γ-aminobutyric acid B) receptors may be a therapeutic target for anxiety disorders. Here we characterized the effects of the GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM) BHF177 on conditioned and unconditioned physiological responses to threat in the light-enhanced startle (LES), stress-induced hyperthermia, and fear-potentiated startle (FPS) procedures in rats. The effects of BHF177 on LES were compared with those of the GABAB receptor agonists baclofen and CGP44532, and the positive control buspirone, a 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist with anxiolytic activity in humans. Baclofen (0.4, 0.9 and 1.25 mg/kg) and CGP44532 (0.065, 0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) administration had significant sedative, but not anxiolytic, activity reflected in overall decrease in the startle response in the LES tests. BHF177 (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) had no effect on LES, nor did it produce an overall sedative effect. Interesting, however, when rats were grouped by high and low LES responses, BHF177 had anxiolytic-like effects only on LES in high, but not low, LES responding rats. BHF177 also blocked stress-induced hyperthermia, but had no effect on conditioned fear responses in the FPS test. Buspirone (1 and 3 mg/kg) had an anxiolytic-like profile in both LES and FPS tests. These results indicate that BHF177 may specifically attenuate unconditioned anxiety in individuals that exhibit a high anxiety state, and has fewer sedative effects than direct agonists. Thus, BHF177 or other GABAB receptor PAMs may be promising compounds for alleviating increased anxiety seen in various psychiatric disorders with a superior side-effect profile compared to GABAB receptor agonists. PMID:26002628

  2. The 5p12 breast cancer susceptibility locus affects MRPS30 expression in estrogen-receptor positive tumors

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, David A.; Fiorito, Elisa; Nord, Silje; Van Loo, Peter; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Fleischer, Thomas; Tost, Jorg; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; Tramm, Trine; Overgaard, Jens; Bukholm, Ida R; Hurtado, Antoni; Balmain, Allan; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci linked to breast cancer susceptibility, but the mechanism by which variations at these loci influence susceptibility is usually unknown. Some variants are only associated with particular clinical subtypes of breast cancer. Understanding how and why these variants influence subtype-specific cancer risk contributes to our understanding of cancer etiology. We conducted a genome-wide expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) study in a discovery set of 287 breast tumors and 97 normal mammary tissue samples and a replication set of 235 breast tumors. We found that the risk-associated allele of rs7716600 in the 5p12 estrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) susceptibility locus was associated with elevated expression of the nearby gene MRPS30 exclusively in ER-positive tumors. We replicated this finding in 235 independent tumors. Further, we showed the rs7716600 risk genotype was associated with decreased MRPS30 promoter methylation exclusively in ER-positive breast tumors. In vitro studies in MCF-7 cells carrying the protective genotype showed that estrogen stimulation decreased MRPS30 promoter chromatin availability and mRNA levels. In contrast, in 600MPE cells carrying the risk genotype, estrogen increased MRPS30 expression and did not affect promoter availability. Our data suggest the 5p12 risk allele affects MRPS30 expression in estrogen-responsive tumor cells after tumor initiation by a mechanism affecting chromatin availability. These studies emphasize that the genetic architecture of breast cancer is context-specific, and integrated analysis of gene expression and chromatin remodeling in normal and tumor tissues will be required to explain the mechanisms of risk alleles. PMID:24388359

  3. Hormone impostors

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  4. Hormone Health Network

    MedlinePlus

    International Resource Center Online Store Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Healthy Living ...

  5. Aromatase Inhibitor-Induced Erythrocytosis in a Patient Undergoing Hormonal Treatment for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Ogbonna, Onyekachi Henry; Oneal, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are most commonly used for breast cancer patients with hormone receptor positive disease. Although the side effect profile of aromatase inhibitors is well known, including common side effects like arthralgia, bone pain, arthritis, hot flashes, and more serious problems like osteoporosis, we present a case of an uncommon side effect of these medications. We report the case of a postmenopausal woman on adjuvant hormonal therapy with anastrozole after completing definitive therapy for stage IIIB estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, who was referred to hematology service for evaluation of persistent erythrocytosis. Primary and known secondary causes of polycythemia were ruled out. On further evaluation, we found that her erythrocytosis began after initiation of anastrozole and resolved after it was discontinued. We discuss the pathophysiology of aromatase inhibitor-induced erythrocytosis and reference of similar cases reported in the literature. PMID:26137331

  6. Abiraterone acetate, exemestane or the combination in postmenopausal patients with estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer†

    PubMed Central

    O'Shaughnessy, J.; Campone, M.; Brain, E.; Neven, P.; Hayes, D.; Bondarenko, I.; Griffin, T. W.; Martin, J.; De Porre, P.; Kheoh, T.; Yu, M. K.; Peng, W.; Johnston, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Androgen receptor (AR) signaling and incomplete inhibition of estrogen signaling may contribute to metastatic breast cancer (MBC) resistance to a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor (NSAI; letrozole or anastrozole). We assessed whether combined inhibition of androgen biosynthesis with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone and estradiol synthesis with exemestane (E) may be of clinical benefit to postmenopausal patients with NSAI-pretreated estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) MBC. Patients and methods Patients (N = 297) were stratified by the number of prior therapies for metastatic disease (0–1 versus 2) and by prior NSAI use (adjuvant versus metastatic), and randomized (1 : 1 : 1) to receive oral once daily 1000 mg abiraterone acetate plus 5 mg prednisone (AA) versus AA with 25 mg E (AAE) versus 25 mg E alone (E). Each treatment arm was well balanced with regard to the proportion of patients with AR-positive breast cancer. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival, clinical benefit rate, duration of response, and overall response rate. Results There was no significant difference in PFS with AA versus E (3.7 versus 3.7 months; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.1; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.82–1.60; P = 0.437) or AAE versus E (4.5 versus 3.7 months; HR = 0.96; 95% CI 0.70–1.32; P = 0.794). Increased serum progesterone concentrations were observed in both arms receiving AA, but not with E. Grade 3 or 4 treatment-emergent adverse events associated with AA, including hypokalemia and hypertension, were less common in patients in the E (2.0% and 2.9%, respectively) and AA arms (3.4% and 1.1%, respectively) than in the AAE arm (5.8% for both). Conclusions Adding AA to E in NSAI-pretreated ER+ MBC patients did not improve PFS compared with treatment with E. An AA-induced progesterone increase may have contributed to this lack of clinical activity. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01381874. PMID:26504153

  7. A pooled analysis of post-diagnosis lifestyle factors in association with late estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Nechuta, Sarah; Chen, Wendy Y; Cai, Hui; Poole, Elizabeth M; Kwan, Marilyn L; Flatt, Shirley W; Patterson, Ruth E; Pierce, John P; Caan, Bette J; Ou Shu, Xiao

    2016-05-01

    Lifestyle factors have been well studied in relation to breast cancer prognosis overall; however, associations of lifestyle and late outcomes (>5 years after diagnosis) have been much less studied, and no studies have focused on estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer survivors, who may have high risk of late recurrence and mortality. We utilized a large prospective pooling study to evaluate the associations of lifestyle factors with late recurrence and all-cause mortality among 6,295 5-year ER+ Stage I-III breast cancer survivors. Pooled and harmonized data were available on clinical factors and lifestyle factors (pre- to post-diagnosis weight change, body mass index (BMI) (kg/m(2)), recreational physical activity, alcohol intake and smoking history), measured on average 2.1 years after diagnosis. Updated information for weight only was available. Study heterogeneity was evaluated by the Q-statistic. Multivariable Cox regression models were stratified by study. Adjusting for clinical factors and potential confounders, ≥ 10% weight gain and obesity (BMI, 30-34.99 and ≥ 35) were associated with increased risk of late recurrence (hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals): 1.24 (1.00-1.53), 1.40 (1.05-1.86) and 1.41 (1.02-1.93), respectively). Daily alcohol intake was associated with late recurrence, 1.28 (1.01-1.62). Physical activity was inversely associated with late all-cause mortality (0.81 (0.71-0.93) and 0.71 (0.61-0.82) for 4.9 to <17.4 and ≥ 17.4 metabolic equivalent-hr/week). A U-shaped association was observed for late all-cause mortality and BMI using updated weight (1.42 (1.15-1.74) and 1.40 (1.09-1.81), <21.5 and ≥ 35, respectively). Smoking was associated with increased risk of late outcomes. In this large prospective pooling project, modifiable lifestyle factors were associated with late outcomes among long-term ER+ breast cancer survivors. PMID:26606746

  8. In vivo application of ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide for detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Krenning, E.P.; Reubi, J.C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Setyono-Han, B.; de Jong, M.; Kooij, P.P.M.; Bruns, C.; van Hagen, P.M.; Marbach, P.; Visser, T.J.; Pless, J.; Lamberts, S.W.J. Sandoz Research Inst., Berne Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre, Rotterdam Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    In this study the authors investigated its in vivo application in the visualization of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors in rats. The distribution of the radiopharmaceutical was investigated after intravenous injection in normal rats and in rats bearing the somatostatin receptor-positive rat pancreatic carcinoma CA 20948. Ex vivo autoradiographic studies showed that specific accumulation of radioactivity occurred in somatostatin receptor-containing tissue (anterior pituitary gland). However, in contrast to the adrenals and pituitary, the tracer accumulation in the kidneys was not mediated by somatostatin receptors. Increasing radioactivity over the somatostatin receptor-positive tumors was measured rapidly after injection and the tumors were clearly visualized by gamma camera scintigraphy. In rats pretreated with 1 mg octreotide accumulation of ({sup 111}In-DPTA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide in the tumors was prevented. Because of its relatively long effective half-life, ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a radionuclide-coupled somatostatin analogue which can be used to visualize somatostatin receptor-bearing tumors efficiently after 24 hr, when interfering background radioactivity is minimized by renal clearance.

  9. Advanced bone formation in mice with a dominant-negative mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor β gene due to activation of Wnt/β-catenin protein signaling.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Patrick J; Kim, Dong Wook; Logan, John G; Davis, Sean; Walker, Robert L; Meltzer, Paul S; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Williams, Graham R

    2012-05-18

    Thyroid hormone (T(3)) acts in chondrocytes and bone-forming osteoblasts to control bone development and maintenance, but the signaling pathways mediating these effects are poorly understood. Thrb(PV/PV) mice have a severely impaired pituitary-thyroid axis and elevated thyroid hormone levels due to a dominant-negative mutant T(3) receptor (TRβ(PV)) that cannot bind T(3) and interferes with the actions of wild-type TR. Thrb(PV/PV) mice have accelerated skeletal development due to unknown mechanisms. We performed microarray studies in primary osteoblasts from wild-type mice and Thrb(PV/PV) mice. Activation of the canonical Wnt signaling in Thrb(PV/PV) mice was confirmed by in situ hybridization analysis of Wnt target gene expression in bone during postnatal growth. By contrast, T(3) treatment inhibited Wnt signaling in osteoblastic cells, suggesting that T(3) inhibits the Wnt pathway by facilitating proteasomal degradation of β-catenin and preventing its accumulation in the nucleus. Activation of the Wnt pathway in Thrb(PV/PV) mice, however, results from a gain of function for TRβ(PV) that stabilizes β-catenin despite the presence of increased thyroid hormone levels. These studies demonstrate novel interactions between T(3) and Wnt signaling pathways in the regulation of skeletal development and bone formation. PMID:22442145

  10. Hormones in Synergy: Regulation of the Pituitary Gonadotropin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Thackray, Varykina G.; Mellon, Pamela L.; Coss, Djurdjica

    2009-01-01

    The precise interplay of hormonal influences that governs gonadotropin hormone production by the pituitary includes endocrine, paracrine and autocrine actions of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), activin and steroids. However, most studies of hormonal regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in the pituitary gonadotrope have been limited to analyses of the isolated actions of individual hormones. LHβ and FSHβ subunits have distinct patterns of expression during the menstrual/estrous cycle as a result of the integration of activin, GnRH, and steroid hormone action. In this review, we focus on studies that delineate the interplay among these hormones in the regulation of LHβ and FSHβ gene expression in gonadotrope cells and discuss how signaling cross-talk contributes to differential expression. We also discuss how recent technological advances will help identify additional factors involved in the differential hormonal regulation of LH and FSH. PMID:19747958

  11. Role of c-Src and focal adhesion kinase in progression and metastasis of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Planas-Silva, Maricarmen D. . E-mail: mcplanas@psu.edu; Bruggeman, Richard D.; Grenko, Ronald T.; Stanley Smith, J.

    2006-03-03

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinases c-Src and focal adhesion kinase (Fak) mediate signal transduction pathways that regulate cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and metastasis. Here, we investigated whether c-Src and Fak are activated during progression of hormone-dependent breast cancer. Maximally active c-Src was overexpressed in a subset of tamoxifen-resistant variants and in metastases of recurrent hormone-treated breast cancer. Active Fak was also frequently observed in these tumors. We also show that estrogen receptor (ER) can bind to Fak and that estrogen can modulate Fak autophosphorylation supporting a cross-talk between these two pathways. Inhibition of c-Src activity blocked proliferation of all tamoxifen-resistant variants, suggesting that inhibitors of c-Src-Fak activity may delay or prevent progression and metastasis of ER-positive tumors. These studies also raise the possibility that fully active forms of c-Src and Fak in breast tumors may be biomarkers to predict tamoxifen resistance and/or risk of recurrence in ER-positive breast cancer.

  12. Discriminative stimulus effects of the GABAB receptor-positive modulator rac-BHFF: comparison with GABAB receptor agonists and drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Koek, Wouter; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C

    2013-03-01

    GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators are thought to have advantages as potential medications for anxiety, depression, and drug addiction. They may have fewer side effects than GABA(B) receptor agonists, because selective enhancement of activated receptors could have effects different from nonselective activation of all receptors. To examine this, pigeons were trained to discriminate the GABA(B) receptor-positive modulator (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF) from its vehicle. The discriminative stimulus effects of rac-BHFF were not mimicked by the GABA(B) receptor agonists baclofen and γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), not by diazepam, and not by alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine, whose self-administration has been reported to be attenuated by GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators. The discriminative stimulus effects of rac-BHFF were not antagonized by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist 3-aminopropyl (diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP35348) but were attenuated by the less efficacious GABA(B) receptor-positive modulator 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropyl)phenol (CGP7930), suggesting the possibility that rac-BHFF produces its discriminative stimulus effects by directly activating GABA(B2) subunits of GABA(B) receptors. At a dose 10-fold lower than the training dose, rac-BHFF enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of baclofen, but not of GHB. This study provides evidence that the effects of GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators are not identical to those of GABA(B) receptor agonists. In addition, the results suggest that positive modulation of GABA(B) receptors does not produce discriminative stimulus effects similar to those of benzodiazepines, alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine. Finally, the finding that rac-BHFF enhanced effects of baclofen but not of GHB is consistent with converging evidence that the populations of GABA(B) receptors mediating the effects of baclofen and GHB are not identical. PMID:23275067

  13. Adult human mesenchymal stem cells enhance breast tumorigenesis and promote hormone independence

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Lyndsay V.; Muir, Shannon E.; Elliott, Steven; Guillot, Lori M.; Antoon, James W.; Penfornis, Patrice; Tilghman, Syreeta L.; Salvo, Virgilio A.; Fonseca, Juan P.; Lacey, Michelle R.; Beckman, Barbara S.; McLachlan, John A.; Rowan, Brian G.; Pochampally, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been shown to home to sites of breast cancer and integrate into the tumor stroma. We demonstrate here the effect of hMSCs on primary breast tumor growth and the progression of these tumors to hormone independence. Co-injection of bone marrow-derived hMSCs enhances primary tumor growth of the estrogen receptor-positive, hormone-dependent breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7 in the presence or absence of estrogen in SCID/beige mice. We also show hormone-independent growth of MCF-7 cells when co-injected with hMSCs. These effects were found in conjunction with increased immunohistochemical staining of the progesterone receptor in the MCF-7/hMSC tumors as compared to MCF-7 control tumors. This increase in PgR expression indicates a link between MCF-7 cells and MSCs through ER-mediated signaling. Taken together, our data reveal the relationship between tumor microenvironment and tumor growth and the progression to hormone independence. This tumor stroma-cell interaction may provide a novel target for the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive, hormone-independent, and endocrine-resistant breast carcinoma. PMID:19597705

  14. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is being suppressed by high blood sugar. ... away. The lab measures the glucose and growth hormone (GH) levels in each sample.

  15. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  16. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003706.htm Growth hormone test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone test measures the amount of growth hormone in ...

  17. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  18. Effects of the GABAB Receptor-Positive Modulators CGP7930 and rac-BHFF in Baclofen- and γ-Hydroxybutyrate-Discriminating Pigeons

    PubMed Central

    France, Charles P.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo effects of GABAB receptor-positive modulators suggest them to have therapeutic potential to treat central nervous system disorders such as anxiety and drug abuse. Although these effects are thought to be mediated by positive modulation of GABAB receptors, such modulation has been examined primarily in vitro. This study further examined the in vivo properties of the GABAB receptor-positive modulators 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropyl) phenol (CGP7930) and (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF). In pigeons discriminating baclofen from saline, γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) produced 100% baclofen-appropriate responding, and the GABAB antagonist 3-aminopropyl(dimethoxymethyl) phosphinic acid (CGP35348) blocked the effects of both drugs. CGP7930 and rac-BHFF produced at most 41 and 74% baclofen-appropriate responding, respectively, and enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of baclofen, but not of GHB. In pigeons discriminating GHB from saline, CGP7930 and rac-BHFF produced at most 1 and 49% GHB-appropriate responding, respectively, and enhanced the effects of baclofen, but not of GHB. Enhancement of the discriminative stimulus effects of baclofen by rac-BHFF and CGP7930 is further evidence of their effectiveness as GABAB receptor-positive modulators in vivo. Furthermore, lack of complete substitution of the positive modulators rac-BHFF and CGP7930 for baclofen and GHB suggests that their discriminative stimulus effects differ from those of GABAB receptor agonists. Finally, together with converging evidence that the GABAB receptor populations mediating the effects of baclofen and GHB are not identical, the present findings suggest that these populations differ in their susceptibility to positive modulatory effects. Such differences could allow for more selective therapeutic targeting of the GABAB system. PMID:22319197

  19. Effects of the GABAB receptor-positive modulators CGP7930 and rac-BHFF in baclofen- and γ-hydroxybutyrate-discriminating pigeons.

    PubMed

    Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C

    2012-05-01

    In vivo effects of GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators suggest them to have therapeutic potential to treat central nervous system disorders such as anxiety and drug abuse. Although these effects are thought to be mediated by positive modulation of GABA(B) receptors, such modulation has been examined primarily in vitro. This study further examined the in vivo properties of the GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropyl) phenol (CGP7930) and (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF). In pigeons discriminating baclofen from saline, γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) produced 100% baclofen-appropriate responding, and the GABA(B) antagonist 3-aminopropyl(dimethoxymethyl) phosphinic acid (CGP35348) blocked the effects of both drugs. CGP7930 and rac-BHFF produced at most 41 and 74% baclofen-appropriate responding, respectively, and enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of baclofen, but not of GHB. In pigeons discriminating GHB from saline, CGP7930 and rac-BHFF produced at most 1 and 49% GHB-appropriate responding, respectively, and enhanced the effects of baclofen, but not of GHB. Enhancement of the discriminative stimulus effects of baclofen by rac-BHFF and CGP7930 is further evidence of their effectiveness as GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators in vivo. Furthermore, lack of complete substitution of the positive modulators rac-BHFF and CGP7930 for baclofen and GHB suggests that their discriminative stimulus effects differ from those of GABA(B) receptor agonists. Finally, together with converging evidence that the GABA(B) receptor populations mediating the effects of baclofen and GHB are not identical, the present findings suggest that these populations differ in their susceptibility to positive modulatory effects. Such differences could allow for more selective therapeutic targeting of the GABA(B) system. PMID:22319197

  20. Early Adaptation and Acquired Resistance to CDK4/6 Inhibition in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Abreu, Maria Teresa; Palafox, Marta; Asghar, Uzma; Rivas, Martín A; Cutts, Rosalind J; Garcia-Murillas, Isaac; Pearson, Alex; Guzman, Marta; Rodriguez, Olga; Grueso, Judit; Bellet, Meritxell; Cortés, Javier; Elliott, Richard; Pancholi, Sunil; Baselga, José; Dowsett, Mitch; Martin, Lesley-Ann; Turner, Nicholas C; Serra, Violeta

    2016-04-15

    Small-molecule inhibitors of the CDK4/6 cell-cycle kinases have shown clinical efficacy in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive metastatic breast cancer, although their cytostatic effects are limited by primary and acquired resistance. Here we report that ER-positive breast cancer cells can adapt quickly to CDK4/6 inhibition and evade cytostasis, in part, via noncanonical cyclin D1-CDK2-mediated S-phase entry. This adaptation was prevented by cotreatment with hormone therapies or PI3K inhibitors, which reduced the levels of cyclin D1 (CCND1) and other G1-S cyclins, abolished pRb phosphorylation, and inhibited activation of S-phase transcriptional programs. Combined targeting of both CDK4/6 and PI3K triggered cancer cell apoptosis in vitro and in patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) models, resulting in tumor regression and improved disease control. Furthermore, a triple combination of endocrine therapy, CDK4/6, and PI3K inhibition was more effective than paired combinations, provoking rapid tumor regressions in a PDX model. Mechanistic investigations showed that acquired resistance to CDK4/6 inhibition resulted from bypass of cyclin D1-CDK4/6 dependency through selection of CCNE1 amplification or RB1 loss. Notably, although PI3K inhibitors could prevent resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors, they failed to resensitize cells once resistance had been acquired. However, we found that cells acquiring resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors due to CCNE1 amplification could be resensitized by targeting CDK2. Overall, our results illustrate convergent mechanisms of early adaptation and acquired resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors that enable alternate means of S-phase entry, highlighting strategies to prevent the acquisition of therapeutic resistance to these agents. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2301-13. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27020857

  1. OctreoScan 111 for imaging of a somatostatin receptor-positive islet cell tumor in rat.

    PubMed

    Bruns, C; Stolz, B; Albert, R; Marbach, P; Pless, J

    1993-01-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) receptors are present in a variety of human tumors such as pituitary and endocrine pancreatic tumors, brain tumors, small cell lung cancers and malignant breast tumors. The 111In-labeled SRIF analog SDZ 215-811 (OctreoScan 111) binds with a high affinity to somatostatin receptors and exhibits SRIF-like biological properties, as demonstrated by the inhibition of growth hormone release from pituitary cells. We report here the in vitro characterization of SDZ 215-811 and the in vivo imaging of an islet cell tumor grown in rats using [111In]SDZ 215-811. In vitro autoradiographies revealed a high density of SRIF receptors on the pancreatic tumor tissue. As early as 5 min after intravenous injection of [111In]SDZ 215-811 into tumor-bearing rats, the tumors were clearly localized by gamma-camera scintigraphy. Even 24 h post injection, the islet cell tumor was still detectable. The radioligand was mainly cleared from the circulation via the kidneys, with a rapid alpha-phase (t1/2 = 5.6 min) and a slow elimination phase (t1/2 = 7.3 h). Biodistribution studies revealed a relatively high accumulation of radioactivity in the kidneys, but low uptake into the liver and the intestine. High uptake of [111In]SDZ 215-811 was observed for the tumor tissue (0.92 +/- 0.07% ID/g; 1 h post injection). Interestingly, a tumor load of 0.14 +/- 0.01% ID/g was still measured after 24 h. The tumor/blood ratio was 4.93 after 24 h, indicating specific accumulation of radioactivity in the islet cell tumor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8392488

  2. LPXRFa, the piscine ortholog of GnIH, and LPXRF receptor positively regulate gonadotropin secretion in Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Biran, Jakob; Golan, Matan; Mizrahi, Naama; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2014-11-01

    LPXRFamide (LPXRFa) peptides have been characterized for their ability to inhibit gonadotropin (GTH) release in birds and stimulate growth hormone (GH) release in frogs. However, their involvement in regulating the reproductive hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in mammals and fish is inconclusive. To study the role of LPXRFa peptides in the regulation of GTH secretion, we cloned tilapia LPXRFa and LPXRF receptor (LPXRF-R). Processing of the tilapia preproLPXRFa liberated three mature LPXRFa peptides that varied in size and post-translational modifications. Phylogenetic analysis of LPXRFa and the closely related RFamide peptide PQRFa showed clear clustering of each peptide sequence with its orthologs from various vertebrates. Signal-transduction analysis of the tilapia LPXRF-R in COS-7 cells showed clear stimulation of CRE-dependent luciferase activity, whereas the human NPFFR1 showed suppression of forskolin-induced CRE-dependent activity in this system. Administration of the tilapia pyroglutaminated LPXRFa-2 peptide to primary cell culture of tilapia pituitaries, or to reproductive female tilapia by ip injection, positively regulated both LH and FSH release in vivo and in vitro. Using double-labeled fluorescent in-situ hybridization and immunofluorescence, βLH cells were found to co-express both tilapia lpxrf and tilapia lpxrf-r mRNA, whereas some of the βFSH cells coexpressed only lpxrf-r mRNA. No coexpression of tilapia lpxrf-r was identified in GH-positive cells. These findings suggest that the LPXRFa system is a potent positive regulator of the reproductive neuroendocrine axis of tilapia. PMID:25144920

  3. [Hormonal dysnatremia].

    PubMed

    Karaca, P; Desailloud, R

    2013-10-01

    Because of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) disorder on production or function we can observe dysnatremia. In the absence of production by posterior pituitary, central diabetes insipidus (DI) occurs with hypernatremia. There are hereditary autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X- linked forms. When ADH is secreted but there is an alteration on his receptor AVPR2, it is a nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in acquired or hereditary form. We can make difference on AVP levels and/or on desmopressine response which is negative in nephrogenic forms. Hyponatremia occurs when there is an excess of ADH production: it is a euvolemic hypoosmolar hyponatremia. The most frequent etiology is SIADH (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH), a diagnostic of exclusion which is made after eliminating corticotropin deficiency and hypothyroidism. In case of brain injury the differential diagnosis of cerebral salt wasting (CSW) syndrome has to be discussed, because its treatment is perfusion of isotonic saline whereas in SIADH, the treatment consists in administration of hypertonic saline if hyponatremia is acute and/or severe. If not, fluid restriction demeclocycline or vaptans (antagonists of V2 receptors) can be used in some European countries. Four types of SIADH exist; 10 % of cases represent not SIADH but SIAD (syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis) due to a constitutive activation of vasopressin receptor that produces water excess. c 2013 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. PMID:24356291

  4. Pure Apocrine Carcinomas Represent a Clinicopathologically Distinct Androgen Receptor-Positive Subset of Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    PubMed

    Mills, Anne M; E Gottlieb, Chelsea; M Wendroth, Scott; M Brenin, Christiana; Atkins, Kristen A

    2016-08-01

    Apocrine carcinomas comprise ∼1% of all breast cancers and are characterized by large cells bearing abundant eosinophilic granular cytoplasm, round nuclei, and prominent nucleoli. They are typically estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor/HER2 negative, making them unresponsive to typical hormonal or HER2-based chemotherapy. However, this subtype of triple-negative breast cancers expresses androgen receptor (AR), a feature not shared by most nonapocrine triple-negative cancers (NA-TNCs). AR therefore represents a potential diagnostic tool and therapeutic target for apocrine breast carcinoma. All pure apocrine carcinomas diagnosed during a 10-year period were reviewed, and clinicopathologic characteristics were compared with a control group of 26 NA-TNC cases. Twenty apocrine carcinomas were identified (∼0.8% of all breast cancers). The mean age at diagnosis was 69.3 years for apocrine carcinomas and 56.7 years for NA-TNC. All apocrine carcinomas and no NA-TNC were AR positive. The proportions of apocrine carcinoma grades varied, with G1 being seen in 15% of patients, G2 in 55%, and G3 in 30%. In contrast, 100% of NA-TNC cases were G3. The majority of apocrine carcinomas presented at low T stage (T1: 70%; T2: 20%; T3: 10%; T4: 0%), whereas NA-TNC cases more often presented at T2 or higher (T1: 46.2%; T2: 30.8%; T3: 11.5%; T4: 11.5%). Thirty percent of apocrine carcinomas and 30.8% of NA-TNCs had nodal metastases at presentation. Apocrine carcinomas had a favorable clinical prognosis, with 80% of patients showing no evidence of disease-related morbidity or mortality (mean follow-up: 45.2 mo). Pure apocrine carcinomas represent a clinicopathologically distinct subgroup of triple-negative breast cancer characterized by AR positivity. When compared with NA-TNC, apocrine carcinomas more often present in older women with lower grade and T stage, a group in which a more conservative treatment regimen is often desired. PMID:27259012

  5. Early initiation of salvage hormone therapy influences survival in patients who failed initial radiation for locally advanced prostate cancer: A secondary analysis of RTOG protocol 86-10

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, William U. . E-mail: wshipley@partners.org; DeSilvio, Michelle; Pilepich, Michael V.; Roach, Mack; Wolkov, Harvey B.; Sause, William T.; Rubin, Philip; Lawton, Colleen A.

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: We examined overall and disease-specific survival outcomes both from the time of initial treatment and from the start of salvage hormone therapy (HT), by the extent of disease progression at the time salvage HT was started in patients treated on RTOG Protocol 86-10. Methods and Materials: With a median follow-up of 9.0 years, 247 patients (54%) had received subsequent salvage HT. The overall survival (OVS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were compared by the extent of disease progression at the time salvage HT was started. Results: For those patients with distant metastases (DM) present at the start of salvage HT, the OVS and DSS were significantly reduced when compared with those with DM absent at the time salvage HT was started (OVS at 8 years, 31% vs. 58%; DSS at 8 years, 38% vs. 65%). A statistically significant increase in DSS was observed among the 143 patients with DM absent when patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) less than 20 were compared with those with PSA greater than 20 at the time salvage HT was started. Conclusions: The DSS and the OVS of the relapsed patient are decreased in those with more extensive disease at the time of salvage HT. However, because this protocol could not evaluate the effect of posttreatment PSA velocity on outcomes, which is likely a better predictor of long-term success with salvage HT, these results cannot be taken to demonstrate that early salvage HT in patients with long posttreatment PSA doubling times is necessary for longer survival.

  6. FDA Approval: Palbociclib for the Treatment of Postmenopausal Patients with Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Julia A; Amiri-Kordestani, Laleh; Charlab, Rosane; Chen, Wei; Palmby, Todd; Tilley, Amy; Zirkelbach, Jeanne Fourie; Yu, Jingyu; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Liang; Crich, Joyce; Chen, Xiao Hong; Hughes, Minerva; Bloomquist, Erik; Tang, Shenghui; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Kluetz, Paul G; Kim, Geoffrey; Ibrahim, Amna; Pazdur, Richard; Cortazar, Patricia

    2015-11-01

    On February 3, 2015, the FDA granted accelerated approval to palbociclib (IBRANCE, Pfizer Inc.), an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4 and CDK6), for use in combination with letrozole for the treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer as initial endocrine-based therapy for their metastatic disease. The approval is based on a randomized, multicenter, open-label phase I/II trial (PALOMA-1) in 165 patients randomized to palbociclib (125 mg orally daily for 21 consecutive days, followed by 7 days off treatment) plus letrozole (2.5 mg orally daily) or letrozole alone. The phase II portion of the trial was divided into two cohorts: cohort 1 enrolled 66 biomarker-unselected patients and cohort 2 enrolled 99 biomarker-positive patients. The major efficacy outcome measure was investigator-assessed progression-free survival (PFS). A large magnitude of improvement in PFS was observed in patients receiving palbociclib plus letrozole compared with patients receiving letrozole alone (HR, 0.488; 95% confidence interval, 0.319-0.748). Multiple sensitivity analyses were supportive of clinical benefit. The most common adverse reaction in patients receiving palbociclib plus letrozole was neutropenia. This article summarizes the FDA thought process and data supporting accelerated approval based on PALOMA-1 that may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in the ongoing and fully accrued confirmatory trial PALOMA-2. PMID:26324739

  7. Hormones and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ... Women's Health Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ...

  8. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... hormones cause the body to make. Tests can measure these growth factors. Accurate growth hormone deficiency testing ...

  9. Hormones and Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Fact Sheet Hormones and Hypertension What is hypertension? Hypertension, or chronic (long-term) high blood pressure, is a main cause of ... tobacco, alcohol, and certain medications play a part. Hormones made in the kidneys and in blood vessels ...

  10. ADH (Antidiuretic Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also known as: Vasopressin; AVP Formal name: Antidiuretic Hormone; Arginine Vasopressin Related tests: Osmolality , BUN , Creatinine , Sodium , ... should know? How is it used? The antidiuretic hormone (ADH) test is used to help detect, diagnose, ...

  11. Menopause and Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Menopause and Hormones: Common Questions Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... reproduction and distribution. Learn More about Menopause and Hormones Menopause--Medicines to Help You Links to other ...

  12. Hormonal effects in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001911.htm Hormonal effects in newborns To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hormonal effects in newborns occur because in the womb babies ...

  13. Novel hormone "receptors".

    PubMed

    Nemere, Ilka; Hintze, Korry

    2008-02-01

    Our concepts of hormone receptors have, until recently, been narrowly defined. In the last few years, an increasing number of reports identify novel proteins, such as enzymes, acting as receptors. In this review we cover the novel receptors for the hormones atrial naturetic hormone, enterostatin, hepcidin, thyroid hormones, estradiol, progesterone, and the vitamin D metabolites 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and 24,25(OH)(2)D(3). PMID:17546587

  14. Aging changes in hormone production

    MedlinePlus

    The endocrine system is made up of organs and tissues that produce hormones. Hormones are natural chemicals produced in one ... hormones that control the other structures in the endocrine system. The amount of these regulating hormones stays about ...

  15. Was sind hormone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlson, P.

    1982-01-01

    Historically, the meaning of the term hormone has changed during the last decades. Morphological studies of secreting cells lead Feyrter to the concept of paracrine action of some hormones. While endocrine regulators are blood-borne, paracrine messengers reach their target cells through the diffusion in the intracellular space. Though it is rather difficult to draw a line between true hormones and hormone-like substances, valid definitions for endocrine and paracrine regulatory systems can be given. The term ‘hormonal control’ should be restricted to endocrine systems. For effectors acting by paracrine mechanisms, the term paramone is proposed in this article.

  16. Hormonal therapies in acne.

    PubMed

    Shaw, James C

    2002-07-01

    Hormones, in particular androgen hormones, are the main cause of acne in men, women, children and adults, in both normal states and endocrine disorders. Therefore, the use of hormonal therapies in acne is rational in concept and gratifying in practice. Although non-hormonal therapies enjoy wide usage and continue to be developed, there is a solid place for hormonal approaches in women with acne, especially adult women with persistent acne. This review covers the physiological basis for hormonal influence in acne, the treatments that are in use today and those that show promise for the future. The main treatments to be discussed are oral contraceptives androgen receptor blockers like spironolactone and flutamide, inhibitors of the enzyme 5 alpha-reductase and topical hormonal treatments. PMID:12083987

  17. Pubertal Development: Correspondence between Hormonal and Physical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Pollak, Seth D.

    2009-01-01

    Puberty is advanced by sex hormones, yet it is not clear how it is best measured. The interrelation of multiple indices of puberty was examined, including the Pubertal Development Scale (PDS), a picture-based interview about puberty (PBIP), and a physical exam. These physical pubertal measures were then associated with basal hormones responsible…

  18. NHE-RF, a Merlin-Interacting Protein, Is Primarily Expressed in Luminal Epithelia, Proliferative Endometrium, and Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Wiederhold, Thorsten; Nielsen, G. Petur; James, Marianne; Pinney-Michalowski, Denise; Roy, Jennifer E.; Cohen, Wendy A.; Ramesh, Vijaya; Louis, David N.

    2001-01-01

    NHE-RF, a regulatory cofactor for NHE (Na+-H+ exchanger) type 3, interacts with ion transporters and receptors through its PDZ domains and with the MERM proteins (merlin, ezrin, radixin and moesin) via its carboxyl terminus. Thus, NHE-RF may act as a multifunctional adaptor protein and play a role in the assembly of signal transduction complexes, linking ion channels and receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. NHE-RF expression is up-regulated in response to estrogen in estrogen receptor-positive breast carcinoma cell lines, suggesting that it may be involved in estrogen signaling. To further understand NHE-RF function and its possible role in estrogen signaling, we analyzed NHE-RF expression in normal human tissues, including cycling endometrium, and in breast carcinomas, tissues in which estrogen plays an important role in regulating cell growth and proliferation. NHE-RF is expressed in many epithelia, especially in cells specialized in ion transport or absorption, and is often localized to apical (luminal) membranes. NHE-RF expression varies markedly in proliferative versus secretory endometrium, with high expression in proliferative (estrogen-stimulated) endometrium. Furthermore, estrogen receptor status and NHE-RF expression correlate closely in breast carcinoma specimens. These findings support a role for NHE-RF in estrogen signaling. PMID:11141479

  19. Seribantumab, an Anti-ERBB3 Antibody, Delays the Onset of Resistance and Restores Sensitivity to Letrozole in an Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Curley, Michael D; Sabnis, Gauri J; Wille, Lucia; Adiwijaya, Bambang S; Garcia, Gabriela; Moyo, Victor; Kazi, Armina A; Brodie, Angela; MacBeath, Gavin

    2015-11-01

    Heregulin-driven ERBB3 signaling has been implicated as a mechanism of resistance to cytotoxic and antiendocrine therapies in preclinical breast cancer models. In this study, we evaluated the effects of seribantumab (MM-121), a heregulin-blocking anti-ERBB3 monoclonal antibody, alone and in combination with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole, on cell signaling and tumor growth in a preclinical model of postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer. In vitro, heregulin treatment induced estrogen receptor phosphorylation in MCF-7Ca cells, and long-term letrozole-treated (LTLT-Ca) cells had increased expression and activation levels of EGFR, HER2, and ERBB3. Treatment with seribantumab, but not letrozole, inhibited basal and heregulin-mediated ERBB receptor phosphorylation and downstream effector activation in letrozole-sensitive (MCF-7Ca) and -refractory (LTLT-Ca) cells. Notably, in MCF-7Ca-derived xenograft tumors, cotreatment with seribantumab and letrozole had increased antitumor activity compared with letrozole alone, which was accompanied by downregulated PI3K/MTOR signaling both prior to and after the development of resistance to letrozole. Moreover, the addition of an MTOR inhibitor to this treatment regimen did not improve antitumor activity and was not well tolerated. Our results demonstrate that heregulin-driven ERBB3 signaling mediates resistance to letrozole in a preclinical model of ER(+) breast cancer, suggesting that heregulin-expressing ER(+) breast cancer patients may benefit from the addition of seribantumab to antiendocrine therapy. PMID:26310543

  20. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) induces estrogen receptor-positive mammary neoplasia through an inflammatory and metabolic phenotype linked to mTor activation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongyan; Lu, Jin; Xiao, Junfeng; Upadhyay, Geeta; Umans, Rachel; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Yin, Yuhzi; Fant, Michael E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Glazer, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPARδ) regulates a multitude of physiological processes associated with glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammation and proliferation. One or more of these processes are potential risk factors for the ability of PPARδ agonists to promote tumorigenesis in the mammary gland. In the present study, we describe a new transgenic mouse model in which activation of PPARδ in the mammary epithelium by endogenous or synthetic ligands resulted in progressive histopathological changes that culminated in the appearance of estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-positive and ErbB2-negative infiltrating ductal carcinomas. Multiparous mice presented with mammary carcinomas after a latency of 12 months, and administration of the PPARδ ligand GW501516 reduced tumor latency to five months. Histopathological changes occurred concurrently with an increase in an inflammatory, invasive, metabolic and proliferative gene signature, including expression of the trophoblast gene, Plac1, beginning one week after GW501516 treatment, and remained elevated throughout tumorigenesis. The appearance of malignant changes correlated with a pronounced increase in phosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid metabolites, which coincided with activation of Akt and mTor signaling that were attenuated by treatment with the mTor inhibitor everolimus. Our findings are the first to demonstrate a direct role of PPARδ in the pathogenesis of mammary tumorigenesis, and suggest a rationale for therapeutic approaches to prevent and treat this disease. PMID:23811944

  1. Orally Active Metabotropic Glutamate Subtype 2 Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators: Structure-Activity Relationships and Assessment in a Rat Model of Nicotine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Sidique, Shyama; Dhanya, Raveendra-Panickar; Sheffler, Douglas J.; Nickols, Hilary Highfield; Yang, Li; Dahl, Russell; Mangravita-Novo, Arianna; Smith, Layton H.; D’Souza, Manoranjan S.; Semenova, Svetlana; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Markou, Athina; Cosford, Nicholas D. P.

