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Sample records for advanced human atherosclerotic

  1. Endothelial lipase is highly expressed in macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, John E; Lindegaard, Marie L S; Hulten, Lillemor M; Schroeder, Torben V; Nielsen, Lars B

    2007-12-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is expressed in endothelial cells, and affects plasma lipoprotein metabolism by hydrolyzing phospholipids in HDL. To determine the cellular expression of EL mRNA and protein in human atherosclerotic lesions, we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical studies on sections of carotid endarterectomy specimens from patients with symptomatic cerebrovascular disease. In each of eight patients, EL mRNA and/or protein were seen in areas between the necrotic core and the fibrotic cap where they colocalized with LPL and macrophage-specific CD68. Moreover, there was a positive association between the expression of EL mRNA and CD68 mRNA in plaques from 26 patients. The impact of differentiation from monocytes into macrophages, and subsequently foam cells (by incubation with acetylated LDL) on expression was studied using THP-1 monocytes and primary human monocytes. EL mRNA expression increased markedly when either type of monocytes was differentiated into macrophages. Upon further differentiation into foam cells EL mRNA decreased whereas protein levels remained high compared to monocytes. In conclusion, macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions display high levels of EL expression, and the level of EL expression varies greatly during transformation of blood monocytes into foam cells.

  2. Grating interferometry-based phase microtomography of atherosclerotic human arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscema, Marzia; Holme, Margaret N.; Deyhle, Hans; Schulz, Georg; Schmitz, Rüdiger; Thalmann, Peter; Hieber, Simone E.; Chicherova, Natalia; Cattin, Philippe C.; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia; Weitkamp, Timm; Saxer, Till; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death and morbidity in the world. Understanding disease development in terms of lumen morphology and tissue composition of constricted arteries is essential to improve treatment and patient outcome. X-ray tomography provides non-destructive three-dimensional data with micrometer-resolution. However, a common problem is simultaneous visualization of soft and hard tissue-containing specimens, such as atherosclerotic human coronary arteries. Unlike absorption based techniques, where X-ray absorption strongly depends on atomic number and tissue density, phase contrast methods such as grating interferometry have significant advantages as the phase shift is only a linear function of the atomic number. We demonstrate that grating interferometry-based phase tomography is a powerful method to three-dimensionally visualize a variety of anatomical features in atherosclerotic human coronary arteries, including plaque, muscle, fat, and connective tissue. Three formalin-fixed, human coronary arteries were measured using advanced laboratory μCT. While this technique gives information about plaque morphology, it is impossible to extract the lumen morphology. Therefore, selected regions were measured using grating based phase tomography, sinograms were treated with a wavelet-Fourier filter to remove ring artifacts, and reconstructed data were processed to allow extraction of vessel lumen morphology. Phase tomography data in combination with conventional laboratory μCT data of the same specimen shows potential, through use of a joint histogram, to identify more tissue types than either technique alone. Such phase tomography data was also rigidly registered to subsequently decalcified arteries that were histologically sectioned, although the quality of registration was insufficient for joint histogram analysis.

  3. Differential expression of bone matrix regulatory proteins in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Dhore, C R; Cleutjens, J P; Lutgens, E; Cleutjens, K B; Geusens, P P; Kitslaar, P J; Tordoir, J H; Spronk, H M; Vermeer, C; Daemen, M J

    2001-12-01

    In the present study, we examined the expression of regulators of bone formation and osteoclastogenesis in human atherosclerosis because accumulating evidence suggests that atherosclerotic calcification shares features with bone calcification. The most striking finding of this study was the constitutive immunoreactivity of matrix Gla protein, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein in nondiseased aortas and the absence of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, BMP-4, osteopontin, and osteonectin in nondiseased aortas and early atherosclerotic lesions. When atherosclerotic plaques demonstrated calcification or bone formation, BMP-2, BMP-4, osteopontin, and osteonectin were upregulated. Interestingly, this upregulation was associated with a sustained immunoreactivity of matrix Gla protein, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein. The 2 modulators of osteoclastogenesis (osteoprotegerin [OPG] and its ligand, OPGL) were present in the nondiseased vessel wall and in early atherosclerotic lesions. In advanced calcified lesions, OPG was present in bone structures, whereas OPGL was only present in the extracellular matrix surrounding calcium deposits. The observed expression patterns suggest a tight regulation of the expression of bone matrix regulatory proteins during human atherogenesis. The expression pattern of both OPG and OPGL during atherogenesis might suggest a regulatory role of these proteins not only in osteoclastogenesis but also in atherosclerotic calcification. PMID:11742876

  4. Microcalcifications in Early Intimal Lesions of Atherosclerotic Human Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Roijers, Ruben B.; Debernardi, Nicola; Cleutjens, Jack P.M.; Schurgers, Leon J.; Mutsaers, Peter H.A.; van der Vusse, Ger J.

    2011-01-01

    Although calcium (Ca) precipitation may play a pathogenic role in atherosclerosis, information on temporal patterns of microcalcifications in human coronary arteries, their relation to expression of calcification-regulating proteins, and colocalization with iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) is scarce. Human coronary arteries were analyzed post mortem with a proton microprobe for element concentrations and stained (immuno)histochemically for morphological and calcification-regulating proteins. Microcalcifications were occasionally observed in preatheroma type I atherosclerotic intimal lesions. Their abundance increased in type II, III, and IV lesions. Moreover, their appearance preceded increased expression of calcification-regulating proteins, such as osteocalcin and bone morphogenetic protein-2. In contrast, their presence coincided with increased expression of uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein (MGP), whereas the content of carboxylated MGP was increased in type III and IV lesions, indicating delayed posttranslational conversion of biologically inactive into active MGP. Ca/phosphorus ratios of the microcalcifications varied from 1.6 to 3.0, including amorphous Ca phosphates. Approximately 75% of microcalcifications colocalized with the accumulation of Fe and Zn. We conclude that Ca microprecipitation occurs in the early stages of atherosclerosis, inferring a pathogenic role in the sequel of events, resulting in overt atherosclerotic lesions. Microcalcifications may be caused by local events triggering the precipitation of Ca rather than by increased expression of calcification-regulating proteins. The high degree of colocalization with Fe and Zn suggests a mutual relationship between these trace elements and early deposition of Ca salts. PMID:21531376

  5. Alternation of histone and DNA methylation in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques.

    PubMed

    Greißel, A; Culmes, M; Napieralski, R; Wagner, E; Gebhard, H; Schmitt, M; Zimmermann, A; Eckstein, H-H; Zernecke, A; Pelisek, J

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about epigenetics and its possible role in atherosclerosis. We here analysed histone and DNA methylation and the expression of corresponding methyltransferases in early and advanced human atherosclerotic carotid lesions in comparison to healthy carotid arteries. Western Blotting was performed on carotid plaques from our biobank with early (n=60) or advanced (n=60) stages of atherosclerosis and healthy carotid arteries (n=12) to analyse di-methylation patterns of histone H3 at positions K4, K9 and K27. In atherosclerotic lesions, di-methylation of H3K4 was unaltered and that of H3K9 and H3K27 significantly decreased compared to control arteries. Immunohistochemistry revealed an increased appearance of di-methylated H3K4 in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), a decreased expression of di-methylated H3K9 in SMCs and inflammatory cells, and reduced di-methylated H3K27 in inflammatory cells in advanced versus early atherosclerosis. Expression of corresponding histone methyltransferases MLL2 and G9a was increased in advanced versus early atherosclerosis. Genomic DNA hypomethylation, as determined by PCR for methylated LINE1 and SAT-alpha, was observed in early and advanced plaques compared to control arteries and in cell-free serum of patients with high-grade carotid stenosis compared to healthy volunteers. In contrast, no differences in DNA methylation were observed in blood cells. Expression of DNA-methyltransferase DNMT1 was reduced in atherosclerotic plaques versus controls, DNMT3A was undetectable, and DNMT3B not altered. DNA-demethylase TET1 was increased in atherosclerosisc plaques. The extent of histone and DNA methylation and expression of some corresponding methyltransferases are significantly altered in atherosclerosis, suggesting a possible contribution of epigenetics in disease development. PMID:25993995

  6. MR histology of advanced atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE- knockout mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumova, A.; Yarnykh, V.; Ferguson, M.; Rosenfeld, M.; Yuan, C.

    2016-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the feasibility of determining the composition of advanced atherosclerotic plaques in fixed ApoE-knockout mice and to develop a time-efficient microimaging protocol for MR histological imaging on mice. Five formalin-fixed transgenic ApoE-knockout mice were imaged at the 9.4T Bruker BioSpec MR scanner using 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence with an isotropic field of view of 24 mm3; TR 20.8 ms; TE 2.6 ms; flip angle 20°, resulted voxel size 47 × 63 × 94 pm3. MRI examination has shown that advanced atherosclerotic lesions of aorta, innominate and carotid arteries in ApoE-knockout mice are characterized by high calcification and presence of the large fibrofatty nodules. MRI quantification of atherosclerotic lesion components corresponded to histological assessment of plaque composition with a correlation coefficient of 0.98.

  7. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  8. Optical detection of structural changes in human carotid atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, R. M.; Canham, P. B.; Finlay, H. M.; Hammond, R. R.; Quantz, M.; Ferguson, G. G.; Liu, L. Y.; Lucas, A. R.

    2005-08-01

    Background: Arterial bifurcations are commonly the sites of developing atherosclerotic plaque that lead to arterial occlusions and plaque rupture (myocardial infarctions and strokes). Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy provides an effective nondestructive method supplying spectral information on extracellular matrix (ECM) protein composition, specifically collagen and elastin. Purpose: To investigate regional differences in the ECM proteins -- collagen I, III and elastin in unstable plaque by analyzing data from laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of human carotid endarterectomy specimens. Methods: Gels of ECM protein extracts (elastin, collagen types I & III) were measured as reference spectra and internal thoracic artery segments (extra tissue from bypass surgery) were used as tissue controls. Arterial segments and the endarterectomy specimens (n=21) were cut into 5mm cross-sectional rings. Ten fluorescence spectra per sampling area were then recorded at 5 sites per ring with argon laser excitation (357nm) with a penetration depth of 200 μm. Spectra were normalized to maximum intensity and analyzed using multiple regression analysis. Tissue rings were fixed in formalin (within 3 hours of surgery), sectioned and stained with H&E or Movat's Pentachrome for histological analysis. Spectroscopy data were correlated with immunohistology (staining for elastin, collagen types I, III and IV). Results: Quantitative fluorescence for the thoracic arteries revealed a dominant elastin component on the luminal side -- confirmed with immunohistology and known artery structure. Carotid endarterectomy specimens by comparison had a significant decrease in elastin signature and increased collagen type I and III. Arterial spectra were markedly different between the thoracic and carotid specimens. There was also a significant elevation (p<0.05) of collagen type I distal to the bifurcation compared to proximal tissue in the carotid specimens. Conclusion: Fluorescence

  9. Magnetic characterization of human blood in the atherosclerotic process in coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janus, B.; Bućko, M. S.; Chrobak, A.; Wasilewski, J.; Zych, M.

    2011-03-01

    In the last decades there has been an increasing interest in biomagnetism—a field of biophysics concerned with the magnetic properties of living organisms. Biomagnetism focuses on the measurement of magnetic properties of biological samples in the clinical environment. Progress in this field can provide new data for the understanding of the pathomechanism of atherosclerosis and support the diagnostic options for the evaluation and treatment of atherothrombotic complications. Lyophilized human blood samples from patients with atherosclerotic lesions (calcium scoring (CS) CS>0) and without atherosclerotic lesions (CS=0) were magnetically investigated. Magnetic measurements (performed in room and low temperature) indicated significant magnetic differences between these two groups of patients. Atherosclerotic blood samples are characterized by higher concentration of ferrimagnetic particles (magnetite and/or maghemite) and significant changes in the superparamagnetic behaviour. This research presents that magnetometry, in combination with medical research can lead to a better understanding of iron physiology in the atherosclerotic process.

  10. Development of Advanced Atherosclerotic Plaque by Injection of Inflammatory Proteins in a Rabbit Iliac Artery Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Sun; Lee, Seul-Gee; Oh, Jaewon; Park, Se-Il; Hong, Sung-Yu; Kim, Sehoon; Lee, Sang-Hak; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Hong, Myeong-Ki; Jang, Yangsoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Appropriate animal models of atherosclerotic plaque are crucial to investigating the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, as well as for the evaluation of the efficacy and safety of vascular devices. We aimed to develop a novel animal model that would be suitable for the study of advanced atherosclerotic lesions in vivo. Materials and Methods Atherosclerotic plaque was induced in 24 iliac arteries from 12 rabbits by combining a high cholesterol diet, endothelial denudation, and injection into the vessel wall with either saline (n=5), olive oil (n=6), or inflammatory proteins [n=13, high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) n=8 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α n=5] using a Cricket™ Micro-infusion catheter. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed to detect plaque characteristics after 4 weeks, and all tissues were harvested for histological evaluation. Results Advanced plaque was more frequently observed in the group injected with inflammatory proteins. Macrophage infiltration was present to a higher degree in the HMGB1 and TNF-α groups, compared to the oil or saline group (82.1±5.1% and 94.6±2.2% compared to 49.6±14.0% and 46.5±9.6%, p-value<0.001), using RAM11 antibody staining. On OCT, lipid rich plaques were more frequently detected in the inflammatory protein group [saline group: 2/5 (40%), oil group: 3/5 (50%), HMGB1 group: 6/8 (75%), and TNF-α group: 5/5 (100%)]. Conclusion These data indicate that this rabbit model of atherosclerotic lesion formation via direct injection of pro-inflammatory proteins into the vessel wall is useful for in vivo studies investigating atherosclerosis. PMID:27401639

  11. Combined imaging of oxidative stress and microscopic structure reveals new features in human atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; Gustafsson, Håkan; Ellingsen, Pål Gunnar; Zachrisson, Helene; Hallbeck, Martin; Hagen, Vegard Stenhjem; Kildemo, Morten; Lindgren, Mikael

    2015-02-01

    Human atherosclerotic samples collected by carotid endarterectomy were investigated using electronic paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) for visualization of reactive oxygen species, and nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) to study structural features. Regions of strong EPRI signal, indicating a higher concentration of reactive oxygen species and increased inflammation, were found to colocalize with regions dense in cholesterol crystals as revealed by NLOM.

  12. 12- and 15-lipoxygenases in human carotid atherosclerotic lesions: Associations with cerebrovascular symptoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoxygenase (ALOX) enzymes are implicated in both pro- and anti-atherogenic processes. The aim of this study was to investigate mRNA expression of 12- and 15-lipoxygenases (ALOX12, ALOX12B, ALOX15, ALOX15B) and the atypical ALOXE3 in human carotid atherosclerotic lesions, in relation to cerebrovasc...

  13. Prednisolone-containing liposomes accumulate in human atherosclerotic macrophages upon intravenous administration

    PubMed Central

    van der Valk, Fleur M.; van Wijk, Diederik F.; Lobatto, Mark E.; Verberne, Hein J.; Storm, Gert; Willems, Martine C.M.; Legemate, Dink A.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Calcagno, Claudia; Mani, Venkatesh; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Paridaans, Maarten P.M.; Otten, Maarten J.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Nieuwdorp, Max; Schulte, Dominik M.; Metselaar, Josbert M.; Mulder, Willem J.M.; Stroes, Erik S.

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery to atherosclerotic plaques via liposomal nanoparticles may improve therapeutic agents’ risk–benefit ratios. Our paper details the first clinical studies of a liposomal nanoparticle encapsulating prednisolone (LN-PLP) in atherosclerosis. First, PLP’s liposomal encapsulation improved its pharmacokinetic profile in humans (n = 13) as attested by an increased plasma half-life of 63 h (LN-PLP 1.5 mg/kg). Second, intravenously infused LN-PLP appeared in 75% of the macrophages isolated from iliofemoral plaques of patients (n = 14) referred for vascular surgery in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. LN-PLP treatment did however not reduce arterial wall permeability or inflammation in patients with atherosclerotic disease (n = 30), as assessed by multimodal imaging in a subsequent randomized, placebo-controlled study. In conclusion, we successfully delivered a long-circulating nanoparticle to atherosclerotic plaque macrophages in patients, whereas prednisolone accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions had no anti-inflammatory effect. Nonetheless, the present study provides guidance for development and imaging-assisted evaluation of future nanomedicine in atherosclerosis. PMID:25791806

  14. A Proteomic Focus on the Alterations Occurring at the Human Atherosclerotic Coronary Intima*

    PubMed Central

    de la Cuesta, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Maroto, Aroa S.; Donado, Alicia; Zubiri, Irene; Posada, Maria; Padial, Luis R.; Pinto, Angel G.; Barderas, Maria G.; Vivanco, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis still represents the major cause of mortality in western societies. Initiation of atherosclerosis occurs within the intima, where major histological and molecular changes are produced during pathogenesis. So far, proteomic analysis of the atherome plaque has been mainly tackled by the analysis of the entire tissue, which may be a challenging approach because of the great complexity of this sample in terms of layers and cell type composition. Based on this, we aimed to study the intimal proteome from the human atherosclerotic coronary artery. For this purpose, we analyzed the intimal layer from human atherosclerotic coronaries, which were isolated by laser microdissection, and compared with those from preatherosclerotic coronary and radial arteries, using a two-dimensional Differential-In-Gel-Electrophoresis (DIGE) approach. Results have pointed out 13 proteins to be altered (seven up-regulated and six down-regulated), which are implicated in the migrative capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells, extracellular matrix composition, coagulation, apoptosis, heat shock response, and intraplaque hemorrhage deposition. Among these, three proteins (annexin 4, myosin regulatory light 2, smooth muscle isoform, and ferritin light chain) constitute novel atherosclerotic coronary intima proteins, because they were not previously identified at this human coronary layer. For this reason, these novel proteins were validated by immunohistochemistry, together with hemoglobin and vimentin, in an independent cohort of arteries. PMID:21248247

  15. Ex vivo differential phase contrast and magnetic resonance imaging for characterization of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Meletta, Romana; Borel, Nicole; Stolzmann, Paul; Astolfo, Alberto; Klohs, Jan; Stampanoni, Marco; Rudin, Markus; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Herde, Adrienne Müller

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive detection of specific atherosclerotic plaque components related to vulnerability is of high clinical relevance to prevent cerebrovascular events. The feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for characterization of plaque components was already demonstrated. We aimed to evaluate the potential of ex vivo differential phase contrast X-ray tomography (DPC) to accurately characterize human carotid plaque components in comparison to high field multicontrast MRI and histopathology. Two human plaque segments, obtained from carotid endarterectomy, classified according to criteria of the American Heart Association as stable and unstable plaque, were examined by ex vivo DPC tomography and multicontrast MRI (T1-, T2-, and proton density-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging). To identify specific plaque components, the plaques were subsequently sectioned and stained for fibrous and cellular components, smooth muscle cells, hemosiderin, and fibrin. Histological data were then matched with DPC and MR images to define signal criteria for atherosclerotic plaque components. Characteristic structures, such as the lipid and necrotic core covered by a fibrous cap, calcification and hemosiderin deposits were delineated by histology and found with excellent sensitivity, resolution and accuracy in both imaging modalities. DPC tomography was superior to MRI regarding resolution and soft tissue contrast. Ex vivo DPC tomography allowed accurate identification of structures and components of atherosclerotic plaques at different lesion stages, in good correlation with histopathological findings.

  16. Elevated expression of mechanosensory polycystins in human carotid atherosclerotic plaques: association with p53 activation and disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Aimilia; Piperi, Christina; Sigala, Fragiska; Agrogiannis, George; Davos, Constantinos H.; Andri, Maria-Anastasia; Manopoulos, Christos; Tsangaris, Sokrates; Basdra, Efthimia K.; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque formation is associated with irregular distribution of wall shear stress (WSS) that modulates endothelial function and integrity. Polycystins (PC)-1/-2 constitute a flow-sensing protein complex in endothelial cells, able to respond to WSS and induce cell-proliferation changes leading to atherosclerosis. An endothelial cell-culture system of measurable WSS was established to detect alterations in PCs expression under conditions of low- and high-oscillatory shear stress in vitro. PCs expression and p53 activation as a regulator of cell proliferation were further evaluated in vivo and in 69 advanced human carotid atherosclerotic plaques (AAPs). Increased PC-1/PC-2 expression was observed at 30–60 min of low shear stress (LSS) in endothelial cells. Elevated PC-1 expression at LSS was followed by p53 potentiation. PCs immunoreactivity localizes in areas with macrophage infiltration and neovascularization. PC-1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher than PC-2 in stable fibroatherotic (V) and unstable/complicated (VI) AAPs. Elevated PC-1 immunostaining was detected in AAPs from patients with diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hypertension and carotid stenosis, at both arteries (50%) or in one artery (90%). PCs seem to participate in plaque formation and progression. Since PC-1 upregulation coincides with p38 and p53 activation, a potential interplay of these molecules in atherosclerosis induction is posed. PMID:26286632

  17. Thiocyanate supplementation decreases atherosclerotic plaque in mice expressing human myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Morgan, P E; Laura, R P; Maki, R A; Reynolds, W F; Davies, M J

    2015-06-01

    Elevated levels of the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. MPO predominantly catalyzes formation of the oxidants hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from Cl(-), and hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) from SCN(-), with these anions acting as competitive substrates. HOSCN is a less powerful and more specific oxidant than HOCl, and selectively targets thiols; such damage is largely reversible, unlike much HOCl-induced damage. We hypothesized that increased plasma SCN(-), and hence HOSCN formation instead of HOCl, may decrease artery wall damage. This was examined using high-fat fed atherosclerosis-prone LDLR(-/-) mice transgenic for human MPO, with and without SCN(-) (10 mM) added to drinking water. Serum samples, collected fortnightly, were analyzed for cholesterol, triglycerides, thiols, MPO, and SCN(-); study-long exposure was calculated by area under the curve (AUC). Mean serum SCN(-) concentrations were elevated in the supplemented mice (200-320 μM) relative to controls (< 120 μM). Normalized aortic root plaque areas at sacrifice were 26% lower in the SCN(-)-supplemented mice compared with controls (P = 0.0417), but plaque morphology was not appreciably altered. Serum MPO levels steadily increased in mice on the high-fat diet, however, comparison of SCN(-)-supplemented versus control mice showed no significant changes in MPO protein, cholesterol, or triglyceride levels; thiol levels were decreased in supplemented mice at one time-point. Plaque areas increased with higher cholesterol AUC (r = 0.4742; P = 0.0468), and decreased with increasing SCN(-) AUC (r = - 0.5693; P = 0.0134). These data suggest that increased serum SCN(-) levels, which can be achieved in humans by dietary manipulation, may decrease atherosclerosis burden.

  18. Thiocyanate supplementation decreases atherosclerotic plaque in mice expressing human myeloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, P. E.; Laura, R. P.; Maki, R. A.; Reynolds, W. F.; Davies, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. MPO predominantly catalyzes formation of the oxidants hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from Cl−, and hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) from SCN−, with these anions acting as competitive substrates. HOSCN is a less powerful and more specific oxidant than HOCl, and selectively targets thiols; such damage is largely reversible, unlike much HOCl-induced damage. We hypothesized that increased plasma SCN−, and hence HOSCN formation instead of HOCl, may decrease artery wall damage. This was examined using high-fat fed atherosclerosis-prone LDLR−/− mice transgenic for human MPO, with and without SCN− (10 mM) added to drinking water. Serum samples, collected fortnightly, were analyzed for cholesterol, triglycerides, thiols, MPO and SCN−; study-long exposure was calculated by area under the curve (AUC). Mean serum SCN− concentrations were elevated in the supplemented mice (200-320 μM) relative to controls (<120 μM). Normalized aortic root plaque areas at sacrifice were 26% lower in the SCN−-supplemented mice compared to controls (P=0.0417), but plaque morphology was not appreciably altered. Serum MPO levels steadily increased in mice on the high-fat diet, however, comparison of SCN−- supplemented vs. control mice showed no significant changes in MPO protein, cholesterol or triglyceride levels; thiol levels were decreased in supplemented mice at one time-point. Plaque areas increased with higher cholesterol AUC (r=0.4742; P=0.0468), and decreased with increasing SCN− AUC (r=−0.5693; P=0.0134). These data suggest that increased serum SCN− levels, which can be achieved in humans by dietary manipulation, may decrease atherosclerosis burden. PMID:25812586

  19. Increased Platelet Reactivity Is Associated with Circulating Platelet-Monocyte Complexes and Macrophages in Human Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Vrijenhoek, Joyce E. P.; van Holten, Thijs C.; Elsenberg, Ellen H. A. M.; Mak-Nienhuis, Elske M.; de Borst, Gert Jan; Jukema, J. Wouter; Pijls, Nico H. J.; Waltenberger, Johannes; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Moll, Frans L.; McClellan, Elizabeth; Stubbs, Andrew; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo; de Groot, Philip G.; Roest, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective Platelet reactivity, platelet binding to monocytes and monocyte infiltration play a detrimental role in atherosclerotic plaque progression. We investigated whether platelet reactivity was associated with levels of circulating platelet-monocyte complexes (PMCs) and macrophages in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques. Methods Platelet reactivity was determined by measuring platelet P-selectin expression after platelet stimulation with increasing concentrations of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), in two independent cohorts: the Circulating Cells cohort (n = 244) and the Athero-Express cohort (n = 91). Levels of PMCs were assessed by flow cytometry in blood samples of patients who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention (Circulating Cells cohort). Monocyte infiltration was semi-quantitatively determined by histological examination of atherosclerotic carotid plaques collected during carotid endarterectomy (Athero-Express cohort). Results We found increased platelet reactivity in patients with high PMCs as compared to patients with low PMCs (median (interquartile range): 4153 (1585–11267) area under the curve (AUC) vs. 9633 (3580–21565) AUC, P<0.001). Also, we observed increased platelet reactivity in patients with high macrophage levels in atherosclerotic plaques as compared to patients with low macrophage levels in atherosclerotic plaques (mean±SD; 8969±3485 AUC vs. 7020±3442 AUC, P = 0.02). All associations remained significant after adjustment for age, sex and use of drugs against platelet activation. Conclusion Platelet reactivity towards ADP is associated with levels of PMCs and macrophages in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques. PMID:25122139

  20. Recombinant Human Elastase Alters the Compliance of Atherosclerotic Tibial Arteries After Ex Vivo Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Karen; Moss, Emma; Gottlieb, Daniel P.; Wong, Marco D.; Bland, Kimberly S.; Franano, F. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine whether vonapanitase (formerly PRT-201), a recombinant human elastase, treatment can fragment the protein elastin in elastic fibers and cause dilation of atherosclerotic human peripheral arteries subjected to ex vivo balloon angioplasty. Materials and Methods: Seven patients undergoing lower limb amputation for peripheral artery disease or who died and donated their bodies to science donated 11 tibial arteries (5 anterior, 6 posterior) for this study. All arteries were atherosclerotic by visual inspection. The arteries underwent ex vivo balloon angioplasty and thereafter were cut into rings and studied on wire myographs where the rings were stretched and tension was recorded. After treatment with vonapanitase 2 mg/mL or vehicle control, myography was repeated and the rings were then subject to elastin content measurement using a desmosine radioimmunoassay and elastic fiber visualization by histology. The wire myography data were used to derive compliance, stress-strain, and incremental elastic modulus curves. Results: Vonapanitase treatment reduced elastin (desmosine) content by 60% and decreased elastic fiber histologic staining. Vonapanitase-treated rings experienced less tension at any level of stretch and as a result had shifts in the compliance and stress-strain curves relative to vehicle-treated rings. Vonapanitase treatment did not alter the incremental elastic modulus curve. Conclusions: Vonapanitase treatment of atherosclerotic human peripheral arteries after ex vivo balloon angioplasty fragmented elastin in elastic fibers, decreased tension in the rings at any level of stretch, and altered the compliance and stress-strain curves in a manner predicting arterial dilation in vivo. Based on this result, local treatment of balloon angioplasty sites may increase blood vessel diameter and thereby improve the success of balloon angioplasty in peripheral artery disease. PMID:26745001

  1. Differential Inhibition of Human Atherosclerotic Plaque–Induced Platelet Activation by Dimeric GPVI-Fc and Anti-GPVI Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Jamasbi, Janina; Megens, Remco T.A.; Bianchini, Mariaelvy; Münch, Götz; Ungerer, Martin; Faussner, Alexander; Sherman, Shachar; Walker, Adam; Goyal, Pankaj; Jung, Stephanie; Brandl, Richard; Weber, Christian; Lorenz, Reinhard; Farndale, Richard; Elia, Natalie; Siess, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Background Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) is the essential platelet collagen receptor in atherothrombosis, but its inhibition causes only a mild bleeding tendency. Thus, targeting this receptor has selective antithrombotic potential. Objectives This study sought to compare compounds interfering with platelet GPVI–atherosclerotic plaque interaction to improve current antiatherothrombotic therapy. Methods Human atherosclerotic plaque–induced platelet aggregation was measured in anticoagulated blood under static and arterial flow conditions (550/s, 1,100/s, and 1,500/s). Inhibition by dimeric GPVI fragment crystallizable region of IgG (Fc) masking GPVI binding sites on collagen was compared with that of 3 anti-GPVI antibodies: BLO8-1, a human domain antibody; 5C4, a fragment antigen-binding (Fab fragment) of monoclonal rat immunoglobulin G; and m-Fab-F, a human recombinant sFab against GPVI dimers. Results GPVI-Fc reduced plaque-triggered platelet aggregation in static blood by 51%, BLO8-1 by 88%, and 5C4 by 93%. Under arterial flow conditions, BLO8-1 and 5C4 almost completely inhibited platelet aggregation while preserving platelet adhesion on plaque. Inhibition by GPVI-Fc, even at high concentrations, was less marked but increased with shear rate. Advanced optical imaging revealed rapid persistent GPVI-Fc binding to collagen under low and high shear flow, upstream and downstream of plaque fragments. At low shear particularly, platelets adhered in plaque flow niches to GPVI-Fc–free segments of collagen fibers and recruited other platelets onto aggregates via ADP and TxA2 release. Conclusions Anti-GPVI antibodies inhibit atherosclerotic plaque-induced platelet aggregation under static and flow conditions more effectively than GPVI-Fc. However, potent platelet inhibition by GPVI-Fc at a higher shear rate (1,500/s) suggests localized antithrombotic efficacy at denuded or fissured stenotic high-risk lesions without systemic bleeding. The compound-specific differences

  2. Association between Human Plasma Chondroitin Sulfate Isomers and Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    PubMed

    Zinellu, Elisabetta; Lepedda, Antonio Junior; Cigliano, Antonio; Pisanu, Salvatore; Zinellu, Angelo; Carru, Ciriaco; Bacciu, Pietro Paolo; Piredda, Franco; Guarino, Anna; Spirito, Rita; Formato, Marilena

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have evidenced variations in plasma glycosaminoglycans content in physiological and pathological conditions. In normal human plasma GAGs are present mainly as undersulfated chondroitin sulfate (CS). The aim of the present study was to evaluate possible correlations between plasma CS level/structure and the presence/typology of carotid atherosclerotic lesion. Plasma CS was purified from 46 control subjects and 47 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy showing either a soft or a hard plaque. The concentration and structural characteristics of plasma CS were assessed by capillary electrophoresis of constituent unsaturated fluorophore-labeled disaccharides. Results showed that the concentration of total CS isomers was increased by 21.4% (P < 0.01) in plasma of patients, due to a significant increase of undersulfated CS. Consequently, in patients the plasma CS charge density was significantly reduced with respect to that of controls. After sorting for plaque typology, we found that patients with soft plaques and those with hard ones differently contribute to the observed changes. In plasma from patients with soft plaques, the increase in CS content was not associated with modifications of its sulfation pattern. On the contrary, the presence of hard plaques was associated with CS sulfation pattern modifications in presence of quite normal total CS isomers levels. These results suggest that the plasma CS content and structure could be related to the presence and the typology of atherosclerotic plaque and could provide a useful diagnostic tool, as well as information on the molecular mechanisms responsible for plaque instability.

  3. Adhesion molecules on the endothelium and mononuclear cells in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    van der Wal, A. C.; Das, P. K.; Tigges, A. J.; Becker, A. E.

    1992-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions show features of a cell-mediated immune inflammatory process. From this viewpoint, the potential role of arterial endothelium in the recruitment of mononuclear cells (T lymphocytes and macrophages) was studied. The endothelium of diffuse intimal thickening (DIT) and atheromatous plaques (AP) in human coronary arteries and abdominal aortas was characterized for the expression of adhesion molecules ELAM-1, ICAM-1, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens HLA-DR/DP. A marked increase in expression of ICAM-1 and ELAM-1, and to a lesser extent HLA-DR/DP was observed on endothelial cells that were adjacent to subendothelial infiltrates of T lymphocytes (CD3+, CD11a+, HLA-DR/DP+) and macrophages (CD14+, CD11a+, CD11c+, HLA-DR/DP+). This contrasted with a lower or absent expression of these activation markers at sites without prominent inflammatory cell infiltrates. These findings could be demonstrated in DIT as well as in AP. The observations suggest that cytokines produced by the subintimal infiltrates may activate the endothelium in a similar way as is observed in the microvasculature at sites of immune inflammation. The expression of these activation markers in the microvasculature is associated with enhanced leukocyte adhesion, permeability for macromolecules, and procoagulant activity, features known to occur also in early experimental atherosclerosis. The findings therefore support the concept that arterial endothelium plays an active role in the recruitment of mononuclear cells in atherosclerotic lesions. Images Figure 1 PMID:1281621

  4. Human macrophage scavenger receptors: primary structure, expression, and localization in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, A; Naito, M; Itakura, H; Ikemoto, S; Asaoka, H; Hayakawa, I; Kanamori, H; Aburatani, H; Takaku, F; Suzuki, H

    1990-01-01

    Two types of cDNAs for human macrophage scavenger receptors were cloned from a cDNA library derived from the phorbol ester-treated human monocytic cell line THP-1. The type I and type II human scavenger receptors encoded by these cDNAs are homologous (73% and 71% amino acid identity) to their previously characterized bovine counterparts and consist of six domains: cytoplasmic (I), membrane-spanning (II), spacer (III), alpha-helical coiled-coil (IV), collagen-like (V), and a type-specific C-terminal (VI). The receptor gene is located on human chromosome 8. The human receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells mediated endocytosis of modified low density lipoproteins. Two mRNAs, 4.0 and 3.2 kilobases, have been detected in human liver, placenta, and brain. Immunohistochemical studies using an anti-peptide antibody which recognizes human scavenger receptors indicated the presence of the scavenger receptors in the macrophages of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting the involvement of scavenger receptors in atherogenesis. Images PMID:2251254

  5. Ticagrelor promotes atherosclerotic plaque stability in a mouse model of advanced atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Preusch, Michael R; Rusnak, Jonas; Staudacher, Kathrin; Mogler, Carolin; Uhlmann, Lorenz; Sievers, Philipp; Bea, Florian; Katus, Hugo A; Blessing, Erwin; Staudacher, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is increasing evidence supporting the role of platelets in atherosclerotic vascular disease. The G-protein-coupled receptor P2Y12 is a central mediator of platelet activation and aggregation but has also been linked to platelet-independent vascular disease. Ticagrelor is an oral P2Y12 antagonist that is used as a standard treatment in patients after acute myocardial infarction. However, the effects of ticagrelor on advanced atherosclerosis have not been investigated. Materials and methods Twenty-week-old apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice received standard chow or standard chow supplemented with 0.15% ticagrelor (approximately 270 mg/kg/day) for 25 weeks. The lesion area was evaluated in the aortic sinus by Movat’s pentachrome staining and lesion composition, thickness of the fibrous cap, and size of the necrotic core evaluated by morphometry. RAW 264.7 macrophages were serum starved and treated with ticagrelor in vitro for the detection and quantification of apoptosis. In addition, oxLDL uptake in RAW 264.7 macrophages was evaluated. Results A trend toward the reduction of total lesion size was detected. However, data did not reach the levels of significance (control, n=11, 565,881 μm2 [interquartile range {IQR} 454,778–603,925 μm2] versus ticagrelor, n=13, 462,595 μm2 [IQR 379,740–546,037 μm2]; P=0.1). A significant reduction in the relative area of the necrotic core (control, n=11, 0.46 [IQR 0.4–0.51] versus ticagrelor, n=13, 0.34 [IQR 0.31–0.39]; P=0.008), and a significant increase in fibrous caps thickness (control, n=11, 3.7 μm [IQR 3.4–4.2 μm] versus ticagrelor, n=13, 4.7 [IQR 4.3–5.5 μm], P=0.04) were seen in ticagrelor-treated mice. In vitro studies demonstrated a reduction in apoptotic RAW 264.7 macrophages (control 0.07±0.03 versus ticagrelor 0.03±0.03; P=0.0002) when incubated with ticagrelor. Uptake of oxLDL in RAW 264.7 was significantly reduced when treated with ticagrelor (control 9.2 [IQR 5.3–12.9] versus

  6. Ticagrelor promotes atherosclerotic plaque stability in a mouse model of advanced atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Preusch, Michael R; Rusnak, Jonas; Staudacher, Kathrin; Mogler, Carolin; Uhlmann, Lorenz; Sievers, Philipp; Bea, Florian; Katus, Hugo A; Blessing, Erwin; Staudacher, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is increasing evidence supporting the role of platelets in atherosclerotic vascular disease. The G-protein-coupled receptor P2Y12 is a central mediator of platelet activation and aggregation but has also been linked to platelet-independent vascular disease. Ticagrelor is an oral P2Y12 antagonist that is used as a standard treatment in patients after acute myocardial infarction. However, the effects of ticagrelor on advanced atherosclerosis have not been investigated. Materials and methods Twenty-week-old apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice received standard chow or standard chow supplemented with 0.15% ticagrelor (approximately 270 mg/kg/day) for 25 weeks. The lesion area was evaluated in the aortic sinus by Movat’s pentachrome staining and lesion composition, thickness of the fibrous cap, and size of the necrotic core evaluated by morphometry. RAW 264.7 macrophages were serum starved and treated with ticagrelor in vitro for the detection and quantification of apoptosis. In addition, oxLDL uptake in RAW 264.7 macrophages was evaluated. Results A trend toward the reduction of total lesion size was detected. However, data did not reach the levels of significance (control, n=11, 565,881 μm2 [interquartile range {IQR} 454,778–603,925 μm2] versus ticagrelor, n=13, 462,595 μm2 [IQR 379,740–546,037 μm2]; P=0.1). A significant reduction in the relative area of the necrotic core (control, n=11, 0.46 [IQR 0.4–0.51] versus ticagrelor, n=13, 0.34 [IQR 0.31–0.39]; P=0.008), and a significant increase in fibrous caps thickness (control, n=11, 3.7 μm [IQR 3.4–4.2 μm] versus ticagrelor, n=13, 4.7 [IQR 4.3–5.5 μm], P=0.04) were seen in ticagrelor-treated mice. In vitro studies demonstrated a reduction in apoptotic RAW 264.7 macrophages (control 0.07±0.03 versus ticagrelor 0.03±0.03; P=0.0002) when incubated with ticagrelor. Uptake of oxLDL in RAW 264.7 was significantly reduced when treated with ticagrelor (control 9.2 [IQR 5.3–12.9] versus

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques promotes platelet activation. Correlation with ischaemic events.

    PubMed

    Lenti, Massimo; Falcinelli, Emanuela; Pompili, Marcella; de Rango, Paola; Conti, Valentina; Guglielmini, Giuseppe; Momi, Stefania; Corazzi, Teresa; Giordano, Giuseppe; Gresele, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Purified active matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is able to promote platelet aggregation. We aimed to assess the role of MMP-2 expressed in atherosclerotic plaques in the platelet-activating potential of human carotid plaques and its correlation with ischaemic events. Carotid plaques from 81 patients undergoing endarterectomy were tested for pro-MMP-2 and TIMP-2 content by zymography and ELISA. Plaque extracts were incubated with gel-filtered platelets from healthy volunteers for 2 minutes before the addition of a subthreshold concentration of thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 (TRAP-6) and aggregation was assessed. Moreover, platelet deposition on plaque extracts immobilised on plastic coverslips under high shear-rate flow conditions was measured. Forty-three plaque extracts (53%) potentiated platelet aggregation (+233 ± 26.8%), an effect prevented by three different specific MMP-2 inhibitors (inhibitor II, TIMP-2, moAb anti-MMP-2). The pro-MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratio of plaques potentiating platelet aggregation was significantly higher than that of plaques not potentiating it (3.67 ± 1.21 vs 1.01 ± 0.43, p<0.05). Moreover, the platelet aggregation-potentiating effect, the active-MMP-2 content and the active MMP-2/pro-MMP-2 ratio of plaque extracts were significantly higher in plaques from patients who developed a subsequent major cardiovascular event. In conclusion, atherosclerotic plaques exert a prothrombotic effect by potentiating platelet activation due to their content of MMP-2; an elevated MMP-2 activity in plaques is associated with a higher rate of subsequent ischaemic cerebrovascular events. PMID:24499865

  8. Human miR-221/222 in Physiological and Atherosclerotic Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dmitry A.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of miR-221/222 is a key player in vascular biology through exhibiting its effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs). These miRNAs contribute to vascular remodeling, an adaptive process involving phenotypic and behavioral changes in vascular cells in response to vascular injury. In proliferative vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, pathological vascular remodeling plays a prominent role. The miR-221/222 cluster controls development and differentiation of ECs but inhibits their proangiogenic activation, proliferation, and migration. miR-221/222 are primarily implicated in maintaining endothelial integrity and supporting quiescent EC phenotype. Vascular expression of miR-221/222 is upregulated in initial atherogenic stages causing inhibition of angiogenic recruitment of ECs and increasing endothelial dysfunction and EC apoptosis. In contrast, these miRNAs stimulate VSMCs and switching from the VSMC “contractile” phenotype to the “synthetic” phenotype associated with induction of proliferation and motility. In atherosclerotic vessels, miR-221/222 drive neointima formation. Both miRNAs contribute to atherogenic calcification of VSMCs. In advanced plaques, chronic inflammation downregulates miR-221/222 expression in ECs that in turn could activate intralesion neoangiogenesis. In addition, both miRNAs could contribute to cardiovascular pathology through their effects on fat and glucose metabolism in nonvascular tissues such as adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscles. PMID:26221589

  9. N(omega)-(carboxymethyl)lysine depositions in human aortic heart valves: similarities with atherosclerotic blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Baidoshvili, Alexi; Niessen, Hans W M; Stooker, Wim; Huybregts, Rien A J M; Hack, C Erik; Rauwerda, Jan A; Meijer, Chris J L M; Eijsman, Leon; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2004-06-01

    Recent studies indicate a role of atherosclerosis-like changes involved in the pathogenesis of aortic valve stenosis. Interestingly, one of the major advanced glycation end products (AGEs), N(omega)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) has been related to the process of atherosclerosis in blood vessels. In the present study, we have analyzed the presence of CML in degenerative altered aortic valves with atherosclerosis-like changes, and in degenerated mitral valves without atherosclerosis-like changes, derived from patients suffering from acute rheumatism during childhood. Degenerated and non-degenerated valves were derived from autopsy or obtained during cardiac surgery. The presence of CML was examined by immunohistochemistry. CML was found on the endothelium and fibroblasts in control aortic and mitral valves. Minor differences in CML staining were observed between control and degeneratively affected mitral valves. In contrast, in degenerated aortic valves, CML accumulation was found in macrophages and on calcification sites, comparable to that in atherosclerotic arteries, while the presence of CML staining on the endothelium and fibroblasts was significantly less as compared with control aortic valves. Our data support the hypothesis that the process of degeneration of aortic valves resembles that of atherosclerosis in blood vessels. They suggest that CML also plays a role in the process of atherosclerosis in aortic valves.

  10. Direct association between diet and the stability of human atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Isabel; Andersson Georgiadou, Elisavet; Mattsson, Sören; Skog, Göran; Pedro, Luís; Fernandes E Fernandes, José; Dias, Nuno; Engström, Gunnar; Nilsson, Jan; Stenström, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Mediterranean diet has been suggested to explain why coronary heart disease mortality is lower in southern than northern Europe. Dietary habits can be revealed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) measurement of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in biological tissues. To study if diet is associated with human plaque stability, atherosclerotic plaques from carotid endarterectomy on 56 patients (21 Portuguese and 35 Swedish) were analysed by IRMS and histology. Plaque components affecting rupture risk were measured. Swedish plaques had more apoptosis, lipids and larger cores, as well as fewer proliferating cells and SMC than the Portuguese, conferring the Swedish a more rupture-prone phenotype. Portuguese plaques contained higher δ(13)C and δ(15)N than the Swedish, indicating that Portuguese plaques were more often derived from marine food. Plaque δ(13)C correlated with SMC and proliferating cells, and inversely with lipids, core size, apoptosis. Plaque δ(15)N correlated with SMC and inversely with lipids, core size and apoptosis. This is the first observational study showing that diet is reflected in plaque components associated with its vulnerability. The Portuguese plaques composition is consistent with an increased marine food intake and those plaques are more stable than those from Swedish patients. Marine-derived food is associated with plaque stability.