    2012-01-01

    Compounds that modulate metabotropic glutamate subtype 2 (mGlu2) receptors have the potential to treat several disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) including drug dependence. Herein we describe the synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies around a series of mGlu2 receptor positive allosteric modulators (PAMs). The effects of N-substitution (R1) and substitutions on the aryl ring (R2) were identified as key areas for SAR exploration (Figure 3). Investigation of the effects of varying substituents in both the isoindolinone (2) and benzisothiazolone (3) series led to compounds with improved in vitro potency and/or efficacy. In addition, several analogues exhibited promising pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. Furthermore, compound 2 was shown to dose-dependently decrease nicotine self-administration in rats following oral administration. Our data, showing for the first time efficacy of an mGlu2 receptor PAM in this in vivo model, suggest potential utility for the treatment of nicotine dependence in humans. PMID:23009245

  2. Oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis induced by ethanolic mango seed extract in cultured estrogen receptor positive breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Al-Shwyeh Hussah; Mohammed, Abdulkarim Sabo; Rasedee, Abdullah; Mirghani, Mohamed Elwathig Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer has become a global health issue requiring huge expenditures for care and treatment of patients. There is a need to discover newer cost-effective alternatives for current therapeutic regimes. Mango kernel is a waste product with potential as a source of anti-cancer phytochemicals, especially since it is non-toxic towards normal breast cell lines at concentrations for which it induces cell death in breast cancer cells. In this study, the anti-cancer effect of mango kernel extract was determined on estrogen receptor-positive human breast carcinoma (MCF-7) cells. The MCF-7 cells were cultured and treated with 5, 10 and 50 μg/mL of mango kernel extract for 12 and 24 h. In response to treatment, there were time- and dose-dependent increases in oxidative stress markers and pro-apoptotic factors; Bcl-2-like protein 4 (BAX), p53, cytochrome c and caspases (7, 8 and 9) in the MCF-7 cells treated with the extract. At the same time, there were decreases in pro-survival markers (Bcl-2 and glutathione) as the result of the treatments. The changes induced in the MCF-7 cells by mango kernel extract treatment suggest that the extract can induce cancer cell apoptosis, likely via the activation of oxidative stress. These findings need to be evaluated further to determine whether mango kernel extract can be developed as an anti-breast cancer agent. PMID:25664859

  3. Hormones and endometrial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Areege; Tempest, Nicola; Parkes, Christina; Alnafakh, Rafah; Makrydima, Sofia; Adishesh, Meera; Hapangama, Dharani K

    2016-02-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the commonest gynaecological cancer in the Western World with an alarmingly increasing incidence related to longevity and obesity. Ovarian hormones regulate normal human endometrial cell proliferation, regeneration and function therefore are implicated in endometrial carcinogenesis directly or via influencing other hormones and metabolic pathways. Although the role of unopposed oestrogen in the pathogenesis of EC has received considerable attention, the emerging role of other hormones in this process, such as androgens and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) is less well recognised. This review aims to consolidate the current knowledge of the involvement of the three main endogenous ovarian hormones (oestrogens, progesterone and androgens) as well as the other hormones in endometrial carcinogenesis, to identify important avenues for future research. PMID:26966933

  4. Palbociclib

    MedlinePlus

    ... a certain type of hormone receptor-positive, advanced breast cancer (breast cancer that depends on hormones such as estrogen to ... taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  5. Prognostic Value of Tumor-Associated Macrophages According to Histologic Locations and Hormone Receptor Status in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Jae Moon; Jang, Min Hye; Kim, Dong Il; Seo, An Na; Park, So Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are involved in tumor progression by promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor cell invasion, migration and angiogenesis. However, in breast cancer, the clinical relevance of the TAM infiltration according to distinct histologic locations (intratumoral vs. stromal) and hormone receptor status is unclear. We investigated the significance of the levels of TAM infiltration in distinct histologic locations in invasive breast cancer. We also examined the relationship of the TAM levels with the clinicopathologic features of tumors, expression of EMT markers, and clinical outcomes. Finally, we analyzed the prognostic value of TAM levels according to hormone receptor status. High levels of infiltration of intratumoral, stromal and total TAMs were associated with high histologic grade, p53 overexpression, high Ki-67 proliferation index and negative hormone receptor status. Infiltration of TAMs was also correlated with overexpression of vimentin, smooth muscle actin and alteration of β-catenin. Overall, a high level of infiltration of intratumoral TAMs was associated with poor disease-free survival, and was found to be an independent prognostic factor. In subgroup analyses by hormone receptor status, a high level of infiltration of intratumoral TAM was an independent prognostic factor in the hormone receptor-positive subgroup, but not in the hormone-receptor negative subgroup. Our findings suggest that intratumoral TAMs play an important role in tumor progression in breast cancer, especially in the hormone receptor-positive group, and the level of TAM infiltration may be used as a prognostic factor and even a therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:25884955

  6. Growth hormone deficiency: an update.

    PubMed

    Audí, L; Fernández-Cancio, M; Camats, N; Carrascosa, A

    2013-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) in humans manifests differently according to the individual developmental stage (early after birth, during childhood, at puberty or in adulthood), the cause or mechanism (genetic, acquired or idiopathic), deficiency intensity and whether it is the only pituitary-affected hormone or is combined with that of other pituitary hormones or forms part of a complex syndrome. Growing knowledge of the genetic basis of GH deficiency continues to provide us with useful information to further characterise mutation types and mechanisms for previously described and new candidate genes. Despite these advances, a high proportion of GH deficiencies with no recognisable acquired basis continue to be labelled as idiopathic, although less frequently when they are congenital and/or familial. The clinical and biochemical diagnoses continue to be a conundrum despite efforts to harmonise biochemical assays for GH and IGF-1 analysis, probably because the diagnosis based on the so-called GH secretion stimulation tests will prove to be of limited usefulness for predicting therapy indications. PMID:23435439

  7. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Increases Radiosensitivity of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells by Prolonging Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Khoram, Nastaran Masoudi; Bigdeli, Bahareh; Nikoofar, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer is an important cause of death among women. The development of radioresistance in breast cancer leads to recurrence after radiotherapy. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a polyphenolic compound of honeybee propolis, is known to have anticancer properties. In this study, we examined whether CAPE enhanced the radiation sensitivity of MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and T47D (estrogen receptor-positive) cell lines. Methods The cytotoxic effect of CAPE on MDA-MB-231 and T47D breast cancer cells was evaluated by performing an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. To assess clonogenic ability, MDA-MB-231 and T47D cells were treated with CAPE (1 µM) for 72 hours before irradiation, and then, a colony assay was performed. A comet assay was used to determine the number of DNA strand breaks at four different times. Results CAPE decreased the viability of both cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In the clonogenic assay, pretreatment of cells with CAPE before irradiation significantly reduced the surviving fraction of MDA-MB-231 cells at doses of 6 and 8 Gy. A reduction in the surviving fraction of T47D cells was observed relative to MDA-MB-231 at lower doses of radiation. Additionally, CAPE maintained radiation-induced DNA damage in T47D cells for a longer period than in MDA-MB-231 cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that CAPE impairs DNA damage repair immediately after irradiation. The induction of radiosensitivity by CAPE in radioresistant breast cancer cells may be caused by prolonged DNA damage. PMID:27066092

  8. Shu-Gan-Liang-Xue Decoction Simultaneously Down-regulates Expressions of Aromatase and Steroid Sulfatase in Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xue-song; Li, Ping-ping

    2011-01-01

    Objective Estradiol (E2) plays an important role in the development of breast cancer. In postmenopausal women, the estrogen can be synthesized via aromatase (CYP19) pathway and steroid-sulfatase (STS) pathway in peripheral tissues, when the production in ovary has ceased. The objective of our study was to explore the effects of Shu-Gan-Liang-Xue Decoction (SGLXD) on the expressions of CYP19 and STS in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer MCF-7 and T47D cells. Methods The effects of SGLXD on the cell viability of MCF-7 and T47D were analyzed by MTT assay. By quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, we evaluated the mRNA and protein expressions of CYP19 and STS in MCF-7 and T47D cells after SGLXD treatment. Results By MTT assay, the cell viability rates of MCF-7 and T47D were significantly inhibited by SGLXD in a dose-dependent manner, the IC50 values were 40.07 mg/ml for MCF-7 cells and 25.62 mg/ml for T47D cells, respectively. As evidenced by real-time PCR and Western blot, the high concentrations of SGLXD significantly down-regulated the expressions of CYP19 and STS both in the transcript level and the protein level. Conclusion The results suggest that SGLXD is a potential dual aromatase-sulfatase inhibitor by simultaneously down-regulating the expressions of CYP19 and STS in MCF-7 and T47D cells. PMID:23467843

  9. Antiproliferative activity and induction of apoptosis in estrogen receptor-positive and negative human breast carcinoma cell lines by Gmelina asiatica roots

    PubMed Central

    Balijepalli, Madhu Katyayani; Tandra, Satyanarayana; Pichika, Mallikarjuna Rao

    2010-01-01

    Low risk of breast cancer has been proposed to be associated with high intake of lignans. We have reported the presence of lignans in Gmelina asiatica roots. There are no scientific reports on the antiproliferative activity of G. asiatica roots. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of ethyl acetate extract from G. asiatica roots (EGAR) on estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) human breast cancer cell lines. The effects of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of EGAR on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells were determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay kit. The mode of cell death caused by EGAR was determined using dual apoptosis assay kit by observing the cells under fluorescent microscope. The quantification of apoptosis and necrosis in cells caused by EGAR was determined using cell death detection kit through ELISA. Down-regulation of the proliferative activity occurred in a clear dose-dependent response with IC50 values of 32.9 ± 3.8 μg/mL in MCF-7 and 19.9 ± 2.3 μg/mL in MDA-MB-231 cell lines. Treatment of breast cancer cells with EGAR resulted in significant apoptosis. The EGAR contain lignans and flavonoids. The antiproliferative activity of the extract is attributed to the presence of these secondary metabolites. The results suggest the efficacy of G. asiatica roots as antiproliferative agents on human breast cancer cells, supporting the hypothesis that plants containing lignans have beneficial effects on human breast cancer. PMID:21808551

  10. Multi-field-of-view strategy for image-based outcome prediction of multi-parametric estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer histopathology: Comparison to Oncotype DX.

    PubMed

    Basavanhally, Ajay; Feldman, Michael; Shih, Natalie; Mies, Carolyn; Tomaszewski, John; Ganesan, Shridar; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to quantify the prognostic information embedded in multi-parametric histologic biopsy images to predict disease aggressiveness in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers (BCa). The novel methodological contribution is in the use of a multi-field-of-view (multi-FOV) framework for integrating image-based information from differently stained histopathology slides. The multi-FOV approach involves a fixed image resolution while simultaneously integrating image descriptors from many FOVs corresponding to different sizes. For each study, the corresponding risk score (high scores reflecting aggressive disease and vice versa), predicted by a molecular assay (Oncotype DX), is available and serves as the surrogate ground truth for long-term patient outcome. Using the risk scores, a trained classifier is used to identify disease aggressiveness for each FOV size. The predictions for each FOV are then combined to yield the final prediction of disease aggressiveness (good, intermediate, or poor outcome). Independent multi-FOV classifiers are constructed for (1) 50 image features describing the spatial arrangement of cancer nuclei (via Voronoi diagram, Delaunay triangulation, and minimum spanning tree graphs) in H and E stained histopathology and (2) one image feature describing the vascular density in CD34 IHC stained histopathology. In a cohort of 29 patients, the multi-FOV classifiers obtained by combining information from the H and E and CD34 IHC stained channels were able to distinguish low- and high-risk patients with an accuracy of 0.91 ± 0.02 and a positive predictive value of 0.94 ± 0.10, suggesting that a purely image-based assay could potentially replace more expensive molecular assays for making disease prognostic predictions. PMID:22811953

  11. CDK9 inhibitors selectively target estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells through combined inhibition of MYB and MCL-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Partha; Yang, Ren-Ming; Sutton, James; Ramsay, Robert G.; Gonda, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that MYB is required for proliferation of, and confers protection against apoptosis on, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+ve) breast cancer cells, which are almost invariably also MYB+ve. We have also shown that MYB expression in ER+ve breast cancer cells is regulated at the level of transcriptional elongation and as such, is suppressed by CDK9i. Here we examined the effects of CDK9i on breast cancer cells and the involvement of MYB in these effects. ER+ve breast cancer cell lines including MCF-7 were much more sensitive (> 10 times) to killing by CDK9i than ER−ve/MYB−ve cells. Moreover, surviving cells showed a block at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Importantly, ectopic MYB expression conferred resistance to apoptosis induction, cell killing and G2/M accumulation. Expression of relevant MYB target genes including BCL2 and CCNB1 was suppressed by CDK9 inhibition, and this too was reversed by ectopic MYB expression. Nevertheless, inhibition of BCL2 alone either by MYB knockdown or by ABT-199 treatment was insufficient for significant induction of apoptosis. Further studies implied that suppression of MCL-1, a well-documented target of CDK9 inhibition, was additionally required for apoptosis induction, while maximal levels of apoptosis induced by CDK9i are likely to also involve inhibition of BCL2L1 expression. Taken together these data suggest that MYB regulation of BCL2 underlies the heightened sensitivity of ER+ve compared to ER−ve breast cancer cells to CDK9 inhibition, and that these compounds represent a potential therapeutic for ER+ve breast cancers and possibly other MYB-dependent cancers. PMID:26812885

  12. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... medicines you take. These include: Birth control pills Hormone therapy Testosterone DHEA (a supplement) If you are ...

  13. Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 30 • Have used combination hormone therapy (estrogen plus progestin) for more than five years • Have a mother, ... know that estrogen (the major female hormone) and progestin (a synthetic form of progesterone, another female hormone) ...

  14. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000908.htm Hormone therapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing ... helps slow the growth of prostate cancer. Male Hormones and Prostate Cancer Androgens are male sex hormones. ...

  15. Detection of Elevated Plasma Levels of EGF Receptor Prior to Breast Cancer Diagnosis among Hormone Therapy Users

    PubMed Central

    Pitteri, Sharon J.; Amon, Lynn M.; Buson, Tina Busald; Zhang, Yuzheng; Johnson, Melissa M.; Chin, Alice; Kennedy, Jacob; Wong, Chee-Hong; Zhang, Qing; Wang, Hong; Lampe, Paul D.; Prentice, Ross L.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Hanash, Samir M.; Li, Christopher I.

    2010-01-01

    Applying advanced proteomic technologies to prospectively collected specimens from large studies is one means of identifying preclinical changes in plasma proteins that are potentially relevant to the early detection of diseases like breast cancer. We conducted fourteen independent quantitative proteomics experiments comparing pooled plasma samples collected from 420 estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer patients ≤17 months prior to their diagnosis and matched controls. Based on the over 3.4 million tandem mass spectra collected in the discovery set, 503 proteins were quantified of which 57 differentiated cases from controls with a p-value<0.1. Seven of these proteins, for which quantitative ELISA assays were available, were assessed in an independent validation set. Of these candidates, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was validated as a predictor of breast cancer risk in an independent set of preclinical plasma samples for women overall [odds ratio (OR)=1.44, p-value=0.0008], and particularly for current users of estrogen plus progestin (E+P) menopausal hormone therapy (OR=2.49, p-value=0.0001). Among current E+P users EGFR's sensitivity for breast cancer risk was 31% with 90% specificity. While EGFR's sensitivity and specificity are insufficient for a clinically useful early detection biomarker, this study suggests that proteins that are elevated preclinically in women who go on to develop breast cancer can be discovered and validated using current proteomic technologies. Further studies are warranted to both examine the role of EGFR and to discover and validate other proteins that could potentially be used for breast cancer early detection. PMID:20959476

  16. Relationship between urinary and serum growth hormone and pubertal status.

    PubMed Central

    Crowne, E C; Wallace, W H; Shalet, S M; Addison, G M; Price, D A

    1992-01-01

    Urinary growth hormone (uGH) excretion and serum growth hormone concentrations have been compared in three groups of children. Group 1 consisted of 21 children who had had cranial irradiation as part of their treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia; group 2, 18 normal children; and group 3, 12 boys with constitutional delay in growth and puberty who were in early puberty. Children in groups 1 and 2 each had a 24 hour serum growth hormone profile (sampling every 20 minutes) and concurrent urine collection. The 12 boys in group 3 had a total of 21 profiles (sampling every 15 minutes for 12 hours) and concurrent urine collections. In the prepubertal children (n = 17), in both groups 1 and 2, there was a significant correlation between mean serum growth hormone and total uGHng/g creatinine. There were also significant correlations between total uGHng/g creatinine and both peak serum growth hormone and mean amplitude of the pulses in the growth hormone profile. In the pubertal children (n = 22), in groups 1 and 2, whether combined or in separate groups, there was no significant correlation between total uGHng/g creatinine and mean serum growth hormone, peak serum growth hormone, or mean amplitude of the pulses in the growth hormone profile. In group 3 there were significant correlations between total uGHng/g creatinine and both the mean serum growth hormone and mean amplitude of the pulses in the profile. Therefore uGH estimations appear to correlate well with serum growth hormone profiles in children who are prepubertal or in early puberty, but not in those further advanced in pubertal development. These results may reflect a variation in the renal handling of growth hormone during pubertal development. uGH estimation may be an unreliable screening investigation for growth hormone sufficiency in mid to late puberty. PMID:1739346

  17. Growth Hormone Promotes Lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Banziger-Tobler, Nadja Erika; Halin, Cornelia; Kajiya, Kentaro; Detmar, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in inflammation and cancer progression, although the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. As determined using comparative transcriptional profiling studies of cultured lymphatic endothelial cells versus blood vascular endothelial cells, growth hormone receptor was expressed at much higher levels in lymphatic endothelial cells than in blood vascular endothelial cells. These findings were confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses. Growth hormone induced in vitro proliferation, sprouting, tube formation, and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells, and the mitogenic effect was independent of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 or -3 activation. Growth hormone also inhibited serum starvation-induced lymphatic endothelial cell apoptosis. No major alterations of lymphatic vessels were detected in the normal skin of bovine growth hormone-transgenic mice. However, transgenic delivery of growth hormone accelerated lymphatic vessel ingrowth into the granulation tissue of full-thickness skin wounds, and intradermal delivery of growth hormone resulted in enlargement and enhanced proliferation of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in wild-type mice. These results identify growth hormone as a novel lymphangiogenic factor. PMID:18583315

  18. Is dehydroepiandrosterone a hormone?

    PubMed

    Labrie, F; Luu-The, V; Bélanger, A; Lin, S-X; Simard, J; Pelletier, G; Labrie, C

    2005-11-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is not a hormone but it is a very important prohormone secreted in large amounts by the adrenals in humans and other primates, but not in lower species. It is secreted in larger quantities than cortisol and is present in the blood at concentrations only second to cholesterol. All the enzymes required to transform DHEA into androgens and/or estrogens are expressed in a cell-specific manner in a large series of peripheral target tissues, thus permitting all androgen-sensitive and estrogen-sensitive tissues to make locally and control the intracellular levels of sex steroids according to local needs. This new field of endocrinology has been called intracrinology. In women, after menopause, all estrogens and almost all androgens are made locally in peripheral tissues from DHEA which indirectly exerts effects, among others, on bone formation, adiposity, muscle, insulin and glucose metabolism, skin, libido and well-being. In men, where the secretion of androgens by the testicles continues for life, the contribution of DHEA to androgens has been best evaluated in the prostate where about 50% of androgens are made locally from DHEA. Such knowledge has led to the development of combined androgen blockade (CAB), a treatment which adds a pure anti-androgen to medical (GnRH agonist) or surgical castration in order to block the access of the androgens made locally to the androgen receptor. In fact, CAB has been the first treatment demonstrated to prolong life in advanced prostate cancer while recent data indicate that it can permit long-term control and probably cure in at least 90% of cases of localized prostate cancer. The new field of intracrinology or local formation of sex steroids from DHEA in target tissues has permitted major advances in the treatment of the two most frequent cancers, namely breast and prostate cancer, while its potential use as a physiological HRT could well provide a physiological balance of androgens and estrogens, thus

  19. Interpreting Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98: a randomized, double-blind, phase III trial comparing letrozole and tamoxifen as adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Regan, Meredith M; Price, Karen N; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Thürlimann, Beat; Gelber, Richard D

    2011-01-01

    The Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 study is a four-arm trial comparing 5 years of monotherapy with tamoxifen or with letrozole or with sequences of 2 years of one followed by 3 years of the other for postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive early invasive breast cancer. From 1998 to 2003, BIG -98 enrolled 8,010 women. The enhanced design f the trial enabled two complementary analyses of efficacy and safety. Collection of tumor specimens further enabled treatment comparisons based on tumor biology. Reports of BIG 1-98 should be interpreted in relation to each individual patient as she weighs the costs and benefits of available treatments. Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT00004205. PMID:21635709

  20. Interpreting breast international group (BIG) 1-98: a randomized, double-blind, phase III trial comparing letrozole and tamoxifen as adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 study is a four-arm trial comparing 5 years of monotherapy with tamoxifen or with letrozole or with sequences of 2 years of one followed by 3 years of the other for postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive early invasive breast cancer. From 1998 to 2003, BIG -98 enrolled 8,010 women. The enhanced design f the trial enabled two complementary analyses of efficacy and safety. Collection of tumor specimens further enabled treatment comparisons based on tumor biology. Reports of BIG 1-98 should be interpreted in relation to each individual patient as she weighs the costs and benefits of available treatments. Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT00004205. PMID:21635709

  1. Thyroid Hormone and Cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Anthony Martin; Ojamaa, Kaie

    2016-01-01

    The heart is a major target of thyroid hormones, with maintenance of euthyroid hormone balance critical for proper function. In particular, chronic low thyroid function can eventually lead to dilated heart failure with impaired coronary blood flow. New evidence also suggests that heart diseases trigger a reduction in cardiac tissue thyroid hormone levels, a condition that may not be detectible using serum hormone assays. Many animal and clinical studies have demonstrated a high prevalence of low thyroid function in heart diseases with worse outcomes from this condition. Animal and human studies have also demonstrated many benefits from thyroid hormone treatment of heart diseases, particularly heart failure. Nonetheless, this potential treatment has not yet translated to patients due to a number of important concerns. The most serious concern involves the potential of accidental overdose leading to increased arrhythmias and sudden death. Several important clinical studies, which actually used excessive doses of thyroid hormone analogs, have played a major role in convincing the medical community that thyroid hormones are simply too dangerous to be considered for treatment in cardiac patients. Nonetheless, this issue has not gone away due primarily to overwhelmingly positive evidence for treatment benefits and a new understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying those benefits. This review will first discuss the clinical evidence for the use of thyroid hormones as a cardioprotective agent and then provide an overview of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying beneficial changes from thyroid hormone treatment of heart diseases. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1199-1219, 2016. PMID:27347890

  2. Efficacy and safety of an adjunctive mGlu2 receptor positive allosteric modulator to a SSRI/SNRI in anxious depression.

    PubMed

    Kent, Justine M; Daly, Ella; Kezic, Iva; Lane, Rosanne; Lim, Pilar; De Smedt, Heidi; De Boer, Peter; Van Nueten, Luc; Drevets, Wayne C; Ceusters, Marc

    2016-06-01

    This phase 2a, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, proof-of-concept study was designed to evaluate, efficacy, safety and tolerability of JNJ-40411813/ADX71149, a novel metabotropic glutamate 2 receptor positive allosteric modulator as an adjunctive treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) with significant anxiety symptoms. Eligible patients (18-64years) had a DSM-IV diagnosis of MDD, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 (HDRS17) score of ≥18, HDRS17 anxiety/somatization factor score of ≥7, and an insufficient response to current treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. The doubly-randomized, 8-week double-blind treatment phase was comprised of two 4-week periods, from which a combined test statistic was generated, with pre-determined weights assigned to each of the 2 treatment periods. Period 1: patients (n=121) were randomly assigned (1:1) to JNJ-40411813 (n=62; 50mg to 150mg b.i.d, flexibly dosed) or placebo (n=59); Period 2: placebo-treated patients (n=22) who continued to meet entry severity criteria were re-randomized (1:1) to JNJ-40411813 or placebo, while other patients underwent sham re-randomization and continued on their same treatment. Of 121 randomized patients, 100 patients (82.6%) were completers. No efficacy signal was detected on the primary endpoint, the 6-item Hamilton Anxiety Subscale (HAM-A6, p=0.51). Efficacy signals (based on prespecified 1-sided p<0.20) were evident on several secondary outcome measures of both depression (HDRS17 total score, 6-item subscale of HDRS17 assessing core depressive symptoms [HAM-D6], and Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology [IDS-C30]) and anxiety (HDRS17 anxiety/somatization factor, IDS-C30 anxiety subscale). Although well-tolerated, the results do not suggest efficacy for JNJ-40411813 as an adjunctive treatment for patients with MDD with significant anxious symptoms in the dose range studied. PMID:26804646

  3. Flow cytometry analysis of hormone receptors on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to identify stress-induced neuroendocrine effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding the role of circulating peptide hormones in the pathogenesis of space-flight induced disorders would be greatly facilitated by a method which monitors chronic levels of hormones and their effects upon in vivo cell physiology. Single and simultaneous multiparameter flow cytometry analysis was employed to identify subpopulations of mononuclear cells bearing receptors for ACTH, Endorphin, and Somatomedin-C using monoclonal antibodies and monospecific antisera with indirect immunofluorescence. Blood samples were obtained from normal donors and subjects participating in decompression chamber studies (acute stress), medical student academic examination (chronic stress), and a drug study (Dexamethasone). Preliminary results indicate most ACTH and Endorphin receptor positive cells are monocytes and B-cells, exhibit little diurnal variation but the relative percentages of receptor positive cells are influenced by exposure to various stressors and ACTH inhibition. This study demonstrates the capability of flow cytometry analysis to study cell surface hormone receptor regulation which should allow insight into neuroendocrine modulation of the immune and other cellular systems during exposure to stress or microgravity.

  4. New insights into adipokinetic hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Vroemen, S F; Van der Horst, D J; Van Marrewijk, W J

    1998-06-25

    Flight activity of insects comprises one of the most intense biochemical processes known in nature, and therefore provides an attractive model system to study the hormonal regulation of metabolism during physical exercise. In long-distance flying insects, such as the migratory locust, both carbohydrate and lipid reserves are utilized as fuels for sustained flight activity. The mobilization of these energy stores in Locusta migratoria is mediated by three structurally related adipokinetic hormones (AKHs), which are all capable of stimulating the release of both carbohydrates and lipids from the fat body. To exert their effects intracellularly, these hormones induce a variety of signal transduction events, involving the activation of AKH receptors, GTP-binding proteins, cyclic AMP, inositol phosphates and Ca2+. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the research into AKH signaling. This not only includes the effects of the three AKHs on each of the signaling molecules, but also crosstalk between signaling cascades and the degradation rates of the hormones in the hemolymph. On the basis of the observed differences between the three AKHs, we have tried to construct a physiological model for their action in locusts, in order to answer a fundamental question in endocrinology: why do several structurally and functionally related peptide hormones co-exist in locusts (and animals in general), when apparently one single hormone would be sufficient to exert the desired effects? We suggest that the success of the migratory locust in performing long-distance flights is in part based on this neuropeptide multiplicity, with AKH-I being the strongest lipid-mobilizing hormone, AKH-II the most powerful carbohydrate mobilizer and AKH-III, a modulatory entity that predominantly serves to provide the animal with energy at rest. PMID:9723879

  5. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two types of bioidentical hormone products: • Pharmaceutical products. These products have been approved by the ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy (a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a ...

  6. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two types of bioidentical hormone products: Pharmaceutical products . These products have been approved by the ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy(a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a ...

  7. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... is to closely replicate normal thyroid functioning. Pure, synthetic thyroxine (T4) works in the same way as ... needing thyroid hormone replacement (see Hypothyroidism brochure ). Pure synthetic thyroxine (T4), taken once daily by mouth, successfully ...

  8. Growth hormone stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone (GH) stimulation test measures the ability of the body to produce GH. ... killing medicine (antiseptic). The first sample is drawn early in the morning. Medicine is given through the ...

  9. Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Endocrine System » Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  10. Autoimmunity against thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Sakata, S

    1994-01-01

    The presence of thyroid hormone autoantibodies (THAA) is a common phenomenon. More than 270 cases have been reported by the end of 1993 involving not only thyroidal but also nonthyroidal disorders. Clinically, THAA in a patient's serum produces variation in thyroid hormone metabolism and, in particular, may interfere with the radioimmunoassay (RIA) results of total or free thyroid hormone measurements, which can cause unusually high or low values of the hormones depending on the B/F separation method used. This in vitro interference can give clinicians confusing information about the patient's thyroid state. As a result, the patient may receive inappropriate treatment from physicians who are unaware of this disorder. The presence of THAA has been reported not only in humans but also in dogs, chickens, and rats. In this review article, clinical features of THAA and the mechanism of autoantibody production are discussed. PMID:7535535

  11. Vaginal bleeding - hormonal

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken just before the period starts Women over age 40 and older may have the option to receive cyclic progestin or cyclic hormone therapy. A health care provider may recommend iron supplements for women with anemia. If you want ...

  12. Luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meduri, G; Charnaux, N; Loosfelt, H; Jolivet, A; Spyratos, F; Brailly, S; Milgrom, E

    1997-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that human choriogonadotropin (hCG), in addition to its function in regulating steroidogenesis, may also play a role as a growth factor. Immunocytochemistry using two different monoclonal antibodies (LHR29 and LHR1055) raised against the human luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (LH/hCG) receptor allowed us to detect this receptor in breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, and ZR75) in individual cancer biopsies and in benign breast lesions. The receptor was also present in epithelial cells of normal human and sow breast. In the latter, its concentration increased after ovulation. The presence of LH/hCG receptor mRNA was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR using primers extending over exons 2-4, 5-11, and 9-11. The proportion of LH/hCG-receptor positive cells and the intensity of the immunolabeling varied in individual biopsies, but there was no obvious correlation with the histological type of the cancer. These results are compatible with previous studies suggesting that during pregnancy, hCG is involved in the differentiation of breast glandular epithelium and that this hormone may play an inhibitory role in mammary carcinogenesis and in the growth of breast tumors. PMID:9041186

  13. Protein Hormones and Immunity‡

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Keith W.; Weigent, Douglas A.; Kooijman, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A number of observations and discoveries over the past 20 years support the concept of important physiological interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. The best known pathway for transmission of information from the immune system to the neuroendocrine system is humoral in the form of cytokines, although neural transmission via the afferent vagus is well documented also. In the other direction, efferent signals from the nervous system to the immune system are conveyed by both the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems. Communication is possible because the nervous and immune systems share a common biochemical language involving shared ligands and receptors, including neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, growth factors, neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines. This means that the brain functions as an immune-regulating organ participating in immune responses. A great deal of evidence has accumulated and confirmed that hormones secreted by the neuroendocrine system play an important role in communication and regulation of the cells of the immune system. Among protein hormones, this has been most clearly documented for prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), but significant influences on immunity by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been demonstrated. Here we review evidence obtained during the past 20 years to clearly demonstrate that neuroendocrine protein hormones influence immunity and that immune processes affect the neuroendocrine system. New findings highlight a previously undiscovered route of communication between the immune and endocrine systems that is now known to occur at the cellular level. This communication system is activated when inflammatory processes induced by proinflammatory cytokines antagonize the function of a variety of hormones, which then causes endocrine resistance in both the periphery and brain. Homeostasis during inflammation is achieved by a balance between cytokines and

  14. Adiposity, hormone replacement therapy use and breast cancer risk by age and hormone receptor status: a large prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Associations of hormone-receptor positive breast cancer with excess adiposity are reasonably well characterized; however, uncertainty remains regarding the association of body mass index (BMI) with hormone-receptor negative malignancies, and possible interactions by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use. Methods Within the European EPIC cohort, Cox proportional hazards models were used to describe the relationship of BMI, waist and hip circumferences with risk of estrogen-receptor (ER) negative and progesterone-receptor (PR) negative (n = 1,021) and ER+PR+ (n = 3,586) breast tumors within five-year age bands. Among postmenopausal women, the joint effects of BMI and HRT use were analyzed. Results For risk of ER-PR- tumors, there was no association of BMI across the age bands. However, when analyses were restricted to postmenopausal HRT never users, a positive risk association with BMI (third versus first tertile HR = 1.47 (1.01 to 2.15)) was observed. BMI was inversely associated with ER+PR+ tumors among women aged ≤49 years (per 5 kg/m2 increase, HR = 0.79 (95%CI 0.68 to 0.91)), and positively associated with risk among women ≥65 years (HR = 1.25 (1.16 to 1.34)). Adjusting for BMI, waist and hip circumferences showed no further associations with risks of breast cancer subtypes. Current use of HRT was significantly associated with an increased risk of receptor-negative (HRT current use compared to HRT never use HR: 1.30 (1.05 to 1.62)) and positive tumors (HR: 1.74 (1.56 to 1.95)), although this risk increase was weaker for ER-PR- disease (Phet = 0.035). The association of HRT was significantly stronger in the leaner women (BMI ≤22.5 kg/m2) than for more overweight women (BMI ≥25.9 kg/m2) for, both, ER-PR- (HR: 1.74 (1.15 to 2.63)) and ER+PR+ (HR: 2.33 (1.84 to 2.92)) breast cancer and was not restricted to any particular HRT regime. Conclusions An elevated BMI may be positively associated with risk of ER-PR- tumors among postmenopausal women

  15. Assessment of the hormonal milieu.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, Susan E; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2011-01-01

    The hormonal milieu has been hypothesized to play a role in a range of human diseases, and therefore has been a topic of much epidemiologic investigation. Hormones of particular interest include: sex steroids; growth hormones; insulin-like growth factors; stress hormones, such as cortisol; and hormones produced by the adipose tissue, termed adipokines. Depending on the hormone, levels may be measured in plasma or serum, urine, saliva, tissue, or by assessing genetic variation in the hormone or hormone metabolizing genes. Sample collection, processing, and storage requirements vary according to the type of sample collected (e.g. blood or urine) and the hormone of interest. Laboratory analysis of hormones is frequently complex, and the technology used to conduct the assays is constantly evolving. For example, direct or indirect radioimmunoassay, bioassay or mass spectrometry can be used to measure sex steroids, each having advantages and disadvantages. Careful attention to laboratory issues, including close collaboration with laboratory colleagues and ongoing quality control assessments, is critical. Whether a single hormone measurement, as is frequently collected in epidemiologic studies, is sufficient to characterize the hormonal environment of interest (e.g. long-term adult hormone exposure) is also an important issue. While the assessment of hormones in epidemiologic studies is complex, these efforts have, and will continue to, add importantly to our knowledge of the role of hormones in human health. PMID:22997864

  16. Regulation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion by hypothalamic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Donoso, A O; Seltzer, A M; Navarro, C E; Cabrera, R J; López, F J; Negro-Vilar, A

    1994-04-01

    1. The present review discusses the proposed roles of the amino acids glutamate and GABA in the central regulation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and in luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. 2. Descriptions of the mechanisms of action of these neurotransmitters have focused on two diencephalic areas, namely, the preoptic-anterior hypothalamic area where the cell bodies of LHRH neurons are located, and the medial basal hypothalamus which contains the nerve endings of the LHRH system. Increasing endogenous GABA concentration by drugs, GABA agonists, or blockade of glutamatergic neurotransmission by selective antagonists in rats and non-human primates prevents ovulation and pulsatile LH release, and blunts the LH surges induced by estrogen or an estrogen-progesterone combination. In contrast, glutamate and different glutamate agonists such as NMDA, AMPA and kainate, can increase LHRH/LH secretion. 3. The simultaneous enhancement of glutamatergic activity and a decrease of GABAergic tone may positively influence the maturation of the pituitary-gonadal system in rats and non-human primates. Administration of glutamate receptor agonists has been shown to significantly advance the onset of puberty. Conversely, glutamate antagonists or increased endogenous GABA levels may delay the onset of puberty. The physiological regulation of LHRH/LH secretion may thus involve a GABA-glutamate interaction and a cooperative action of the various types of ionotropic glutamate receptors. 4. The inhibitory actions of GABA on LH release and ovulation may be exerted at the level of afferent nerve terminals that regulate LHRH secretion. A likely candidate is noradrenaline, as suggested by the synaptic connections between noradrenergic nerve terminals and GABAergic interneurons in the preoptic area. Recent experiments have provided complementary evidence for the physiological balance between inhibitory and excitatory transmission resulting in modulation of the action of

  17. Gastrointestinal hormones regulating appetite.

    PubMed

    Chaudhri, Owais; Small, Caroline; Bloom, Steve

    2006-07-29

    The role of gastrointestinal hormones in the regulation of appetite is reviewed. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body. Gut hormones function to optimize the process of digestion and absorption of nutrients by the gut. In this capacity, their local effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion have been well characterized. By altering the rate at which nutrients are delivered to compartments of the alimentary canal, the control of food intake arguably constitutes another point at which intervention may promote efficient digestion and nutrient uptake. In recent decades, gut hormones have come to occupy a central place in the complex neuroendocrine interactions that underlie the regulation of energy balance. Many gut peptides have been shown to influence energy intake. The most well studied in this regard are cholecystokinin (CCK), pancreatic polypeptide, peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin and ghrelin. With the exception of ghrelin, these hormones act to increase satiety and decrease food intake. The mechanisms by which gut hormones modify feeding are the subject of ongoing investigation. Local effects such as the inhibition of gastric emptying might contribute to the decrease in energy intake. Activation of mechanoreceptors as a result of gastric distension may inhibit further food intake via neural reflex arcs. Circulating gut hormones have also been shown to act directly on neurons in hypothalamic and brainstem centres of appetite control. The median eminence and area postrema are characterized by a deficiency of the blood-brain barrier. Some investigators argue that this renders neighbouring structures, such as the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the nucleus of the tractus solitarius in the brainstem, susceptible to influence by circulating factors. Extensive reciprocal connections exist between these areas and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and other energy-regulating centres of the

  18. Thyroid hormone resistance.

    PubMed

    Olateju, Tolulope O; Vanderpump, Mark P J

    2006-11-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited syndrome of reduced end-organ responsiveness to thyroid hormone. Patients with RTH have elevated serum free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations and normal or slightly elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level. Despite a variable clinical presentation, the common characteristic clinical features are goitre but an absence of the usual symptoms and metabolic consequences of thyroid hormone excess. Patients with RTH can be classified on clinical grounds alone into either generalized resistance (GRTH), pituitary resistance (PRTH) or combined. Mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta gene are responsible for RTH and 122 different mutations have now been identified belonging to 300 families. With the exception of one family found to have complete deletion of the TRbeta gene, all others have been demonstrated to have minor alterations at the DNA level. The differential diagnosis includes a TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma and the presence of endogenous antibodies directed against thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Failure to differentiate RTH from primary thyrotoxicosis has resulted in the inappropriate treatment of nearly one-third of patients. Although occasionally desirable, no specific treatment is available for RTH; however, the diagnosis allows appropriate genetic counselling. PMID:17132274

  19. [Hormones and hair growth].

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2010-06-01

    With respect to the relationship between hormones and hair growth, the role of androgens for androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and hirsutism is best acknowledged. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that intervene in androgen metabolism have been successfully developed for treatment of these conditions. Clinical observations of hair conditions involving hormones beyond the androgen horizon have determined their role in regulation of hair growth: estrogens, prolactin, thyroid hormone, cortisone, growth hormone (GH), and melatonin. Primary GH resistance is characterized by thin hair, while acromegaly may cause hypertrichosis. Hyperprolactinemia may cause hair loss and hirsutism. Partial synchronization of the hair cycle in anagen during late pregnancy points to an estrogen effect, while aromatase inhibitors cause hair loss. Hair loss in a causal relationship to thyroid disorders is well documented. In contrast to AGA, senescent alopecia affects the hair in a diffuse manner. The question arises, whether the hypothesis that a causal relationship exists between the age-related reduction of circulating hormones and organ function also applies to hair and the aging of hair. PMID:20502852

  20. A history of growth hormone injection devices.

    PubMed

    Fidotti, E

    2001-05-01

    In the early 1960s, growth hormone (GH) deficiency was treated by intramuscular injection of GH extracted from human pituitary glands. Since then, there have been many advances in treatment encompassing the route of administration, the injection product and the injection device. This review considers the advances in injection device that have already taken place and how they have benefited the patient, particularly in terms of reduced pain and improved convenience. In the future, needle-free injection techniques and depot formulations of GH are likely to offer alternatives to daily subcutaneous injections. PMID:11393569

  1. Tumor biology in estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-negative breast cancer: Mind the menopausal status

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is not one disease, but can be categorized into four major molecular subtypes according to hormone receptor [estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR)] and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression status. Ki67 labeling index and/or multigene assays are used to classify ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer into luminal A and luminal B (HER2-negative) subtypes. To date, most studies analyzing predictive or prognostic factors in ER-positive breast cancer have been performed in postmenopausal women, mainly using patients and samples in adjuvant aromatase inhibitor trials. In contrast, even the clinical roles of PgR and Ki67 have been little analyzed so far in premenopausal women. PgR is one of the estrogen-responsive genes, and it has been reported that plasma estradiol levels are related to expression levels of estrogen-responsive genes including PGR in ER-positive breast cancer. In this article, biological differences, especially differences in expression of PgR and Ki67 in ER-positive breast cancer between pre- and postmenopausal women are discussed. Clinical roles of PgR and Ki67 in ER-positive breast cancer differ between pre- and postmenopausal women. We suggest that the mechanisms of development and estrogen-dependent growth of ER-positive breast cancer might differ according to menopausal status. PMID:26677435

  2. Combination treatment with proteasome inhibitors and antiestrogens has a synergistic effect mediated by p21WAF1 in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maynadier, Marie; Basile, Ilaria; Gallud, Audrey; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Garcia, Marcel

    2016-08-01

    Although antiestrogens significantly improve the survival of patients with ER-positive breast cancer, therapeutic resistance remains a major limitation. The combinatorial use of antiestrogen with other therapies was proposed to increase their efficiency and more importantly, to prevent or delay the resistance phenomenon. In the present study, we addressed their combined effects with proteasome inhibitors (PIs). The effects of antiestrogens (hydroxyl-tamoxifen, raloxifen and fulvestrant) currently used in endocrine therapy were tested in combination with PIs, bortezomib or MG132, on the growth of three ER-positive breast cancer cell lines and in two cellular models of acquired antiestrogen resistance. When compared to single treatments, these combined treatments were significantly more effective in preventing the growth of the cell lines. The regulation of key cell cycle proteins, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21WAF1 and p27KIP1, were also studied. Bortezomib and MG132 drastically increased p21WAF1 expression through elevation of its mRNA concentration. Notably, p27KIP1 regulation was quite different from that of p21WAF1. Furthermore, the effect of bortezomib in combination with antiestrogen was evaluated on antiestrogen-resistant cell lines. The growth of two antiestrogen-resistant cell lines appeared responsive to proteasome inhibition and was strongly decreased by a combined therapy with an antiestrogen. Collectively, these findings provide new perspectives for the use of PIs in combination with endocrine therapies for breast cancer and possibly to overcome acquired hormonal resistance. PMID:27373750

  3. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  4. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... to temporarily stop medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ...

  5. Side Effects of Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Living with Prostate Cancer Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction Loss of Fertility Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects: When ...

  6. Aging changes in hormone production

    MedlinePlus

    ... that produce hormones are controlled by other hormones. Aging also changes this process. For example, an endocrine ... produce the same amount at a slower rate. AGING CHANGES The hypothalamus is located in the brain. ...

  7. Investigation of sexual dimorphisms through mouse models and hormone/hormone-disruptor treatments.

    PubMed

    Ipulan, Lerrie Ann; Raga, Dennis; Suzuki, Kentaro; Murashima, Aki; Matsumaru, Daisuke; Cunha, Gerald; Yamada, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in mouse reproductive tissues is observable in adult, post-natal, and embryonic stages. The development of sexually dimorphic tissues starts with an ambisexual structure. It is followed by sex-specific organogenesis as guided by different signaling pathways that occur from late embryonic stages. The measurement of the anogenital distance (AGD), and the observation of the external genitalia are practical ways to distinguish male and female pups at birth and thereafter. Careful observation of the morphological or histological features and the molecular signatures of the external genitalia and perineum enable identification of sex or feminization/masculinization of embryos. Aberrations in hormone signaling via castration or treatment with hormones or hormone disruptors result in dysmorphogenesis of reproductive tissues. Several hormone disruptors have been used to modulate different aspects of hormone action through competitive inhibition and exogenous hormone treatment. Concomitantly, the vast advancement of conditional mutant mouse analysis leads to the frequent utilization of Cre recombination technology in the study of reproductive/urogenital tissue development. Mouse Cre-lines that are tissue-specific and cell-specific are also effective tools in identifying the molecular mechanisms during sexually dimorphic development. Cre-lines applicable to different cell populations in the prostate, seminal vesicles, testis and ovaries, and mammary glands are currently being utilized. In the external genitalia and perineum, Cre lines that examine the signaling pathways of cells of endodermal, ectodermal, and mesenchymal origin reveal the roles of these tissues in the development of the external genitalia. The interaction of hormones and growth factors can be examined further through a variety of techniques available for researchers. Such cumulative information about various technologies is summarized. PMID:26651426

  8. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  9. [Hormonal contraception in autoimmpne diseases].

    PubMed

    Matyszkiewicz, Anna; Jach, Robert; Rajtar-Ciosek, Agnieszka; Basta, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The onset and the course of autoimmune diseases is influenced among other factors by the sex hormones. Hormonal contraception might affect the course of the autoimmune disease. The paper summarises the manner of save application of hormonal contraception in patients with autoimmune disease. PMID:27526427

  10. Reproductive hormones in the environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low detections of reproductive hormones, at the part per trillion concentrations, are frequently measured in surface and subsurface waters. These exogenous hormones are a concern because they can bind strongly to hormone receptors in animals and induce an endocrine response or disruption. Human heal...

  11. Bioidentical Hormones for Menopausal Hormone Therapy: Variation on a Theme

    PubMed Central

    Bythrow, Jenna

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Progesterone creams and natural or bioidentical compounded estrogen preparations are being promoted to consumers as safe alternatives to conventional menopausal hormone therapy and as health-promoting tonics. No reliable data support these claims. SAFETY Natural hormones, including estradiol, estriol, estrone, and progesterone, can be expected to have the same adverse event profile as conventional menopausal hormone regimens. SALIVARY HORMONE TESTS Salivary tests may be used to persuade asymptomatic consumers to use hormones (or symptomatic patients to use higher doses than those needed to mitigate symptoms), a practice that can be expected to result in adverse events. PMID:17549577

  12. Differences in expression of proliferation-associated genes and RANKL across the menstrual cycle in estrogen receptor-positive primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Ben P; Viale, Giuseppe; Galimberti, Viviana; Rotmensz, Nicole; Gibelli, Bianca; Smith, Ian E; Dowsett, Mitch

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if there are differences in the expression of estrogen-regulated genes (ERGs), proliferation-associated genes and the progesterone effector RANKL, in premenopausal ER+ breast cancer as a result of the major changes in hormone levels that occur through the menstrual cycle. Primary ER+ tumours from 174 patients were assigned to one of three menstrual cycle windows: W1 (days 27-35 + 1-6), W2 (days 7-16) and W3 (days 17-26). RNA expression of 42 genes, including 24 putative genes associated with plasma E2 levels, seven proliferation genes and RANKL was measured. Expression of PGR, TFF1, GREB1 and PDZK1 followed the previously reported pattern: a higher level in W2 compared to W1 while W3 had an intermediate value, mirroring changes in plasma estradiol. Of the other 20 ERGs, four (RUNX1, AGR2, SERPINA3 and SERPINA5) showed significant differences (p = 0.009-0.049) in expression across the menstrual cycle. The expression of six of seven proliferation-associated genes varied across the cycle but differently from the ERGs, being 20-35 % lower in W3 compared to W1 and W2 (p = 0.004-0.031). Expression of RANKL was 2.5 to 3-fold highest in W3 (p = 0.0001) and negatively correlated to the expression of the proliferation-associated genes (r = -0.37; p < 0.0001). Expression of proliferation-associated genes and RANKL in ER+ breast tumours varies across the menstrual cycle showing a different rhythm to that of ERGs. This may affect the interpretation of gene expression profiles but may be exploitable as an endogenous test of endocrine responsiveness. PMID:25367875

  13. Randomized Phase II, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Exemestane With or Without Entinostat in Postmenopausal Women With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer Progressing on Treatment With a Nonsteroidal Aromatase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Yardley, Denise A.; Ismail-Khan, Roohi R.; Melichar, Bohuslav; Lichinitser, Mikhail; Munster, Pamela N.; Klein, Pamela M.; Cruickshank, Scott; Miller, Kathy D.; Lee, Min J.; Trepel, Jane B

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Entinostat is an oral isoform selective histone deacetylase inhibitor that targets resistance to hormonal therapies in estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) breast cancer. This randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II study evaluated entinostat combined with the aromatase inhibitor exemestane versus exemestane alone. Patients and Methods Postmenopausal women with ER+ advanced breast cancer progressing on a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor were randomly assigned to exemestane 25 mg daily plus entinostat 5 mg once per week (EE) or exemestane plus placebo (EP). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Blood was collected in a subset of patients for evaluation of protein lysine acetylation as a biomarker of entinostat activity. Results One hundred thirty patients were randomly assigned (EE group, n = 64; EP group, n = 66). Based on intent-to-treat analysis, treatment with EE improved median PFS to 4.3 months versus 2.3 months with EP (hazard ratio [HR], 0.73; 95% CI, 0.50 to 1.07; one-sided P = .055; two-sided P = .11 [predefined significance level of .10, one-sided]). Median overall survival was an exploratory end point and improved to 28.1 months with EE versus 19.8 months with EP (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.97; P = .036). Fatigue and neutropenia were the most frequent grade 3/4 toxicities. Treatment discontinuation because of adverse events was higher in the EE group versus the EP group (11% v 2%). Protein lysine hyperacetylation in the EE biomarker subset was associated with prolonged PFS. Conclusion Entinostat added to exemestane is generally well tolerated and demonstrated activity in patients with ER+ advanced breast cancer in this signal-finding phase II study. Acetylation changes may provide an opportunity to maximize clinical benefit with entinostat. Plans for a confirmatory study are underway. PMID:23650416

  14. Predicting Response to Hormonal Therapy and Survival in Men with Hormone Sensitive Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grivas, Petros D.; Robins, Diane M.; Hussain, Maha

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deprivation is the cornerstone of the management of metastatic prostate cancer. Despite several decades of clinical experience with this therapy there are no standard predictive biomarkers for response. Although several candidate genetic, hormonal, inflammatory, biochemical, metabolic biomarkers have been suggested as potential predictors of response and outcome, none has been prospectively validated nor has proven clinical utility to date. There is significant heterogeneity in the depth and duration of hormonal response and in the natural history of advanced disease; therefore to better optimize/individualize therapy and for future development, identification of biomarkers is critical. This review summarizes the current data on the role of several candidate biomarkers that have been evaluated in the advanced/metastatic disease setting. PMID:22705096

  15. Bone loss in thyroid disease: role of low TSH and high thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Abe, Etsuko; Sun, Li; Mechanick, Jeffrey; Iqbal, Jameel; Yamoah, Kosj; Baliram, Ramkumarie; Arabi, Ario; Moonga, Baljit S; Davies, Terry F; Zaidi, Mone

    2007-11-01

    More than 10% of postmenopausal women in the United States receive thyroid hormone replacement therapy and up to 20% of these women are over-replaced inducing subclinical hyperthyroidism. Because hyperthyroidism and post menopausal osteoporosis overlap in women of advancing age, it is urgent to understand the effect of thyroid hormone excess on bone. We can now provide results that not thyroid hormones but also TSH itself has an equally important role to play in bone remodeling. PMID:18083940

  16. Linker histones in hormonal gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Vicent, G P; Wright, R H G; Beato, M

    2016-03-01

    In the present review, we summarize advances in our knowledge on the role of the histone H1 family of proteins in breast cancer cells, focusing on their response to progestins. Histone H1 plays a dual role in gene regulation by hormones, both as a structural component of chromatin and as a dynamic modulator of transcription. It contributes to hormonal regulation of the MMTV promoter by stabilizing a homogeneous nucleosome positioning, which reduces basal transcription whereas at the same time promoting progesterone receptor binding and nucleosome remodeling. These combined effects enhance hormone dependent gene transcription, which eventually requires H1 phosphorylation and displacement. Various isoforms of histone H1 have specific functions in differentiated breast cancer cells and compact nucleosomal arrays to different extents in vitro. Genome-wide studies show that histone H1 has a key role in chromatin dynamics of hormone regulated genes. A complex sequence of enzymatic events, including phosphorylation by CDK2, PARylation by PARP1 and the ATP-dependent activity of NURF, are required for H1 displacement and gene de-repression, as a prerequisite for further nucleosome remodeling. Similarly, during hormone-dependent gene repression a dedicated enzymatic mechanism controls H1 deposition at promoters by a complex containing HP1γ, LSD1 and BRG1, the ATPase of the BAF complex. Thus, a broader vision of the histone code should include histone H1, as the linker histone variants actively participate in the regulation of the chromatin structure. How modifications of the core histones tails affect H1 modifications and vice versa is one of the many questions that remains to be addressed to provide a more comprehensive view of the histone cross-talk mechanisms. PMID:26518266

  17. Gonads and the evolution of hormonal phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rosvall, Kimberly A; Bergeon Burns, Christine M; Jayaratna, Sonya P; Dossey, Emma K; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2016-08-01

    Hormones are dynamic signaling molecules that influence gene activity and phenotype, and they are thus thought to play a central role in phenotypic evolution. In vertebrates, many fitness-related traits are mediated by the hormone testosterone (T), but the mechanisms by which T levels evolve are unclear. Here, we summarize a series of studies that advance our understanding of these mechanisms by comparing males from two subspecies of dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis) that differ in aggression, body size, and ornamentation. We first review our research demonstrating population differences in the time-course of T production, as well as findings that point to the gonad as a major source of this variation. In a common garden, the subspecies do not differ in pituitary output of luteinizing hormone, but males from the more androgenized subspecies have greater gonadal gene expression for specific steroidogenic enzymes, and they may be less sensitive to feedback along the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Furthermore, we present new data from a common garden study demonstrating that the populations do not differ in gonadal sensitivity to gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (i.e., GnIH receptor mRNA abundance), but the more androgenized subspecies expresses less gonadal mRNA for glucocorticoid receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor, suggesting altered cross-talk between the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal and -adrenal axes as another mechanism by which these subspecies have diverged in T production. These findings highlight the diversity of mechanisms that may generate functional variation in T and influence hormone-mediated phenotypic evolution. PMID:27252189

  18. The Role of Thyroid Hormone in Testicular Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Márcia Santos; Wajner, Simone Magagnin; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is a critical regulator of growth, development and metabolism in virtually all tissues, and altered thyroid status affects many organs and systems. Although for many years testis has been regarded as a thyroid hormone unresponsive organ, it is now evident that thyroid hormone plays an important role in testicular development and function. A considerable amount of data shows that thyroid hormone influences steroidogenesis as well as spermatogenesis. The involvement of triiodothyronine (T3) in the control of Sertoli cell proliferation and functional maturation is widely accepted, as well as its role in postnatal Leydig cell differentiation and steroidogenesis. The presence of thyroid hormone receptors in testicular cells throughout development and in adulthood implies that T3 may act directly on these cells to bring about its effects. Several recent studies have employed different methodologies and techniques in an attempt to understand the mechanisms underlying thyroid hormone effects on testicular cells. The current review aims at presenting an updated picture of the recent advances made regarding the role of thyroid hormones in male gonadal function. PMID:18728126

  19. Thyroid Hormone and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Safer, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    Although thyroid hormone is one of the most potent stimulators of growth and metabolic rate, the potential to use thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology has never been subject to rigorous investigation. A number of investigators have demonstrated intriguing therapeutic potential for topical thyroid hormone. Topical T3 has accelerated wound healing and hair growth in rodents. Topical T4 has been used to treat xerosis in humans. It is clear that the use of thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology may be of large consequence and merits further study. This is a review of the literature regarding thyroid hormone action on skin along with skin manifestations of thyroid disease. The paper is intended to provide a context for recent findings of direct thyroid hormone action on cutaneous cells in vitro and in vivo which may portend the use of thyroid hormone to promote wound healing. PMID:23577275

  20. Hormonal control of implantation.

    PubMed

    Sandra, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    In mammals, implantation represents a key step of pregnancy and its progression conditions not only the success of pregnancy but health of the offspring. Implantation requires a complex and specific uterine tissue, the endometrium, whose biological functions are tightly regulated by numerous signals, including steroids and polypeptide hormones. Endometrial tissue is endowed with dynamic properties that associate its ability to control the developmental trajectory of the embryo (driver property) and its ability to react to embryos displaying distinct capacities to develop to term (sensor property). Since dynamical properties of the endometrium can be affected by pre- and post-conceptional environment, determining how maternal hormonal signals and their biological actions are affected by environmental factors (e.g. nutrition, stress, infections) is mandatory to reduce or even to prevent their detrimental effects on endometrial physiology in order to preserve the optimal functionality of this tissue. PMID:27172870

  1. Hormones in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pratap; Magon, Navneet

    2012-01-01

    The endocrinology of human pregnancy involves endocrine and metabolic changes that result from physiological alterations at the boundary between mother and fetus. Progesterone and oestrogen have a great role along with other hormones. The controversies of use of progestogen and others are discussed in this chapter. Progesterone has been shown to stimulate the secretion of Th2 and reduces the secretion of Th1 cytokines which maintains pregnancy. Supportive care in early pregnancy is associated with a significant beneficial effect on pregnancy outcome. Prophylactic hormonal supplementation can be recommended for all assisted reproduction techniques cycles. Preterm labor can be prevented by the use of progestogen. The route of administration plays an important role in the drug's safety and efficacy profile in different trimesters of pregnancy. Thyroid disorders have a great impact on pregnancy outcome and needs to be monitored and treated accordingly. Method of locating review: Pubmed, scopus PMID:23661874

  2. The wound hormone jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J.K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic wound responses through distinct cell autonomous and nonautonomous pathways. In both pathways, bioactive JAs are recognized by an F-box protein-based receptor system that couples hormone binding to ubiquitin-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. These results provide a new framework for understanding how plants recognize and respond to tissue injury. PMID:19695649

  3. Biology of PXR: role in drug-hormone interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Dai, Shu; Guo, Yan; Xie, Wen; Zhai, Yonggong

    2014-01-01

    Hormonal homeostasis is essential for a variety of physiological and pathological processes. Elimination and detoxification of xenobiotics, such as drugs introduced into the human body, could disrupt the balance of hormones due to the induction of drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and transporters. Pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) functions as a master xenobiotic receptor involved in drug metabolism and drug-drug interactions by its coordinated transcriptional regulation of phase I and phase II DMEs and transporters. Recently, increasing evidences indicate that PXR can also mediate the endocrine disruptor function and thus impact the integrity of the endocrine system. This review focuses primarily on the recent advances in our understanding of the function of PXR in glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid, androgen and estrogen homeostasis. The elucidation of PXR-mediated drug-hormone interactions might have important therapeutic implications in dealing with hormone-dependent diseases and safety assessment of drugs. PMID:26417296

  4. Metronomic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting: results of two parallel feasibility trials (TraQme and TAME) in patients with HER2+ and HER2− locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Petry, V.; Gagliato, D.M.; Leal, A.I.C.; Arai, R.J.; Longo, E.; Andrade, F.; Ricci, M.D.; Piato, J.R.; Barroso-Sousa, R.; Hoff, P.M.; Mano, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has practical and theoretical advantages over adjuvant chemotherapy strategy in breast cancer (BC) management. Moreover, metronomic delivery has a more favorable toxicity profile. The present study examined the feasibility of neoadjuvant metronomic chemotherapy in two cohorts [HER2+ (TraQme) and HER2− (TAME)] of locally advanced BC. Twenty patients were prospectively enrolled (TraQme, n=9; TAME, n=11). Both cohorts received weekly paclitaxel at 100 mg/m2 during 8 weeks followed by weekly doxorubicin at 24 mg/m2 for 9 weeks in combination with oral cyclophosphamide at 100 mg/day (fixed dose). The HER2+ cohort received weekly trastuzumab. The study was interrupted because of safety issues. Thirty-six percent of patients in the TAME cohort and all patients from the TraQme cohort had stage III BC. Of note, 33% from the TraQme cohort and 66% from the TAME cohort displayed hormone receptor positivity in tumor tissue. The pathological complete response rates were 55% and 18% among patients enrolled in the TraQme and TAME cohorts, respectively. Patients in the TraQme cohort had more advanced BC stages at diagnosis, higher-grade pathological classification, and more tumors lacking hormone receptor expression, compared to the TAME cohort. The toxicity profile was also different. Two patients in the TraQme cohort developed pneumonitis, and in the TAME cohort we observed more hematological toxicity and hand-foot syndrome. The neoadjuvant metronomic chemotherapy regimen evaluated in this trial was highly effective in achieving a tumor response, especially in the HER2+ cohort. Pneumonitis was a serious, unexpected adverse event observed in this group. Further larger and randomized trials are warranted to evaluate the association between metronomic chemotherapy and trastuzumab treatment. PMID:25760024

  5. Favorable Response of Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma to Targeted 177Lu-DOTATATE Therapy: Will PRRT Evolve to Become an Important Approach in Receptor-Positive Cases?

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Ranade, Rohit

    2016-06-01

    This report illustrates an excellent partial response of Merkel cell carcinoma with multiple bilobar hepatic metastases to a single cycle of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. This response, coupled with minimal side effects, warrants consideration of this therapy early in the disease course (rather than at an advanced stage after failure of other therapies) if the metastatic lesions exhibit adequate tracer avidity on somatostatin receptor-based imaging. Our patient showed progression of systemic disease after having undergone a second surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy to the head and neck, as well as chemotherapy, and hence was considered a candidate for PRRT. In a pretreatment study, the metastatic lesions demonstrated avidity to both somatostatin receptors and (18)F-FDG. Three months after the first cycle of treatment, when the patient was being evaluated for a second cycle, both imaging parameters showed evidence of a partial response that included nearly complete resolution of the two previously seen lesions. In view of the relatively good tolerability, minimal side effects, and targeted nature of the treatment, PRRT may evolve to become the first-line therapy for metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma and should be examined further in a larger number of patients. PMID:26471333

  6. Improving Response to Hormone Therapy in Breast Cancer: New Targets, New Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Rugo, Hope S; Vidula, Neelima; Ma, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer expresses the estrogen and or progesterone receptors (ER and PR). In tumors without concomitant HER2 amplification, hormone therapy is a major treatment option for all disease stages. Resistance to hormonal therapy is associated with disease recurrence and progression. Recent studies have identified a number of resistance mechanisms leading to estrogen-independent growth of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer as a result of genetic and epigenetic alterations, which could be exploited as novel therapeutic targets. These include acquired mutations in ER-alpha (ESR1) in response to endocrine deprivation; constitutive activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) 4 and 6; cross talk between ER and growth factor receptor signaling such as HER family members, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathways, intracellular growth, and survival signals PI3K/Akt/mTOR; and epigenetic modifications by histone deacetylase (HDAC) as well as interactions with tumor microenvironment and host immune response. Inhibitors of these pathways are being developed to improve efficacy of hormonal therapy for treatment of both metastatic and early-stage disease. Two agents are currently approved in the United States for the treatment of metastatic HR+ breast cancer, including the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib. Management of toxicity is a critical aspect of treatment; the primary toxicity of everolimus is stomatitis (treated with topical steroids) and of palbociclib is neutropenia (treated with dose reduction/delay). Many agents are in clinical trials, primarily in combination with hormone therapy; novel combinations are under active investigation. PMID:27249746

  7. Naloxone does not Affect the Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone-Induced Inhibition of Luteinizing Hormone Secretion in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Naylor, A M; Porter, D W; Lincoln, D W

    1989-06-01

    Abstract Injection of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (21 pmol) into the third cerebral ventricle of long-term ovariectomized ewes caused a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly when compared with the control responses to saline (50 mul). A notable characteristic of the response was the delayed and sustained nature of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition. In the presence of the opioid antagonist naloxone (4 +/- 25 mg iv), the central administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone still produced a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Again, mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly. When naloxone was injected iv, there was a significant rise in mean luteinizing hormone levels as a consequence of an increase in pulse frequency (in four out of five ewes) and a significant increase in luteinizing hormone pulse amplitude. In conclusion, these data suggest that central opioid pathways sensitive to blockade by naloxone are not involved in the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition of luteinizing hormone release. Furthermore, in the long-term ovariectomized ewe, endogenous opioid peptides exert a tonic inhibitory influence on luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone/luteinizing hormone secretion. PMID:19210459

  8. Hormonal contraception and lactation.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, J J

    1996-12-01

    Hormonal contraceptive measures can be used immediately postpartum if the patient so desires. Progestin-only contraceptives are preferable to estrogen-containing methods if initiated during the first six months after delivery. Progestin only contraceptives do not appear to affect milk volume, composition, or to cause deleterious effects in the infant. Ideally for women who desire a form of contraception in addition to lactation-induced amenorrhea, progestin-only methods should be started at six weeks postpartum if the woman is fully breastfeeding. Since contraception protection is provided by lactation amenorrhea, the six week delay will decrease infant exposure to exogenous hormones and decrease the incidence of irregular postpartum bleeding. Milk volume may decrease with the use of estrogen; however, no detrimental effects have been shown on infant growth or development. For women who are planning to gradually wean their infant, use of COCs may provide an easier transition to bottle-feeding. COCs should be used with caution by women who are not able to obtain supplemental milk. A decrease in milk volume can lead to earlier discontinuation of the hormonal contraceptive in an attempt to increase milk quantity. Supplementation is often needed, and then the woman ovulates again, possibly resulting in an unintended pregnancy. Many women are motivated immediately postpartum to accept contraception. For other women, lack of access to health care may provide barriers in obtaining adequate contraception later. In either case, there are adequate data to show no detriments of starting progestin-only contraceptives within days of delivery. Therefore, the best method for the patient should be employed to ensure adequate contraception while preserving optimal lactation. PMID:9025449

  9. The growth hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Waters, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Once thought to be present only in liver, muscle and adipose tissue, the GH receptor is now known to be ubiquitously distributed, in accord with the many pleiotropic actions of GH. These include the regulation of metabolism, postnatal growth, cognition, immune, cardiac and renal systems and gut function. GH exerts these actions primarily through alterations in gene expression, initiated by activation of its membrane receptor and the resultant activation of the associated JAK2 (Janus kinase 2) and Src family kinases. Receptor activation involves hormone initiated movements within a receptor homodimer, rather than simple receptor dimerization. We have shown that binding of the hormone realigns the orientation of the two receptors both by relative rotation and by closer apposition just above the cell membrane. This is a consequence of the asymmetric placement of the binding sites on the hormone. Binding results in a conversion of parallel receptor transmembrane domains into a rotated crossover orientation, which produces separation of the lower part of the transmembrane helices. Because the JAK2 is bound to the Box1 motif proximal to the inner membrane, receptor activation results in separation of the two associated JAK2s, and in particular the removal of the inhibitory pseudokinase domain from the kinase domain of the other JAK2 (and vice versa). This brings the two kinase domains into position for trans-activation and initiates tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor cytoplasmic domain and other substrates such as STAT5, the key transcription factor mediating most genomic actions of GH. There are a limited number of genomic actions initiated by the Src kinase family member which also associates with the upper cytoplasmic domain of the receptor, including important immune regulatory actions to dampen exuberant innate immune activation of cells involved in transplant rejection. These findings offer insights for developing specific receptor antagonists which may be

  10. Behavioral Interventions to Enhance Adherence to Hormone Therapy in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Cabling, Mark L; Lobo, Tania; Dash, Chiranjeev; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2016-08-01

    Adjuvant hormone therapy contributes to reductions in recurrence and mortality for women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. However, adherence to hormone therapy is suboptimal. This is the first systematic literature review examining interventions aimed at improving hormone therapy adherence. Researchers followed the PRISMA guidelines. PubMed-Medline, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Ovid-Medline, and EMBASE were searched for behavioral interventions that aimed to enhance adherence to adjuvant hormone therapy in breast cancer survivors. A total of 376 articles were screened for eligibility. Five articles met the study criteria. All interventions presented adherence outcomes after 1-year follow-up. None significantly enhanced adherence compared to the usual care in the primary analysis (odds ratios ranged from 1.03 to 2.06 for adherence and from 1.11 to 1.18 for persistence). All studies targeted patients, and only 3 studies included postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Three tested the same intervention consisting of educational materials. Only one was conducted in the United States. Only one reported participants' ethnicity. Overall, it was unclear whether the studies contained bias. The use of different terminology and operationalization of adherence made comparisons challenging. Interventions to improve adherence to adjuvant hormone therapy in US breast cancer populations that include survivors who are ethnically diverse, premenopausal, and receiving tamoxifen therapy are necessary to inform future interventions. Adoption of consistent adherence definitions/measurements will provide a clearer framework to consolidate aggregate findings. Given the limited efficacy of tested interventions, it is important to engage oncologists and researchers to develop approaches that target different components associated with hormone therapy adherence, such as doctor-patient communication or social support. PMID:27133733

  11. Thyroid Hormone, Cancer, and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Yun; Chin, Yu-Tan; Yang, Yu-Chen S H; Lai, Husan-Yu; Wang-Peng, Jacqueline; Liu, Leory F; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Davis, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play important roles in regulating normal metabolism, development, and growth. They also stimulate cancer cell proliferation. Their metabolic and developmental effects and growth effects in normal tissues are mediated primarily by nuclear hormone receptors. A cell surface receptor for the hormone on integrin [alpha]vβ3 is the initiation site for effects on tumor cells. Clinical hypothyroidism may retard cancer growth, and hyperthyroidism was recently linked to the prevalence of certain cancers. Local levels of thyroid hormones are controlled through activation and deactivation of iodothyronine deiodinases in different organs. The relative activities of different deiodinases that exist in tissues or organs also affect the progression and development of specific types of cancers. In this review, the effects of thyroid hormone on signaling pathways in breast, brain, liver, thyroid, and colon cancers are discussed. The importance of nuclear thyroid hormone receptor isoforms and of the hormone receptor on the extracellular domain of integrin [alpha]vβ3 as potential cancer risk factors and therapeutic targets are addressed. We analyze the intracellular signaling pathways activated by thyroid hormones in cancer progression in hyperthyroidism or at physiological concentrations in the euthyroid state. Determining how to utilize the deaminated thyroid hormone analog (tetrac), and its nanoparticulate derivative to reduce risks of cancer progression, enhance therapeutic outcomes, and prevent cancer recurrence is also deliberated. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1221-1237, 2016. PMID:27347891

  12. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Androgen deprivation therapy; ADT; Androgen suppression therapy; Combined androgen blockade ... Androgens cause prostate cancer cells to grow. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer lowers the effect level of ...

  13. Evaluation of oral care to prevent oral mucositis in estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer patients treated with everolimus (Oral Care-BC): randomized controlled phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Naoki; Ota, Yoshihide; Hayashi, Naoki; Naito, Mariko; Kashiwabara, Kosuke; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Yamashita, Toshinari; Mukai, Hirofumi; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    This is a randomized, multi-center, open-label, phase III study to evaluate the efficacy of professional oral care in preventing oral mucositis induced by everolimus in postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer. Patients will be randomized into professional oral care and control groups (1:1 ratio). All patients will receive everolimus with exemestane and will continue everolimus until disease progression. In the professional oral care group, patients will receive teeth surface cleaning, scaling and tongue cleaning before starting everolimus, and will continue to receive professional oral care weekly from oral surgeons throughout the 8 week treatment. In the control group, patients will brush their own teeth and gargle with 0.9% sodium chloride solution or water. The primary endpoint is the incidence of all grades of oral mucositis. Target accrual is 200 patients with a two-sided type I error rate of 5% and 80% power to detect 25% risk reduction. PMID:27365521

  14. Biological effects of fulvestrant on estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer: short, medium and long‐term effects based on sequential biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, John F.R.; Cheung, Kwok L.; Gutteridge, Eleanor; Ellis, Ian O.; Nicholson, Robert I.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first study of the biological effect of fulvestrant on ER positive clinical breast cancer using sequential biopsies through to progression. Thirty‐two locally/systemically advanced breast cancers treated with first‐line fulvestrant (250 mg/month) were biopsied at therapy initiation, 6 weeks, 6 months and progression and immunohistochemically‐analyzed for Ki67, ER, EGFR and HER2 expression/signaling activity. This series showed good fulvestrant responses (duration of response [DoR] = 25.8 months; clinical benefit = 81%). Ki67 fell (p < 0.001) in 79% of tumours by 6 months and lower Ki67 at all preprogression time‐points predicted for longer DoR. ER and PR significantly decreased in all tumours by 6 months (p < 0.001), with some declines in ER (serine 118) phosphorylation and Bcl‐2 (p = 0.007). There were modest HER2 increases (p = 0.034, 29% tumours) and loss of any detectable EGFR phosphorylation (p = 0.024, 50% tumours) and MAP kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation (p = 0.019, 65% tumours) by 6 months. While ER remained low, there was some recovery of Ki67, Bcl‐2 and (weakly) EGFR/MAPK activity in 45–67% patients at progression. Fulvestrant's anti‐proliferative impact is related to DoR, but while commonly downregulating ER and indicators of its signaling and depleting EGFR/MAPK signaling in some patients, additional elements must determine response duration. Residual ER at fulvestrant relapse explains reported sensitivity to further endocrine therapies. Occasional modest treatment‐induced HER2 and weakly detectable EGFR/HER2/MAPK signaling at relapse suggests targeting of such activity might have value alongside fulvestrant in some patients. However, unknown pathways must drive relapse in most. Ki67 has biomarker potential to predict fulvestrant outcome and as a quantitative measure of response. PMID:26178788

  15. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0.83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone users were at lower risk of advanced stage of colorectal cancer, which seems supportive for a causal association between hormone therapy and colorectal cancer. PMID:26758900

  16. Palbociclib as a first-line treatment in oestrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative, advanced breast cancer not cost-effective with current pricing: a health economic analysis of the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK).

    PubMed

    Matter-Walstra, K; Ruhstaller, T; Klingbiel, D; Schwenkglenks, M; Dedes, K J

    2016-07-01

    Endocrine therapy continues to be the optimal systemic treatment for metastatic ER(+)HER2(-) breast cancer. The CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib combined with letrozole has recently been shown to significantly improve progression-free survival. Here we examined the cost-effectiveness of this regimen for the Swiss healthcare system. A Markov cohort simulation based on the PALOMA-1 trial (Finn et al. in Lancet Oncol 16:25-35, 2015) was used as the clinical course. Input parameters were based on summary trial data. Costs were assessed from the Swiss healthcare system perspective. Adding palbociclib to letrozole (PALLET) compared to letrozole monotherapy was estimated to cost an additional CHF342,440 and gain 1.14 quality-adjusted life years, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of CHF301,227/QALY gained. In univariate sensitivity analyses, no tested variation in key parameters resulted in an ICER below a willingness-to-pay threshold of CHF100,000/QALY. PALLET had a 0 % probability of being cost-effective in probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Lowering PALLET's price by 75 % resulted in an ICER of CHF73,995/QALY and a 73 % probability of being cost-effective. At current prices, PALLET would cost the Swiss healthcare system an additional CHF155 million/year. Palbociclib plus letrozole cannot be considered cost-effective for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer in the Swiss healthcare system. PMID:27277747

  17. The Association of Low-To-Moderate Alcohol Consumption with Breast Cancer Subtypes Defined by Hormone Receptor Status

    PubMed Central

    Strumylaite, Loreta; Sharp, Stephen J.; Kregzdyte, Rima; Poskiene, Lina; Bogusevicius, Algirdas; Pranys, Darius

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol is a well-established risk factor for breast cancer, but pathways involved in alcohol-related breast carcinogenesis are not clearly defined. We examined the association between low-to-moderate alcohol intake and breast cancer subtypes by tumor hormone receptor status. Materials and Methods A hospital-based case-control study was performed in 585 cases and 1,170 controls. Information on alcohol intake and other risk factors was collected via a questionnaire. Logistic regression was used for analyses. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The odds ratio of breast cancer was 1.75 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21–2.53) in women who consumed ≤5 drinks/week, and 3.13 (95% CI: 1.81–5.43) in women who consumed >5 drinks/week, both compared with non-drinkers for ≥10 years, after adjustment for age and other confounders. The association of alcohol intake with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer was stronger than with estrogen receptor-negative: the odds ratio per 1 category increase was 2.05 (95% CI: 1.49–2.82) and 1.29 (95% CI: 0.85–1.94) (P-heterogeneity = 0.07). There was no evidence of an interaction between alcohol intake and menopausal status (P = 0.19) in overall group; however, it was significant in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer (P = 0.04). Conclusions Low-to-moderate alcohol intake is associated with the risk of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer with the strongest association in postmenopausal women. Since alcohol intake is a modifiable risk factor of breast cancer, every woman should be informed and advised to control alcohol use. PMID:26674340

  18. Hormonal control of inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Farsky, Sandra P.

    1993-01-01

    Almost any stage of inflammatory and immunological responses is affected by hormone actions. This provides the basis for the suggestion that hormones act as modulators of the host reaction against trauma and infection. Specific hormone receptors are detected in the reactive structures in inflamed areas and binding of hormone molecules to such receptors results in the generation of signals that influence cell functions relevant for the development of inflammatory responses. Diversity of hormonal functions accounts for recognized pro- and anti-inflammatory effects exerted by these substances. Most hormone systems are capable of influencing inflammatory events. Insulin and glucocorticoids, however, exert direct regulatory effects at concentrations usually found in plasma. Insulin is endowed with facilitatory actions on vascular reactivity to inflammatory mediators and inflammatory cell functions. Increased concentrations of circulating glucocorticoids at the early stages of inflammation results in downregulation of inflammatory responses. Oestrogens markedly reduce the response to injury in a variety of experimental models. Glucagon and thyroid hormones exert indirect anti-inflammatory effects mediated by the activity of the adrenal cortex. Accordingly, inflammation is not only merely a local response, but a hormone-controlled process. PMID:18475521

  19. Homeostasis, thymic hormones and aging.

    PubMed

    Goya, R G; Bolognani, F

    1999-01-01

    The thymic-pituitary axis constitutes a bidirectional circuit where the ascending feedback loop is effected by thymic factors of epithelial origin. The aim of the present article is, first, to introduce the idea of an immune-neuroendocrine homeostatic network in higher animals. Next, the relevance of the thymus in this network and the possible role of this gland in the neuroendocrine imbalances associated with aging are discussed. A number of studies are next reviewed which show that the endocrine thymus produces several bioactive molecules, generally called thymic hormones, which in addition to possessing immunoregulatory properties are also active on nervous and endocrine circuits. In particular, the reported activities of thymosin fraction five, thymosin alpha 1 and thymosin beta 4 on beta-endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, glucocorticoids, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion in different animal and cell models are reviewed. The known hypophysiotropic actions of other thymic hormones like thymulin, homeostatic thymus hormone and thymus factor are also summarized, and the impact of aging on pituitary responsiveness to thymic hormones is discussed. As a conclusion, it is proposed that in addition to its central role in the regulation of the immune function, the thymus gland may extend its influence to nonimmunologic components of the body, including the neuroendocrine system. The early onset of thymus involution might, therefore, act as a triggering event which would initiate the gradual decline in homeostatic potential that characterizes the aging process. PMID:10202264

  20. Types of Cancer Treatment: Hormone Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Describes how hormone therapy slows or stops the growth of breast and prostate cancers that use hormones to grow. Includes information about the types of hormone therapy and side effects that may happen.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions isolated growth hormone deficiency isolated growth hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a condition caused by a severe ...

  2. Hormonal changes during menopause.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzawi, Farook; Palacios, Santiago

    2009-06-20

    Ovarian senescence occurs gradually during the fourth and fifth decades of life, leading to menopause at an average age of about 51 years. This senescence results in a changing hormonal milieu, with decreases in the levels of estrogens and androgens. Similar changes may be induced by surgical menopause (bilateral oophorectomy) or ovarian failure resulting from cancer treatment. The declining levels of estrogens and androgens affect many tissues of the body and can produce a variety of signs and symptoms, including vasomotor symptoms, decreased bone density, changes in mood and energy, loss of pubic hair and changes in the genital tissues, and effects on sexual function. Accurate measurement of testosterone levels in postmenopausal women requires methods that are validated in the lower ranges of testosterone level observed in this population. PMID:19372016

  3. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone in human and bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Amarant, T; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1982-10-01

    Two hypothalamic peptide hormones, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), have been isolated from human milk and bovine colostrum. Acidified methanolic extracts, prepared from human milk, bovine colostrum and rat hypothalami, as well as synthetic LHRH and TRH markers were subjected to high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The eluates were tested for the presence of LHRH and TRH by specific radioimmunoassays. It was found that milk extracts contain significant amounts of LHRH (3.9 - 11.8 ng/ml) and TRH (0.16 - 0.34 ng/ml), which comigrate with the corresponding marker hormones and with those of hypothalamic origin. The HPLC-purified LHRH from both human and bovine milk was bioactive in a dose-response manner similar to synthetic LHRH. PMID:6816590

  4. Management of Hormone-Sensitive and Hormone-Refractory Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rago

    1998-11-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is a significant health problem in the United States and is the focus of increasing attention in our society. With the aging of the US population, it is likely that prostate cancer will continue to grow in importance. The options for systemic therapy of metastatic prostate cancer should be familiar to physicians, including nonspecialists, whose patients seek their advice and counsel. METHODS: Past and recent literature was surveyed to provide an understanding of the systemic treatment of advanced prostate cancer. The author presents a review of the systemic treatment of metastatic prostate cancer in different clinical circumstances and addresses the current status of chemotherapy in the management of advanced prostate cancer. RESULTS: Early androgen deprivation used over prolonged periods appears to be modestly superior to delayed androgen deprivation with a small potential survival advantage and an advantage in delaying disease progression in advanced prostate cancer. Patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer may benefit from secondary hormonal therapy (eg, adrenal enzyme inhibitors, antiandrogens, glucocorticoids) and chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: The choices of therapy for metastatic prostate cancer depend on individual patient preference. Patients and physicians should be aware of the possible side effects associated with the therapeutics options for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:10761100

  5. Prospective Clinical Utility Study of the Use of the 21-Gene Assay in Adjuvant Clinical Decision Making in Women With Estrogen Receptor-Positive Early Invasive Breast Cancer: Results From the SWITCH Study

    PubMed Central

    Pivot, Xavier B.; Jacot, William; Naman, Hervé L.; Spaeth, Dominique; Misset, Jean-Louis; Largillier, Rémy; Sautiere, Jean-Loup; de Roquancourt, Anne; Pomel, Christophe; Rouanet, Philippe; Rouzier, Roman; Penault-Llorca, Frederique M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The 21-gene Oncotype DX Recurrence Score assay is a validated assay to help decide the appropriate treatment for estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), early-stage breast cancer (EBC) in the adjuvant setting. The choice of adjuvant treatments might vary considerably in different countries according to various treatment guidelines. This prospective multicenter study is the first to assess the impact of the Oncotype DX assay in the French clinical setting. Methods. A total of 100 patients with ER+, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative EBC, and node-negative (pN0) disease or micrometastases in up to 3 lymph nodes (pN1mi) were enrolled. Treatment recommendations, physicians’ confidence before and after knowing the Recurrence Score value, and physicians’ perception of the assay were recorded. Results. Of the 100 patients, 95 were evaluable (83 pN0, 12 pN1mi). Treatment recommendations changed in 37% of patients, predominantly from chemoendocrine to endocrine treatment alone. The proportion of patients recommended chemotherapy decreased from 52% pretest to 25% post-test. Of patients originally recommended chemotherapy, 61% were recommended endocrine treatment alone after receiving the Recurrence Score result. For both pN0 and pN1mi patients, post-test recommendations appeared to follow the Recurrence Score result for low and high values. Physicians’ confidence improved significantly. Conclusion. These are the first prospective data on the impact of the Oncotype DX assay on adjuvant treatment decisions in France. Using the assay was associated with a significant change in treatment decisions and an overall reduction in chemotherapy use. These data are consistent with those presented from European and non-European studies. Implications for Practice: This study shows that in estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative early breast cancer (either node-negative or with micrometastases in up to 3 lymph nodes

  6. Inverse relationship between heat stable enterotoxin-b induced fluid accumulation and adherence of F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in ligated jejunal loops of F4ab/ac fimbria receptor-positive swine.

    PubMed

    Erume, Joseph; Wijemanne, Prageeth; Berberov, Emil M; Kachman, Stephen D; Oestmann, Daniel J; Francis, David H; Moxley, Rodney A

    2013-01-25

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) increases bacterial adherence to porcine enterocytes in vitro and enhances small intestinal colonization in swine. Heat-stable enterotoxin-b (STb) is not known to affect colonization; however, through an induction of net fluid accumulation it might reduce bacterial adherence. The relationship between fluid accumulation and bacterial adherence in jejunal loops inoculated with ETEC strains that produce LT, STb, both, or neither toxin was studied. Ligated jejunal loops were constructed in weaned Yorkshire pigs in two independent experiments (Exp. 1, n=5, 8-week-old; Exp. 2, n=6, 6-8-week-old). Each pig was inoculated with six F4ac(+)E. coli strains: (1) LT(+), STb(+) parent (WAM2317); (2) STb(-) (ΔestB) mutant (MUN297); (3) MUN297 complemented with STb (MUN298); (4) LT(-) STb(-) (ΔeltAB ΔestB) mutant (MUN300); (5) MUN300 complemented with LT (MUN301); and (6) 1836-2 (non-enterotoxigenic, wild-type). Pigs were confirmed to be K88 (F4)ab/ac receptor-positive in Exp. 2 by testing for intestinal mucin-type glycoproteins and inferred to be receptor-positive in both Exp. 1 and 2 based on histopathologic evidence of bacterial adherence. Strains that produced STb induced marked fluid accumulation with the response (ml/cm) to WAM2317 and MUN298 significantly greater than that to the other strains (P<0.0001). Conversely, bacterial adherence scores based on immunohistochemistry and CFU/g of washed mucosa were both lowest in the strains that expressed STb and highest in those that did not. For the two experiments combined, the Pearson correlation coefficient (R) between fluid volume (ml/cm) and log CFU per gram was -0.57021 (P<0.0001); R(2)=0.3521 (n=197). These results support the hypothesis that enterotoxin-induced fluid accumulation flushes progeny organisms into the lumen of the bowel, thereby increasing the likelihood of fecal shedding and transmission of the pathogen to new hosts. PMID

  7. Learning receptor positions from imperfectly known motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm is described for learning image interpolation functions for sensor arrays whose sensor positions are somewhat disordered. The learning is based on failures of translation invariance, so it does not require knowledge of the images being presented to the visual system. Previously reported implementations of the method assumed the visual system to have precise knowledge of the translations. It is demonstrated that translation estimates computed from the imperfectly interpolated images can have enough accuracy to allow the learning process to converge to a correct interpolation.