  11. Direct association between diet and the stability of human atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Isabel; Andersson Georgiadou, Elisavet; Mattsson, Sören; Skog, Göran; Pedro, Luís; Fernandes e Fernandes, José; Dias, Nuno; Engström, Gunnar; Nilsson, Jan; Stenström, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Mediterranean diet has been suggested to explain why coronary heart disease mortality is lower in southern than northern Europe. Dietary habits can be revealed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) measurement of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) in biological tissues. To study if diet is associated with human plaque stability, atherosclerotic plaques from carotid endarterectomy on 56 patients (21 Portuguese and 35 Swedish) were analysed by IRMS and histology. Plaque components affecting rupture risk were measured. Swedish plaques had more apoptosis, lipids and larger cores, as well as fewer proliferating cells and SMC than the Portuguese, conferring the Swedish a more rupture-prone phenotype. Portuguese plaques contained higher δ13C and δ15N than the Swedish, indicating that Portuguese plaques were more often derived from marine food. Plaque δ13C correlated with SMC and proliferating cells, and inversely with lipids, core size, apoptosis. Plaque δ15N correlated with SMC and inversely with lipids, core size and apoptosis. This is the first observational study showing that diet is reflected in plaque components associated with its vulnerability. The Portuguese plaques composition is consistent with an increased marine food intake and those plaques are more stable than those from Swedish patients. Marine-derived food is associated with plaque stability. PMID:26490319

  12. Equivalence testing in microarray analysis: similarities in the transcriptome of human atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Eijgelaar, Wouter J; Horrevoets, Anton J G; Bijnens, Ann-Pascale J J; Daemen, Mat J A P; Verhaegh, Wim F J

    2010-05-01

    We focus on similarities in the transcriptome of human Kupffer cells and alveolar, splenic, and atherosclerotic plaque-residing macrophages. We hypothesized that these macrophages share a common expression signature. We performed microarray analysis on mRNA from these subsets (4 patients) and developed a novel statistical method to identify genes with significantly similar expression levels. Phenotypic and functional diversity between macrophage subpopulations reflects their plasticity to respond to microenvironmental signals. Apart from detecting differences in expression profiles, the comparison of the transcriptomes of different macrophage populations may also allow the definition of molecular similarities between these subsets. This new method calculates the maximum difference in gene expression level, based on the estimated confidence interval on that gene's expression variance. We listed the genes by equivalence ranking relative to expression level. FDR estimation was used to determine significance. We identified 500 genes with significantly equivalent expression levels in the macrophage subsets at 5.5% FDR using a confidence level of α = 0.05 for equivalence. Among these are the established macrophage marker CD68, IL1 receptor antagonist, and MHC-related CD1C. These 500 genes were submitted to IPA and GO clustering using DAVID. Additionally, hierarchical clustering of these genes in the Novartis human gene expression atlas revealed a subset of 200 genes specifically expressed in macrophages. Equivalently expressed genes, identified by this new method, may not only help to dissect common molecular mechanisms, but also to identify cell- or condition-specific sets of marker genes that can be used for drug targeting and molecular imaging. PMID:20068025

  13. Low expression of ferroxidases is implicated in the iron retention in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jiajie; Zhou, Yu; Hao, Shuangying; Wang, Qi; Li, Kuanyu; Qiao, Tong

    2015-09-01

    The effect of iron on the progress of atherosclerosis is still controversial. To explore the relationship between atherosclerotic plaques and iron metabolism and how iron is accumulated in plaque macrophages, we performed Oil red O staining to detect the lipid of the atherosclerotic plaques, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect the intracellular lipids (total cholesterol, free cholesterol) and serum hepcidin, Western-blot to examine the iron-related proteins, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence assays to localize ferroportin 1 in macrophages. The contents of serum iron and transferrin saturation were measured. The results confrimed that atherosclerotic plaques were all lipid-rich. Compared to normal vessel wall, atherosclerotic plaques had significantly higher levels of ferritin and ferroportin 1. Strikingly, we found the much lower levels of ferroxidases ceruloplasmin and hephaestin in plaque tissue than the normal vessel, while the content of serum hepcidin, iron and transferrin saturation were similar in these two groups. The novel finding suggests that the inability of ferrous iron to be oxidized into ferric iron might be a potential mechanism for iron retention in plaques. PMID:26208458

  14. Rap1 induces cytokine production in pro-inflammatory macrophages through NFκB signaling and is highly expressed in human atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yin; Sukhova, Galina K; Wong, Hoi Kin; Xu, Aimin; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Tang, Eva Hoi Ching

    2015-01-01

    Repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1) is essential for maintaining telomere length and structural integrity, but it also exerts other non-telomeric functions. The present study tested the hypothesis that Rap1 is released into the cytoplasm and induces production of pro-inflammatory cytokines via nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling in macrophages, a cell type involved in the development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. Western blotting analysis confirmed that Rap1 was present in the cytoplasm of differentiated human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1, a macrophage-like cell line). Co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed a direct interaction between Rap1 and I kappa B kinase (IKK). Knockdown of Rap1 suppressed lipopolysaccharide-mediated activation of NFκB, and phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B α (IκBα) and p65 in THP-1 macrophages. The reduction of NFκB activity was paralleled by a decreased production of NFκB-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines and an increased expression of IκBα (native NFκB inhibitor) in various macrophage models with pro-inflammatory phenotype, including THP-1, mouse peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived M1 macrophages. These changes were observed selectively in pro-inflammatory macrophages but not in bone marrow-derived M2 macrophages (with an anti-inflammatory phenotype), mouse lung endothelial cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells or human aortic smooth muscle cells. Immunostaining revealed that Rap1 was localized mainly in macrophage-rich areas in human atherosclerotic plaques and that the presence of Rap1 was positively correlated with the advancement of the disease process. In pro-inflammatory macrophages, Rap1 promotes cytokine production via NFκB activation favoring a pro-inflammatory environment which may contribute to the development and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26505215

  15. Expression of cartilage-specific markers in calcified and non-calcified atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Aigner, Thomas; Neureiter, Daniel; Câmpean, Valentina; Soder, Stephan; Amann, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    Recently, molecular mechanisms resembling endochondral ossification were suggested to be important for atherosclerotic vessel calcification. The aim of this study was to investigate in a series of human atherosclerotic (non-diabetic) lesions of the crural arteries the distribution and expression of classical marker genes of the endochondral ossification pathway. Immunostaining for marker proteins S-100 protein and collagen types II and X were performed on atherosclerotic lesions of different grades (according to Stary). Quantitative real-time PCR for human COL1A1, COL2A1, COL10A1, SOX9, and BMP-2 was applied on RNA isolated from atherosclerotic arteries. In most samples, no expression of collagen type II and S-100 protein was found. Exceptionally, S-100 protein and type II collagen expression was observed very focally within advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Type X collagen was not detected in any of the lesions investigated. Overall, in our study we found no evidence that chondrogenic differentiation pathways are generally active in atherosclerotic plaque formation. In particular type X collagen, one important molecule in cartilage calcification, was not expressed in any of the investigated specimens. Occasionally, however, chondrocytic differentiation markers occur within atherosclerotic lesions. This most likely represents a metaplastic event associated, but not causative for atherosclerotic vessel degeneration and calcification. PMID:17335825

  16. Morphometric and hemodynamic analysis of atherosclerotic progression in human carotid artery bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu; Yin, Xiaoping; Xu, Yingjin; Jia, Xinwei; Li, Jianhui; Niu, Pei; Shen, Wenzeng; Kassab, Ghassan S; Tan, Wenchang; Huo, Yunlong

    2016-03-01

    Although atherosclerosis has been widely investigated at carotid artery bifurcation, there is a lack of morphometric and hemodynamic data at different stages of the disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the lesion difference in patients with carotid artery disease compared with healthy control subjects. The three-dimensional (3D) geometry of carotid artery bifurcation was reconstructed from computed tomography angiography (CTA) images of Chinese control subjects (n = 30) and patients with carotid artery disease (n = 30). We defined two novel vector angles (i.e., angles 1 and 2) that were tangential to the reconstructed contour of the 3D vessel. The best-fit diameter was computed along the internal carotid artery (ICA) center line. Hemodynamic analysis was performed at various bifurcations. Patients with stenotic vessels have larger angles 1 and 2 (151 ± 11° and 42 ± 20°) and smaller diameters of the external carotid artery (ECA) (4.6 ± 0.85 mm) compared with control subjects (144 ± 13° and 36 ± 16°, 5.2 ± 0.57 mm) although there is no significant difference in the common carotid artery (CCA) (7.1 ± 1.2 vs. 7.5 ± 1.0 mm, P = 0.18). In particular, all patients with carotid artery disease have a stenosis at the proximal ICA (including both sinus and carina regions), while 20% of patients have stenosis at the middle ICA and 20% have stenosis expansion to the entire cervical ICA. Morphometric and hemodynamic analyses suggest that atherosclerotic plaques initiate at both sinus and carina regions of ICA and progress downstream.

  17. Advances in human genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, H.; Hirschhorn, K.

    1993-01-01

    This book has five chapters covering peroxisomal diseases, X-linked immunodeficiencies, genetic mutations affecting human lipoproteins and their receptors and enzymes, genetic aspects of cancer, and Gaucher disease. The chapter on peroxisomes covers their discovery, structure, functions, disorders, etc. The chapter on X-linked immunodeficiencies discusses such diseases as agammaglobulinemia, severe combined immunodeficiency, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, animal models, linkage analysis, etc. Apolipoprotein formation, synthesis, gene regulation, proteins, etc. are the main focus of chapter 3. The chapter on cancer covers such topics as oncogene mapping and the molecular characterization of some recessive oncogenes. Gaucher disease is covered from its diagnosis, classification, and prevention, to its organ system involvement and molecular biology.

  18. Detection of human cytomegalovirus and epstein-barr virus in coronary atherosclerotic tissue.

    PubMed

    Imbronito, Ana Vitória; Marcelino, Silvia Linardi; Grande, Sabrina Rosa; Nunes, Fabio Daumas; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies indicated that patients with atherosclerosis are predominantly infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), but rarely infected by type 1 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-1). In this study, atheromas of 30 patients who underwent aortocoronary bypass surgery with coronary endartherectomy were tested for the presence of these two viruses. HCMV occurred in 93.3% of the samples and EBV-1 was present in 50% of them. Concurrent presence of both pathogens was detected in 43.3% of the samples.

  19. In vitro angioplasty of atherosclerotic human femoral arteries: analysis of the geometrical changes in the individual tissues using MRI and image processing.

    PubMed

    Auer, Martin; Stollberger, Rudolf; Regitnig, Peter; Ebner, Franz; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2010-04-01

    Existing atherosclerotic plaque imaging techniques such as intravascular ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography, optical coherence tomography, and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (hrMRI) require computerized methods to separate and analyze the plaque morphology. In this work, we perform in vitro balloon angioplasty experiments with 10 human femoral arteries using hrMRI and image processing. The vessel segments contain low-grade to high-grade lesions with very different plaque compositions. The experiments are designed to mimic the in vivo situation. We use a semi-automatic image processing tool to extract the three-dimensional (3D) geometries of the tissue components at four characteristic stages of the angioplasty procedure. The obtained geometries are then used to determine geometrical and mechanical indices in order to characterize, classify, and analyze the atherosclerotic plaques by their specific geometrical changes. During inflation, three vessels ruptured via helical crack propagation. The adventitia, media, and intima did not preserve their area/volume during inflation; the area changes of the lipid pool during inflation were significant. The characterization of changes in individual 3D tissue geometries, together with tissue-specific mechanical properties, may serve as a basis for refined finite element (FE) modeling, which is key to better understand stress evolution in various atherosclerotic plaque configurations. PMID:20148308

  20. Long-chain bases in the sphingolipids of atherosclerotic human aorta.

    PubMed

    Panganamala, R V; Geer, J C; Cornwell, D G

    1969-07-01

    Long-chain bases were prepared from human aorta sphingomyelin by a combined enzymatic hydrolysis-alkaline hydrolysis procedure and these bases were isolated by thin-layer chromatography. Aldehydes, obtained from the long-chain bases by periodate oxidation, were converted to 1,3-dioxolane derivatives. Dioxolanes were identified and quantified by gas-liquid chromatography before and after catalytic hydrogenation, and before and after separation into saturated, monoene, and diene dioxolane fractions. The monoene dioxolanes were converted to aldehydes by reductive ozonolysis with dimethyl sulfide and these aldehydes were isolated and identified as dioxolane derivatives. The double bond positions in the major diene component were established by reductive ozonolysis and permanganate-periodate oxidation. Sphingenines in the cerebroside-sulfatide and sulfatide fractions of aorta were converted to aldehydes by the reductive ozonolysis of intact sphingolipids and these aldehydes were analyzed as the dioxolanes. Human aorta sphingomyelin contained significant amounts of 4-hexadecasphingenine, 4-heptadecasphingenine, sphinganine, 4-sphingenine, and 4,x14-sphingadienine. Small amounts of hexadecasphinganine, 4-tetradecasphingenine, a sphingadienine isomer, an unknown sphinganine, and two unknown diene long-chain bases were also found in sphingomyelin. The presence of a branched-chain 4-sphingenine was tentatively established and the possible presence of a sphingenine isomer was suggested. The major sphingenines were the same in the sphingomyelin, sulfatide, and cerebroside-sulfatide fractions of human aorta.

  1. Detection of Human Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in Coronary Atherosclerotic Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Imbronito, Ana Vitória; Marcelino, Silvia Linardi; Grande, Sabrina Rosa; Nunes, Fabio Daumas; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that patients with atherosclerosis are predominantly infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), but rarely infected by type 1 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-1). In this study, atheromas of 30 patients who underwent aortocoronary bypass surgery with coronary endartherectomy were tested for the presence of these two viruses. HCMV occurred in 93.3% of the samples and EBV-1 was present in 50% of them. Concurrent presence of both pathogens was detected in 43.3% of the samples. PMID:24031529

  2. Cystathionine γ-lyase is expressed in human atherosclerotic plaque microvessels and is involved in micro-angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    van den Born, J. C.; Mencke, R.; Conroy, S.; Zeebregts, C. J.; van Goor, H.; Hillebrands, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques are classically divided into stable and vulnerable plaques. Vulnerable plaques are prone to rupture with a risk for infarction. High intraplaque microvessel density predisposes to plaque vulnerability. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a proangiogenic gasotransmitter which is endogenously produced by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and is believed to have vasculoprotective effects. However, due to its proangiogenic effects, H2S may result in pathological angiogenesis in atherosclerotic plaques, thereby increasing plaque vulnerability. The aim of this study was to determine CSE expression pattern in atherosclerotic plaques, and investigate whether CSE is involved in micro-angiogenesis in vitro. Endarterectomy plaques were studied for CSE expression, and the role of CSE in micro-angiogenesis was studied in vitro. CSE is expressed in plaques with similar levels in both stable and vulnerable plaques. CSE co-localized with von Willebrand Factor-positive microvessel endothelial cells and alpha-smooth-muscle actin-positive SMCs. In vitro, inhibition of CSE in HMEC-1 reduced tube formation, cell viability/proliferation, and migration which was restored after culture in the presence of H2S donor GYY4137. CSE is expressed in intraplaque microvessels, and H2S is a stimulator of micro-angiogenesis in vitro. Due to this pro-angiogenic effect, high levels of CSE in atherosclerotic plaques may be a potential risk for plaque vulnerability. PMID:27708362

  3. Comparing Raman and fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy from human atherosclerotic lesions using a bimodal probe.

    PubMed

    Dochow, Sebastian; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Phipps, Jennifer E; Ma, Dinglong; Bocklitz, Thomas; Schmitt, Michael; Bishop, John W; Margulies, Kenneth B; Marcu, Laura; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and Raman spectroscopy are two promising methods to support morphological intravascular imaging techniques with chemical contrast. Both approaches are complementary and may also be used in combination with OCT/IVUS to add chemical specificity to these morphologic intravascular imaging modalities. In this contribution, both modalities were simultaneously acquired from two human coronary specimens using a bimodal probe. A previously trained SVM model was used to interpret the fluorescence lifetime data; integrated band intensities displayed in RGB false color images were used to interpret the Raman data. Both modalities demonstrate unique strengths and weaknesses and these will be discussed in comparison to histologic analyses from the two coronary arteries imaged. PMID:27003796

  4. The impact of scaled boundary conditions on wall shear stress computations in atherosclerotic human coronary bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Jelle T C; Schwarz, Janina C V; Wentzel, Jolanda J; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Siebes, Maria; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine if reliable patient-specific wall shear stress (WSS) can be computed when diameter-based scaling laws are used to impose the boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics. This study focused on mildly diseased human coronary bifurcations since they are predilection sites for atherosclerosis. Eight patients scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention were imaged with angiography. The velocity proximal and distal of a bifurcation was acquired with intravascular Doppler measurements. These measurements were used for inflow and outflow boundary conditions for the first set of WSS computations. For the second set of computations, absolute inflow and outflow ratios were derived from geometry-based scaling laws based on angiography data. Normalized WSS maps per segment were obtained by dividing the absolute WSS by the mean WSS value. Absolute and normalized WSS maps from the measured-approach and the scaled-approach were compared. A reasonable agreement was found between the measured and scaled inflows, with a median difference of 0.08 ml/s [-0.01; 0.20]. The measured and the scaled outflow ratios showed a good agreement: 1.5 percentage points [-19.0; 4.5]. Absolute WSS maps were sensitive to the inflow and outflow variations, and relatively large differences between the two approaches were observed. For normalized WSS maps, the results for the two approaches were equivalent. This study showed that normalized WSS can be obtained from angiography data alone by applying diameter-based scaling laws to define the boundary conditions. Caution should be taken when absolute WSS is assessed from computations using scaled boundary conditions. PMID:26945083

  5. The impact of scaled boundary conditions on wall shear stress computations in atherosclerotic human coronary bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Jelle T C; Schwarz, Janina C V; Wentzel, Jolanda J; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Siebes, Maria; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine if reliable patient-specific wall shear stress (WSS) can be computed when diameter-based scaling laws are used to impose the boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics. This study focused on mildly diseased human coronary bifurcations since they are predilection sites for atherosclerosis. Eight patients scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention were imaged with angiography. The velocity proximal and distal of a bifurcation was acquired with intravascular Doppler measurements. These measurements were used for inflow and outflow boundary conditions for the first set of WSS computations. For the second set of computations, absolute inflow and outflow ratios were derived from geometry-based scaling laws based on angiography data. Normalized WSS maps per segment were obtained by dividing the absolute WSS by the mean WSS value. Absolute and normalized WSS maps from the measured-approach and the scaled-approach were compared. A reasonable agreement was found between the measured and scaled inflows, with a median difference of 0.08 ml/s [-0.01; 0.20]. The measured and the scaled outflow ratios showed a good agreement: 1.5 percentage points [-19.0; 4.5]. Absolute WSS maps were sensitive to the inflow and outflow variations, and relatively large differences between the two approaches were observed. For normalized WSS maps, the results for the two approaches were equivalent. This study showed that normalized WSS can be obtained from angiography data alone by applying diameter-based scaling laws to define the boundary conditions. Caution should be taken when absolute WSS is assessed from computations using scaled boundary conditions.

  6. Extracts of human atherosclerotic lesions modify LDL inducing enhanced macrophage uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, H.F.; O'Neill, J.

    1986-03-01

    Both an LDL-like fraction isolated from human aortic plaques and LDL incubated with cultured aortic endothelial or smooth muscle cells have been shown to be internalized by macrophages in vitro in an unregulated fashion leading to foam cell formation. Lipid peroxidation induced by free radicals released from cells was shown to be responsible for cell-modified LDL. The authors incubated LDL with a supernatant fraction of leached, i.e. non-homogenized, extracts of aortic plaques for one hour at 37/sup 0/C, to determine whether extracellular components present in arteries were also capable of modifying LDL. Extract-treated LDL showed the following changes relative to untreated LDL: 1) increased electrophretic mobility, 2) altered pattern of B-100 on SDS-PAGE, i.e. presence of a doublet with higher M/sub r/ than B-100, and 3) enhanced uptake by cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages as measured by increased degradation of /sup 125/I-LDL, and increased stimulation of cholesterol esterification using /sup 14/C-oleate. Extracts from homogenized plaques and grossly normal intima induced similar changes. The modification was tissue specific in that extracts of arteries but not of liver, muscle or skin modified LDL. Protease degradation of LDL during incubation was probably not responsible since inhibitors did not prevent modification. It is possible that products of lipid peroxidation present in extracellular lipid of arteries may propagate free radicals or be incorporated into LDL, leading to modifications similar to those found in cell-modified LDL.

  7. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy to Characterize Inflammatory Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Dai, Xiaohu; Beebe, Tyler; Hsiai, Tzung

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and therapy, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Predicting metabolically active atherosclerotic lesions has remained an unmet clinical need. We hereby developed an electrochemical strategy to characterize the inflammatory states of high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Using the concentric bipolar microelectrodes, we sought to demonstrate distinct Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopic (EIS) measurements for unstable atherosclerotic plaques that harbored active lipids and inflammatory cells. Using equivalent circuits to simulate vessel impedance at the electrode-endoluminal tissue interface, we demonstrated specific electric elements to model working and counter electrode interfaces as well as the tissue impedance. Using explants of human coronary, carotid, and femoral arteries at various Stary stages of atherosclerotic lesions (n = 15), we performed endoluminal EIS measurements (n = 147) and validated with histology and immunohistochemistry. We computed the vascular tissue resistance using the equivalent circuit model and normalized the resistance to the lesion-free regions. Tissue resistance was significantly elevated in the oxLDL-rich thin-cap atheromas (1.57±0.40, n = 14, p < 0.001) and fatty streaks (1.36±0.28, n = 33, p < 0.001) as compared with lesion-free region (1.00±0.18, n = 82) or oxLDL-absent fibrous atheromas (0.86±0.30, n = 12). Tissue resistance was also elevated in the calcified core of fibrous atheroma (2.37±0.60, n = 6, p < 0.001). Despite presence of fibrous structures, tissue resistance between ox-LDL-absent fibroatheroma and the lesion-free regions was statistically insignificant (0.86±0.30, n = 12, p > 0.05). Hence, we demonstrate that the application of EIS strategy was sensitive to detect fibrous cap oxLDL-rich lesions and specific to distinguish oxLDL-absent fibroatheroma. PMID:21959227

  8. Noninvasive imaging modalities to visualize atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is becoming a major cause of death in the world due to global epidemic of diabetes and obesity. For the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, it is necessary to detect high-risk atherosclerotic plaques prior to events. Recent technological advances enable to visualize atherosclerotic plaques noninvasively. This ability of noninvasive imaging helps to refine cardiovascular risk assessment in various individuals, select optimal therapeutic strategy and evaluate the efficacy of medical therapies. In this review, we discuss the role of the currently available imaging modalities including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography. Advantages and disadvantages of each noninvasive imaging modality will be also summarized. PMID:27500092

  9. Propionibacterium acnes Recovered from Atherosclerotic Human Carotid Arteries Undergoes Biofilm Dispersion and Releases Lipolytic and Proteolytic Enzymes in Response to Norepinephrine Challenge In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lanter, Bernard B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, human atherosclerotic carotid arteries were examined following endarterectomy for the presence of the Gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and its potential association with biofilm structures within the arterial wall. The P. acnes 16S rRNA gene was detectable in 4 of 15 carotid artery samples, and viable P. acnes was one among 10 different bacterial species recoverable in culture. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of 5 additional atherosclerotic carotid arteries demonstrated biofilm bacteria within all samples, with P. acnes detectable in 4 samples. We also demonstrated that laboratory-grown cultures of P. acnes biofilms were susceptible to induction of a biofilm dispersion response when challenged with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine in the presence of iron-bound transferrin or with free iron. The production and release of lipolytic and proteolytic extracellular enzymes by P. acnes were shown to increase in iron-induced dispersed biofilms, and these dispersion-induced P. acnes VP1 biofilms showed increased expression of mRNAs for the triacylglycerol lipases PPA2105 and PPA1796 and the hyaluronate lyase PPA380 compared to that in untreated biofilms. These results demonstrate that P. acnes can infect the carotid arteries of humans with atherosclerosis as a component of multispecies biofilms and that dispersion is inducible for this organism, at least in vitro, with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine resulting in the production and release of degradative enzymes. PMID:26216428

  10. Propionibacterium acnes Recovered from Atherosclerotic Human Carotid Arteries Undergoes Biofilm Dispersion and Releases Lipolytic and Proteolytic Enzymes in Response to Norepinephrine Challenge In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lanter, Bernard B; Davies, David G

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, human atherosclerotic carotid arteries were examined following endarterectomy for the presence of the Gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and its potential association with biofilm structures within the arterial wall. The P. acnes 16S rRNA gene was detectable in 4 of 15 carotid artery samples, and viable P. acnes was one among 10 different bacterial species recoverable in culture. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of 5 additional atherosclerotic carotid arteries demonstrated biofilm bacteria within all samples, with P. acnes detectable in 4 samples. We also demonstrated that laboratory-grown cultures of P. acnes biofilms were susceptible to induction of a biofilm dispersion response when challenged with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine in the presence of iron-bound transferrin or with free iron. The production and release of lipolytic and proteolytic extracellular enzymes by P. acnes were shown to increase in iron-induced dispersed biofilms, and these dispersion-induced P. acnes VP1 biofilms showed increased expression of mRNAs for the triacylglycerol lipases PPA2105 and PPA1796 and the hyaluronate lyase PPA380 compared to that in untreated biofilms. These results demonstrate that P. acnes can infect the carotid arteries of humans with atherosclerosis as a component of multispecies biofilms and that dispersion is inducible for this organism, at least in vitro, with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine resulting in the production and release of degradative enzymes. PMID:26216428

  11. The influence of constitutive law choice used to characterise atherosclerotic tissue material properties on computing stress values in human carotid plaques.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Yuan, Jianmin; Feng, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Yongxue; Brown, Adam J; Wang, Shuo; Lu, Qingsheng; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2015-11-01

    Calculating high stress concentration within carotid atherosclerotic plaques has been shown to be complementary to anatomical features in assessing vulnerability. Reliability of stress calculation may depend on the constitutive laws/strain energy density functions (SEDFs) used to characterize tissue material properties. Different SEDFs, including neo-Hookean, one-/two-term Ogden, Yeoh, 5-parameter Mooney-Rivlin, Demiray and modified Mooney-Rivlin, have been used to describe atherosclerotic tissue behavior. However, the capacity of SEDFs to fit experimental data and the difference in the stress calculation remains unexplored. In this study, seven SEDFs were used to fit the stress-stretch data points of media, fibrous cap, lipid and intraplaque hemorrhage/thrombus obtained from 21 human carotid plaques. Semi-analytic solution, 2D structure-only and 3D fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analyses were used to quantify stress using different SEDFs and the related material stability examined. Results show that, except for neo-Hookean, all other six SEDFs fitted the experimental points well, with vessel stress distribution in the circumferential and radial directions being similar. 2D structural-only analysis was successful for all seven SEDFs, but 3D FSI were only possible with neo-Hookean, Demiray and modified Mooney-Rivlin models. Stresses calculated using Demiray and modified Mooney-Rivlin models were nearly identical. Further analyses indicated that the energy contours of one-/two-term Ogden and 5-parameter Mooney-Rivlin models were not strictly convex and the material stability indictors under homogeneous deformations were not always positive. In conclusion, considering the capacity in characterizing material properties and stabilities, Demiray and modified Mooney-Rivlin SEDF appear practical choices for mechanical analyses to predict the critical mechanical conditions within carotid atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:26472305

  12. Apoptosis is abundant in human atherosclerotic lesions, especially in inflammatory cells (macrophages and T cells), and may contribute to the accumulation of gruel and plaque instability.

    PubMed Central

    Björkerud, S.; Björkerud, B.

    1996-01-01

    Death of intimal tissue may lead to plaque rupture with thrombosis, which is the basis of the most severe clinical consequences of atherosclerosis. Little is known about the mechanisms that promote intimal cell death or its nature. This work was undertaken to elucidate the extent to which, the cell types in which, and where programmed cell death, apoptosis, might occur in atherosclerotic lesions. The material was fibrous or fibro-fatty non-ulcerated lesions from the human thoracic aorta and coronary arteries. Apoptosis was indicated by the in situ labeling of internucleosomally degraded DNA with the TUNEL technique, which has a preference for apoptosis as compared with cell necrosis and was combined with the immunohistochemical typing of cells. Apoptosis was corroborated by morphological criteria on the light and electron microscope levels and by the presence of an apoptosis-specific protein. It was common in the lesions and virtually absent in non-atherosclerotic regions. It occurred in smooth muscle cells subendothelially, in places of the fibrous cap, and in the underlying media, which may destabilize the plaque and promote rupture. Inflammatory cells, ie, macrophages and T cells, appeared abundantly subendothelially, in the fibrous cap, and in the shoulder regions, and apoptosis was common, maybe reflecting a means for quenching of the inflammatory reaction. Many macrophages contained abundant apoptotic material indicative of phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, but the occurrence of apoptosis, even in some of these cells, and of apoptotic material extracellularly and the very high numbers of apoptotic cells that were encountered may indicate insufficient mechanisms for the removal of apoptotic cells in the atherosclerotic lesion. It is not possible to decide as yet whether this is due to overloading with cellular material by inflammation and cell multiplication, to an increased frequency of apoptosis, to a reduction of the removal/degradation of apoptotic material

  13. The influence of constitutive law choice used to characterise atherosclerotic tissue material properties on computing stress values in human carotid plaques

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Yuan, Jianmin; Feng, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Yongxue; Brown, Adam J.; Wang, Shuo; Lu, Qingsheng; Gillard, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    Calculating high stress concentration within carotid atherosclerotic plaques has been shown to be complementary to anatomical features in assessing vulnerability. Reliability of stress calculation may depend on the constitutive laws/strain energy density functions (SEDFs) used to characterize tissue material properties. Different SEDFs, including neo-Hookean, one-/two-term Ogden, Yeoh, 5-parameter Mooney–Rivlin, Demiray and modified Mooney–Rivlin, have been used to describe atherosclerotic tissue behavior. However, the capacity of SEDFs to fit experimental data and the difference in the stress calculation remains unexplored. In this study, seven SEDFs were used to fit the stress–stretch data points of media, fibrous cap, lipid and intraplaque hemorrhage/thrombus obtained from 21 human carotid plaques. Semi-analytic solution, 2D structure-only and 3D fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analyses were used to quantify stress using different SEDFs and the related material stability examined. Results show that, except for neo-Hookean, all other six SEDFs fitted the experimental points well, with vessel stress distribution in the circumferential and radial directions being similar. 2D structural-only analysis was successful for all seven SEDFs, but 3D FSI were only possible with neo-Hookean, Demiray and modified Mooney–Rivlin models. Stresses calculated using Demiray and modified Mooney–Rivlin models were nearly identical. Further analyses indicated that the energy contours of one-/two-term Ogden and 5-parameter Mooney–Rivlin models were not strictly convex and the material stability indictors under homogeneous deformations were not always positive. In conclusion, considering the capacity in characterizing material properties and stabilities, Demiray and modified Mooney–Rivlin SEDF appear practical choices for mechanical analyses to predict the critical mechanical conditions within carotid atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:26472305

  14. The influence of constitutive law choice used to characterise atherosclerotic tissue material properties on computing stress values in human carotid plaques.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Yuan, Jianmin; Feng, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Yongxue; Brown, Adam J; Wang, Shuo; Lu, Qingsheng; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2015-11-01

    Calculating high stress concentration within carotid atherosclerotic plaques has been shown to be complementary to anatomical features in assessing vulnerability. Reliability of stress calculation may depend on the constitutive laws/strain energy density functions (SEDFs) used to characterize tissue material properties. Different SEDFs, including neo-Hookean, one-/two-term Ogden, Yeoh, 5-parameter Mooney-Rivlin, Demiray and modified Mooney-Rivlin, have been used to describe atherosclerotic tissue behavior. However, the capacity of SEDFs to fit experimental data and the difference in the stress calculation remains unexplored. In this study, seven SEDFs were used to fit the stress-stretch data points of media, fibrous cap, lipid and intraplaque hemorrhage/thrombus obtained from 21 human carotid plaques. Semi-analytic solution, 2D structure-only and 3D fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analyses were used to quantify stress using different SEDFs and the related material stability examined. Results show that, except for neo-Hookean, all other six SEDFs fitted the experimental points well, with vessel stress distribution in the circumferential and radial directions being similar. 2D structural-only analysis was successful for all seven SEDFs, but 3D FSI were only possible with neo-Hookean, Demiray and modified Mooney-Rivlin models. Stresses calculated using Demiray and modified Mooney-Rivlin models were nearly identical. Further analyses indicated that the energy contours of one-/two-term Ogden and 5-parameter Mooney-Rivlin models were not strictly convex and the material stability indictors under homogeneous deformations were not always positive. In conclusion, considering the capacity in characterizing material properties and stabilities, Demiray and modified Mooney-Rivlin SEDF appear practical choices for mechanical analyses to predict the critical mechanical conditions within carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

  15. ACAT inhibition reduces the progression of pre-existing, advanced atherosclerotic mouse lesions without plaque or systemic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rong, James X.; Blachford, Courtney; Feig, Jonathan E.; Bander, Ilda; Mayne, Jeffrey; Kusunoki, Jun; Miller, Christine; Davis, Matthew; Wilson, Martha; Dehn, Shirley; Thorp, Edward; Tabas, Ira; Taubman, Mark B.; Rudel, Lawrence L.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) converts cholesterol to cholesteryl esters in plaque foam cells. Complete deficiency of macrophage ACAT has been shown to increase atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice due to cytotoxicity from free cholesterol accumulation, while we previously showed that partial ACAT inhibition by Fujirebio compound F1394 decreased early atherosclerosis development. In this report, we tested F1394 effects on pre-established, advanced lesions of apoE-/- mice. Methods & Results ApoE-/- mice on Western diet for 14 weeks developed advanced plaques, and were either sacrificed (“Baseline”), or continued on Western diet without or with F1394 and sacrificed after 14 more weeks. F1394 was not associated with systemic toxicity. Compared to the baseline group, lesion size progressed in both groups; however, F1394 significantly retarded plaque progression, and reduced plaque macrophage, free and esterified cholesterol, and tissue factor contents compared to the untreated group. Apoptosis of plaque cells was not increased, consistent with the decrease in lesional free cholesterol, plaque necrosis was not increased, and efferocytosis (phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells) was not impaired. The effects of F1394 were independent of changes in plasma cholesterol levels. Conclusions Partial ACAT inhibition by F1394 lowered plaque cholesterol content and had other antiatherogenic effects in advanced lesions in apoE-/- mice without overt systemic or plaque toxicity, suggesting the continued potential of ACAT inhibition for the clinical treatment of atherosclerosis in spite of recent trial data. PMID:23139293

  16. Urine Proteome Analysis Reflects Atherosclerotic Disease in an ApoE−/− Mouse Model and Allows the Discovery of New Candidate Biomarkers in Mouse and Human Atherosclerosis*

    PubMed Central

    von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Schiffer, Eric; Sackmann, Christine; Zürbig, Petra; Neudorfer, Irene; Zirlik, Andreas; Htun, Nay; Iphöfer, Alexander; Jänsch, Lothar; Mischak, Harald; Bode, Christoph; Chen, Yung C.; Peter, Karlheinz

    2012-01-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis of atherosclerosis via single biomarkers has been attempted but remains elusive. However, a previous polymarker or pattern approach of urine polypeptides in humans reflected coronary artery disease with high accuracy. The aim of the current study is to use urine proteomics in ApoE−/− mice to discover proteins with pathophysiological roles in atherogenesis and to identify urinary polypeptide patterns reflecting early stages of atherosclerosis. Urine of ApoE−/− mice either on high fat diet (HFD) or chow diet was collected over 12 weeks; urine of wild type mice on HFD was used to exclude diet-related proteome changes. Capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry (CE-MS) of samples identified 16 polypeptides specific for ApoE−/− mice on HFD. In a blinded test set, these polypeptides allowed identification of atherosclerosis at a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 100%, as well as monitoring of disease progression. Sequencing of the discovered polypeptides identified fragments of α1-antitrypsin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), kidney androgen-regulated protein, and collagen. Using immunohistochemistry, α1-antitrypsin, EGF, and collagen type I were shown to be highly expressed in atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE−/− mice on HFD. Urinary excretion levels of collagen and α1-antitrypsin fragments also significantly correlated with intraplaque collagen and α1-antitrypsin content, mirroring plaque protein expression in the urine proteome. To provide further confirmation that the newly identified proteins are relevant in humans, the presence of collagen type I, α1-antitrypsin, and EGF was also confirmed in human atherosclerotic disease. Urine proteome analysis in mice exemplifies the potential of a novel multimarker approach for the noninvasive detection of atherosclerosis and monitoring of disease progression. Furthermore, this approach represents a novel discovery tool for the identification of proteins relevant in murine

  17. Urine proteome analysis reflects atherosclerotic disease in an ApoE-/- mouse model and allows the discovery of new candidate biomarkers in mouse and human atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Schiffer, Eric; Sackmann, Christine; Zürbig, Petra; Neudorfer, Irene; Zirlik, Andreas; Htun, Nay; Iphöfer, Alexander; Jänsch, Lothar; Mischak, Harald; Bode, Christoph; Chen, Yung C; Peter, Karlheinz

    2012-07-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis of atherosclerosis via single biomarkers has been attempted but remains elusive. However, a previous polymarker or pattern approach of urine polypeptides in humans reflected coronary artery disease with high accuracy. The aim of the current study is to use urine proteomics in ApoE(-/-) mice to discover proteins with pathophysiological roles in atherogenesis and to identify urinary polypeptide patterns reflecting early stages of atherosclerosis. Urine of ApoE(-/-) mice either on high fat diet (HFD) or chow diet was collected over 12 weeks; urine of wild type mice on HFD was used to exclude diet-related proteome changes. Capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry (CE-MS) of samples identified 16 polypeptides specific for ApoE(-/-) mice on HFD. In a blinded test set, these polypeptides allowed identification of atherosclerosis at a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 100%, as well as monitoring of disease progression. Sequencing of the discovered polypeptides identified fragments of α(1)-antitrypsin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), kidney androgen-regulated protein, and collagen. Using immunohistochemistry, α(1)-antitrypsin, EGF, and collagen type I were shown to be highly expressed in atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE(-/-) mice on HFD. Urinary excretion levels of collagen and α(1)-antitrypsin fragments also significantly correlated with intraplaque collagen and α(1)-antitrypsin content, mirroring plaque protein expression in the urine proteome. To provide further confirmation that the newly identified proteins are relevant in humans, the presence of collagen type I, α(1)-antitrypsin, and EGF was also confirmed in human atherosclerotic disease. Urine proteome analysis in mice exemplifies the potential of a novel multimarker approach for the noninvasive detection of atherosclerosis and monitoring of disease progression. Furthermore, this approach represents a novel discovery tool for the identification of proteins relevant in

  18. Site-specific Nitration of Apolipoprotein A-I at Tyrosine 166 Is Both Abundant within Human Atherosclerotic Plaque and Dysfunctional*

    PubMed Central

    DiDonato, Joseph A.; Aulak, Kulwant; Huang, Ying; Wagner, Matthew; Gerstenecker, Gary; Topbas, Celalettin; Gogonea, Valentin; DiDonato, Anthony J.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Mehl, Ryan A.; Fox, Paul L.; Plow, Edward F.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Fisher, Edward A.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2014-01-01

    We reported previously that apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is oxidatively modified in the artery wall at tyrosine 166 (Tyr166), serving as a preferred site for post-translational modification through nitration. Recent studies, however, question the extent and functional importance of apoA-I Tyr166 nitration based upon studies of HDL-like particles recovered from atherosclerotic lesions. We developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb 4G11.2) that recognizes, in both free and HDL-bound forms, apoA-I harboring a 3-nitrotyrosine at position 166 apoA-I (NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I) to investigate the presence, distribution, and function of this modified apoA-I form in atherosclerotic and normal artery wall. We also developed recombinant apoA-I with site-specific 3-nitrotyrosine incorporation only at position 166 using an evolved orthogonal nitro-Tyr-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair for functional studies. Studies with mAb 4G11.2 showed that NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I was easily detected in atherosclerotic human coronary arteries and accounted for ∼8% of total apoA-I within the artery wall but was nearly undetectable (>100-fold less) in normal coronary arteries. Buoyant density ultracentrifugation analyses showed that NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I existed as a lipid-poor lipoprotein with <3% recovered within the HDL-like fraction (d = 1.063–1.21). NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I in plasma showed a similar distribution. Recovery of NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I using immobilized mAb 4G11.2 showed an apoA-I form with 88.1 ± 8.5% reduction in lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activity, a finding corroborated using a recombinant apoA-I specifically designed to include the unnatural amino acid exclusively at position 166. Thus, site-specific nitration of apoA-I at Tyr166 is an abundant modification within the artery wall that results in selective functional impairments. Plasma levels of this modified apoA-I form may provide insights into a pathophysiological process within the diseased artery wall. PMID:24558038

  19. A method to compensate for the underestimation of collagen with polarized picrosirius red imaging in human artery atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, C. A.; Grainger, S. J.; Su, J. L.; Madden, S. P.; Muller, J. E.

    2016-04-01

    Although picrosirius red (PSR) is known to be in quantifying collagen under polarized light (PL), commonly used linearly PL can result in an underestimation of collagen, as some of the fibers may appear dark if aligned with the transmission axis of the polarizers. To address this, a sample may be imaged with circularly polarized light at the expense of higher background intensity. However, the quality and alignment of the microscope illumination optics, polarizers and waveplates can still produce imaging variability with circular polarization. A simpler technique was tested that minimized variability and background intensity with linear polarization by acquiring images at multiple angles of histology slide rotation to create a composite co-registered image, permitting the optimal semi-quantitative visualization of collagen. Linear polarization imaging was performed on PSR stained artery sections. By rotating the slide at 60° intervals while maintaining illumination, polarization and exposure parameters, 6 images were acquired for each section. A composite image was created from the 6 co-registered images, and comprised of the maximum pixel intensity at each point. Images from any of the 6 rotation positions consistently showed variation in PSR signal. A composite image compensates for this variability, without loss of spatial resolution. Additionally, grayscale analysis showed an increased intensity range of 15 - 50% with a linearly polarized composite image over a circularly polarized image after background correction, indicating better SNR. This proposed technique will be applied in the development of a near infrared spectroscopy algorithm to detect vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques in vivo.

  20. Primary culture of endothelial cells from atherosclerotic human aorta. Part 1. Identification, morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of two endothelial cell subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Antonov, A S; Nikolaeva, M A; Klueva, T S; Romanov YuA; Babaev, V R; Bystrevskaya, V B; Perov, N A; Repin, V S; Smirnov, V N

    1986-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) were harvested by 0.1% collagenase treatment for adult human thoracic aortas obtained 1-3 h after sudden death. At least 35-70% of EC were removed from the intimal surface of aorta, 90-95% of them being viable. Plating efficiency was 70-80%. Monolayer formation was achieved at a seeding density of 5-8 X 10(2) cells/mm2. The cells were identified as endothelium by the presence of Factor VIII antigen, Weigel-Palade bodies and typically endothelial morphology at confluence. Unlike endothelial cultures derived from human umbilical veins and infant aortas, primary cultures obtained from human adult aortas contain multinuclear EC with Factor VIII antigen and Weibel-Palade bodies. The number of multinuclear EC in cultures isolated from aortas affected by atherosclerosis was 2-fold higher (P less than 0.05) than in cultures obtained from grossly normal aortas taken from donors of the same age. EC with numerous lipid inclusions revealed by oil-red-O staining were present in all the EC primary cultures derived from aortas affected by atherosclerosis. No oil-red-O-positive cells were detected among the EC cultured from infant aorta, aorta of young donors, and umbilical vein. An electron microscopic examination of EC from atherosclerotic aorta in culture and in situ failed to reveal any ultrastructural peculiarities distinguishing multinuclear EC from the mononuclear EC. PMID:3004520

  1. Enhanced External Counterpulsation Treatment May Intervene The Advanced Atherosclerotic Plaque Progression by Inducing The Variations of Mechanical Factors: A 3D FSI Study Based on in vivo Animal Experiment.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianhang; Wang, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Growing evidences suggest that long-term enhanced external counter-pulsation (EECP) treatment can inhibit the initiation of atherosclerotic lesion by improving the hemodynamic environment in aortas. However, whether this kind procedure will intervene the progression of advanced atherosclerotic plaque remains elusive and causes great concern in its clinical application presently. In the current paper, a pilot study combining animal experiment and numerical simulation was conducted to investigate the acute mechanical stress variations during EECP intervention, and then to assess the possible chronic effects. An experimentally induced hypercholesterolemic porcine model was developed and the basic hemodynamic measurement was performed in vivo before and during EECP treatment. Meanwhile, A 3D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model of blood vessel with symmetric local stenosis was developed for the numerical calculation of some important mechanical factors. The results show that EECP augmented 12.21% of the plaque wall stress (PWS), 57.72% of the time average wall shear stress (AWSS) and 43.67% of the non-dimensional wall shear stress gradient (WSSGnd) at throat site of the stenosis. We suggest that long-term EECP treatment may intervene the advanced plaque progression by inducing the significant variations of some important mechanical factors, but its proper effects will need a further research combined follow-up observation in clinic. PMID:27263260

  2. Differential expression of oxidation-specific epitopes and apolipoprotein(a) in progressing and ruptured human coronary and carotid atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Rogier A; Kolodgie, Frank; Ravandi, Amir; Leibundgut, Gregor; Hu, Patrick P; Prasad, Anand; Mahmud, Ehtisham; Dennis, Edward; Curtiss, Linda K; Witztum, Joseph L; Wasserman, Bruce A; Otsuka, Fumiyuki; Virmani, Renu; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2012-12-01

    The relationships between oxidation-specific epitopes (OSE) and lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] and progressive atherosclerosis and plaque rupture have not been determined. Coronary artery sections from sudden death victims and carotid endarterectomy specimens were immunostained for apoB-100, oxidized phospholipids (OxPL), apo(a), malondialdehyde-lysine (MDA), and MDA-related epitopes detected by antibody IK17 and macrophage markers. The presence of OxPL captured in carotid and saphenous vein graft distal protection devices was determined with LC-MS/MS. In coronary arteries, OSE and apo(a) were absent in normal coronary arteries and minimally present in early lesions. As lesions progressed, apoB and MDA epitopes did not increase, whereas macrophage, apo(a), OxPL, and IK17 epitopes increased proportionally, but they differed according to plaque type and plaque components. Apo(a) epitopes were present throughout early and late lesions, especially in macrophages and the necrotic core. IK17 and OxPL epitopes were strongest in late lesions in macrophage-rich areas, lipid pools, and the necrotic core, and they were most specifically associated with unstable and ruptured plaques. Specific OxPL were present in distal protection devices. Human atherosclerotic lesions manifest a differential expression of OSEs and apo(a) as they progress, rupture, and become clinically symptomatic. These findings provide a rationale for targeting OSE for biotheranostic applications in humans. PMID:22969153

  3. Atherosclerotic and Non-Atherosclerotic Coronary Heart Disease in Women.

    PubMed

    Kolovou, Genovefa; Kolovou, Vana; Koutelou, Maria; Mavrogeni, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic Coronary heart disease (CHD) and non-atherosclerotic CHD in individuals less than 50 years of age is considered a "men's case". Undoubtedly, premenopausal women develop atherosclerotic/non-atherosclerotic CHD relatively rarely compared with men. This is attributed mostly to the cardioprotective role of estrogens (mainly estradiol). Nevertheless, there are predisposing conditions, which also make young women vulnerable to develop atherosclerotic/non-atherosclerotic CHD. Women who have classical cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, obesity, and dyslipidaemia, are more likely to develop cardiac events, even at a young age. Moreover, there are also other conditions that cause acute coronary syndromes, even in the absence of coronary atheromatic plaques such as myocardial bridge, coronary artery dissection, coronary artery spasm, coronary artery embolism and congenital anomalies of coronary arteries. Also, autoimmune diseases, some of which are more prevalent in women can cause atherosclerotic/ non-atherosclerotic CHD. In this narrative review we have summarized some of the causes that predispose young women to develop atherosclerotic/non-atherosclerotic CHD. PMID:26337108

  4. Human atherosclerotic plaque alternative macrophages display low cholesterol handling but high phagocytosis because of distinct activities of the PPARɣ and LXRα pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Baron, Morgane; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Copin, Corinne; Sebti, Yasmine; Derudas, Bruno; Mayi, Thérèse; Bories, Gael; Tailleux, Anne; Haulon, Stéphane; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Rationale A crucial step in atherogenesis is the infiltration of the sub-endothelial space of large arteries by monocytes where they differentiate into macrophages and transform into lipid-loaded foam cells. Macrophages are heterogeneous cells which adapt their response to environmental cytokines. Th1 cytokines promote monocyte differentiation into M1 macrophages, while Th2 cytokines trigger an “alternative” M2 phenotype. Objective We previously reported the presence of CD68+MR+ M2 macrophages in human atherosclerotic plaques. However, the function of these plaque CD68+MR+ macrophages is still unknown. Methods and Results Histological analysis revealed that CD68+MR+ locate far from the lipid core of the plaque and contain smaller lipid droplets compared to CD68+MR− macrophages. IL-4 polarized CD68+MR+ display a reduced capacity to handle and efflux cellular cholesterol due to low expression levels of the nuclear receptor Liver X Receptor (LXR)α and its target genes, ABCA1 and ApoE, caused by the high 15-lipoxygenase activity in CD68+MR+ macrophages. By contrast, CD68+MR+ highly express opsonins and receptors involved in phagocytosis resulting in high phagocytic activity. In M2 macrophages, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated receptor (PPAR)γ activation enhances the phagocytic, but not the cholesterol trafficking pathways. Conclusions These data identify a distinct macrophage sub-population with a low susceptibility to become foam cells, but high phagocytic activity due to different regulatory activities of the PPARγ-LXRα pathways. PMID:21350215

  5. Inhibition of B7-1 (CD80) by RhuDex® reduces lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation in human atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Doesch, Andreas O; Zhao, Li; Gleissner, Christian A; Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Rohde, David; Okuyucu, Deniz; Hakimi, Maani; Dengler, Thomas J; Katus, Hugo A; Erbel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is based on a chronic inflammatory process including the innate and adaptive immune response. Costimulatory molecules and their receptors provide decisive signals for antigen-specific cell activation. The contribution of B7-related pathways to atherosclerosis has hardly been explored. Methods In the present study, we investigated the contribution of B7-1 to inflammation and tissue injury in the human plaque microenvironment in order to identify possible target structures of future therapeutic agents ex vivo and in vitro. Results Carotid artery plaque stimulation with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) could be significantly inhibited by RhuDex®, a specific inhibitor of the costimulatory molecule B7-1 ex vivo (P<0.001). Coculture of antigen-presenting cells with T-cells demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of RhuDex® derived from reduced T-cell activation. In addition, incubation of monocytes/macrophages with LPS and RhuDex® resulted in an inhibitory negative feedback on antigen-presenting cells. Signaling pathways affected by RhuDex® seem to be nuclear transcription factor kappa B, activator protein-1, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Conclusion The present data support B7-1 alone as an important costimulatory molecule in the context of LPS-mediated inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions. Due to its marked inhibitory effects, RhuDex® may be a useful therapy to modulate the inflammatory milieu in atherosclerosis. PMID:24872677

  6. Human factors challenges for advanced process control

    SciTech Connect

    Stubler, W.F.; O`Hara, J..M.