  8. Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... both combination and estrogen-alone hormone use made mammography less effective for the early detection of breast ... such as a reduction in the use of mammography, may also have contributed to this decline ( 15 ). ...

  9. Network Identification of Hormonal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Vis, Daniel J.; Westerhuis, Johan A.; Hoefsloot, Huub C. J.; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; van der Greef, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Relations among hormone serum concentrations are complex and depend on various factors, including gender, age, body mass index, diurnal rhythms and secretion stochastics. Therefore, endocrine deviations from healthy homeostasis are not easily detected or understood. A generic method is presented for detecting regulatory relations between hormones. This is demonstrated with a cohort of obese women, who underwent blood sampling at 10 minute intervals for 24-hours. The cohort was treated with bromocriptine in an attempt to clarify how hormone relations change by treatment. The detected regulatory relations are summarized in a network graph and treatment-induced changes in the relations are determined. The proposed method identifies many relations, including well-known ones. Ultimately, the method provides ways to improve the description and understanding of normal hormonal relations and deviations caused by disease or treatment. PMID:24852517

  10. [Hormone therapy through changing times].

    PubMed

    Reuter, Miriam; Fassnacht, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Despite several studies in the last years, only women with menopausal symptoms who desire therapy are treated. There is still no recommendation for menopausale hormone therapy for primary prevention of diseases such as coronary artery disease, osteoporosis or depression. The risk of thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and stroke is elevated especially for elderly women with oral hormone therapy. Benefits may exceed risks in younger, early-menopausal women, for whom hormone therapy may be prescribed more liberally. Systemic hormone therapy is for vasomotor symptoms, local therapy for the genitourinary syndrome of menopause. Choice of formulation depends on the individual risk due to symptoms and favours of the patients. With moderate to high cardiovascular risk profile, a transdermal route of estrogen application - in women with an intact uterus in combination with micronized progesterone - seems to be the best option. PMID:26841174

  11. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... agonists , which are sometimes called LHRH analogs, are synthetic proteins that are structurally similar to LHRH and ... gland to stop producing luteinizing hormone, which prevents testosterone from being produced. Treatment with an LHRH agonist ...

  12. Growth hormone stimulation test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... test is performed by administering the amino acid arginine in a vein to raise hGH levels. The ... to secrete growth hormone in response to the arginine. Lack of hGH can cause growth retardation in ...

  13. Thyroid Hormone and Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism affect the cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism is known to be associated with enhanced atherosclerosis and ischemic heart diseases. The accelerated atherosclerosis in the hypothyroid state has been traditionally ascribed to atherogenic lipid profile, diastolic hypertension, and impaired endothelial function. However, recent studies indicate that thyroid hormone has direct anti-atherosclerotic effects, such as production of nitric oxide and suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation. These data suggest that thyroid hormone inhibits atherogenesis through direct effects on the vasculature as well as modification of risk factors for atherosclerosis. This review summarizes the basic and clinical studies on the role of thyroid hormone in vascular remodeling. The possible application of thyroid hormone mimetics to the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis is also discussed. PMID:26558400

  14. Steroid hormones, steroid receptors, and breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Finlay-Schultz, Jessica; Sartorius, Carol A

    2015-06-01

    The ovarian hormones progesterone and estrogen play important roles in breast cancer etiology, proliferation, and treatment. Androgens may also contribute to breast cancer risk and progression. In recent years, significant advances have been made in defining the roles of these steroid hormones in stem cell homeostasis in the breast. Stem cells are potential origins of breast cancer and may dictate tumor phenotype. At least a portion of breast cancers are proposed to be driven by cancer stem cells (CSCs), cells that mimic the self-renewing and repopulating properties of normal stem cells, and can confer drug resistance. Progesterone has been identified as the critical hormone regulating normal murine mammary stem cell (MaSC) populations and normal human breast stem cells. Synthetic progestins increase human breast cancer risk; one theory speculates that this occurs through increased stem cells. Progesterone treatment also increases breast CSCs in established breast cancer cell lines. This is mediated in part through progesterone regulation of transcription factors, signal transduction pathways, and microRNAs. There is also emerging evidence that estrogens and androgens can regulate breast CSC numbers. The evolving concept that a breast CSC phenotype is dynamic and can be influenced by cell signaling and external cues emphasizes that steroid hormones could be crucial players in controlling CSC number and function. Here we review recent studies on steroid hormone regulation of breast CSCs, and discuss mechanisms by which this occurs. PMID:26265122

  15. Design and Synthesis of Systemically Active Metabotropic Glutamate Subtype-2 and -3 (mGlu2/3) Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators (PAMs): Pharmacological Characterization and Assessment in a Rat Model of Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As part of our ongoing small-molecule metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM) research, we performed structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies around a series of group II mGlu PAMs. Initial analogues exhibited weak activity as mGlu2 receptor PAMs and no activity at mGlu3. Compound optimization led to the identification of potent mGlu2/3 selective PAMs with no in vitro activity at mGlu1,4–8 or 45 other CNS receptors. In vitro pharmacological characterization of representative compound 44 indicated agonist-PAM activity toward mGlu2 and PAM activity at mGlu3. The most potent mGlu2/3 PAMs were characterized in assays predictive of ADME/T and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, allowing the discovery of systemically active mGlu2/3 PAMs. On the basis of its overall profile, compound 74 was selected for behavioral studies and was shown to dose-dependently decrease cocaine self-administration in rats after intraperitoneal administration. These mGlu2/3 receptor PAMs have significant potential as small molecule tools for investigating group II mGlu pharmacology. PMID:24735492

  16. HER-2, p53, p21 and hormonal receptors proteins expression as predictive factors of response and prognosis in locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant docetaxel plus epirubicin combination

    PubMed Central

    Tiezzi, Daniel G; Andrade, Jurandyr M; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo; Zola, Fábio E; Marana, Heitor RC; Tiezzi, Marcelo G

    2007-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been considered the standard care in locally advanced breast cancer. However, about 20% of the patients do not benefit from this clinical treatment and, predictive factors of response were not defined yet. This study was designed to evaluate the importance of biological markers to predict response and prognosis in stage II and III breast cancer patients treated with taxane and anthracycline combination as neoadjuvant setting. Methods Sixty patients received preoperative docetaxel (75 mg/m2) in combination with epirubicin (50 mg/m2) in i.v. infusion in D1 every 3 weeks after incisional biopsy. They received adjuvant chemotherapy with CMF or FEC, attaining axillary status following definitive breast surgery. Clinical and pathologic response rates were measured after preoperative therapy. We evaluated the response rate to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and the prognostic significance of clinicopathological and immunohistochemical parameters (ER, PR, p51, p21 and HER-2 protein expression). The median patient age was 50.5 years with a median follow up time 48 months after the time of diagnosis. Results Preoperative treatment achieved clinical response in 76.6% of patients and complete pathologic response in 5%. The clinical, pathological and immunohistochemical parameters were not able to predict response to therapy and, only HER2 protein overexpression was associated with a decrease in disease free and overall survival (P = 0.0007 and P = 0.003) as shown by multivariate analysis. Conclusion Immunohistochemical phenotypes were not able to predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Clinical response is inversely correlated with a risk of death in patients submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and HER2 overexpression is the major prognostic factor in stage II and III breast cancer patients treated with a neoadjuvant docetaxel and epirubicin combination. PMID:17324279

  17. Endogenous parathyroid hormone-related protein compensates for the absence of parathyroid hormone in promoting bone accrual in vivo in a model of bone marrow ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qi; Zhou, Xichao; Zhu, Min; Wang, Qian; Goltzman, David; Karaplis, Andrew; Miao, Dengshun

    2013-09-01

    To assess the effect of hypoparathyroidism on osteogenesis and bone turnover in vivo, bone marrow ablation (BMXs) were performed in tibias of 8-week-old wild-type and parathyroid hormone-null (PTH(-/-)) mice and newly formed bone tissue was analyzed from 5 days to 3 weeks after BMX. At 1 week after BMX, trabecular bone volume, osteoblast numbers, alkaline phosphatase-positive areas, type I collagen-positive areas, PTH receptor-positive areas, calcium sensing receptor-positive areas, and expression of bone formation-related genes were all decreased significantly in the diaphyseal regions of bones of PTH(-/-) mice compared to wild-type mice. In contrast, by 2 weeks after BMX, all parameters related to osteoblastic bone accrual were increased significantly in PTH(-/-) mice. At 5 days after BMX, active tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts had appeared in wild-type mice but were undetectable in PTH(-/-) mice, Both the ratio of mRNA levels of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) and TRAP-positive osteoclast surface were still reduced in PTH(-/-) mice at 1 week but were increased by 2 weeks after BMX. The expression levels of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) at both mRNA and protein levels were upregulated significantly at 1 week and more dramatically at 2 weeks after BMX in PTH(-/-) mice. To determine whether the increased newly formed bones in PTH(-/-) mice at 2 weeks after BMX resulted from the compensatory action of PTHrP, PTH(-/-) PTHrP(+/-) mice were generated and newly formed bone tissue was compared in these mice with PTH(-/-) and wild-type mice at 2 weeks after BMX. All parameters related to osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption were reduced significantly in PTH(-/-) PTHrP(+/-) mice compared to PTH(-/-) mice. These results demonstrate that PTH deficiency itself impairs osteogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and osteoclastic bone resorption, whereas subsequent upregulation of PTHr

  18. Premenopausal serum sex hormone levels in relation to breast cancer risk, overall and by hormone receptor status - results from the EPIC cohort.

    PubMed

    Kaaks, Rudolf; Tikk, Kaja; Sookthai, Disorn; Schock, Helena; Johnson, Theron; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Dossus, Laure; Baglietto, Laura; Rinaldi, Sabina; Chajes, Veronique; Romieu, Isabelle; Boeing, Heiner; Schütze, Madlen; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Mattiello, Amalia; Buckland, Genevieve; Ramón Quirós, Jose; Sánchez, María-José; Amiano, Pilar; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Barricarte, Aurelio; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H; van Gils, Carla H; Peeters, Petra H; Andersson, Anne; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Key, Timothy J; Travis, Ruth C; Merritt, Melissa A; Gunter, Marc J; Riboli, Elio; Lukanova, Annekatrin

    2014-04-15

    Results from prospective studies on premenopausal serum hormone levels in relation to breast cancer risk have been inconclusive, especially with regard to tumor subtypes. Using a case-control study nested within the prospective European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort (801 breast cancer cases and 1,132 matched control subjects), we analyzed the relationships of prediagnostic serum estradiol, free estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, free testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels with the risk of breast cancer by estrogen and progesterone receptor-positive and -negative breast tumors and by age at diagnoses. Higher prediagnostic serum levels of testosterone and free testosterone were associated with an increased overall risk of breast cancer [ORQ4-Q1  = 1.56 (95% CI 1.15-2.13), ptrend  = 0.02 for testosterone and ORQ4-Q1  = 1.33 (95% CI 0.99-1.79), ptrend  = 0.04 for free testosterone], but no significant risk association was observed for estradiol, free estradiol, progesterone and SHBG. Tests for heterogeneity between receptor-positive and -negative tumors were not significant. When analysis were stratified by age at tumor diagnosis, the odds ratios observed for estradiol were stronger and borderline significant for breast cancer diagnosed at age less than 50 [ORQ4-Q1  = 1.32 (95% CI 0.87-2.01), ptrend  = 0.05] compared to breast cancer diagnosed at age 50 or above [ORQ4-Q1  = 0.94 (95% CI 0.60-1.47), ptrend  = 0.34, phet  = 0.04]. In conclusion, our data indicate that higher premenopausal circulating testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of developing breast cancer, but do not show a significant association of estradiol or progesterone with breast cancer risk, overall, by menstrual cycle phase or by tumor receptor status, although a possible risk increase with higher estradiol levels for tumors diagnosed before age 50 was seen. PMID:24155248

  19. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Wiersinga, W M

    2001-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement has been used for more than 100 years in the treatment of hypothyroidism, and there is no doubt about its overall efficacy. Desiccated thyroid contains both thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)); serum T(3) frequently rises to supranormal values in the absorption phase, associated with palpitations. Liothyronine (T(3)) has the same drawback and requires twice-daily administration in view of its short half-life. Synthetic levothyroxine (L-T(4)) has many advantages: in view of its long half-life, once-daily administration suffices, the occasional missing of a tablet causes no harm, and the extrathyroidal conversion of T(4) into T(3) (normally providing 80% of the daily T(3) production rate) remains fully operative, which may have some protective value during illness. Consequently, L-T(4) is nowadays preferred, and its long-term use is not associated with excess mortality. The mean T(4) dose required to normalize serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is 1.6 microg/kg per day, giving rise to serum free T(4) (fT(4)) concentrations that are slightly elevated or in the upper half of the normal reference range. The higher fT(4) values are probably due to the need to generate from T(4) the 20% of the daily T(3) production rate that otherwise is derived from the thyroid gland itself. The daily maintenance dose of T(4) varies widely between 75 and 250 microg. Assessment of the appropriate T(4) dose is by assay of TSH and fT(4), preferably in a blood sample taken before ingestion of the subsequent T(4) tablet. Dose adjustments can be necessary in pregnancy and when medications are used that are known to interfere with the absorption or metabolism of T(4). A new equilibrium is reached after approximately 6 weeks, implying that laboratory tests should not be done earlier. With a stable maintenance dose, an annual check-up usually suffices. Accumulated experience with L-T(4) replacement has identified some areas of concern. First, the

  20. Metabolomics Analysis of Hormone-Responsive and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cell Responses to Paclitaxel Identify Key Metabolic Differences.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Delisha A; Winnike, Jason H; McRitchie, Susan L; Clark, Robert F; Pathmasiri, Wimal W; Sumner, Susan J

    2016-09-01

    To date, no targeted therapies are available to treat triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), while other breast cancer subtypes are responsive to current therapeutic treatment. Metabolomics was conducted to reveal differences in two hormone receptor-negative TNBC cell lines and two hormone receptor-positive Luminal A cell lines. Studies were conducted in the presence and absence of paclitaxel (Taxol). TNBC cell lines had higher levels of amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, nucleotides, and nucleotide sugars and lower levels of proliferation-related metabolites like choline compared with Luminal A cell lines. In the presence of paclitaxel, each cell line showed unique metabolic responses, with some similarities by type. For example, in the Luminal A cell lines, levels of lactate and creatine decreased while certain choline metabolites and myo-inositol increased with paclitaxel. In the TNBC cell lines levels of glutamine, glutamate, and glutathione increased, whereas lysine, proline, and valine decreased in the presence of drug. Profiling secreted inflammatory cytokines in the conditioned media demonstrated a greater response to paclitaxel in the hormone-positive Luminal cells compared with a secretion profile that suggested greater drug resistance in the TNBC cells. The most significant differences distinguishing the cell types based on pathway enrichment analyses were related to amino acid, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism pathways, whereas several biological pathways were differentiated between the cell lines following treatment. PMID:27447733

  1. Mimicking postmenopausal steroid metabolism in breast cancer cell culture: Differences in response to DHEA or other steroids as hormone sources.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Lin, Sheng-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Following menopause virtually 100% of estrogens are synthesized in peripheral target tissues from precursor steroids of adrenal origin. These steroids are the unique source of sex steroids in these women. This positions some steroid metabolizing enzymes as primary targets for novel therapies for estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. However, previous research on the steroid-converting enzymes has been performed using their direct substrate as a hormone source, depending on the facility where studied and the robust signal obtained. These experiments may not always provide an accurate reflection of physiological and post-menopausal conditions. We suggest providing dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) as an intracrinological hormone source, and comparing the role of steroid-converting enzymes using DHEA and their direct substrates when an extensive mechanistic understanding is required. Here, we present a comparative study of these enzymes with the provision of DHEA and the direct substrates, estrone (E1) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT), or additional steroids as hormone sources, in breast cancer cells. Enzyme knockdown by respective specific siRNAs and observations on the resulting differences in biological function were carried out. Cell biology studies showed no difference in biological function for 17β-HSD1 and 17β-HSD7 when cultured with different steroid hormones: cell proliferation and estradiol levels decreased, whereas DHT accumulated; cyclinD1, PCNA, and pS2 were down-regulated after knocking down these two enzymes, although the quantitative results varied. However, culture medium supplementation was found to have a marked impact on the study of 3α-HSD3. We demonstrated that provision of different steroids as a substrate or hormone sources may promote modified biological effects: provision of DHEA is the preferred choice to mimic postmenopausal steroid metabolism in cell culture. PMID:26200948

  2. Growth hormone signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Carter-Su, Christin; Schwartz, Jessica; Argetsinger, Lawrence S

    2016-06-01

    Over 20years ago, our laboratory showed that growth hormone (GH) signals through the GH receptor-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. We showed that GH binding to its membrane-bound receptor enhances binding of JAK2 to the GHR, activates JAK2, and stimulates tyrosyl phosphorylation of both JAK2 and GHR. The activated JAK2/GHR complex recruits a variety of signaling proteins, thereby initiating multiple signaling pathways and cellular responses. These proteins and pathways include: 1) Stat transcription factors implicated in the expression of multiple genes, including the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 1; 2) Shc adapter proteins that lead to activation of the grb2-SOS-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1,2 pathway; 3) insulin receptor substrate proteins implicated in the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and Akt pathway; 4) signal regulatory protein α, a transmembrane scaffold protein that recruits proteins including the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2; and 5) SH2B1, a scaffold protein that can activate JAK2 and enhance GH regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Our recent work has focused on the function of SH2B1. We have shown that SH2B1β is recruited to and phosphorylated by JAK2 in response to GH. SH2B1 localizes to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and focal adhesions; it also cycles through the nucleus. SH2B1 regulates the actin cytoskeleton and promotes GH-dependent motility of RAW264.7 macrophages. Mutations in SH2B1 have been found in humans exhibiting severe early-onset childhood obesity and insulin resistance. These mutations impair SH2B1 enhancement of GH-induced macrophage motility. As SH2B1 is expressed ubiquitously and is also recruited to a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases, our results raise the possibility that effects of SH2B1 on the actin cytoskeleton in various cell types, including neurons, may play a role in regulating body weight. PMID:26421979

  3. The control of calcium metabolism by parathyroid hormone, calcitonin and vitamin D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potts, J. T., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in analysis of chemistry and physiology of parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, and Vitamin D are described along with development of techniques in radioassay methods. Emphasis is placed on assessment of normal and abnormal patterns of secretion of these hormones in specific relation to the physiological adaptations of weightlessness and space flight. Related diseases that involve perturbations in normal skeletal and calcium homeostasis are also considered.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of a 21-gene recurrence score assay versus Canadian clinical practice in women with early-stage estrogen- or progesterone-receptor-positive, axillary lymph-node negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay may inform adjuvant systematic treatment decisions in women with early stage breast cancer. We sought to investigate the cost effectiveness of using the RS-assay versus current clinical practice (CCP) in women with early-stage estrogen- or progesterone-receptor-positive, axilliary lymph-node negative breast cancer (ER+/ PR + LN- ESBC) from the perspective of the Canadian public healthcare system. Methods We developed a Markov model to project the lifetime clinical and economic consequences of ESBC. We evaluated adjuvant therapy separately in post- and pre-menopausal women with ER+/ PR + LN- ESBC. We assumed that the RS-assay would reclassify pre- and post-menopausal women among risk levels (low, intermediate and high) and guide adjuvant systematic treatment decisions. The model was parameterized using 7 year follow up data from the Manitoba Cancer Registry, cost data from Manitoba administrative databases, and secondary sources. Costs are presented in 2010 CAD. Future costs and benefits were discounted at 5%. Results The RS-assay compared to CCP generated cost-savings in pre-menopausal women and had an ICER of $60,000 per QALY gained in post-menopausal women. The cost effectiveness was most sensitive to the proportion of women classified as intermediate risk by the RS-assay who receive adjuvant chemotherapy and the risk of relapse in the RS-assay model. Conclusions The RS-assay is likely to be cost effective in the Canadian healthcare system and should be considered for adoption in women with ER+/ PR + LN- ESBC. However, ongoing assessment and validation of the assay in real-world clinical practice is warranted. PMID:23031196

  5. Changes over time in the impact of gene-expression profiles on the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in estrogen receptor positive early stage breast cancer patients: A nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Kuijer, A; Drukker, C A; Elias, S G; Smorenburg, C H; Th Rutgers, E J; Siesling, S; van Dalen, Th

    2016-08-15

    Ten years ago gene-expression profiles were introduced to aid adjuvant chemotherapy decision making in breast cancer. Since then subsequent national guidelines gradually expanded the indication area for adjuvant chemotherapy. In this nation-wide study the evolution of the proportion of patients with estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) tumors receiving adjuvant chemotherapy in relation to gene-expression profile use in patient groups that became newly eligible for chemotherapy according to national guideline changes over time is assessed. Data on all surgically treated early breast cancer patients diagnosed between 2004-2006 and 2012-2014 were obtained from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. ER+/Her2- patients with tumor-characteristics making them eligible for gene-expression testing in both cohorts and a discordant chemotherapy recommendation over time (2004 guideline not recommending and 2012 guideline recommending chemotherapy) were identified. We identified 3,864 patients eligible for gene-expression profile use during both periods. Gene-expression profiles were deployed in 5% and 35% of the patients in the respective periods. In both periods the majority of patients was assigned to a low genomic risk-profile (67% and 69%, respectively) and high adherence rates to the test result were observed (86% and 91%, respectively). Without deploying a gene-expression profile 8% and 52% (p <0.001) of the respective cohorts received chemotherapy while 21% and 28% of these patients received chemotherapy when a gene-expression profile was used (p 0.191). In conclusion, in ER+/Her2- early stage breast cancer patients gene-expression profile use was associated with a consistent proportion of patients receiving chemotherapy despite an adjusted guideline-based recommendation to administer chemotherapy. PMID:27062369

  6. Growth Hormone and Cerebral Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, S; Guarneri, F

    2016-08-01

    Great interest has recently been focused on a paper reporting characteristic deposits of amyloid-β protein associated with Alzheimer's disease in brains of adults who died of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. As they had contracted such disease after treatment with prion-contaminated human growth hormone extracted from cadaver-derived pituitaries, the authors have suggested that interhuman transmission of Alzheimer's disease had occurred. Our previous research led us to find that amyloid-forming peptides share amino acid sequence homology, summarized by a motif. Here, we probed the amino acid sequence of human growth hormone for such a motif, and found that 2 segments fit the motif and are potentially amyloid-forming. This finding was confirmed by Aggrescan, another well-known software for the prediction of amyloidogenic peptides. Our results, taken together with data from the literature that are missing in the aforementioned paper and associated commentaries, minimize the contagious nature of the iatrogenically-acquired coexistence of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Alzheimer's disease. In particular, the above mentioned paper misses literature data on intratumoral amyloidosis in growth hormone- and prolactin-secreting adenomas, tumors relatively frequent in adults, which are often silent. It cannot be excluded that some pituitaries used to extract growth hormone contained clinically silent microadenomas, a fraction of which containing amyloid deposits, and patients might had received a fraction of growth hormone (with or without prolactin) that already was an amyloid seed. The intrinsic amyloidogenicity of growth hormone, in the presence of contaminating prion protein (and perhaps prolactin as well) and amyloid-β contained in some cadavers' pituitaries, may have led to the observed co-occurring of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27214308

  7. Genetics of growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mullis, Primus E

    2007-03-01

    When a child is not following the normal, predicted growth curve, an evaluation for underlying illness and central nervous system abnormalities is required and appropriate consideration should be given to genetic defects causing growth hormone (GH) deficiency. This article focuses on the GH gene, the various gene alterations, and their possible impact on the pituitary gland. Transcription factors regulating pituitary gland development may cause multiple pituitary hormone deficiency but may present initially as GH deficiency. The role of two most important transcription factors, POU1F1 (Pit-1) and PROP 1, is discussed. PMID:17336732

  8. Iodine and thyroid hormones during pregnancy and postpartum.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Faustino R

    2007-07-01

    Iodine is a trace element essential for synthesis of the thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine and thyroxine. These hormones play a vital role in the early growth and development stages of most organs, especially the brain. The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared that, after famine, iodine deficiency is the most avoidable cause of cerebral lesions including different degrees of mental retardation and cerebral paralysis. The main function of iodine in vertebrates is to interact with the thyroid hormones. During pregnancy sufficient quantities of iodine are required to prevent the appearance of hypothyroidism, trophoblastic and embryonic or fetal disorders, neonatal and maternal hypothyroidism, and permanent sequelae in infants. Thyroid hormone receptors and iodothyronine deiodinases are present in placenta and central nervous tissue of the fetus. A number of environmental factors influence the epidemiology of thyroid disorders, and even relatively small abnormalities and differences in the level of iodine intake in a population have profound effects on the occurrence of thyroid abnormalities. The prevalence of disorders related to iodine deficit during pregnancy and postpartum has increased. Iodine supplementation is an effective measure in the case of pregnant and lactating women. However, it is not implemented and the problem is still present even in societies with theoretically advanced health systems. During pregnancy and postpartum, the WHO recommends iodine intake be increased to at least 200 microg/day. Side-effects provoked by iodine supplementation are rare during pregnancy at the recommended doses. PMID:17701774

  9. Hormone May Be Linked to Teenage Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159014.html Hormone May Be Linked to Teenage Obesity Researchers suspect ... may have lower levels of a weight-regulating hormone than normal-weight teens, a new study says. " ...

  10. Hormone May Be Linked to Teenage Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159014.html Hormone May Be Linked to Teenage Obesity Researchers suspect low levels of spexin might play ... reduced levels of this hormone in adults with obesity. Overall, our findings suggest spexin may play a ...

  11. Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003691.htm Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test To use the sharing features on ... page, please enable JavaScript. The parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTH-RP) test measures the level of a ...

  12. Combination Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Adding the drug everolimus (Afinitor®) to exemestane helped postmenopausal women whose advanced breast cancer had stopped responding to hormonal therapy live about 4 months longer without the disease progressing than women who received exemestane alone.

  13. Natural hormone therapy for menopause.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Khalid

    2010-02-01

    Menopausal women are deficient in estrogen, progesterone, and frequently in testosterone and DHEA. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the United States has generally consisted of one or two agents, typically equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone, with increased risk of heart attack, stroke, dementia, and breast cancer [WHI trials]. Bio-identical hormones [chemically endogenous hormones] have gained popularity and can be mixed according to physician's orders by compounding pharmacists in the United States. However, there is little published information about the use of such hormones. This paper reports a 12 plus months follow up on 189 patients who were administered natural estrogen plus progesterone with or without DHEA or testosterone according to a rationalized protocol described later. Ninety-seven percent of the patients experienced varying degrees of symptom control, whereas three had minimal or questionable benefit. Mental symptoms experienced upon presentation improved in 90% of the patients. Sixty percent of the patients, who had gained weight during menopause, lost an average of 14.8 lbs [SD 11.98 lbs]. Complications described with traditional HRT did not develop in this group of patients. These findings point out a need for larger controlled trials of similar protocols in the management of menopause. PMID:19995152

  14. Growth Hormone: Use and Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... than children of the same age), such as chronic kidney disease, Turner syndrome, and Prader-Willi syndrome In adults, GH is used to treat • Growth hormone deficiency • Muscle wasting (loss of muscle tissue) from HIV • Short bowel ...

  15. Thyroid Hormones as Renal Cell Cancer Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Matak, Damian; Bartnik, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary; Czarnecka, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that thyroid hormone is an important regulator of cancer development and metastasis. What is more, changes across the genome, as well as alternative splicing, may affect the activity of the thyroid hormone receptors. Mechanism of action of the thyroid hormone is different in every cancer; therefore in this review thyroid hormone and its receptor are presented as a regulator of renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27034829

  16. [Hormonal etiology in erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Jabaloyas, José María Martínez

    2010-10-01

    The proper function of erection mechanisms depend on correct interrelationship between psychological, vascular, neurological and hormonal factors. Endocrine diseases affect sexual function, and sexual dysfunction may be one of the symptoms of some hormonal anomalies. Diabetes mellitus is the endocrine disease most frequently causing erectile dysfunction due to the frequent vascular and neurological complications associated. It is important to determine blood glucose in the initial evaluation of a male with erectile dysfunction, as well as to try an adequate control of blood glucose levels to avoid worsening. Diabetic male erectile dysfunction is multifactorial, more severe and has worse response to oral treatment. Hyperprolactinemia causes disorders of the sexual sphere because it produces a descent of testosterone. In these cases, sexual symptoms are treated by correcting the levels of prolactin. Routine determination of prolactin is not clear and it seems it should be determined when testosterone levels are diminished. Thyroid hormone disorders (both hyper and hypotyroidism) are associated with erectile dysfunction, which will subside in half the patients with thyroid hormone normalization. The role of adrenal hormones in erectile function is not clear and their routine determination is not considered in the diagnostic evaluation of erectile dysfunction. The role of estradiol in the regulation of the erection mechanism is not well known either, although it is known that high levels may cause erectile dysfunction. Among endocrine-metabolic disorders we point out dyslipemias, with hypercholesterolemia as an important risk factor for erectile dysfunction and, though its correction may prevent vascular system deterioration, the role of statins in erectile dysfunction is not clear. PMID:20978293

  17. Hormones in international meat production: biological, sociological and consumer issues.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, Hugh

    2002-12-01

    proliferation in cells maintaining receptivity. Mathematical models describing quantitative relationships between consumption of small amounts of oestrogens in meat in addition to greater concentrations from endogenous production, chemical stoichiometry at cellular level and human pathology have not been developed. Such an approach will be necessary to establish 'molecular materiality' of the additional hormone intake as a component of relative risk assessment. The other hormones, although generally less well researched, are similarly subject to a range of tests to determine potentially adverse effects. The resulting limited international consensus relates to the application of the 'precautionary principle' and non-acceptance by the European Commission of the recommendations of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, which determined that meat from cattle, hormone-treated according to good practice, was safe for human consumers. The present review considers the hormone issue in the context of current international social methodology and regulation, recent advances in knowledge of biological activity of hormones and current status of science-based evaluation of food safety and risk for human consumers. PMID:19087409

  18. "Sex Hormones" in Secondary School Biology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehm, Ross H.; Young, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which the term "sex hormone" is used in science textbooks, and whether the use of the term "sex hormone" is associated with pre-empirical concepts of sex dualism, in particular the misconceptions that these so-called "sex hormones" are sex specific and restricted to sex-related physiological functioning. We found…

  19. The Ontogenesis of Human Fetal Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, S. L.; Grumbach, M. M.; Shepard, T. H.

    1972-01-01

    The content and concentration of immunoreactive growth hormone (GH) were measured in 117 human fetal pituitary glands from 68 days of gestation to term and in the pituitary glands of 20 children 1 month to 9 yr of age. Physicochemical and immunochemical properties of GH of fetal pituitary glands and GH from adult pituitary glands were indistinguishable by disc gel electrophoresis, immunoelectrophoresis, starch gel electrophoresis, and radioimmunoassay techniques. In the fetal pituitary gland, the GH content rose from mean levels of 0.44±0.2 μg at 10-14 wk of gestation, to 9.21±2.31 μg at 15-19 wk, to 59.38±11.08 μg at 20-24 wk, to 225.93±40.49 μg at 25-29 wk, to 577.67±90 μg at 30-34 wk, and to 675.17±112.33 μg at 35-40 wk. There was a significant positive correlation between growth hormone content of the pituitary and gestational age, crown-rump length, and the weight of the pituitary gland. The content and concentration (micrograms/milligram) of human growth hormone (HGH) in the fetal pituitary showed significant increments (P < 0.001) for each 4 wk period of gestation until 35 wk. Further increases in the HGH content were noted in pituitaries of children aged 1-9 yr (range of 832 to 11.211 μg). Immunoreactive GH was detected in fetal serum at a concentration of 14.5 ng/ml as early as 70 days gestation, the youngest fetus assayed. At 10-14 wk, the mean concentration of serum growth hormone was 65.2±7.6 ng/ml; at 15-19 wk 114.9±12.5 ng/ml; at 20-24 wk 119.3±19.8 ng/ml; at 25-29 wk 72.0±11.5 ng/ml; and 33.5±4.2 ng/ml at term. A significant negative correlation of serum growth hormone with advancing gestational age after 20-24 wk was observed (P < 0.001). In 17 fetuses paired serum and pituitary samples were assayed; no significant correlation between the concentration of serum GH and the pituitary content or concentration of GH was demonstrable. The serum concentration of chorionic somatomammotropin (HCS) in the fetus was unrelated to gestational

  20. Peripheral activities of growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Granata, R

    2016-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates GH synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition to its endocrine role, GHRH exerts a wide range of extrapituitary effects which include stimulation of cell proliferation, survival and differentiation, and inhibition of apoptosis. Accordingly, expression of GHRH, as well as the receptor GHRH-R and its splice variants, has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types. Among the direct peripheral activities, GHRH regulates pancreatic islet and β-cell survival and function and endometrial cell proliferation, promotes cardioprotection and wound healing, influences the immune and reproductive systems, reduces inflammation, indirectly increases lifespan and adiposity and acts on skeletal muscle cells to inhibit cell death and atrophy. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly clear that GHRH exerts important extrapituitary functions, suggesting potential therapeutic use of the peptide and its analogs in a wide range of medical settings. PMID:26891937

  1. Hormonal treatment of acne vulgaris: an update

    PubMed Central

    Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition associated with multiple factors. Although mostly presenting alone, it can likewise present with features of hyperandrogenism and hormonal discrepancies. Of note, hormonal therapies are indicated in severe, resistant-to-treatment cases and in those with monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are inappropriate. This article serves as an update to hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discusses the basics of endocrinal evaluation for patients with suspected hormonal acne, and provides an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women. PMID:27621661

  2. Insect hormones and their derivatives as insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, William S.

    1971-01-01

    The hormonal control of moulting, reproduction, and diapause in insects has little or no relationship to any similar phenomena in other animals, and the hormones involved in these processes are unlike any known hormones of vertebrates. The availability of pure chemicals with high biological activity has permitted an astonishing increase in research on insect hormones. At present, understanding of insect endocrinology is far too incomplete to justify much speculation about the possibility of using insect hormones as insecticides. However, the preliminary studies discussed in this paper give reason for hope, and the results justify further effort. PMID:4938025

  3. Parathyroid hormone - Secretion and metabolism in vivo.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habener, J. F.; Powell, D.; Murray, T. M.; Mayer, G. P.; Potts, J. T., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Gel filtration and radioimmunoassay were used to determine the molecular size and immunochemical reactivity of parathyroid hormone present in gland extracts, in the general peripheral circulation, and in parathyroid effluent blood from patients with hyperparathyroidism, as well as from calves and from cattle. It was found that parathyroid hormone secreted from the parathyroids in man and cattle is at least as large as the molecule extracted from normal bovine glands. However, once secreted into the circulation the hormone is cleaved, and one or more fragments, immunologically, dissimilar to the originally secreted hormone, constitute the dominant form of circulating immunoreactive hormone.

  4. Hormonal treatment of acne vulgaris: an update.

    PubMed

    Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition associated with multiple factors. Although mostly presenting alone, it can likewise present with features of hyperandrogenism and hormonal discrepancies. Of note, hormonal therapies are indicated in severe, resistant-to-treatment cases and in those with monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are inappropriate. This article serves as an update to hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discusses the basics of endocrinal evaluation for patients with suspected hormonal acne, and provides an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women. PMID:27621661

  5. Management of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Brandon; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2015-03-01

    In 2014, prostate cancer will affect roughly 15 % of American men during their lifetimes with about 230,000 new cases and 29,000 deaths per year. If required, most can be treated with curative surgery or radiotherapy. Upon relapse, androgen deprivation therapy (intermittent or continuous) is the cornerstone of treatment for hormone-sensitive disease. Response is variable and treatment is associated with a significant risk of toxicity. Recently, significant advances in survival have been demonstrated with chemohormonal therapy in men with high-volume disease. In addition, new findings have informed the approach to preventing bone complications in patients on therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Devising clinical prediction tools and biomarkers is needed to select patients most likely to benefit from certain therapies and allow for a personalized approach. PMID:25677237

  6. [Hormones and mammary tumors in the bitch: a review].

    PubMed

    Rutteman, G R

    1992-02-01

    Toxicity studies as well as epidemiological studies in veterinary medicine have shown that both ovarian steroids and a large number of synthetic derivatives may promote the formation of mammary tumours in dogs. Abnormalities in pituitary function, particularly in the secretion of growth hormones, have been assumed to be involved in this process. In the present paper the possible role of endogenous and exogenous hormones in the pathogenesis of mammary tumours in bitches is reviewed. The available evidence suggests that steroid hormones may act at an early stage in the development of tumours by stimulating the proliferation of normal epithelium. This results in an increase in the number of susceptible cells. In addition a growth-stimulating action may be exerted upon cells which have undergone partial malignant transformation, but possibly to a lesser extent upon fully malignant cells at a late stage of tumour development. In advanced mammary cancers steroid receptors are frequently absent, which may indicate a more autonomous pattern of growth. It seems justified to conclude that in clinical practice ovariectomy at an early age as a measure to prevent oestrus is to be preferred to progestin treatment with regard to the risk of mammary carcinoma. Still, there is no indication that in dogs, ovariectomy will reduce the risk of metastasis once the animal is presented with a mammary carcinoma. The earlier assumption that overproduction of growth hormone is an important factor in the pathogenesis of spontaneous mammary tumours in the dogs could not be proven. The role of prolactin and of thyroid hormones in this process continues to be uncertain. PMID:1736405

  7. The role of reproductive hormones in epithelial ovarian carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gharwan, Helen; Bunch, Kristen P; Annunziata, Christina M

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer comprises ∼85% of all ovarian cancer cases. Despite acceptance regarding the influence of reproductive hormones on ovarian cancer risk and considerable advances in the understanding of epithelial ovarian carcinogenesis on a molecular level, complete understanding of the biologic processes underlying malignant transformation of ovarian surface epithelium is lacking. Various hypotheses have been proposed over the past several decades to explain the etiology of the disease. The role of reproductive hormones in epithelial ovarian carcinogenesis remains a key topic of research. Primary questions in the field of ovarian cancer biology center on its developmental cell of origin, the positive and negative effects of each class of hormones on ovarian cancer initiation and progression, and the role of the immune system in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. The development of the female reproductive tract is dictated by the hormonal milieu during embryogenesis. Intensive research efforts have revealed that ovarian cancer is a heterogenous disease that may develop from multiple extra-ovarian tissues, including both Müllerian (fallopian tubes, endometrium) and non-Müllerian structures (gastrointestinal tissue), contributing to its heterogeneity and distinct histologic subtypes. The mechanism underlying ovarian localization, however, remains unclear. Here, we discuss the role of reproductive hormones in influencing the immune system and tipping the balance against or in favor of developing ovarian cancer. We comment on animal models that are critical for experimentally validating existing hypotheses in key areas of endocrine research and useful for preclinical drug development. Finally, we address emerging therapeutic trends directed against ovarian cancer. PMID:26373571

  8. Progestogens in menopausal hormone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Woroń, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Progestogens share one common effect: the ability to convert proliferative endometrium to its secretory form. In contrast, their biological activity is varied, depending on the chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, receptor affinity and different potency of action. Progestogens are widely used in the treatment of menstrual cycle disturbances, various gynaecological conditions, contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. The administration of progestogen in menopausal hormone therapy is essential in women with an intact uterus to protect against endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. Progestogen selection should be based on the characteristics available for each progestogen type, relying on the assessment of relative potency of action in experimental models and animal models, and on the indirect knowledge brought by studies of the clinical use of different progestogen formulations. The choice of progestogen should involve the conscious use of knowledge of its benefits, with a focus on minimizing potential side effects. Unfortunately, there are no direct clinical studies comparing the metabolic effects of different progestogens. PMID:26327902

  9. Long-acting hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Gabelnick, Henry; Brosens, Ivo

    2015-11-01

    Today, a new category of fertility-regulating agents has been created: long-acting, reversible hormonal contraceptives; they minimize compliance, while maximize effectiveness. They comprise subdermal implants and intrauterine devices. Other long-acting agents exist, such as Depo Provera and Noristerat. Use of Depo Provera and Noristerat carries great effectiveness, good clinical safety and usefulness in developing countries. They cause no significant increase in breast cancer risk, but they may carry an increased risk of HIV. Subcutaneous delivery systems have two common features: prolongation of effect is obtained by a drug reservoir and for most of their duration of action they provide a continuous, sustained release of the active hormone. Finally, the intrauterine system Mirena represents both a very effective contraceptive and a specific treatment for menorrhagia. PMID:26626534

  10. A Simulated Growth Hormone Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Mary

    1996-08-01

    Growth hormone is a drug that is sometimes abused by amateur or professional athletes for performance-enhancement. This laboratory is a semimicroscale simulation analysis of a sample of "urine" to detect proteins of two very different molecular weights. Gel filtration uses a 10 mL disposable pipette packed with Sephadex. Students analyze the fractions from the filtration by comparing colors of the Brilliant Blue Coomassie Dye as it interacts with the proteins in the sample to a standard set of known concentration of protein with the dye. The simulated analysis of growth hormone is intended to be included in a unit on organic chemistry or in the second year of high school chemistry.

  11. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy. PMID:24007251

  12. Effects of microgravity on growth hormone concentration and distribution in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Aga; Jensen, Philip; Desrosiers, Mark; Bandurski, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    On earth, gravity affects the distribution of the plant growth hormone, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), in a manner such that the plant grows into a normal vertical orientation (shoots up, roots down). How the plant controls the amount and distribution of IAA is only partially understood and is currently under investigation in this laboratory. The question to be answered in the flight experiment concerns the effect of gravity on the concentration, turn over, and distribution of the growth hormone. The answer to this question will aid in understanding the mechanism by which plants control the amount and distribution of growth hormone. Such knowledge of a plant's hormonal metabolism may aid in the growth of plants in space and will lead to agronomic advances.

  13. Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, J.; Smith, S.M.; Aung, K.; Dyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a well-recognized cause of impaired cognition due to hypercalcemia. However, recent studies have suggested that perhaps parathyroid hormone itself plays a role in cognition, especially executive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of parathyroid hormone levels in a study cohort of elders with impaied cognition. Methods: Sixty community-living adults, 65 years of age and older, reported to Adult Protective Services for self-neglect and 55 controls matched (on age, ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status) consented and participated in this study. The research team conducted in-home comprehensive geriatric assessments which included the Mini-mental state exam (MMSE), the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS) , the Wolf-Klein clock test and a comprehensive nutritional panel, which included parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium. Students t tests and linear regression analyses were performed to assess for bivariate associations. Results: Self-neglecters (M = 73.73, sd=48.4) had significantly higher PTH levels compared to controls (M =47.59, sd=28.7; t=3.59, df=98.94, p<.01). There was no significant group difference in ionized calcium levels. Overall, PTH was correlated with the MMSE (r=-.323, p=.001). Individual regression analyses revealed a statistically significant correlation between PTH and MMSE in the self-neglect group (r=-.298, p=.024) and this remained significant after controlling for ionized calcium levels in the regression. No significant associations were revealed in the control group or among any of the other cognitive measures. Conclusion: Parathyroid hormone may be associated with cognitive performance.

  14. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5′-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  15. Inflammation and sex hormone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin; Naumann, Heidrun; Weidler, Claudia; Schellenberg, Martina; Anders, Sven; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-06-01

    The incidence of autoimmune diseases is higher in females than in males. In both sexes, adrenal hormones, that is, glucocorticoids, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and androgens, are inadequately low in patients when compared to healthy controls. Hormonally active androgens are anti-inflammatory, whereas estrogens are pro-inflammatory. Therefore, the mechanisms responsible for the alterations of steroid profiles in inflammation are of major interest. The local metabolism of androgens and estrogens may determine whether a given steroid profile found in a subject's blood results in suppression or promotion of inflammation. The steroid metabolism in mixed synovial cells, fibroblasts, macrophages, and monocytes was assessed. Major focus was on cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), while cells from patients with osteoarthritis served as controls. Enzymes directly or indirectly involved in local sex steroid metabolism in RA are: DHEA-sulfatase, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase (CYP19), which are required for the synthesis of sex steroids from precursors, 5alpha-reductase and 16alpha-hydroxylase, which can be involved either in the generation of more active steroids or in the pathways leading to depletion of active hormones, and 3alpha-reductase and 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7B), which unidirectionally are involved in the depletion of active hormones. Androgens inhibit aromatization in synovial cells when their concentration is sufficiently high. As large amounts of estrogens are formed in synovial tissue, there may be a relative lack of androgens. Production of 5alpha-reduced androgens should increase the local anti-inflammatory activity; however, it also opens a pathway for the inactivation of androgens. The data discussed here suggest that therapy of RA patients may benefit from the use of nonaromatizable androgens and/or the use of aromatase inhibitors. PMID:16855150

  16. Premenstrual changes. Impaired hormonal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Halbreich, U; Alt, I H; Paul, L

    1988-03-01

    Premenstrual changes (PMCs) in mood and behavior are very prevalent. Nonetheless, their pathophysiology is still obscure and no proven treatment is yet available. Evaluation of the plethora of available data leads to the suggestion that PMCs may result from a temporary impairment of homeostasis among a multitude of systems. This impairment is triggered by a differential pace and magnitude of change-over-time in levels of several hormones and other substances during the luteal phase. PMID:3288473

  17. Luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone synergy: A review of role in controlled ovarian hyper-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Gottumukkala Achyuta Rama; Chavan, Rahul; Deenadayal, Mamata; Gunasheela, Devika; Gutgutia, Rohit; Haripriya, Geetha; Govindarajan, Mirudhubashini; Patel, Nayana Hitesh; Patki, Ameet Shashikant

    2013-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) in synergy with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulates normal follicular growth and ovulation. FSH is frequently used in assisted reproductive technology (ART). Recent studies have facilitated better understanding on the complementary role of the LH to FSH in regulation of the follicle; however, role of LH in stimulation of follicle, optimal dosage of LH in stimulation and its importance in advanced aged patients has been a topic of discussion among medical fraternity. Though the administration of exogenous LH with FSH is obligatory for controlled ovarian stimulation in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, there is still a paucity of information of its usage in other patient population. In this review we looked in to the multiple roles that LH plays complementary to FSH to better understand the LH requirement in patients undergoing ART. PMID:24672160

  18. Sex Hormones and Macronutrient Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Comitato, Raffaella; Saba, Anna; Turrini, Aida; Arganini, Claudia; Virgili, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The biological differences between males and females are determined by a different set of genes and by a different reactivity to environmental stimuli, including the diet, in general. These differences are further emphasized and driven by the exposure to a different hormone flux throughout the life. These differences have not been taken into appropriate consideration by the scientific community. Nutritional sciences are not immune from this “bias” and when nutritional needs are concerned, females are considered only when pregnant, lactating or when their hormonal profile is returning back to “normal,” i.e., to the male-like profile. The authors highlight some of the most evident differences in aspects of biology that are associated with nutrition. This review presents and describes available data addressing differences and similarities of the “reference man” vs. the “reference woman” in term of metabolic activity and nutritional needs. According to this assumption, available evidences of sex-associated differences of specific biochemical pathways involved in substrate metabolism are reported and discussed. The modulation by sexual hormones affecting glucose, amino acid and protein metabolism and the metabolization of nutritional fats and the distribution of fat depots, is considered targeting a tentative starting up background for a gender concerned nutritional science. PMID:24915409

  19. Genetic construction, expression, and melanoma-selective cytotoxicity of a diphtheria toxin-related alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J R; Bishai, W; Borowski, M; Miyanohara, A; Boyd, J; Nagle, S

    1986-01-01

    The structural gene for diphtheria toxin, tox, has been modified at its Sph I site by the introduction of an oligonucleotide linker encoding a unique Pst I restriction endonuclease site and a synthetic oligonucleotide encoding alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH). The resulting fusion gene directs the expression of a diphtheria toxin-related alpha-MSH hybrid protein in which the diphtheria toxin receptor-binding domain has been replaced with alpha-MSH sequences. The chimeric toxin has been partially purified from periplasmic extracts of recombinant Escherichia coli K-12 and has been found to be selectively toxic for alpha-MSH receptor-positive human malignant melanoma NEL-M1 cells in vitro. Images PMID:3095831

  20. Interactions of growth hormone secretagogues and growth hormone-releasing hormone/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Bowers, C Y

    2001-02-01

    The class of novel synthetic compounds termed growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) act in the hypothalamus through, as yet, unknown pathways. We performed physiologic and histochemical studies to further understand how the GHS system interacts with the well-established somatostatin (SRIF)/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neuroendocrine system for regulating pulsatile GH secretion. Comparison of the GH-releasing activities of the hexapeptide growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH administered intravenously to conscious adult male rats showed that the pattern of GH responsiveness to GHRP-6 was markedly time-dependent, similar to that observed with GHRH. Immunoneutralization of endogenous SRIF reversed the blunted GH response to GHRP-6 at trough times, suggesting that GHRP-6 neither disrupts nor inhibits the cyclical release of endogenous hypothalamic SRIF. By striking contrast, passive immunization with anti-GHRH serum virtually obliterated the GH responses to GHRP-6, irrespective of the time of administration. These findings suggest that the GHSs do not act by altering SRIF release but, rather, stimulate GH release via GHRH-dependent pathways. Our dual chromogenic and autoradiographic in situ hybridization experiments revealed that a subpopulation of GHRH mRNA-containing neurons in the arcuate (Arc) nucleus and ventromedial nucleus (VMN) of the hypothalamus expressed the GHS receptor (GHS-R) gene. These results provide strong anatomic evidence that GHSs may directly stimulate GHRH release into hypophyseal portal blood, and thereby influence GH secretion, through interaction with the GHS-R on GHRH- containing neurons. Altogether, these findings support the notion that an additional neuroendocrine pathway may exist to regulate pulsatile GH secretion, possibly through the influence of the newly discovered GHS natural peptide, ghrelin. PMID:11322498

  1. Highly sensitive simultaneous quantification of estrogenic tamoxifen metabolites and steroid hormones by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Johänning, Janina; Heinkele, Georg; Precht, Jana C; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eichelbaum, Michel; Schwab, Matthias; Schroth, Werner; Mürdter, Thomas E

    2015-09-01

    Tamoxifen is a mainstay in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and is metabolized to more than 30 different compounds. Little is known about in vivo concentrations of estrogenic metabolites E-metabolite E, Z-metabolite E, and bisphenol and their relevance for tamoxifen efficacy. Therefore, we developed a highly sensitive HPLC-ESI-MS/MS quantification method for tamoxifen metabolites bisphenol, E-metabolite E, and Z-metabolite E as well as for the sex steroid hormones estradiol, estrone, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone. Plasma samples were subjected to protein precipitation followed by solid phase extraction. Upon derivatization with 3-[(N-succinimide-1-yl)oxycarbonyl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide, all analytes were separated on a sub-2-μm column with a gradient of acetonitrile in water with 0.1 % of formic acid. Analytes were detected on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer with positive electrospray ionization in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. Our method demonstrated high sensitivity, accuracy, and precision. The lower limits of quantification were 12, 8, and 25 pM for bisphenol, E-metabolite E, and Z-metabolite E, respectively, and 4 pM for estradiol and estrogen, 50 pM for testosterone and androstenedione, and 25 pM for progesterone. The method was applied to plasma samples of postmenopausal patients taken at baseline and under tamoxifen therapy. Graphical Abstract Sample preparation and derivatization for highly sensitive quantification of estrogenic tamoxifen metabolites and steroid hormones by HPLC-MS/MS. PMID:26206706

  2. Altered radiation responses of breast cancer cells resistant to hormonal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luzhna, Lidiya; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine therapy agents (the selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulators such as tamoxifen or the selective ER down-regulators such as ICI 182,780) are key treatment regimens for hormone receptor-positive breast cancers. While these drugs are very effective in controlling ER-positive breast cancer, many tumors that initially respond well to treatment often acquire drug resistance, which is a major clinical problem. In clinical practice, hormonal therapy agents are commonly used in combination or sequence with radiation therapy. Tamoxifen treatment and radiotherapy improve both local tumor control and patient survival. However, tamoxifen treatment may render cancer cells less responsive to radiation therapy. Only a handful of data exist on the effects of radiation on cells resistant to hormonal therapy agents. These scarce data show that cells that were resistant to tamoxifen were also resistant to radiation. Yet, the existence and mechanisms of cross-resistance to endocrine therapy and radiation therapy need to be established. Here, we for the first time examined and compared radiation responses of MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7/S0.5) and two antiestrogen resistant cell lines derived from MCF-7/S0.5: the tamoxifen resistant MCF-7/TAMR-1 and ICI 182,780 resistant MCF-7/182R-6 cell lines. Specifically, we analyzed the radiation-induced changes in the expression of genes involved in DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle regulation. We found that the tamoxifen-resistant cell line in contrast to the parental and ICI 182,780-resistant cell lines displayed a significantly less radiation-induced decrease in the expression of genes involved in DNA repair. Furthermore, we show that MCF-7/TAMR-1 and MCF-7/182R-6 cells were less susceptible to radiation-induced apoptosis as compared to the parental line. These data indicate that tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells have a reduced sensitivity to radiation treatment. The current study may therefore serve as a

  3. In experimental chronic kidney disease or cancer, parathyroid hormone is a novel mediator of cachexia.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Christina M; Mitch, William E

    2016-05-01

    Hyperparathyroidism plays a central role in the disordered bone mineral metabolism of chronic kidney disease, and has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in that setting. A recent study suggests a novel role for parathyroid hormone and its receptor in muscle wasting and cachexia occurring in advanced chronic kidney disease. PMID:27083271

  4. Sex and gonadal hormones in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease: what is relevant to the human condition?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Biologic sex and gonadal hormones matter in human aging and diseases of aging such as Alzheimer’s – and the importance of studying their influences relates directly to human health. The goal of this article is to review the literature to date on sex and hormones in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with an exclusive focus on interpreting the relevance of findings to the human condition. To this end, we highlight advances in AD and in sex and hormone biology, discuss what these advances mean for merging the two fields, review the current mouse model literature, raise major unresolved questions, and offer a research framework that incorporates human reproductive aging for future studies aimed at translational discoveries in this important area. Unraveling human relevant pathways in sex and hormone-based biology may ultimately pave the way to novel and urgently needed treatments for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23126652

  5. Sex steroids and growth hormone interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; de Mirecki-Garrido, Mercedes; Guerra, Borja; Díaz, Mario; Díaz-Chico, Juan Carlos

    2016-04-01

    GH and sex hormones are critical regulators of body growth and composition, somatic development, intermediate metabolism, and sexual dimorphism. Deficiencies in GH- or sex hormone-dependent signaling and the influence of sex hormones on GH biology may have a dramatic impact on liver physiology during somatic development and in adulthood. Effects of sex hormones on the liver may be direct, through hepatic receptors, or indirect by modulating endocrine, metabolic, and gender-differentiated functions of GH. Sex hormones can modulate GH actions by acting centrally, regulating pituitary GH secretion, and peripherally, by modulating GH signaling pathways. The endocrine and/or metabolic consequences of long-term exposure to sex hormone-related compounds and their influence on the GH-liver axis are largely unknown. A better understanding of these interactions in physiological and pathological states will contribute to preserve health and to improve clinical management of patients with growth, developmental, and metabolic disorders. PMID:26775014

  6. Thyroid hormone resistance and its management

    PubMed Central

    Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    The syndrome of impaired sensitivity to thyroid hormone, also known as syndrome of thyroid hormone resistance, is an inherited condition that occurs in 1 of 40,000 live births characterized by a reduced responsiveness of target tissues to thyroid hormone due to mutations on the thyroid hormone receptor. Patients can present with symptoms of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. They usually have elevated thyroid hormones and a normal or elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone level. Due to their nonspecific symptomatic presentation, these patients can be misdiagnosed if the primary care physician is not familiar with the condition. This can result in frustration for the patient and sometimes unnecessary invasive treatment such as radioactive iodine ablation, as in the case presented herein. PMID:27034574

  7. [The cervix and hormonal contraception].

    PubMed

    Gorins, A

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews the histological effects of hormonal contraceptives on the cervix and assesses statistical studies examining the relationship between oral contraceptive (OC) usage and cancerous lesions of the cervix. The cervix acquires a pseudopregnant appearance under the influence of combined OCs. The Malpighian epithelium acquires a richly vascularized stroma characterized by accelerated maturation and the endocervical ectropion may be swollen, frequently with epidermoid metaplasia. Such changes increase with the duration of hormonal contraception and are more pronounced with combined than with sequential OCs. Among pathological changes that may occur are active adenomatous hyperplasia and epithelial abnormalities including dysplasia involving dyscaryotic cells with regular nuclei and no mitotic abnormality. Epithelial anomalies may present various histocytological features and are sometimes difficult to interpret. Epidemiologic study of the cervix is difficult because of the number of parameters to be considered: age at 1st intercourse, frequency of intercourse, number of partners, the formulation of the OC, and the variable duration of use which may have been interrupted by use of another method such as the IUD. Statistical studies have yielded contradictory results, with the earliest reports showing a higher incidence of dysplasia among women using OCs and most later studies showing a possible increased incidence of moderate dysplasia but no increased incidence of carcinoma in situ or invasive carcinoma. The recent study by Vessey et al. which compared 6838 parous OC users with 3154 parous IUD users over 10 years revealed invasive cancer in 13 women all of whom used OCs, with carcinomas in situ and dysplasias also more frequent in women using OCs. The duration of use was found to be a significant factor. Age and dates of marriage and 1st pregnancy were similar in subjects and controls, but no data were provided on age at 1st intercourse or number of

  8. Aluminum, parathyroid hormone, and osteomalacia

    SciTech Connect

    Burnatowska-Hledin, M.A.; Kaiser, L.; Mayor, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Aluminum exposure in man is unavoidable. The occurrence of dialysis dementia, vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia, and hypochromic microcytic anemia in dialysis patients underscores the potential for aluminum toxicity. Although exposure via dialysate and hyperalimentation leads to significant tissue aluminum accumulation, the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum and the severe pathology associated with large aluminum burdens suggest that smaller exposures via the gastrointestinal tract and lungs could represent an important, though largely unrecognized, public health problem. It is clear that some aluminum absorption occurs with the ingestion of small amounts of aluminum in the diet and medicines, and even greater aluminum absorption is seen in individuals consuming large amounts of aluminum present in antacids. Aluminum absorption is enhanced in the presence of elevated circulating parathyroid hormone. In addition, elevated PTH leads to the preferential deposition of aluminum in brain and bone. Consequently, PTH is likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of toxicities in those organs. PTH excess also seems to lead to the deposition of aluminum in the parathyroid gland. The in vitro demonstration that aluminum inhibits parathyroid hormone release is consistent with the findings of a euparathyroid state in dialysis patients with aluminum related vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia. Nevertheless, it seems likely that hyperparathyroidism is at least initially involved in the pathogenesis of aluminum neurotoxicity and osteomalacia; the increases in tissue aluminum stores are followed by suppression of parathyroid hormone release, which is required for the evolution of osteomalacia. Impaired renal function is not a prerequisite for increased tissue aluminum burdens, nor for aluminum-related organ toxicity. Consequently, it is likely that these diseases will be observed in populations other than those with chronic renal disease.

  9. Simultaneous radioimmunoassay for luteinizing hormone and prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, M.K.; Deschepper, C.F.

    1985-05-01

    A combined radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the measurement of the anterior pituitary proteins luteinizing hormone (LH) and prolactin (PRL) is described and compared with individual RIAs for these hormones. The standard curves and the sample values for LH and PRL were identical when determined in a combined or in an individual RIA. This technique may prove useful to a number of laboratories where it is desirable to determine levels of more than one hormone in limited sample volumes.

  10. Leptin and Hormones: Energy Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, Georgios A; Paschou, Stavroula A; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2016-09-01

    Leptin, a 167 amino acid adipokine, plays a major role in human energy homeostasis. Its actions are mediated through binding to leptin receptor and activating JAK-STAT3 signal transduction pathway. It is expressed mainly in adipocytes, and its circulating levels reflect the body's energy stores in adipose tissue. Recombinant methionyl human leptin has been FDA approved for patients with generalized non-HIV lipodystrophy and for compassionate use in subjects with congenital leptin deficiency. The purpose of this review is to outline the role of leptin in energy homeostasis, as well as its interaction with other hormones. PMID:27519135

  11. SWOG S0800 (NCI CDR0000636131): addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant nab-paclitaxel with dose-dense doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide improves pathologic complete response (pCR) rates in inflammatory or locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nahleh, Z A; Barlow, W E; Hayes, D F; Schott, A F; Gralow, J R; Sikov, W M; Perez, E A; Chennuru, S; Mirshahidi, H R; Corso, S W; Lew, D L; Pusztai, L; Livingston, R B; Hortobagyi, G N

    2016-08-01

    SWOG S0800, a randomized open-label Phase II clinical trial, compared the combination of weekly nab-paclitaxel and bevacizumab followed by dose-dense doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC) with nab-paclitaxel followed or preceded by AC as neoadjuvant treatment for HER2-negative locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) or inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). Patients were randomly allocated (2:1:1) to three neoadjuvant chemotherapy arms: (1) nab-paclitaxel with concurrent bevacizumab followed by AC; (2) nab-paclitaxel followed by AC; or (3) AC followed by nab-paclitaxel. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) with stratification by disease type (non-IBC LABC vs. IBC) and hormone receptor status (positive vs. negative). Overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and toxicity were secondary endpoints. Analyses were intent-to-treat comparing bevacizumab to the combined control arms. A total of 215 patients were accrued including 11 % with IBC and 32 % with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). The addition of bevacizumab significantly increased the pCR rate overall (36 vs. 21 %; p = 0.019) and in TNBC (59 vs. 29 %; p = 0.014), but not in hormone receptor-positive disease (24 vs. 18 %; p = 0.41). Sequence of administration of nab-paclitaxel and AC did not affect the pCR rate. While no significant differences in OS or EFS were seen, a trend favored the addition of bevacizumab for EFS (p = 0.06) in TNBC. Overall, Grade 3-4 adverse events did not differ substantially by treatment arm. The addition of bevacizumab to nab-paclitaxel prior to dose-dense AC neoadjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved the pCR rate compared to chemotherapy alone in patients with triple-negative LABC/IBC and was accompanied by a trend for improved EFS. This suggests reconsideration of the role of bevacizumab in high-risk triple-negative locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:27393622

  12. Growth Hormone and Craniofacial Tissues. An update

    PubMed Central

    Litsas, George

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone is an important regulator of bone homeostasis. In childhood, it determines the longitudinal bone growth, skeletal maturation, and acquisition of bone mass. In adulthood, it is necessary to maintain bone mass throughout life. Although an association between craniofacial and somatic development has been clearly established, craniofacial growth involves complex interactions of genes, hormones and environment. Moreover, as an anabolic hormone seems to have an important role in the regulation of bone remodeling, muscle enhancement and tooth development. In this paper the influence of growth hormone on oral tissues is reviewed. PMID:25674165

  13. Restoration of hormonal action and muscle protein.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Arny A; Wolfe, Robert R

    2007-09-01

    This review focuses on the effects of restoring hormonal levels and/or influence on muscle protein metabolism in the stressed state. We have highlighted our clinical experience in the administration of anabolic and anticatabolic agents in stressed clinical populations, primarily adult and pediatric burn injury, as well as patients undergoing elective hip arthroplasty. Our previous experience entails the administration of anabolic hormones, such as testosterone and its derivatives, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 combined with its binding protein 3, and insulin. Current efforts focus on the administration of anticatabolic agents to reduce the effects of hypercortisolemia. Muscle protein metabolism was determined by stable isotope methodology. Our results indicate that normalization of anabolic hormone concentrations or amelioration of hormonal resistance restores the effects of feeding on skeletal muscle protein metabolism. Anabolic hormone administration results in a more favorable muscle protein balance in severely burned patients. Amelioration of hypercortisolemia in the stressed state leads to an improvement in protein kinetics. To summarize, alterations in hormonal influence that accompany stress states favor the loss of muscle protein. Restoration or normalization of hormonal influence improves muscle protein kinetics and ameliorates the loss of muscle nitrogen. To restore hormonal influence, clinicians should consider reestablishing anabolic stimuli and reducing catabolic stimuli. PMID:17713420

  14. Determinants of Growth Hormone Resistance in Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    States of under-nutrition are characterized by growth hormone resistance. Decreased total energy intake, as well as isolated protein-calorie malnutrition and isolated nutrient deficiencies result in elevated growth hormone levels and low levels of IGF-I. We review various states of malnutrition and a disease state characterized by chronic under-nutrition -- anorexia nervosa -- and discuss possible mechanisms contributing to the state of growth hormone resistance, including FGF-21 and SIRT1. We conclude by examining the hypothesis that growth hormone resistance is an adaptive response to states of under-nutrition, in order to maintain euglycemia and preserve energy. PMID:24363451

  15. Natriuretic Hormones in Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Hodes, Anastasia; Lichtstein, David

    2014-01-01

    Natriuretic hormones (NH) include three groups of compounds: the natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), the gastrointestinal peptides (guanylin and uroguanylin), and endogenous cardiac steroids. These substances induce the kidney to excrete sodium and therefore participate in the regulation of sodium and water homeostasis, blood volume, and blood pressure (BP). In addition to their peripheral functions, these hormones act as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in the brain. In this review, the established information on the biosynthesis, release and function of NH is discussed, with particular focus on their role in brain function. The available literature on the expression patterns of each of the NH and their receptors in the brain is summarized, followed by the evidence for their roles in modulating brain function. Although numerous open questions exist regarding this issue, the available data support the notion that NH participate in the central regulation of BP, neuroprotection, satiety, and various psychiatric conditions, including anxiety, addiction, and depressive disorders. In addition, the interactions between the different NH in the periphery and the brain are discussed. PMID:25506340

  16. Hormonal mechanisms of cooperative behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Marta C.; Bshary, Redouan; Fusani, Leonida; Goymann, Wolfgang; Hau, Michaela; Hirschenhauser, Katharina; Oliveira, Rui F.

    2010-01-01

    Research on the diversity, evolution and stability of cooperative behaviour has generated a considerable body of work. As concepts simplify the real world, theoretical solutions are typically also simple. Real behaviour, in contrast, is often much more diverse. Such diversity, which is increasingly acknowledged to help in stabilizing cooperative outcomes, warrants detailed research about the proximate mechanisms underlying decision-making. Our aim here is to focus on the potential role of neuroendocrine mechanisms on the regulation of the expression of cooperative behaviour in vertebrates. We first provide a brief introduction into the neuroendocrine basis of social behaviour. We then evaluate how hormones may influence known cognitive modules that are involved in decision-making processes that may lead to cooperative behaviour. Based on this evaluation, we will discuss specific examples of how hormones may contribute to the variability of cooperative behaviour at three different levels: (i) within an individual; (ii) between individuals and (iii) between species. We hope that these ideas spur increased research on the behavioural endocrinology of cooperation. PMID:20679116

  17. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and cognition.

    PubMed

    McCarrey, Anna C; Resnick, Susan M

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". Prior to the publication of findings from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) in 2002, estrogen-containing hormone therapy (HT) was used to prevent age-related disease, especially cardiovascular disease, and to treat menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes and sleep disruptions. Some observational studies of HT in midlife and aging women suggested that HT might also benefit cognitive function, but randomized clinical trials have produced mixed findings in terms of health and cognitive outcomes. This review focuses on hormone effects on cognition and risk for dementia in naturally menopausal women as well as surgically induced menopause, and highlights findings from the large-scale WHI Memory Study (WHIMS) which, contrary to expectation, showed increased dementia risk and poorer cognitive outcomes in older postmenopausal women randomized to HT versus placebo. We consider the 'critical window hypothesis', which suggests that a window of opportunity may exist shortly after menopause during which estrogen treatments are most effective. In addition, we highlight emerging evidence that potential adverse effects of HT on cognition are most pronounced in women who have other health risks, such as lower global cognition or diabetes. Lastly, we point towards implications for future research and clinical treatments. PMID:25935728

  18. Tissue thyroid hormones and thyronamines.

    PubMed

    Accorroni, Alice; Saponaro, Federica; Zucchi, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    It has been known for a long time that changes in cardiac function are a major component of the clinical presentation of thyroid disease. Increased heart rate and hyperdynamic circulation are hallmarks of hyperthyroidism, while bradycardia and decreased contractility characterize hypothyroidism. Recent findings have provided novel insights in the physiology and pathophysiology of heart regulation by thyroid hormones. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge on thyroxine (T4) transport and metabolism and on the biochemical pathways leading to genomic and non-genomic effects produced by 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) and by its active metabolites, particularly 3,5-diiodothyronine (T2) and 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM). On this basis, specific issues of special interest for cardiology are discussed, namely (1) relevance of the regulation of proteins involved in the control of calcium homeostasis and in pacemaker cell activity, due to non-genomic as well as to classical genomic effects; (2) stimulation of fatty acid oxidation by T2 and T1AM, the latter also causing a negative inotropic and chronotropic action at micromolar concentrations; (3) induction of D3 deiodinase in heart failure, potentially causing selective cardiac hypothyroidism, whose clinical implications are still controversial; and (4) cardioprotective effect of T1AM, possibly occurring at physiological concentrations, and relevance of T3 and of thyroid hormone receptor α1 in post-infarction repair. PMID:27115768

  19. The influence of photoperiod on gonadotrophin-releasing hormone stimulated luteinising hormone release in the anoestrous mare.

    PubMed

    Nequin, L G; King, S S; Matt, K S; Jurak, R C

    1990-09-01

    The transition from anoestrus to oestrus in mares is controlled by photoperiod. The present study examined whether additional daylength would accelerate the mares' response to gonadotrophin-releasing-hormone (GnRH). Nine anoestrous mares were placed under ambient or artificial long lighting on 7th January. The four month experimental period was divided into a three-day sequence which was repeated at 21 day intervals. Ovaries were palpated rectally on Day 1; saline was injected (1 ml intravenously [iv]) on Day 2; GnRH was administered (0.59 microgram/kg bodyweight iv) on Day 3. Blood was taken at -60, 0, 15, 30, 60 and 120 mins relative to saline or GnRH treatment. Serum luteinising hormone (LH) was determined by a homologous equine radioimmunoassay (RIA). Several criteria were employed to define a positive response to GnRH and the results were analysed by Fisher's exact probability test. Treatment with artificial light allowed a response to GnRH within six weeks whereas the mares in ambient lighting took 12 weeks to respond to GnRH. The advancement in the time of response to GnRH under the long photoperiod could be related to changes in pituitary LH content, accelerated follicular activity or alterations in other brain-pituitary hormone levels. PMID:2226401

  20. Interactive effects of dietary composition and hormonal treatment on reproductive development of cultured female European eel, Anguilla anguilla.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Filipa F G; Støttrup, Josianne G; Kjørsvik, Elin; Tveiten, Helge; Tomkiewicz, Jonna

    2016-08-01

    Farmed female eels were fed two experimental diets with similar proximate composition but different n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels. Both diets had similar levels of arachidonic acid (ARA), while levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in one diet were approximately 4.5 and 2.6 times higher compared to the other diet, respectively. After the feeding period, each diet group was divided into two and each half received one of two hormonal treatments using salmon pituitary extract (SPE) for 13 weeks: i) a constant hormone dose of 18.75mg SPE/kg initial body weight (BW) and ii) a variable hormone dosage that increased from 12.5mg SPE/kg initial BW to 25mg SPE/kg initial BW. Results showed a significant interaction between diets and hormonal treatments on gonadosomatic index (GSI), indicating that the effect of broodstock diets on ovarian development depends on both nutritional status and hormonal regime. Females fed with higher levels of n-3 series PUFAs and stimulated with the constant hormonal treatment reached higher GSIs than those receiving the variable hormonal treatment. However, when females were fed lower levels of n-3 series PUFAs there was no difference in the effect of hormonal treatments on GSI. We also found that, independent of hormonal treatment, the diet with higher levels of n-3 series PUFAs led to the most advanced stages of oocyte development, such as germinal vesicle migration. Concentration of sex steroids (E2, T, and 11-KT) in the plasma did not differ between diets and hormonal treatments, but was significantly correlated with ovarian developmental stage. In conclusion, increasing dietary levels of n-3 PUFAs seemed to promote oocyte growth, leading to a more rapid progression of ovarian development in European eel subjected to hormonal treatment. PMID:27264530

  1. Growth Hormone Response after Administration of L-dopa, Clonidine, and Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone in Children with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Seigfried M.

    1993-01-01

    This study of eight growth-retarded children with Down's syndrome (aged 1 to 6.5 years) found that administration of growth hormone was more effective than either L-dopa or clonidine. Results suggest that children with Down's syndrome have both anatomical and biochemical hypothalamic derangements resulting in decreased growth hormone secretion and…

  2. miR-200a/miR-141 and miR-205 upregulation might be associated with hormone receptor status and prognosis in endometrial carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ying; Si, Jing-Wen; Li, Wen-Ting; Liang, Li; Zhao, Jian; Zhou, Mei; Li, Dong; Li, Ting

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinicopathological significance of miR-200a/miR-141 and miR-205 expression in endometrioid carcinomas (ECs) versus nonendometrioid carcinomas (NECs) and to assess their correlation with hormone receptor status. miR-200a/miR-141 and miR-205 expression in 154 endometrial cancers was determined by qRT-PCR. The status of estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR) was assessed using immunohistochemistry. miR-200a/miR-141 and miR-205 increased significantly in ECs and in NECs. The expression level of miR-200a was significantly higher in NECs than in ECs (P = 0.025). Furthermore, there was a trend that NECs with worse clinicopathological variables had a higher miR-200a expression, while an inverse trend existed in ECs. miR-205 upregulation occurred frequently in NECs without lymph node metastases (P = 0.030), whereas such association was not present in ECs. Interestingly, In ECs, miR-200a/miR-141 upregulation occurred frequently in the hormone receptor positive subgroups than the negative subgroups (P < 0.05). Similarly, the expression level of miR-205 was higher in the hormone receptor positive subgroups and the association between miR-205 and PR reached statistical significance (P = 0.024). In contrast, in NECs, a negative correlation was found between miR-200a/miR-141 and ER or PR status. Meanwhile, in ECs, miR-200a upregulation correlated with prolonged survival in the ER positive subgroup (P = 0.046), whereas an inverse trend existed in the ER negative subgroup. Our findings suggest that miR-200a/miR-141 and miR-205 increased significantly in ECs and in NECs. However, they might behave differently in ECs versus NECs. miR-200a/miR-141 and miR-205 might be associated with hormone receptor status in endometrial cancer and may possess prognostic impacts. PMID:26045795

  3. Postmenopausal hormone therapy: cardiovascular risks.

    PubMed

    2003-04-01

    (1) The WHI study was published in 2002: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial in more than 16 000 women with an average age of 63 years at enrollment. The paper reports data on the long-term adverse effects of combined equine estrogen-progestin hormone replacement therapy, taken for 5 years. (2) On average, a yearly excess of 19 severe adverse events per 10 000 women occurred in the estrogen-progestin group. Relative to the placebo group, there were an extra 8 pulmonary embolisms, 7 coronary events, 8 strokes and 8 cases of invasive breast cancer. In contrast, there were 6 fewer colorectal cancers and 5 fewer hip fractures in the active treatment group. (3) The differences in the frequency of coronary events and venous thromboembolism emerged after the first year of treatment, while the curves for stroke and breast cancer diverged after the second and fifth years, respectively. (4) The overall mortality rate did not differ between the two groups. (5) A placebo-controlled trial of the same hormone combination (HERS trial), given for 4.1 years as secondary prophylaxis against coronary heart disease was published in 1998. The drug was ineffective during the trial, and during unblinded post-trial follow-up of 2 321 women for an average of 2.7 years (HERS II study). (6) The estrogen-progestin combination used in these trials did not reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (in primary or secondary prophylaxis) or the risk of stroke. On the contrary, both risks increased. (7) The increased incidence of deep venous thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism associated with estrogen-progestin replacement therapy was confirmed in these trials, even among women with no relevant history. (8) The WHI trial also confirmed the increased risk of breast cancer in women on hormone replacement therapy, but did not study its impact on outcome or mortality. (9) The WHI trial confirmed the beneficial impact of estrogen-progestin combination therapy on the risk of

  4. Shaping Small Bioactive Molecules to Untangle Their Biological Function: A Focus on Fluorescent Plant Hormones.

    PubMed

    Lace, Beatrice; Prandi, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Modern biology overlaps with chemistry in explaining the structure and function of all cellular processes at the molecular level. Plant hormone research is perfectly located at the interface between these two disciplines, taking advantage of synthetic and computational chemistry as a tool to decipher the complex biological mechanisms regulating the action of plant hormones. These small signaling molecules regulate a wide range of developmental processes, adapting plant growth to ever changing environmental conditions. The synthesis of small bioactive molecules mimicking the activity of endogenous hormones allows us to unveil many molecular features of their functioning, giving rise to a new field, plant chemical biology. In this framework, fluorescence labeling of plant hormones is emerging as a successful strategy to track the fate of these challenging molecules inside living organisms. Thanks to the increasing availability of new fluorescent probes as well as advanced and innovative imaging technologies, we are now in a position to investigate many of the dynamic mechanisms through which plant hormones exert their action. Such a deep and detailed comprehension is mandatory for the development of new green technologies for practical applications. In this review, we summarize the results obtained so far concerning the fluorescent labeling of plant hormones, highlighting the basic steps leading to the design and synthesis of these compelling molecular tools and their applications. PMID:27378726

  5. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland

    PubMed Central

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2+ and Sox9+ adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors. PMID:27109116

  6. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2(+) and Sox9(+) adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors. PMID:27109116

  7. Glucoregulatory function of thyroid hormones: role of pancreatic hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, M.J.B.; Burger, A.G.; Ferrannini, E.; Jequier, E.; Acheson, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glucose metabolism was investigated in humans before and 14 days after 300 micrograms L-thyroxine (T4)/day using a sequential clamp protocol during short-term somatostatin infusion (500 micrograms/h, 0-6 h) at euglycemia (0-2.5 h), at 165 mg/dl (2.5-6 h), and during insulin infusion (1.0 mU.kg-1.min-1, 4.5-6 h). T4 treatment increased plasma T4 (+96%) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3, +50%), energy expenditure (+8%), glucose turnover (+32%), and glucose oxidation (Glucox +87%) but decreased thyroid-stimulating hormone (-96%) and nonoxidative glucose metabolism (Glucnonox, -30%) at unchanged lipid oxidation (Lipox). During somatostatin and euglycemia glucose production (Ra, -67%) and disposal (Rd, -28%) both decreased in euthyroid subjects but remained at -22% and -5%, respectively, after T4 treatment. Glucox (control, -20%; +T4, -25%) fell and Lipox increased (control, +42%; +T4, +45%) in both groups, whereas Glucnonox decreased before (-36%) but increased after T4 (+57%). During somatostatin infusion and hyperglycemia Rd (control, +144%; +T4, +84%) and Glucnonox (control, +326%; +T4, +233%) increased, whereas Glucox and Lipox remained unchanged. Insulin further increased Rd (+76%), Glucox (+155%), and Glucnonox (+50%) but decreased Ra (-43%) and Lipox (-43%). All these effects were enhanced by T4 (Rd, +38%; Glucox, +45%; Glucnonox, +35%; Ra, +40%; Lipox, +11%). Our data provide evidence that, in humans, T3 stimulates Ra and Rd, which is in part independent of pancreatic hormones.

  8. PEGylation of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRF) analogues.

    PubMed

    Esposito, P; Barbero, L; Caccia, P; Caliceti, P; D'Antonio, M; Piquet, G; Veronese, F M

    2003-09-26

    Synthetically produced GRF1-29 (Sermorelin) has an amino acid composition identical to the N-terminal 29 amino acids sequence of the natural hypothalamic GHRH1-44 (Figure 1). It maintains bioactivity in vitro and is almost equally effective in eliciting secretion of endogenous growth hormone in vivo. The main drawbacks associated with the pharmaceutical use of hGRF1-29 relate to its short half-life in plasma, about 10-20 min in humans, which is caused mostly by renal ultrafiltration and enzymatic degradation at the N terminus. PEGylation has been considered as one valid approach to obtain more stable forms of the peptide, with a longer in vivo half-life and ultimately with increased pharmacodynamic response along the somatotropic axis (endogenous GH, IGF-1 levels). Different PEGylated GRF conjugates were obtained and their bioactivity was tested in vitro and in vivo by monitoring endogenous growth hormone (GH) serum levels after intravenous (i.v.) injection in rats, and intravenous and subcutaneous (s.c.) injection in pigs. It was found that GRF-PEG conjugates are able to bind and activate the human GRF receptor, although with different potency. The effect of PEG molecular weight, number of PEG chains bound and position of PEGylation site on GRF activity were investigated. Mono-PEGylated isomers with a PEG5000 polymer chain linked to Lys 12 or Lys 21 residues, showed high biological activity in vitro, which is similar to that of hGRF1-29, and a higher pharmacodynamic response as compared to unmodified GRF molecule. PMID:14499707

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel (177)Lu-DOTA-[Gly(3)-cyclized(Dap(4), (d)-Phe(7), Asp(10))-Arg(11)]α-MSH(3-13) analogue for melanocortin-1 receptor-positive tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Cheong; Hong, Young Don; Kim, Jin Ju; Choi, Sang Mu; Baek, Hye Suk; Choi, Sun-Ju

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a novel α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) analogue 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) coupled [Gly(3)-cyclized(Dap(4), (d)-Phe(7), Asp(10))-Arg(11)]α-MSH(3-13) (DOTA-GMSH) for melanocortin-1 receptor (MC-1R) targeting was newly synthesized, radiolabeled with (177)Lu, and in vitro and in vivo characterized. (177)Lu-labeled peptides were prepared with a high radiolabeling yield (>98%), and its Log p value was -2.89. No degradation was observed not only by serum incubation at 37°C for 7 days but also by an HPLC analysis of radioactive metabolites in urine. A cell binding assay revealed that an inhibitory concentration of 50% (IC(50)) of the peptide was 3.80 nM. The tumor-to-blood ratio, which was 14.27 at 2 hours p.i., was increased to 56.37 at 24 hours p.i., which means that the radiolabeled peptide was highly accumulated in a tumor and was rapidly cleared from the blood pool. We, therefore, conclude that (177)Lu-DOTA-GMSH has promising characteristics for application in nuclear medicine, namely for the diagnosis of MC-1R over-expressing tumors. PMID:22831553

  10. Systemic therapy for the treatment of hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer: from intermittent androgen deprivation therapy to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Bobby C; Shevach, Jeffrey; Oh, William K

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of advanced prostate cancer has changed considerably in recent years, but the vast majority of advances have been made in patients with metastatic castration-resistant disease. There have been relatively fewer advances in the earlier, hormonally responsive stage of metastatic disease. Since the empiric establishment of androgen deprivation therapy as first-line therapy for metastatic prostate cancer decades ago, there have been multiple studies looking at variations of suppressing testosterone, but the overall paradigm has not been strongly challenged until more recently. In particular, the dramatic results reported by the CHAARTED trial not only bring chemotherapy to an arena historically dominated solely by hormonal therapy but also stimulate renewed efforts into improving upon our management of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. PMID:25677235

  11. Hormonal and Local Regulation of Bone Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canalis, Ernesto

    1985-01-01

    Reviews effects of hormones, systemic factors, and local regulators on bone formation. Identifies and explains the impact on bone growth of several hormones as well as the components of systemic and local systems. Concentrates on bone collagen and DNA synthesis. (Physicians may earn continuing education credit by completing an appended test). (ML)

  12. Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone Criticism Grows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaard, Greta

    1995-01-01

    Discusses concerns related to the use of recombinant bovine growth hormone in the United States and other countries. Analyses the issue from the perspectives of animal rights, human health, world hunger, concerns of small and organic farmers, costs to the taxpayer, and environmental questions. A sidebar discusses Canadian review of the hormone.…

  13. Insect Control (II): Hormones and Viruses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Jean L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses research in the use of hormones and viruses to control insect populations. Although entomologists do not think that pheromones, hormones, and viruses will completely replace more conventional chemical insecticides, they will become increasingly important and will reduce our dependence on traditional insecticides. (JR)

  14. Collective hormonal profiles predict group performance.

    PubMed

    Akinola, Modupe; Page-Gould, Elizabeth; Mehta, Pranjal H; Lu, Jackson G

    2016-08-30

    Prior research has shown that an individual's hormonal profile can influence the individual's social standing within a group. We introduce a different construct-a collective hormonal profile-which describes a group's hormonal make-up. We test whether a group's collective hormonal profile is related to its performance. Analysis of 370 individuals randomly assigned to work in 74 groups of three to six individuals revealed that group-level concentrations of testosterone and cortisol interact to predict a group's standing across groups. Groups with a collective hormonal profile characterized by high testosterone and low cortisol exhibited the highest performance. These collective hormonal level results remained reliable when controlling for personality traits and group-level variability in hormones. These findings support the hypothesis that groups with a biological propensity toward status pursuit (high testosterone) coupled with reduced stress-axis activity (low cortisol) engage in profit-maximizing decision-making. The current work extends the dual-hormone hypothesis to the collective level and provides a neurobiological perspective on the factors that determine who rises to the top across, not just within, social hierarchies. PMID:27528679

  15. Menstrual cycle hormones, food intake, and cravings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Food craving and intake are affected by steroid hormones during the menstrual cycle, especially in the luteal phase, when craving for certain foods has been reported to increase. However, satiety hormones such as leptin have also been shown to affect taste sensitivity, and therefore food ...