    1996-08-01

    New human-system interface technologies provide opportunities for improving operator and plant performance. However, if these technologies are not properly implemented, they may introduce new challenges to performance and safety. This paper reports the results from a survey of human factors considerations that arise in the implementation of advanced human-system interface technologies in process control and other complex systems. General trends were identified for several areas based on a review of technical literature and a combination of interviews and site visits with process control organizations. Human factors considerations are discussed for two of these areas, automation and controls.

  7. Technological advances for studying human behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roske-Hofstrand, Renate J.

    1990-01-01

    Technological advances for studying human behavior are noted in viewgraph form. It is asserted that performance-aiding systems are proliferating without a fundamental understanding of how they would interact with the humans who must control them. Two views of automation research, the hardware view and the human-centered view, are listed. Other viewgraphs give information on vital elements for human-centered research, a continuum of the research process, available technologies, new technologies for persistent problems, a sample research infrastructure, the need for metrics, and examples of data-link technology.

  8. Ultrasound Tissue Characterization of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Picano, Eugenio; Paterni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    A thrombotic occlusion of the vessel fed by ruptured coronary atherosclerotic plaque may result in unstable angina, myocardial infarction or death, whereas embolization from a plaque in carotid arteries may result in transient ischemic attack or stroke. The atherosclerotic plaque prone to such clinical events is termed high-risk or vulnerable plaque, and its identification in humans before it becomes symptomatic has been elusive to date. Ultrasonic tissue characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque is possible with different techniques—such as vascular, transesophageal, and intravascular ultrasound—on a variety of arterial segments, including carotid, aorta, and coronary districts. The image analysis can be based on visual, video-densitometric or radiofrequency methods and identifies three distinct textural patterns: hypo-echoic (corresponding to lipid- and hemorrhage-rich plaque), iso- or moderately hyper-echoic (fibrotic or fibro-fatty plaque), and markedly hyperechoic with shadowing (calcific plaque). Hypoechoic or dishomogeneous plaques, with spotty microcalcification and large plaque burden, with plaque neovascularization and surface irregularities by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, are more prone to clinical complications than hyperechoic, extensively calcified, homogeneous plaques with limited plaque burden, smooth luminal plaque surface and absence of neovascularization. Plaque ultrasound morphology is important, along with plaque geometry, in determining the atherosclerotic prognostic burden in the individual patient. New quantitative methods beyond backscatter (to include speed of sound, attenuation, strain, temperature, and high order statistics) are under development to evaluate vascular tissues. Although not yet ready for widespread clinical use, tissue characterization is listed by the American Society of Echocardiography roadmap to 2020 as one of the most promising fields of application in cardiovascular ultrasound imaging, offering unique

  9. Progression and regression of the atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    de Feyter, P J; Vos, J; Deckers, J W

    1995-08-01

    In animals in which atherosclerosis was induced experimentally (by a high cholesterol diet) regression of the atherosclerotic lesion was demonstrated after serum cholesterol was reduced by cholesterol- lowering drugs or a low-fat diet. Whether regression of advanced coronary arterly lesions also takes place in humans after a similar intervention remains conjectural. However, several randomized studies, primarily employing lipid-lowering intervention or comprehensive changes in lifestyle, have demonstrated, using serial angiograms, that it is possible to achieve less progression, arrest or even (small) regression of atherosclerotic lesions. The lipid-lowering trials (NHBLI, CLAS, POSCH, FATS, SCOR and STARS) studied 1240 symptomatic patients, mostly men, with moderately elevated cholesterol levels and moderately severe angiographic-proven coronary artery disease. A variety of lipid-lowering drugs, in addition to a diet, were used over an intervention period ranging from 2 to 3 years. In all but one study (NHBLI), the progression of coronary atherosclerosis was less in the treated group, but regression was induced in only a few patients. The overall relative risk of progression of coronary atherosclerosis was 0 x 62 and 2 x 13, respectively. The induced angiographic differences were small and did not produce any significant haemodynamic benefit. The most important result was tht the disease process could be stabilized in the majority of patients. Three comprehensive lifestyle change trials (the Lifestyle Heart study, STARS and the Heidelberg Study) studied 183 patients, who were subjected to stress management, and/or intensive exercise, in addition to a low fat diet, over a period ranging from 1 to 3 years. All three trials demonstrated less progression, and more regression with overall relative risks of 0 x 40 and 2 x 35 respectively, in the intervention groups. Angiographic trials demonstrated that retardation or arrest of coronary atherosclerosis was possible

  10. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  11. Population in Advanced Placement Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Martha B.

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the population section of the Advanced Placement course outline for human geography, focusing on four themes: (1) geographical analysis of population; (2) population distribution and composition; (3) population growth and decline over time and space; and (4) population movement. Identifies strategies for instructional activities.…

  12. Biobanking in Atherosclerotic Disease, Opportunities and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Scholtes, V.P.W; de Vries, J.P.P.M; Catanzariti, L.M; de Kleijn, D.P.V; Moll, F.L; de Borst, G.J; Pasterkamp, G

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in Western countries and current research is still focusing on optimizing therapeutic approaches in the battle against this multifactorial disease. Concepts regarding the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases originate from observations of human atherosclerotic tissue obtained from autopsies or during vascular surgery. These observations have helped us to disentangle the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. However, identifying vulnerable patients, those prone to developing cardiovascular complications, remains difficult. The search for predictive cardiovascular biomarkers continues and large, well organized biobanks are needed to discover or validate novel biomarkers. Biobanks are an extremely valuable resource that enables us to study the influence of both genetic and environmental factors on the development of multifactorial diseases such as atherosclerosis. This review will focus on the advantages and pitfalls in atherosclerotic biobanking. PMID:22294969

  13. Advances in Computationally Modeling Human Oral Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2015-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in experimental high throughput screening (HTS) of ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) and pharmacokinetic properties, the ADME and Toxicity (ADME-Tox) in silico modeling is still indispensable in drug discovery as it can guide us to wisely select drug candidates prior to expensive ADME screenings and clinical trials. Compared to other ADME-Tox properties, human oral bioavailability (HOBA) is particularly important but extremely difficult to predict. In this paper, the advances in human oral bioavailability modeling will be reviewed. Moreover, our deep insight on how to construct more accurate and reliable HOBA QSAR and classification models will also discussed. PMID:25582307

  14. 150-kD oxygen-regulated protein is expressed in human atherosclerotic plaques and allows mononuclear phagocytes to withstand cellular stress on exposure to hypoxia and modified low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Y; Kuwabara, K; Hirota, S; Ikeda, J; Stern, D; Yanagi, H; Matsumoto, M; Ogawa, S; Kitamura, Y

    1996-01-01

    The 150-kD oxygen-regulated protein (ORP150) was initially characterized based on its selective expression in astrocytes subjected to oxygen deprivation (Kuwabara, K., M. Matsumoto, J. Ikeda, O. Hori, S. Ogawa, Y. Maeda, K. Kitagawa, N. Imuta, K. Kinoshita, D.M. Stern, et al. 1996. J. Biol. Chem. 279:5025-5032). We have found that exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells and mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) to hypoxia (pO2 approximately 12-14 torr) induces ORP150 transcripts and production of the antigen, whereas incubation with either hydrogen peroxide, sodium arsenite, heat shock, or 2-deoxyglucose was without effect. Tissue extracts prepared from human atherosclerotic lesions demonstrated expression of ORP150 mRNA and antigen, vs lack of ORP150 in samples from nonatherosclerotic areas. In situ hybridization using ORP150 riboprobes showed the mRNA to be predominantly [correction of predominately] present in macrophages in in atherosclerotic plaques. Furthermore, autoantibody to ORP150 was demonstrated in the serum of patients with severe atherosclerosis, consistent with inducible in vivo expression of ORP150. Introduction of antisense oligonucleotide for ORP150 selectively diminished hypoxia-mediated induction of ORP150 antigen and reduced the viability of hypoxic MPs, especially in the presence of modified (oxidized/acetylated) LDL. In support of a role for ORP150 in the MPs' response to the microenvironment of an atheroma, the presence of oxidized LDL enhanced by approximately 10-fold ORP150 expression in hypoxic cultures. These data indicate that cells of the atherosclerotic vessel wall express ORP150 as part of a protective mechanism, potentially triggered by local hypoxia/hypoxemia and augmented by modified lipoproteins. The presence of antibody to ORP150 in sera of patients with severe atherosclerosis emphasizes the possibility that ORP150 may be a marker of vascular pathology. PMID:8878445

  15. Application of IR and NIR fiber optic imaging in thermographic and spectroscopic diagnosis of atherosclerotic vulnerable plaques: preliminary experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghavi, Morteza; Khan, Tania; Gu, Bujin; Soller, Babs R.; Melling, Peter; Asif, Mohammed; Gul, Khawar; Madjid, Mohammad; Casscells, S. W.; Willerson, James T.

    2000-12-01

    Despite major advances in cardiovascular science and technology during the past three decades, approximately half of all myocardial infarctions and sudden deaths occur unexpectedly. It is widely accepted that coronary atherosclerotic plaques and thrombotic complications resulting from their rupture or erosion are the underlying causes of this major health problem. The majority of these vulnerable plaques exhibit active inflammation, a large necrotic lipid core, a thin fibrous cap, and confer a stenosis of less than 70%. These lesions are not detectable by stress testing or coronary angiography. Our group is exploring the possibility of a functional classification based on physiological variables such as plaque temperature, pH, oxygen consumption, lactate production etc. We have shown that heat accurately locates the inflamed plaques. We also demonstrated human atherosclerotic plaques are heterogeneous with regard to pH and hot plaques and are more likely to be acidic. To develop a nonsurgical method for locating the inflamed plaques, we are developing both IR fiber optic imaging and NIR spectroscopic systems in our laboratory to detect hot and acidic plaque in atherosclerotic arterial walls. Our findings introduce the possibility of an isolated/combined IR and NIR fiber optic catheter that can bring new insight into functional assessment of atherosclerotic plaque and thereby detection of active and inflamed lesions responsible for heart attacks and strokes.

  16. In vivo fluorescence imaging of atherosclerotic plaques with activatable cell-penetrating peptides targeting thrombin activity†

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Emilia S.; Whitney, Michael A.; Friedman, Beth; Aguilera, Todd A.; Crisp, Jessica L.; Baik, Fred M.; Jiang, Tao; Baird, Stephen M.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Tsien, Roger Y.

    2012-01-01

    Thrombin and other coagulation enzymes have been shown to be important during atherosclerotic disease development. Study of these proteases is currently limited because of lack of robust molecular imaging agents for imaging protease activity in vivo. Activatable cell penetrating peptides (ACPPs) have been used to monitor MMP activity in tumors and, in principle, can be modified to detect other proteases. We have developed a probe that incorporates the peptide sequence DPRSFL from the proteinase activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) into an ACPP and shown that it is preferentially cleaved by purified thrombin. Active thrombin in serum cleaves DPRSFL–ACPP with >90% inhibition by lepirudin or argatroban. The DPRSFL–ACPP cleavage product accumulated in advanced atherosclerotic lesions in living mice, with 85% reduction in retention upon pre-injection of mice with hirudin. Uptake of the ACPP cleavage product was highest in plaques with histological features associated with more severe disease. Freshly resected human atheromas bathed in DPRSFL–ACPP retained 63% greater cleavage product compared to control ACPP. In conclusion, DPRSFL–ACPP can be used to study thrombin activity in coagulation and atherosclerosis with good spatial and temporal resolution. Thrombin-sensitive ACPPs may be developed into probes for early detection and intraoperative imaging of high risk atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:22534729

  17. Advances in Human B Cell Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Denise A.; Wei, Chungwen; Qian, Yu; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (“Big Biology”), necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort. PMID:23087687

  18. Plaque and arterial vulnerability investigation in a three-layer atherosclerotic human coronary artery using computational fluid-structure interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is the common form of cardiovascular diseases and known to be the main reason of deaths in the world. Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) simulations can be employed to assess the interactions of artery/plaque and blood to provide a more precise anticipation for rupture of arterial tissue layers and plaque tissues inside an atherosclerotic artery. To date, the arterial tissue in computational FSI simulations has been considered as a one-layer structure. However, a single layer assumption might have deeply bounded the results and, consequently, more computational simulation is needed by considering the arterial tissue as a three-layer structure. In this study, a three-dimensional computational FSI model of an atherosclerotic artery with a three-layer structure and different plaque types was established to perform a more accurate arterial wall/plaque tissue vulnerability assessment. The hyperelastic material coefficients of arterial layers were calculated and implemented in the computational model. The fully coupled fluid and structure models were solved using the explicit dynamics finite element code LS-DYNA. The results revealed the significant role of plaque types in the normal and shear stresses induced within the arterial tissue layers. The highest von Mises and shear stresses were observed on the stiffest calcified plaque with 3.59 and 3.27 MPa, while the lowest von Mises and shear stresses were seen on the hypocellular plaque with 1.15 and 0.63 MPa, respectively. Regardless of plaque types, the media and adventitia layers were played protective roles by displaying less stress on their wall, whilst the intima layer was at a high risk of rupture. The findings of this study have implications not only for determining the most vulnerable arterial layer/plaque tissue inside an atherosclerotic coronary artery but also for balloon-angioplasty, stenting, and bypass surgeries.

  19. Atherosclerotic Renal Artery Stenosis and Hypertension: Pragmatism, Pitfalls, and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bavishi, Chirag; de Leeuw, Peter W; Messerli, Franz H

    2016-06-01

    For many years and even decades, a diagnostic work-up to look for a secondary form of hypertension, particularly of renovascular origin, has been a central tenet in medicine. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is considered the most common cause of renovascular hypertension. However, advances in understanding the complex pathophysiology of this condition and the recently documented futility of renal revascularization bring into question whether atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis truly causes "renovascular hypertension." From a clinical point of view, a clear distinction should be made between hypertension associated with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis and hypertension caused by renal artery stenosis-induced activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Most patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis do not have a form of hypertension that is remediable or improved by angioplasty; to expose them to the cost, inconvenience, and risk of a diagnostic work-up add up to little more than a wild goose chase. However, with very few exceptions, medical therapy with antihypertensives and statins remains the cornerstone for the management of patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis and hypertension.

  20. Hyperspectral imaging of atherosclerotic plaques in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Randeberg, Lise L.; Olstad, Elisabeth; Haugen, Olav A.; Aksnes, Astrid; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2011-02-01

    Vulnerable plaques constitute a risk for serious heart problems, and are difficult to identify using existing methods. Hyperspectral imaging combines spectral- and spatial information, providing new possibilities for precise optical characterization of atherosclerotic lesions. Hyperspectral data were collected from excised aorta samples (n = 11) using both white-light and ultraviolet illumination. Single lesions (n = 42) were chosen for further investigation, and classified according to histological findings. The corresponding hyperspectral images were characterized using statistical image analysis tools (minimum noise fraction, K-means clustering, principal component analysis) and evaluation of reflectance/fluorescence spectra. Image analysis combined with histology revealed the complexity and heterogeneity of aortic plaques. Plaque features such as lipids and calcifications could be identified from the hyperspectral images. Most of the advanced lesions had a central region surrounded by an outer rim or shoulder-region of the plaque, which is considered a weak spot in vulnerable lesions. These features could be identified in both the white-light and fluorescence data. Hyperspectral imaging was shown to be a promising tool for detection and characterization of advanced atherosclerotic plaques in vitro. Hyperspectral imaging provides more diagnostic information about the heterogeneity of the lesions than conventional single point spectroscopic measurements.

  1. A Rabbit Model of Thrombosis on Atherosclerotic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Atsushi; Asada, Yujiro

    2011-01-01

    Thrombus formation on a disrupted atherosclerotic plaque is a key event that leads to atherothrombosis. Because thrombus is induced by chemical or physical injury of normal arteries in most animal models of thrombosis, the mechanisms of thrombogenesis and thrombus growth in atherosclerotic vessels should be investigated in diseased arteries of appropriate models. Pathological findings of human atherothrombosis suggest that tissue factor, an initiator of the coagulation cascade, significantly affects enhanced platelet aggregation and fibrin formation after plaque disruption. We established a rabbit model of atherothrombosis based on human pathology in which differences in thrombus formation between normal and atherosclerotic arteries, factors contributing to thrombus growth, and mechanisms of plaque erosion can be investigated. Emerging transgenic and stem cell technologies should also provide an invaluable rabbit experimental model in the near future. PMID:21253503

  2. Laboratory Diagnosis of Human Rabies: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Reeta Subramaniam; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Rabies, an acute progressive, fatal encephalomyelitis, transmitted most commonly through the bite of a rabid animal, is responsible for an estimated 61,000 human deaths worldwide. The true disease burden and public health impact due to rabies remain underestimated due to lack of sensitive laboratory diagnostic methods. Rapid diagnosis of rabies can help initiate prompt infection control and public health measures, obviate the need for unnecessary treatment/medical tests, and assist in timely administration of pre- or postexposure prophylactic vaccination to family members and medical staff. Antemortem diagnosis of human rabies provides an impetus for clinicians to attempt experimental therapeutic approaches in some patients, especially after the reported survival of a few cases of human rabies. Traditional methods for antemortem and postmortem rabies diagnosis have several limitations. Recent advances in technology have led to the improvement or development of several diagnostic assays which include methods for rabies viral antigen and antibody detection and assays for viral nucleic acid detection and identification of specific biomarkers. These assays which complement traditional methods have the potential to revolutionize rabies diagnosis in future. PMID:24348170

  3. Subject-Specific Fully-Coupled and One-Way Fluid-Structure Interaction Models for Modeling of Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xiaojuan; Gao, Peiyi; Jing, Lina; Lin, Yan; Sui, Binbin

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodynamics play an important role in the development and progression of carotid atherosclerosis, and may be important in the assessment of plaque vulnerability. The aim of this study was to develop a system to assess the hemodynamics of carotid atherosclerotic plaques using subject-specific fluid-structure interaction (FSI) models based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material/Methods Models of carotid bifurcations (n=86 with plaques from 52 patients, n=14 normal carotids from 12 participants) were obtained at the Department of Radiology, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital between 2010 and 2013. The maximum von Mises stress, minimum pressure, and flow velocity values were assessed at the most stenotic site in patients, or at the carotid bifurcations in healthy volunteers. Results of one-way FSI were compared with fully-coupled FSI for the plaques of 19 randomly selected models. Results The maximum von Mises stress and the minimum pressure and velocity were significantly increased in the stenosis group compared with controls based on one-way FSI (all P<0.05). The maximum von Mises stress and the minimum pressure were significantly higher and the velocity was significantly lower based on fully coupled FSI compared with on-way FSI (all P<0.05). Although there were differences in numerical values, both methods were equivalent. The maximum von Mises stress of vulnerable plaques was significantly higher than stable plaques (P<0.001). The maximum von Mises stress of the group with fibrous cap defect was significantly higher than the group without fibrous cap defect (P=0.001). Conclusions The hemodynamics of atherosclerotic plaques can be assessed noninvasively using subject-specific models of FSI based on MRI. PMID:26510514

  4. Atherosclerotic plaque behind the stent changes after bare-metal and drug-eluting stent implantation in humans: implications for late stent failure?

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Ioannis; Takahashi, Saeko; Tsuda, Masaya; Shishido, Koki; Antoniadis, Antonios P.; Papafaklis, Michail I.; Mizuno, Shingo; Coskun, Ahmet U.; Saito, Shigeru; Feldman, Charles L.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Stone, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The natural history and the role of atherosclerotic plaque located behind the stent (PBS) are still poorly understood. We evaluated the serial changes in PBS following bare-metal (BMS) compared to first-generation drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation and the impact of these changes on in-stent neointimal hyperplasia (NIH). Methods Three-dimensional coronary reconstruction by angiography and intravascular ultrasound was performed after intervention and at 6–10-month follow-up in 157 patients with 188 lesions treated with BMS (n=89) and DES (n=99). Results There was a significant decrease in PBS area (−7.2%; p<0.001) and vessel area (−1.7%; p<0.001) after BMS and a respective increase in both areas after DES implantation (6.1%; p<0.001 and 4.1%; p<0.001, respectively). The decrease in PBS area significantly predicted neointimal area at follow-up after BMS (β: 0.15; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.10–0.20, p<0.001) and DES (β: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.07–0.11; p<0.001) implantation. The decrease in PBS area was the most powerful predictor of significant NIH after BMS implantation (odds ratio: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.02–1.26; p=0.02). Conclusions The decrease in PBS area after stent implantation is significantly associated with the magnitude of NIH development at follow-up. This finding raises the possibility of a communication between the lesion within the stent and the underlying native atherosclerotic plaque, and may have important implications regarding the pathobiology of in-stent restenosis and late/very late stent thrombosis. PMID:27494445

  5. A matrix of cholesterol crystals, but not cholesterol alone, primes human monocytes/macrophages for excessive endotoxin-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Role in atherosclerotic inflammation?

    PubMed

    Bendtzen, Klaus; Christensen, Ole; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Holmstrup, Palle

    2014-06-01

    When exposed to small amounts of bacterial endotoxin, matrices of cholesterol crystals, but not cholesterol itself, primed human monocytes/macrophages to a highly augmented (>10-fold) production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α. Priming also sensitized the cells, as 10- to 100-fold lower levels of endotoxin were needed for TNF-α production equivalent to that of unprimed cells. The pro-inflammatory effect was selective as endotoxin-induced production of other pro-inflammatory cytokines was unaffected while production of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 was diminished. These findings suggest that cholesterol matrix formation may play a pathogenic role in atherosclerotic inflammation, and they indicate a mechanism by which bacteria and/or bacterial products may play a role in processes leading to arteriosclerosis.

  6. Quantification of Apoptosis in Mouse Atherosclerotic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Figg, Nichola L; Bennett, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a key process occurring in atherosclerosis, both in humans and in animal models. Apoptosis occurs in all cell types studied thus far, and thus lineage marking is often necessary. Apoptosis should be ascertained using a combination of morphological features and activation of specific pathways (e.g., terminal UTP nick end labeling-TUNEL). Both TUNEL and cryptic epitope antibodies (e.g., cleaved caspase 3) can be used, although they will often give different frequencies. Apoptotic frequency but not rate can be estimated from these methods, as we do not know the timing of apoptosis or how much of the process is marked by each method. We describe the morphological and immunohistochemical methods used in our laboratory to detect apoptotic cells in animal and human atherosclerotic plaques.

  7. Progress in atherosclerotic plaque imaging

    PubMed Central

    Soloperto, Giulia; Casciaro, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the primary cause of mortality in the industrialized world, and arterial obstruction, triggered by rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques, lead to myocardial infarction and cerebral stroke. Vulnerable plaques do not necessarily occur with flow-limiting stenosis, thus conventional luminographic assessment of the pathology fails to identify unstable lesions. In this review we discuss the currently available imaging modalities used to investigate morphological features and biological characteristics of the atherosclerotic plaque. The different imaging modalities such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear imaging and their intravascular applications are illustrated, highlighting their specific diagnostic potential. Clinically available and upcoming methodologies are also reviewed along with the related challenges in their clinical translation, concerning the specific invasiveness, accuracy and cost-effectiveness of these methods. PMID:22937215

  8. Morpheus: Advancing Technologies for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olansen, Jon B.; Munday, Stephen R.; Mitchell, Jennifer D.; Baine, Michael

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Morpheus Project has developed and tested a prototype planetary lander capable of vertical takeoff and landing. Designed to serve as a vertical testbed (VTB) for advanced spacecraft technologies, the vehicle provides a platform for bringing technologies from the laboratory into an integrated flight system at relatively low cost. This allows individual technologies to mature into capabilities that can be incorporated into human exploration missions. The Morpheus vehicle is propelled by a LOX/Methane engine and sized to carry a payload of 1100 lb to the lunar surface. In addition to VTB vehicles, the Project s major elements include ground support systems and an operations facility. Initial testing will demonstrate technologies used to perform autonomous hazard avoidance and precision landing on a lunar or other planetary surface. The Morpheus vehicle successfully performed a set of integrated vehicle test flights including hot-fire and tethered hover tests, leading up to un-tethered free-flights. The initial phase of this development and testing campaign is being conducted on-site at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), with the first fully integrated vehicle firing its engine less than one year after project initiation. Designed, developed, manufactured and operated in-house by engineers at JSC, the Morpheus Project represents an unprecedented departure from recent NASA programs that traditionally require longer, more expensive development lifecycles and testing at remote, dedicated testing facilities. Morpheus testing includes three major types of integrated tests. A hot-fire (HF) is a static vehicle test of the LOX/Methane propulsion system. Tether tests (TT) have the vehicle suspended above the ground using a crane, which allows testing of the propulsion and integrated Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) in hovering flight without the risk of a vehicle departure or crash. Morpheus free-flights (FF) test the complete Morpheus system without the additional

  9. The tolls and dangers of atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation drives atherosclerosis. Toll-like receptor-2 and -4 are so far the strongest candidates for initiating innate immune signalling in atherosclerosis. Their signalling has implications for lesion development, foam cell formation, inflammation, matrix degradation and ischemia-reperfusion. The repertoire of TLR agonists is expanding. They collectively represent a conglomerate of structurally diverse molecular patterns requiring a high level of versatility in their sensing. Such versatility is achieved through cooperation of TLR heterodimers, co-receptors, and binding proteins. Several endogenous and exogenous molecular patterns engaging TLRs are associated with atherosclerosis development and complications. In this review, I describe how such molecular patterns are sensed, how they signal and what the consequences in the atherosclerotic plaque might be. The effect of TLR antagonising compounds in human and murine atherosclerosis is also addressed.

  10. PROBABILISTIC MODELING FOR ADVANCED HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposures to environmental pollutants widely vary depending on the emission patterns that result in microenvironmental pollutant concentrations, as well as behavioral factors that determine the extent of an individual's contact with these pollutants. Probabilistic human exp...

  11. Advancing Humanities Studies at Community, Technical, and Junior Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Diane U.; And Others

    The American Association of Community and Junior Colleges' (AACJC's) two-year Advancing the Humanities Project (AHP) has assisted selected community colleges in promoting the humanities on their campuses. Parts I and II of this report on the AHP present statements by Dale Parnell and Judith Jeffrey Howard about the AACJC's humanities initiatives…

  12. Human factors survey of advanced instrumentation and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A survey oriented towards identifying the human factors issues in regard to the use of advanced instrumentation and controls (I C) in the nuclear industry was conducted. A number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities were participants in the survey. Human factors items, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays (CGD), controls, organizational support, training, and related topics, were discussed. The survey found the industry to be concerned about the human factors issues related to the implementation of advanced I C. Fifteen potential human factors problems were identified. They include: the need for an advanced I C guideline equivalent to NUREG-0700; a role change in the control room from operator to supervisor; information overload; adequacy of existing training technology for advanced I C; and operator acceptance and trust. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Live Observation of Atherosclerotic Plaque Disruption in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Daeichin, V.; Sluimer, J. C.; van der Heiden, K.; Skachkov, I.; Kooiman, K.; Janssen, A.; Janssen, B.; Bosch, J. G.; de Jong, N.; Daemen, M. J. A. P.; van der Steen, A. F. W.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The actual occurrence of spontaneous plaque rupture in mice has been a matter of debate. We report on an in vivo observation of the actual event of possible plaque disruption in a living ApoE-/- mouse. Methods and Results: During live contrast-enhanced ultrasonography of a 50-week-old ApoE-/- male mouse, symptoms suggesting plaque disruption in the brachiocephalic artery were observed. Histological analysis confirmed the presence of advanced atherosclerotic lesions with dissections and intraplaque hemorrhage in the affected brachiocephalic trunk, pointing towards plaque rupture as the cause of the observed event. However, we did not detect a luminal thrombus or cap rupture, which is a key criterion for plaque rupture in human atherosclerosis. Conclusion: This study reports the real-time occurrence of a possible plaque rupture in a living ApoE-/- mouse.

  14. Advancing Usability Evaluation through Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman

    2005-07-01

    This paper introduces a novel augmentation to the current heuristic usability evaluation methodology. The SPAR-H human reliability analysis method was developed for categorizing human performance in nuclear power plants. Despite the specialized use of SPAR-H for safety critical scenarios, the method also holds promise for use in commercial off-the-shelf software usability evaluations. The SPAR-H method shares task analysis underpinnings with human-computer interaction, and it can be easily adapted to incorporate usability heuristics as performance shaping factors. By assigning probabilistic modifiers to heuristics, it is possible to arrive at the usability error probability (UEP). This UEP is not a literal probability of error but nonetheless provides a quantitative basis to heuristic evaluation. When combined with a consequence matrix for usability errors, this method affords ready prioritization of usability issues.

  15. Human factors aspects of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    An important consideration in regards to the use of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry is the interface between the instrumentation system and the human. A survey, oriented towards identifying the human factors aspects of digital instrumentation, was conducted at a number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities. Human factors issues, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays, controls, organizational support, training, and related topics were identified. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. [Atherosclerotic renal artery disease diagnosis update].

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Haesler, Erik; Teta, Daniel; Qanadli, Salah Dine; Burnier, Michel

    2009-02-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease represents a cause of which little is known but not a cause to be neglected for hypertension and renal insufficiency. Even though its occurrence remains badly defined, atherosclerotic renal artery disease is constantly on the rise due to the aging population, the never prevailing hypertension and diabetes mellitus. This review aims to give a clinical profile of patients presenting with atherosclerotic renal artery disease and to discuss, in the light of study results, which diagnostic evaluation should be used considering the sequence and the benefit and risk of each in order to initiate a personalized treatment. Patients affected by atherosclerotic renal artery disease are likely to have more complications and more extensive target-organ damage than patients without renal artery stenosis. The evolution of the atherosclerotic renal artery disease is in general slow and progressive. Nevertheless, certain clinical cases manifest themselves with the onset of acute renal failure bought upon by the administration of blockers of the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, or by some other causes responsible for a sudden drop in renal plasma flow (e.g., thrombosis of the renal artery). The relationship between atherosclerotic renal artery disease and atherosclerosis is complex, and mediators implicated in the pathophysiology of renovascular disease may also contribute to the progression of cardiovascular damage. An early assumption of the atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is warranted to determine the adapted treatment (i.e., medical treatment, revascularisation...) just as the assumption and the correction of the more general cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:18809367

  17. Advances in Human B19 Erythrovirus Biology▿

    PubMed Central

    Servant-Delmas, Annabelle; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Morinet, Frédéric; Pillet, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery, human parvovirus B19 (B19V), now termed erythrovirus, has been associated with many clinical situations (neurological and myocardium infections, persistent B19V DNAemia) in addition to the prototype clinical manifestations, i.e., erythema infectiosum and erythroblastopenia crisis. In 2002, the use of new molecular tools led to the characterization of three different genotypes of human B19 erythrovirus. Although the genomic organization is conserved, the geographic distribution of the different genotypes varies worldwide, and the nucleotidic divergences can impact the molecular diagnosis of B19 virus infection. The cell cycle of the virus remains partially unresolved; however, recent studies have shed light on the mechanism of cell entry and the interactions of B19V proteins with apoptosis pathways. PMID:20631151

  18. Approach to atherosclerotic renovascular disease: 2016

    PubMed Central

    Daloul, Reem; Morrison, Aubrey R.

    2016-01-01

    The management of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis in patients with hypertension or impaired renal function remains a clinical dilemma. The current general consensus, supported by the results of the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions and Cardiovascular Outcomes for Renal Artery Lesions trials, argues strongly against endovascular intervention in favor of optimal medical management. We discuss the limitations and implications of the contemporary clinical trials and present our approach and formulate clear recommendations to help with the management of patients with atherosclerotic narrowing of the renal artery. PMID:27679718

  19. Approach to atherosclerotic renovascular disease: 2016

    PubMed Central

    Daloul, Reem; Morrison, Aubrey R.

    2016-01-01

    The management of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis in patients with hypertension or impaired renal function remains a clinical dilemma. The current general consensus, supported by the results of the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions and Cardiovascular Outcomes for Renal Artery Lesions trials, argues strongly against endovascular intervention in favor of optimal medical management. We discuss the limitations and implications of the contemporary clinical trials and present our approach and formulate clear recommendations to help with the management of patients with atherosclerotic narrowing of the renal artery.

  20. Approach to atherosclerotic renovascular disease: 2016.

    PubMed

    Daloul, Reem; Morrison, Aubrey R

    2016-10-01

    The management of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis in patients with hypertension or impaired renal function remains a clinical dilemma. The current general consensus, supported by the results of the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions and Cardiovascular Outcomes for Renal Artery Lesions trials, argues strongly against endovascular intervention in favor of optimal medical management. We discuss the limitations and implications of the contemporary clinical trials and present our approach and formulate clear recommendations to help with the management of patients with atherosclerotic narrowing of the renal artery. PMID:27679718

  1. Primary Stenting of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Straube, T. Stingele, Robert; Jansen, Olav

    2005-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and safety of stenting intracranial atherosclerotic stenoses.Methods: In 12 patients the results of primary intracranial stenting were evaluated retrospectively. Patient ages ranged from 49 to 79 years (mean 64 years). Six patients presented with stenoses in the anterior circulation, and six had stenosis in the posterior circulation. One patient presented with extra- and intracranial tandem stenosis of the left internal carotid artery. Three patients presented with acute basilar thrombosis, caused by high-grade basilar stenoses.Results: Intracranial stenoses were successfully stented in 11 of 12 patients. In one patient the stent could not be advanced over the carotid siphon to reach the stenosis of the ophthalmic internal carotid artery. Follow-up digital subtraction angiographic studies were obtained in two patients who had presented with new neurologic signs or symptoms. In both cases the angiogram did not show any relevant stenotic endothelial hyperplasia. In one patient, after local thrombolysis the stenosis turned out to be so narrow that balloon angioplasty had to be performed before stent deployment. All three patients treated for stenosis-related basilar thrombosis died due to brainstem infarction that had ensued before the intervention.Conclusions: Prophylactic primary stenting of intracranial stenoses of the anterior or posterior cerebral circulation can be performed with a low complication rate; technical problems such as stent flexibility must still be solved. Local thrombolysis followed by stenting in stenosis-related thrombotic occlusion is technically possible.

  2. Advanced Solid State Lighting for Human Evaluation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Holbert, Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Lighting intensity and color have a significant impact on human circadian rhythms. Advanced solid state lighting was developed for the Advanced Exploration System (AES) Deep Space Habitat(DSH) concept demonstrator. The latest generation of assemblies using the latest commercially available LED lights were designed for use in the Bigelow Aerospace Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) simulator and the University of Hawaii's Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (Hi-SEAS) habitat. Agreements with both these organizations will allow the government to receive feedback on the lights and lighting algorithms from long term human interaction.

  3. Mucosal Administration of Collagen V Ameliorates the Atherosclerotic Plaque Burden by Inducing Interleukin 35-dependent Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Park, Arick C; Huang, Guorui; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Massoudi, Dawiyat; Kernien, John F; Vignali, Dario A; Sullivan, Jeremy A; Wilkes, David S; Burlingham, William J; Greenspan, Daniel S

    2016-02-12

    We have shown previously that collagen V (col(V)) autoimmunity is a consistent feature of atherosclerosis in human coronary artery disease and in the Apoe(-/-) mouse model. We have also shown sensitization of Apoe(-/-) mice with col(V) to markedly increase the atherosclerotic burden, providing evidence of a causative role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic pathogenesis. Here we sought to determine whether induction of immune tolerance to col(V) might ameliorate atherosclerosis, providing further evidence for a causal role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherogenesis and providing insights into the potential for immunomodulatory therapeutic interventions. Mucosal inoculation successfully induced immune tolerance to col(V) with an accompanying reduction in plaque burden in Ldlr(-/-) mice on a high-cholesterol diet. The results therefore demonstrate that inoculation with col(V) can successfully ameliorate the atherosclerotic burden, suggesting novel approaches for therapeutic interventions. Surprisingly, tolerance and reduced atherosclerotic burden were both dependent on the recently described IL-35 and not on IL-10, the immunosuppressive cytokine usually studied in the context of induced tolerance and amelioration of atherosclerotic symptoms. In addition to the above, using recombinant protein fragments, we were able to localize two epitopes of the α1(V) chain involved in col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic Ldlr(-/-) mice, suggesting future courses of experimentation for the characterization of such epitopes.

  4. Noninvasive diagnosis of ruptured peripheral atherosclerotic lesions and myocardial infarction by antibody profiling

    PubMed Central

    Cleutjens, Kitty B.J.M.; Faber, Birgit C.G.; Rousch, Mat; van Doorn, Ruben; Hackeng, Tilman M.; Vink, Cornelis; Geusens, Piet; ten Cate, Hugo; Waltenberger, Johannes; Tchaikovski, Vadim; Lobbes, Marc; Somers, Veerle; Sijbers, Anneke; Black, Darcey; Kitslaar, Peter J.E.H.M.; Daemen, Mat J.A.P.

    2008-01-01

    Novel biomarkers, such as circulating (auto)antibody signatures, may improve early detection and treatment of ruptured atherosclerotic lesions and accompanying cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarction. Using a phage-display library derived from cDNAs preferentially expressed in ruptured peripheral human atherosclerotic plaques, we performed serological antigen selection to isolate displayed cDNA products specifically interacting with antibodies in sera from patients with proven ruptured peripheral atherosclerotic lesions. Two cDNA products were subsequently evaluated on a validation series of patients with peripheral atherosclerotic lesions, healthy controls, and patients with coronary artery disease at different stages. Our biomarker set was able to discriminate between patients with peripheral ruptured lesions and patients with peripheral stable plaques with 100% specificity and 76% sensitivity. Furthermore, 93% of patients with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) tested positive for our biomarkers, whereas all patients with stable angina pectoris tested negative. Moreover, 90% of AMI patients who initially tested negative for troponin T, for which a positive result is known to indicate myocardial infarction, tested positive for our biomarkers upon hospital admission. In conclusion, antibody profiling constitutes a promising approach for noninvasive diagnosis of atherosclerotic lesions, because a positive serum response against a set of 2 cDNA products showed a strong association with the presence of ruptured peripheral atherosclerotic lesions and myocardial infarction. PMID:18654662

  5. High speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging of atherosclerotic arteries (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Zhonglie; Ma, Teng; Qu, Yueqiao; Li, Jiawen; Yu, Mingyue; He, Youmin; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the industrialized nations. Accurate quantification of both the morphology and composition of lipid-rich vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque are essential for early detection and optimal treatment in clinics. In previous works, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging for detection of lipid-rich plaque within coronary artery walls has been demonstrated in ex vivo, but the imaging speed is still limited. In order to increase the imaging speed, a high repetition rate laser is needed. In this work, we present a high speed integrated IVPA/US imaging system with a 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator laser at 1725 nm. A miniature catheter with 1.0 mm outer diameter was designed with a 200 μm multimode fiber and an ultrasound transducer with 45 MHz center frequency. The fiber was polished at 38 degree and enclosed in a glass capillary for total internal reflection. An optical/electrical rotary junction and pull-back mechanism was applied for rotating and linearly scanning the catheter to obtain three-dimensional imaging. Atherosclerotic rabbit abdominal aorta was imaged as two frame/second at 1725 nm. Furthermore, by wide tuning range of the laser wavelength from 1680 nm to 1770 nm, spectroscopic photoacoustic analysis of lipid-mimicking phantom and an human atherosclerotic artery was performed ex vivo. The results demonstrated that the developed IVPA/US imaging system is capable for high speed intravascular imaging for plaque detection.

  6. Human life support for advanced space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzkopf, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    The requirements for a human life support system for long-duration space missions are reviewed. The system design of a controlled ecological life support system is briefly described, followed by a more detailed account of the study of the conceptual design of a Lunar Based CELSS. The latter is to provide a safe, reliable, recycling lunar base life support system based on a hybrid physicochemical/biological representative technology. The most important conclusion reached by this study is that implementation of a completely recycling CELSS approach for a lunar base is not only feasible, but eminently practical. On a cumulative launch mass basis, a 4-person Lunar Base CELSS would pay for itself in approximately 2.6 years relative to a physicochemical air/water recycling system with resupply of food from the Earth. For crew sizes of 30 and 100, the breakeven point would come even sooner, after 2.1 and 1.7 years, respectively, due to the increased mass savings that can be realized with the larger plant growth units. Two other conclusions are particularly important with regard to the orientation of future research and technology development. First, the mass estimates of the Lunar Base CELSS indicate that a primary design objective in implementing this kind of system must be to minimized the mass and power requirement of the food production plant growth units, which greatly surpass those of the other air and water recycling systems. Consequently, substantial research must be directed at identifying ways to produce food more efficiently. On the other hand, detailed studies to identify the best technology options for the other subsystems should not be expected to produce dramatic reductions in either mass or power requirement of a Lunar Base CELSS. The most crucial evaluation criterion must, therefore, be the capability for functional integration of these technologies into the ultimate design of the system. Secondly, this study illustrates that existing or near

  7. Human life support for advanced space exploration.

    PubMed

    Schwartzkopf, S H

    1997-01-01

    The requirements for a human life support system for long-duration space missions are reviewed. The system design of a controlled ecological life support system is briefly described, followed by a more detailed account of the study of the conceptual design of a Lunar Based CELSS. The latter is to provide a safe, reliable, recycling lunar base life support system based on a hybrid physicochemical/biological representative technology. The most important conclusion reached by this study is that implementation of a completely recycling CELSS approach for a lunar base is not only feasible, but eminently practical. On a cumulative launch mass basis, a 4-person Lunar Base CELSS would pay for itself in approximately 2.6 years relative to a physicochemical air/water recycling system with resupply of food from the Earth. For crew sizes of 30 and 100, the breakeven point would come even sooner, after 2.1 and 1.7 years, respectively, due to the increased mass savings that can be realized with the larger plant growth units. Two other conclusions are particularly important with regard to the orientation of future research and technology development. First, the mass estimates of the Lunar Base CELSS indicate that a primary design objective in implementing this kind of system must be to minimized the mass and power requirement of the food production plant growth units, which greatly surpass those of the other air and water recycling systems. Consequently, substantial research must be directed at identifying ways to produce food more efficiently. On the other hand, detailed studies to identify the best technology options for the other subsystems should not be expected to produce dramatic reductions in either mass or power requirement of a Lunar Base CELSS. The most crucial evaluation criterion must, therefore, be the capability for functional integration of these technologies into the ultimate design of the system. Secondly, this study illustrates that existing or near

  8. Human life support for advanced space exploration.

    PubMed

    Schwartzkopf, S H

    1997-01-01

    The requirements for a human life support system for long-duration space missions are reviewed. The system design of a controlled ecological life support system is briefly described, followed by a more detailed account of the study of the conceptual design of a Lunar Based CELSS. The latter is to provide a safe, reliable, recycling lunar base life support system based on a hybrid physicochemical/biological representative technology. The most important conclusion reached by this study is that implementation of a completely recycling CELSS approach for a lunar base is not only feasible, but eminently practical. On a cumulative launch mass basis, a 4-person Lunar Base CELSS would pay for itself in approximately 2.6 years relative to a physicochemical air/water recycling system with resupply of food from the Earth. For crew sizes of 30 and 100, the breakeven point would come even sooner, after 2.1 and 1.7 years, respectively, due to the increased mass savings that can be realized with the larger plant growth units. Two other conclusions are particularly important with regard to the orientation of future research and technology development. First, the mass estimates of the Lunar Base CELSS indicate that a primary design objective in implementing this kind of system must be to minimized the mass and power requirement of the food production plant growth units, which greatly surpass those of the other air and water recycling systems. Consequently, substantial research must be directed at identifying ways to produce food more efficiently. On the other hand, detailed studies to identify the best technology options for the other subsystems should not be expected to produce dramatic reductions in either mass or power requirement of a Lunar Base CELSS. The most crucial evaluation criterion must, therefore, be the capability for functional integration of these technologies into the ultimate design of the system. Secondly, this study illustrates that existing or near

  9. Advanced human-system interface design review guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced, computer-based, human-system interface designs are emerging in nuclear power plant (NPP) control rooms. These developments may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will greatly affect the ways in which operators interact with systems. At present, however, the only guidance available to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the review of control room-operator interfaces, NUREG-0700, was written prior to these technological changes and is thus not designed to address them. The objective of the project reported in this paper is to develop an Advanced Control Room Design Review Guideline for use in performing human factors reviews of advanced operator interfaces. This guideline will be implemented, in part, as a portable, computer-based, interactive document for field use. The paper describes the overall guideline development methodology, the present status of the document, and the plans for further guideline testing and development. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Imagining STEM Higher Education Futures: Advancing Human Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores a conceptual approach to the question of what it means to provide a university education that addresses equity, and encourages the formation of STEM graduates oriented to public-good values and with commitments to making professional contributions to society which will advance human well-being. It considers and rejects…

  11. Cities and Urban Land Use in Advanced Placement Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the cities and urban land use section of the Advanced Placement (AP) human geography course, focusing on the: (1) definitions of urbanism; (2) origin and evolution of cities; (3) functional character of contemporary cities; (4) built environment and social space; and (5) responses to urban growth. (CMK)

  12. Human Ecology and Health Advancement: The Newcastle Experience and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Jenny; Honari, Morteza

    1992-01-01

    Argues for the necessity of adopting a human ecological framework for the advancement of health. Focusing on the Australian experience, highlights the difficulties in moving beyond the narrow mold of Western Medical Science to a more holistic, quality of life orientation, and suggests that the role of education at all levels of the community is…

  13. Industrialization and Economic Development in Advanced Placement Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Adrian J.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the industrialization and economic development section of the Advanced Placement (AP) human geography course, addressing four specific aspects: (1) the character of industrialization; (2) spatial aspects of the rise of industrial economies; (3) contemporary global patterns of industrialization and resource extraction; and (4) impacts of…

  14. Intra- and extracranial atherosclerotic disease: casting a new light on emerging trends.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jing; Wang, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Intra- and extracranial atherosclerotic stenosis has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of secondary stroke mortality. Advances in invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities have improved analysis of hemodynamic changes and allowed better delineation of the integrity of intracranial collateralization and plague morphology in patients with artery stenosis. This review focuses on new imaging modalities and clinical applications of currently available techniques, and provides significant insight into future directions in comprehensive analysis of intra- and extracranial atherosclerotic stenosis. PMID:27367590

  15. Advanced automated glass cockpit certification: Being wary of human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amalberti, Rene; Wilbaux, Florence

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents some facets of the French experience with human factors in the process of certification of advanced automated cockpits. Three types of difficulties are described: first, the difficulties concerning the hotly debated concept of human error and its non-linear relationship to risk of accident; a typology of errors to be taken into account in the certification process is put forward to respond to this issue. Next, the difficulties connected to the basically gradual and evolving nature of pilot expertise on a given type of aircraft, which contrasts with the immediate and definitive style of certifying systems. The last difficulties to be considered are those related to the goals of certification itself on these new aircraft and the status of findings from human factor analyses (in particular, what should be done with disappointing results, how much can the changes induced by human factors investigation economically affect aircraft design, how many errors do we need to accumulate before we revise the system, what should be remedied when human factor problems are discovered at the certification stage: the machine? pilot training? the rules? or everything?). The growth of advanced-automated glass cockpits has forced the international aeronautical community to pay more attention to human factors during the design phase, the certification phase and pilot training. The recent creation of a human factor desk at the DGAC-SFACT (Official French services) is a direct consequence of this. The paper is divided into three parts. Part one debates human error and its relationship with system design and accident risk. Part two describes difficulties connected to the basically gradual and evolving nature of pilot expertise on a given type of aircraft, which contrasts with the immediate and definitive style of certifying systems. Part three focuses on concrete outcomes of human factors for certification purposes.

  16. Technical advances and pitfalls on the way to human cloning.

    PubMed

    Mollard, Richard; Denham, Mark; Trounson, Alan

    2002-03-01

    There exists a widespread consensus that the cloning of human beings to term would be detrimental to both the mother and child and of little value to society. However, the ambition of a few organisations and the recent advances in cellular and molecular technologies that led to the cloning of Dolly the sheep, for example, have meant that such a procedure will be possible if not illegal in the near future. The science associated with the cloning technologies practiced in other mammalian species reported to date provide important advances in our understanding of how cells function during early developmental processes and commit themselves to specific developmental pathways. However, many technological insufficiencies remain. Both technological advances and several of the associated insufficiencies are outlined in this review.

  17. Technical advances and pitfalls on the way to human cloning.

    PubMed

    Mollard, Richard; Denham, Mark; Trounson, Alan

    2002-03-01

    There exists a widespread consensus that the cloning of human beings to term would be detrimental to both the mother and child and of little value to society. However, the ambition of a few organisations and the recent advances in cellular and molecular technologies that led to the cloning of Dolly the sheep, for example, have meant that such a procedure will be possible if not illegal in the near future. The science associated with the cloning technologies practiced in other mammalian species reported to date provide important advances in our understanding of how cells function during early developmental processes and commit themselves to specific developmental pathways. However, many technological insufficiencies remain. Both technological advances and several of the associated insufficiencies are outlined in this review. PMID:11963651

  18. Laser capture microdissection for analysis of macrophage gene expression from atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Feig, Jonathan E; Fisher, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery disease, resulting from atherosclerosis, is the leading cause of death in the Western world. Most previous studies have subjected atherosclerotic arteries, a tissue of mixed cellular composition, to homogenization in order to identify the factors in plaque development, thereby obscuring information relevant to specific cell types. Because macrophage foam cells are critical mediators in atherosclerotic plaque advancement, we reasoned that performing gene analysis on those cells would provide specific insight in novel regulatory factors and potential therapeutic targets. We demonstrated for the first time in vascular biology that foam cell-specific RNA can be isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM) of plaques. As expected, compared to whole tissue, a significant enrichment in foam cell-specific RNA transcripts was observed. Furthermore, because regression of atherosclerosis is a tantalizing clinical goal, we developed and reported a transplantation-based mouse model. This involved allowing plaques to form in apoE-/- mice and then changing the plaque's plasma environment from hyperlipidemia to normolipidemia. Under those conditions, rapid regression ensued in a process involving emigration of plaque foam cells to regional and systemic lymph nodes. Using LCM, we were able to show that under regression conditions, there was decreased expression in foam cells of inflammatory genes, but an up-regulation of cholesterol efflux genes. Interestingly, we also found that increased expression of chemokine receptor CCR7, a known factor in dendritic cell migration, was required for regression. In conclusion, the LCM methods described in this chapter, which have already lead to a number of striking findings, will likely further facilitate the study of cell type-specific gene expression in animal and human plaques during various stages of atherosclerosis, and after genetic, pharmacologic, and environmental perturbations.

  19. [Atherosclerotic renal artery disease management update].

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Haesler, Erik; Teta, Daniel; Qanadli, Salah Dine; Burnier, Michel

    2009-02-01

    In the case of atherosclerotic renal artery disease, the best conclusive results lie principally not in the degree of the stenosis but rather in the degree the renal parenchymal disease beyond the stenosis itself. These determining factors involve the controlling of the patients blood pressure, the improvement in the renal function and the beneficial results to the cardiovascular system. Besides the indispensable medical treatment, a revascularisation by angioplasty may be indicated. This procedure with or without vascular stent often allows satisfactory angiographic results. A treatment by surgical revascularisation is only recommended in the case of extensive atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta, complex lesions of the latter or an abdominal aortic aneurism. Although the frequency of restenosis of angioplasty with stent remains extremely low, the risk of cholesterol emboli due to the diffuse atherosclerotic lesions of the abdominal aorta, must be considered at the time of each aortic catheterization. The therapeutic approach of atherosclerotic renal artery disease must be dictated by the whole cardiovascular risk factors and by the threat of target organs. The control of the blood pressure and the maintenance of the renal function must be integrated in the decisional algorithm as well as the possible risks in carrying out an eventual revascularisation procedure. Finally, the renal angioplasty should in numerous situations be integrated in the overall assumption of responsibility of the atherosclerotic vascular diseases, and should be part of the medical treatment. Several questions still do exist; at what moment an atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis should and e considered critical, and which procedure should be considered for which patient? The purpose of this review is to propose a decisional tool for individualized treatments in the light of results from randomized and controlled studies. PMID:18815087

  20. [Atherosclerotic renal artery disease management update].

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Haesler, Erik; Teta, Daniel; Qanadli, Salah Dine; Burnier, Michel

    2009-02-01

    In the case of atherosclerotic renal artery disease, the best conclusive results lie principally not in the degree of the stenosis but rather in the degree the renal parenchymal disease beyond the stenosis itself. These determining factors involve the controlling of the patients blood pressure, the improvement in the renal function and the beneficial results to the cardiovascular system. Besides the indispensable medical treatment, a revascularisation by angioplasty may be indicated. This procedure with or without vascular stent often allows satisfactory angiographic results. A treatment by surgical revascularisation is only recommended in the case of extensive atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta, complex lesions of the latter or an abdominal aortic aneurism. Although the frequency of restenosis of angioplasty with stent remains extremely low, the risk of cholesterol emboli due to the diffuse atherosclerotic lesions of the abdominal aorta, must be considered at the time of each aortic catheterization. The therapeutic approach of atherosclerotic renal artery disease must be dictated by the whole cardiovascular risk factors and by the threat of target organs. The control of the blood pressure and the maintenance of the renal function must be integrated in the decisional algorithm as well as the possible risks in carrying out an eventual revascularisation procedure. Finally, the renal angioplasty should in numerous situations be integrated in the overall assumption of responsibility of the atherosclerotic vascular diseases, and should be part of the medical treatment. Several questions still do exist; at what moment an atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis should and e considered critical, and which procedure should be considered for which patient? The purpose of this review is to propose a decisional tool for individualized treatments in the light of results from randomized and controlled studies.

  1. Leukocyte trafficking-associated vascular adhesion protein 1 is expressed and functionally active in atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Silvola, Johanna M. U.; Virtanen, Helena; Siitonen, Riikka; Hellberg, Sanna; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Metsälä, Olli; Ståhle, Mia; Saanijoki, Tiina; Käkelä, Meeri; Hakovirta, Harri; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Saukko, Pekka; Jauhiainen, Matti; Veres, Tibor Z.; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Knuuti, Juhani; Saraste, Antti; Roivainen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Given the important role of inflammation and the potential association of the leukocyte trafficking-associated adhesion molecule vascular adhesion protein 1 (VAP-1) with atherosclerosis, this study examined whether functional VAP-1 is expressed in atherosclerotic lesions and, if so, whether it could be targeted by positron emission tomography (PET). First, immunohistochemistry revealed that VAP-1 localized to endothelial cells of intra-plaque neovessels in human carotid endarterectomy samples from patients with recent ischemic symptoms. In low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice expressing only apolipoprotein B100 (LDLR−/−ApoB100/100), VAP-1 was expressed on endothelial cells lining inflamed atherosclerotic lesions; normal vessel walls in aortas of C57BL/6N control mice were VAP-1-negative. Second, we discovered that the focal uptake of VAP-1 targeting sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 based PET tracer [68Ga]DOTA-Siglec-9 in atherosclerotic plaques was associated with the density of activated macrophages (r = 0.58, P = 0.022). As a final point, we found that the inhibition of VAP-1 activity with small molecule LJP1586 decreased the density of macrophages in inflamed atherosclerotic plaques in mice. Our results suggest for the first time VAP-1 as a potential imaging target for inflamed atherosclerotic plaques, and corroborate VAP-1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27731409

  2. Specific imaging of atherosclerotic plaque lipids with two-wavelength intravascular photoacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Jansen, Krista; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; van Soest, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    The lipid content in plaques is an important marker for identifying atherosclerotic lesions and disease states. Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging can be used to visualize lipids in the artery. In this study, we further investigated lipid detection in the 1.7-µm spectral range. By exploiting the relative difference between the IVPA signal strengths at 1718 and 1734 nm, we could successfully detect and differentiate between the plaque lipids and peri-adventitial fat in human coronary arteries ex vivo. Our study demonstrates that IVPA imaging can positively identify atherosclerotic plaques using only two wavelengths, which could enable rapid data acquisition in vivo. PMID:26417500

  3. Genesis and growth of extracellular-vesicle-derived microcalcification in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Joshua D; Goettsch, Claudia; Bertazzo, Sergio; Maldonado, Natalia; Ruiz, Jessica L; Goh, Wilson; Yabusaki, Katsumi; Faits, Tyler; Bouten, Carlijn; Franck, Gregory; Quillard, Thibaut; Libby, Peter; Aikawa, Masanori; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Aikawa, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Clinical evidence links arterial calcification and cardiovascular risk. Finite-element modelling of the stress distribution within atherosclerotic plaques has suggested that subcellular microcalcifications in the fibrous cap may promote material failure of the plaque, but that large calcifications can stabilize it. Yet the physicochemical mechanisms underlying such mineral formation and growth in atheromata remain unknown. Here, by using three-dimensional collagen hydrogels that mimic structural features of the atherosclerotic fibrous cap, and high-resolution microscopic and spectroscopic analyses of both the hydrogels and of calcified human plaques, we demonstrate that calcific mineral formation and maturation results from a series of events involving the aggregation of calcifying extracellular vesicles, and the formation of microcalcifications and ultimately large calcification areas. We also show that calcification morphology and the plaque's collagen content-two determinants of atherosclerotic plaque stability-are interlinked. PMID:26752654

  4. Genesis and growth of extracellular-vesicle-derived microcalcification in atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Goettsch, Claudia; Bertazzo, Sergio; Maldonado, Natalia; Ruiz, Jessica L.; Goh, Wilson; Yabusaki, Katsumi; Faits, Tyler; Bouten, Carlijn; Franck, Gregory; Quillard, Thibaut; Libby, Peter; Aikawa, Masanori; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Aikawa, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Clinical evidence links arterial calcification and cardiovascular risk. Finite-element modelling of the stress distribution within atherosclerotic plaques has suggested that subcellular microcalcifications in the fibrous cap may promote material failure of the plaque, but that large calcifications can stabilize it. Yet the physicochemical mechanisms underlying such mineral formation and growth in atheromata remain unknown. Here, by using three-dimensional collagen hydrogels that mimic structural features of the atherosclerotic fibrous cap, and high-resolution microscopic and spectroscopic analyses of both the hydrogels and of calcified human plaques, we demonstrate that calcific mineral formation and maturation results from a series of events involving the aggregation of calcifying extracellular vesicles, and the formation of microcalcifications and ultimately large calcification areas. We also show that calcification morphology and the plaque’s collagen content--two determinants of atherosclerotic plaque stability--are interlinked.

  5. Genesis and growth of extracellular vesicle-derived microcalcification in atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Goettsch, Claudia; Bertazzo, Sergio; Maldonado, Natalia; Ruiz, Jessica L.; Goh, Wilson; Yabusaki, Katsumi; Faits, Tyler; Bouten, Carlijn; Franck, Gregory; Quillard, Thibaut; Libby, Peter; Aikawa, Masanori; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence links arterial calcification and cardiovascular risk. Finite-element modelling of the stress distribution within atherosclerotic plaques has suggested that subcellular microcalcifications in the fibrous cap may promote material failure of the plaque, but that large calcifications can stabilize it. Yet the physicochemical mechanisms underlying such mineral formation and growth in atheromata remain unknown. Here, by using three-dimensional collagen hydrogels that mimic structural features of the atherosclerotic fibrous cap, and high-resolution microscopic and spectroscopic analyses of both the hydrogels and of calcified human plaques, we demonstrate that calcific mineral formation and maturation results from a series of events involving the aggregation of calcifying extracellular vesicles, and the formation of microcalcifications and ultimately large calcification zones. We also show that calcification morphology and the plaque’s collagen content – two determinants of atherosclerotic plaque stability - are interlinked. PMID:26752654

  6. Lipidome of atherosclerotic plaques from hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bojic, Lazar A; McLaren, David G; Shah, Vinit; Previs, Stephen F; Johns, Douglas G; Castro-Perez, Jose M

    2014-12-15

    The cellular, macromolecular and neutral lipid composition of the atherosclerotic plaque has been extensively characterized. However, a comprehensive lipidomic analysis of the major lipid classes within atherosclerotic lesions has not been reported. The objective of this study was to produce a detailed framework of the lipids that comprise the atherosclerotic lesion of a widely used pre-clinical model of plaque progression. Male New Zealand White rabbits were administered regular chow supplemented with 0.5% cholesterol (HC) for 12 weeks to induce hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Our lipidomic analyses of plaques isolated from rabbits fed the HC diet, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry, detected most of the major lipid classes including: Cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, diacylglycerols, fatty acids, phosphatidylserines, lysophosphatidylcholines, ceramides, phosphatidylglycerols, phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylethanolamines. Given that cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines comprise greater than 75% of total plasma lipids, we directed particular attention towards the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the fatty acid composition of these lipids. We additionally found that sphingomyelins were relatively abundant lipid class within lesions, and compared the abundance of sphingomyelins to their precursor phosphatidylcholines. The studies presented here are the first approach to a comprehensive characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque lipidome.

  7. Lipidome of Atherosclerotic Plaques from Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Bojic, Lazar A.; McLaren, David G.; Shah, Vinit; Previs, Stephen F.; Johns, Douglas G.; Castro-Perez, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular, macromolecular and neutral lipid composition of the atherosclerotic plaque has been extensively characterized. However, a comprehensive lipidomic analysis of the major lipid classes within atherosclerotic lesions has not been reported. The objective of this study was to produce a detailed framework of the lipids that comprise the atherosclerotic lesion of a widely used pre-clinical model of plaque progression. Male New Zealand White rabbits were administered regular chow supplemented with 0.5% cholesterol (HC) for 12 weeks to induce hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Our lipidomic analyses of plaques isolated from rabbits fed the HC diet, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry, detected most of the major lipid classes including: Cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, diacylglycerols, fatty acids, phosphatidylserines, lysophosphatidylcholines, ceramides, phosphatidylglycerols, phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylethanolamines. Given that cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines comprise greater than 75% of total plasma lipids, we directed particular attention towards the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the fatty acid composition of these lipids. We additionally found that sphingomyelins were relatively abundant lipid class within lesions, and compared the abundance of sphingomyelins to their precursor phosphatidylcholines. The studies presented here are the first approach to a comprehensive characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque lipidome. PMID:25517033

  8. A Cryptochrome 2 mutation yields advanced sleep phase in humans.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Arisa; Shi, Guangsen; Jones, Christopher R; Lipzen, Anna; Pennacchio, Len A; Xu, Ying; Hallows, William C; McMahon, Thomas; Yamazaki, Maya; Ptáček, Louis J; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Familial Advanced Sleep Phase (FASP) is a heritable human sleep phenotype characterized by very early sleep and wake times. We identified a missense mutation in the human Cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) gene that co-segregates with FASP in one family. The mutation leads to replacement of an alanine residue at position 260 with a threonine (A260T). In mice, the CRY2 mutation causes a shortened circadian period and reduced phase-shift to early-night light pulse associated with phase-advanced behavioral rhythms in the light-dark cycle. The A260T mutation is located in the phosphate loop of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding domain of CRY2. The mutation alters the conformation of CRY2, increasing its accessibility and affinity for FBXL3 (an E3 ubiquitin ligase), thus promoting its degradation. These results demonstrate that CRY2 stability controlled by FBXL3 plays a key role in the regulation of human sleep wake behavior. PMID:27529127

  9. Advances in culture and manipulation of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, X; Villa-Diaz, L G; Krebsbach, P H

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cell biology and emerging technologies to reprogram somatic cells to a stem cell-like state are helping bring stem cell therapies for a range of human disorders closer to clinical reality. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have become a promising resource for regenerative medicine and research into early development because these cells are able to self-renew indefinitely and are capable of differentiation into specialized cell types of all 3 germ layers and trophoectoderm. Human PSCs include embryonic stem cells (hESCs) derived from the inner cell mass of blastocyst-stage embryos and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) generated via the reprogramming of somatic cells by the overexpression of key transcription factors. The application of hiPSCs and the finding that somatic cells can be directly reprogrammed into different cell types will likely have a significant impact on regenerative medicine. However, a major limitation for successful therapeutic application of hPSCs and their derivatives is the potential xenogeneic contamination and instability of current culture conditions. This review summarizes recent advances in hPSC culture and methods to induce controlled lineage differentiation through regulation of cell-signaling pathways and manipulation of gene expression as well as new trends in direct reprogramming of somatic cells.

  10. Recent advances in research on climate and human conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiang, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    A rapidly growing body of empirical, quantitative research examines whether rates of human conflict can be systematically altered by climatic changes. We discuss recent advances in this field, including Bayesian meta-analyses of the effect of temperature and rainfall on current and future large-scale conflicts, the impact of climate variables on gang violence and suicides in Mexico, and probabilistic projections of personal violence and property crime in the United States under RCP scenarios. Criticisms of this research field will also be explained and addressed.

  11. NASA's Advanced Life Support Systems Human-Rated Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, D. L.; Tri, T. O.; Packham, N. J.

    1996-01-01

    Future NASA missions to explore the solar system will be long-duration missions, requiring human life support systems which must operate with very high reliability over long periods of time. Such systems must be highly regenerative, requiring minimum resupply, to enable the crews to be largely self-sufficient. These regenerative life support systems will use a combination of higher plants, microorganisms, and physicochemical processes to recycle air and water, produce food, and process wastes. A key step in the development of these systems is establishment of a human-rated test facility specifically tailored to evaluation of closed, regenerative life supports systems--one in which long-duration, large-scale testing involving human test crews can be performed. Construction of such a facility, the Advanced Life Support Program's (ALS) Human-Rated Test Facility (HRTF), has begun at NASA's Johnson Space Center, and definition of systems and development of initial outfitting concepts for the facility are underway. This paper will provide an overview of the HRTF project plan, an explanation of baseline configurations, and descriptive illustrations of facility outfitting concepts.

  12. NASA's Advanced Life Support Systems Human-Rated Test Facility.

    PubMed

    Henninger, D L; Tri, T O; Packham, N J

    1996-01-01

    Future NASA missions to explore the solar system will be long-duration missions, requiring human life support systems which must operate with very high reliability over long periods of time. Such systems must be highly regenerative, requiring minimum resupply, to enable the crews to be largely self-sufficient. These regenerative life support systems will use a combination of higher plants, microorganisms, and physicochemical processes to recycle air and water, produce food, and process wastes. A key step in the development of these systems is establishment of a human-rated test facility specifically tailored to evaluation of closed, regenerative life supports systems--one in which long-duration, large-scale testing involving human test crews can be performed. Construction of such a facility, the Advanced Life Support Program's (ALS) Human-Rated Test Facility (HRTF), has begun at NASA's Johnson Space Center, and definition of systems and development of initial outfitting concepts for the facility are underway. This paper will provide an overview of the HRTF project plan, an explanation of baseline configurations, and descriptive illustrations of facility outfitting concepts.

  13. Bacterial Communities Associated with Atherosclerotic Plaques from Russian Individuals with Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ziganshina, Elvira E.; Sharifullina, Dilyara M.; Lozhkin, Andrey P.; Khayrullin, Rustem N.; Ignatyev, Igor M.; Ziganshin, Ayrat M.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is considered a chronic disease of the arterial wall and is the major cause of severe disease and death among individuals all over the world. Some recent studies have established the presence of bacteria in atherosclerotic plaque samples and suggested their possible contribution to the development of cardiovascular disease. The main objective of this preliminary pilot study was to better understand the bacterial diversity and abundance in human atherosclerotic plaques derived from common carotid arteries of individuals with atherosclerosis (Russian nationwide group) and contribute towards the further identification of a main group of atherosclerotic plaque bacteria by 454 pyrosequencing their 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes. The applied approach enabled the detection of bacterial DNA in all atherosclerotic plaques. We found that distinct members of the order Burkholderiales were present at high levels in all atherosclerotic plaques obtained from patients with atherosclerosis with the genus Curvibacter being predominant in all plaque samples. Moreover, unclassified Burkholderiales as well as members of the genera Propionibacterium and Ralstonia were typically the most significant taxa for all atherosclerotic plaques. Other genera such as Burkholderia, Corynebacterium and Sediminibacterium as well as unclassified Comamonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae and Burkholderiaceae were always found but at low relative abundances of the total 16S rRNA gene population derived from all samples. Also, we found that some bacteria found in plaque samples correlated with some clinical parameters, including total cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase and fibrinogen levels. Finally, our study indicates that some bacterial agents at least partially may be involved in affecting the development of cardiovascular disease through different mechanisms. PMID:27736997

  14. Does human cognition allow Human Factors (HF) certification of advanced aircrew systems?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, Iain S.; Taylor, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper has examined the requirements of HF specification and certification within advanced or complex aircrew systems. It suggests reasons for current inadequacies in the use of HF in the design process, giving some examples in support, and suggesting an avenue towards the improvement of the HF certification process. The importance of human cognition to the operation and performance of advanced aircrew systems has been stressed. Many of the shortfalls of advanced aircrew systems must be attributed to over automated designs that show little consideration on either the mental limits or the cognitive capabilities of the human system component. Traditional approaches to system design and HF certification are set within an over physicalistic foundation. Also, traditionally it was assumed that physicalistic system functions could be attributed to either the human or the machine on a one to one basis. Moreover, any problems associated with the parallel needs, or promoting human understanding alongside system operation and direction, were generally equated in reality by the natural flexibility and adaptability of human skills. The consideration of the human component of a complex system is seen as being primarily based on manifestations of human behavior to the almost total exclusion of any appreciation of unobservable human mental and cognitive processes. The argument of this paper is that the considered functionality of any complex human-machine system must contain functions that are purely human and purely cognitive. Human-machine system reliability ultimately depends on human reliability and dependability and, therefore, on the form and frequency of cognitive processes that have to be conducted to support system performance. The greater the demand placed by an advanced aircraft system on the human component's basic knowledge processes or cognition, rather than on skill, the more insiduous the effects the human may have on that system. This paper discusses one

  15. The contemporary management of intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xinyi; Wong, Ka Sing; Leung, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is the most common cause of cerebral vasculopathy and an important stroke etiology worldwide, with a higher prevalence in Asian, Hispanic and African ethnicities. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease portends a recurrent stroke risk as high as 18% at one year. The key to secondary prevention is an understanding of the underlying stroke mechanism and aggressive control of conventional cardiovascular risks. Contemporary treatment includes antiplatelet therapy, optimal glycemic and blood pressure control, statin therapy and lifestyle modifications. For patients with high-grade (70-99%) symptomatic steno-occlusion, short-term dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel followed by life-long single antiplatelet therapy may reduce the recurrent risk. Current evidence does not advocate percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting as an initial treatment. External counterpulsation, encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis and remote limb ischemic preconditioning are treatments under investigation. Future studies should aim at predicting patients prone to recurrence despite of medical therapies and testing the efficacy of emerging therapies.

  16. Consciousness in humans and non-human animals: recent advances and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Boly, Melanie; Seth, Anil K.; Wilke, Melanie; Ingmundson, Paul; Baars, Bernard; Laureys, Steven; Edelman, David B.; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2013-01-01

    This joint article reflects the authors' personal views regarding noteworthy advances in the neuroscience of consciousness in the last 10 years, and suggests what we feel may be promising future directions. It is based on a small conference at the Samoset Resort in Rockport, Maine, USA, in July of 2012, organized by the Mind Science Foundation of San Antonio, Texas. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of subjectivity in humans and other animals, including empirical, applied, technical, and conceptual insights. These include the evidence for the importance of fronto-parietal connectivity and of “top-down” processes, both of which enable information to travel across distant cortical areas effectively, as well as numerous dissociations between consciousness and cognitive functions, such as attention, in humans. In addition, we describe the development of mental imagery paradigms, which made it possible to identify covert awareness in non-responsive subjects. Non-human animal consciousness research has also witnessed substantial advances on the specific role of cortical areas and higher order thalamus for consciousness, thanks to important technological enhancements. In addition, much progress has been made in the understanding of non-vertebrate cognition relevant to possible conscious states. Finally, major advances have been made in theories of consciousness, and also in their comparison with the available evidence. Along with reviewing these findings, each author suggests future avenues for research in their field of investigation. PMID:24198791

  17. Potential beneficial effects of ixmyelocel-T in the treatment of atherosclerotic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Advanced atherosclerotic lesions are characterized by lipid accumulation, inflammation, and defective efferocytosis. An ideal therapy should address all aspects of this multifactorial disease. Ixmyelocel-T therapy, an expanded autologous multicellular therapy showing clinical promise in the treatment of diseases associated with advanced atherosclerosis, includes a novel population of M2-like macrophages. Here, we examine the macrophages of ixmyelocel-T and determine their ability to influx modified cholesterol in an atheroprotective manner, maintaining cholesterol homeostasis and preventing cellular dysfunction and death, ultimately promoting reverse cholesterol efflux. Methods Approximately 50 ml of whole bone marrow was obtained from healthy donors and shipped overnight. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) were produced by using density gradient separation and cultured for approximately 12 days to generate ixmyelocel-T. CD14+ cells were isolated from ixmyelocel-T via positive selection for analysis. Ixmyelocel-T and human leukemia monocyte (THP-1) cells were loaded with acetylated low-density lipoprotein (Ac-LDL) for analysis. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence were used to examine Ac-LDL uptake, expression of cytokines was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunofluorescence assay (ELISA), and quantitative real-time PCR was used to analyze expression of cholesterol-transport genes. Both the in vitro cholesterol efflux assay and in vivo reverse cholesterol transport assay were used to examine cholesterol transport. Results Ixmyelocel-T macrophages take up acetylated low-density lipoprotein and express the scavenger receptors CD36 and scavenger receptor-B1 (SR-B1). Ixmyelocel-T did not become apoptotic or proinflammatory after lipid loading. The cholesterol transporter genes ABAC1 and ABCG1 were both statistically significantly upregulated when ixmyelocel-T macrophages were loaded with cholesterol. Ixmyelocel-T also exhibited enhanced apolipoprotein A

  18. Developing Advanced Human Support Technologies for Planetary Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdich, Debra P.; Campbell, Paul D.; Jernigan, J. Mark

    2004-01-01

    The United States Vision for Space Exploration calls for sending robots and humans to explore the Earth's moon, the planet Mars, and beyond. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing a set of design reference missions that will provide further detail to these plans. Lunar missions are expected to provide a stepping stone, through operational research and evaluation, in developing the knowledge base necessary to send crews on long duration missions to Mars and other distant destinations. The NASA Exploration Systems Directorate (ExSD), in its program of bioastronautics research, manages the development of technologies that maintain human life, health, and performance in space. Using a system engineering process and risk management methods, ExSD's Human Support Systems (HSS) Program selects and performs research and technology development in several critical areas and transfers the results of its efforts to NASA exploration mission/systems development programs in the form of developed technologies and new knowledge about the capabilities and constraints of systems required to support human existence beyond Low Earth Orbit. HSS efforts include the areas of advanced environmental monitoring and control, extravehicular activity, food technologies, life support systems, space human factors engineering, and systems integration of all these elements. The HSS Program provides a structured set of deliverable products to meet the needs of exploration programs. These products reduce the gaps that exist in our knowledge of and capabilities for human support for long duration, remote space missions. They also reduce the performance gap between the efficiency of current space systems and the greater efficiency that must be achieved to make human planetary exploration missions economically and logistically feasible. In conducting this research and technology development program, it is necessary for HSS technologists and program managers to develop a

  19. Human umbilical cord blood cells and diabetes mellitus: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Alluru S; Kothari, Neil; Kuppasani, Kishore; Ende, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy for patients with diabetes is an area of great interest to both scientists and clinicians. Human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs) are being increasingly used as a source of stem cells for cell-based therapy for diabetes because these cells can differentiate into pancreatic islet β-cells. Administration of HUCBCs has been shown to lower blood glucose levels in diabetic animal models. The use of autologous HUCBC transfusion in type 1 diabetic children has not shown any benefit. However, "Stem Cell Educator" therapy has shown promise in long term lowering of blood glucose levels in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. In this review, we will briefly discuss recent advances in HUCBC therapy in the treatment of diabetes and some of its complications.

  20. Advanced Plasma Propulsion for Human Missions to Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Benjamin B.; Pearson, J. Boise

    1999-01-01

    This paper will briefly identify a promising fusion plasma power source, which when coupled with a promising electric thruster technology would provide for an efficient interplanetary transfer craft suitable to a 4 year round trip mission to the Jovian system. An advanced, nearly radiation free Inertial Electrostatic Confinement scheme for containing fusion plasma was judged as offering potential for delivering the performance and operational benefits needed for such high energy human expedition missions, without requiring heavy superconducting magnets for containment of the fusion plasma. Once the Jovian transfer stage has matched the heliocentric velocity of Jupiter, the energy requirements for excursions to its outer satellites (Callisto, Ganymede and Europa) by smaller excursion craft are not prohibitive. The overall propulsion, power and thruster system is briefly described and a preliminary vehicle mass statement is presented.

  1. Zebrafish Models of Human Leukemia: Technological Advances and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Nicholas R; Laroche, Fabrice J F; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Feng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Insights concerning leukemic pathophysiology have been acquired in various animal models and further efforts to understand the mechanisms underlying leukemic treatment resistance and disease relapse promise to improve therapeutic strategies. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a vertebrate organism with a conserved hematopoietic program and unique experimental strengths suiting it for the investigation of human leukemia. Recent technological advances in zebrafish research including efficient transgenesis, precise genome editing, and straightforward transplantation techniques have led to the generation of a number of leukemia models. The transparency of the zebrafish when coupled with improved lineage-tracing and imaging techniques has revealed exquisite details of leukemic initiation, progression, and regression. With these advantages, the zebrafish represents a unique experimental system for leukemic research and additionally, advances in zebrafish-based high-throughput drug screening promise to hasten the discovery of novel leukemia therapeutics. To date, investigators have accumulated knowledge of the genetic underpinnings critical to leukemic transformation and treatment resistance and without doubt, zebrafish are rapidly expanding our understanding of disease mechanisms and helping to shape therapeutic strategies for improved outcomes in leukemic patients.

  2. Zebrafish Models of Human Leukemia: Technological Advances and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Nicholas R.; Laroche, Fabrice J.F.; Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Insights concerning leukemic pathophysiology have been acquired in various animal models and further efforts to understand the mechanisms underlying leukemic treatment resistance and disease relapse promise to improve therapeutic strategies. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a vertebrate organism with a conserved hematopoietic program and unique experimental strengths suiting it for the investigation of human leukemia. Recent technological advances in zebrafish research including efficient transgenesis, precise genome editing, and straightforward transplantation techniques have led to the generation of a number of leukemia models. The transparency of the zebrafish when coupled with improved lineage-tracing and imaging techniques has revealed exquisite details of leukemic initiation, progression, and regression. With these advantages, the zebrafish represents a unique experimental system for leukemic research and additionally, advances in zebrafish-based high-throughput drug screening promise to hasten the discovery of novel leukemia therapeutics. To date, investigators have accumulated knowledge of the genetic underpinnings critical to leukemic transformation and treatment resistance and without doubt, zebrafish are rapidly expanding our understanding of disease mechanisms and helping to shape therapeutic strategies for improved outcomes in leukemic patients. PMID:27165361

  3. Zebrafish Models of Human Leukemia: Technological Advances and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Nicholas R; Laroche, Fabrice J F; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Feng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Insights concerning leukemic pathophysiology have been acquired in various animal models and further efforts to understand the mechanisms underlying leukemic treatment resistance and disease relapse promise to improve therapeutic strategies. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a vertebrate organism with a conserved hematopoietic program and unique experimental strengths suiting it for the investigation of human leukemia. Recent technological advances in zebrafish research including efficient transgenesis, precise genome editing, and straightforward transplantation techniques have led to the generation of a number of leukemia models. The transparency of the zebrafish when coupled with improved lineage-tracing and imaging techniques has revealed exquisite details of leukemic initiation, progression, and regression. With these advantages, the zebrafish represents a unique experimental system for leukemic research and additionally, advances in zebrafish-based high-throughput drug screening promise to hasten the discovery of novel leukemia therapeutics. To date, investigators have accumulated knowledge of the genetic underpinnings critical to leukemic transformation and treatment resistance and without doubt, zebrafish are rapidly expanding our understanding of disease mechanisms and helping to shape therapeutic strategies for improved outcomes in leukemic patients. PMID:27165361

  4. Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banker, Brian F.; Robinson, Travis

    2016-01-01

    The proposed paper will cover ongoing effort named HESTIA (Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement), led at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) to promote a cross-subsystem approach to developing Mars-enabling technologies with the ultimate goal of integrated system optimization. HESTIA also aims to develop the infrastructure required to rapidly test these highly integrated systems at a low cost. The initial focus is on the common fluids architecture required to enable human exploration of mars, specifically between life support and in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) subsystems. An overview of the advancements in both integrated technologies, in infrastructure, in simulation, and in modeling capabilities will be presented, as well as the results and findings of integrated testing,. Due to the enormous mass gear-ratio required for human exploration beyond low-earth orbit, (for every 1 kg of payload landed on Mars, 226 kg will be required on Earth), minimization of surface hardware and commodities is paramount. Hardware requirements can be minimized by reduction of equipment performing similar functions though for different subsystems. If hardware could be developed which meets the requirements of both life support and ISRU it could result in the reduction of primary hardware and/or reduction in spares. Minimization of commodities to the surface of mars can be achieved through the creation of higher efficiency systems producing little to no undesired waste, such as a closed-loop life support subsystem. Where complete efficiency is impossible or impractical, makeup commodities could be manufactured via ISRU. Although, utilization of ISRU products (oxygen and water) for crew consumption holds great promise of reducing demands on life support hardware, there exist concerns as to the purity and transportation of commodities. To date, ISRU has been focused on production rates and purities for

  5. Stress and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    Recent major advances in medical science have introduced a wide variety of treatments against atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular diseases, which has led to a significant reduction in mortality associated with these diseases. However, atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death. Furthermore, progress in medical science has demonstrated the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease to be complicated, with a wide variety of underlying factors. Among these factors, stress is thought to be pivotal. Several types of stress are involved in the development of cardiovascular disease, including oxidative stress, mental stress, hemodynamic stress and social stress. Accumulating evidence indicates that traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, including diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and smoking, induce oxidative stress in the vasculature. Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction, atherogenesis, hypertension and remodeling of blood vessels. Meanwhile, mental stress is a well-known major contributor to the development of cardiovascular disease. The cardiovascular system is constantly exposed to hemodynamic stress by the blood flow and/or pulsation, and hemodynamic stress exerts profound effects on the biology of vascular cells and cardiomyocytes. In addition, social stress, such as that due to a lack of social support, poverty or living alone, has a negative impact on the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, there are interactions between mental, oxidative and hemodynamic stress. The production of reactive oxygen species is increased under high levels of mental stress in close association with oxidative stress. These stress responses and their interactions play central roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, the pathophysiological and clinical implications of stress are discussed in this article.

  6. Photon counting spectral CT component analysis of coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque samples

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, P; Thran, A; Roessl, E; Martens, G; Sigovan, M; Douek, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the capabilities of photon counting spectral CT to differentiate components of coronary atherosclerotic plaque based on differences in spectral attenuation and iodine-based contrast agent concentration. Methods: 10 calcified and 13 lipid-rich non-calcified histologically demonstrated atheromatous plaques from post-mortem human coronary arteries were scanned with a photon counting spectral CT scanner. Individual photons were counted and classified in one of six energy bins from 25 to 70 keV. Based on a maximum likelihood approach, maps of photoelectric absorption (PA), Compton scattering (CS) and iodine concentration (IC) were reconstructed. Intensity measurements were performed on each map in the vessel wall, the surrounding perivascular fat and the lipid-rich and the calcified plaques. PA and CS values are expressed relative to pure water values. A comparison between these different elements was performed using Kruskal–Wallis tests with pairwise post hoc Mann–Whitney U-tests and Sidak p-value adjustments. Results: Results for vessel wall, surrounding perivascular fat and lipid-rich and calcified plaques were, respectively, 1.19 ± 0.09, 0.73 ± 0.05, 1.08 ± 0.14 and 17.79 ± 6.70 for PA; 0.96 ± 0.02, 0.83 ± 0.02, 0.91 ± 0.03 and 2.53 ± 0.63 for CS; and 83.3 ± 10.1, 37.6 ± 8.1, 55.2 ± 14.0 and 4.9 ± 20.0 mmol l−1 for IC, with a significant difference between all tissues for PA, CS and IC (p < 0.012). Conclusion: This study demonstrates the capability of energy-sensitive photon counting spectral CT to differentiate between calcifications and iodine-infused regions of human coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque samples by analysing differences in spectral attenuation and iodine-based contrast agent concentration. Advances in knowledge: Photon counting spectral CT is a promising technique to identify plaque components by analysing differences in iodine-based contrast agent

  7. Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products in human dentine.

    PubMed

    Miura, Jiro; Nishikawa, Kantaro; Kubo, Mizuho; Fukushima, Shuichiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Takeshige, Fumio; Araki, Tsutomu

    2014-02-01

    Cross-linking of collagen by Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) occurs by non-enzymatic glycation (Maillard reaction). The purpose of this study was to examine whether AGEs are formed in human dentinal collagen, and to consider any possible influence of AGEs on dentinal physiology. Mechanical characteristics, fluorescence spectra and immunohistochemical analyses of demineralized dentine sections from young subjects were compared with those of aged ones. The same investigations were performed with young dentine artificially glycated by incubation in 0.1M ribose solution. Indentation measurement indicated that the sections from aged dentine were mechanically harder than those from young dentine. The hardness of young dentine increased after incubation in ribose solution. Fluorescence peak wavelength of the young dentine was shorter than that of the aged one, but shifted towards the peak wavelength of the aged one after incubation in ribose solution. These changes were considered to be due to accumulation of AGEs. Existence of AGEs in dentinal collagen was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. The obtained results suggest that AGEs accumulation occurs in dentinal collagen and is affected by both human age and physiological conditions such as glucose level in blood because dentinal collagen receives nourishment via dental pulp and tubules. PMID:24370182

  8. An imbalance between specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators and pro-inflammatory leukotrienes promotes instability of atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Fredman, Gabrielle; Hellmann, Jason; Proto, Jonathan D.; Kuriakose, George; Colas, Romain A.; Dorweiler, Bernhard; Connolly, E. Sander; Solomon, Robert; Jones, David M.; Heyer, Eric J.; Spite, Matthew; Tabas, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Chronic unresolved inflammation plays a causal role in the development of advanced atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms that prevent resolution in atherosclerosis remain unclear. Here, we use targeted mass spectrometry to identify specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPM) in histologically-defined stable and vulnerable regions of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques. The levels of SPMs, particularly resolvin D1 (RvD1), and the ratio of SPMs to pro-inflammatory leukotriene B4 (LTB4), are significantly decreased in the vulnerable regions. SPMs are also decreased in advanced plaques of fat-fed Ldlr−/− mice. Administration of RvD1 to these mice during plaque progression restores the RvD1:LTB4 ratio to that of less advanced lesions and promotes plaque stability, including decreased lesional oxidative stress and necrosis, improved lesional efferocytosis, and thicker fibrous caps. These findings provide molecular support for the concept that defective inflammation resolution contributes to the formation of clinically dangerous plaques and offer a mechanistic rationale for SPM therapy to promote plaque stability. PMID:27659679

  9. Dual-modality fiber-based OCT-TPL imaging system for simultaneous microstructural and molecular analysis of atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianyi; McElroy, Austin; Halaney, David; Vela, Deborah; Fung, Edmund; Hossain, Shafat; Phipps, Jennifer; Wang, Bingqing; Yin, Biwei; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    New optical imaging techniques that provide contrast to study both the anatomy and composition of atherosclerotic plaques can be utilized to better understand the formation, progression and clinical complications of human coronary artery disease. We present a dual-modality fiber-based optical imaging system for simultaneous microstructural and molecular analysis of atherosclerotic plaques that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging. Experimental results from ex vivo human coronary arteries show that OCT and TPL optical contrast in recorded OCT-TPL images is complimentary and in agreement with histological analysis. Molecular composition (e.g., lipid and oxidized-LDL) detected by TPL imaging can be overlaid onto plaque microstructure depicted by OCT, providing new opportunities for atherosclerotic plaque identification and characterization. PMID:26137371

  10. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) remains a major cause of secondary hypertension and renal failure. Randomized, prospective trials show that medical treatment should constitute the main therapeutic approach in ARAS. Regardless of intensive treatment and adequate blood pressure control, however, renal and extra-renal complications are not uncommon. Yet, the precise mechanisms, accurate detection, and optimal treatment in ARAS remain elusive. Strategies oriented to early detection and targeting these pathogenic pathways might prevent development of clinical endpoints. Here, we review the results of recent clinical trials, current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, novel imaging techniques to assess renal damage in ARAS, and treatment options. PMID:25908472

  11. Anti-atherosclerotic therapy based on botanicals.

    PubMed

    Orekhov, Alexander N; Sobenin, Igor A; Korneev, Nikolay V; Kirichenko, Tatyana V; Myasoedova, Veronika A; Melnichenko, Alexandra A; Balcells, Mercedes; Edelman, Elazer R; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2013-04-01

    Natural products including botanicals for both therapy of clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis and reduction of atherosclerosis risk factors are topics of recent patents. Only a few recent patents are relevant to the direct antiatherosclerotic therapy leading to regression of atherosclerotic lesions. Earlier, using a cellular model we have developed and patented several anti-atherosclerotic drugs. The AMAR (Atherosclerosis Monitoring and Atherogenicity Reduction) study was designed to estimate the effect of two-year treatment with time-released garlic-based drug Allicor on the progression of carotid atherosclerosis in 196 asymptomatic men aged 40-74 in double-blinded placebo-controlled randomized clinical study. The primary outcome was the rate of atherosclerosis progression, measured by high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography as the increase in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) of the far wall of common carotid arteries. The mean rate of IMT changes in Allicor-treated group (-0.022±0.007 mm per year) was significantly different (P = 0.002) from the placebo group in which there was a moderate progression of 0.015±0.008 mm at the overall mean baseline IMT of 0.931±0.009 mm. A significant correlation was found between the changes in blood serum atherogenicity (the ability of serum to induce cholesterol accumulation in cultured cells) during the study and the changes in intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries (r = 0.144, P = 0.045). Thus, the results of AMAR study demonstrate that long-term treatment with Allicor has a direct anti-atherosclerotic effect on carotid atherosclerosis and this effect is likely to be due to serum atherogenicity inhibition. The beneficial effects of other botanicals including Inflaminat (calendula, elder and violet), phytoestrogen- rich Karinat (garlic powder, extract of grape seeds, green tea leafs, hop cones, β-carotene, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid) on atherosclerosis have also been revealed in clinical studies

  12. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: current status.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Lerman, Lilach O

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) remains a major cause of secondary hypertension and kidney failure. Randomized prospective trials show that medical treatment should constitute the main therapeutic approach in ARAS. Regardless of intensive treatment and adequate blood pressure control, however, renal and extrarenal complications are not uncommon. Yet, the precise mechanisms, accurate detection, and optimal treatment in ARAS remain elusive. Strategies oriented to early detection and targeting these pathogenic pathways might prevent development of clinical end points. Here, we review the results of recent clinical trials, current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, novel imaging techniques to assess kidney damage in ARAS, and treatment options. PMID:25908472

  13. Interleukin 10-coated nanoparticle systems compared for molecular imaging of atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Almer, Gunter; Summers, Kelli L; Scheicher, Bernhard; Kellner, Josef; Stelzer, Ingeborg; Leitinger, Gerd; Gries, Anna; Prassl, Ruth; Zimmer, Andreas; Mangge, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is one of the leading causes of mortality in high-income countries. Early diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions is one of the biggest challenges currently facing cardiovascular medicine. The present study focuses on developing targeted nanoparticles (NPs) in order to improve the detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic-plaques. Various biomarkers involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic-plaques have been identified and one of these promising candidates for diagnostic targeting is interleukin 10 (IL10). IL10 has been shown to be a key anti-inflammatory responding cytokine in the early stages of atherogenesis, and has already been used for therapeutic interventions in humans and mice. IL10, the targeting sequence, was coupled to two different types of NPs: protamine-oligonucleotide NPs (proticles) and sterically stabilized liposomes in order to address the question of whether the recognition and detection of atherosclerotic-lesions is primarily determined by the targeting sequence itself, or whether it depends on the NP carrier system to which the biomarker is coupled. Each IL10-targeted NP was assessed based on its sensitivity and selectivity toward characterizing atherosclerotic-plaque lesions using an apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse as the model of atherosclerosis. Aortas from apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed a high fat diet, were stained with either fluorescence-labeled IL10 or IL10-coupled NPs. Ex vivo imaging was performed using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. We found that IL10-targeted proticles generated a stronger signal by accumulating at the surface of atherosclerotic-plaques, while IL10-targeted, sterically stabilized liposomes showed a staining pattern deeper in the plaque compared to the fluorescence-labeled IL10 alone. Our results point to a promising route for enhanced in vivo imaging using IL10-targeted NPs. NPs allow a higher payload of signal emitting molecules to be delivered to the atherosclerotic

  14. Antibody-Labeled Liposomes for CT Imaging of Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Danila, Delia; Partha, Ranga; Elrod, Don B.; Lackey, Melinda; Casscells, S. Ward; Conyers, Jodie L.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the specific binding of anti-intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) conjugated liposomes (immunoliposomes, or ILs) to activated human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) with the purpose of designing a computed tomographic imaging agent for early detection of atherosclerotic plaques. Covalent attachment of anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibodies to pre-formed liposomes stabilized with polyethylene glycol yielded ILs, with a coupling efficiency of the ICAM-1 to the liposomes of 10% to 24%. The anti-ICAM-1–labeled ILs had an average diameter of 136 nm as determined by dynamic light-scattering and cryogenic electron microscopy. The ILs' encapsulation of 5-[N-acetyl-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-amino)-N, N′-bis(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-2,4,6-triiodo-benzene-1,3-dicarboxamide (iohexol) was determined to be 18% to 19% by a dialysis technique coupled with ultraviolet detection of free iohexol. This encapsulation corresponded to 30 to 38 mg iodine per mL IL solution, and the ILs exhibited 91% to 98.5% iohexol retention at room temperature and under physiologic conditions. The specific binding of the ILs to cultured, activated HCAEC was measured using flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and fluorescence microscopy. The immunosorbent assays demonstrated the specificity of binding of anti-ICAM-1 to ICAM-1 compared with control studies using nonspecific immunoglobulin G-labeled ILs. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy experiments demonstrated the expression of ICAM-1 on the surface of activated HCAEC. Therefore, our iohexol-filled ILs demonstrated potential for implementation in computed tomographic angiography to noninvasively detect atherosclerotic plaques that are prone to rupture. PMID:19876414

  15. Thermal compression and molding of atherosclerotic vascular tissue with use of radiofrequency energy: implications for radiofrequency balloon angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, B I; Becker, G J; Waller, B F; Barry, K J; Connolly, R J; Kaplan, J; Shapiro, A R; Nardella, P C

    1989-04-01

    The combined delivery of pressure and thermal energy may effectively remodel intraluminal atherosclerotic plaque and fuse intimal tears. To test these hypotheses with use of a non-laser thermal energy source, radiofrequency energy was delivered to postmortem human atherosclerotic vessels from a metal "hot-tip" catheter, block-mounted bipolar electrodes and from a prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter. Sixty-two radiofrequency doses delivered from a metal electrode tip produced dose-dependent ablation of atherosclerotic plaque, ranging from clean and shallow craters with histologic evidence of thermal compression at doses less than 40 J to tissue charring and vaporization at higher (greater than 80 J) doses. Lesion dimensions ranged between 3.14 and 3.79 mm in diameter and 0.20 and 0.47 mm in depth. Tissue perforation was not observed. To test the potential for radiofrequency fusion of intimal tears, 5 atm of pressure and 200 J radiofrequency energy were delivered from block-mounted bipolar electrodes to 48 segments of human atherosclerotic aorta, which had been manually separated into intima-media and media-adventitial layers. Significantly stronger tissue fusion resulted (28.5 +/- 3.3 g) with radiofrequency compared with that with pressure alone (4.8 +/- 0.26 g; p less than 0.0001). A prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter was used to deliver 3 atm of balloon pressure with or without 200 J radiofrequency energy to 20 postmortem human atherosclerotic arterial segments. In 10 of 10 radiofrequency-treated vessels, thermal "molding" of both normal and atherosclerotic vessel wall segments resulted with increased luminal diameter and histologic evidence of medial myocyte damage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Thermal compression and molding of atherosclerotic vascular tissue with use of radiofrequency energy: implications for radiofrequency balloon angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.I.; Becker, G.J.; Waller, B.F.; Barry, K.J.; Connolly, R.J.; Kaplan, J.; Shapiro, A.R.; Nardella, P.C.