  16. Hormones and pheromones in regulation of insect behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both pheromones and hormones are well recognized regulators of insect biology. However, the interactions between hormones and pheromones in coordinating insect biology are less well understood. We have studied the interactions between juvenile hormone, its precursor methyl farnesoate, and pheromon...

  17. Thyroid hormone receptors regulate adipogenesis and carcinogenesis via crosstalk signaling with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Changxue; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They are ligand-dependent transcription factors that interact with their cognate hormone response elements in the promoters to regulate respective target gene expression to modulate cellular functions. While the transcription activity of each is regulated by their respective ligands, recent studies indicate that via multiple mechanisms PPARs and TRs crosstalk to affect diverse biological functions. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and biological impact of crosstalk between these two important nuclear receptors, focusing on their roles in adipogenesis and carcinogenesis. PMID:19741045

  18. The Treatment of Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer: Docetaxel and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Petrylak, Daniel P

    2006-01-01

    Two randomized clinical trials demonstrated a survival benefit of 20% to 24% with docetaxel-based therapy when compared with survival with mitoxantrone and prednisone after failure of androgen ablation therapy. These studies supported the approval of docetaxel-based therapy for the treatment of metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer by the US Food and Drug Administration in May 2005. Clinical trials in hormone-refractory prostate cancer are now focused on building on the survival improvement seen with docetaxel-based therapy. This article presents a summary of some of the more promising treatments and regimens for advanced prostate cancer. PMID:17021642

  19. Sex hormone exposure during pregnancy and malformations.

    PubMed

    Briggs, M H; Briggs, M

    1979-01-01

    This general review of the effects of exposure to sex hormones during pregnancy and subsequent fetal malformation presents summaries of animal studies, develops the data indicating virilization and feminization in humans, documents chromosome abnormalities, and presents data on the connection of steroid exposure in utero and somatic malformations. Fetal exposure can occur 3 different ways, through hormonal pregnancy test, via obstetrical use of hormones, or because of continued maternal use of oral contraceptives after conception. In the latter case, an ongoing prospective study indicates that accidental ingestion of oral contraceptives after conception is not harmful to the fetus if taken during early pregnancy. Tables present summaries of numerous large surveys and retrospective studies linking particular sex hormones (exogenous) to particular fetal malformations including neural tube defects and other constellations of developmental problems. The question of exogenous hormone effects on the personality of infants who were exposed in utero is addressed. PMID:400321

  20. Parathyroid Hormone, Calcitonin, and Vitamin D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potts, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    Analyses of secretion of parathyroid hormone during tests of stimulation and suppression of hormone-secretory activity using infusions of EDTA and calcium, respectively, have established that, in contrast to previous views, secretion of the hormone is not autonomous in many patients that have adenomatous hyperparathyroidism, but is responsive to changes in blood-calcium concentration. These findings have led to a new understanding of the pathophysiology of hormone production in hyperparathy-roidism. A related application of the diagnostic use of the radioimmunoassay is the preoperative localization of parathyroid tumors and the distinction between adenomas and chief-cell hyperplasia. Work involving catheterization and radioimmunoassay of blood samples obtained from the subclavin and innominate veins and the venae cavae, led to localization in a high percentage of patients. However, this procedure has been adopted recently to detect hormone concentration in the small veins directly draining the parathyroid glands.

  1. Thyroid hormone resistance: a novel mutation in thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene - case report.

    PubMed

    Işık, Emregül; Beck Peccoz, Paolo; Campi, Irene; Özön, Alev; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Gönç, Nazlı; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone resistance (THR) is a dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormones. It is usually caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene. In the present report, we describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics and genetic analysis of patients with a novel THRB gene mutation. The index patient had been misdiagnosed as hyperthyroidism and treated with antithyroid drugs since eight days of age. Thyroid hormone results showed that thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) was never suppressed despite elevated thyroid hormone levels, and there was no symptom suggesting hyperthyroidism. A heterozygous mutation at codon 350 located in exon 9 of the THRB gene was detected in all the affected members of the family. It is important to consider thyroid hormone levels in association with TSH levels to prevent inappropriate treatment and the potential complications, such as clinical hypothyroidism or an increase in goiter size. PMID:24217081

  2. Expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor and effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue on proliferation of cultured gastric smooth muscle cells of rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; He, Hong-Xuan; Sun, Xu-De; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Li-Hong; Huang, Wei-Quan; Zhang, Rong-Qing

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor and the effects of GnRH analog (alarelin) on proliferation of cultured gastric smooth muscle cells (GSMC) of rats. METHODS: Immunohistochemical ABC methods and in situ hybridization methods were used to dectect protein and mRNA expression of GnRH receptor in GSMC, respectively. Techniques of cell culture, OD value of MTT test, measure of 3H-TdR incorporation, average fluorescent values of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and flow cytometric DNA analysis were used in the experiment. RESULTS: The cultured GSMC of rats showed immunoreactivity for GnRH receptor; positive staining was located in cytoplasm. GnRH receptor mRNA hybridized signals were also detected in cytoplasm. When alarelin (10-9, 10-7, 10-5 mol/L) was administered into the medium and incubated for 24 h, OD value of MTT, 3H-TdR incorporation and average fluorescent values of PCNA all decreased significantly as compared with the control group (P < 0.05). The maximum inhibitory effect on cell proliferation was achieved a concentration of 10-5 mol/L and it acted in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometric DNA analysis revealed that alarelin could significantly enhance ratio of G1 phase and decrease ratio of S phase of GSMC of rats (P < 0.05).The maximum inhibitory effect on ratio of S phase was at the concentration of 10-5 mol/L and also acted in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that GnRH receptor can be expressed by GSMC of rats. GnRH analogue can directly inhibit proliferation and DNA synthesis of rat GSMC through GnRH receptors. PMID:15188505

  3. Thyroid hormones, learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Rivas, M; Naranjo, J R

    2007-06-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs), T3 and T4, have many physiological actions and are essential for normal behavioral, intellectual and neurological development. THs have a broad spectrum of effects on the developing brain and mediate important effects within the CNS throughout life. Insufficient maternal iodine intake during gestation and TH deficiency during human development are associated to pathological alterations such as cretinism and mental retardation. In adulthood, thyroid dysfunction is related to neurological and behavioral abnormalities, including memory impairment. Analysis of different experimental models suggests that most of the effects on cognition as a result of thyroid dysfunction rely on hippocampal modifications. Insufficiency of THs during development thus alters hippocampal synaptic function and impairs behavioral performance of hippocampal-dependent learning and memory tasks that persist in euthyroid adult animals. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge obtained by clinical observations and experimental models that shows the importance of THs in learning and mnemonic processes. PMID:17543038

  4. Growth hormone doping: a review

    PubMed Central

    Erotokritou-Mulligan, Ioulietta; Holt, Richard IG; Sönksen, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    The use of growth hormone (GH) as a performance enhancing substance was first promoted in lay publications, long before scientists fully acknowledged its benefits. It is thought athletes currently use GH to enhance their athletic performance and to accelerate the healing of sporting injuries. Over recent years, a number of high profile athletes have admitted to using GH. To date, there is only limited and weak evidence for its beneficial effects on performance. Nevertheless the “hype” around its effectiveness and the lack of a foolproof detection methodology that will detect its abuse longer than 24 hours after the last injection has encouraged its widespread use. This article reviews the current evidence of the ergogenic effects of GH along with the risks associated with its use. The review also examines methodologies, both currently available and in development for detecting its abuse. PMID:24198576

  5. [Plant hormones, plant growth regulators].

    PubMed

    Végvári, György; Vidéki, Edina

    2014-06-29

    Plants seem to be rather defenceless, they are unable to do motion, have no nervous system or immune system unlike animals. Besides this, plants do have hormones, though these substances are produced not in glands. In view of their complexity they lagged behind animals, however, plant organisms show large scale integration in their structure and function. In higher plants, such as in animals, the intercellular communication is fulfilled through chemical messengers. These specific compounds in plants are called phytohormones, or in a wide sense, bioregulators. Even a small quantity of these endogenous organic compounds are able to regulate the operation, growth and development of higher plants, and keep the connection between cells, tissues and synergy between organs. Since they do not have nervous and immume systems, phytohormones play essential role in plants' life. PMID:24954142

  6. Hormone therapy, dilemmas, medical decisions.

    PubMed

    Schulkin, Jay

    2008-01-01

    The decision for women to go on hormone therapy (HT) remains controversial. An historical oscillation of beliefs exists related in part to expectations of the medicinal value of HT over longer-term use beyond the initial peri-menonpausal period. Studies thought to resolve issues surrounding the efficacy of HT were perhaps overstated as confusion still permeates the decision making with regard to HT. Overzealous advertising and exaggerated understanding of the results (negative or positive) undermine patient and physician decision making. There remains no magic bullet with regard to HT. What remains is still the possibility of HT longer-term efficacy on diverse end organ systems with pockets of clinical and scientific ambiguity while working to engender reasonable expectations. PMID:18315763

  7. Hormonal changes in antiorthostatic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, V.; Popovic, P.; Honeycutt, C.

    1982-01-01

    Hypokinesia, especially hypokinesia with negative tilt ('antiorthostatic hypokinesia'), mimics some of the effects of weightlessness. It is shown that cardiac output is increased during early exposure of rats to antiorthostatic hypokinesia. The increase of the stroke volume and of the cardiac output observed in the antiorthostatic hypokinetic rats is probably the consequence of a blood volume shift toward the chest brought forth by head-down positioning of the animals. It is also possible that struggling of the animals to escape from the harness and an increased metabolism contribute to the elevation of cardiac output. In order to study this hypothesis 'stress hormones' were measured in the antiorthostatic rats. Plasma levels of ACTH, corticosterone and prolactin were measured in the arterial blood (0.3 ml) sampled before, during and after hypokinesia from chronic aortic cannulas of the rats.

  8. Adipose tissues and thyroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    Obregon, Maria-Jesus

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of energy balance is regulated by complex homeostatic mechanisms, including those emanating from adipose tissue. The main function of the adipose tissue is to store the excess of metabolic energy in the form of fat. The energy stored as fat can be mobilized during periods of energy deprivation (hunger, fasting, diseases). The adipose tissue has also a homeostatic role regulating energy balance and functioning as endocrine organ that secretes substances that control body homeostasis. Two adipose tissues have been identified: white and brown adipose tissues (WAT and BAT) with different phenotype, function and regulation. WAT stores energy, while BAT dissipates energy as heat. Brown and white adipocytes have different ontogenetic origin and lineage and specific markers of WAT and BAT have been identified. “Brite” or beige adipose tissue has been identified in WAT with some properties of BAT. Thyroid hormones exert pleiotropic actions, regulating the differentiation process in many tissues including the adipose tissue. Adipogenesis gives raise to mature adipocytes and is regulated by several transcription factors (c/EBPs, PPARs) that coordinately activate specific genes, resulting in the adipocyte phenotype. T3 regulates several genes involved in lipid mobilization and storage and in thermogenesis. Both WAT and BAT are targets of thyroid hormones, which regulate genes crucial for their proper function: lipogenesis, lipolysis, thermogenesis, mitochondrial function, transcription factors, the availability of nutrients. T3 acts directly through specific TREs in the gene promoters, regulating transcription factors. The deiodinases D3, D2, and D1 regulate the availability of T3. D3 is activated during proliferation, while D2 is linked to the adipocyte differentiation program, providing T3 needed for lipogenesis and thermogenesis. We examine the differences between BAT, WAT and brite/beige adipocytes and the process that lead to activation of UCP1 in WAT

  9. Acyl-CoA synthetase-4, a new regulator of mTOR and a potential therapeutic target for enhanced estrogen receptor function in receptor-positive and -negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dattilo, Melina A.; Solano, Angela R.; Maloberti, Paula M.; Podesta, Ernesto J.

    2015-01-01

    Although the role of acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) in mediating an aggressive phenotype is well accepted, there is little evidence as to the early steps through which ACSL4 increases tumor growth and progression. In this study, and by means of the stable transfection of MCF-7 cells with ACSL4 using the tetracycline Tet-Off system (MCF-7 Tet-Off/ACSL4), we identify the mTOR pathway as one of the main specific signatures of ACSL4 expression and demonstrate the partial involvement of the lipoxygenase pathway in the activation of mTOR. The specificity of ACSL4 action on mTOR signaling is also determined by doxycycline inhibition of ACSL4 expression in MCF-7 Tet-Off/ACSL4 cells, by the expression of ACSL4 in the non-aggressive T47D breast cancer cell line and by knocking down this enzyme expression in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which constitutively express ACSL4. ACSL4 regulates components of the two complexes of the mTOR pathway (mTORC1/2), along with upstream regulators and substrates. We show that mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and ACSL4 inhibitor rosiglitazone can act in combination to inhibit cell growth. In addition, we demonstrate a synergistic effect on cell growth inhibition by the combination of rosiglitazone and tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor α (ERα) inhibitor. Remarkably, this synergistic effect is also evident in the triple negative MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that ACSL4 could be a target to restore tumor hormone dependence in tumors with poor prognosis for disease-free and overall survival, in which no effective specifically targeted therapy is readily available. PMID:26536660

  10. Analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing cytotoxic groups.

    PubMed Central

    Janáky, T; Juhász, A; Bajusz, S; Csernus, V; Srkalovic, G; Bokser, L; Milovanovic, S; Redding, T W; Rékási, Z; Nagy, A

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to produce better cytotoxic analogues, chemotherapeutic antineoplastic radicals including an alkylating nitrogen mustard derivative of D-phenylalanine (D-melphalan), reactive cyclopropane, anthraquinone derivatives [2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone and the anticancer antibiotic doxorubicin], and an antimetabolite (methotrexate) were coupled to suitably modified agonists and antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH). Analogues with D-lysine6 and D-ornithine6 or N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-lysine and N delta-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-ornithine were used as carriers for one or two cytotoxic moieties. The enhanced biological activities produced by the incorporation of D amino acids into position 6 of the agonistic analogues were further increased by the attachment of hydrophobic cytotoxic groups, resulting in compounds with 10-50 times higher activity than LH-RH. Most of the monosubstituted agonistic analogues showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of human breast cancer cells, while the receptor binding affinities of peptides containing two cytotoxic side chains were lower. Antagonistic carriers [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,D-Lys6,D-Ala10] LH-RH [where Nal(2) is 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine], [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH, and their D-Pal(3)3 homologs [Pal(3) is 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine] as well as [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Pal(3)3,Tyr5,N epsilon-(2,3-diamino-propionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH were linked to cytotoxic compounds. The hybrid molecules inhibited ovulation in rats at doses of 10 micrograms and suppressed LH release in vitro. The receptor binding of cytotoxic analogues was decreased compared to the precursor peptides, although analogues with 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone hemiglutarate had high affinities. All of the cytotoxic analogues tested inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultures of human breast and prostate cancer cell lines

  11. Anabolic hormone profiles in elite military men.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Marcus K; Kviatkovsky, Shiloah A; Hernández, Lisa M; Sargent, Paul; Segal, Sabrina; Granger, Douglas A

    2016-06-01

    We recently characterized the awakening responses and daily profiles of the catabolic stress hormone cortisol in elite military men. Anabolic hormones follow a similar daily pattern and may counteract the catabolic effects of cortisol. This companion report is the first to characterize daily profiles of anabolic hormones dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and testosterone in this population. Overall, the men in this study displayed anabolic hormone profiles comparable to that of healthy, athletic populations. Consistent with the cortisol findings in our prior report, summary parameters of magnitude (hormone output) within the first hour after awakening displayed superior stability versus summary parameters of pattern for both DHEA (r range: 0.77-0.82) and testosterone (r range: 0.62-0.69). Summary parameters of evening function were stable for the two hormones (both p<0.001), while the absolute decrease in testosterone across the day was a stable proxy of diurnal function (p<0.001). Removal of noncompliant subjects did not appreciably affect concentration estimates for either hormone at any time point, nor did it alter the repeatability of any summary parameter. The first of its kind, this report enables accurate estimations of anabolic balance and resultant effects upon health and human performance in this highly resilient yet chronically stressed population. PMID:27083310

  12. [Thyroid hormone and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Magdalena Maria; Łacka, Katarzyna

    2014-09-01

    It is well established that thyroid hormones affect the cardiovascular system through genomic and nongenomic actions. TRalpha1 is the major thyroid hormone receptor in the heart. T3 suppresses increased mitotic activity of stimulated cardiomyocytes. Hyperthyroidism induces a hyperdynamic cardiovascular state, which is associated with enhanced left ventricular systolic and diastolic function and the chronotropic and inotropic properties of thyroid hormones. Hypothyroidism, however, is characterized by opposite changes. In addition, thyroid hormones decrease peripheral vascular resistance, influence the rennin-angiotensin system (RAS), and increase blood volume and erythropoetin secretion with subsequent increased preload and cardiac output. Thyroid hormones play an important role in cardiac electrophysiology and have both pro- and anti-arrhytmic potential. Thyroid hormone deficiency is associated with a less favorable lipid profile. Selective modulation of the TRbeta1 receptor is considered as a potential therapeutic target to treat dyslipidemia without cardiac side effects. Thyroid hormones have a beneficial effect on limiting myocardial ischemic injury, preventing and reversing cardiac remodeling and improving cardiac hemodynamics in endstage heart failure. This is crucial because a low T3 syndrome accompanies both acute and chronic cardiac diseases. PMID:25345279

  13. Hormonal Factors and Disturbances in Eating Disorders.

    PubMed

    Culbert, Kristen M; Racine, Sarah E; Klump, Kelly L

    2016-07-01

    This review summarizes the current state of the literature regarding hormonal correlates of, and etiologic influences on, eating pathology. Several hormones (e.g., ghrelin, CCK, GLP-1, PYY, leptin, oxytocin, cortisol) are disrupted during the ill state of eating disorders and likely contribute to the maintenance of core symptoms (e.g., dietary restriction, binge eating) and/or co-occurring features (e.g., mood symptoms, attentional biases). Some of these hormones (e.g., ghrelin, cortisol) may also be related to eating pathology via links with psychological stress. Despite these effects, the role of hormonal factors in the etiology of eating disorders remains unknown. The strongest evidence for etiologic effects has emerged for ovarian hormones, as changes in ovarian hormones predict changes in phenotypic and genetic influences on disordered eating. Future studies would benefit from utilizing etiologically informative designs (e.g., high risk, behavioral genetic) and continuing to explore factors (e.g., psychological, neural responsivity) that may impact hormonal influences on eating pathology. PMID:27222139

  14. Effects of hormones on lipids and lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.

    1991-12-01

    Levels of plasma lipids and lipoproteins are strong predictors for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. In women, as in men, numerous factors contribute to variations in plasma lipoproteins that may affect cardiovascular disease risk. These include age, dietary components, adiposity, genetic traits, and hormonal changes. Each of these factors may operate to varying degrees in determining changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles accompanying menopause- Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested increases in levels of cholesterol, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins associated with menopause. High density lipoproteins (HDL), which are higher in women than men and are thought to contribute to relative protection of premenopausal women from cardiovascular disease, remain relatively constant in the years following menopause, although small, and perhaps transient reductions in the HDL{sub 2} subfraction have been reported in relation to reduced estradiol level following menopause. Despite these associations, it has been difficult to determine the role of endogenous hormones in influencing the plasma lipoproteins of postmenopausal women. In principle, the effects of hormone replacement should act to reverse any alterations in lipoprotein metabolism that are due to postmenopausal hormone changes. While there may be beneficial effects on lipoproteins, hormone treatment does not restore a premenopausal lipoprotein profile. Furthermore, it is not dear to what extent exogenous hormone-induced lipoprotein changes contribute to the reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy.

  15. Arabidopsis Hormone Database: a comprehensive genetic and phenotypic information database for plant hormone research in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhi-yu; Zhou, Xin; Li, Linchuan; Yu, Xiangchun; Li, Hongjiang; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Cao, Guangyu; Bai, Mingyi; Wang, Xingchun; Jiang, Caifu; Lu, Haibin; Hou, Xianhui; Qu, Lijia; Wang, Zhiyong; Zuo, Jianru; Fu, Xiangdong; Su, Zhen; Li, Songgang; Guo, Hongwei

    2009-01-01

    Plant hormones are small organic molecules that influence almost every aspect of plant growth and development. Genetic and molecular studies have revealed a large number of genes that are involved in responses to numerous plant hormones, including auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, abscisic acid, ethylene, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, and brassinosteroid. Here, we develop an Arabidopsis hormone database, which aims to provide a systematic and comprehensive view of genes participating in plant hormonal regulation, as well as morphological phenotypes controlled by plant hormones. Based on data from mutant studies, transgenic analysis and gene ontology (GO) annotation, we have identified a total of 1026 genes in the Arabidopsis genome that participate in plant hormone functions. Meanwhile, a phenotype ontology is developed to precisely describe myriad hormone-regulated morphological processes with standardized vocabularies. A web interface (http://ahd.cbi.pku.edu.cn) would allow users to quickly get access to information about these hormone-related genes, including sequences, functional category, mutant information, phenotypic description, microarray data and linked publications. Several applications of this database in studying plant hormonal regulation and hormone cross-talk will be presented and discussed. PMID:19015126

  16. Low selenium status in the elderly influences thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, O; Girelli, D; Azzini, M; Stanzial, A M; Russo, C; Ferroni, M; Corrocher, R

    1995-12-01

    1. Iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase, which is mainly responsible for peripheral triiodothyronine (T3) production, has recently been demonstrated to be a selenium-containing enzyme. In the elderly, reduced peripheral conversion of thyroxine (T4) to T3 and overt hypothyroidism are frequently observed. 2. We measured serum selenium and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (as indices of selenium status), thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone in 109 healthy euthyroid subjects (52 women, 57 men), carefully selected to exclude abnormally low thyroid hormone levels induced by acute or chronic diseases or calorie restriction. The subjects were subdivided into three age groups. To avoid conditions of under-nutrition or malnutrition, dietary records were obtained for a sample of 24 subjects, randomly selected and representative of the whole population for age and sex. 3. In order to properly assess the influence of selenium status on iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase type I activity, a double-blind placebo-controlled trial was also carried out on 36 elderly subjects, resident at a privately owned nursing home. 4. In the free-living population, a progressive reduction of the T3/T4 ratio (due to increased T4 levels) and of selenium and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity was observed with advancing age. A highly significant linear correlation between T4, T3/T4 and selenium was observed in the population as a whole (for T4, R = -0.312, P < 0.002; for T3/T4 ratio, R = 0.32, P < 0.01) and in older subjects (for T4, R = -0.40, P < 0.05; for T3/T4 ratio, R = 0.54, P < 0.002). 5. The main result of the double-blind placebo-controlled trial was a significant improvement of selenium indices and a decrease in the T4 level in selenium-treated subjects; serum selenium, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity and thyroid hormones did not change in placebo-treated subjects. 6. We concluded that selenium status influences thyroid hormones in the elderly, mainly modulating T4

  17. The Role of SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complexes in Hormone Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Sarnowska, Elzbieta; Gratkowska, Dominika M; Sacharowski, Sebastian P; Cwiek, Pawel; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Siedlecki, Janusz A; Koncz, Csaba; Sarnowski, Tomasz J

    2016-07-01

    SWI/SNF-type ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs) are evolutionarily conserved multiprotein machineries controlling DNA accessibility by regulating chromatin structure. We summarize here recent advances highlighting the role of SWI/SNF in the regulation of hormone signaling pathways and their crosstalk in Arabidopsis thaliana. We discuss the functional interdependences of SWI/SNF complexes and key elements regulating developmental and hormone signaling pathways by indicating intriguing similarities and differences in plants and humans, and summarize proposed mechanisms of SWI/SNF action on target loci. We postulate that, given their viability, several plant SWI/SNF mutants may serve as an attractive model for searching for conserved functions of SWI/SNF CRCs in hormone signaling, cell cycle control, and other regulatory pathways. PMID:26920655

  18. Chemistry and Biology in the Biosynthesis and Action of Thyroid Hormones.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Santanu; Raja, Karuppusamy; Schweizer, Ulrich; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2016-06-27

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are secreted by the thyroid gland. They control lipid, carbohydrate, and protein metabolism, heart rate, neural development, as well as cardiovascular, renal, and brain functions. The thyroid gland mainly produces l-thyroxine (T4) as a prohormone, and 5'-deiodination of T4 by iodothyronine deiodinases generates the nuclear receptor binding hormone T3. In this Review, we discuss the basic aspects of the chemistry and biology as well as recent advances in the biosynthesis of THs in the thyroid gland, plasma transport, and internalization of THs in their target organs, in addition to the deiodination and various other enzyme-mediated metabolic pathways of THs. We also discuss thyroid hormone receptors and their mechanism of action to regulate gene expression, as well as various thyroid-related disorders and the available treatments. PMID:27226395

  19. The Radioimmunoassay of Fluid and Electrolyte Hormones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, Lanny C.

    1985-01-01

    The subject of the paper will be the assay of fluid/electrolyte hormones. ADH (antidiuretic hormone also referred to as vasopressin) reduces fluid loss by increasing water reabsorption by the kidney. The stimuli for its release from the pituitary are loss of blood, dehydration, or increased salt intake. Angiotensin II is the next hormone of interest. It is "generated" from a blood protein by the release of renin from the kidney. One of its functions is to stimulate the secretion of aldosterone from the adrenal gland. Release of renin is also stimulated by volume and sodium loss.

  20. Hormonal component of tumor photodynamic therapy response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush

    2008-02-01

    The involvement of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones in the response of the treatment of solid tumors by photodynamic therapy (PDT) comes from the induction of acute phase response by this modality. This adrenal gland activity is orchestrated through the engagement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal axis incited by stress signals emanating from the PDT-treated tumor. Glucocorticoid hormone activity engendered within the context of PDT-induced acute phase response performs multiple important functions; among other involvements they beget acute phase reactant production, systemic neutrophil mobilization, and control the production of inflammation-modulating and immunoregulatory proteins.

  1. Obtaining growth hormone from calf blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalchev, L. A.; Ralchev, K. K.; Nikolov, I. T.

    1979-01-01

    The preparation of a growth hormone from human serum was used for the isolation of the hormone from calf serum. The preparation was biologically active - it increased the quantity of the free fatty acids released in rat plasma by 36.4 percent. Electrophoresis in Veronal buffer, ph 8.6, showed the presence of a single fraction having mobility intermediate between that of alpha and beta globulins. Gel filtration through Sephadex G 100 showed an elutriation curve identical to that obtained by the growth hormone prepared from pituitary glands.

  2. Positioning the nodule, the hormone dictum

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yiliang

    2009-01-01

    The formation of a nitrogen-fixing nodule involves two diverse developmental processes in the legume root: infection thread initiation in epidermal cells and nodule primordia formation in the cortex. Several plant hormones have been reported to positively or negatively regulate nodulation. These hormones function at different stages in the nodulation process and may facilitate the coordinated development of the epidermal and cortical developmental programs that are necessary to allow bacterial infection into the developing nodule. In this paper, we review and discuss how the tissue specific nature of hormonal action dictates where, when and how a nodule is formed. PMID:19649179

  3. Positioning the nodule, the hormone dictum.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yiliang; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2009-02-01

    The formation of a nitrogen-fixing nodule involves two diverse developmental processes in the legume root: infection thread initiation in epidermal cells and nodule primordia formation in the cortex. Several plant hormones have been reported to positively or negatively regulate nodulation. These hormones function at different stages in the nodulation process and may facilitate the coordinated development of the epidermal and cortical developmental programs that are necessary to allow bacterial infection into the developing nodule. In this paper, we review and discuss how the tissue specific nature of hormonal action dictates where, when and how a nodule is formed. PMID:19649179

  4. Smoking and hormone-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Spangler, J G

    1999-09-01

    Through its antiestrogenic effect, cigarette smoking is linked to a variety of hormone-related disorders, both benign and malignant. Diseases that depend on this hormone for growth and development tend to be less common among smokers, such as endometrial cancer and uterine fibroids. Some normal, estrogen-dependent physiologic processes are affected by smoking, making osteoporosis and premature menopause more common among women who smoke. In other disorders, the link between sex hormone levels, cigarette smoking, and disease development is less clear. PMID:10436284

  5. Hormonal contraception and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Saleh, A A; Ginsburg, K A; Duchon, T A; Dorey, L G; Hirata, J; Alshameeri, R S; Dombrowski, M P; Mammen, E F

    1995-05-15

    73 healthy women (29 controls, 25 using OCs, and 19 using Norplant) were selected from the clinic population at North Oakland Medical Center for inclusion in this study after obtaining informed consent. Age, race, height, weight, blood pressure, and cigarette smoking were recorded for each subject. 12 patients were on monophasic OCs while 13 were on triphasic preparations. Both hormonal contraceptive groups had used their particular contraceptive for at least 3 months prior to blood drawing. Platelet tests were performed within 2 hours of sample collection: platelet counts (PLC) and mean platelet volume (MPV) were determined on an Automated Platelet Counter (Baker 810 Platelet Analyzer). Whole blood aggregation was performed on a platelet aggregometer (Chrono-Log, Model 550) using both ADP (ADP, 5 mM) and collagen (COLL, 2 mcg/ml) as inducing agents. Demographic differences were not significant (p 0.05) among the 3 treatment groups, whose average age was 25.3-25.8 years old. Furthermore, no significant differences (p 0.05) in platelet function were detected among controls or subjects receiving either oral contraceptives or Norplant, compared to control patients. The mean platelet counts (X 10/9/L) were 223 for OC users, 231 for Norplant users, and 232 for controls. The respective platelet aggregation (ADP, ohms) values were 12.5, 18.0, and 19.2 as well as (COLL, ohms) 35.6, 40.7, and 39.0. These results demonstrated that there is no evidence for altered platelet function, with the testing methods employed, in women using either Norplant or combination low dose oral contraceptives. To date, several studies have examined this issue, with contradictory reports about the effects of hormonal contraceptives in platelet function. After controlling for differences between various steroid preparations and other such confounding variables, some of these conflicting conclusions could be the result of a lack of uniformity among the methods used to evaluate platelet aggregation

  6. Neuroendocrine hormone amylin in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Xi; Pan, Yan-Hong; Huang, Yan-Mei; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-05-10

    The neuroendocrine hormone amylin, also known as islet amyloid polypeptide, is co-localized, co-packaged and co-secreted with insulin from adult pancreatic islet β cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Specifically, amylin reduces secretion of nutrient-stimulated glucagon, regulates blood pressure with an effect on renin-angiotensin system, and delays gastric emptying. The physiological actions of human amylin attribute to the conformational α-helix monomers whereas the misfolding instable oligomers may be detrimental to the islet β cells and further transform to β-sheet fibrils as amyloid deposits. No direct evidence proves that the amylin fibrils in amyloid deposits cause diabetes. Here we also have performed a systematic review of human amylin gene changes and reported the S20G mutation is minor in the development of diabetes. In addition to the metabolic effects, human amylin may modulate autoimmunity and innate inflammation through regulatory T cells to impact on both human type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27162583

  7. Considerations in parathyroid hormone testing.

    PubMed

    Cavalier, Etienne; Plebani, Mario; Delanaye, Pierre; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude

    2015-11-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a major player in phosphocalcic metabolism and its measurement is very important for the correct diagnosis and treatment of several diseases. PTH determination represents the paradigm of quality in laboratory medicine as many variables in the pre-, intra-, and post-analytical phases strongly affect the value of the clinical information. Analytical determination of PTH has been rendered difficult by the presence, in the circulation, of truncated fragments that can cross-react with the antibodies used for its determination. In addition, pre-analytical phase is complicated by the lack of stability of the peptide and the best sample to use for its determination remains controversial, as well as sample handling and storage. PTH secretion is also affected by circadian and seasonal rhythms and by physical exercise. Finally, from the post-analytical perspective, establishment of reliable reference ranges requires further efforts as the selection criteria for reference subjects should take into consideration new variables such as gender, race and vitamin D levels. Finally, clinical guidelines have recently revised and improved the criteria for a correct interpretation of PTH values. PMID:26035114

  8. Thyroid hormones and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Felipe

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem and its relationship to thyroid dysfunction has been increasingly investigated in recent years. Since it has been demonstrated that thyroid hormones (TH) and mainly T3 have cardioprotective effects, it is easy to understand that in the scenario of thyroid disorder, cardiac function may be damaged, and inversely in cardiac dysfunction thyroid dysregulation may be seen. The increase in plasma TH produces a clear neurohormonal activation which impacts negatively on cardiac function. In hypothyroidism, and in addition to extracardiac dysfunction, myocardial and vascular remodelling is altered and they contribute to cardiac failure. Abnormal low plasma TSH has also been shown to be a risk factor for developing HF in several recent studies, and they suggest that TSH is an independent predictor of clinical outcome including death and cardiac hospitalizations. Therefore, physicians should consider all these concepts when managing a patient with heart failure, not only for a clear diagnosis, but also for better and accurate treatment. PMID:27098905

  9. Neuroendocrine hormone amylin in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Xi; Pan, Yan-Hong; Huang, Yan-Mei; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-01-01

    The neuroendocrine hormone amylin, also known as islet amyloid polypeptide, is co-localized, co-packaged and co-secreted with insulin from adult pancreatic islet β cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Specifically, amylin reduces secretion of nutrient-stimulated glucagon, regulates blood pressure with an effect on renin-angiotensin system, and delays gastric emptying. The physiological actions of human amylin attribute to the conformational α-helix monomers whereas the misfolding instable oligomers may be detrimental to the islet β cells and further transform to β-sheet fibrils as amyloid deposits. No direct evidence proves that the amylin fibrils in amyloid deposits cause diabetes. Here we also have performed a systematic review of human amylin gene changes and reported the S20G mutation is minor in the development of diabetes. In addition to the metabolic effects, human amylin may modulate autoimmunity and innate inflammation through regulatory T cells to impact on both human type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27162583

  10. Chemosignals, hormones, and amphibian reproduction.

    PubMed

    Woodley, Sarah

    2015-02-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Chemosignals and Reproduction". Amphibians are often thought of as relatively simple animals especially when compared to mammals. Yet the chemosignaling systems used by amphibians are varied and complex. Amphibian chemosignals are particularly important in reproduction, in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Chemosignaling is most evident in salamanders and newts, but increasing evidence indicates that chemical communication facilitates reproduction in frogs and toads as well. Reproductive hormones shape the production, dissemination, detection, and responsiveness to chemosignals. A large variety of chemosignals have been identified, ranging from simple, invariant chemosignals to complex, variable blends of chemosignals. Although some chemosignals elicit straightforward responses, others have relatively subtle effects. Review of amphibian chemosignaling reveals a number of issues to be resolved, including: 1) the significance of the complex, individually variable blends of courtship chemosignals found in some salamanders, 2) the behavioral and/or physiological functions of chemosignals found in anuran "breeding glands", 3) the ligands for amphibian V2Rs, especially V2Rs expressed in the main olfactory epithelium, and 4) the mechanism whereby transdermal delivery of chemosignals influences behavior. To date, only a handful of the more than 7000 species of amphibians has been examined. Further study of amphibians should provide additional insight to the role of chemosignals in reproduction. PMID:24945995

  11. Hormonal Treatment and Pelviscopic Myomectomy

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Rodas, E.; Semm, K.

    1995-01-01

    In cases of benign lesions, pelviscopy is used in about 70% of all abdominal operations at our Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. From 1990 to 1992, 851 patients with myomas were treated by surgery. In 57% pelviscopy, in 2% laparotomy, and in 1% hysteroscopic myomectomies were treated. In 11%, a CISH (Classical Intrafascial SEMM—serrated edged macro morcellator—Hysterectomy) without colpotomy was applied using the operative technique of pelviscopy or laparotomy. The application of this new surgical technique preserves the patient's pelvic floor (diaphragm pelvis and urogenitalis), its blood supply, and neural function. Details of the surgical techniques used in pelviscopic myomaenucleations are described. One hundred sixteen patients were treated with a gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue (GnRH-a) before the pelviscopic myomaenucleation took place. In this study, 64 (55%) patients received 3,75 mg leuprorelin, and 52 (45%), patients 3.75 mg triptorelin. The monthly injections took place over a period of 3 to 6 months. After 3 months, an identical reduction of the myomas of about 10% to 50% was observed in 103 patients (88%) in both therapy groups. The preservation of the uterus by this minimal invasive surgery technique was generally accepted. No serious complications occurred. PMID:18493368

  12. Hormone naïve prostate cancer: predicting and maximizing response intervals

    PubMed Central

    Moul, Judd W

    2015-01-01

    Hormone naïve advanced prostate cancer is subdivided into two disease states: biochemical recurrence and traditional M1 (metastatic) prostate cancer and characterized by no prior hormonal therapy or androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). In biochemical recurrence/prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence, men should be risk-stratified based on their PSA doubling time, the Gleason score and the timing of the recurrence. In general, only men who are at high risk should be considered for early/immediate ADT although this is best done using shared decision with the patient. The type of ADT to be used in biochemical recurrence ranging from oral-only peripheral blockade (peripheral androgen deprivation) to complete hormonal therapy (combined androgen blockade [CAB]) remains in debate owing to lack of randomized controlled trials (RCT). However, there is good RCT support for use of intermittent hormonal therapy (IHT). There is also limited research on biomarker response (PSA and testosterone decline) to predict prognosis. On the other hand, in the setting of M1 hormone naïve prostate cancer, there are many more RCT's to inform our decisions. CAB and gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists perhaps provide a slight efficacy advantage while IHT may be slightly inferior with minimal M1 disease. The PSA nadir at 7 months after starting ADT is a powerful prognostic tool for M1 patients. There is growing recognition that serum testosterone (T) control while on ADT is linked to the development of castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Especially for a M1 patient, maintaining a serum T below 20–30 ng dl−1 prolongs the response to ADT. Novel oral agents (abiraterone and enzalutamide) may soon find use in hormone naïve disease and may alter the treatment landscape. Despite over 75 years of experience with ADT, many questions remain, and the field continues to evolve. PMID:26112479

  13. Gastrointestinal hormones stimulate growth of Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors by transactivating the EGF receptor

    PubMed Central

    Di Florio, Alessia; Sancho, Veronica; Moreno, Paola; Fave, Gianfranco Delle; Jensen, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors[NETs] usually pursuit a benign course, but some show aggressive behavior. The treatment of patients with advanced NETs is marginally effective and new approaches are needed. In other tumors, transactivation of the EGF receptor(EGFR) by growth factors, gastrointestinal(GI) hormones and lipids can stimulate growth, which has led to new treatments. Recent studies show a direct correlation between NET malignancy and EGFR expression, EGFR inhibition decreases basal NET growth and an autocrine growth effect exerted by GI hormones, for some NETs. To determine if GI hormones can stimulate NET growth by inducing transactivation of EGFR, we examined the ability of EGF, TGFα and various GI hormones to stimulate growth of the human foregut carcinoid, BON, the somatostatinoma QGP-1 and the rat islet tumor, Rin-14B-cell lines. The EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, AG1478 strongly inhibited EGF and the GI hormones stimulated cell growth, both in BON and QGP-1 cells. In all the three neuroendocrine cell lines studied, we found EGF, TGFα and the other growth-stimulating GI hormones increased Tyr1068 EGFR phosphorylation. In BON cells, both the GI hormones neurotensin and a bombesin analogue caused a time- and dose-dependent increase in EGFR phosphorylation, which was strongly inhibited by AG1478. Moreover, we found this stimulated phosphorylation was dependent on Src kinases, PKCs, matrix metalloproteinase activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. These results raise the possibility that disruption of this signaling cascade by either EGFR inhibition alone or combined with receptor antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of foregut NETs/PETs. PMID:23220008

  14. Adaptive diversity: hormones and metabolism in freshwaters.

    PubMed

    Laudet, Vincent

    2010-12-01

    Genes underlying the evolution of morphological traits have recently been identified in a number of model species. In the stickleback, the metabolic adaptations to a freshwater habitat have now been linked to a well-known hormonal system. PMID:21145015

  15. Genetics Home Reference: combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... People with combined pituitary hormone deficiency may have hypothyroidism, which is underactivity of the butterfly-shaped thyroid gland in the lower neck. Hypothyroidism can cause many symptoms, including weight gain and ...