    1989-04-01

    The combined delivery of pressure and thermal energy may effectively remodel intraluminal atherosclerotic plaque and fuse intimal tears. To test these hypotheses with use of a non-laser thermal energy source, radiofrequency energy was delivered to postmortem human atherosclerotic vessels from a metal hot-tip catheter, block-mounted bipolar electrodes and from a prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter. Sixty-two radiofrequency doses delivered from a metal electrode tip produced dose-dependent ablation of atherosclerotic plaque, ranging from clean and shallow craters with histologic evidence of thermal compression at doses less than 40 J to tissue charring and vaporization at higher (greater than 80 J) doses. Lesion dimensions ranged between 3.14 and 3.79 mm in diameter and 0.20 and 0.47 mm in depth. Tissue perforation was not observed. To test the potential for radiofrequency fusion of intimal tears, 5 atm of pressure and 200 J radiofrequency energy were delivered from block-mounted bipolar electrodes to 48 segments of human atherosclerotic aorta, which had been manually separated into intima-media and media-adventitial layers. Significantly stronger tissue fusion resulted (28.5 +/- 3.3 g) with radiofrequency compared with that with pressure alone (4.8 +/- 0.26 g; p less than 0.0001). A prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter was used to deliver 3 atm of balloon pressure with or without 200 J radiofrequency energy to 20 postmortem human atherosclerotic arterial segments. In 10 of 10 radiofrequency-treated vessels, thermal molding of both normal and atherosclerotic vessel wall segments resulted with increased luminal diameter and histologic evidence of medial myocyte damage.

  17. Technical Advancement and Human Progress and The Problems of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bixby, Louis W.

    1980-01-01

    Projects and discusses possible future developments resulting from electrochemical technological advancements. Educational implications are explored, and examples of integrated learning in diverse interest areas are given. (CS)

  18. Dengue human infection models to advance dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christian P; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P

    2015-12-10

    Dengue viruses (DENV) currently infect approximately 400 million people each year causing millions to seek care and overwhelming the health care infrastructure in endemic areas. Vaccines to prevent dengue and therapeutics to treat dengue are not currently available. The efficacy of the most advanced candidate vaccine against symptomatic dengue in general and DENV-2 in particular was much lower than expected, despite the ability of the vaccine to induce neutralizing antibody against all four DENV serotypes. Because seroconversion to the DENV serotypes following vaccination was thought to be indicative of induced protection, these results have made it more difficult to assess which candidate vaccines should or should not be evaluated in large studies in endemic areas. A dengue human infection model (DHIM) could be extremely valuable to down-select candidate vaccines or therapeutics prior to engaging in efficacy trials in endemic areas. Two DHIM have been developed to assess the efficacy of live attenuated tetravalent (LATV) dengue vaccines. The first model, developed by the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at the U. S. National Institutes of Health, utilizes a modified DENV-2 strain DEN2Δ30. This virus was derived from the DENV-2 Tonga/74 that caused only very mild clinical infection during the outbreak from which it was recovered. DEN2Δ30 induced viremia in 100%, rash in 80%, and neutropenia in 27% of the 30 subjects to whom it was given. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) is developing a DHIM the goal of which is to identify DENV that cause symptomatic dengue fever. WRAIR has evaluated seven viruses and has identified two that meet dengue fever criteria. Both of these models may be very useful in the evaluation and down-selection of candidate dengue vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26424605

  19. Dengue human infection models to advance dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christian P; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P

    2015-12-10

    Dengue viruses (DENV) currently infect approximately 400 million people each year causing millions to seek care and overwhelming the health care infrastructure in endemic areas. Vaccines to prevent dengue and therapeutics to treat dengue are not currently available. The efficacy of the most advanced candidate vaccine against symptomatic dengue in general and DENV-2 in particular was much lower than expected, despite the ability of the vaccine to induce neutralizing antibody against all four DENV serotypes. Because seroconversion to the DENV serotypes following vaccination was thought to be indicative of induced protection, these results have made it more difficult to assess which candidate vaccines should or should not be evaluated in large studies in endemic areas. A dengue human infection model (DHIM) could be extremely valuable to down-select candidate vaccines or therapeutics prior to engaging in efficacy trials in endemic areas. Two DHIM have been developed to assess the efficacy of live attenuated tetravalent (LATV) dengue vaccines. The first model, developed by the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at the U. S. National Institutes of Health, utilizes a modified DENV-2 strain DEN2Δ30. This virus was derived from the DENV-2 Tonga/74 that caused only very mild clinical infection during the outbreak from which it was recovered. DEN2Δ30 induced viremia in 100%, rash in 80%, and neutropenia in 27% of the 30 subjects to whom it was given. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) is developing a DHIM the goal of which is to identify DENV that cause symptomatic dengue fever. WRAIR has evaluated seven viruses and has identified two that meet dengue fever criteria. Both of these models may be very useful in the evaluation and down-selection of candidate dengue vaccines and therapeutics.

  20. Human factors of advanced technology (glass cockpit) transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.

    1989-01-01

    A three-year study of airline crews at two U.S. airlines who were flying an advanced technology aircraft, the Boeing 757 is discussed. The opinions and experiences of these pilots as they view the advanced, automated features of this aircraft, and contrast them with previous models they have flown are discussed. Training for advanced automation; (2) cockpit errors and error reduction; (3) management of cockpit workload; and (4) general attitudes toward cockpit automation are emphasized. The limitations of the air traffic control (ATC) system on the ability to utilize the advanced features of the new aircraft are discussed. In general the pilots are enthusiastic about flying an advanced technology aircraft, but they express mixed feelings about the impact of automation on workload, crew errors, and ability to manage the flight.

  1. Positron emission tomography of the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque in man – a contemporary review

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Sune F; Hag, Anne Mette F; Klausen, Thomas L; Ripa, Rasmus S; Bodholdt, Rasmus P; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the primary underlying cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world today and is set to become the prevailing disease and major cause of death worldwide by 2020. In the 1950s surgical intervention was introduced to treat symptomatic patients with high-grade carotid artery stenosis due to atherosclerosis – a procedure known as carotid endarterectomy (CEA). By removing the atherosclerotic plaque from the affected carotid artery of these patients, CEA is beneficial by preventing subsequent ipsilateral ischemic stroke. However, it is known that patients with low to intermediate artery stenosis may still experience ischemic events, leading clinicians to consider plaque composition as an important feature of atherosclerosis. Today molecular imaging can be used for characterization, visualization and quantification of cellular and subcellular physiological processes as they take place in vivo; using this technology we can obtain valuable information on atherosclerostic plaque composition. Applying molecular imaging clinically to atherosclerotic disease therefore has the potential to identify atherosclerotic plaques vulnerable to rupture. This could prove to be an important tool for the selection of patients for CEA surgery in a health system increasingly focused on individualized treatment. This review focuses on current advances and future developments of in vivo atherosclerosis PET imaging in man. PMID:24289282

  2. A statin-loaded reconstituted high-density lipoprotein nanoparticle inhibits atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Tang, Jun; Cormode, David P.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ozcan, Canturk; Otten, Maarten J.; Zaidi, Neeha; Lobatto, Mark E.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Kuan, Emma L.; Martel, Catherine; Hewing, Bernd; Sager, Hendrik; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. Statins have potent anti-inflammatory properties but these cannot be fully exploited with oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability. Here we present an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle that delivers statins to atherosclerotic plaques. We demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and show that this effect is mediated through the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. We also apply statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and show that they accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions in which they directly affect plaque macrophages. Finally, we demonstrate that a 3-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibits plaque inflammation progression, while a 1-week high-dose regimen markedly decreases inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Statin-rHDL represents a novel potent atherosclerosis nanotherapy that directly affects plaque inflammation.

  3. Heparin Cofactor II in Atherosclerotic Lesions from the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) Study

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Jill C.; Deans, Carolyn; Hoffman, Maureane R.; Thomas, David B.; Malcom, Gray T.; Zieske, Arthur W.; Strong, Jack P.; Koch, Gary G.; Church, Frank C.

    2009-01-01

    Heparin cofactor II (HCII) is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) that has been shown to be a predictor of decreased atherosclerosis in the elderly and protective against atherosclerosis in mice. HCII inhibits thrombin in vitro and HCII-thrombin complexes have been detected in human plasma. Moreover, the mechanism of protection against atherosclerosis in mice was determined to be the inhibition of thrombin. Despite this evidence, the presence of HCII in human atherosclerotic tissue has not been reported. In this study, using samples of coronary arteries obtained from the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) study, we explore the local relationship between HCII and (pro)thrombin in atherosclerosis. We found that HCII and (pro)thrombin are co-localized in the lipid-rich necrotic core of atheromas. A significant positive correlation between each protein and the severity of the atherosclerotic lesion was present. These results suggest that HCII is in a position to inhibit thrombin in atherosclerotic lesions where thrombin can exert a proatherogenic inflammatory response. However, these results should be tempered by the additional findings from this, and other studies, that indicate the presence of other plasma proteins (antithrombin, albumin, and α1-protease inhibitor) in the same localized region of the atheroma. PMID:19747479

  4. Therapeutic strategies to deplete macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    De Meyer, Inge; Martinet, Wim; De Meyer, Guido R. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages can be found in all stages of atherosclerosis and are major contributors of atherosclerotic plaque development, progression and destabilization. Continuous recruitment of monocytes drives this chronic inflammatory disease, which can be intervened by several strategies: reducing the inflammatory stimulus by lowering circulating lipids and promoting cholesterol efflux from plaque, direct and indirect targeting of adhesion molecules and chemokines involved in monocyte adhesion and transmigration and inducing macrophage death in atherosclerotic plaques in combination with anti-inflammatory drugs. This review discusses the outlined strategies to deplete macrophages from atherosclerotic plaques to promote plaque stabilization. PMID:22309283

  5. Selepressin and Arginine Vasopressin Do Not Display Cardiovascular Risk in Atherosclerotic Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Boucheix, Olivier; Blakytny, Robert; Haroutunian, Gerard; Henriksson, Marie; Laporte, Regent; Milano, Stephane; Reinheimer, Torsten M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock remains associated with significant mortality rates. Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and analogs with V1A receptor agonist activity are increasingly used to treat fluid-resistant vasodilatory hypotension, including catecholamine-refractory septic shock. Clinical studies have been restricted to healthy volunteers and catecholamine-refractory septic shock patients excluding subjects with cardiac co-morbidities because of presumed safety issues. The novel selective V1A receptor agonist selepressin, with short half-life, has been designed to avoid V2 receptor-related complications and long-term V1A receptor activation. Cardiovascular safety of selepressin, AVP, and the septic shock standard of care norepinephrine was investigated in a rabbit model of early-stage atherosclerosis. Methods Atherosclerosis was established in New Zealand White rabbits using a 1% cholesterol-containing diet. Selepressin, AVP, or norepinephrine was administered as cumulative intravenous infusion rates to atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic animals. Results Selepressin and AVP induced a slight dose-dependent increase in arterial pressure (AP) associated with a moderate decrease in heart rate, no change in stroke volume, and a moderate decrease in aortic blood flow (ABF). In contrast, norepinephrine induced a marked dose-dependent increase in AP associated with a lesser decrease in the heart rate, an increase in stroke volume, and a moderate increase in ABF. For all three vasopressors, there was no difference in responses between atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic animals. Conclusion Further studies should be considered using more advanced atherosclerosis models, including with septic shock, before considering septic shock clinical trials of patients with comorbidities. Here, selepressin and AVP treatments did not display relevant cardiovascular risk in early-stage rabbit atherosclerosis. PMID:27788216

  6. Endothelial cells and macrophages, partners in atherosclerotic plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Antohe, Felicia

    2006-01-01

    Heart disease and stroke, the main cardiovascular diseases (CVD), have become global epidemics in our days. High levels of cholesterol and other abnormal lipids are among the main risk factors of atherosclerosis, the number one killer in the world. However, recent advances in CVD treatment together with improvements in surgical techniques have increased the quality of life and reduced premature death rates and disabilities. Nevertheless, they still add a heavy burden to the rising global costs of health care. The medical priorities highlight not only the need for early recognition of the warning signs of a heart attack, but also the need for early biomarkers for prevention. Two active partners in the development and progression of atherosclerotic plaques are the macrophages and endothelial cells that influence each other and modify the microenvironment composition of the plaque leading to either rapid progression or regression of individual lesions in patients. In this review we address two specific aspects related to atherosclerosis: i) the way in which folic acid and folic acid conjugates may be helpful to identify activated macrophages and ii) the high potential of proteomic analysis to evidence and identify the multiple changes induced in activated vascular cells. PMID:17178598

  7. Citrullination within the atherosclerotic plaque: A potential target for the anti-citrullinated protein antibody response in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sokolove, Jeremy; Sharpe, Orr; Brennan, Matthew; Lahey, Lauren J.; Kao, Amy H.; Krishnan, Eswar; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Lepus, Christin M.; Wasko, Mary Chester; Robinson, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Purpose Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, an observation not explained by traditional cardiac risk factors and generally limited to those with RA-associated autoantibodies such as rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA). We hypothesized that citrullinated proteins within the atherosclerotic plaque can be targeted by ACPA, forming stimulatory immune complexes which propagate the progression of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Protein lysates prepared from atherosclerotic segments of human aorta were investigated for the presence of citrulline-modified proteins and specifically citrullinated fibrinogen (cFb) by immunoprecipitation and/or immunoblotting followed by mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemistry was performed in coronary artery plaques for the presence of citrullinated proteins and the PAD4 enzyme. Levels of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP), anti-citrullinated vimentin (cVim), and anti-cFb antibodies were measured in 134 women with seropositive RA previously characterized for the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis by electron beam CT scan (EBCT). Western analysis of atherosclerotic plaque lysates demonstrated several citrullinated proteins and the presence of cFb was confirmed by immunoprecipitation, and mass spectroscopy. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated co-localization of citrullinated proteins and the PAD4 enzyme within the coronary artery plaque. In age-adjusted regression models, antibodies targeting cFb and cit-vimentin, but not CCP2, were associated with an increased aortic plaque burden. Conclusion Citrullinated proteins are prevalent within the atherosclerotic plaque, and certain ACPAs are associated with atherosclerotic burden. These observations suggest that targeting of citrullinated epitopes, specifically cFb, within the atherosclerotic plaque could provide a mechanism for accelerated atherosclerosis observed in patients with RA. PMID

  8. [Advances on research of human exposure to triclosan].

    PubMed

    Jin, Chenye; Chen, Yiming; Zhang, Peiqi; Xiong, Zhezhen; Wang, Caifeng; Tian, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Triclosan, a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent, was reported to have been widely detected in various human biological samples such as urine, blood and human milk among foreign populations. In China, limited reports have been found on human exposure to triclosan, and the reported urinary triclosan concentrations were significantly lower than that of American populations. Besides, the potential influencing factors still remain unclear regarding human exposure to triclosan, but evidences suggest that those in middle age and with higher household income and higher social class tend to have higher urinary triclosan concentrations. Furthermore, triclosan exposure tend to differ by sex, geography, heredity, metabolism and life style.

  9. Automated tissue characterization of in vivo atherosclerotic plaques by intravascular optical coherence tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Ughi, Giovanni Jacopo; Adriaenssens, Tom; Sinnaeve, Peter; Desmet, Walter; D’hooge, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is rapidly becoming the method of choice for the in vivo investigation of coronary artery disease. While IVOCT visualizes atherosclerotic plaques with a resolution <20µm, image analysis in terms of tissue composition is currently performed by a time-consuming manual procedure based on the qualitative interpretation of image features. We illustrate an algorithm for the automated and systematic characterization of IVOCT atherosclerotic tissue. The proposed method consists in a supervised classification of image pixels according to textural features combined with the estimated value of the optical attenuation coefficient. IVOCT images of 64 plaques, from 49 in vivo IVOCT data sets, constituted the algorithm’s training and testing data sets. Validation was obtained by comparing automated analysis results to the manual assessment of atherosclerotic plaques. An overall pixel-wise accuracy of 81.5% with a classification feasibility of 76.5% and per-class accuracy of 89.5%, 72.1% and 79.5% for fibrotic, calcified and lipid-rich tissue respectively, was found. Moreover, measured optical properties were in agreement with previous results reported in literature. As such, an algorithm for automated tissue characterization was developed and validated using in vivo human data, suggesting that it can be applied to clinical IVOCT data. This might be an important step towards the integration of IVOCT in cardiovascular research and routine clinical practice. PMID:23847728

  10. [Atherosclerotic calcification of coronary artery detected by electron beam CT: A new probation of calcific algorithm].

    PubMed

    Li, Wensheng; Song, Zhijian; Zhao, Shumin; Zuo, Huanchen

    2006-08-01

    Electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) can detect the atherosclerotic calcification of coronary artery qualitatively and quantitatively. It was also verified that the atherosclerotic calcification was directly related to the atherosclerotic extent and had a limited relation to the occurrence of coronary heart disease (CHD). So EBCT is one of the good non-invasive methods for predicting the risk of CHD. However, there are some problems in the calcification parameters (calcification area, calcification score) adopted by EBCT which have high variability and low reproducibility. As a result, these parameters have imperfection and need to be improved further. This research provides a new calcification parameter (calcification volume) which makes the use of three dimensional information of all calcific pixels in EBCT scanning images of coronary artery. After experiment in 11 human coronary artery specimens, it was testified that calcification volume had a lower variability than calcification area and calcification score in 25% percentile, median, 75% percentile, Mean, respectively. P value of t test in Mean variability is 0.027, and 0.058. These results suggest that calcification volume may be a new calcification parameter. PMID:17002127

  11. Imaging of oxidation-specific epitopes with targeted nanoparticles to detect high-risk atherosclerotic lesions: progress and future directions.

    PubMed

    Briley-Saebo, Karen; Yeang, Calvin; Witztum, Joseph L; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2014-11-01

    Oxidation-specific epitopes (OSE) within developing atherosclerotic lesions are key antigens that drive innate and adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis, leading to chronic inflammation. Oxidized phospholipids and malondialdehyde-lysine epitopes are well-characterized OSE present in human atherosclerotic lesions, particularly in pathologically defined vulnerable plaques. Using murine and human OSE-specific antibodies as targeting agents, we have developed radionuclide and magnetic resonance based nanoparticles, containing gadolinium, manganese or lipid-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide, to non-invasively image OSE within experimental atherosclerotic lesions. These methods quantitate plaque burden, allow detection of lesion progression and regression, plaque stabilization, and accumulation of OSE within macrophage-rich areas of the artery wall, suggesting they detect the most active lesions. Future studies will focus on using "natural" antibodies, lipopeptides, and mimotopes for imaging applications. These approaches should enhance the clinical translation of this technique to image, monitor, evaluate efficacy of novel therapeutic agents, and guide optimal therapy of high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:25297940

  12. Planetary protection issues in advance of human exploration of Mars.

    PubMed

    McKay, C P; Davis, W L

    1989-01-01

    Current planetary quarantine considerations focus on robotic missions and attempt a policy of no biological contamination. The presence of humans on Mars, however, will inevitably result in biological contamination and physical alteration of the local environment. The focus of planetary quarantine must therefore shift toward defining and minimizing the inevitable contamination associated with humans. This will involve first determining those areas that will be affected by the presence of a human base, then verifying that these environments do not harbor indigenous life nor provide sites for Earth bacteria to grow. Precursor missions can provide salient information that can make more efficient the planning and design of human exploration missions. In particular, a robotic sample return mission can help to eliminate the concern about returning samples with humans or the return of humans themselves from a planetary quarantine perspective. Without a robotic return the cost of quarantine that would have to be added to a human mission may well exceed the cost of a robotic return mission. Even if the preponderance of scientific evidence argues against the presence of indigenous life, it must be considered as part of any serious planetary quarantine analysis for missions to Mars. If there is life on Mars, the question of human exploration assumes an ethical dimension. PMID:11537372

  13. Planetary protection issues in advance of human exploration of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Davis, Wanda L.

    1989-01-01

    The major planetary quarantine issues associated with human exploration of Mars, which is viewed as being more likely to harbor indigenous life than is the moon, are discussed. Special attention is given to the environmental impact of human missions to Mars due to contamination and mechanical disturbances of the local environment, the contamination issues associated with the return of humans, and the planetary quarantine strategy for a human base. It is emphasized that, in addition to the question of indigenous life, there may be some concern of returning to earth the earth microorganisms that have spent some time in the Martian environment. It is suggested that, due to the fact that a robot system can be subjected to more stringent controls and protective treatments than a mission involving humans, a robotic sample return mission can help to eliminate many planetary-quarantine concerns about returning samples.

  14. Atherosclerotic renovascular disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Philip A; Guo, Haifeng; Gilbertson, David T; Liu, Jiannong; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Ishani, Areef; Collins, Allan J; Foley, Robert N

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD) is an increasingly recognized clinical condition that is diagnosed predominantly in older patients. Here we used annual United States Medicare 5% Denominator Files and studied 16,036,904 patients, 66 years of age and older, to quantify trends in diagnostic rates, associations, treatment, and outcomes of ARVD over a 13-year period. Overall, there was an ARVD rate of 3.09 per 1000 patient-years, which rose progressively with an adjusted hazard ratio of 3.35, comparing data from 1992 to 2004. Within 6 months of disease diagnosis, 13.4% of patients had undergone revascularization. A biphasic pattern of revascularization was found where the adjusted hazard ratios significantly increased in a progressive manner until 1999, following which there was a decline through 2004, which was not significant. The method of revascularization changed markedly over time with endovascular intervention steadily replacing direct surgical revascularization. As a time-dependent variable, ARVD was associated with excess mortality in each calendar year, albeit with declining hazard ratio estimates in more recent years. Among patients with this disease, revascularization was associated with mortality adjusted hazard ratios <1 in each year. Our study shows the diagnosis of ARVD has substantially risen in the United States but the survival implications were not fully explained by other comorbid vascular diseases.

  15. Heat Shock Proteins: Mediators of Atherosclerotic Development.

    PubMed

    Deniset, Justin F; Pierce, Grant N

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins play important housekeeping roles in a variety of cells within the body during normal control conditions. The many different functions for heat shock proteins in the cell depend upon the specific heat shock protein involved. Each protein is nominally differentiated based upon its molecular size. However, in addition to their role in normal cell function, heat shock proteins may play an even more important role as pro-survival proteins conserved through evolution to protect the cell from a variety of stresses. The ability of a cell to withstand these environmental stresses is critical to its capacity to adapt and remain viable. Loss of this ability may lead to pathological states. Abnormal localization, structure or function of the heat shock proteins has been associated with many pathologies, including those involving heart disease. Heat shock proteins like HSP60 and HSP70 in particular have been identified as playing important roles in inflammation and immune reactions. Inflammation has been identified recently as an important pathological risk factor for heart disease. It is perhaps not surprising therefore, that heat shock protein family has been increasingly identified as an important intracellular pathway associated with inflammatory-mediated heart conditions including atherosclerosis. This paper reviews the evidence in support of a role for heat shock proteins in cardiovascular disease and the potential to target these proteins to alter the progression of atherosclerotic disease.

  16. Extracellular matrix protein gene expression in atherosclerotic hypertensive pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Botney, M. D.; Kaiser, L. R.; Cooper, J. D.; Mecham, R. P.; Parghi, D.; Roby, J.; Parks, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    Lobar pulmonary arteries from patients with unexplained pulmonary hypertension were obtained at the time of single-lung transplantation to determine the response of large elastic vessels to increased intraluminal pressure. Specifically, human pulmonary arteries were examined to determine if remodeling remained active at the time of surgery and whether remodeling was similar to previously reported remodeling observed in several animal models. Grossly, the hypertensive vessels appeared atherosclerotic. Histochemical stains revealed a thick, diffuse neointima in hypertensive vessels compared with normal vessels. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated elastin protein in the neointima and in situ hybridization studies demonstrated tropoelastin mRNA largely in the neointima. Similarly, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization detected cellular fibronectin, thrombospondin and type I collagen protein and mRNA within the thickened intima from hypertensive vessels. These studies provide evidence that hypertensive vessels in patients with severe chronic pulmonary hypertension are actively remodeling but that the pattern of remodeling is different from previously described animal models. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1739129

  17. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. Evaluation procedures and guidelines for human factors engineering reviews

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.; Baker, C.C.; Welch, D.L.; Granda, T.M.; Vingelis, P.J.

    1994-07-01

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator`s overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support. NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use.

  18. Advanced control rooms and crew performance issues: Implications for human reliability

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.M.; Hall, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    Recent trends in advanced control room (ACR) design are considered with respect to their impact on human performance. It is concluded that potentially negative influences exist, however, a variety of factors make it difficult to model, analyze, and quantify these effects for human reliability analyses (HRAs).

  19. Human rights advances in women's reproductive health in Africa.

    PubMed

    Ngwena, Charles G; Brookman-Amissah, Eunice; Skuster, Patty

    2015-05-01

    The African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights recently adopted General Comment No 2 to interpret provisions of Article 14 of the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights Women. The provisions relate to women's rights to fertility control, contraception, family planning, information and education, and abortion. The present article highlights the General Comment's potential to promote women's sexual and reproductive rights in multiple ways. The General Comment's human rights value goes beyond providing states with guidance for framing their domestic laws, practices, and policies to comply with treaty obligations. General Comment No 2 is invaluable in educating all stakeholders-including healthcare providers, lawyers, policymakers, and judicial officers at the domestic level-about pertinent jurisprudence. Civil society and human rights advocates can use the General Comment to render the state accountable for failure to implement its treaty obligations.

  20. Advanced Research Training in Human Geography: The Scottish Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwanzura-Ottemoeller, Fungisai; Hopkins, Peter; Lorimer, Hayden; Philip, Lorna J.

    2005-01-01

    Formal research training is integral to research degrees in human geography completed in UK higher education institutions today. The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) has been the driving force behind the formalization of research training. Arguably less well known among the ESRC research training recommendations is the stipulation that…

  1. Human Relationships That Nurture and Advance the Construction of Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, William E.; Gwaltney, Thomas M.

    This paper reviews the historical antecedents and theoretical foundation for a constructivist approach to teaching and learning. One neglected characteristic of constructivism apparent in the professional literature is the need to better understand that human relationships in the classroom are often pivotal in helping students construct knowledge.…

  2. Human Factors Evaluation of Advanced Electric Power Grid Visualization Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Dauenhauer, Peter M.; Wierks, Tamara G.; Podmore, Robin

    2009-04-01

    This report describes initial human factors evaluation of four visualization tools (Graphical Contingency Analysis, Force Directed Graphs, Phasor State Estimator and Mode Meter/ Mode Shapes) developed by PNNL, and proposed test plans that may be implemented to evaluate their utility in scenario-based experiments.

  3. Nuclear microscopy of atherosclerotic tissue: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Frank; Ren, M. Q.; Xie, J. P.; Tan, B. K. H.; Halliwell, B.

    2001-07-01

    This paper reviews the work carried out in the Research Centre for Nuclear Microscopy, NUS on the role of iron in coronary heart disease, using the technique of nuclear microscopy to determine the levels of iron and other trace elements in the artery wall and lesions. These investigations have indicated that iron may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis, probably through the promotion of cytotoxic free radicals leading to the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Using a rabbit model we have observed that early atherosclerotic lesions, induced by feeding the animals on a 1% cholesterol diet, contain increased levels of iron (up to 8 times) compared with the adjacent healthy artery wall. In a follow-up time sequence study, we have shown that iron accumulation occurs at the onset of lesion formation, which takes place around 4-6 weeks after exposure to the 1% cholesterol diet. As the lesions mature, they enlarge to occupy a significant fraction of the artery wall, and at about 16 weeks the lesions begin to show signs of calcification. In an additional experiment, where the cholesterol fed rabbits were kept anaemic through weekly bleeding, the iron content of the artery wall was reduced and the onset of atherogenesis was delayed. In a further investigation, rabbits were fed on a 1% cholesterol diet and after 6 weeks (corresponding to the period of early lesion formation) a test group was subjected to treatment using the iron chelator desferal. Preliminary results indicate that during the treatment with desferal, lesion development was slowed down.

  4. Oncolytic virotherapy for human malignant mesothelioma: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Boisgerault, Nicolas; Achard, Carole; Delaunay, Tiphaine; Cellerin, Laurent; Tangy, Frédéric; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Cancer virotherapy is an attractive alternative to conventional treatments because it offers a wide range of antitumor effects due to 1) the diversity of the oncolytic viruses that are now available and 2) their multifaceted activities against both tumor cells and tumor vessels, in addition to their ability to induce antitumor immune responses. In this review, we summarize preclinical and clinical data regarding the targeting of malignant mesothelioma (MM) by oncolytic viruses. We also discuss the potential of other oncolytic viruses that have already shown antitumor effects against several malignancies in advanced clinical trials but are yet to be tested against MM cells. Finally, we review how the activation of the immune system and combinations with other types of anticancer treatments could support the development of oncolytic virotherapy for the treatment of MM. PMID:27512676

  5. Recent Advances in Computational Mechanics of the Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, M.; Dabiri, Y.; Li, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling. PMID:23509602

  6. Setaria digitata in advancing our knowledge of human lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Perumal, A N I; Gunawardene, Y I N S; Dassanayake, R S

    2016-03-01

    Setaria digitata is a filarial parasite that causes fatal cerebrospinal nematodiasis in goats, sheep and horses, resulting in substantial economic losses in animal husbandry in the tropics. Due to its close resemblance to Wuchereria bancrofti, this nematode is also frequently used as a model organism to study human lymphatic filariasis. This review highlights numerous insights into the morphological, histological, biochemical, immunological and genetic aspects of S. digitata that have broadened our understanding towards the control and eradication of filarial diseases. PMID:25924635

  7. The myth of the "vulnerable plaque": transitioning from a focus on individual lesions to atherosclerotic disease burden for coronary artery disease risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Fuster, Valentin

    2015-03-01

    The cardiovascular science community has pursued the quest to identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque in patients for decades, hoping to prevent acute coronary events. However, despite major advancements in imaging technology that allow visualization of rupture-prone plaques, clinical studies have not demonstrated improved risk prediction compared with traditional approaches. Considering the complex relationship between plaque rupture and acute coronary event risk suggested by pathology studies and confirmed by clinical investigations, these results are not surprising. This review summarizes the evidence supporting a multifaceted hypothesis of the natural history of atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Managing patients at risk of acute coronary events mandates a greater focus on the atherosclerotic disease burden rather than on features of individual plaques. PMID:25601032

  8. The dark and bright side of atherosclerotic calcification.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Giuseppe; Iacobini, Carla; Blasetti Fantauzzi, Claudia; Menini, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Vascular calcification is an unfavorable event in the natural history of atherosclerosis that predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, increasing evidence suggests that different calcification patterns are associated with different or even opposite histopathological and clinical features, reflecting the dual relationship between inflammation and calcification. In fact, initial calcium deposition in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli results in the formation of spotty or granular calcification ("microcalcification"), which induces further inflammation. This vicious cycle favors plaque rupture, unless an adaptive response prevails, with blunting of inflammation and survival of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). VSMCs promote fibrosis and also undergo osteogenic transdifferentiation, with formation of homogeneous or sheet-like calcification ("macrocalcification"), that stabilizes the plaque by serving as a barrier towards inflammation. Unfortunately, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating this adaptive response. The advanced glycation/lipoxidation endproducts (AGEs/ALEs) have been shown to promote vascular calcification and atherosclerosis. Recent evidence suggests that two AGE/ALE receptors, RAGE and galectin-3, modulate in divergent ways, not only inflammation, but also vascular osteogenesis, by favoring "microcalcification" and "macrocalcification", respectively. Galectin-3 seems essential for VSMC transdifferentiation into osteoblast-like cells via direct modulation of the WNT-β-catenin signaling, thus driving formation of "macrocalcification", whereas RAGE favors deposition of "microcalcification" by promoting and perpetuating inflammation and by counteracting the osteoblastogenic effect of galectin-3. Further studies are required to understand the molecular mechanisms regulating transition from "microcalcification" to "macrocalcification", thus allowing to design therapeutic strategies which favor this adaptive process

  9. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  10. Detection of atherosclerotic vascular tissue from optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Ammu; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Mike; Sherif, Sherif

    2012-10-01

    Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease continues to be one of the major causes of mortality. Prevention, diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease are dependent on the detection of high risk atherosclerotic plaque. As age is one of the most important risk factors, atherosclerosis worsens steadily with increasing age. Automatic characterization of atherosclerotic plaque using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) images provides a powerful tool to classify patients with high risk plaque. In this study we develop an automatic classifier to detect atherosclerotic plaque in young and old Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits, using OCT images without reliance on visual inspection. Our classifier based on texture analysis technique may provide an efficient tool for detecting invisible changes in tissue structure. We extracted a set of 22 statistical textural features for each image using the spatial gray level dependence matrix (SGLDM) method. An optimal scalar feature selection process was carried to select the best discriminating features that employ the Fisher discriminant ratio (FDR) criterion, and cross correlation measure between the pairs of features. Using these optimal features, we formed a combination of 5 best classification features using an exhaustive search method. A combined feature set was finally employed for the classification of plaque. We obtained correct classification rate and validation of 76.67% and 75% respectively.

  11. Application of infrared fiber optic imaging in atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bujin; Casscells, S. W.; Bearman, Gregory H.; McNatt, Janice; Naghevi, Morteza; Malik, Basit A.; Gul, Khawar; Willerson, James T.

    1999-07-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques - the main cause of heart attach and stokes - is not predictable. Hence even treadmill stress tests fail to detect many persons at risk. Fatal plaques are found at autopsies to be associated with active inflammatory cells. Classically, inflammation is detected by its swelling, red color, pain and heat. We have found that heat accurately locates the dangerous plaques that are significantly warmer then atherosclerotic plaques without the same inflammation. In order to develop a non-surgical method of locating these plaques, an IR fiber optic imaging system has been developed in our laboratory to evalute the causes and effect of heat in atherosclerotic plaques. The fiber optical imagin bundle consists of 900 individual As2S3 chalcogenide glass fibers which transmit IR radiation from 0.7 micrometers 7 micrometers with little energy loss. By combining that with a highly sensitive Indium Antimonide IR focal plane array detector, we are able to obtain thermal graphic images in situ. The temperature heterogeneity of atherosclerotic plaques developed in the arteral of the experimental animal models is under study with the new device. The preliminary experimental results from the animal model are encouraging. The potential of using this new technology in diagnostic evaluation of the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is considerable.

  12. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. General evaluation model, technical development, and guideline description

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator`s overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use.

  13. Assessing human exposure to airborne pollutants: Advances and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J. )

    1991-08-01

    A committee which was convened by the National Research Council, recently completed an analysis of new methods and technologies for assessing exposure to air pollutants. The committee identified three major ways of determining human exposure to airborne pollutants. Monitoring the air around an individual with a portable personal air sampler is, of course, the most comprehensive and most accurate. It is also the costliest and most time consuming. The second method is more indirect and involves techniques such as measuring the amount of a contaminant with a stationary monitor and extrapolating exposure by means of personal activity records or mathematical models. Exposure to carbon monoxide inside a car, for example, might be roughly calculated from the amount of time spent in the car and the quantity of carbon monoxide in the car under typical operating conditions. The third method involves biological markers as a measure of the integrated dose within the body and of past contact with pollutants. For example, a marker for airborne lead exposure can be elevated lead levels in the blood. However, this must be weighed against contributions from other media. A final and major point made in the report is the need to have accurate and realistic assessments to ensure optimal reduction of human exposure. To accomplish this, exposure assessment research should be supported by government programs. Although not stated, such research should also be supported by other sectors, including the regulated community.

  14. High shear stress induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation through angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Qiu, Juhui; Luo, Shisui; Xie, Xiang; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Kang; Ye, Zhiyi; Liu, Wanqian; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques causing thrombosis is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic strokes. Inhibition of thrombosis is one of the important tasks developing biomedical materials such as intravascular stents and vascular grafts. Shear stress (SS) influences the formation and development of atherosclerosis. The current review focuses on the vulnerable plaques observed in the high shear stress (HSS) regions, which localizes at the proximal region of the plaque intruding into the lumen. The vascular outward remodelling occurs in the HSS region for vascular compensation and that angiogenesis is a critical factor for HSS which induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation. These results greatly challenge the established belief that low shear stress is important for expansive remodelling, which provides a new perspective for preventing the transition of stable plaques to high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27482467

  15. Human mortality at very advanced age might be constant.

    PubMed

    Klemera, P; Doubal, S

    1997-11-01

    An attempt was made to identify the course of the mortality rate at the upper tail of human age. The only known data suitable for this purpose were published by Riggs and Millecchia (J.E. Riggs, R.J. Millecchia, Mech. Ageing Dev. 62 (1992) 191-199) and our analysis follows up their results. By means of mathematical elaboration it was proved that these data imply a constant mortality rate (approx. 25% per year) at ages above 113 years for men and above 116 years for women. Indirect arguments supporting the validity of the source data are discussed. Nevertheless, even if the source data are mistaken, we proved they cannot be the product of purely random errors and our results may contribute to the elucidation of the origin of those systematic errors. PMID:9379712

  16. Divergent JAM-C Expression Accelerates Monocyte-Derived Cell Exit from Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Miljkovic-Licina, Marijana; Lee, Boris P.; Fischer, Nicolas; Fish, Richard J.; Kwak, Brenda; Fisher, Edward A.; Imhof, Beat A.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, caused in part by monocytes in plaques, continues to be a disease that afflicts the modern world. Whilst significant steps have been made in treating this chronic inflammatory disease, questions remain on how to prevent monocyte and macrophage accumulation in atherosclerotic plaques. Junctional Adhesion Molecule C (JAM-C) expressed by vascular endothelium directs monocyte transendothelial migration in a unidirectional manner leading to increased inflammation. Here we show that interfering with JAM-C allows reverse-transendothelial migration of monocyte-derived cells, opening the way back out of the inflamed environment. To study the role of JAM-C in plaque regression we used a mouse model of atherosclerosis, and tested the impact of vascular JAM-C expression levels on monocyte reverse transendothelial migration using human cells. Studies in-vitro under inflammatory conditions revealed that overexpression or gene silencing of JAM-C in human endothelium exposed to flow resulted in higher rates of monocyte reverse-transendothelial migration, similar to antibody blockade. We then transplanted atherosclerotic, plaque-containing aortic arches from hyperlipidemic ApoE-/- mice into wild-type normolipidemic recipient mice. JAM-C blockade in the recipients induced greater emigration of monocyte-derived cells and further diminished the size of atherosclerotic plaques. Our findings have shown that JAM-C forms a one-way vascular barrier for leukocyte transendothelial migration only when present at homeostatic copy numbers. We have also shown that blocking JAM-C can reduce the number of atherogenic monocytes/macrophages in plaques by emigration, providing a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27442505

  17. Advanced Nuclear Power Concepts for Human Exploration Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Robert L. Cataldo; Lee S. Mason

    2000-06-04

    The design reference mission for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) human mission to Mars supports a philosophy of living off the land in order to reduce crew risk, launch mass, and life-cycle costs associated with logistics resupply to a Mars base. Life-support materials, oxygen, water, and buffer gases, and the crew's ascent-stage propellant would not be brought from Earth but rather manufactured from the Mars atmosphere. The propellants would be made over {approx}2 yr, the time between Mars mission launch window opportunities. The production of propellants is very power intensive and depends on type, amount, and time to produce the propellants. Closed-loop life support and food production are also power intensive. With the base having several habitats, a greenhouse, and propellant production capability, total power levels reach well over 125 kW(electric). The most mass-efficient means of satisfying these requirements is through the use of nuclear power. Studies have been performed to identify a potential system concept, described in this paper, using a mobile cart to transport the power system away from the Mars lander and provide adequate separation between the reactor and crew. The studies included an assessment of reactor and power conversion technology options, selection of system and component redundancy, determination of optimum separation distance, and system performance sensitivity to some key operating parameters.

  18. Advanced UV Absorbers for the Protection of Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Hüglin, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    The increasing awareness of the damaging effects of UV radiation to human skin triggered the market introduction of new cosmetic UV absorbers. This article summarizes the outcome of a multi-year research program, in which the author contributed to the development of different new UV filters. First of all, the molecular design and the basic properties of bis-ethylhexyloxyphenol methoxyphenyl triazine (BEMT) will be presented. This oil-soluble filter, which today is widely used in both beach products and skin care products, exhibits inherent photostability and strong broad-spectrum UV-A+B absorbance. Based on the concept of micronized organic UV absorbers, the UV-B filter tris biphenyl triazine (TBPT) will be introduced. At present TBPT exhibits the highest efficacy of all cosmetic UV absorbers in the market (measured by area under the UV spectrum). Finally, the concept of liposomogenic UV absorbers will be featured. This approach was developed to create water-resistant UV filters, as liposomogenic structures are thought to integrate into the lipids of the horny layer. Due to prohibitively high costs, this technology did not result in a commercial product so far. PMID:27561611

  19. Advanced UV Absorbers for the Protection of Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Hüglin, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    The increasing awareness of the damaging effects of UV radiation to human skin triggered the market introduction of new cosmetic UV absorbers. This article summarizes the outcome of a multi-year research program, in which the author contributed to the development of different new UV filters. First of all, the molecular design and the basic properties of bis-ethylhexyloxyphenol methoxyphenyl triazine (BEMT) will be presented. This oil-soluble filter, which today is widely used in both beach products and skin care products, exhibits inherent photostability and strong broad-spectrum UV-A+B absorbance. Based on the concept of micronized organic UV absorbers, the UV-B filter tris biphenyl triazine (TBPT) will be introduced. At present TBPT exhibits the highest efficacy of all cosmetic UV absorbers in the market (measured by area under the UV spectrum). Finally, the concept of liposomogenic UV absorbers will be featured. This approach was developed to create water-resistant UV filters, as liposomogenic structures are thought to integrate into the lipids of the horny layer. Due to prohibitively high costs, this technology did not result in a commercial product so far.

  20. Advanced Analysis of Pharmaco-Sleep Data in Humans.

    PubMed

    Anderer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaco-sleep studies in humans aim at the description of the effects of drugs, most frequently substances that act on the central nervous system, by means of quantitative analysis of biosignals recorded in subjects during sleep. Up to 2007, the only standard for the classification of sleep macrostructure that found worldwide acceptance were the rules published in 1968 by Rechtschaffen and Kales. In May 2007, the AASM Manual for the Scoring of Sleep and Associated Events was published by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, and concerning the classification of sleep stages, these new rules are supposed to replace those developed by Rechtschaffen and Kales. As compared to the rather low interrater reliability of manual sleep scoring, semiautomated approaches may achieve a reliability close to 1 (Cohen's kappa 0.99 for 2 semiautomated scorings as compared to 0.76 for 2 manual scorings) without any decline in validity. Depending on the aim of the pharmaco-sleep study, additional analyses concerning sleep fragmentation, sleep microstructure, sleep depth, sleep processes and local aspects of sleep should be considered. For some of these additional features, rules for visual scoring have been established, while for others automatic analysis is obligatory. Generally, for reasons of cost-effectiveness but also reliability, automatic analysis is preferable to visual analysis. However, the validity of the automatic method applied has to be proven. PMID:26901054

  1. A Distributed Simulation Facility to Support Human Factors Research in Advanced Air Transportation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amonlirdviman, Keith; Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Ladik, John F.; Sherer, Dana Z.

    1998-01-01

    A distributed real-time simulation of the civil air traffic environment developed to support human factors research in advanced air transportation technology is presented. The distributed environment is based on a custom simulation architecture designed for simplicity and flexibility in human experiments. Standard Internet protocols are used to create the distributed environment, linking all advanced cockpit simulator, all Air Traffic Control simulator, and a pseudo-aircraft control and simulation management station. The pseudo-aircraft control station also functions as a scenario design tool for coordinating human factors experiments. This station incorporates a pseudo-pilot interface designed to reduce workload for human operators piloting multiple aircraft simultaneously in real time. The application of this distributed simulation facility to support a study of the effect of shared information (via air-ground datalink) on pilot/controller shared situation awareness and re-route negotiation is also presented.

  2. Advanced human machine interaction for an image interpretation workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, S.; Martin, M.; van de Camp, F.; Peinsipp-Byma, E.; Beyerer, J.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, many new interaction technologies have been developed that enhance the usability of computer systems and allow for novel types of interaction. The areas of application for these technologies have mostly been in gaming and entertainment. However, in professional environments, there are especially demanding tasks that would greatly benefit from improved human machine interfaces as well as an overall improved user experience. We, therefore, envisioned and built an image-interpretation-workstation of the future, a multi-monitor workplace comprised of four screens. Each screen is dedicated to a complex software product such as a geo-information system to provide geographic context, an image annotation tool, software to generate standardized reports and a tool to aid in the identification of objects. Using self-developed systems for hand tracking, pointing gestures and head pose estimation in addition to touchscreens, face identification, and speech recognition systems we created a novel approach to this complex task. For example, head pose information is used to save the position of the mouse cursor on the currently focused screen and to restore it as soon as the same screen is focused again while hand gestures allow for intuitive manipulation of 3d objects in mid-air. While the primary focus is on the task of image interpretation, all of the technologies involved provide generic ways of efficiently interacting with a multi-screen setup and could be utilized in other fields as well. In preliminary experiments, we received promising feedback from users in the military and started to tailor the functionality to their needs

  3. Advancing human health risk assessment: integrating recent advisory committee recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dourson, Michael; Becker, Richard A; Haber, Lynne T; Pottenger, Lynn H; Bredfeldt, Tiffany; Fenner-Crisp, Penelope A

    2013-07-01

    Over the last dozen years, many national and international expert groups have considered specific improvements to risk assessment. Many of their stated recommendations are mutually supportive, but others appear conflicting, at least in an initial assessment. This review identifies areas of consensus and difference and recommends a practical, biology-centric course forward, which includes: (1) incorporating a clear problem formulation at the outset of the assessment with a level of complexity that is appropriate for informing the relevant risk management decision; (2) using toxicokinetics and toxicodynamic information to develop Chemical Specific Adjustment Factors (CSAF); (3) using mode of action (MOA) information and an understanding of the relevant biology as the key, central organizing principle for the risk assessment; (4) integrating MOA information into dose-response assessments using existing guidelines for non-cancer and cancer assessments; (5) using a tiered, iterative approach developed by the World Health Organization/International Programme on Chemical Safety (WHO/IPCS) as a scientifically robust, fit-for-purpose approach for risk assessment of combined exposures (chemical mixtures); and (6) applying all of this knowledge to enable interpretation of human biomonitoring data in a risk context. While scientifically based defaults will remain important and useful when data on CSAF or MOA to refine an assessment are absent or insufficient, assessments should always strive to use these data. The use of available 21st century knowledge of biological processes, clinical findings, chemical interactions, and dose-response at the molecular, cellular, organ and organism levels will minimize the need for extrapolation and reliance on default approaches. PMID:23844697

  4. Advancing human health risk assessment: Integrating recent advisory committee recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Richard A.; Haber, Lynne T.; Pottenger, Lynn H.; Bredfeldt, Tiffany; Fenner-Crisp, Penelope A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last dozen years, many national and international expert groups have considered specific improvements to risk assessment. Many of their stated recommendations are mutually supportive, but others appear conflicting, at least in an initial assessment. This review identifies areas of consensus and difference and recommends a practical, biology-centric course forward, which includes: (1) incorporating a clear problem formulation at the outset of the assessment with a level of complexity that is appropriate for informing the relevant risk management decision; (2) using toxicokinetics and toxicodynamic information to develop Chemical Specific Adjustment Factors (CSAF); (3) using mode of action (MOA) information and an understanding of the relevant biology as the key, central organizing principle for the risk assessment; (4) integrating MOA information into dose–response assessments using existing guidelines for non-cancer and cancer assessments; (5) using a tiered, iterative approach developed by the World Health Organization/International Programme on Chemical Safety (WHO/IPCS) as a scientifically robust, fit-for-purpose approach for risk assessment of combined exposures (chemical mixtures); and (6) applying all of this knowledge to enable interpretation of human biomonitoring data in a risk context. While scientifically based defaults will remain important and useful when data on CSAF or MOA to refine an assessment are absent or insufficient, assessments should always strive to use these data. The use of available 21st century knowledge of biological processes, clinical findings, chemical interactions, and dose–response at the molecular, cellular, organ and organism levels will minimize the need for extrapolation and reliance on default approaches. PMID:23844697

  5. A Framework for Human Performance Criteria for Advanced Reactor Operational Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques V Hugo; David I Gertman; Jeffrey C Joe

    2014-08-01

    This report supports the determination of new Operational Concept models needed in support of the operational design of new reactors. The objective of this research is to establish the technical bases for human performance and human performance criteria frameworks, models, and guidance for operational concepts for advanced reactor designs. The report includes a discussion of operating principles for advanced reactors, the human performance issues and requirements for human performance based upon work domain analysis and current regulatory requirements, and a description of general human performance criteria. The major findings and key observations to date are that there is some operating experience that informs operational concepts for baseline designs for SFR and HGTRs, with the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as a best-case predecessor design. This report summarizes the theoretical and operational foundations for the development of a framework and model for human performance criteria that will influence the development of future Operational Concepts. The report also highlights issues associated with advanced reactor design and clarifies and codifies the identified aspects of technology and operating scenarios.

  6. Increased apolipoprotein E and c-fms gene expression without elevated interleukin 1 or 6 mRNA levels indicates selective activation of macrophage functions in advanced human atheroma.

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, R N; Underwood, R; Doyle, M V; Wang, A; Libby, P

    1992-01-01

    Cells found within atherosclerotic lesions can produce in culture protein mediators that may participate in atherogenesis. To test whether human atheromata actually contain transcripts for certain of these genes, we compared levels of mRNAs in carotid or coronary atheromata and in nonatherosclerotic human vessels by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of cDNAs reverse-transcribed from RNA. We measured PCR products (generated during exponential amplification) by incorporation of 32P-labeled primers. Levels of interleukin 1 alpha, 1 beta, or 6 mRNAs in plaques and controls did not differ. Compared to uninvolved vessels, plaques did contain higher levels of mRNA encoding platelet-derived growth factor A chain (42 +/- 24 vs. 12 +/- 10 fmol of product; mean +/- SD; n = 8 and 8, respectively; P = 0.007) and B chain (41 +/- 36 vs. 4 +/- 3 fmol of product, n = 14 and 6, respectively; P = 0.024). Atherosclerotic lesions consistently had much higher levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE) mRNA than did control vessels (131 +/- 71 vs. 5 +/- 3 fmol of product; n = 12 and 10, respectively; P less than 0.001). Direct RNA blot analyses confirmed elevated levels of apoE mRNA in plaque extracts. To test whether mononuclear phagocytes might be a source of the apoE mRNA, we studied a selective marker for cells of the monocytic lineage, the c-fms protooncogene, which encodes the receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Plaques also contained elevated levels of c-fms mRNA (30 +/- 17 vs. 5 +/- 3 fmol of product; n = 10 and 7, respectively; P = 0.002). Immunohistochemical colocalization demonstrated apoE protein in association with macrophages in plaques, whereas nonatherosclerotic vessels showed no immunoreactive apoE. ApoE produced locally in atheroma might modulate the functions of lesional T cells or promote "reverse cholesterol transport" by associating with high density lipoprotein particles, thus targeting them for peripheral uptake. Macrophages within the advanced

  7. Perspectives on the Development and Future of Advanced Placement® Human Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrant, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography faced a number of hurdles that nearly derailed the course before it launched in 2000-2001. A dedicated cadre of geography professionals and high school teachers rose to the challenge and the course remains one of the fastest growing AP courses currently offered by College Board. Seventeen readers and leaders…

  8. Placing Advanced Placement® Human Geography: Its Role in U.S. Geography Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Advanced Placement Human Geography (AP HG) in the context of its place in efforts to reform geography education. It presents a critical analysis of the AP program and its curriculum, asserting that it represents "powerful knowledge" as conceptualized by Young. It concludes with a call for research in AP HG aligned…

  9. Familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome: A short-period circadian rhythm variant in humans.

    PubMed

    Jones, C R; Campbell, S S; Zone, S E; Cooper, F; DeSano, A; Murphy, P J; Jones, B; Czajkowski, L; Ptácek, L J

    1999-09-01

    Biological circadian clocks oscillate with an approximately 24-hour period, are ubiquitous, and presumably confer a selective advantage by anticipating the transitions between day and night. The circadian rhythms of sleep, melatonin secretion and body core temperature are thought to be generated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, the anatomic locus of the mammalian circadian clock. Autosomal semi-dominant mutations in rodents with fast or slow biological clocks (that is, short or long endogenous period lengths; tau) are associated with phase-advanced or delayed sleep-wake rhythms, respectively. These models predict the existence of familial human circadian rhythm variants but none of the human circadian rhythm disorders are known to have a familial tendency. Although a slight 'morning lark' tendency is common, individuals with a large and disabling sleep phase-advance are rare. This disorder, advanced sleep-phase syndrome, is characterized by very early sleep onset and offset; only two cases are reported in young adults. Here we describe three kindreds with a profound phase advance of the sleep-wake, melatonin and temperature rhythms associated with a very short tau. The trait segregates as an autosomal dominant with high penetrance. These kindreds represent a well-characterized familial circadian rhythm variant in humans and provide a unique opportunity for genetic analysis of human circadian physiology. PMID:10470086

  10. Reducing the Human Burden of Breast Cancer: Advanced Radiation Therapy Yields Improved Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Currey, Adam D; Bergom, Carmen; Kelly, Tracy R; Wilson, J Frank

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important modality in the treatment of patients with breast cancer. While its efficacy in the treatment of breast cancer was known shortly after the discovery of x-rays, significant advances in radiation delivery over the past 20 years have resulted in improved patient outcomes. With the development of improved systemic therapy, optimizing local control has become increasingly important and has been shown to improve survival. Better understanding of the magnitude of treatment benefit, as well as patient and biological factors that confer an increased recurrence risk, have allowed radiation oncologists to better tailor treatment decisions to individual patients. Furthermore, significant technological advances have occurred that have reduced the acute and long-term toxicity of radiation treatment. These advances continue to reduce the human burden of breast cancer. It is important for radiation oncologists and nonradiation oncologists to understand these advances, so that patients are appropriately educated about the risks and benefits of this important treatment modality.

  11. Revascularization in atherosclerotic renovascular disease: problems beyond the obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chade, A R

    2006-09-01

    The main goal in the treatment of obstructive atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD) is to preserve or recover renal function. The ARVD kidney continues to deteriorate in 20-40% of cases despite restoration of blood flow. Holden et al. report that renal function stabilized or improved in up to 97% of patients with the use of a distal embolic protection device. PMID:16929332

  12. Atherosclerotic changes of vessels caused by restriction of movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gvishiani, G. S.; Kobakhidze, N. G.; Mchedlishvili, M. G.; Dekanosidze, T. I.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of restriction of movement on the development of atheroscelerosis was studied in rabbits. Drastic restriction of movement for 20 and 30 days causes atherosclerotic alterations of the aorta and shifts in ECG which are characteristic of coronary atherosclerosis. At the same time, shortening of the duration of blood coagulation and an increase in the content of catecholamines and beta-lipoproteids occur.

  13. Cap buckling as a potential mechanism of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Abdelali, Maria; Reiter, Steven; Mongrain, Rosaire; Bertrand, Michel; L'Allier, Philippe L; Kritikou, Ekaterini A; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2014-04-01

    Plaque rupture in atherosclerosis is the primary cause of potentially deadly coronary events, yet about 40% of ruptures occur away from the plaque cap shoulders and cannot be fully explained with the current biomechanical theories. Here, cap buckling is considered as a potential destabilizing factor which increases the propensity of the atherosclerotic plaque to rupture and which may also explain plaque failure away from the cap shoulders. To investigate this phenomenon, quasistatic 2D finite element simulations are performed, considering the salient geometrical and nonlinear material properties of diverse atherosclerotic plaques over the range of physiological loads. The numerical results indicate that buckling may displace the location of the peak von Mises stresses in the deflected caps. Plaque buckling, together with its deleterious effects is further observed experimentally in plaque caps using a physical model of deformable mock coronary arteries with fibroatheroma. Moreover, an analytical approach combining quasistatic equilibrium equations with the Navier-Bresse formulas is used to demonstrate the buckling potential of a simplified arched slender cap under intraluminal pressure and supported by foundations. This analysis shows that plaque caps - calcified, fibrotic or cellular - may buckle in specific undulated shapes once submitted to critical loads. Finally, a preliminary analysis of intravascular ultrasonography recordings of patients with atherosclerotic coronary arteries corroborates the numerical, experimental and theoretical findings and shows that various plaque caps buckle in vivo. By displacing the sites of high stresses in the plaque cap, buckling may explain the atherosclerotic plaque cap rupture at various locations, including cap shoulders.

  14. In vivo determination of arterial collagen synthesis in atherosclerotic rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Opsahl, W.P.; DeLuca, D.J.; Ehrhart, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    Collagen and non-collagen protein synthesis rates were determined in vivo in tissues from rabbits fed a control or atherogenic diet supplemented with 2% peanut oil and 0.25% cholesterol for 4 months. Rabbits received a bolus intravenous injection of L-(/sup 3/H)-proline (1.0 mCi/kg) and unlabeled L-proline (7 mmoles/kg) in 0.9% NaCl. Plasma proline specific activity decreased only 20% over 5 hr and was similar to the specific activity of free proline in tissues. Thoracic aortas from atherosclerotic rabbits exhibited raised plaques covering at least 75% of the surface. Thoracic intima plus a portion of the media (TIM) was separated from the remaining media plus adventitia (TMA). Dry delipidated weight, total collagen content, and collagen as a percent of dry weight were increased significantly in the TIM of atherosclerotic rabbits. Collagen synthesis rates and collagen synthesis as a percent of total protein synthesis were likewise increased both in the TIM and in the abdominal aortas. No differences from controls either in collagen content or collagen synthesis rates were observed in the TMA, lung or skin. These results demonstrate for the first time in vivo that formation of atherosclerotic plaques is associated with increased rates of collagen synthesis. Furthermore, as previously observed with incubations in vitro, collagen synthesis was elevated to a greater extent than noncollagen protein synthesis in atherosclerotic aortas from rabbits fed cholesterol plus peanut oil.

  15. Evaluation of the radiolabeled boronic acid-based FAP inhibitor MIP-1232 for atherosclerotic plaque imaging.

    PubMed

    Meletta, Romana; Müller Herde, Adrienne; Chiotellis, Aristeidis; Isa, Malsor; Rancic, Zoran; Borel, Nicole; Ametamey, Simon M; Krämer, Stefanie D; Schibli, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Research towards the non-invasive imaging of atherosclerotic plaques is of high clinical priority as early recognition of vulnerable plaques may reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events. The fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP) was recently proposed as inflammation-induced protease involved in the process of plaque vulnerability. In this study, FAP mRNA and protein levels were investigated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively, in human endarterectomized carotid plaques. A published boronic-acid based FAP inhibitor, MIP-1232, was synthetized and radiolabeled with iodine-125. The potential of this radiotracer to image plaques was evaluated by in vitro autoradiography with human carotid plaques. Specificity was assessed with a xenograft with high and one with low FAP level, grown in mice. Target expression analyses revealed a moderately higher protein level in atherosclerotic plaques than normal arteries correlating with plaque vulnerability. No difference in expression was determined on mRNA level. The radiotracer was successfully produced and accumulated strongly in the FAP-positive SK-Mel-187 melanoma xenograft in vitro while accumulation was negligible in an NCI-H69 xenograft with low FAP levels. Binding of the tracer to endarterectomized tissue was similar in plaques and normal arteries, hampering its use for atherosclerosis imaging. PMID:25633335

  16. Insights into cyclosporine A-induced atherosclerotic risk in transplant recipients: macrophage scavenger receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Song; Mathis, A Scott; Rosenblatt, Joseph; Minko, Tamara; Friedman, Gary S; Gioia, Kevin; Serur, David S; Knipp, Gregory T

    2004-02-27

    Clinical monitoring of organ-transplant recipients suggests that administration of cyclosporine (CsA) may increase the risk of atherosclerosis when compared with the general population. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the utility of the in vitro Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP)-1 human monocyte cell culture model for determining drug-related atherosclerotic potential in macrophages. The effect of CsA on the mRNA expression of macrophage scavenger receptor genes including CD36, CD68, scavenger receptor (SR)-A, SR-BII, and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1); the nuclear hormone receptors, including peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)gamma and liver-X-receptor (LXR)alpha; and the cholesterol efflux pump ABCA1 were investigated as markers of atherosclerotic progression. The THP-1 cells were cultured and differentiated into macrophages. The macrophages were then treated with CsA to assess gene expression. Time- (1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours) and dose- (concentrations [mg/L] corresponding to the trough [0.5], peak [1.25] and 4x peak [5]) dependency of CsA was assessed. The treated macrophage mRNA gene expression of CD36, CD68, and PPARgamma were up-regulated in the presence of CsA. Interestingly, SR-A, SR-BII, LOX-1, and LXRalpha expression appeared to be slightly down-regulated, and ABCA1 was relatively unchanged. Immunoblotting studies demonstrated that the protein expression of CD36 was unchanged or increased, PPARgamma was unchanged, and ABCA1 was unchanged or decreased at 4 and 8 hours. The results document CsA-induced mRNA and protein changes in receptors relevant to lipid-laden foam cell formation and demonstrate the utility of THP-1 macrophages for screening of atherosclerotic risk potential. PMID:15084924

  17. Insights into cyclosporine A-induced atherosclerotic risk in transplant recipients: macrophage scavenger receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Song; Mathis, A Scott; Rosenblatt, Joseph; Minko, Tamara; Friedman, Gary S; Gioia, Kevin; Serur, David S; Knipp, Gregory T

    2004-02-27

    Clinical monitoring of organ-transplant recipients suggests that administration of cyclosporine (CsA) may increase the risk of atherosclerosis when compared with the general population. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the utility of the in vitro Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP)-1 human monocyte cell culture model for determining drug-related atherosclerotic potential in macrophages. The effect of CsA on the mRNA expression of macrophage scavenger receptor genes including CD36, CD68, scavenger receptor (SR)-A, SR-BII, and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1); the nuclear hormone receptors, including peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)gamma and liver-X-receptor (LXR)alpha; and the cholesterol efflux pump ABCA1 were investigated as markers of atherosclerotic progression. The THP-1 cells were cultured and differentiated into macrophages. The macrophages were then treated with CsA to assess gene expression. Time- (1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours) and dose- (concentrations [mg/L] corresponding to the trough [0.5], peak [1.25] and 4x peak [5]) dependency of CsA was assessed. The treated macrophage mRNA gene expression of CD36, CD68, and PPARgamma were up-regulated in the presence of CsA. Interestingly, SR-A, SR-BII, LOX-1, and LXRalpha expression appeared to be slightly down-regulated, and ABCA1 was relatively unchanged. Immunoblotting studies demonstrated that the protein expression of CD36 was unchanged or increased, PPARgamma was unchanged, and ABCA1 was unchanged or decreased at 4 and 8 hours. The results document CsA-induced mRNA and protein changes in receptors relevant to lipid-laden foam cell formation and demonstrate the utility of THP-1 macrophages for screening of atherosclerotic risk potential.

  18. Fatty streak formation occurs in human fetal aortas and is greatly enhanced by maternal hypercholesterolemia. Intimal accumulation of low density lipoprotein and its oxidation precede monocyte recruitment into early atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, C; D'Armiento, F P; Mancini, F P; Postiglione, A; Witztum, J L; Palumbo, G; Palinski, W

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether oxidized LDL enhances atherogenesis by promoting monocyte recruitment into the vascular intima, we investigated whether LDL accumulation and oxidation precede intimal accumulation of monocytes in human fetal aortas (from spontaneous abortions and premature newborns who died within 12 h; fetal age 6.2+/-1.3 mo). For this purpose, a systematic assessment of fatty streak formation was carried out in fetal aortas from normocholesterolemic mothers (n = 22), hypercholesterolemic mothers (n = 33), and mothers who were hypercholesterolemic only during pregnancy (n = 27). Fetal plasma cholesterol levels showed a strong inverse correlation with fetal age (R = -0.88, P < 0.0001). In fetuses younger than 6 mo, fetal plasma cholesterol levels correlated with maternal ones (R = 0.86, P = 0.001), whereas in older fetuses no such correlation existed. Fetal aortas from hypercholesterolemic mothers and mothers with temporary hypercholesterolemia contained significantly more and larger lesions (758,651+/-87,449 and 451,255+/-37,448 micron2 per section, respectively; mean+/-SD) than aortas from normocholesterolemic mothers (61,862+/-9,555 micron2; P < 0.00005). Serial sections of the arch, thoracic, and abdominal aortas were immunostained for recognized markers of atherosclerosis: macrophages, apo B, and two different oxidation-specific epitopes (malondialdehyde- and 4-hydroxynonenal-lysine). Of the atherogenic sites that showed positive immunostaining for at least one of these markers, 58.6% were established lesions containing both macrophage/foam cells and oxidized LDL (OxLDL). 17.3% of all sites contained only native LDL, and 13.3% contained only OxLDL without monocyte/ macrophages. In contrast, only 4.3% of sites contained isolated monocytes in the absence of native or oxidized LDL. In addition, 6.3% of sites contained LDL and macrophages but few oxidation-specific epitopes. These results demonstrate that LDL oxidation and formation of fatty streaks occurs

  19. Workshop on Critical Issues in Microgravity Fluids, Transport, and Reaction Processes in Advanced Human Support Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Joshi, Jitendra A.

    2004-01-01

    This workshop was designed to bring the experts from the Advanced Human Support Technologies communities together to identify the most pressing and fruitful areas of research where success hinges on collaborative research between the two communities. Thus an effort was made to bring together experts in both advanced human support technologies and microgravity fluids, transport and reaction processes. Expertise was drawn from academia, national laboratories, and the federal government. The intent was to bring about a thorough exchange of ideas and develop recommendations to address the significant open design and operation issues for human support systems that are affected by fluid physics, transport and reaction processes. This report provides a summary of key discussions, findings, and recommendations.

  20. Advances in Robotic, Human, and Autonomous Systems for Missions of Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Briggs, Geoffrey A.; Glass, Brian J.; Pedersen, Liam; Kortenkamp, David M.; Wettergreen, David S.; Nourbakhsh, I.; Clancy, Daniel J.; Zornetzer, Steven (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Space exploration missions are evolving toward more complex architectures involving more capable robotic systems, new levels of human and robotic interaction, and increasingly autonomous systems. How this evolving mix of advanced capabilities will be utilized in the design of new missions is a subject of much current interest. Cost and risk constraints also play a key role in the development of new missions, resulting in a complex interplay of a broad range of factors in the mission development and planning of new missions. This paper will discuss how human, robotic, and autonomous systems could be used in advanced space exploration missions. In particular, a recently completed survey of the state of the art and the potential future of robotic systems, as well as new experiments utilizing human and robotic approaches will be described. Finally, there will be a discussion of how best to utilize these various approaches for meeting space exploration goals.

  1. Comprehensive Plasma Metabolomic Analyses of Atherosclerotic Progression Reveal Alterations in Glycerophospholipid and Sphingolipid Metabolism in Apolipoprotein E-deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Vi T.; Huang, Aric; Zhong, Lexy H.; Shi, Yuanyuan; Werstuck, Geoff H.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major underlying cause of most cardiovascular diseases. Despite recent advances, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of atherogenesis are not clear. In this study, comprehensive plasma metabolomics were used to investigate early-stage atherosclerotic development and progression in chow-fed apolipoprotein E-deficient mice at 5, 10 and 15 weeks of age. Comprehensive plasma metabolomic profiles, based on 4365 detected metabolite features, differentiate atherosclerosis-prone from atherosclerosis-resistant models. Metabolites in the sphingomyelin pathway were significantly altered prior to detectable lesion formation and at all subsequent time-points. The cytidine diphosphate-diacylglycerol pathway was up-regulated during stage I of atherosclerosis, while metabolites in the phosphatidylethanolamine and glycosphingolipid pathways were augmented in mice with stage II lesions. These pathways, involving glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism, were also significantly affected during the course of atherosclerotic progression. Our findings suggest that distinct plasma metabolomic profiles can differentiate the different stages of atherosclerotic progression. This study reveals that alteration of specific, previously unreported pathways of glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism are associated with atherosclerosis. The clear difference in the level of several metabolites supports the use of plasma lipid profiling as a diagnostic tool of atherogenesis. PMID:27721472

  2. The Fat-Fed Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mouse Brachiocephalic Artery in the Study of Atherosclerotic Plaque Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Andrew R.; Jackson, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis has been studied in animals for almost a century, yet the events leading up to the rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque (the underlying cause of the majority of fatal thrombosis formation) have only been studied in the past decade, due in part to the development of a mouse model of spontaneous plaque rupture. Apolipoprotein E knockout mice, when fed a high-fat diet, consistently develop lesions in the brachiocephalic artery that rupture at a known time point. It is therefore now possible to observe the development of lesions to elucidate the mechanisms behind the rupture of plaques. Critics argue that the model does not replicate the appearance of human atherosclerotic plaque ruptures. The purpose of this review is to highlight the reasons why we should be looking to the apolipoprotein E knockout mouse to further our understanding of plaque rupture. PMID:21076539

  3. Human-System Safety Methods for Development of Advanced Air Traffic Management Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.

    1999-05-24

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is supporting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in the development of advanced air traffic management (ATM) systems as part of the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies program. As part of this program INEEL conducted a survey of human-system safety methods that have been applied to complex technical systems, to identify lessons learned from these applications and provide recommendations for the development of advanced ATM systems. The domains that were surveyed included offshore oil and gas, commercial nuclear power, commercial aviation, and military. The survey showed that widely different approaches are used in these industries, and that the methods used range from very high-level, qualitative approaches to very detailed quantitative methods such as human reliability analysis (HRA) and probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). In addition, the industries varied widely in how effectively they incorporate human-system safety assessment in the design, development, and testing of complex technical systems. In spite of the lack of uniformity in the approaches and methods used, it was found that methods are available that can be combined and adapted to support the development of advanced air traffic management systems.

  4. Effects of an Advanced Reactor’s Design, Use of Automation, and Mission on Human Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Joe; Johanna H. Oxstrand

    2014-06-01

    The roles, functions, and tasks of the human operator in existing light water nuclear power plants (NPPs) are based on sound nuclear and human factors engineering (HFE) principles, are well defined by the plant’s conduct of operations, and have been validated by years of operating experience. However, advanced NPPs whose engineering designs differ from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) will impose changes on the roles, functions, and tasks of the human operators. The plans to increase the use of automation, reduce staffing levels, and add to the mission of these advanced NPPs will also affect the operator’s roles, functions, and tasks. We assert that these factors, which do not appear to have received a lot of attention by the design engineers of advanced NPPs relative to the attention given to conceptual design of these reactors, can have significant risk implications for the operators and overall plant safety if not mitigated appropriately. This paper presents a high-level analysis of a specific advanced NPP and how its engineered design, its plan to use greater levels of automation, and its expanded mission have risk significant implications on operator performance and overall plant safety.

  5. Human Factors Engineering (HFE) insights for advanced reactors based upon operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, J.; Nasta, K.

    1997-01-01

    The NRC Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (HFE PRM, NUREG-0711) was developed to support a design process review for advanced reactor design certification under 10CFR52. The HFE PRM defines ten fundamental elements of a human factors engineering program. An Operating Experience Review (OER) is one of these elements. The main purpose of an OER is to identify potential safety issues from operating plant experience and ensure that they are addressed in a new design. Broad-based experience reviews have typically been performed in the past by reactor designers. For the HFE PRM the intent is to have a more focussed OER that concentrates on HFE issues or experience that would be relevant to the human-system interface (HSI) design process for new advanced reactors. This document provides a detailed list of HFE-relevant operating experience pertinent to the HSI design process for advanced nuclear power plants. This document is intended to be used by NRC reviewers as part of the HFE PRM review process in determining the completeness of an OER performed by an applicant for advanced reactor design certification. 49 refs.

  6. Delivery of negatively charged liposomes into the atherosclerotic plaque of apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse aortic tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhaorigetu, Siqin; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Sood, Anil K; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Walton, Brian L

    2014-09-01

    Liposomes have been used to diagnose and treat cancer and, to a lesser extent, cardiovascular disease. We previously showed the uptake of anionic liposomes into the atheromas of Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits within lipid pools. However, the cellular distribution of anionic liposomes in atherosclerotic plaque remains undescribed. In addition, how anionic liposomes are absorbed into atherosclerotic plaque is unclear. We investigated the uptake and distribution of anionic liposomes in atherosclerotic plaque in aortic tissues from apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. To facilitate the tracking of liposomes, we used liposomes containing fluorescently labeled non-silencing small interfering RNA. Confocal microscopy analysis showed the uptake of anionic liposomes into atherosclerotic plaque and colocalization with macrophages. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed anionic liposomal accumulation in macrophages. To investigate how anionic liposomes cross the local endothelial barrier, we examined the role of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) treated with or without the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Pretreatment with amantadine, an inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, significantly decreased liposomal uptake in HCAECs treated with or without TNF-α by 77% and 46%, respectively. Immunoblot analysis showed that endogenous clathrin expression was significantly increased in HCAECs stimulated with TNF-α but was inhibited by amantadine. These studies indicated that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is partly responsible for the uptake of liposomes by endothelial cells. Our results suggest that anionic liposomes target macrophage-rich areas of vulnerable plaque in ApoE(-)(/)(-) mice; this finding may lead to the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for treating vulnerable plaque in humans.

  7. Biophysical regulation of Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected monocyte recruitment to atherosclerotic foci

    PubMed Central

    Evani, Shankar J.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is implicated in atherosclerosis although the contributory mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize that C. pneumoniae infection favors the recruitment of monocytes to atherosclerotic foci by altering monocyte biophysics. Primary, fresh human monocytes were infected with C. pneumoniae for 8 h, and the interactions between monocytes and E-selectin or aortic endothelium under flow were characterized by video microscopy and image analysis. The distribution of membrane lipid rafts and adhesion receptors were analyzed by imaging flow cytometry. Infected cells rolled on E-selectin and endothelial surfaces, and this rolling was slower, steady and uniform compared to uninfected cells. Infection decreases cholesterol levels, increases membrane fluidity, disrupts lipid rafts, and redistributes CD44, which is the primary mediator of rolling interactions. Together, these changes translate to higher firm adhesion of infected monocytes on endothelium, which is enhanced in the presence of LDL. Uninfected monocytes treated with LDL or left untreated were used as baseline control. Our results demonstrate that the membrane biophysical changes due to infection and hyperlipidemia are one of the key mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae can exacerbate atherosclerotic pathology. These findings provide a framework to characterize the role of ‘infectious burden’ in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26785849

  8. Ultrafast optical-ultrasonic system and miniaturized catheter for imaging and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiawen; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Steward, Earl; Yu, Mingyue; Piao, Zhonglie; He, Youmin; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav M.; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) is the number one cause of death worldwide. The majority of CAD-induced deaths are due to the rupture of vulnerable plaques. Accurate assessment of plaques is crucial to optimize treatment and prevent death in patients with CAD. Current diagnostic techniques are often limited by either spatial resolution or penetration depth. Several studies have proved that the combined use of optical and ultrasonic imaging techniques increase diagnostic accuracy of vulnerable plaques. Here, we introduce an ultrafast optical-ultrasonic dual-modality imaging system and flexible miniaturized catheter, which enables the translation of this technology into clinical practice. This system can perform simultaneous optical coherence tomography (OCT)-intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging at 72 frames per second safely in vivo, i.e., visualizing a 72 mm-long artery in 4 seconds. Results obtained in atherosclerotic rabbits in vivo and human coronary artery segments show that this ultrafast technique can rapidly provide volumetric mapping of plaques and clearly identify vulnerable plaques. By providing ultrafast imaging of arteries with high resolution and deep penetration depth simultaneously, this hybrid IVUS-OCT technology opens new and safe opportunities to evaluate in real-time the risk posed by plaques, detect vulnerable plaques, and optimize treatment decisions. PMID:26678300

  9. Classification of aortic atherosclerotic lesions with time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Marcu, Laura; Grundfest, Warren S.; Fishbein, Michael C.

    1999-07-01

    In this study, we examine the possibility of differentiating between classes of atherosclerotic lesions based on time- resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and we compare the performance of classification schemes that use either the time-resolved spectra or only the intensity spectra. Transient fluorescence emissions induced by pulsed nitrogen laser excitation was measured on 87 excised samples of human aorta. The samples were classified histologically using the AHA classification Predictor variables derived from the time-resolved spectra included the spectral intensities at 360-510 nm and parameters of a biexponential fit of the fluorescence impulse response function. Stepwise discriminant analysis using these predict variables showed that a few predictor variables sufficed to correctly classify 89 percent of the samples. Excluding the time- dependent decay and using only the spectral intensities, the percentage of correctly classified cases was significantly lower: 51 percent. These results establish that time- resolved fluorescence spectroscopy markedly improved on the performance of steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy for fine classification of atherosclerotic lesions.

  10. Biophysical regulation of Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected monocyte recruitment to atherosclerotic foci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evani, Shankar J.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is implicated in atherosclerosis although the contributory mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize that C. pneumoniae infection favors the recruitment of monocytes to atherosclerotic foci by altering monocyte biophysics. Primary, fresh human monocytes were infected with C. pneumoniae for 8 h, and the interactions between monocytes and E-selectin or aortic endothelium under flow were characterized by video microscopy and image analysis. The distribution of membrane lipid rafts and adhesion receptors were analyzed by imaging flow cytometry. Infected cells rolled on E-selectin and endothelial surfaces, and this rolling was slower, steady and uniform compared to uninfected cells. Infection decreases cholesterol levels, increases membrane fluidity, disrupts lipid rafts, and redistributes CD44, which is the primary mediator of rolling interactions. Together, these changes translate to higher firm adhesion of infected monocytes on endothelium, which is enhanced in the presence of LDL. Uninfected monocytes treated with LDL or left untreated were used as baseline control. Our results demonstrate that the membrane biophysical changes due to infection and hyperlipidemia are one of the key mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae can exacerbate atherosclerotic pathology. These findings provide a framework to characterize the role of ‘infectious burden’ in the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  11. Endothelial to mesenchymal transition is common in atherosclerotic lesions and is associated with plaque instability.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Solene M; Lecce, Laura; Michelis, Katherine C; Nomura-Kitabayashi, Aya; Pandey, Gaurav; Purushothaman, K-Raman; d'Escamard, Valentina; Li, Jennifer R; Hadri, Lahouaria; Fujitani, Kenji; Moreno, Pedro R; Benard, Ludovic; Rimmele, Pauline; Cohain, Ariella; Mecham, Brigham; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Nabel, Elizabeth G; Hajjar, Roger; Fuster, Valentin; Boehm, Manfred; Kovacic, Jason C

    2016-06-24

    Endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EndMT) plays a major role during development, and also contributes to several adult cardiovascular diseases. Importantly, mesenchymal cells including fibroblasts are prominent in atherosclerosis, with key functions including regulation of: inflammation, matrix and collagen production, and plaque structural integrity. However, little is known about the origins of atherosclerosis-associated fibroblasts. Here we show using endothelial-specific lineage-tracking that EndMT-derived fibroblast-like cells are common in atherosclerotic lesions, with EndMT-derived cells expressing a range of fibroblast-specific markers. In vitro modelling confirms that EndMT is driven by TGF-β signalling, oxidative stress and hypoxia; all hallmarks of atherosclerosis. 'Transitioning' cells are readily detected in human plaques co-expressing endothelial and fibroblast/mesenchymal proteins, indicative of EndMT. The extent of EndMT correlates with an unstable plaque phenotype, which appears driven by altered collagen-MMP production in EndMT-derived cells. We conclude that EndMT contributes to atherosclerotic patho-biology and is associated with complex plaques that may be related to clinical events.

  12. TRAIL-expressing T cells induce apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells in the atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kayoko; Niessner, Alexander; Kopecky, Stephen L.; Frye, Robert L.; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2006-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are precipitated by a rupture of the atherosclerotic plaque, often at the site of T cell and macrophage infiltration. Here, we show that plaque-infiltrating CD4 T cells effectively kill vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). VSMCs sensitive to T cell–mediated killing express the death receptor DR5 (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand [TRAIL] receptor 2), and anti-TRAIL and anti-DR5 antibodies block T cell–mediated apoptosis. CD4 T cells that express TRAIL upon stimulation are expanded in patients with ACS and more effectively induce VSMC apoptosis. Adoptive transfer of plaque-derived CD4 T cells into immunodeficient mice that are engrafted with human atherosclerotic plaque results in apoptosis of VSMCs, which was prevented by coadministration of anti-TRAIL antibody. These data identify that the death pathway is triggered by TRAIL-producing CD4 T cells as a direct mechanism of VSMC apoptosis, a process which may lead to plaque destabilization. PMID:16418392

  13. Endothelial to mesenchymal transition is common in atherosclerotic lesions and is associated with plaque instability

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Solene M.; Lecce, Laura; Michelis, Katherine C.; Nomura-Kitabayashi, Aya; Pandey, Gaurav; Purushothaman, K-Raman; d'Escamard, Valentina; Li, Jennifer R.; Hadri, Lahouaria; Fujitani, Kenji; Moreno, Pedro R.; Benard, Ludovic; Rimmele, Pauline; Cohain, Ariella; Mecham, Brigham; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Hajjar, Roger; Fuster, Valentin; Boehm, Manfred; Kovacic, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EndMT) plays a major role during development, and also contributes to several adult cardiovascular diseases. Importantly, mesenchymal cells including fibroblasts are prominent in atherosclerosis, with key functions including regulation of: inflammation, matrix and collagen production, and plaque structural integrity. However, little is known about the origins of atherosclerosis-associated fibroblasts. Here we show using endothelial-specific lineage-tracking that EndMT-derived fibroblast-like cells are common in atherosclerotic lesions, with EndMT-derived cells expressing a range of fibroblast-specific markers. In vitro modelling confirms that EndMT is driven by TGF-β signalling, oxidative stress and hypoxia; all hallmarks of atherosclerosis. ‘Transitioning' cells are readily detected in human plaques co-expressing endothelial and fibroblast/mesenchymal proteins, indicative of EndMT. The extent of EndMT correlates with an unstable plaque phenotype, which appears driven by altered collagen-MMP production in EndMT-derived cells. We conclude that EndMT contributes to atherosclerotic patho-biology and is associated with complex plaques that may be related to clinical events. PMID:27340017

  14. Some inadequacies of the current human factors certification process of advanced aircraft technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paries, Jean

    1994-01-01

    Automation related accidents or serious incidents are not limited to advanced technology aircraft. There is a full history of such accidents with conventional technology aircraft. However, this type of occurrence is far from sparing the newest 'glass cockpit' generation, and it even seems to be a growing contributor to its accident rate. Nevertheless, all these aircraft have been properly certificated according to the relevant airworthiness regulations. Therefore, there is a growing concern that with the technological advancement of air transport aircraft cockpits, the current airworthiness regulations addressing cockpit design and human factors may have reached some level of inadequacy. This paper reviews some aspects of the current airworthiness regulations and certification process related to human factors of cockpit design and focuses on questioning their ability to guarantee the intended safety objectives.

  15. Advances in radiation biology: Relative radiation sensitivities of human organ systems. Volume 12

    SciTech Connect

    Lett, J.T.; Altman, K.I.; Ehmann, U.K.; Cox, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is a thematically focused issue of Advances in Radiation Biology. The topic surveyed is relative radiosensitivity of human organ systems. Topics considered include relative radiosensitivities of the thymus, spleen, and lymphohemopoietic systems; relative radiosensitivities of the small and large intestine; relative rediosensitivities of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus; relative radiation sensitivity of the integumentary system; dose response of the epidermal; microvascular, and dermal populations; relative radiosensitivity of the human lung; relative radiosensitivity of fetal tissues; and tolerance of the central and peripheral nervous system to therapeutic irradiation.

  16. Open Innovation at NASA: A New Business Model for Advancing Human Health and Performance Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.; Keeton, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new business model for advancing NASA human health and performance innovations and demonstrates how open innovation shaped its development. A 45 percent research and technology development budget reduction drove formulation of a strategic plan grounded in collaboration. We describe the strategy execution, including adoption and results of open innovation initiatives, the challenges of cultural change, and the development of virtual centers and a knowledge management tool to educate and engage the workforce and promote cultural change.

  17. Recent Advances in Understanding the Role of Nutrition in Human Genome Evolution12

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Kaixiong; Gu, Zhenglong

    2011-01-01

    Dietary transitions in human history have been suggested to play important roles in the evolution of mankind. Genetic variations caused by adaptation to diet during human evolution could have important health consequences in current society. The advance of sequencing technologies and the rapid accumulation of genome information provide an unprecedented opportunity to comprehensively characterize genetic variations in human populations and unravel the genetic basis of human evolution. Series of selection detection methods, based on various theoretical models and exploiting different aspects of selection signatures, have been developed. Their applications at the species and population levels have respectively led to the identification of human specific selection events that distinguish human from nonhuman primates and local adaptation events that contribute to human diversity. Scrutiny of candidate genes has revealed paradigms of adaptations to specific nutritional components and genome-wide selection scans have verified the prevalence of diet-related selection events and provided many more candidates awaiting further investigation. Understanding the role of diet in human evolution is fundamental for the development of evidence-based, genome-informed nutritional practices in the era of personal genomics. PMID:22332091

  18. Endovascular Versus Medical Therapy for Atherosclerotic Renovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mark Shipeng; Folt, David A.; Drummond, Christopher A.; Haller, Steven T.; Cooper, Emily L.; Brewster, Pamela; Evans, Kaleigh L.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of renal artery stenosis (RAS) has become increasingly common in part due to greater awareness of ischemic renal disease and increased use of diagnostic techniques. Over 90 % of RAS cases are caused by atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD). Patients with ARVD are at high risk for fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular and renal events. The mortality rate in patients with ARVD is high, especially with other cardiovascular or renal comorbidities. Recent clinical studies have provided substantial evidence concerning medical therapy and endovascular interventional therapeutic approaches for ARVD. Despite previous randomized clinical trials, the optimal therapy for ARVD remained uncertain until the results of the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial were released recently. CORAL demonstrated that optimal medical therapy was equally effective to endovascular therapy in the treatment of ARVD. Clinicians can now practice with more evidence-based medicine to treat ARVD and potentially decrease mortality in patients with ARVD using optimal medical therapy. PMID:25301353

  19. Intravascular photoacoustic tomography for characterization of atherosclerotic lipid and inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Qin, Huan; Shi, Yujiao; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a fast growing imaging technology depending on its high optical resolution of optics while taking the advantage of the high penetration depth of ultrasound. In this paper, we demonstrate the new progress in the photoacoustic imaging. Atherosclerosis is characterized by a progressive build-up of lipid in the arterial wall, which is known as plaque. Histological studies demonstrate that the primary cause of acute cardiovascular events is the rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Lipid and inflammation within the plaque are related to influence the propensity of plaques to disrupt. Photoacoustic intravascular tomography (IVPAT) holds a great advantage in providing comprehensive morphological and functional information of plaques. Lipid relative concentration maps of atherosclerotic aorta were obtained and compared with histology. Furthermore, by selectively targeting the intravascular inflammatory cytokines, IVPAT is also capable of mapping the inflamed area and determining the degree of inflammation.