  16. Male reproductive hormone profile in Rwandan students.

    PubMed

    Gahutu, J B

    2014-12-01

    To illustrate the male reproductive hormone profile, a study was conducted among healthy male university students living at Butare, Rwanda (altitude: 1 768 m, barometric pressure: 629 mm Hg). Venous blood was collected in the morning, after overnight fasting. Hormonal assays were performed by classical sandwich ELISA technique. Mean values (±standard deviation SD) were follicle-stimulating hormone FSH: 3.7 ± 1.6 IU l(-1) ; luteinising hormone LH: 3.6 ± 2.2 IU l(-1) ; and total testosterone: 21.0 ± 7.5 nm. The results compare well with findings of other studies. PMID:24313662

  17. Strategies for the Determination of Plant Hormones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Gregory C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes methods for isolating, purifying, and analyzing plant hormones (molecules involved in plant growth regulation and development). The presentation reflects the historical development of analyses, beginning with bioassays and ending with novel immunochemical assays. (JN)

  18. Management of Hormone Deprivation Symptoms After Cancer.

    PubMed

    Faubion, Stephanie S; Loprinzi, Charles L; Ruddy, Kathryn J

    2016-08-01

    Cancer survivors often experience symptoms related to hormone deprivation, including vasomotor symptoms, genitourinary symptoms, and sexual health concerns. These symptoms can occur due to natural menopause in midlife women, or they can be brought on by oncologic therapies in younger women or men. We searched PubMed for English-language studies from January 1990 through January 2016 to identify relevant articles on the management of hormone deprivation symptoms, including vasomotor, genitourinary, and sexual symptoms in patients with cancer. The search terms used included hormone deprivation, vasomotor symptoms, hot flash, vaginal dryness, sexual dysfunction, and breast cancer. This manuscript provides a comprehensive description of data supporting the treatment of symptoms associated with hormone deprivation. PMID:27492917

  19. IODIDE DEFICIENCY, THYROID HORMONES, AND NEURODEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis. Severe iodide insufficiency during early development is associated with cognitive deficits. Environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under conditio...

  20. Neuroendocrine Regulation of Growth Hormone Secretion.

    PubMed

    Steyn, Frederik J; Tolle, Virginie; Chen, Chen; Epelbaum, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the main findings that emerged in the intervening years since the previous volume on hormonal control of growth in the section on the endocrine system of the Handbook of Physiology concerning the intra- and extrahypothalamic neuronal networks connecting growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin hypophysiotropic neurons and the integration between regulators of food intake/metabolism and GH release. Among these findings, the discovery of ghrelin still raises many unanswered questions. One important event was the application of deconvolution analysis to the pulsatile patterns of GH secretion in different mammalian species, including Man, according to gender, hormonal environment and ageing. Concerning this last phenomenon, a great body of evidence now supports the role of an attenuation of the GHRH/GH/Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis in the control of mammalian aging. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:687-735, 2016. PMID:27065166

  1. Climacteric in untreated isolated growth hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Menilson; Salvatori, Roberto; Oliveira, Carla R.P.; Pereira, Rossana M.C.; Souza, Anita H.O.; Nobrega, Luciana M.A.; Cruz, Edla do A.C.; Menezes, Marcos; Alves, Érica O.; Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the time, intensity of symptoms, hormonal profile, and related morbidity of climacteric in women with untreated isolated growth hormone (GH) deficiency (IGHD). Design Women belonging to a large Brazilian kindred with IGHD due to a homozygous mutation in the GH-releasing hormone receptor gene were studied. None of them had ever received GH replacement therapy. A two-step protocol was performed. In the first case-control experiment, aimed to determine the age at climacteric, we compared eight women with IGHD and 32 normal women between 37 and 55 years of age. In the second cross-sectional experiment, aimed to determine the severity of climacteric symptoms, seven women with IGHD (aged 47-65 y) were compared with 13 controls (aged 44-65 y). The Kupperman Index scores, serum follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, and estradiol levels were determined, and pelvic and mammary ultrasonography, mammography, and colpocytology were performed. Results The number of women with follicle-stimulating hormone above 20 mIU/mL was higher in women with IGHD than controls. Kupperman’s Index was not different between the two groups. Menarche had been delayed and parity was lower in women with IGHD. Hormonal profile was similar, but prolactin was lower in women with IGHD. Uterine volume was smaller in women with IGHD, and endometrial thickness and ovarian volume were similar in the two groups. No difference in breast images or in colpocytology was observed between the two groups. Conclusions Menarche was delayed and the beginning of climacteric is anticipated in untreated lifetime IGHD, but menopausal symptoms and hormonal profile resemble the normal climacteric. PMID:18223507

  2. Young addicted men hormone profile detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieliński, Paweł; Wasiewicz, Piotr; Leszczyńska, Bożena; Gromadzka-Ostrowska, Joanna

    2010-09-01

    Hormone parameters were determined in the serum of young addicted men in order to compare them with those obtained from the group of healthy subjects. Three groups were investigated which were named opiates, mixed and control group. Statistical and data mining methods were applied to obtain significant differences. R package was used for all computation. The determination of hormones parameters provide important information relative to impact of addiction.

  3. 21 CFR 862.1545 - Parathyroid hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Parathyroid hormone test system. 862.1545 Section... Systems § 862.1545 Parathyroid hormone test system. (a) Identification. A parathyroid hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of parathyroid hormone in serum and plasma....

  4. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of human growth hormone in plasma. Human growth...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of human growth hormone in plasma. Human growth...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1545 - Parathyroid hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Parathyroid hormone test system. 862.1545 Section... Systems § 862.1545 Parathyroid hormone test system. (a) Identification. A parathyroid hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of parathyroid hormone in serum and plasma....

  9. 21 CFR 862.1545 - Parathyroid hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Parathyroid hormone test system. 862.1545 Section... Systems § 862.1545 Parathyroid hormone test system. (a) Identification. A parathyroid hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of parathyroid hormone in serum and plasma....

  10. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1545 - Parathyroid hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Parathyroid hormone test system. 862.1545 Section... Systems § 862.1545 Parathyroid hormone test system. (a) Identification. A parathyroid hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of parathyroid hormone in serum and plasma....

  12. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of human growth hormone in plasma. Human growth...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1545 - Parathyroid hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parathyroid hormone test system. 862.1545 Section... Systems § 862.1545 Parathyroid hormone test system. (a) Identification. A parathyroid hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of parathyroid hormone in serum and plasma....

  1. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of human growth hormone in plasma. Human growth...

  2. Hormonal Perturbations in Occupationally Exposed Nickel Workers

    PubMed Central

    Beshir, Safia; Ibrahim, Khadiga Salah; Shaheen, Weam; Shahy, Eman M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nickel exposure is recognized as an endocrine disruptor because of its adverse effects on reproduction. AIM: This study was designed to investigate the possible testiculo-hormonal perturbations on workers occupationally exposed to nickel and to assess its effects on human male sexual function. METHODS: Cross-sectional comparative study, comprising 105 electroplating male non-smoker, non-alcoholic workers exposed to soluble nickel and 60 controls was done. Serum luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, testosterone levels and urinary nickel concentrations were determined for the studied groups. RESULTS: Serum luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, urinary nickel and the simultaneous incidence of more than one sexual disorder were significantly higher in the exposed workers compared to controls. The occurrence of various types of sexual disorders (decreased libido, impotence and premature ejaculation) in the exposed workers was 9.5, 5.1 and 4.4 folds respectively than the controls. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to nickel produces possible testiculo-hormonal perturbations in those exposed workers. PMID:27335607

  3. Rapid steroid hormone actions via membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Nofrat; Verma, Anjali; Bivens, Caroline B; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2016-09-01

    Steroid hormones regulate a wide variety of physiological and developmental functions. Traditional steroid hormone signaling acts through nuclear and cytosolic receptors, altering gene transcription and subsequently regulating cellular activity. This is particularly important in hormonally-responsive cancers, where therapies that target classical steroid hormone receptors have become clinical staples in the treatment and management of disease. Much progress has been made in the last decade in detecting novel receptors and elucidating their mechanisms, particularly their rapid signaling effects and subsequent impact on tumorigenesis. Many of these receptors are membrane-bound and lack DNA-binding sites, functionally separating them from their classical cytosolic receptor counterparts. Membrane-bound receptors have been implicated in a number of pathways that disrupt the cell cycle and impact tumorigenesis. Among these are pathways that involve phospholipase D, phospholipase C, and phosphoinositide-3 kinase. The crosstalk between these pathways has been shown to affect apoptosis and proliferation in cardiac cells, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes as well as cancer cells. This review focuses on rapid signaling by 17β-estradiol and 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 to examine the integrated actions of classical and rapid steroid signaling pathways both in contrast to each other and in concert with other rapid signaling pathways. This new approach lends insight into rapid signaling by steroid hormones and its potential for use in targeted drug therapies that maximize the benefits of traditional steroid hormone-directed therapies while mitigating their less desirable effects. PMID:27288742

  4. Postmenopausal hormone therapy: the way ahead.

    PubMed

    Pines, Amos

    2007-05-20

    This article follows the milestones in the history of postmenopausal hormone treatment, with a look into the future. In the first era, hormones were regarded as an anti-aging panacea, the fountain of eternal youth. It was recommended then that every postmenopausal woman should consider the use of hormone replacement therapy. In the second era, people realized that hormones are medications, and as such should be given for clear and scientifically proven indications. When the issue of harm as a result of hormone treatment led to professional and public debates, the concept was changed into a clinically oriented approach commonly phrased as "the expected benefits should be weighed individually against potential risks". In the third era, individualization had a further step, stressing the prognostic importance of the following parameters: women's age, age at start of hormone use, duration of therapy, dosage, route of administration, and the exact type and combination of estrogen and progestogen. The fourth era is already knocking on our door, as new molecules are sought, which will maximize the desired effects of therapy while minimizing or eliminating the risks. The fifth era is still a wishful thinking, searching for the ultimate treatment which will be based on individual gene mapping and accurate assessment of the chance to achieve treatment goals vis-à-vis the risk of having a serious adverse event. PMID:17376615

  5. Hormone-independent pathways of sexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Renfree, Marilyn B; Chew, Keng Yih; Shaw, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    New observations over the last 25 years of hormone-independent sexual dimorphisms have gradually and unequivocally overturned the dogma, arising from Jost's elegant experiments in the mid-1900s, that all somatic sex dimorphisms in vertebrates arise from the action of gonadal hormones. Although we know that Sry, a Y-linked gene, is the primary gonadal sex determinant in mammals, more recent analysis in marsupials, mice, and finches has highlighted numerous sexual dimorphisms that are evident well before the differentiation of the testis and which cannot be explained by a sexually dimorphic hormonal environment. In marsupials, scrotal bulges and mammary primordia are visible before the testis has differentiated due to the expression of a gene(s) on the X chromosome. ZZ and ZW gynandromorph finches have brains that develop in a sexually dimorphic way dependent on their sex chromosome content. In genetically manipulated mice, it is the X chromosomes, not the gonads, that determine many characters including rate of early development, adiposity, and neural circuits. Even spotted hyenas have sexual dimorphisms that cannot be simply explained by hormonal exposure. This review discusses the recent findings that confirm that there are hormone-independent sexual dimorphisms well before the gonads begin to produce their hormones. PMID:24577198

  6. An update: salivary hormones and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Gatti, R; De Palo, E F

    2011-04-01

    Saliva contains cells and compounds, of local and non-local oral origin, namely inorganic, organic non-protein, protein/polypeptide, and lipid molecules. Moreover, some hormones, commonly assayed in plasma, such as steroids, are detectable in oral fluid and peptide/protein, and non-steroid hormones have been investigated. The sports practice environment and athletes' availability, together with hormone molecule characteristics in saliva and physical exercise behavior effects, confirm this body fluid as an alternative to serum. This review focuses on the relation between salivary steroids and psycho-physiological stress and underlines how the measurement of salivary cortisol provides an approach of self-report psychological indicator and anxiety change in relation to exercise performance. The correlation between salivary and plasma steroid hormone (cortisol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)) levels, observed during exercise, has been considered, underlining how the type, duration, and intensity of the exercise influence the salivary steroid concentrations in the same way as serum-level variations. Training conditions have been considered in relation to the salivary hormonal response. This review focuses on studies related to salivary hormone measurements, mainly steroids, in physical exercise. Saliva use in physical disciplines, as a real alternative to serum, could be a future perspective. PMID:21129038

  7. Stability of cytotoxic luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone conjugate (AN-152) containing doxorubicin 14-O-hemiglutarate in mouse and human serum in vitro: implications for the design of preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Nagy, A; Plonowski, A; Schally, A V

    2000-01-18

    Recently, we developed a series of cytotoxic peptide conjugates containing 14-O-glutaryl esters of doxorubicin (DOX) or 2-pyrrolino-DOX (AN-201). Serum carboxylesterase enzymes (CE) can partially hydrolyze these conjugates in the circulation, releasing the cytotoxic radical, before the targeting is complete. CE activity in serum of nude mice is about 10 times higher than in human serum. Thus, we found that the t(1/2) of AN-152, an analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) containing DOX, at 0.3 mg/ml is 19. 49 +/- 0.74 min in mouse serum and 126.06 +/- 3.03 min in human serum in vitro. The addition of a CE inhibitor, diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), to mouse serum in vitro significantly (P < 0. 01) prolongs the t(1/2) of AN-152 to 69.63 +/- 4.44 min. When DFP is used in vivo, 400 nmol/kg cytotoxic somatostatin analog AN-238 containing AN-201 is well tolerated by mice, whereas all animals die after the same dose without DFP. In contrast, DFP has no effect on the tolerance of AN-201. A better tolerance to AN-238 after DFP treatment is due to the selective uptake of AN-238 by somatostatin receptor-positive tissues. Our results demonstrate that the suppression of the CE activity in nude mice greatly decreases the toxicity of cytotoxic hybrids containing 2-pyrrolino-DOX 14-O-hemiglutarate and brings this animal model closer to the conditions that exist in humans. The use of DFP together with these peptide conjugates in nude mice permits a better understanding of their mechanism of action and improves the clinical predictability of the oncological and toxicological results. PMID:10639165

  8. Advance directives

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Rory; Mailo, Kevin; Angeles, Ricardo; Agarwal, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To establish the prevalence of patients with advance directives in a family practice, and to describe patients’ perspectives on a family doctor’s role in initiating discussions about advance directives. Design A self-administered patient questionnaire. Setting A busy urban family medicine teaching clinic in Hamilton, Ont. Participants A convenience sample of adult patients attending the clinic over the course of a typical business week. Main outcome measures The prevalence of advance directives in the patient population was determined, and the patients’ expectations regarding the role of their family doctors were elucidated. Results The survey population consisted of 800 participants (a response rate of 72.5%) well distributed across age groups; 19.7% had written advance directives and 43.8% had previously discussed the topic of advance directives, but only 4.3% of these discussions had occurred with family doctors. In 5.7% of cases, a family physician had raised the issue; 72.3% of respondents believed patients should initiate the discussion. Patients who considered advance directives extremely important were significantly more likely to want their family doctors to start the conversation (odds ratio 3.98; P < .05). Conclusion Advance directives were not routinely addressed in the family practice. Most patients preferred to initiate the discussion of advance directives. However, patients who considered the subject extremely important wanted their family doctors to initiate the discussion. PMID:25873704

  9. Toward a consensus nomenclature for insect neuropeptides and peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Coast, Geoffrey M; Schooley, David A

    2011-03-01

    The nomenclature currently in use for insect neuropeptide and peptide hormone families is reviewed and suggestions are made as to how it can be rationalized. Based upon this review, a number of conventions are advanced as a guide to a more rationale nomenclature. The scheme that is put forward builds upon the binomial nomenclature scheme proposed by Raina and Gäde in 1988, when just over 20 insect neuropeptides had been identified. Known neuropeptides and peptide hormones are assigned to 32 structurally distinct families, frequently with overlapping functions. The names given to these families are those that are currently in use, and describe a biological function, homology to known invertebrate/vertebrate peptides, or a conserved structural motif. Interspecific isoforms are identified using a five-letter code to indicate genus and species names, and intraspecific isoforms are identified by Roman or Arabic numerals, with the latter used to signify the order in which sequences are encoded on a prepropeptide. The proposed scheme is sufficiently flexible to allow the incorporation of novel peptides, and could be extended to other arthropods and non-arthropod invertebrates. PMID:21093513

  10. Active metabolism of thyroid hormone during metamorphosis of amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Paris, Mathilde; Hillenweck, Anne; Bertrand, Stéphanie; Delous, Georges; Escriva, Hector; Zalko, Daniel; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Laudet, Vincent

    2010-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs), and more precisely the 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T(3)) acetic derivative 3,3',5-triiodothyroacetic acid (TRIAC), have been shown to activate metamorphosis in amphioxus. However, it remains unknown whether TRIAC is endogenously synthesized in amphioxus and more generally whether an active TH metabolism is regulating metamorphosis. Here we show that amphioxus naturally produces TRIAC from its precursors T(3) and l-thyroxine (T(4)), supporting its possible role as the active TH in amphioxus larvae. In addition, we show that blocking TH production inhibits metamorphosis and that this effect is compensated by exogenous T(3), suggesting that a peak of TH production is important for advancement of proper metamorphosis. Moreover, several amphioxus genes encoding proteins previously proposed to be involved in the TH signaling pathway display expression profiles correlated with metamorphosis. In particular, thyroid hormone receptor (TR) and deiodinases gene expressions are either up- or down-regulated during metamorphosis and by TH treatments. Overall, these results suggest that an active TH metabolism controls metamorphosis in amphioxus, and that endogenous TH production and metabolism as well as TH-regulated metamorphosis are ancestral in the chordate lineage. PMID:21558188

  11. Recombinant growth hormone treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Melmed, S; Sherman, B; Frane, J; Munsat, T L; Festoff, B W

    1993-06-01

    Based on the known trophic effects of growth hormone (GH) on nerve and muscle 75 patients with ALS were treated for up to 18 months with synthetic human growth hormone (Protropin) or a placebo. The course of ALS was assessed serially using a quantitative (TQNE) neuromuscular and manual exam (MRC) and laboratory chemistries. Average insulin-related growth factor (IGF-I) values increased from 1.2 to 2.3 U/mL in the treated group. Surprisingly, serum insulin levels did not increase. Hyperglycemia was noted in only 2 patients of the 38 patients receiving hGH, and this resolved with cessation of treatment. Over the 12 months of treatment there were 11 deaths (6 controls, 5 treated). Survival analysis, performed approximately 12 months following cessation of treatment, did not reveal a difference between the treatment and placebo group. The TQNE scores declined inexorably in both the control and treated group. Retrospective analysis of the TQNE data indicated a poor prognosis for patients who lost arm strength early. A correlation between the TQNE and MRC scores was evident at early stages of motor unit loss, less so when muscle weakness was advanced. PMID:8502260

  12. The loss of muscle mass and sarcopenia: non hormonal intervention.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Gómez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Viña, Jose

    2011-12-01

    Muscle aging is a key component of the increase in frailty in human populations. The generation of critical levels of power is a prerequisite to perform simple tasks of daily living, such as rising from a chair or climbing stairs. There is great scientific and social interest to determine which behaviors can lead to the maintenance of the muscle mass in young immobilized subjects and in the elderly. Several hormonal treatments have been proposed for the treatment of sarcopenia. However, the side effects associated to these treatments emphasize the need of finding non-toxic and non-hormonal treatments that help increase muscle strength, improve muscle function, and decrease the degree of dependency in the old population. Recently, several studies have shed new light on this topic. Any medical efforts to develop treatments to prevent muscle dysfunction leading to sarcopenia, and eventually frailty, will be a major breakthrough in the public health in advances countries. Moreover, any significant improvement in the loss of muscle function will be a major breakthrough in the health and welfare of the population. PMID:21920428

  13. Peptidomics for the discovery and characterization of neuropeptides and hormones

    PubMed Central

    Romanova, Elena V.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of neuropeptides as signaling molecules with paracrine or hormonal regulatory functions has led to trailblazing advances in physiology and fostered the characterization of numerous neuropeptide-binding G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) as potential drug targets. The impact on human health has been tremendous: approximately 30% of commercial drugs act via the GPCR pathway. However, about 25% of the GPCRs encoded by the mammalian genome still lack their pharmacological identity. Searching for the orphan GPCR endogenous ligands that likely are neuropeptides has proved to be a formidable task. Here we describe the mass spectrometry-based technologies and experimental strategies that have been successful in achieving high throughput characterization of endogenous peptides in nervous and endocrine systems. PMID:26143240

  14. Growth Hormone Research Society perspective on the development of long-acting growth hormone preparations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Growth Hormone (GH) Research Society (GRS) convened a workshop to address important issues regarding trial design, efficacy, and safety of long-acting growth hormone preparations (LAGH). A closed meeting of 55 international scientists with expertise in GH, including pediatric and adult endocrino...

  15. Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Xenopus Metamorphosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in anuran larvae rise rapidly during metamorphosis. Such a rise in an adult anuran would inevitably trigger a negative feedback response resulting in decreased synthesis and secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by the pituitary....

  16. Vascular Effects of Estrogenic Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reslan, Ossama M.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in men and postmenopausal women (Post-MW) than premenopausal women (Pre-MW). Despite recent advances in preventive measures, the incidence of CVD in women has shown a rise that matched the increase in the Post-MW population. The increased incidence of CVD in Post-MW has been related to the decline in estrogen levels, and hence suggested vascular benefits of endogenous estrogen. Experimental studies have identified estrogen receptor ERα, ERβ and a novel estrogen binding membrane protein GPR30 (GPER) in blood vessels of humans and experimental animals. The interaction of estrogen with vascular ERs mediates both genomic and non-genomic effects. Estrogen promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation by increasing nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and hyperpolarizing factor. Estrogen also inhibits the mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contraction including [Ca2+]i, protein kinase C and Rho-kinase. Additional effects of estrogen on the vascular cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, lipid profile and the vascular inflammatory response have been reported. In addition to the experimental evidence in animal models and vascular cells, initial observational studies in women using menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) have suggested that estrogen may protect against CVD. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) such as the Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS) and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), which examined the effects of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) in older women with established CVD (HERS) or without overt CVD (WHI), failed to demonstrate protective vascular effects of estrogen treatment. Despite the initial set-back from the results of MHT RCTs, growing evidence now supports the ‘timing hypothesis’, which suggests that MHT could increase the risk of CVD if started late after menopause, but may produce beneficial cardiovascular effects in younger women during the perimenopausal period. The choice of

  17. Identification of thyroid hormone response elements in vivo using mice expressing a tagged thyroid hormone receptor α1

    PubMed Central

    Dudazy-Gralla, Susi; Nordström, Kristina; Hofmann, Peter Josef; Meseh, Dina Abdul; Schomburg, Lutz; Vennström, Björn; Mittag, Jens

    2013-01-01

    TRα1 (thyroid hormone receptor α1) is well recognized for its importance in brain development. However, due to the difficulties in predicting TREs (thyroid hormone response elements) in silico and the lack of suitable antibodies against TRα1 for ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation), only a few direct TRα1 target genes have been identified in the brain. Here we demonstrate that mice expressing a TRα1–GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion protein from the endogenous TRα locus provide a valuable animal model to identify TRα1 target genes. To this end, we analysed DNA–TRα1 interactions in vivo using ChIP with an anti-GFP antibody. We validated our system using established TREs from neurogranin and hairless, and by verifying additional TREs from known TRα1 target genes in brain and heart. Moreover, our model system enabled the identification of novel TRα1 target genes such as RNF166 (ring finger protein 166). Our results demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing a tagged nuclear receptor constitute a feasible approach to study receptor–DNA interactions in vivo, circumventing the need for specific antibodies. Models like the TRα1–GFP mice may thus pave the way for genome-wide mapping of nuclear receptor-binding sites, and advance the identification of novel target genes in vivo. PMID:23398480

  18. Sexual hormones in human skin.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, C C; Chen, W-C; Thornton, M J; Qin, K; Rosenfield, R

    2007-02-01

    The skin locally synthesizes significant amounts of sexual hormones with intracrine or paracrine actions. The local level of each sexual steroid depends upon the expression of each of the androgen- and estrogen-synthesizing enzymes in each cell type, with sebaceous glands and sweat glands being the major contributors. Sebocytes express very little of the key enzyme, cytochrome P450c17, necessary for synthesis of the androgenic prohormones dehydroepiandrosterone and androstenedione, however, these prohormones can be converted by sebocytes and sweat glands, and probably also by dermal papilla cells, into more potent androgens like testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Five major enzymes are involved in the activation and deactivation of androgens in skin. Androgens affect several functions of human skin, such as sebaceous gland growth and differentiation, hair growth, epidermal barrier homeostasis and wound healing. Their effects are mediated by binding to the nuclear androgen receptor. Changes of isoenzyme and/or androgen receptor levels may have important implications in the development of hyperandrogenism and the associated skin diseases such as acne, seborrhoea, hirsutism and androgenetic alopecia. On the other hand, estrogens have been implicated in skin aging, pigmentation, hair growth, sebum production and skin cancer. Estrogens exert their actions through intracellular receptors or via cell surface receptors, which activate specific second messenger signaling pathways. Recent studies suggest specific site-related distribution of ERalpha and ERbeta in human skin. In contrast, progestins play no role in the pathogenesis of skin disorders. However, they play a major role in the treatment of hirsutism and acne vulgaris, where they are prescribed as components of estrogen-progestin combination pills and as anti-androgens. These combinations enhance gonadotropin suppression of ovarian androgen production. Estrogen-progestin treatment can reduce the need for shaving

  19. Circadian and sleep-dependent regulation of hormone release in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeisler, C. A.; Klerman, E. B.

    1999-01-01

    Daily oscillations characterize the release of nearly every hormone. The circadian pacemaker, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, generates circadian, approximately 24-hour rhythms in many physiologic functions. However, the observed hormonal oscillations do not simply reflect the output of this internal clock. Instead, daily hormonal profiles are the product of a complex interaction between the output of the circadian pacemaker, periodic changes in behavior, light exposure, neuroendocrine feedback mechanisms, gender, age, and the timing of sleep and wakefulness. The interaction of these factors can affect hormonal secretory pulse frequency and amplitude, with each endocrine system differentially affected by these factors. This chapter examines recent advances in understanding the effects on endocrine rhythms of a number of these factors. Sleep exerts a profound effect on endocrine secretion. Sleep is a dynamic process that is characterized by periodic changes in electrophysiologic activity. These electrophysiologic changes, which are used to mark the state and depth of sleep, are associated with periodic, short-term variations in hormonal levels. The secretion of hormones such as renin and human growth hormone are strongly influenced by sleep or wake state, while melatonin and cortisol levels are relatively unaffected by sleep or wake state. In addition, sleep is associated with changes in posture, behavior, and light exposure, each of which is known to affect endocrine secretion. Furthermore, the tight concordance of habitual sleep and wake times with certain circadian phases has made it difficult to distinguish sleep and circadian effects on these hormones. Specific protocols, designed to extract circadian and sleep information semi-independently, have been developed and have yielded important insights into the effects of these regulatory processes. These results may help to account for changes in endocrine rhythms observed in circadian

  20. How to use and interpret hormone ratios.

    PubMed

    Sollberger, Silja; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Hormone ratios have become increasingly popular throughout the neuroendocrine literature since they offer a straightforward way to simultaneously analyze the effects of two interdependent hormones. However, the analysis of ratios is associated with statistical and interpretational concerns which have not been sufficiently considered in the context of endocrine research. The aim of this article, therefore, is to demonstrate and discuss these issues, and to suggest suitable ways to address them. In a first step, we use exemplary testosterone and cortisol data to illustrate that one major concern of ratios lies in their distribution and inherent asymmetry. As a consequence, results of parametric statistical analyses are affected by the ultimately arbitrary decision of which way around the ratio is computed (i.e., A/B or B/A). We suggest the use of non-parametric methods as well as the log-transformation of hormone ratios as appropriate methods to deal with these statistical problems. However, in a second step, we also discuss the complicated interpretation of ratios, and propose moderation analysis as an alternative and oftentimes more insightful approach to ratio analysis. In conclusion, we suggest that researchers carefully consider which statistical approach is best suited to investigate reciprocal hormone effects. With regard to the hormone ratio method, further research is needed to specify what exactly this index reflects on the biological level and in which cases it is a meaningful variable to analyze. PMID:26521052

  1. Hormonal control of sulfate uptake and assimilation.

    PubMed

    Koprivova, Anna; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2016-08-01

    Plant hormones have a plethora of functions in control of plant development, stress response, and primary metabolism, including nutrient homeostasis. In the plant nutrition, the interplay of hormones with responses to nitrate and phosphate deficiency is well described, but relatively little is known about the interaction between phytohormones and regulation of sulfur metabolism. As for other nutrients, sulfate deficiency results in modulation of root architecture, where hormones are expected to play an important role. Accordingly, sulfate deficiency induces genes involved in metabolism of tryptophane and auxin. Also jasmonate biosynthesis is induced, pointing to the need of increase the defense capabilities of the plants when sulfur is limiting. However, hormones affect also sulfate uptake and assimilation. The pathway is coordinately induced by jasmonate and the key enzyme, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase, is additionally regulated by ethylene, abscisic acid, nitric oxid, and other phytohormones. Perhaps the most intriguing link between hormones and sulfate assimilation is the fact that the main regulator of the response to sulfate starvation, SULFATE LIMITATION1 (SLIM1) belongs to the family of ethylene related transcription factors. We will review the current knowledge of interplay between phytohormones and control of sulfur metabolism and discuss the main open questions. PMID:26810064

  2. [Hormonal treatments for fertility disorders in cattle].

    PubMed

    Gundling, N; Feldmann, M; Hoedemaker, M

    2012-01-01

    In dairy cows, hormonal treatments are commonly implemented for acyclicity, silent heat and endometritis. Before treatment, causes of infertility need to be detected and severe failures in housing, feeding or other diseases must be eliminated. Without sustainable improvement of herd management, the use of intensive hormonal treatments will not improve reproductive performance. The most common cause of anoestrous is silent heat. In cows with a palpable corpus luteum, injection of prostaglandin F2α (PGF) reliably induces oestrous. A satisfactory treatment for acyclicity (ovarian dystrophy, ovarian cysts) does not exist. Combinations of different hormones have greater treatment success than a single use of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) or human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). Strategic use of PGF during the early postpartum period cannot be recommended because positive effects on uterus involution and resumption of the oestrous cycle after calving have not been verified. In contrast, application of GnRH combined with PGF in the puerperal phase appeared to have positive effects on fertility of cows with endometritis. The same applies to PGF for cows with chronic endometritis. Cases of endometritis with fetid odour of vaginal mucus or isolation of Trueperella pyogenes should be treated with antibiotics. Treatment before the 27th day post partum is not advisable. In conclusion, hormonal treatments can be used to treat fertility disorders. Nevertheless, in order to enhance the reproductive performance at the herd level, a sustainable improvement of the general conditions (housing, feeding, animal health, management) is a prerequisite. PMID:22911233

  3. Hormonal regulation of secondary cell wall formation.

    PubMed

    Didi, Vojtěch; Jackson, Phil; Hejátko, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Secondary cell walls (SCWs) have critical functional importance but also constitute a high proportion of the plant biomass and have high application potential. This is true mainly for the lignocellulosic constituents of the SCWs in xylem vessels and fibres, which form a structured layer between the plasma membrane and the primary cell wall (PCW). Specific patterning of the SCW thickenings contributes to the mechanical properties of the different xylem cell types, providing the plant with mechanical support and facilitating the transport of solutes via vessels. In the last decade, our knowledge of the basic molecular mechanisms controlling SCW formation has increased substantially. Several members of the multi-layered regulatory cascade participating in the initiation and transcriptional regulation of SCW formation have been described, and the first cellular components determining the pattern of SCW at the subcellular resolution are being uncovered. The essential regulatory role of phytohormones in xylem development is well known and the molecular mechanisms that link hormonal signals to SCW formation are emerging. Here, we review recent knowledge about the role of individual plant hormones and hormonal crosstalk in the control over the regulatory cascades guiding SCW formation and patterning. Based on the analogy between many of the mechanisms operating during PCW and SCW formation, recently identified mechanisms underlying the hormonal control of PCW remodelling are discussed as potentially novel mechanisms mediating hormonal regulatory inputs in SCW formation. PMID:26002972

  4. Hormonal Regulation of Nuclear Permeability*◆

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Elizabeth M.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Sehgal, Sona; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Transport into the nucleus is critical for regulation of gene transcription and other intranuclear events. Passage of molecules into the nucleus depends in part upon their size and the presence of appropriate targeting sequences. However, little is known about the effects of hormones or their second messengers on transport across the nuclear envelope. We used localized, two-photon activation of a photoactivatable green fluorescent protein to investigate whether hormones, via their second messengers, could alter nuclear permeability. Vasopressin other hormones that increase cytosolic Ca2+ and activate protein kinase C increased permeability across the nuclear membrane of SKHep1 liver cells in a rapid unidirectional manner. An increase in cytosolic Ca2+ was both necessary and sufficient for this process. Furthermore, localized photorelease of caged Ca2+ near the nuclear envelope resulted in a local increase in nuclear permeability. Neither activation nor inhibition of protein kinase C affected nuclear permeability. These findings provide evidence that hormones linking to certain G protein-coupled receptors increase nuclear permeability via cytosolic Ca2+. Short term regulation of nuclear permeability may provide a novel mechanism by which such hormones permit transcription factors and other regulatory molecules to enter the nucleus, thereby regulating gene transcription in target cells. PMID:17158097

  5. Sex hormones and brain dopamine functions.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor-Zarate, Ramon; Cruz, Gonzalo; Renard, Georgina M; Espinosa, Pedro; Ramirez, Victor D

    2014-01-01

    Sex hormones exert differential effects on a variety of sensitive tissues like the reproductive tract, gonads, liver, bone and adipose tissue, among others. In the brain, sex hormones act as neuroactive steroids regulating the function of neuroendocrine diencephalic structures like the hypothalamus. In addition, steroids can exert physiological effects upon cortical, limbic and midbrain structures, influencing different behaviors such as memory, learning, mood and reward. In the last three decades, the role of sex hormones on monoamine neurotransmitters in extra-hypothalamic areas related to motivated behaviors, learning and locomotion has been the focus of much research. The purpose of this thematic issue is to present the state of art concerning the effects of sex hormones on the neurochemical regulation of dopaminergic midbrain areas involved in neurobiological and pathological processes, such as addiction to drugs of abuse. We also discuss evidence of how neonatal exposure to sex hormones or endocrine disrupting chemicals can produce long-term changes on the neurochemical regulation of dopaminergic neurons in the limbic and midbrain areas. PMID:25540983

  6. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Glinsky, Gennadi V.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  7. Sex Hormone Receptor Repertoire in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Gerald M.; Fell, Ryan G.

    2013-01-01

    Classification of breast cancer as endocrine sensitive, hormone dependent, or estrogen receptor (ER) positive refers singularly to ERα. One of the oldest recognized tumor targets, disruption of ERα-mediated signaling, is believed to be the mechanistic mode of action for all hormonal interventions used in treating this disease. Whereas ERα is widely accepted as the single most important predictive factor (for response to endocrine therapy), the presence of the receptor in tumor cells is also of prognostic value. Even though the clinical relevance of the two other sex hormone receptors, namely, ERβ and the androgen receptor remains unclear, two discordant phenomena observed in hormone-dependent breast cancers could be causally related to ERβ-mediated effects and androgenic actions. Nonetheless, our understanding of regulatory molecules and resistance mechanisms remains incomplete, further compromising our ability to develop novel therapeutic strategies that could improve disease outcomes. This review focuses on the receptor-mediated actions of the sex hormones in breast cancer. PMID:24324894

  8. Metabolic hormones in saliva: origins and functions

    PubMed Central

    Zolotukhin, S.

    2012-01-01

    The salivary proteome consists of thousands of proteins, which include, among others, hormonal modulators of energy intake and output. Although the functions of this prominent category of hormones in whole body energy metabolism are well characterized, their functions in the oral cavity, whether as a salivary component, or when expressed in taste cells, are less studied and poorly understood. The respective receptors for the majority of salivary metabolic hormones have been also shown to be expressed in salivary glands, taste cells, or other cells in the oral mucosa. This review provides a comprehensive account of the gastrointestinal hormones, adipokines, and neuropeptides identified in saliva, salivary glands, or lingual epithelium, as well as their respective cognate receptors expressed in the oral cavity. Surprisingly, few functions are assigned to salivary metabolic hormones, and these functions are mostly associated with the modulation of taste perception. Because of the well-characterized correlation between impaired oral nutrient sensing and increased energy intake and body mass index, a conceptually provocative point of view is introduced, whereupon it is argued that targeted changes in the composition of saliva could affect whole body metabolism in response to the activation of cognate receptors expressed locally in the oral mucosa. PMID:22994880

  9. Sex hormone profiles of premenarcheal athletes.

    PubMed

    Peltenburg, A L; Erich, W B; Thijssen, J J; Veeman, W; Jansen, M; Bernink, M J; Zonderland, M L; van den Brande, J L; Huisveld, I A

    1984-01-01

    Female gymnasts have a delayed onset and probably retarded progression of puberty. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the delay in onset of puberty in gymnasts as compared to girl swimmers is modulated by a lower estrone level due to a smaller amount of body fat. The sex-hormone and gonadotropin levels of 46 gymnasts and 37 girl swimmers of the same biological maturation (breast development: M = 1 or M = 2) were studied. In each subject the following hormones were measured in plasma: estrone, 17-beta-estradiol, DHEAS, testosterone, androstenedione, LH, and FSH. In prepubertal children (M = 1) the levels of estrone, testosterone, and androstenedione were lower in the gymnastic group as compared to the swimming group. In the early pubertal (M = 2) gymnastic and swimming groups these hormone levels were no longer different. The other hormone levels were not significantly different in either the prepubertal groups or the early pubertal ones. Within the total prepubertal group there is a clear relationship between the estrone levels and the levels of testosterone and androstenedione, but not between estrone and 17-beta-estradiol, nor between the calculated fat mass and any of the hormone levels. It appears that the androstenedione and testosterone levels are responsible for the difference in estrone level, rather than the amount of body fat. PMID:6236076

  10. Obestatin: an interesting but controversial gut hormone.

    PubMed

    Lacquaniti, Antonio; Donato, Valentina; Chirico, Valeria; Buemi, Antoine; Buemi, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Obestatin is a 23-amino acid peptide hormone released from the stomach and is present not only in the gastrointestinal tract, but also in the spleen, mammary gland, breast milk and plasma. Obestatin appears to function as part of a complex gut-brain network whereby hormones and substances from the stomach and intestines signal the brain about satiety or hunger. In contrast to ghrelin, which causes hyperphagia and obesity, obestatin appears to act as an anorectic hormone, decreasing food intake and reducing body weight gain. Further studies have shown that obestatin is also involved in improving memory, regulating sleep, affecting cell proliferation, increasing the secretion of pancreatic juice enzymes and inhibiting glucose-induced insulin secretion. This hormone has not only been studied in the field of physiology but also in the fields of obesity and diabetes mellitus, and in patients with psychogenic eating disorders. Obestatin has a role in regulating the cell cycle by exerting proliferative effects that may be seen in cell physiology and oncology. Given the current controversy regarding the effects of obestatin and its cognate ligand, this article provides the latest review of the physiological and pathological characteristics of this hormone. PMID:22156552

  11. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Davis, Paul J; Glinsky, Gennadi V; Lin, Hung-Yun; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  12. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  13. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Antonio; Di Segni, Chantal; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Silvestrini, Andrea; Meucci, Elisabetta; Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases. PMID:27051079

  14. Steroid hormone sulphation in lead workers.

    PubMed Central

    Apostoli, P; Romeo, L; Peroni, E; Ferioli, A; Ferrari, S; Pasini, F; Aprili, F

    1989-01-01

    The metabolism of steroid hormones has been investigated in 10 workers exposed to lead and in 10 non-exposed subjects to determine whether lead interferes with the first or second phase reactions of steroid hormone biotransformation, or both. In the exposed workers blood lead concentrations (PbB) ranged from 45 to 69 micrograms/100 ml; in the controls PbB was less than 25 micrograms/100 ml. No statistical differences were found for the total amount of the urinary hormone metabolites, but a drop of about 50% was observed for the sulphated portion. It is suggested that lead interferes with the mechanisms of sulphoconjugation through an effect on the cytosol enzymes sulphotransferase and sulphokinase. PMID:2930732

  15. Should dermatologists prescribe hormonal contraceptives for acne?

    PubMed

    Harper, Julie C

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the primary factors contributing to the development of acne vulgaris is excess sebum. Sebaceous glands and sebum excretion are regulated, at least in part, by androgen hormones. Acne treatments that block this androgen effect include spironolactone and combination oral contraceptives (COC). Three COC are now FDA approved to treat moderate acne. Dermatologists must become experts at prescribing these hormonal contraceptives. Likewise, it is vital to be aware of contraindications to hormonal contraceptive therapy. Proper patient selection relies on an appropriate medical history and an assessment of blood pressure. A pelvic exam and/or Papanicolaou smear are not required prior to initiating therapy with a COC. It is important to counsel patients about potential adverse effects of COC pills and to establish appropriate expectations concerning acne improvement. PMID:19845722

  16. Plant hormone interactions: how complex are they?

    PubMed

    Ross, John J; Weston, Diana E; Davidson, Sandra E; Reid, James B

    2011-04-01

    Models describing plant hormone interactions are often complex and web-like. Here we assess several suggested interactions within one experimental system, elongating pea internodes. Results from this system indicate that at least some suggested interactions between auxin, gibberellins (GAs), brassinosteroids (BRs), abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene do not occur in this system or occur in the reverse direction to that suggested. Furthermore, some of the interactions are relatively weak and may be of little physiological relevance. This is especially true if plant hormones are assumed to show a log-linear response curve as many empirical results suggest. Although there is strong evidence to support some interactions between hormones (e.g. auxin stimulating ethylene and bioactive GA levels), at least some of the web-like complexities do not appear to be justified or are overstated. Simpler and more targeted models may be developed by dissecting out key interactions with major physiological effects. PMID:21214880

  17. Gravitational effects on plant growth hormone concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandurski, R. S.; Schulze, A.