  20. Adventitial inflammation and its interaction with intimal atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Wangler, Susanne; Gleissner, Christian A.; Korosoglou, Grigorios; Katus, Hugo A.; Erbel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The presence of adventitial inflammation in correlation with atherosclerotic lesions has been recognized for decades. In the last years, several studies have investigated the relevance and impact of adventitial inflammation on atherogenesis. In the abdominal aorta of elderly Apoe−/− mice, adventitial inflammatory structures were characterized as organized ectopic lymphoid tissue, and therefore termed adventitial tertiary lymphoid organs (ATLOs). These ATLOs possess similarities in development, structure and function to secondary lymphoid organs. A crosstalk between intimal atherosclerotic lesions and ATLOs has been suggested, and several studies could demonstrate a potential role for medial vascular smooth muscle cells in this process. We here review the development, phenotypic characteristics, and function of ATLOs in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we discuss the possible role of medial vascular smooth muscle cells and their interaction between plaque and ATLOs. PMID:25152736

  1. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Sunny; Miller, Avraham; Agarwal, Chirag; Zakin, Elina; Acholonu, Michael; Gidwani, Umesh; Sharma, Abhishek; Kulbak, Guy; Shani, Jacob; Chen, On

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstable or vulnerable to rupture. The presence of inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaque has been considered as one of the initial events which convert a stable plaque into an unstable and vulnerable plaque. This paper systemically reviews the noninvasive and invasive imaging modalities that are currently available to detect this inflammatory process, at least in the intermediate stages, and discusses the ongoing studies that will help us to better understand and identify it at the molecular level. PMID:26798515

  2. Severe Brown Fat Lipoatrophy Aggravates Atherosclerotic Process in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Beneit, Nuria; Escribano, Óscar; Díaz-Castroverde, Sabela; García-Gómez, Gema; Fernández, Silvia; Benito, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is one of the major risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases and is characterized by abnormal accumulation of adipose tissue, including perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT). However, brown adipose tissue (BAT) activation reduces visceral adiposity. To demonstrate that severe brown fat lipoatrophy might accelerate atherosclerotic process, we generated a new mouse model without insulin receptor (IR) in BAT and without apolipoprotein (Apo)E (BAT-specific IR knockout [BATIRKO];ApoE(-/-) mice) and assessed vascular and metabolic alterations associated to obesity. In addition, we analyzed the contribution of the adipose organ to vascular inflammation. Brown fat lipoatrophy induces visceral adiposity, mainly in gonadal depot (gonadal white adipose tissue [gWAT]), severe glucose intolerance, high postprandial glucose levels, and a severe defect in acute insulin secretion. BATIRKO;ApoE(-/-) mice showed greater hypertriglyceridemia than the obtained in ApoE(-/-) and hypercholesterolemia similar to ApoE(-/-) mice. BATIRKO;ApoE(-/-) mice, in addition to primary insulin resistance in BAT, also showed a significant decrease in insulin signaling in liver, gWAT, heart, aorta artery, and thoracic PVAT. More importantly, our results suggest that severe brown fat lipoatrophy aggravates the atherosclerotic process, characterized by a significant increase of lipid depots, atherosclerotic coverage, lesion size and complexity, increased macrophage infiltration, and proinflammatory markers expression. Finally, an increase of TNF-α and leptin as well as a decrease of adiponectin by BAT, gWAT, and thoracic PVAT might also be responsible of vascular damage. Our results suggest that severe brown lipoatrophy aggravates atherosclerotic process. Thus, BAT activation might protect against obesity and its associated metabolic alterations. PMID:27414981

  3. From Lipids to Inflammation: New Approaches to Reducing Atherosclerotic Risk.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Michael D; Fazio, Sergio

    2016-02-19

    The introduction of statins ≈ 30 years ago ushered in the era of lipid lowering as the most effective way to reduce risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nonetheless, residual risk remains high, and statin intolerance is frequently encountered in clinical practice. After a long dry period, the field of therapeutics targeted to lipids and atherosclerosis has entered a renaissance. Moreover, the demonstration of clinical benefits from the addition of ezetimibe to statin therapy in subjects with acute coronary syndromes has renewed the enthusiasm for the cholesterol hypothesis and the hope that additional agents that lower low-density lipoprotein will decrease risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Drugs in the orphan disease category are now available for patients with the most extreme hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, discovery and rapid translation of a novel biological pathway has given rise to a new class of cholesterol-lowering drugs, the proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin-9 inhibitors. Trials of niacin added to statin have failed to demonstrate cardiac benefits, and 3 cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors have also failed to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk, despite producing substantial increases in HDL levels. Although the utility of triglyceride-lowering therapies remains uncertain, 2 large clinical trials are testing the influence of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on atherosclerotic events in hypertriglyceridemia. Novel antisense therapies targeting apolipoprotein C-III (for triglyceride reduction) and apo(a) (for lipoprotein(a) reduction) are showing a promising trajectory. Finally, 2 large clinical trials are formally putting the inflammatory hypothesis of atherosclerosis to the test and may open a new avenue for cardiovascular disease risk reduction.

  4. Macrophage-targeted photodynamic detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Tawakol, Ahmed; Castano, Ana P.; Gad, Faten; Zahra, Touqir; Ahmadi, Atosa; Stern, Jeremy; Ortel, Bernhard; Chirico, Stephanie; Shirazi, Azadeh; Syed, Sakeena; Muller, James E.

    2003-06-01

    Rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque (VP) leading to coronary thrombosis is the chief cause of sudden cardiac death. VPs are angiographically insignificant lesions, which are excessively inflamed and characterized by dense macrophage infiltration, large necrotic lipid cores, thin fibrous caps, and paucity of smooth muscle cells. We have recently shown that chlorin(e6) conjugated with maleylated albumin can target macrophages with high selectivity via the scavenger receptor. We report the potential of this macrophage-targeted fluorescent probe to localize in VPs in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis, and allow detection and/or diagnosis by fluorescence spectroscopy or imaging. Atherosclerotic lesions were induced in New Zealand White rabbit aortas by balloon injury followed by administration of a high-fat diet. 24-hours after IV injection of the conjugate into atherosclerotic or normal rabbits, the animals were sacrificed, and aortas were removed, dissected and examined for fluorescence localization in plaques by fiber-based spectrofluorimetry and confocal microscopy. Dye uptake within the aortas was also quantified by fluorescence extraction of samples from aorta segments. Biodistribution of the dye was studied in many organs of the rabbits. Surface spectrofluorimetry after conjugate injection was able to distinguish between plaque and adjacent aorta, between atherosclerotic and normal aorta, and balloon-injured and normal iliac arteries with high significance. Discrete areas of high fluorescence (up to 20 times control were detected in the balloon-injured segments, presumably corresponding to macrophage-rich plaques. Confocal microscopy showed red ce6 fluorescence localized in plaques that showed abundant foam cells and macrophages by histology. Extraction data on aortic tissue corroborated the selectivity of the conjugate for plaques. These data support the strategy of employing macrophage-targeted fluorescent dyes to detect VP by intravascular

  5. Quantitative analysis of the polarization characteristics of atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarkova, Ekaterina V.; Kirillin, Michail Y.; Dudenkova, Varvara V.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Moiseev, Alexander A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Timofeeva, Lidia B.; Fiks, Ilya I.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Gladkova, Natalia D.

    2016-04-01

    In this study we demonstrate the capability of cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP OCT) to assess collagen and elastin fibers condition in atherosclerotic plaques basing on ratio of the OCT signal levels in cross- and co- polarizations. We consider the depolarization factor (DF) and the effective birefringence (Δn) as quantitative characteristics of CP OCT images. We revealed that calculation of both DF and Δn in the region of interest (fibrous cap) yields a statistically significant difference between stable and unstable plaques (0.46+/-0.21 vs 0.09+/-0.04 for IDF; (4.7+/-1.0)•10-4 vs (2.5+/-0.7)•10-4 for Δn p<0.05). In parallel with CP OCT we used the nonlinear microscopy for analysis of thin cross-section of atherosclerotic plaque, revealing the different average isotropy index of collagen and elastin fibers for stable and unstable plaques (0.30 +/- 0.10 vs 0.70 +/- 0.08; p<0.001). The proposed approach for quantitative assessment of CP OCT images allows cross-scattering and birefringence characterization of stable and unstable atherosclerotic plaques.

  6. Small entities with large impact: microcalcifications and atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Maldonado, Natalia; Aikawa, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Atherosclerotic plaque rupture and subsequent acute events, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, contribute to the majority of cardiovascular-related deaths. Calcification has emerged as a significant predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, challenging previously held notions that calcifications stabilize atherosclerotic plaques. In this review, we address this discrepancy through recent findings that not all calcifications are equivalent in determining plaque stability. Recent findings The risk associated with calcification is inversely associated with calcification density. As opposed to large calcifications that potentially stabilize the plaque, biomechanical modeling indicates that small microcalcifications within the plaque fibrous cap can lead to sufficient stress accumulation to cause plaque rupture. Microcalcifications appear to derive from matrix vesicles enriched in calcium-binding proteins that are released by cells within the plaque. Clinical detection of microcalcifications has been hampered by the lack of imaging resolution required for in-vivo visualization; however, recent studies have demonstrated promising new techniques to predict the presence of microcalcifications. Summary Microcalcifications play a major role in destabilizing atherosclerotic plaques. The identification of critical characteristics that lead to instability along with new imaging modalities to detect their presence in vivo may allow early identification and prevention of acute cardiovascular events. PMID:25188916

  7. Combination of Light and Melatonin Time Cues for Phase Advancing the Human Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Tina M.; Markwald, Rachel R.; Chinoy, Evan D.; Snider, Jesse A.; Bessman, Sara C.; Jung, Christopher M.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Photic and non-photic stimuli have been shown to shift the phase of the human circadian clock. We examined how photic and non-photic time cues may be combined by the human circadian system by assessing the phase advancing effects of one evening dose of exogenous melatonin, alone and in combination with one session of morning bright light exposure. Design: Randomized placebo-controlled double-blind circadian protocol. The effects of four conditions, dim light (∼1.9 lux, ∼0.6 Watts/m2)-placebo, dim light-melatonin (5 mg), bright light (∼3000 lux, ∼7 Watts/m2)-placebo, and bright light-melatonin on circadian phase was assessed by the change in the salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) prior to and following treatment under constant routine conditions. Melatonin or placebo was administered 5.75 h prior to habitual bedtime and 3 h of bright light exposure started 1 h prior to habitual wake time. Setting: Sleep and chronobiology laboratory environment free of time cues. Participants: Thirty-six healthy participants (18 females) aged 22 ± 4 y (mean ± SD). Results: Morning bright light combined with early evening exogenous melatonin induced a greater phase advance of the DLMO than either treatment alone. Bright light alone and melatonin alone induced similar phase advances. Conclusion: Information from light and melatonin appear to be combined by the human circadian clock. The ability to combine circadian time cues has important implications for understanding fundamental physiological principles of the human circadian timing system. Knowledge of such principles is important for designing effective countermeasures for phase-shifting the human circadian clock to adapt to jet lag, shift work, and for designing effective treatments for circadian sleep-wakefulness disorders. Citation: Burke TM; Markwald RR; Chinoy ED; Snider JA; Bessman SC; Jung CM; Wright Jr KP. Combination of light and melatonin time cues for phase advancing the human circadian

  8. Advances in probing the blood vessels of the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacke, E. Mark

    2002-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers a marvelous means to probe the vasculature of the human body non-invasively. The first major advances came when the physics of the effects of motion in MRI were first understood well enough that new methods could be designed to compensate for the motion. This led to the development of MR angiography. The second major advance occurred when a contrast agent was used to enhance the signal from vessels independent of blood flow. This made it possible to image much smaller vessels because of the increased signal-to-noise ratio. The third major advance occurred when the susceptibility of the venous blood was used to create a new contrast unique to veins even in the presence of the contrast agent to enhance their signal. The fourth advance is close behind with the potential to use the susceptibility to measure the local oxygen content. Each of these advances involved some interesting physics and raised questions about local magnetic field effects, some of which remain unanswered yet today. We will show results from the first three levels with hints at how to proceed to the fourth. The development of this technology has important clinical implications. With new higher relaxivity contrast agents and higher field magnets coming on the market, the possibility to image vessels down to on the order of 100 microns may be viable. Each advance has enhanced the range of applications from just imaging vessels to occult vascular disease, trauma, the detection of blood products, and physiologic function of the tissue itself.

  9. Advanced Imaging and Tissue Engineering of the Human Limbal Epithelial Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Isobel; Dziasko, Marc; Kureshi, Alvena; Levis, Hannah J.; Morgan, Louise; Neale, Michael; Sheth, Radhika; Tovell, Victoria E.; Vernon, Amanda J.; Funderburgh, James L.; Daniels, Julie T.

    2015-01-01

    The limbal epithelial stem cell niche provides a unique, physically protective environment in which limbal epithelial stem cells reside in close proximity with accessory cell types and their secreted factors. The use of advanced imaging techniques is described to visualize the niche in three dimensions in native human corneal tissue. In addition, a protocol is provided for the isolation and culture of three different cell types, including human limbal epithelial stem cells from the limbal niche of human donor tissue. Finally, the process of incorporating these cells within plastic compressed collagen constructs to form a tissue-engineered corneal limbus is described and how immunohistochemical techniques may be applied to characterize cell phenotype therein. PMID:25388395

  10. Challenges and advances in mouse modeling for human pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wanglong

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is critical for developed countries, where its rate of diagnosis has been increasing steadily annually. In the past decade, the advances of pancreatic cancer research have not contributed to the decline in mortality rates from pancreatic cancer—the overall 5-year survival rate remains about 5% low. This number only underscores an obvious urgency for us to better understand the biological features of pancreatic carcinogenesis, to develop early detection methods, and to improve novel therapeutic treatments. To achieve these goals, animal modeling that faithfully recapitulates the whole process of human pancreatic cancer is central to making the advancements. In this review, we summarize the currently available animal models for pancreatic cancer and the advances in pancreatic cancer animal modeling. We compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of three major categories of these models: (1) carcinogen-induced; (2) xenograft and allograft; and (3) genetically engineered mouse models. We focus more on the genetically engineered mouse models, a category which has been rapidly expanded recently for their capacities to mimic human pancreatic cancer and metastasis, and highlight the combinations of these models with various newly developed strategies and cell-lineage labeling systems. PMID:23114842

  11. A framework for advanced methods of control of human-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Paul

    2012-04-01

    The vibration serviceability of civil engineering structures under human dynamic excitation is becoming ever more critical with the design and redevelopment of structures with reduced mass, stiffness and damping. A large number of problems have been reported in floors, footbridges, sports stadia, staircases and other structures. Unfortunately, the range of options available to fix such problems are very limited and are primarily limited to structural modification or the implementation of passive vibration control measures, such as tuned mass dampers. This paper presents the initial development of a new framework for advanced methods of control of humaninduced vibrations in civil engineering structures. This framework includes both existing passive methods of vibration control and more advanced active, semi-active and hybrid control techniques, which may be further developed as practical solutions for these problems. Through the use of this framework, rational decisions as to the most appropriate technologies for particular human vibration problems may be made and pursued further. This framework is also intended to be used in the design of new civil engineering structures, where advanced control technologies may be used both to increase the achievable slenderness and to reduce the amount of construction materials used and hence their embodied energy. This will be an ever more important consideration with the current drive for structures with reduced environmental impact.

  12. Stationary and high-frequency pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance of a calcified atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul'Yanov, V. A.; Galiullina, L. F.; Galyavich, A. S.; Izotov, V. G.; Mamin, G. V.; Orlinskii, S. B.; Rodionov, A. A.; Salakhov, M. Kh.; Silkin, N. I.; Sitdikova, L. M.; Khairullin, R. N.; Chelyshev, Yu. A.

    2008-09-01

    New possibilities of applying high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance in medicine are demonstrated on an example of the investigation of a calcified atherosclerotic plaque. After the irradiation of the atherosclerotic plaque by x rays, a new type of paramagnetic centers—organomineral radicals—is detected. The spectral and relaxation characteristics of these radicals depend on the calcification degree of the atherosclerotic plaque and can be used for diagnostics.

  13. Recent advances in the prenatal interrogation of the human fetal genome.

    PubMed

    Hui, Lisa; Bianchi, Diana W

    2013-02-01

    The amount of genetic and genomic information obtainable from the human fetus during pregnancy is accelerating at an unprecedented rate. Two themes have dominated recent technological advances in prenatal diagnosis: interrogation of the fetal genome in increasingly high resolution and the development of non-invasive methods of fetal testing using cell-free DNA in maternal plasma. These two areas of advancement have now converged with several recent reports of non-invasive assessment of the entire fetal genome from maternal blood. However, technological progress is outpacing the ability of the healthcare providers and patients to incorporate these new tests into existing clinical care, and further complicates many of the economic and ethical dilemmas in prenatal diagnosis. This review summarizes recent work in this field and discusses the integration of these new technologies into the clinic and society.

  14. Computational Hemodynamic Analysis for the Diagnosis of Atherosclerotic Changes in Intracranial Aneurysms: A Proof-of-Concept Study Using 3 Cases Harboring Atherosclerotic and Nonatherosclerotic Aneurysms Simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Hidenori; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Endo, Toshiki; Funamoto, Kenichi; Ohta, Makoto; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    This was a proof-of-concept computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study designed to identify atherosclerotic changes in intracranial aneurysms. We selected 3 patients with multiple unruptured aneurysms including at least one with atherosclerotic changes and investigated whether an image-based CFD study could provide useful information for discriminating the atherosclerotic aneurysms. Patient-specific geometries were constructed from three-dimensional data obtained using rotational angiography. Transient simulations were conducted under patient-specific inlet flow rates measured by phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimetry. In the postanalyses, we calculated time-averaged wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index, and relative residence time (RRT). The volume of blood flow entering aneurysms through the neck and the mean velocity of blood flow inside aneurysms were examined. We applied the age-of-fluid method to quantitatively assess the residence of blood inside aneurysms. Atherosclerotic changes coincided with regions exposed to disturbed blood flow, as indicated by low WSS and long RRT. Blood entered aneurysms in phase with inlet flow rates. The mean velocities of blood inside atherosclerotic aneurysms were lower than those inside nonatherosclerotic aneurysms. Blood in atherosclerotic aneurysms was older than that in nonatherosclerotic aneurysms, especially near the wall. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that CFD analysis provided detailed information on the exchange and residence of blood that is useful for the diagnosis of atherosclerotic changes in intracranial aneurysms. PMID:27703491

  15. Measuring therapeutic alliance between oncologists and patients with advanced cancer: The Human Connection Scale

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Jennifer W; Block, Susan D.; Nilsson, Matthew; Wright, Alexi; Trice, Elizabeth; Friedlander, Robert; Paulk, Elizabeth; Prigerson, Holly G

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Patients consider having a human connection with a physician to be an important aspect of end-of-life (EOL) care. We sought to develop and validate a measure of therapeutic alliance between advanced cancer patients and their physicians, and to evaluate the effects of therapeutic alliance on EOL experiences and care. Methods We developed The Human Connection (THC) scale to measure the extent to which patients felt a sense of mutual understanding, caring, and trust with their physicians. The scale was administered to 217 advanced cancer patients along with measures of attributes hypothesized to be related to therapeutic alliance, including emotional acceptance of terminal illness. EOL outcomes in 90 patients who died during the study were also examined. Results The 16-item THC questionnaire was internally consistent (Cronbach’s α =.90) and valid, based on its expected positive association with emotional acceptance of the terminal illness (r=.31, P<.0001). THC scores were inversely related to symptom burden (r=−.19, P=.006), functional status (Karnofsky score, r=.22, P=.001), and mental illness (THC score 50.69 for patients with any DSM diagnosis versus 55.22 for those without, P=.03). THC scores were not significantly associated with EOL discussions (P=.68). Among patients who had died, EOL ICU care was inversely associated with therapeutic alliance (THC score 46.5 for those with ICU care versus 55.5 for those without, P=.002), such that patients with higher THC scores were less likely to spend time in the ICU during the last week of life. Conclusion The THC scale is a valid and reliable measure of therapeutic alliance between advanced cancer patients and their physicians. In addition, we found no evidence to suggest that EOL discussions harm patients’ therapeutic alliance. A strong therapeutic alliance is associated with emotional acceptance of a terminal illness and with decreased ICU care at the end of life among patients with advanced cancer

  16. Cannabinoids and atherosclerotic coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Singla, Sandeep; Sachdeva, Rajesh; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2012-06-01

    Marijuana is the most abused recreational drug in the United States. Cannabinoids, the active ingredients of marijuana, affect multiple organ systems in the human body. The pharmacologic effects of marijuana, based on stimulation of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, which are widely distributed in the cardiovascular system, have been well described. Activation of these receptors modulates the function of various cellular elements of the vessel wall, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Clinically, there are reports linking marijuana smoking to the precipitation of angina and acute coronary syndromes. Recently, large published clinical trials with CB1 antagonist rimonabant did not show any significant benefit of this agent in preventing progression of atherosclerosis. In light of these findings and emerging data on multiple pathways linking cannabinoids to atherosclerosis, we discuss the literature on the role of cannabinoids in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. We also propose a marijuana paradox, which implies that inhalation of marijuana may be linked to precipitation of acute coronary syndromes, but modulation of the endocannabinoid system by a noninhalation route may have a salutary effect on the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22278660

  17. Association between human papillomavirus and EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Deng, Fang; Qian, Li-Ting; Meng, Shui-Ping; Zhang, Yang; Shan, Wu-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Bao-Long

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene in lung cancer patients; however, few studies have investigated this association in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients undergoing gefitinib treatment. The present study investigated the association between HPV and EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients. A total of 95 advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients were enrolled in the study. The HPV infection status and presence of EGFR mutations in tumor tissue was evaluated. Patient clinical characteristics were also determined and compared with HPV infection and EGFR mutation status to analyze their impact on progression-free survival. HPV DNA was identified in 27/95 (28.4%) lung adenocarcinoma tumors and was most common in patients with lymph node metastasis (P=0.016). A total of 44/95 (46.3%) cases exhibited EGFR mutations, which were predominantly observed in female patients and non-smokers. The presence of HPV DNA was significantly associated with EGFR mutations (P=0.012) and multivariate analysis also revealed that HPV DNA was significantly associated with EGFR mutations (odds ratio=3.971) in advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Patients with both HPV infections and EGFR mutations exhibit a marked decrease in the risk of lung cancer progression when compared with those without HPV infection or EGFR mutations (adjusted HR=0.640; 95% confidence interval: 0.488–0.840; P=0.001). HPV infection was significantly associated with EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients. Furthermore, patients with HPV infections exhibited the longest progression-free survival times, which may be due to good response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor- or platinum-based-adjuvant therapy in these patients. Patients with EGFR mutations exhibited a better prognosis when compared with those exhibiting wild-type EGFR, regardless of HPV status. PMID:27602120

  18. Association between human papillomavirus and EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Deng, Fang; Qian, Li-Ting; Meng, Shui-Ping; Zhang, Yang; Shan, Wu-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Bao-Long

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene in lung cancer patients; however, few studies have investigated this association in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients undergoing gefitinib treatment. The present study investigated the association between HPV and EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients. A total of 95 advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients were enrolled in the study. The HPV infection status and presence of EGFR mutations in tumor tissue was evaluated. Patient clinical characteristics were also determined and compared with HPV infection and EGFR mutation status to analyze their impact on progression-free survival. HPV DNA was identified in 27/95 (28.4%) lung adenocarcinoma tumors and was most common in patients with lymph node metastasis (P=0.016). A total of 44/95 (46.3%) cases exhibited EGFR mutations, which were predominantly observed in female patients and non-smokers. The presence of HPV DNA was significantly associated with EGFR mutations (P=0.012) and multivariate analysis also revealed that HPV DNA was significantly associated with EGFR mutations (odds ratio=3.971) in advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Patients with both HPV infections and EGFR mutations exhibit a marked decrease in the risk of lung cancer progression when compared with those without HPV infection or EGFR mutations (adjusted HR=0.640; 95% confidence interval: 0.488–0.840; P=0.001). HPV infection was significantly associated with EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients. Furthermore, patients with HPV infections exhibited the longest progression-free survival times, which may be due to good response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor- or platinum-based-adjuvant therapy in these patients. Patients with EGFR mutations exhibited a better prognosis when compared with those exhibiting wild-type EGFR, regardless of HPV status.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING GUIDANCE FOR SAFETY EVALUATIONS OF ADVANCED REACTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    O'HARA, J.; PERSENSKY, J.; SZABO, A.

    2006-10-01

    Advanced reactors are expected to be based on a concept of operations that is different from what is currently used in today's reactors. Therefore, regulatory staff may need new tools, developed from the best available technical bases, to support licensing evaluations. The areas in which new review guidance may be needed and the efforts underway to address the needs will be discussed. Our preliminary results focus on some of the technical issues to be addressed in three areas for which new guidance may be developed: automation and control, operations under degraded conditions, and new human factors engineering methods and tools.

  20. Raised soluble P-selectin moderately accelerates atherosclerotic plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Kevin J; Lumsden, Natalie G; Andrews, Karen L; Aprico, Andrea; Harris, Emma; Irvine, Jennifer C; Jefferis, Ann-maree; Fang, Lu; Kanellakis, Peter; Bobik, Alex; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F

    2014-01-01

    Soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin), a biomarker of inflammatory related pathologies including cardiovascular and peripheral vascular diseases, also has pro-atherosclerotic effects including the ability to increase leukocyte recruitment and modulate thrombotic responses in vivo. The current study explores its role in progressing atherosclerotic plaque disease. Apoe-/- mice placed on a high fat diet (HFD) were given daily injections of recombinant dimeric murine P-selectin (22.5 µg/kg/day) for 8 or 16 weeks. Saline or sE-selectin injections were used as negative controls. In order to assess the role of sP-selectin on atherothrombosis an experimental plaque remodelling murine model, with sm22α-hDTR Apoe-/- mice on a HFD in conjunction with delivery of diphtheria toxin to induce targeted vascular smooth muscle apoptosis, was used. These mice were similarly given daily injections of sP-selectin for 8 or 16 weeks. While plaque mass and aortic lipid content did not change with sP-selectin treatment in Apoe-/- or SM22α-hDTR Apoe-/- mice on HFD, increased plasma MCP-1 and a higher plaque CD45 content in Apoe-/- HFD mice was observed. As well, a significant shift towards a more unstable plaque phenotype in the SM22α-hDTR Apoe-/- HFD mice, with increased macrophage accumulation and lower collagen content, leading to a lower plaque stability index, was observed. These results demonstrate that chronically raised sP-selectin favours progression of an unstable atherosclerotic plaque phenotype.

  1. Identification of Atherosclerotic Plaques in Carotid Artery by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Rick; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Silveira, Landulfo; Costa, Maricília Silva; Alves, Leandro Procópio; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto; Brugnera, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid artery using the Fluorescence Spectroscopy. The most important pathogeny in the cardiovascular disorders is the atherosclerosis, which may affect even younger individuals. With approximately 1.2 million heart attacks and 750,000 strokes afflicting an aging American population each year, cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of death. Carotid artery samples were obtained from the Autopsy Service at the University of São Paulo (São Paulo, SP, Brazil) taken from cadavers. After a histopathological analysis the 60 carotid artery samples were divided into two groups: normal (26) and atherosclerotic plaques (34). Samples were irradiated with the wavelength of 488 nm from an Argon laser. A 600 μm core optical fiber, coupled to the Argon laser, was used for excitation of the sample, whereas another 600 optical fiber, coupled to the spectrograph entrance slit, was used for collecting the fluorescence from the sample. Measurements were taken at different points on each sample and then averaged. Fluorescence spectra showed a single broad line centered at 549 nm. The fluorescence intensity for each sample was calculated by subtracting the intensity at the peak (550 nm) and at the bottom (510 nm) and then data were statistically analyzed, looking for differences between both groups of samples. ANOVA statistical test showed a significant difference (p<0,05) between both types of tissues, with regard to the fluorescence peak intensities. Our results indicate that this technique could be used to detect the presence of the atherosclerotic in carotid tissue.

  2. Atherosclerotic plaque detection by confocal Brillouin and Raman microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Basagaoglu, Berkay; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerosis, the development of intraluminal plaque, is a fundamental pathology of cardiovascular system and remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Biomechanical in nature, plaque rupture occurs when the mechanical properties of the plaque, related to the morphology and viscoelastic properties, are compromised, resulting in intraluminal thrombosis and reduction of coronary blood flow. In this report, we describe the first simultaneous application of confocal Brillouin and Raman microscopies to ex-vivo aortic wall samples. Such a non-invasive, high specific approach allows revealing a direct relationship between the biochemical and mechanical properties of atherosclerotic tissue.

  3. Systemic Atherosclerotic Inflammation Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: Myocardial Infarction Begets Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nikhil V; Toor, Iqbal; Shah, Anoop S V; Carruthers, Kathryn; Vesey, Alex T; Alam, Shirjel R; Sills, Andrew; Hoo, Teng Y; Melville, Adam J; Langlands, Sarah P; Jenkins, William S A; Uren, Neal G; Mills, Nicholas L; Fletcher, Alison M; van Beek, Edwin J R; Rudd, James H F; Fox, Keith A A; Dweck, Marc R; Newby, David E

    2015-01-01

    Background Preclinical data suggest that an acute inflammatory response following myocardial infarction (MI) accelerates systemic atherosclerosis. Using combined positron emission and computed tomography, we investigated whether this phenomenon occurs in humans. Methods and Results Overall, 40 patients with MI and 40 with stable angina underwent thoracic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined positron emission and computed tomography scan. Radiotracer uptake was measured in aortic atheroma and nonvascular tissue (paraspinal muscle). In 1003 patients enrolled in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events, we assessed whether infarct size predicted early (≤30 days) and late (>30 days) recurrent coronary events. Compared with patients with stable angina, patients with MI had higher aortic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (tissue-to-background ratio 2.15±0.30 versus 1.84±0.18, P<0.0001) and plasma C-reactive protein concentrations (6.50 [2.00 to 12.75] versus 2.00 [0.50 to 4.00] mg/dL, P=0.0005) despite having similar aortic (P=0.12) and less coronary (P=0.006) atherosclerotic burden and similar paraspinal muscular 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (P=0.52). Patients with ST-segment elevation MI had larger infarcts (peak plasma troponin 32 300 [10 200 to >50 000] versus 3800 [1000 to 9200] ng/L, P<0.0001) and greater aortic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (2.24±0.32 versus 2.02±0.21, P=0.03) than those with non–ST-segment elevation MI. Peak plasma troponin concentrations correlated with aortic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (r=0.43, P=0.01) and, on multivariate analysis, independently predicted early (tertile 3 versus tertile 1: relative risk 4.40 [95% CI 1.90 to 10.19], P=0.001), but not late, recurrent MI. Conclusions The presence and extent of MI is associated with increased aortic atherosclerotic inflammation and early recurrent MI. This finding supports the hypothesis that acute MI exacerbates systemic atherosclerotic inflammation and remote plaque destabilization

  4. Advances in Pemphigus and its Endemic Pemphigus Foliaceus (Fogo Selvagem) Phenotype: A Paradigm of Human Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Culton, Donna A.; Qian, Ye; Li, Ning; Rubenstein, David; Aoki, Valeria; Filhio, Gunter Hans; Rivitti, Evandro A.; Diaz, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    Pemphigus encompasses a group of organ specific, antibody mediated autoimmune diseases of the skin characterized by keratinocyte detachment that leads to the development of blisters and erosions, which can become life-threatening. The pathogenic autoantibodies recognize desmogleins, which are members of the desmosomal cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules. Desmoglein 3 is targeted in pemphigus vulgaris while desmoglein 1 is targeted in pemphigus foliaceus and its endemic form, fogo selvagem. This review will briefly define the salient features of pemphigus and the proposed steps in pathogenesis. We will then summarize the most recent advances in three important areas of investigation: (i) epidemiologic, genetic, and immunologic features of fogo selvagem, (ii) molecular mechanisms of injury to the epidermis, and (iii) novel therapeutic strategies targeting specific steps in disease pathogenesis. The advances in each of these three seemingly separate areas contribute to the overall understanding of the pemphigus disease model. These recent advancements also underscore the dynamic interplay between the treatment of patients in a clinical setting and basic science research, which has led to an integrative understanding disease pathogenesis and treatment and allow pemphigus to serve as a paradigm of human autoimmunity. PMID:18838249

  5. Technology Roadmap Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-03-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order.Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies.

  6. Cryptic parasite revealed improved prospects for treatment and control of human cryptosporidiosis through advanced technologies.

    PubMed

    Jex, Aaron R; Smith, Huw V; Nolan, Matthew J; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Young, Neil D; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Gasser, Robin B

    2011-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important genus of parasitic protozoa of humans and other vertebrates and is a major cause of intestinal disease globally. Unlike many common causes of infectious enteritis, there are no widely available, effective vaccine or drug-based intervention strategies for Cryptosporidium, and control is focused mainly on prevention. This approach is particularly deficient for infections of severely immunocompromised and/or suppressed, the elderly or malnourished people. However, cryptosporidiosis also presents a significant burden on immunocompetent individuals, and can, for example have lasting effects on the physical and mental development of children infected at an early age. In the last few decades, our understanding of Cryptosporidium has expanded significantly in numerous areas, including the parasite life-cycle, the processes of excystation, cellular invasion and reproduction, and the interplay between parasite and host. Nonetheless, despite extensive research, many aspects of the biology of Cryptosporidium remain unknown, and treatment and control are challenging. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of Cryptosporidium, with a focus on major advances arising from the recently completed genome sequences of the two species of greatest relevance in humans, namely Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum. In addition, we discuss the potential of next-generation sequencing technologies, new advances in in silico analyses and progress in in vitro culturing systems to bridge these gaps and to lead toward effective treatment and control of cryptosporidiosis.

  7. Identifying human disease genes: advances in molecular genetics and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, S M; Ali, A; Baig, S M; Barh, D; Miyoshi, A; Azevedo, V

    2014-07-04

    The human genome project is one of the significant achievements that have provided detailed insight into our genetic legacy. During the last two decades, biomedical investigations have gathered a considerable body of evidence by detecting more than 2000 disease genes. Despite the imperative advances in the genetic understanding of various diseases, the pathogenesis of many others remains obscure. With recent advances, the laborious methodologies used to identify DNA variations are replaced by direct sequencing of genomic DNA to detect genetic changes. The ability to perform such studies depends equally on the development of high-throughput and economical genotyping methods. Currently, basically for every disease whose origen is still unknown, genetic approaches are available which could be pedigree-dependent or -independent with the capacity to elucidate fundamental disease mechanisms. Computer algorithms and programs for linkage analysis have formed the foundation for many disease gene detection projects, similarly databases of clinical findings have been widely used to support diagnostic decisions in dysmorphology and general human disease. For every disease type, genome sequence variations, particularly single nucleotide polymorphisms are mapped by comparing the genetic makeup of case and control groups. Methods that predict the effects of polymorphisms on protein stability are useful for the identification of possible disease associations, whereas structural effects can be assessed using methods to predict stability changes in proteins using sequence and/or structural information.

  8. Heart research advances using database search engines, Human Protein Atlas and the Sydney Heart Bank.

    PubMed

    Li, Amy; Estigoy, Colleen; Raftery, Mark; Cameron, Darryl; Odeberg, Jacob; Pontén, Fredrik; Lal, Sean; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G

    2013-10-01

    This Methodological Review is intended as a guide for research students who may have just discovered a human "novel" cardiac protein, but it may also help hard-pressed reviewers of journal submissions on a "novel" protein reported in an animal model of human heart failure. Whether you are an expert or not, you may know little or nothing about this particular protein of interest. In this review we provide a strategic guide on how to proceed. We ask: How do you discover what has been published (even in an abstract or research report) about this protein? Everyone knows how to undertake literature searches using PubMed and Medline but these are usually encyclopaedic, often producing long lists of papers, most of which are either irrelevant or only vaguely relevant to your query. Relatively few will be aware of more advanced search engines such as Google Scholar and even fewer will know about Quertle. Next, we provide a strategy for discovering if your "novel" protein is expressed in the normal, healthy human heart, and if it is, we show you how to investigate its subcellular location. This can usually be achieved by visiting the website "Human Protein Atlas" without doing a single experiment. Finally, we provide a pathway to discovering if your protein of interest changes its expression level with heart failure/disease or with ageing.

  9. Quality assurance and risk management: Perspectives on Human Factors Certification of Advanced Aviation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Robert M.; Macleod, Iain S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is based on the experience of engineering psychologists advising the U.K. Ministry of Defense (MoD) on the procurement of advanced aviation systems that conform to good human engineering (HE) practice. Traditional approaches to HE in systems procurement focus on the physical nature of the human-machine interface. Advanced aviation systems present increasingly complex design requirements for human functional integration, information processing, and cognitive task performance effectiveness. These developing requirements present new challenges for HE quality assurance (QA) and risk management, requiring focus on design processes as well as on design content or product. A new approach to the application of HE, recently adopted by NATO, provides more systematic ordering and control of HE processes and activities to meet the challenges of advanced aircrew systems design. This systematic approach to HE has been applied by MoD to the procurement of mission systems for the Royal Navy Merlin helicopter. In MoD procurement, certification is a judicial function, essentially independent of the service customer and industry contractor. Certification decisions are based on advice from MoD's appointed Acceptance Agency. Test and evaluation (T&E) conducted by the contractor and by the Acceptance Agency provide evidence for certification. Certification identifies limitations of systems upon release to the service. Evidence of compliance with HE standards traditionally forms the main basis of HE certification and significant non-compliance could restrict release. The systems HE approach shows concern for the quality of processes as well as for the content of the product. Human factors certification should be concerned with the quality of HE processes as well as products. Certification should require proof of process as well as proof of content and performance. QA criteria such as completeness, consistency, timeliness, and compatibility provide generic guidelines for

  10. Correlation of Respirator Fit Measured on Human Subjects and a Static Advanced Headform

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Michael S.; He, Xinjian; Joseph, Michael E.; Zhuang, Ziqing; Heimbuch, Brian K.; Shaffer, Ronald E.; Choe, Melanie; Wander, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the correlation of N95 filtering face-piece respirator (FFR) fit between a Static Advanced Headform (StAH) and 10 human test subjects. Quantitative fit evaluations were performed on test subjects who made three visits to the laboratory. On each visit, one fit evaluation was performed on eight different FFRs of various model/size variations. Additionally, subject breathing patterns were recorded. Each fit evaluation comprised three two-minute exercises: “Normal Breathing,” “Deep Breathing,” and again “Normal Breathing.” The overall test fit factors (FF) for human tests were recorded. The same respirator samples were later mounted on the StAH and the overall test manikin fit factors (MFF) were assessed utilizing the recorded human breathing patterns. Linear regression was performed on the mean log10-transformed FF and MFF values to assess the relationship between the values obtained from humans and the StAH. This is the first study to report a positive correlation of respirator fit between a headform and test subjects. The linear regression by respirator resulted in R2 = 0.95, indicating a strong linear correlation between FF and MFF. For all respirators the geometric mean (GM) FF values were consistently higher than those of the GM MFF. For 50% of respirators, GM FF and GM MFF values were significantly different between humans and the StAH. For data grouped by subject/respirator combinations, the linear regression resulted in R2 = 0.49. A weaker correlation (R2 = 0.11) was found using only data paired by subject/respirator combination where both the test subject and StAH had passed a real-time leak check before performing the fit evaluation. For six respirators, the difference in passing rates between the StAH and humans was < 20%, while two respirators showed a difference of 29% and 43%. For data by test subject, GM FF and GM MFF values were significantly different for 40% of the subjects. Overall, the advanced headform system has

  11. Correlation of respirator fit measured on human subjects and a static advanced headform.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Michael S; He, Xinjian; Joseph, Michael E; Zhuang, Ziqing; Heimbuch, Brian K; Shaffer, Ronald E; Choe, Melanie; Wander, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the correlation of N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) fit between a Static Advanced Headform (StAH) and 10 human test subjects. Quantitative fit evaluations were performed on test subjects who made three visits to the laboratory. On each visit, one fit evaluation was performed on eight different FFRs of various model/size variations. Additionally, subject breathing patterns were recorded. Each fit evaluation comprised three two-minute exercises: "Normal Breathing," "Deep Breathing," and again "Normal Breathing." The overall test fit factors (FF) for human tests were recorded. The same respirator samples were later mounted on the StAH and the overall test manikin fit factors (MFF) were assessed utilizing the recorded human breathing patterns. Linear regression was performed on the mean log10-transformed FF and MFF values to assess the relationship between the values obtained from humans and the StAH. This is the first study to report a positive correlation of respirator fit between a headform and test subjects. The linear regression by respirator resulted in R(2) = 0.95, indicating a strong linear correlation between FF and MFF. For all respirators the geometric mean (GM) FF values were consistently higher than those of the GM MFF. For 50% of respirators, GM FF and GM MFF values were significantly different between humans and the StAH. For data grouped by subject/respirator combinations, the linear regression resulted in R(2) = 0.49. A weaker correlation (R(2) = 0.11) was found using only data paired by subject/respirator combination where both the test subject and StAH had passed a real-time leak check before performing the fit evaluation. For six respirators, the difference in passing rates between the StAH and humans was < 20%, while two respirators showed a difference of 29% and 43%. For data by test subject, GM FF and GM MFF values were significantly different for 40% of the subjects. Overall, the advanced headform system has potential

  12. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans in atherosclerotic lesions: novel targets of chronic statin treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Marzoll, Andrea; Melchior-Becker, Ariane; Cipollone, Francesco; Fischer, Jens W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs), such as decorin and biglycan, regulate the assembly and turnover of collagenous matrix. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of chronic rosuvastatin treatment on decorin, biglycan and the collagen matrix in ApoE-deficient mice. Twenty-week-old male ApoE-deficient mice received normal chow or 20 mg rosuvastatin/kg × day for 32 weeks. Subsequently, matrix composition was analysed by histochemistry and immunostaining at the aortic root and in innominate arteries of ApoE deficient mice as well as in human carotid endarterectomy specimens. Immunoblotting of proteoglycans was performed from aortic extracts of ApoE-deficient mice. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting revealed strongly increased decorin and biglycan deposition in atherosclerotic plaques at the aortic root and in innominate arteries. In contrast, versican and perlecan expression was not changed by rosu-vastatin. Furthermore, matrix metalloproteinase 2 and gelatinolytic activity were decreased in response to rosuvastatin and a condensed collagen-rich matrix was formed. In carotid endarterectomy specimens of statin-treated patients increased decorin and biglycan accumulation was detected as well. Drug treatment did not change low-density lipoprotein (LDL) plasma levels in ApoE-deficient mice and did not significantly affect lipid retention at the aortic root level as demonstrated by oil-red O staining and immunohistochemistry of LDL. Long-term treatment with rosuvastatin caused pronounced remodelling of atherosclerotic plaque matrix characterized specifically by enrichment with SLRPs and formation of a condensed collagen matrix. Therefore, decorin and biglycan might represent novel targets of statin treatment that contribute to a stable plaque phenotype. PMID:20015203

  13. Real-Time Elastography Visualization and Histopathological Characterization of Rabbit Atherosclerotic Carotid Arteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, ZhenZhen; Liu, NaNa; Zhang, LiFeng; Li, XiaoYing; Han, XueSong; Peng, YanQing; Dang, MeiZheng; Sun, LiTao; Tian, JiaWei

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of non-invasive vascular real-time elastography imaging (RTE) in visualizing the composition of rabbit carotid atherosclerotic plaque as determined by histopathology, a rabbit model of accelerated carotid atherosclerosis was used. Thirty rabbits were randomly divided into two groups of 15 rabbits each. The first group was fed a cholesterol-rich diet and received balloon-induced injury the left common carotid artery endothelium, whereas the second group only received a cholesterol-rich diet. The rabbits were all examined in vivo with HITACHI non-invasive vascular real-time elastography (Hi-RTE) at baseline and 12 wk, and results from the elastography were compared with American Heart Association histologic classifications. Hi-RTE and the American Heart Association histologic classifications had good agreement, with weighted Cohen's kappa (95% confidence internal) of 0.785 (0.649-0.920). Strains of segmented plaques that were stained in different colors were statistically different (p < 0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of elastograms for detecting a lipid core were 95.5% and 61.5%, respectively, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.789, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.679 to 0.876. This study is the first to indicate the feasibility of utilizing Hi-RTE in visualizing normal and atherosclerotic rabbit carotid arteries non-invasively. This affordable and reliable method can be widely applied in research of both animal and human peripheral artery atherosclerosis.

  14. Angiopoietin-2 blocking antibodies reduce early atherosclerotic plaque development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Theelen, Thomas L.; Lappalainen, Jari P.; Sluimer, Judith C.; Gurzeler, Erika; Cleutjens, Jack P.; Gijbels, Marion J.; Biessen, Erik A.L.; Daemen, Mat J.A.P.; Alitalo, Kari; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) blocking agents are currently undergoing clinical trials for use in cancer treatment. Ang-2 has also been associated with rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques in humans, suggesting a role for Ang-2 in plaque stability. Despite the availability of Ang-2 blocking agents, their clinical use is still lacking. Our aim was to establish if Ang-2 has a role in atheroma development and in the transition of subclinical to clinically relevant atherosclerosis. We investigated the effect of antibody-mediated Ang-2 blockage on atherogenesis after in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. Methods Hypercholesterolemic (low-density lipoprotein receptor−/− apolipoprotein B100/100) mice were subjected to high-cholesterol diet for eight weeks, one group with and one group without Ang-2 blocking antibody treatment during weeks 4–8.To enhance plaque development, a peri-adventitial collar was placed around the carotid arteries at the start of antibody treatment. Aortic root, carotid arteries and brachiocephalic arteries were analyzed to evaluate the effect of Ang-2 blockage on atherosclerotic plaque size and stable plaque characteristics. Results Anti-Ang-2 treatment reduced the size of fatty streaks in the brachiocephalic artery (−72%, p < 0.05). In addition, antibody-mediated Ang-2 blockage reduced plasma triglycerides (−27%, p < 0.05). In contrast, Ang-2 blockage did not have any effect on the size or composition (collagen content, macrophage percentage, adventitial microvessel density) of pre-existing plaques in the aortic root or collar-induced plaques in the carotid artery. Conclusions Ang-2 blockage was beneficial as it decreased fatty streak formation and plasma triglyceride levels, but had no adverse effect on pre-existing atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:26062989

  15. Frequency Analysis of the Photoacoustic Signal Generated by Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaque.

    PubMed

    Daeichin, Verya; Wu, Min; De Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F W; van Soest, Gijs

    2016-08-01

    The identification of unstable atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries is emerging as an important tool for guiding percutaneous coronary interventions and may enable preventive treatment of such plaques in the future. Assessment of plaque stability requires imaging of both structure and composition. Spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) imaging can visualize atherosclerotic plaque composition on the basis of the optical absorption contrast. It is an established fact that the frequency content of the photoacoustic (PA) signal is correlated with structural tissue properties. As PA signals can be weak, it is important to match the transducer bandwidth to the signal frequency content for in vivo imaging. In this ex vivo study on human coronary arteries, we combined sPA imaging and analysis of frequency content of the PA signals. Using a broadband transducer (-3-dB one-way bandwidth of 10-35 MHz) and a 1-mm needle hydrophone (calibrated for 1-20 MHz), we covered a large frequency range of 1-35 MHz for receiving the PA signals. Spectroscopic PA imaging was performed at wavelengths ranging from 1125 to 1275 nm with a step of 2 nm, allowing discrimination between plaque lipids and adventitial tissue. Under sPA imaging guidance, the frequency content of the PA signals from the plaque lipids was quantified. Our data indicate that more than 80% of the PA energy of the coronary plaque lipids lies in the frequency band below 8 MHz. This frequency information can guide the choice of the transducer element used for PA catheter fabrication.

  16. Imaging of the Fibrous Cap in Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Saba, Luca; Potters, Fons; Lugt, Aad van der; Mallarini, Giorgio

    2010-08-15

    In the last two decades, a substantial number of articles have been published to provide diagnostic solutions for patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. These articles have resulted in a shift of opinion regarding the identification of stroke risk in patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. In the recent past, the degree of carotid artery stenosis was the sole determinant for performing carotid intervention (carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting) in these patients. We now know that the degree of stenosis is only one marker for future cerebrovascular events. If one wants to determine the risk of these events more accurately, other parameters must be taken into account; among these parameters are plaque composition, presence and state of the fibrous cap (FC), intraplaque haemorrhage, plaque ulceration, and plaque location. In particular, the FC is an important structure for the stability of the plaque, and its rupture is highly associated with a recent history of transient ischaemic attack or stroke. The subject of this review is imaging of the FC.

  17. Noninvasive imaging of focal atherosclerotic lesions using fluorescence molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Dolonchampa; Solomon, Metasebya; Nguyen, Annie; Pierce, Richard A.; Woodard, Pamela K.; Akers, Walter J.; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P.; Abendschein, Dana R.; Shokeen, Monica

    2014-11-01

    Insights into the etiology of stroke and myocardial infarction suggest that rupture of unstable atherosclerotic plaque is the precipitating event. Clinicians lack tools to detect lesion instability early enough to intervene, and are often left to manage patients empirically, or worse, after plaque rupture. Noninvasive imaging of the molecular events signaling prerupture plaque progression has the potential to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with myocardial infarction and stroke by allowing early intervention. Here, we demonstrate proof-of-principle in vivo molecular imaging of C-type natriuretic peptide receptor in focal atherosclerotic lesions in the femoral arteries of New Zealand white rabbits using a custom built fiber-based, fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system. Longitudinal imaging showed changes in the fluorescence signal intensity as the plaque progressed in the air-desiccated vessel compared to the uninjured vessel, which was validated by ex vivo tissue studies. In summary, we demonstrate the potential of FMT for noninvasive detection of molecular events leading to unstable lesions heralding plaque rupture.