    1983-01-01

    Dolk's (1936) finding that more growth hormone diffuses from the lower side of a gravity-stimulated plant shoot than from the upper side is presently confirmed by means of both an isotope dilution assay and selected ion monitoring-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and it is established that the asymmetrically distributed hormone is indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). This is the first physicochemical demonstration that there is more IAA on the lower sides of a geostimulated plant shoot. It is also found that free IAA primarily occurs in the conductive vascular tissues of the shoot, while IAA esters predominate in the growing cortical cells. A highly sensitive gas chromatographic isotope dilution assay shows that the hormone asymmetry also occurs in the nonvascular tissue.

  18. Hormonal replacement therapy and gynecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Onnis, A; Marchetti, M

    1999-01-01

    The problem of quality of life and lifestyle in elderly women is today a very important social problem all over the world but particularly in rich western countries. Life expectancy of the population will be longer and longer in the future and for both females and males the biological involution correlated with the aging process must be delayed. The gonadal hormones stimulate the healthy state of the entire body (heart, skin, brain, bones, urogenital apparatus and so on) and consequently hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) is mandatory. In women the biological clock of menopause allows us to intervene at the right time, with personalized estrogenic, estroprogestinic or estroandrogenic treatments. Health benefits and groundless risks allow today a careful hormonal management even in women treated for gynaecological cancers (breast and endometrium as well). PMID:10412612

  19. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Meucci, Elisabetta; Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases. PMID:27051079

  20. Effects of retinoic acid on growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene expression and growth hormone secretion in rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Maliza, Rita; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-30

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule in embryonic development and adult tissue. The actions of RA are mediated by the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), which regulate gene expression. RAR and RXR are widely expressed in the anterior pituitary gland. RA was reported to stimulate growth hormone (GH) gene expression in the anterior pituitary cells. However, current evidence is unclear on the role of RA in gene expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (Ghrh-r), growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghs-r) and somatostatin receptors (Sst-rs). Using isolated anterior pituitary cells of rats, we examined the effects of RA on gene expression of these receptors and GH release. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10(-6) M) for 24 h increased gene expression levels of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r; however, expressions of Sst-r2 and Sst-r5 were unchanged. Combination treatment with the RAR-agonist Am80 and RXR-agonist PA024 mimicked the effects of ATRA on Ghrh-r and Ghs-r gene expressions. Exposure of isolated pituitary cells to ATRA had no effect on basal GH release. In contrast, ATRA increased growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)- and ghrelin-stimulated GH release from cultured anterior pituitary cells. Our results suggest that expressions of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r are regulated by RA through the RAR-RXR receptor complex and that RA enhances the effects of GHRH and ghrelin on GH release from the anterior pituitary gland. PMID:27052215

  1. Contraceptive Hormone Use and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shufelt, Chrisandra L.; Noel Bairey Merz, C.

    2009-01-01

    Contraceptive hormones, most commonly prescribed as oral contraceptives (OC), are a widely utilized method to prevent ovulation, implantation and therefore pregnancy. The Women’s Health Initiative demonstrated cardiovascular risk linked to menopausal hormone therapy among women without pre-existing cardiovascular disease, prompting review of the safety, efficacy and side effects of other forms of hormone therapy. A variety of basic science, animal and human data suggest that contraceptive hormones have anti-atheromatous effects, however relatively less is known regarding the impact on atherosclerosis, thrombosis, vasomotion and arrhythmogenesis. Newer generation OC formulations currently in use indicate no increased myocardial infarction (MI) risk for current users, but a persistent increased risk of venous thrombo-embolism (VTE). There are no cardiovascular data available for the newest generation contraceptive hormone formulations, including those that contain newer progestins that lower blood pressure, as well as the non-oral routes (topical and vaginal). Current guidelines indicate that, as with all medication, contraceptive hormones should be selected and initiated by weighing risks and benefits for the individual patient. Women 35 years and older should be assessed for cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, smoking, diabetes, nephropathy and other vascular diseases including migraines, prior to use. Existing data are mixed with regard to possible protection from OC for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events; longer-term cardiovascular follow-up of menopausal women with regard to prior OC use, including subgroup information regarding adequacy of ovulatory cycling, the presence of hyperandrogenic conditions, and the presence of prothrombotic genetic disorders is needed to address this important issue. PMID:19147038

  2. Negative regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein expression by steroid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Kajitani, Takashi; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Okinaga, Hiroko; Chikamori, Minoru; Iizuka, Masayoshi; Okazaki, Tomoki

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Steroid hormones repress expression of PTHrP in the cell lines where the corresponding nuclear receptors are expressed. {yields} Nuclear receptors are required for suppression of PTHrP expression by steroid hormones, except for androgen receptor. {yields} Androgen-induced suppression of PTHrP expression appears to be mediated by estrogen receptor. -- Abstract: Elevated parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is responsible for humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), which is of clinical significance in treatment of terminal patients with malignancies. Steroid hormones were known to cause suppression of PTHrP expression. However, detailed studies linking multiple steroid hormones to PTHrP expression are lacking. Here we studied PTHrP expression in response to steroid hormones in four cell lines with excessive PTHrP production. Our study established that steroid hormones negatively regulate PTHrP expression. Vitamin D receptor, estrogen receptor {alpha}, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, were required for repression of PTHrP expression by the cognate ligands. A notable exception was the androgen receptor, which was dispensable for suppression of PTHrP expression in androgen-treated cells. We propose a pathway(s) involving nuclear receptors to suppress PTHrP expression.

  3. Hemostatic Disorders in Hormonally Active Pituitary Tumors.

    PubMed

    Świątkowska-Stodulska, R; Babińska, A; Mital, A; Stodulski, D; Sworczak, K

    2015-10-01

    Endocrinopathies encompass heterogeneous diseases that can lead to hemostasis disorders at various stages over their clinical course. Normal hemostasis requires an equilibrium between the processes of coagulation and fibrinolysis, which depend on multiple activators and inhibitors. To date, the influence of various hormonal disorders on the hemostatic system has been assessed many times. The aim of this review was to analyze hemostasis abnormalities that occur in patients with hormonally active pituitary tumors: corticotropinoma, somatotropinoma, prolactinoma, gonadotropinoma and thyrotropinoma. Authors discuss studies that examined coagulation and hemostasis parameters among patients with these tumors, as well as analyze antithrombotic prophylaxis approach for endogenous hypercortisolemia subjects in particular. PMID:26285071

  4. Hormonal mechanisms in the onset of puberty

    PubMed Central

    Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Odell, William D.

    1975-01-01

    Sexual maturation is associated with increasing levels of sex steroids. These steroidal events are the result of complex changes that occur at several functional levels including the hypothalamus, pituitary, gonad and adrenal gland. These changes, as outlined in Table 3, are often interrelated. While considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the hormonal events associated with sexual maturation, many important questions remain unanswered. Further intensive investigation will be required before we have a lucid understanding of the physiological basis of the sequence of hormonal events which occur during the pubertal process. PMID:1197148

  5. Antiandrogen and hormonal treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J C

    1996-10-01

    In the treatment of acne in women, the use of antiandrogens and other hormonal approaches is a valuable alternative to standard therapy. These treatments that are based on physiologically sound principles produce gratifying results in selected women with acne, and are the primary treatment for women with hirsutism. The drugs discussed in this article include spironolactone, cyproterone acetate, flutamide, oral contraceptives, corticosteroids, finasteride, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists. Patient selection, pretreatment evaluation, and case studies also are discussed with an emphasis on practical applications. PMID:9238337

  6. How sex hormones promote skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Velders, Martina; Diel, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration efficiency declines with age for both men and women. This decline impacts on functional capabilities in the elderly and limits their ability to engage in regular physical activity and to maintain independence. Aging is associated with a decline in sex hormone production. Therefore, elucidating the effects of sex hormone substitution on skeletal muscle homeostasis and regeneration after injury or disuse is highly relevant for the aging population, where sarcopenia affects more than 30 % of individuals over 60 years of age. While the anabolic effects of androgens are well known, the effects of estrogens on skeletal muscle anabolism have only been uncovered in recent times. Hence, the purpose of this review is to provide a mechanistic insight into the regulation of skeletal muscle regenerative processes by both androgens and estrogens. Animal studies using estrogen receptor (ER) antagonists and receptor subtype selective agonists have revealed that estrogens act through both genomic and non-genomic pathways to reduce leukocyte invasion and increase satellite cell numbers in regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. Although animal studies have been more conclusive than human studies in establishing a role for sex hormones in the attenuation of muscle damage, data from a number of recent well controlled human studies is presented to support the notion that hormonal therapies and exercise induce added positive effects on functional measures and lean tissue mass. Based on the fact that aging human skeletal muscle retains the ability to adapt to exercise with enhanced satellite cell activation, combining sex hormone therapies with exercise may induce additive effects on satellite cell accretion. There is evidence to suggest that there is a 'window of opportunity' after the onset of a hypogonadal state such as menopause, to initiate a hormonal therapy in order to achieve maximal benefits for skeletal muscle health. Novel receptor subtype selective

  7. Saliva tests, part 2: salivary hormones, hormone replacement pharmacokinetics, and the importance of timely testing.

    PubMed

    Kells, John; Dollbaum, Charles M

    2009-01-01

    Published research has substantiated the accuracy of saliva testing in determining the values of specific hormones such as the major estrogens (estradiol, estrone, estriol), progesterone, androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone, testerone, 5a-dihydrotestosterone), cortisol, and melatonin. When compared with serum testing, saliva testing also offers multiple advantages in cost and convenience. In this second of a two-part series, we discuss in greater detail the types of hormones that can be accurately identified in saliva samples, the pharmacokinetics of hormone replacelment therapy,and the importance of timely testing. PMID:23966539

  8. Lower sex hormone levels are associated with more chronic musculoskeletal pain in community-dwelling elderly women.

    PubMed

    de Kruijf, Marjolein; Stolk, Lisette; Zillikens, M Carola; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Hofman, Albert; Huygen, Frank J P M; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Meurs, Joyce B J

    2016-07-01

    Chronic pain is more prevalent in women than in men, with increasing differences between sexes in advanced age. This could be caused by differences in sex hormone levels. We therefore studied the relationship between sex hormones and the prevalence and incidence of chronic pain. The association between sex hormone levels and chronic pain was examined in 9717 participants aged 45 years and older from the Rotterdam Study, a population-based study. Chronic pain was defined as pain in the lower back, hands, knees and/or hips for at least 3 months. Sex hormone levels included estrogen, testosterone, androstenedione, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone. Relationships between hormones and prevalent and new onset chronic pain were analyzed using linear and logistic regression, stratified by gender. Women with androstenedione or estradiol levels in the lowest tertile had more chronic pain (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.03-1.39 and odds ratio, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.10-1.48, respectively). Mean estradiol levels were lower among men with chronic pain (mean difference -3.88 pmol/L; P = 0.005). Lowest tertile 17-hydroxyprogesterone in women was associated with 38% more new onset pain. All these associations were independent from age, body mass index, health and lifestyle factors, and osteoarthritis. Lower sex hormone levels are associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain, independent from lifestyle and health-related factors, in community-dwelling elderly women. These results suggest that sex hormones play a role in chronic pain and should be taken into account when a patient presents with chronic pain. Therefore, sex hormones may be a potential treatment target for these patients. PMID:27331348

  9. Effect of ethanolic extract of Lepidium meyenii Walp on serum hormone levels in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongzhong; Yu, Longjiang; Jin, Wenwen; Ao, Mingzhang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of long-term ethanol extract of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) on serum hormone levels in ovariectomized (OVX) rats and compare them with the effect of diethylstilbestrol. Materials and Methods: Fifty female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized or sham operated. Both sham and OVX control groups (n = 10, respectively) received the vehicle. The remaining OVX rats were oral administrated with ethanol extract of Maca (0.096, or 0.24g/kg; n = 10, respectively) and diethylstilbestrol (0.05 mg/kg; n = 10). The treatment continued for 28 weeks. At week 12 and week 28, the blood of rats was collected and serum hormone levels, including estradiol (E2), testosterone (T) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured by radioimmunoassay. Results: At week 12, the levels of serum E2 were slightly higher in Maca groups than that in OVX group; T levels were significantly decreased; and FSH levels were advanced slightly in Maca groups than that in sham group. After 28 weeks administration, serum E2 levels in Maca-treated animals did not differ significantly from sham control, the low dose of Maca increased serum E2 levels, and Maca prevented increase in serum FSH levels compared with OVX group. Conclusions: Long-term Maca supply modulates endocrine hormone balance in OVX rats, especially it decreases enhanced FSH levels. It is proposed that Maca may become a potential choice for postmenopausal women. PMID:25097281

  10. 'Love Hormone' Gene May Be Key to Social Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159485.html 'Love Hormone' Gene May Be Key to Social Life ... in people. It's sometimes referred to as the "love hormone." The University of Georgia team assessed more ...

  11. Effects of phenobarbital on thyroid hormone contabolism in rat hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in rodents. PB induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes increases thyroid hormones catabolism and biliary elimination. This study examines the catabolism and cl...

  12. 'Love Hormone' Gene May Be Key to Social Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159485.html 'Love Hormone' Gene May Be Key to Social Life Early ... is involved in the production of oxytocin, a hormone linked with a large number of social behaviors ...

  13. Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159955.html Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause 5- ... important risk cognitively associated with the use of hormone therapy over at least five years," said lead ...

  14. Hormone Abuse Prevention and What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ... Women's Health Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ...

  15. Information for People Treated with Human Growth Hormone (Summary)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program (NHPP): Information for People Treated with Pituitary Human Growth Hormone (Summary) Page Content On this page: ... disease (CJD) occur in people treated with pituitary human growth hormone (hGH)? How many people treated with ...

  16. Preventing Growth Hormone Abuse: An Emerging Health Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, George L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Facts about growth hormone abuse should be incorporated into substance abuse components of health education curriculums. Sources, uses, and dangers associated with human growth hormones are discussed. A sample lesson plan is included. (IAH)

  17. Fate and transport of reproductive hormone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An invited overview of the NSF funded projects 0730492 "Effects of Animal Manure Storage and Disposal on the Fate and Transport of Manure-Borne Hormones," and 0244169 "Fate and Transport of an Endocrine Disruptor in Soil-Water Systems." We will highlight the Research and Educational contributions by...

  18. Effects of thyroid hormones on the heart.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Uricoechea, Hernando; Bonelo-Perdomo, Anilsa; Sierra-Torres, Carlos Hernán

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones have a significant impact on heart function, mediated by genomic and non-genomic effects. Consequently, thyroid hormone deficiencies, as well as excesses, are expected to result in profound changes in cardiac function regulation and cardiovascular hemodynamics. Thyroid hormones upregulate the expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-activated ATPase and downregulate the expression of phospholamban. Overall, hyperthyroidism is characterized by an increase in resting heart rate, blood volume, stroke volume, myocardial contractility, and ejection fraction. The development of "high-output heart failure" in hyperthyroidism may be due to "tachycardia-mediated cardiomyopathy". On the other hand, in a hypothyroid state, thyroid hormone deficiency results in lower heart rate and weakening of myocardial contraction and relaxation, with prolonged systolic and early diastolic times. Cardiac preload is decreased due to impaired diastolic function. Cardiac afterload is increased, and chronotropic and inotropic functions are reduced. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction is relatively common in patients over 65 years of age. In general, subclinical hypothyroidism increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality and CHD events, but not of total mortality. The risk of CHD mortality and atrial fibrillation (but not other outcomes) in subclinical hyperthyroidism is higher among patients with very low levels of thyrotropin. Finally, medications such as amiodarone may induce hypothyroidism (mediated by the Wolff-Chaikoff), as well as hyperthyroidism (mediated by the Jod-Basedow effect). In both instances, the underlying cause is the high concentration of iodine in this medication. PMID:25438971

  19. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  20. Prolactin and growth hormone in fish osmoregulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sakamoto, T.; McCormick, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    Prolactin is an important regulator of multiple biological functions in vertebrates, and has been viewed as essential to ion uptake as well as reduction in ion and water permeability of osmoregulatory surfaces in freshwater and euryhaline fish. Prolactin-releasing peptide seems to stimulate prolactin expression in the pituitary and peripheral organs during freshwater adaptation. Growth hormone, a member of the same family of hormones as prolactin, promotes acclimation to seawater in several teleost fish, at least in part through the action of insulin-like growth factor I. In branchial epithelia, development and differentiation of the seawater-type chloride cell (and their underlying biochemistry) is regulated by GH, IGF-I, and cortisol, whereas the freshwater-type chloride cell is regulated by prolactin and cortisol. In the epithelia of gastrointestinal tract, prolactin induces cell proliferation during freshwater adaptation, whereas cortisol stimulates both cell proliferation and apoptosis. We propose that control of salinity acclimation in teleosts by prolactin and growth hormone primarily involves regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation (the latter including upregulation of specific ion transporters), and that there is an important interaction of these hormones with corticosteroids. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biological Functions of Thyroid Hormone in Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Chie-Pein; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormone, 3,3,5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3), modulates several physiological processes, including cellular growth, differentiation, metabolism, inflammation and proliferation, via interactions with thyroid hormone response elements (TREs) in the regulatory regions of target genes. Infection and inflammation are critical processes in placental development and pregnancy-related diseases. In particular, infection is the leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. However, to date, no successful approach has been developed for the effective diagnosis of infection in preterm infants. Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a serious disorder that adversely affects ~5% of human pregnancies. Recent studies identified a multiprotein complex, the inflammasome, including the Nod-like receptor (NLR) family of cytosolic pattern recognition receptors, the adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC) and caspase-1, which plays a vital role in the placenta. The thyroid hormone modulates inflammation processes and is additionally implicated in placental development and disease. Therefore, elucidation of thyroid hormone receptor-regulated inflammation-related molecules, and their underlying mechanisms in placenta, should facilitate the identification of novel predictive and therapeutic targets for placental disorders. This review provides a detailed summary of current knowledge with respect to identification of useful biomarkers and their physiological significance in placenta. PMID:25690032

  2. Growth hormone: health considerations beyond height gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The therapeutic benefit of growth hormone (GH) therapy in improving height in short children is widely recognized; however, GH therapy is associated with other metabolic actions that may be of benefit in these children. Beneficial effects of GH on body composition have been documented in several dif...

  3. Multiple aberrant hormone receptors in Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Ghorayeb, Nada; Bourdeau, Isabelle; Lacroix, André

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms regulating cortisol production when ACTH of pituitary origin is suppressed in primary adrenal causes of Cushing's syndrome (CS) include diverse genetic and molecular mechanisms. These can lead either to constitutive activation of the cAMP system and steroidogenesis or to its regulation exerted by the aberrant adrenal expression of several hormone receptors, particularly G-protein coupled hormone receptors (GPCR) and their ligands. Screening for aberrant expression of GPCR in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (BMAH) and unilateral adrenal tumors of patients with overt or subclinical CS demonstrates the frequent co-expression of several receptors. Aberrant hormone receptors can also exert their activity by regulating the paracrine secretion of ACTH or other ligands for those receptors in BMAH or unilateral tumors. The aberrant expression of hormone receptors is not limited to adrenal CS but can be implicated in other endocrine tumors including primary aldosteronism and Cushing's disease. Targeted therapies to block the aberrant receptors or their ligands could become useful in the future. PMID:25971648

  4. Thyroid hormone effect in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Miler, Eliana A; Ríos de Molina, María Del Carmen; Domínguez, Gabriela; Guerra, Liliana N

    2008-01-01

    We have already demonstrated that a combined treatment of methimazole and an antioxidant mixture improved the condition of hyperthyroid patients both biochemically and clinically. Elevated thyroid hormone levels might trigger signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism through the increase of free radicals. To study the direct effect of thyroid hormone on cellular markers of oxidative stress, we carried out in vitro assays in which 0.1-20.0 nM T3 (6.5-1300.0 ng/dl) doses were added to culture media of the human hepatocyte cell line Hep G2 for 1-24 h. T3 increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and intracellular oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels; SOD activity was also higher with hormone treatment, whereas catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities showed no variation at different T3 doses and during all experimental times. When ascorbic acid was added to the culture, the MDA level decreased and SOD activity was increased. With higher doses of T3 (e.g. 200 nM), cell death occurred (69% of apoptotic cells). The increase in SOD activity was not enough to overcome the effect of T3 since MDA and GSSG remained high during a 24-h experiment. We showed a beneficial effect of ascorbic acid when cells were exposed to a T3 dose of 20 nM, a higher level of hormone than that achieved in hyperthyroidism. PMID:18647489

  5. Pharmaceuticals and Hormones in the Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some of the earliest initial reports from Europe and the United States demonstrated that a variety of pharmaceuticals and hormones could be found in surface waters, source waters, drinking water, and influents and effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). It is unknown...

  6. Plant Hormones: How They Affect Root Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhard, Diana Hereda

    This science study aid, produced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, includes a series of plant rooting activities for secondary science classes. The material in the pamphlet is written for students and includes background information on plant hormones, a vocabulary list, and five learning activities. Objectives, needed materials, and…

  7. Human Growth Hormone: The Latest Ergogenic Aid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowart, Virginia S.

    1988-01-01

    Believing that synthetic human growth hormone (hGH) will lead to athletic prowess and fortune, some parents and young athletes wish to use the drug to enhance sports performance. Should hGH become widely available, its abuse could present many problems, from potential health risks to the ethics of drug-enhanced athletic performance. (JL)

  8. Personal view: Hormones and depression in women.

    PubMed

    Studd, J

    2015-02-01

    Depression is more common in women, occurring at times of hormonal fluctuations as premenstrual depression, postnatal depression and perimenopausal depression. These are all related to changes in hormone levels and constitute the diagnosis of reproductive depression. There is a risk that severe premenstrual depression can be misdiagnosed as bipolar disorder and that women will be started on inappropriate antidepressants or mood-stabilizing therapy. The most effective treatment for severe premenstrual syndrome is by suppression of ovulation and suppression of the cyclical hormonal changes by transdermal estrogens or by GnRH analogs. Postnatal depression is more common in women with a history of premenstrual depression and also responds to transdermal estrogens. Transdermal testosterone gel can be also used in women who suffer loss of energy and loss of libido which may be due to the inappropriate prescription of antidepressants. There is also a role for the Mirena IUS and laparoscopic hysterectomy and oophorectomy in women who are progestogen-intolerant. The hormonal causation of certain common types of depression in women and the successful treatment by estrogens should be understood by psychiatrists and gynecologists. PMID:25040604

  9. Lymphocyte GH-axis hormones in immunity.

    PubMed

    Weigent, Douglas A

    2013-01-01

    The production and utilization of common ligands and their receptors by cells of the immune and neuroendocrine systems constitutes a biochemical information circuit between and within the immune and neuroendocrine systems. The sharing of ligands and receptors allows the immune system to serve as the sixth sense notifying the nervous system of the presence of foreign entities. Within this framework, it is also clear that immune cell functions can be altered by neuroendocrine hormones and that cells of the immune system have the ability to produce neuroendocrine hormones. This review summarizes a part of this knowledge with particular emphasis on growth hormone (GH). The past two decades have uncovered a lot of detail about the actions of GH, acting through its receptor, at the molecular and cellular level and its influence on the immune system. The production and action of immune cell-derived GH is less well developed although its important role in immunity is also slowly emerging. Here we discuss the production of GH, GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their cognate receptors on cells of the immune system and their influence via endocrine/autocrine/paracrine and intracrine pathways on immune function. The intracellular mechanisms of action of immune cell-derived GH are still largely unexplored, and it is anticipated that further work in this particular area will establish an important role for this source of GH in normal physiology and in pathologic situations. PMID:24177252

  10. Hormone Metabolism During Potato Tuber Dormancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    At harvest and for an indeterminate period thereafter potato tubers will not sprout and are physiologically dormant. The length of tuber dormancy is dependent on cultivar and pre- and postharvest environmental conditions. Plant hormones have been shown to be involved in all phases of dormancy prog...

  11. THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION: FROM KINETICS TO DYNAMICS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide range of chemicals with diverse structures act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are chemicals that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormones (THs), or change circulating or t...

  12. Plant hormones and ecophysiology of conifers

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, W.J.

    1995-07-01

    Over the past 30 years, there have been very substantial fluctuations in the interests of plant scientists in the involvement of plant growth regulators in the control of physiology, growth, and development of plants. In the years following the identification of the five major classes of growth regulators and identification of other groups of compounds of somewhat more restricted interest, an enormous number of papers reported the effects of hormones applied externally to a very wide range of plants. During this period, it became very fashionable to compare effects of hormones with the effects of the environment on developmental and physiological phenomena and to suggest a regulatory role for the hormone(s) in the processes under consideration. Ross et al. (1983) have published a very comprehensive survey of the effects of growth regulators applied externally to conifers, and even 10 years later, it is difficult to improve on what they have done. Nevertheless, in the light of recent changes in our understanding of how growth regulators may work, it is necessary to reexamine this field and ask what we really know about the involvement of growth regulators in the ecophysiology of conifers.

  13. Thyroid hormone testing in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravinder J; Kaur, Parmpreet

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid dysfunction and treatment follow up require accurate measurement of thyroid hormones. Most thyroid disease is treated on an outpatient basis; thus, assays have to be rapid and cost effective for optimal patient care. There are no rapid or point-of-care thyroid tests yet available, which could replace centralized automated thyroid testing. With the high population of thyroid dysfunction, it is important for thyroid assays to be available widely and locally. Immunoassays are most commonly used due to their ease and availability, but are limited in their accuracy. MS assays are much more specific, but are laborious with a high machine cost. Many hospitals may not be able to afford the machines and lack technical expertise. Sensitivity, specificity and standardization issues still result in substantial differences between various tests currently used for this population. To address these issues, new performance standards are being established by the professional organizations and technological advancements are being undertaken by instrument manufacturers. Automation solution is provided by various manufacturers and offers a choice for the hospital labs to select a platform which helps in their workflow and other chemistry testing. This has also resulted in decentralization and easy access to the thyroid testing. Even with these advancements, it is understandably confusing for clinicians to choose an assay for various clinical scenarios (20). As it becomes more available and standardized, LC-MS will continue to demonstrate its superiority to immunoassay. PMID:27329994

  14. Hormones, hormonal agents, and neuropeptides involved in the neuroendocrine regulation of sleep in humans.

    PubMed

    Kotronoulas, Grigorios; Stamatakis, Antonios; Stylianopoulou, Fotini

    2009-01-01

    Sleep is an essential ubiquitous biological process, a periodical state of quiescence in which there is minimal processing of sensory information and no interaction with conspecifics or the environment. Despite relevant research on sleep structure and testing of numerous endogenous sleep-affecting chemicals, questions as to the precise mechanisms and functions of sleep remain without satisfactory responses. The purpose of this review is to report on current evidence as regards the effect of several endogenous and exogenous hormones, hormonal agents, and neuropeptides on sleep onset or wake process, when administered in humans in specific doses and via different routes. The actions of several peptides are presented in detail. Some of them (growth hormone releasing hormone, ghrelin, galanin, neuropeptide Y) seem to promote sleep, whereas others (corticotropin, somatostatin) impair its continuity. PMID:20045796

  15. Clinical studies with d-Trp 6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in anovulatory women.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, C J; Charro-Salgado, A; Peréz-Infante, V; del Campo, G L; Botella-Llusiá, J; Coy, D H; Schally, A V

    1978-04-01

    Nine anovulatory patients with hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction were treated with d-Trp6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, an analog with far greater gonadotropin-releasing activity than luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. Four of eight patients, who were formerly unsuccessfully treated with clomiphene, human chorionic gonadotropin, and human menopausal gonadotropin, ovulated after treatment with the peptide alone or with peptide preceded by clomiphene, and three became pregnant. The ninth patient, who had amenorrhea and anovulation due to excessive loss of weight caused by anorexia nervosa, also ovulated after treatment with the analog. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of this potent analog for induction of ovulation and pregnancy and point favorably toward clinical applications. PMID:348500

  16. Structure-activity relationship of crustacean peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    In crustaceans, various physiological events, such as molting, vitellogenesis, and sex differentiation, are regulated by peptide hormones. To understanding the functional sites of these hormones, many structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have been published. In this review, the author focuses the SAR of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-family peptides and androgenic gland hormone and describes the detailed results of our and other research groups. The future perspectives will be also discussed. PMID:26624010

  17. Growth hormone: its physiology and control.

    PubMed

    Scanes, C G; Lauterio, T J

    1984-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone produced by the somatotrophs of the anterior pituitary gland of birds and other vertebrates. The secretion of GH in birds is under hypothalamic control; it involves three peptidergic releasing factors: growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) (stimulatory); thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) (stimulatory); and somatostatin (SRIF) (inhibitory). In addition, there is evidence for effects of biogenic amines (including serotonin and norepinephrine) and prostaglandins at the level of the hypothalamus and possibly also the pituitary gland. In all avian species examined, plasma concentrations of GH are high in young posthatching chicks but low in the adult and embryo. The difference in plasma concentrations of GH between young and adult birds is due to both greater GH secretion and reduced clearance. The lower secretion of GH in adult birds reflects fewer somatotrophs in the pituitary, changes in somatotroph structure, and reduced GH responses to TRH or GRF administration. There is only limited data on the role of GH in birds. GH appears to be required for normal growth; acting at least in part by increasing somatomedin production. However, plasma concentrations of GH do not necessarily correlate with growth rate. For instance, in chicks with reduced growth rate owing to either goitrogen or protein deficiency in the diet, plasma concentrations of GH are elevated. GH also can influence lipid metabolism by increasing lipolysis, decreasing lipogenesis, and stimulating the uptake of glucose by adipose tissue. The physiological significance of these actions is, however, not established. In addition, GH affects the secretion of other hormones, the immune system, and perhaps also the reproductive system. PMID:6151579

  18. Cardiovascular Risk in Growth Hormone Deficiency: Beneficial Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lanes, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adulthood is associated with an increased risk of developing adverse cardiovascular events and with reduced life expectancy. Cardiovascular and metabolic abnormalities have so far been evaluated only in a small number of children with GHD and adolescents. In this article we review these abnormalities and their underlying mechanisms and discuss the beneficial effect of growth hormone treatment in subjects with GHD. PMID:27241971

  19. Studying Links between Hormones and Negative Affect: Models and Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Considers eight models for the study of pubertal change that explore possible links between hormones and negative affective experiences, such as depression and aggression. Notes that hormonal effects, though small, have demonstrated stability and have interacted with psychological and social factors, implicating hormonal changes in the development…

  20. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  1. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1002 - Follicle stimulating hormone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Follicle stimulating hormone. 522.1002 Section 522....1002 Follicle stimulating hormone. (a)(1) Specifications. Each package contains 2 vials. One vial... hormone. The other vial contains 10 milliliters of aqueous diluent. (2) Sponsor. See No. 052923 in §...

  3. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  4. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  5. 21 CFR 522.1002 - Follicle stimulating hormone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Follicle stimulating hormone. 522.1002 Section 522....1002 Follicle stimulating hormone. (a)(1) Specifications. Each package contains 2 vials. One vial... hormone. The other vial contains 10 milliliters of aqueous diluent. (2) Sponsor. See No. 052923 in §...

  6. 21 CFR 522.1002 - Follicle stimulating hormone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Follicle stimulating hormone. 522.1002 Section 522....1002 Follicle stimulating hormone. (a)(1) Specifications. Each package contains 2 vials. One vial... hormone. The other vial contains 10 milliliters of aqueous diluent. (2) Sponsor. See No. 052923 in §...

  7. 21 CFR 522.1002 - Follicle stimulating hormone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Follicle stimulating hormone. 522.1002 Section 522....1002 Follicle stimulating hormone. (a)(1) Specifications. Each package contains 2 vials. One vial... hormone. The other vial contains 10 milliliters of aqueous diluent. (2) Sponsor. See No. 052923 in §...

  8. 21 CFR 522.1002 - Follicle stimulating hormone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Follicle stimulating hormone. 522.1002 Section 522....1002 Follicle stimulating hormone. (a)(1) Specifications. Each package contains 2 vials. One vial... hormone. The other vial contains 10 milliliters of aqueous diluent. (2) Sponsor. See 059521 in §...

  9. Hormones and acne: pathophysiology, clinical evaluation, and therapies.

    PubMed

    Thiboutot, D

    2001-09-01

    Hormonal aspects of acne are of particular interest in treating adult women. A review of the role of hormones in the pathogenesis of acne, guidelines for the workup of a suspected endocrine disorder, and an overview of the use of hormonal therapy in women with endocrine problems and in normal women is presented. PMID:11594669

  10. Overlapping nongenomic and genomic actions of thyroid hormone and steroids

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, Stephen R.; Davis, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The genomic actions of thyroid hormone and steroids depend upon primary interactions of the hormones with their specific nuclear receptor proteins. Formation of nuclear co-activator or co-repressor complexes involving the liganded receptors subsequently result in transcriptional events—either activation or suppression—at genes that are specific targets of thyroid hormone or steroids. Nongenomic actions of thyroid hormone and steroids are in contrast initiated at binding sites on the plasma membrane or in cytoplasm or organelles and do not primarily require formation of intranuclear receptor protein-hormone complexes. Importantly, hormonal actions that begin nongenomically outside the nucleus often culminate in changes in nuclear transcriptional events that are regulated by both traditional intranuclear receptors as well as other nuclear transcription factors. In the case of thyroid hormone, the extranuclear receptor can be the classical “nuclear” thyroid receptor (TR), a TR isoform, or integrin αvβ3. In the case of steroid hormones, the membrane receptor is usually, but not always, the classical “nuclear” steroid receptor. This concept defines the paradigm of overlapping nongenomic and genomic hormone mechanisms of action. Here we review some examples of how extranuclear signaling by thyroid hormone and by estrogens and androgens modulates intranuclear hormone signaling to regulate a number of vital biological processes both in normal physiology and in cancer progression. We also point out that nongenomic actions of thyroid hormone may mimic effects of estrogen in certain tumors. PMID:26303085

  11. Active immunization to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone to inhibit the induction of mammary tumors in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ravdin, P.M.; Jordan, V.C.

    1988-01-01

    Immunization of female rats with a bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate results in suppression of dimethylbenzanthracene mammary tumor incidence. Tumor incidence was 1.3, and 1.29 tumors per rat in bovine serum albumin alone (n = 10) and unimmunized (n = 18) control groups, but no tumors were found in the bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate immunized animals (n = 10). In a second experiment immunization with bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugates reduced tumor incidence to 0.3 tumors per rat (n = 10) from the 1.2 tumors per animal seen in the control animals (n = 10) immunized with bovine serum albumin alone. Bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone immunization caused the production of anti-LHRH antibodies, an interruption of estrous cycles, lowered serum estradiol and progesterone levels, and atrophy of the ovaries and uteri. Immunization BSA-hormone conjugates is a novel anti-tumor strategy.

  12. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  13. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Research advances, a new feature in Journal of Chemical Engineering that brings information about innovations in current areas of research to high school and college science faculty with an intent to provide educators with timely descriptions of latest progress in research that can be integrated into existing courses to update course content and…

  14. [Cardiovascular risks with prostate cancer hormonal treatment: rationale for a department of oncocardiology].

    PubMed

    Latorzeff, I; Ploussard, G; Guillotreau, J; Jonca, F; Labarthe, P; Rollin, G; Beauval, J-B; Pathak, A

    2016-07-01

    Prostate cancer, the most frequent cancer in man, is an adenocarcinoma sensible to chemical castration in more than 80% of cases due to its hormonal dependency. Androgen deprivation is the treatment for advanced cancer and can be associated with radiotherapy locally or in locally advanced situations. Multidisciplinary therapeutic choice depends on patient age and co-morbidities and clinical stage. The impact of hormonal treatment confers varied side effects and cardiovascular effects are now better known. Responsible mechanisms of this cardiotoxicity are at the same time direct but also indirect by metabolic thermogenic effects. Analysis of these clinical or biological effects, their correlations to the used type of hormonal treatment and the possible precautions of prescription will be detailed in this analysis of the literature. The collaboration of the oncologist or the urologist with the cardiologist becomes necessary and the existence of a unit of oncocardiology could improve the evaluation of the risk-benefit balance and the tolerance of the treatment. PMID:27344534

  15. Structural Basis for Antibody Discrimination between Two Hormones That Recognize the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Ho, Patricia W.M.; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John; Parker, Michael W.

    2009-08-18

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays a vital role in the embryonic development of the skeleton and other tissues. When it is produced in excess by cancers it can cause hypercalcemia, and its local production by breast cancer cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis formation in that disease. Antibodies have been developed that neutralize the action of PTHrP through its receptor, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, without influencing parathyroid hormone action through the same receptor. Such neutralizing antibodies against PTHrP are therapeutically effective in animal models of the humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy and of bone metastasis formation. We have determined the crystal structure of the complex between PTHrP (residues 1-108) and a neutralizing monoclonal anti-PTHrP antibody that reveals the only point of contact is an {alpha}-helical structure extending from residues 14-29. Another striking feature is that the same residues that interact with the antibody also interact with parathyroid hormone receptor 1, showing that the antibody and the receptor binding site on the hormone closely overlap. The structure explains how the antibody discriminates between the two hormones and provides information that could be used in the development of novel agonists and antagonists of their common receptor.

  16. Exogenous Hormone Use: Oral Contraceptives, Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy, and Health Outcomes in the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Grodstein, Francine; Stampfer, Meir J.; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II from 1976 to 2016. Results. Oral contraceptive and postmenopausal hormone use were studied in relation to major health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Current or recent oral contraceptive use is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (mainly among smokers), melanoma, and breast cancer, and a lower risk of colorectal and ovarian cancer. Although hormone therapy is not indicated primarily for chronic disease prevention, findings from the NHS and a recent analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative indicate that younger women who are closer to menopause onset have a more favorable risk–benefit profile than do older women from use of hormone therapy for relief of vasomotor symptoms. Conclusions. With updated information on hormone use, lifestyle factors, and other variables, the NHS and NHS II continue to contribute to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. PMID:27459451

  17. Enzyme immunoassay for rat growth hormone: applications to the study of growth hormone variants

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, M.A.; Hymer, W.C.

    1987-06-29

    A sensitive and specific competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for rat growth hormone was developed. In this assay soluble growth hormone and growth hormone adsorbed to a solid-phase support compete for monkey anti-growth hormone antibody binding sites. The immobilized antibody-growth hormone complex is detected and quantified using goat anti-monkey immunoglobin G covalently conjugated to horse radish peroxidase. Therefore, a high concentration of soluble growth hormone in the sample will result in low absorbance detection from the colored products of the enzyme reaction. Assay parameters were optimized by investigating the concentration of reagents and the reaction kinetics in each of the assay steps. The assay can be performed in 27 hours. A sensitivity range of 0.19 ng to 25 ng in the region of 10 to 90% binding was obtained. Near 50% binding (3 ng) the intraassay coefficient of variation (CV) was 5.54% and the interassay CV was 5.33%. The correlation coefficient (r/sup 2/) between radioimmunoassay and EIA was 0.956 and followed the curve Y = 0.78X + 1.0. 9 references, 6 figures.

  18. Structural Basis for Antibody Discrimination between Two Hormones That Recognize the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Ho, Patricia W. M.; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John; Parker, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays a vital role in the embryonic development of the skeleton and other tissues. When it is produced in excess by cancers it can cause hypercalcemia, and its local production by breast cancer cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis formation in that disease. Antibodies have been developed that neutralize the action of PTHrP through its receptor, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, without influencing parathyroid hormone action through the same receptor. Such neutralizing antibodies against PTHrP are therapeutically effective in animal models of the humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy and of bone metastasis formation. We have determined the crystal structure of the complex between PTHrP (residues 1–108) and a neutralizing monoclonal anti-PTHrP antibody that reveals the only point of contact is an α-helical structure extending from residues 14–29. Another striking feature is that the same residues that interact with the antibody also interact with parathyroid hormone receptor 1, showing that the antibody and the receptor binding site on the hormone closely overlap. The structure explains how the antibody discriminates between the two hormones and provides information that could be used in the development of novel agonists and antagonists of their common receptor. PMID:19346515

  19. Sex hormones affect neurotransmitters and shape the adult female brain during hormonal transition periods

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Claudia; Villringer, Arno; Sacher, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Sex hormones have been implicated in neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, dendritic branching, myelination and other important mechanisms of neural plasticity. Here we review the evidence from animal experiments and human studies reporting interactions between sex hormones and the dominant neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine, GABA and glutamate. We provide an overview of accumulating data during physiological and pathological conditions and discuss currently conceptualized theories on how sex hormones potentially trigger neuroplasticity changes through these four neurochemical systems. Many brain regions have been demonstrated to express high densities for estrogen- and progesterone receptors, such as the amygdala, the hypothalamus, and the hippocampus. As the hippocampus is of particular relevance in the context of mediating structural plasticity in the adult brain, we put particular emphasis on what evidence could be gathered thus far that links differences in behavior, neurochemical patterns and hippocampal structure to a changing hormonal environment. Finally, we discuss how physiologically occurring hormonal transition periods in humans can be used to model how changes in sex hormones influence functional connectivity, neurotransmission and brain structure in vivo. PMID:25750611

  20. Hormonal changes in humans during spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Strollo, F

    1999-01-01

    Readers of this review may feel that there is much more that we do not know about space endocrinology than what we know. Several reasons for this state of affairs have been given: 1. the complexity of the field of endocrinology with its still increasing number of known hormones, releasing factors and precursors, and of the interactions between them through various feedback mechanisms 2. the difficulty in separating the microgravity effects from the effects of stress from launch, isolation and confinement during flight, reentry, and postflight re-adaptation 3. the experimental limitations during flight, such as limited number of subjects, limited number of samples, impossibility of collecting triple samples for pulsatile hormones like growth hormone 4. the disturbing effects of countermeasures used by astronauts 5. the inadequacy of postflight samples for conclusions about inflight values 6. limitations of conclusions from animal experiments and space simulation studies The endocrinology field is divided in to nine systems or axes, which are successively reviewed: 1. Rapid bone demineralization in the early phase of spaceflight that, when unopposed, leads to catastrophic effects after three months but that slows down later. The endocrine mechanism, apart from the effect of exercise as a countermeasure, is not yet understood. 2. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is involved in stress reactions, which complicate our understanding and makes postflight analysis dubious. 3. In the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, pulsatility poses a problem for obtaining representative values (e.g., for luteinizing hormone). Reproduction of rats in space is possible, but much more needs to be known about this aspect, particularly in women, before the advent of space colonies, but also in males because some evidence for reversible testicular dysfunction in space has been found. 4. The hypothalamic-pituitary-somato-mammotrophic axis involves prolactin and growth hormone. The