  18. Laser speckle imaging of atherosclerotic plaques through optical fiber bundles.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Seemantini K; Bouma, Brett E; Yelin, Dvir; Gulati, Amneet; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2008-01-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI), a new technique that measures an index of plaque viscoelasticity, has been investigated recently to characterize atherosclerotic plaques. These prior studies demonstrated the diagnostic potential of LSI for detecting high-risk plaques and were conducted ex vivo. To conduct intracoronary LSI in vivo, the laser speckle pattern must be transmitted from the coronary wall to the image detector in the presence of cardiac motion. Small-diameter, flexible optical fiber bundles, similar to those used in coronary angioscopy, may be incorporated into an intravascular catheter for this purpose. A key challenge is that laser speckle is influenced by inter-fiber leakage of light, which may be exacerbated during bundle motion. In this study, we tested the capability of optical fiber bundles to transmit laser speckle patterns obtained from atherosclerotic plaques and evaluated the influence of motion on the diagnostic accuracy of fiber bundle-based LSI. Time-varying helium-neon laser speckle images of aortic plaques were obtained while cyclically moving the flexible length of the bundle to mimic coronary motion. Our results show that leached fiber bundles may reliably transmit laser speckle images in the presence of cardiac motion, providing a viable option to conduct intracoronary LSI. PMID:19021396

  19. Inhibition of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 reduces complex coronary atherosclerotic plaque development

    PubMed Central

    Wilensky, Robert L; Shi, Yi; Mohler, Emile R; Hamamdzic, Damir; Burgert, Mark E; Li, Jun; Postle, Anthony; Fenning, Robert S; Bollinger, James G; Hoffman, Bryan E; Pelchovitz, Daniel J; Yang, Jisheng; Mirabile, Rosanna C; Webb, Christine L; Zhang, LeFeng; Zhang, Ping; Gelb, Michael H; Walker, Max C; Zalewski, Andrew; Macphee, Colin H

    2010-01-01

    Increased lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity is associated with increased risk of cardiac events, but it is not known whether Lp-PLA2 is a causative agent. Here we show that selective inhibition of Lp-PLA2 with darapladib reduced development of advanced coronary atherosclerosis in diabetic and hypercholesterolemic swine. Darapladib markedly inhibited plasma and lesion Lp-PLA2 activity and reduced lesion lysophosphatidylcholine content. Analysis of coronary gene expression showed that darapladib exerted a general anti-inflammatory action, substantially reducing the expression of 24 genes associated with macrophage and T lymphocyte functioning. Darapladib treatment resulted in a considerable decrease in plaque area and, notably, a markedly reduced necrotic core area and reduced medial destruction, resulting in fewer lesions with an unstable phenotype. These data show that selective inhibition of Lp-PLA2 inhibits progression to advanced coronary atherosclerotic lesions and confirms a crucial role of vascular inflammation independent from hypercholesterolemia in the development of lesions implicated in the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction and stroke. PMID:18806801

  20. Symptomatic Atherosclerotic Disease and Decreased Risk of Cancer-Specific Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Benito-León, Julián; de la Aleja, Jesús González; Martínez-Salio, Antonio; Louis, Elan D.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The few studies that have assessed the association between symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and risk of cancer have had conflicting results. In addition, these studies ascertained participants either from treatment settings (ie, service-based studies) or by using a records linkage system (ie, medical records of patients evaluated at clinics or hospitals) and, therefore, were prone to selection bias. Our purpose was to estimate the risk of cancer mortality in a large population-based sample of elderly people, comparing participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (atherosclerotic stroke and coronary disease) to their counterparts without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (ie, controls) in the same population. In this population-based, prospective study (Neurological Disorders of Central Spain, NEDICES), 5262 elderly community-dwelling participants with and without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease were identified and followed for a median of 12.1 years, after which the death certificates of those who died were reviewed. A total of 2701 (53.3%) of 5262 participants died, including 314 (68.6%) of 458 participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and 2387 (49.7%) of 4804 controls. Cancer mortality was reported significantly less often in those with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (15.6%) than in controls (25.6%) (P < 0.001). In an unadjusted Cox model, risk of cancer-specific mortality was decreased in participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (HR = 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55−0.98, P = 0.04) vs. those without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (reference group). In an adjusted Cox model, HR = 0.58; 95% CI, 0.38−0.89; P = 0.01. This population-based, prospective study suggests that there is an inverse association between symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and risk of cancer mortality. PMID:26266364

  1. Dietary advanced lipid oxidation endproducts are risk factors to human health.

    PubMed

    Kanner, Joseph

    2007-09-01

    Lipid oxidation in foods is one of the major degradative processes responsible for losses in food quality. The oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids results in significant generation of dietary advanced lipid oxidation endproducts (ALEs) which are in part cytotoxic and genotoxic compounds. The gastrointestinal tract is constantly exposed to dietary oxidized food compounds, after digestion a part of them are absorbed into the lymph or directly into the blood stream. After ingestion of oxidized fats animals and human have been shown to excrete in urine increase amounts of malondialdehyde but also lipophilic carbonyl compounds. Oxidized cholesterol in the diet was found to be a source of oxidized lipoproteins in human serum. Some of the dietary ALEs, which are absorbed from the gut to the circulatory system, seems to act as injurious chemicals that activate an inflammatory response which affects not only circulatory system but also organs such as liver, kidney, lung, and the gut itself. We believe that repeated consumption of oxidized fat in the diet poses a chronic threat to human health. High concentration of dietary antioxidants could prevent lipid oxidation and ALEs generation not only in foods but also in stomach condition and thereby potentially decrease absorption of ALEs from the gut. This could explains the health benefit of diets containing large amounts of dietary antioxidants such those present in fruits and vegetables, or products such as red-wine or tea consuming during the meal. PMID:17854006

  2. Dietary advanced lipid oxidation endproducts are risk factors to human health.

    PubMed

    Kanner, Joseph

    2007-09-01

    Lipid oxidation in foods is one of the major degradative processes responsible for losses in food quality. The oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids results in significant generation of dietary advanced lipid oxidation endproducts (ALEs) which are in part cytotoxic and genotoxic compounds. The gastrointestinal tract is constantly exposed to dietary oxidized food compounds, after digestion a part of them are absorbed into the lymph or directly into the blood stream. After ingestion of oxidized fats animals and human have been shown to excrete in urine increase amounts of malondialdehyde but also lipophilic carbonyl compounds. Oxidized cholesterol in the diet was found to be a source of oxidized lipoproteins in human serum. Some of the dietary ALEs, which are absorbed from the gut to the circulatory system, seems to act as injurious chemicals that activate an inflammatory response which affects not only circulatory system but also organs such as liver, kidney, lung, and the gut itself. We believe that repeated consumption of oxidized fat in the diet poses a chronic threat to human health. High concentration of dietary antioxidants could prevent lipid oxidation and ALEs generation not only in foods but also in stomach condition and thereby potentially decrease absorption of ALEs from the gut. This could explains the health benefit of diets containing large amounts of dietary antioxidants such those present in fruits and vegetables, or products such as red-wine or tea consuming during the meal.

  3. Biological effects of space radiation on human cells: history, advances and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Maalouf, Mira; Durante, Marco; Foray, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to radiation is one of the main concerns for space exploration by humans. By focusing deliberately on the works performed on human cells, we endeavored to review, decade by decade, the technological developments and conceptual advances of space radiation biology. Despite considerable efforts, the cancer and the toxicity risks remain to be quantified: 1) the nature and the frequency of secondary heavy ions need to be better characterized in order to estimate their contribution to the dose and to the final biological response; 2) the diversity of radiation history of each astronaut and the impact of individual susceptibility make very difficult any epidemiological analysis for estimating hazards specifically due to space radiation exposure. 3) Cytogenetic data undoubtedly revealed that space radiation exposure produce significant damage in cells. However, our knowledge of the basic mechanisms specific to low-dose, to repeated doses and to adaptive response is still poor. The application of new radiobiological techniques, like immunofluorescence, and the use of human tissue models different from blood, like skin fibroblasts, may help in clarifying all the above items. PMID:21436608

  4. [Advances in the experimental analysis of behavior: issues of choice behavior, comparative cognition, and human language].

    PubMed

    Sakagami, T; Yamamoto, J; Jitsumori, M

    1994-12-01

    As the opportunity to contact with related areas has increased, the study of of the experimental analysis of behavior has experienced revolutionary changes. Some of the most active and important areas-studies of choice, comparative cognition, and human language--are reviewed to acquaint readers. Studies of CHOICE have linked to the molar theories of behavioral economics and behavioral ecology, which promoted research of choice by animals under uncertainty conditions. Further approach has been made to integrate the molar and molecular analyses on the basis of the ideas of behavior dynamics. COMPARATIVE COGNITION is a part of a larger field including cognitive science, behavioral neuroscience, and biological science. Recent developments, aided with a comparative perspective, made significant contributions to our understanding of the phylogeny and ontogeny of cognition. Advances in analysis of human behavior provided tools to study behavioral aspects of semantics, syntax, and pragmatics of HUMAN LANGUAGE. Using the paradigm of stimulus equivalence, the emergence of stimulus relations, stimulus-stimulus networks, hierarchical structure of verbal behavior, and other language-related behaviors have been investigated.

  5. Differential oxidative status and immune characterization of the early and advanced stages of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Freitas, L F; De Rossi, T; Campos, F C; Simão, A N Colado; Barbosa, D S; Pinge-Filho, P; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is the malignant neoplasia with the highest incidence in women worldwide. Chronic oxidative stress and inflammation have been indicated as major mediators during carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Human studies have not considered the complexity of tumor biology during the stages of cancer advance, limiting their clinical application. The purpose of this study was to characterize systemic oxidative stress and immune response parameters in early (ED; TNM I and II) and advanced disease (AD; TNM III and IV) of patients diagnosed with infiltrative ductal carcinoma breast cancer. Oxidative stress parameters were evaluated by plasmatic lipoperoxidation, carbonyl content, thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS), nitric oxide levels (NO), total radical antioxidant parameter (TRAP), superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities and GSH levels. Immune evaluation was determined by TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, and IL-10 levels and leukocytes oxidative burst evaluation by chemiluminescence. Tissue damage analysis included heart (total CK and CKMB), liver (AST, ALT, GGT), and renal (creatinine, urea, and uric acid) plasmatic markers. C-reactive protein (CRP) and iron metabolism were also evaluated. Analysis of the results verified different oxidative stress statuses occur at distinct cancer stages. ED was characterized by reduction in catalase, 8-isoprostanes, and GSH levels, with enhanced lipid peroxidation and TBARS levels. AD exhibited more pronounced oxidative status, with reduction in catalase activity and TRAP, intense lipid peroxidation and high levels of NO, TBARs, and carbonyl content. ED patients presented a Th2 immune pattern, while AD exhibited Th1 status. CRP levels and ferritin were increased in both stages of disease. Leukocytes burst impairment was observed in both the groups. Plasma iron levels were significantly elevated in AD. The data obtained indicated that oxidative stress enhancement and immune response impairment may be necessary to ensure

  6. Human factors engineering guidance for the review of advanced alarm systems

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.; Higgins, J.C.; Stubler, W.F.

    1994-09-01

    This report provides guidance to support the review of the human factors aspects of advanced alarm system designs in nuclear power plants. The report is organized into three major sections. The first section describes the methodology and criteria that were used to develop the design review guidelines. Also included is a description of the scope, organization, and format of the guidelines. The second section provides a systematic review procedure in which important characteristics of the alarm system are identified, described, and evaluated. The third section provides the detailed review guidelines. The review guidelines are organized according to important characteristics of the alarm system including: alarm definition; alarm processing and reduction; alarm prioritization and availability; display; control; automated; dynamic, and modifiable characteristics; reliability, test, maintenance, and failure indication; alarm response procedures; and control-display integration and layout.

  7. Computational methods to extract meaning from text and advance theories of human cognition.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Danielle S

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades, researchers have made great advances in the area of computational methods for extracting meaning from text. This research has to a large extent been spurred by the development of latent semantic analysis (LSA), a method for extracting and representing the meaning of words using statistical computations applied to large corpora of text. Since the advent of LSA, researchers have developed and tested alternative statistical methods designed to detect and analyze meaning in text corpora. This research exemplifies how statistical models of semantics play an important role in our understanding of cognition and contribute to the field of cognitive science. Importantly, these models afford large-scale representations of human knowledge and allow researchers to explore various questions regarding knowledge, discourse processing, text comprehension, and language. This topic includes the latest progress by the leading researchers in the endeavor to go beyond LSA.

  8. Computational methods to extract meaning from text and advance theories of human cognition.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Danielle S

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades, researchers have made great advances in the area of computational methods for extracting meaning from text. This research has to a large extent been spurred by the development of latent semantic analysis (LSA), a method for extracting and representing the meaning of words using statistical computations applied to large corpora of text. Since the advent of LSA, researchers have developed and tested alternative statistical methods designed to detect and analyze meaning in text corpora. This research exemplifies how statistical models of semantics play an important role in our understanding of cognition and contribute to the field of cognitive science. Importantly, these models afford large-scale representations of human knowledge and allow researchers to explore various questions regarding knowledge, discourse processing, text comprehension, and language. This topic includes the latest progress by the leading researchers in the endeavor to go beyond LSA. PMID:25164173

  9. Advances in microfluidic platforms for analyzing and regulating human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, Tongcheng; Shusta, Eric V; Palecek, Sean P

    2015-10-01

    Microfluidic devices employ submillimeter length scale control of flow to achieve high-resolution spatial and temporal control over the microenvironment, providing powerful tools to elucidate mechanisms of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) regulation and to elicit desired hPSC fates. In addition, microfluidics allow control of paracrine and juxtracrine signaling, thereby enabling fabrication of microphysiological systems comprised of multiple cell types organized into organs-on-a-chip. Microfluidic cell culture systems can also be integrated with actuators and sensors, permitting construction of high-density arrays of cell-based biosensors for screening applications. This review describes recent advances in using microfluidics to understand mechanisms by which the microenvironment regulates hPSC fates and applications of microfluidics to realize the potential of hPSCs for in vitro modeling and screening applications.

  10. Recent Advances in Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bawage, Swapnil Subhash; Tiwari, Pooja Munnilal; Singh, Shree Ram

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of respiratory infection in infants and the elderly, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. The interdisciplinary fields, especially biotechnology and nanotechnology, have facilitated the development of modern detection systems for RSV. Many anti-RSV compounds like fusion inhibitors and RNAi molecules have been successful in laboratory and clinical trials. But, currently, there are no effective drugs for RSV infection even after decades of research. Effective diagnosis can result in effective treatment, but the progress in both of these facets must be concurrent. The development in prevention and treatment measures for RSV is at appreciable pace, but the implementation into clinical practice still seems a challenge. This review attempts to present the promising diverse research approaches and advancements in the area of diagnosis, prevention, and treatment that contribute to RSV management. PMID:24382964

  11. KLF4-dependent phenotypic modulation of smooth muscle cells has a key role in atherosclerotic plaque pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shankman, Laura S; Gomez, Delphine; Cherepanova, Olga A; Salmon, Morgan; Alencar, Gabriel F; Haskins, Ryan M; Swiatlowska, Pamela; Newman, Alexandra A C; Greene, Elizabeth S; Straub, Adam C; Isakson, Brant; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Owens, Gary K

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies investigating the role of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis have provided controversial results owing to the use of unreliable methods for clearly identifying each of these cell types. Here, using Myh11-CreER(T2) ROSA floxed STOP eYFP Apoe(-/-) mice to perform SMC lineage tracing, we find that traditional methods for detecting SMCs based on immunostaining for SMC markers fail to detect >80% of SMC-derived cells within advanced atherosclerotic lesions. These unidentified SMC-derived cells exhibit phenotypes of other cell lineages, including macrophages and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). SMC-specific conditional knockout of Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) resulted in reduced numbers of SMC-derived MSC- and macrophage-like cells, a marked reduction in lesion size, and increases in multiple indices of plaque stability, including an increase in fibrous cap thickness as compared to wild-type controls. On the basis of in vivo KLF4 chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses and studies of cholesterol-treated cultured SMCs, we identified >800 KLF4 target genes, including many that regulate pro-inflammatory responses of SMCs. Our findings indicate that the contribution of SMCs to atherosclerotic plaques has been greatly underestimated, and that KLF4-dependent transitions in SMC phenotype are critical in lesion pathogenesis.

  12. Stenting and Medical Therapy for Atherosclerotic Renal-Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Christopher J.; Murphy, Timothy P.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Jamerson, Kenneth; Henrich, William; Reid, Diane M.; Cohen, David J.; Matsumoto, Alan H.; Steffes, Michael; Jaff, Michael R.; Prince, Martin R.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; Tuttle, Katherine R.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Rundback, John H.; Massaro, Joseph M.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Dworkin, Lance D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis is a common problem in the elderly. Despite two randomized trials that did not show a benefit of renal-artery stenting with respect to kidney function, the usefulness of stenting for the prevention of major adverse renal and cardiovascular events is uncertain. METHODS We randomly assigned 947 participants who had atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis and either systolic hypertension while taking two or more antihypertensive drugs or chronic kidney disease to medical therapy plus renal-artery stenting or medical therapy alone. Participants were followed for the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular and renal events (a composite end point of death from cardiovascular or renal causes, myocar-dial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for congestive heart failure, progressive renal insufficiency, or the need for renal-replacement therapy). RESULTS Over a median follow-up period of 43 months (interquartile range, 31 to 55), the rate of the primary composite end point did not differ significantly between participants who underwent stenting in addition to receiving medical therapy and those who received medical therapy alone (35.1% and 35.8%, respectively; hazard ratio with stenting, 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76 to 1.17; P = 0.58). There were also no significant differences between the treatment groups in the rates of the individual components of the primary end point or in all-cause mortality. During follow-up, there was a consistent modest difference in systolic blood pressure favoring the stent group (−2.3 mm Hg; 95% CI, −4.4 to −0.2; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Renal-artery stenting did not confer a significant benefit with respect to the prevention of clinical events when added to comprehensive, multifactorial medical therapy in people with atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis and hypertension or chronic kidney disease. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and others; Clinical

  13. The Role of PPARγ in Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Inflammatory Response in Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-qing; Chen, Cheng; Cai, Wei; Zeng, Yue-lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Advances made in the past ten years highlight the notion that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPARγ) has protective properties in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this study was to define the roles of PPARγ in AGEs-induced inflammatory response in human chondrocytes. Methods Primary human chondrocytes were stimulated with AGEs in the presence or absence of neutralizing antibody against RAGE (anti-RAGE), MAPK specific inhibitors and PPARγ agonist pioglitazone. The expression of IL-1, MMP-13, TNF-α, PPARγ, nuclear NF-κB p65 and cytosol IκBα was determined by western blotting and real-time PCR. Results AGEs could enhance the expression of IL-1, TNF-α, and MMP-13, but the level of PPARγ was decreased in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which was inhibited by anti-RAGE, SB203580 (P38 MAPK specific inhibitor) and SP600125 (a selective inhibitor of JNK). PPARγ agonist pioglitazone could inhibit the effects of AGEs-induced inflammatory response and PPARγ down-regulation. In human chondrocytes, AGEs could induce cytosol IκBα degradation and increase the level of nuclear NF-κB p65, which was inhibited by PPARγ agonist pioglitazone. Conclusions In primary human chondrocytes, AGEs could down-regulate PPARγ expression and increase the inflammatory mediators, which could be reversed by PPARγ agonist pioglitazone. Activation of RAGE by AGEs triggers a cascade of downstream signaling, including MAPK JNK/ p38, PPARγ and NF-κB. Taken together, PPARγ could be a potential target for pharmacologic intervention in the treatment of OA. PMID:26024533

  14. A Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of Human Space Missions for the Advanced Integration Matrix (AIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.; Dillon-Merrill, Robin L.; Thomas, Gretchen A.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Integration Matrix (AIM) Project u7ill study and solve systems-level integration issues for exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO), through the design and development of a ground-based facility for developing revolutionary integrated systems for joint human-robotic missions. This paper describes a Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of human space missions that was developed to help define the direction and priorities for AIM. Risk analysis is required for all major NASA programs and has been used for shuttle, station, and Mars lander programs. It is a prescribed part of early planning and is necessary during concept definition, even before mission scenarios and system designs exist. PRA cm begin when little failure data are available, and be continually updated and refined as detail becomes available. PRA provides a basis for examining tradeoffs among safety, reliability, performance, and cost. The objective of AIM's PRA is to indicate how risk can be managed and future human space missions enabled by the AIM Project. Many critical events can cause injuries and fatalities to the crew without causing loss of vehicle or mission. Some critical systems are beyond AIM's scope, such as propulsion and guidance. Many failure-causing events can be mitigated by conducting operational tests in AIM, such as testing equipment and evaluating operational procedures, especially in the areas of communications and computers, autonomous operations, life support, thermal design, EVA and rover activities, physiological factors including habitation, medical equipment, and food, and multifunctional tools and repairable systems. AIM is well suited to test and demonstrate the habitat, life support, crew operations, and human interface. Because these account for significant crew, systems performance, and science risks, AIM will help reduce mission risk, and missions beyond LEO are far enough in the future that AIM can have significant impact.

  15. Opening the Solar System: An Advanced Nuclear Spacecraft for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werka, R. O.; Percy, T. K.

    2014-01-01

    Human exploration of the solar system is limited by our technology, not our imagination. We dream of a time when we can freely travel among the planets and truly become a spacefaring people. However, the current state of our technology limits our options for architecting missions to other planets. Instead of sailing the seas of space in the way that we cruise the seas of Earth, our limited propulsion technology requires us to depart Earth on a giant cluster of gas tanks and return in a lifeboat. This inefficient approach to exploration is evident in many of today's leading mission plans for human flights to Mars, asteroids, and other destinations. The cost and complexity of this approach to mission architecting makes it extremely difficult to realize our dreams of exploration beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). This does not need to be the case. Researchers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have been investigating the feasibility of a new take on nuclear propulsion with the performance to enable a paradigm shift in human space exploration. During the fall of 2013, engineers at MSFC's Advanced Concepts Office developed a spacecraft concept (pictured below) around this new propulsion technology and redefined the human Mars mission to show its full potential. This spacecraft, which can be launched with a fleet of soon-to-be available SLS launch vehicles, is fueled primarily with hydrogen, and is fully reusable with no staging required. The reusable nature of this design enables a host of alternative mission architectures that more closely resemble an ocean voyage than our current piecemeal approach to exploration.

  16. Receptors for advanced glycosylation endproducts in human brain: role in brain homeostasis.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J. J.; Dickson, D.; Hof, P. R.; Vlassara, H.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are the reactive derivatives of nonenzymatic glucose-macromolecule condensation products. Aging human tissues accumulate AGEs in an age-dependent manner and contribute to age-related functional changes in vital organs. We have shown previously that AGE scavenger receptors are present on monocyte/macrophages, lymphocytes, and other cells. However, it remains unclear whether the human brain can efficiently eliminate AGE-modified proteins and whether excessive AGEs can contribute to inflammatory changes leading to brain injury in aging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To explore the expression and characteristics of AGE-binding proteins on CNS glia components and their putative function, such as degradation of AGE-modified proteins, primary human astrocytes and human monocytes (as a microglial cell surrogate) and murine microglia (N9) cells and cell membrane extracts were used. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the distribution of AGE-binding proteins in the human hippocampus; RT-PCR techniques were used to examine the biologic effects of AGEs and a model AGE compound, FFI, on AGE-binding protein modulation and cytokine responses of human astrocytes and monocytes. RESULTS: Our results showed that AGE-binding proteins AGE-R1, -R2, and -R3 are present in glial cells. Western blot analyses and radiolabeled ligand binding studies show that AGE-R1 and -R3 from human astrocytes bind AGE-modified proteins; binding could be blocked by anti-AGE-R1 and anti-AGE-R3 antibodies, respectively. Immunohistochemistry showed that AGE-R1 and -R2 are expressed mainly in neurons; only some glial cells express these AGE-binding proteins. In contrast, AGE-R3 was found only on those astrocytes whose positively stained foot processes extend and surround the sheath of microcapillaries. RT-PCR results showed that mRNAs of the three AGE-binding proteins are expressed constitutively in human astrocytes and monocytes, and receptor transcripts are

  17. Lipocalin (LCN) 2 Mediates Pro-Atherosclerotic Processes and Is Elevated in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matthes, Lukas A.; Schuett, Harald; Koch, Ann-Kathrin; Grote, Karsten; Schieffer, Bernhard; Schuett, Jutta; Luchtefeld, Maren

    2015-01-01

    Background Lipocalin (LCN) 2 is associated with multiple acute and chronic inflammatory diseases but the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether LCN2 is released from macrophages and contributes to pro-atherosclerotic processes and whether LCN2 plasma levels are associated with the severity of coronary artery disease progression in humans. Methods and Results In an autocrine-paracrine loop, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α promoted the release of LCN2 from murine bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) and vice versa. Moreover, LCN2 stimulation of BMDM led to up-regulation of M1 macrophage markers. In addition, enhanced migration of monocytic J774A.1 cells towards LCN2 was observed. Furthermore, LCN2 increased the expression of the scavenger receptors Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) as well as scavenger receptor class A-1 (SRA-1) and induced the conversion of macrophages to foam cells. In atherosclerotic lesions of low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (ldlr−/−) mice fed a high fat, high cholesterol diet, LCN2 was found to be co-localized with macrophages in the shoulder region of the atherosclerotic plaque. In addition, LCN2 plasma levels were significantly increased in plasma samples of these mice. Finally, LCN2 plasma levels correlated with the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients as determined by coronary angiography. Conclusions Here we demonstrated that LCN2 plays a pivotal role in processes involved in atherogenesis by promoting polarization and migration of monocytic cells and development of macrophages towards foam cells. Moreover, LCN2 may be used as a prognostic marker to determine the status of CAD progression. PMID:26367277

  18. Low Endogenous Secretory Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products Levels Are Associated With Inflammation and Carotid Atherosclerosis in Prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Di Pino, Antonino; Urbano, Francesca; Zagami, Rose Maria; Filippello, Agnese; Di Mauro, Stefania; Piro, Salvatore; Purrello, Francesco; Rabuazzo, Agata Maria

    2016-04-01

    Pre-diabetes is associated with advanced vascular damage. Our data shows that subjects with pre-diabetes exhibited low esRAGE plasma levels and gene expression, which are inversely related with markers of inflammation and atherosclerotic risk.

  19. Lipid and protein maps defining arterial layers in atherosclerotic aorta.

    PubMed

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Balluff, Benjamin; Maroto, Aroa S; Carreira, Ricardo J; van Zeijl, Rene J M; Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Padial, Luis R; McDonnell, Liam A; Vivanco, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2015-09-01

    Subclinical atherosclerosis cannot be predicted and novel therapeutic targets are needed. The molecular anatomy of healthy and atherosclerotic tissue is pursued to identify ongoing molecular changes in atherosclerosis development. Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) accounts with the unique advantage of analyzing proteins and metabolites (lipids) while preserving their original localization; thus two dimensional maps can be obtained. Main molecular alterations were investigated in a rabbit model in response to early development of atherosclerosis. Aortic arterial layers (intima and media) and calcified regions were investigated in detail by MALDI-MSI and proteins and lipids specifically defining those areas of interest were identified. These data further complement main findings previously published in J Proteomics (M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics. (In press); M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics 108 (2014) 465-468.) [1,2]. PMID:26217810

  20. Evaluation and percutaneous management of atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Widlus, D.M.; Osterman, F.A. Jr. )

    1989-06-02

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease (PVD) of the lower extremities deprives a person of the ability to exercise to their satisfaction, later of the ability to perform the activities of their daily life, and finally of their legs themselves. Peripheral vascular disease has long been managed by the vascular surgeon utilizing endarterectomy and peripheral arterial bypass. Patient acceptance of nonsurgical, percutaneous procedures such as percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA) is high. Increased utilization of these procedures has led to improved techniques and adjuncts to therapy, as well as more critical review of long-term results. This article will review the evaluation and nonoperative management of PVD, with an emphasis on the newer modalities of management presently being investigated.

  1. miRNAs in atherosclerotic plaque initiation, progression, and rupture

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Ioannis; Sun, Xinghui; Stone, Peter H.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Feinberg, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic immune-inflammatory disorder that integrates multiple cell types and a diverse set of inflammatory mediators. miRNAs are emerging as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in most, if not all, vertebrate cells and constitute central players in many physiological and pathological processes. Rapidly accumulating experimental studies reveal their key role in cellular and molecular processes related to the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we review the current evidence for the involvement of miRNAs in early atherosclerotic lesion formation to plaque rupture and erosion. We conclude with a perspective on the clinical relevance, therapeutic opportunities, and future challenges of miRNA biology in the pathogenesis of this complex disease. PMID:25771097

  2. Zooming in on the genesis of atherosclerotic plaque microcalcifications.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jessica L; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Aikawa, Elena; Hutcheson, Joshua D

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence conclusively demonstrates that calcium burden is a significant predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. These observations have challenged the previously held notion that calcification serves to stabilize the atherosclerotic plaque. Recent studies have shown that microcalcifications that form within the fibrous cap of the plaques lead to the accrual of plaque-destabilizing mechanical stress. Given the association between calcification morphology and cardiovascular outcomes, it is important to understand the mechanisms leading to calcific mineral deposition and growth from the earliest stages. We highlight the open questions in the field of cardiovascular calcification and include a review of the proposed mechanisms involved in extracellular vesicle-mediated mineral deposition. PMID:27040360

  3. Technical advance: liposomal alendronate depletes monocytes and macrophages in the nonhuman primate model of human disease.

    PubMed

    Burwitz, Benjamin J; Reed, Jason S; Hammond, Katherine B; Ohme, Merete A; Planer, Shannon L; Legasse, Alfred W; Ericsen, Adam J; Richter, Yoram; Golomb, Gershon; Sacha, Jonah B

    2014-09-01

    Nonhuman primates are critical animal models for the study of human disorders and disease and offer a platform to assess the role of immune cells in pathogenesis via depletion of specific cellular subsets. However, this model is currently hindered by the lack of reagents that safely and specifically ablate myeloid cells of the monocyte/macrophage Lin. Given the central importance of macrophages in homeostasis and host immunity, development of a macrophage-depletion technique in nonhuman primates would open new avenues of research. Here, using LA at i.v. doses as low as 0.1 mg/kg, we show a >50% transient depletion of circulating monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages in RMs by an 11-color flow cytometric analysis. Diminution of monocytes was followed rapidly by emigration of monocytes from the bone marrow, leading to a rebound of monocytes to baseline levels. Importantly, LA was well-tolerated, as no adverse effects or changes in gross organ function were observed during depletion. These results advance the ex vivo study of myeloid cells by flow cytometry and pave the way for in vivo studies of monocyte/macrophage biology in nonhuman primate models of human disease. PMID:24823811

  4. DNA technological progress toward advanced diagnostic tools to support human hookworm control.

    PubMed

    Gasser, R B; Cantacessi, C; Loukas, A

    2008-01-01

    Blood-feeding hookworms are parasitic nematodes of major human health importance. Currently, it is estimated that 740 million people are infected worldwide, and more than 80 million of them are severely affected clinically by hookworm disease. In spite of the health problems caused and the advances toward the development of vaccines against some hookworms, limited attention has been paid to the need for improved, practical methods of diagnosis. Accurate diagnosis and genetic characterization of hookworms is central to their effective control. While traditional diagnostic methods have considerable limitations, there has been some progress toward the development of molecular-diagnostic tools. The present article provides a brief background on hookworm disease of humans, reviews the main methods that have been used for diagnosis and describes progress in establishing polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for the specific diagnosis of hookworm infection and the genetic characterisation of the causative agents. This progress provides a foundation for the rapid development of practical, highly sensitive and specific diagnostic and analytical tools to be used in improved hookworm prevention and control programmes.

  5. Technical Advance: Liposomal alendronate depletes monocytes and macrophages in the nonhuman primate model of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Burwitz, Benjamin J.; Reed, Jason S.; Hammond, Katherine B.; Ohme, Merete A.; Planer, Shannon L.; Legasse, Alfred W.; Ericsen, Adam J.; Richter, Yoram; Golomb, Gershon; Sacha, Jonah B.

    2014-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are critical animal models for the study of human disorders and disease and offer a platform to assess the role of immune cells in pathogenesis via depletion of specific cellular subsets. However, this model is currently hindered by the lack of reagents that safely and specifically ablate myeloid cells of the monocyte/macrophage Lin. Given the central importance of macrophages in homeostasis and host immunity, development of a macrophage-depletion technique in nonhuman primates would open new avenues of research. Here, using LA at i.v. doses as low as 0.1 mg/kg, we show a >50% transient depletion of circulating monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages in RMs by an 11-color flow cytometric analysis. Diminution of monocytes was followed rapidly by emigration of monocytes from the bone marrow, leading to a rebound of monocytes to baseline levels. Importantly, LA was well-tolerated, as no adverse effects or changes in gross organ function were observed during depletion. These results advance the ex vivo study of myeloid cells by flow cytometry and pave the way for in vivo studies of monocyte/macrophage biology in nonhuman primate models of human disease. PMID:24823811

  6. Classification of human colonic tissues using FTIR spectra and advanced statistical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwielly, A.; Argov, S.; Salman, A.; Bogomolny, E.; Mordechai, S.

    2010-04-01

    One of the major public health hazards is colon cancer. There is a great necessity to develop new methods for early detection of cancer. If colon cancer is detected and treated early, cure rate of more than 90% can be achieved. In this study we used FTIR microscopy (MSP), which has shown a good potential in the last 20 years in the fields of medical diagnostic and early detection of abnormal tissues. Large database of FTIR microscopic spectra was acquired from 230 human colonic biopsies. Five different subgroups were included in our database, normal and cancer tissues as well as three stages of benign colonic polyps, namely, mild, moderate and severe polyps which are precursors of carcinoma. In this study we applied advanced mathematical and statistical techniques including principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), on human colonic FTIR spectra in order to differentiate among the mentioned subgroups' tissues. Good classification accuracy between normal, polyps and cancer groups was achieved with approximately 85% success rate. Our results showed that there is a great potential of developing FTIR-micro spectroscopy as a simple, reagent-free viable tool for early detection of colon cancer in particular the early stages of premalignancy among the benign colonic polyps.

  7. Low dose tunicamycin enhances atherosclerotic plaque stability by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meijuan; Song, Liqiang; Yan, Hao; Liu, Min; Zhang, Le; Ma, Ying; Yuan, Jian; Hu, Jianhua; Ji, Zhaole; Zhang, Rongqing; Li, Congye; Wang, Haichang; Tao, Ling; Zhang, Yingmei; Li, Yan

    2016-01-15

    After decades of indolent progression, atherosclerosis may cause unheralded events, such as myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome and stroke due to sudden rupture of atherosclerotic plaques, and pharmacologically modulating plaque stability would reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) is responsible for the vulnerability of plaques. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this work, ApoE(-/-) mice underwent perivascular carotid collar placement surgeries or sham operations were given higher (3.0mg/kg) and lower (0.3mg/kg) doses of tunicamycin (TM), and plaque stability was evaluated. It was shown that lower TM-treated animals exhibited reduced plaque areas and necrotic cores as well as fibrous cap thickness accompanied by a lower percentage of infiltrates and foam cells than the sham-operated and higher TM treated animals. Lower TM had a profound inhibitory effect on plasma inflammatory response and lipid profile in atherosclerotic ApoE(-/-) mice. In addition, we found that the ApoE(-/-) mice presented higher autophagy activity in response to lower TM administration while apoptosis was reduced. An in vitro study in murine macrophages revealed that lower TM could markedly reduce lipid uptake and accumulation and cell apoptosis while significantly upregulated the expression of Atg7. However, higher TM had adverse effects. Finally, mild induction of ERS by lower TM inhibits AKT-TSC-mTOR cascades to increase cellular autophagy. However, high TM failed to enhance autophagy and equilibrate elevated CHOP-mediated cell death in spite of the inhibition of AKT-TSC-mTOR signaling. In conclusion, lower TM stabilized plaques by activating autophagy through AKT-TSC-mTOR signaling. PMID:26616221

  8. Low dose tunicamycin enhances atherosclerotic plaque stability by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meijuan; Song, Liqiang; Yan, Hao; Liu, Min; Zhang, Le; Ma, Ying; Yuan, Jian; Hu, Jianhua; Ji, Zhaole; Zhang, Rongqing; Li, Congye; Wang, Haichang; Tao, Ling; Zhang, Yingmei; Li, Yan

    2016-01-15

    After decades of indolent progression, atherosclerosis may cause unheralded events, such as myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome and stroke due to sudden rupture of atherosclerotic plaques, and pharmacologically modulating plaque stability would reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) is responsible for the vulnerability of plaques. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this work, ApoE(-/-) mice underwent perivascular carotid collar placement surgeries or sham operations were given higher (3.0mg/kg) and lower (0.3mg/kg) doses of tunicamycin (TM), and plaque stability was evaluated. It was shown that lower TM-treated animals exhibited reduced plaque areas and necrotic cores as well as fibrous cap thickness accompanied by a lower percentage of infiltrates and foam cells than the sham-operated and higher TM treated animals. Lower TM had a profound inhibitory effect on plasma inflammatory response and lipid profile in atherosclerotic ApoE(-/-) mice. In addition, we found that the ApoE(-/-) mice presented higher autophagy activity in response to lower TM administration while apoptosis was reduced. An in vitro study in murine macrophages revealed that lower TM could markedly reduce lipid uptake and accumulation and cell apoptosis while significantly upregulated the expression of Atg7. However, higher TM had adverse effects. Finally, mild induction of ERS by lower TM inhibits AKT-TSC-mTOR cascades to increase cellular autophagy. However, high TM failed to enhance autophagy and equilibrate elevated CHOP-mediated cell death in spite of the inhibition of AKT-TSC-mTOR signaling. In conclusion, lower TM stabilized plaques by activating autophagy through AKT-TSC-mTOR signaling.

  9. Microcalcifications in atherosclerotic lesion of apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse

    PubMed Central

    Debernardi, Nicola; Roijers, Ruben B; Krams, Rob; de Crom, Rini; Mutsaers, Peter HA; van der Vusse, Ger J

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that calcium-rich microdeposits in the vascular wall might play a crucial role in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis. Here we investigated an atherosclerotic lesion of the carotid artery in an established murine model, i.e. the apolipoprotein E-deficient (APOE−/−) mouse to identify (i) the presence of microcalcifications, if any, (ii) the elemental composition of microcalcifications with special reference to calcium/phosphorus mass ratio and (iii) co-localization of increased concentrations of iron and zinc with microcalcifications. Atherosclerosis was induced by a flow-divider placed around the carotid artery resulting in low and high shear-stress regions. Element composition was assessed with a proton microprobe. Microcalcifications, predominantly present in the thickened intima of the low shear-stress region, were surrounded by areas with normal calcium levels, indicating that calcium-precipitation is a local event. The diameter of intimal microcalcifications varied from 6 to 70 μm. Calcium/phosphorus ratios of microcalcifications varied from 0.3 to 4.8, mainly corresponding to the ratio of amorphous calcium-phosphate. Increased iron and zinc concentrations commonly co-localized with microcalcifications. Our findings indicate that the atherosclerotic process in the murine carotid artery is associated with locally accumulated calcium, iron and zinc. The calcium-rich deposits resemble amorphous calcium phosphate rather than pure hydroxyapatite. We propose that the APOE−/− mouse, in which atherosclerosis was evoked by a flow-divider, offers a useful model to investigate the pathophysiological significance of accumulation of elements such as calcium, iron and zinc. PMID:20804542

  10. Abdominal Aortic Disease Caused by Penetrating Atherosclerotic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masataka; Imai, Akito; Sakamoto, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Akinobu; Watanabe, Yasunori; Jikuya,, Tomoaki

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU) of the aorta is defined as an atherosclerotic lesion with ulceration of the aortic intima and media and rupture of the internal elastic lamina. PAU induced aortic dissection, aortic rupture, and secular aortic aneurysm and typically occurs in elderly hypertensive patients with severe atherosclerosis. Although it has been reported that atherosclerosis similarly occurs in the abdominal aorta, its natural history and treatment are still unclear. This study investigated the clinical features, natural history, and treatment of PAU of the abdominal aorta. Method:Between April 2006 and March 2009, 4 diagnoses of PAU in the abdominal aorta were made by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These 4 cases were analyzed along with 61 previously reported cases from the literature with diagnoses of PAU in the abdominal aorta, aortic rupture, and isolated abdominal aortic dissection over the past 15 years, giving a total of 65 cases. Results:The patients were men with an average age of 63.5 years. All 4 had hypertension, and 2 had concomitant coronary artery disease. Two patients were asymptomatic, and the other 2 were symptomatic and transmural rupture had occurred. All diagnoses were made by CT and MRI. All 4 patients underwent open surgery with a knitted Dacron graft, with no postoperative deaths. In the literature, 53% of cases were symptomatic, including pain (40%, n = 26), shock (4.6%, n = 3), and lower limb embolism (9.2%, n = 6). The remaining 40% of cases were asymptomatic (n = 26). Six patients were treated medically, while 58 patients underwent surgery, with 2 postoperative deaths. Conclusion:We suggest that surgical treatment (open surgery or endovascular stent grafting) should be performed to prevent an aortic catastrophe such as intramural hematoma, dissection, or rupture. (English translation of Jpn J Vasc Surg 2010; 19: 723-730.) PMID:23555480

  11. Recent advances in determining protein and amino acid requirements in humans.

    PubMed

    Elango, Rajavel; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B

    2012-08-01

    During the past 25 years a significant amount of research has been conducted to determine amino acid requirements in humans. This is primarily due to advancements in the application of stable isotopes to examine amino acid requirements. The indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method has emerged as a robust and minimally invasive technique to identify requirements. The IAAO method is based on the concept that when one indispensable dietary amino acid (IDAA) is deficient for protein synthesis, then the excess of all other IDAA, including the indicator amino acid, will be oxidized. With increasing intakes of the limiting amino acid, IAAO will decrease, reflecting increasing incorporation into protein. Once the requirement for the limiting amino acid is met there will be no further change in the indicator oxidation. The IAAO method has been systematically applied to determine most IDAA requirements in adults. The estimates are comparable to the values obtained using the more elaborate 24h-indicator amino acid oxidation and balance (24h-IAAO/IAAB) model. Due to its non-invasive nature the IAAO method has also been used to determine requirements for amino acids in neonates, children and in disease. The IAAO model has recently been applied to determine total protein requirements in humans. The IAAO method is rapid, reliable and has been used to determine amino acid requirements in different species, across the life cycle and in disease. The recent application of IAAO to determine protein requirements in humans is novel and has significant implications for dietary protein intake recommendations globally.

  12. Detection of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on human skin by in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. A.; Pereira, L.; Ali, S. M.; Pizzol, C. D.; Tellez, C. A.; Favero, P. P.; Santos, L.; da Silva, V. V.; Praes, C. E. O.

    2016-03-01

    The aging process involves the reduction in the production of the major components of skin tissue. During intrinsic aging and photoaging processes, in dermis of human skin, fibroblasts become senescent and have decreased activity, which produce low levels of collagen. Moreover, there is accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs have incidence in the progression of age-related diseases, principally in diabetes mellitus and in Alzheimer's diseases. AGEs causes intracellular damage and/or apoptosis leading to an increase of the free radicals, generating a crosslink with skin proteins and oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to detect AGEs markers on human skin by in vivo Confocal Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were obtained by using a Rivers Diagnostic System, 785 nm laser excitation and a CCD detector from the skin surface down to 120 μm depth. We analyzed the confocal Raman spectra of the skin dermis of 30 women volunteers divided into 3 groups: 10 volunteers with diabetes mellitus type II, 65-80 years old (DEW); 10 young healthy women, 20-33 years old (HYW); and 10 elderly healthy women, 65-80 years old (HEW). Pentosidine and glucosepane were the principally identified AGEs in the hydroxyproline and proline Raman spectral region (1000-800 cm-1), in the 1.260-1.320 cm-1 region assignable to alpha-helical amide III modes, and in the Amide I region. Pentosidine and glucosepane calculated vibrational spectra were performed through Density Functional Theory using the B3LYP functional with 3-21G basis set. Difference between the Raman spectra of diabetic elderly women and healthy young women, and between healthy elderly women and healthy young women were also obtained with the purpose of identifying AGEs Raman bands markers. AGEs peaks and collagen changes have been identified and used to quantify the glycation process in human skin.

  13. Cadmium exposure and atherosclerotic carotid plaques –Results from the Malmö diet and Cancer study

    SciTech Connect

    Fagerberg, Björn; Barregard, Lars; Sallsten, Gerd; Forsgard, Niklas; Östling, Gerd; Persson, Margaretha; Borné, Yan; and others

    2015-01-15

    Background: Epidemiological studies indicate that cadmium exposure through diet and smoking is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. There are few data on the relationship between cadmium and plaques, the hallmark of underlying atherosclerotic disease. Objectives: To examine the association between exposure to cadmium and the prevalence and size of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid artery. Methods: A population sample of 4639 Swedish middle-aged women and men was examined in 1991–1994. Carotid plaque was determined by B-mode ultrasound. Cadmium in blood was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results: Comparing quartile 4 with quartile 1 of blood cadmium, the odds ratio (OR) for prevalence of any plaque was 1.9 (95% confidence interval 1.6–2.2) after adjustment for sex and, age; 1.4 (1.1–1.8) after additional adjustment for smoking status; 1.4 (1.1–1.7) after the addition of education level and life style factors; 1.3 (1.03–1.8) after additional adjustment for risk factors and predictors of cardiovascular disease. No effect modification by sex was found in the cadmium-related prevalence of plaques. Similarly, ORs for the prevalence of small and large plaques were after full adjustment 1.4 (1.0–2.1) and 1.4 (0.9–2.0), respectively. The subgroup of never smokers showed no association between cadmium and atherosclerotic plaques. Conclusions: These results extend previous studies on cadmium exposure and clinical cardiovascular events by adding data on the association between cadmium and underlying atherosclerosis in humans. The role of smoking remains unclear. It may both cause residual confounding and be a source of pro-atherogenic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Blood cadmium level is associated with atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid artery. • The results extend previous knowledge of cadmium exposure and clinical events. • The role of smoking remains unclear.

  14. Next Generation Respiratory Viral Vaccine System: Advanced and Emerging Bioengineered Human Lung Epithelia Model (HLEM) Organoid Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; Schneider, Sandra L.; MacIntosh, Victor; Gibbons, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and influenza, are the S t" leading cause of United States and worldwide deaths. Newly emerging pathogens signaled the need for an advanced generation of vaccine technology.. Human bronchial-tracheal epithelial tissue was bioengineered to detect, identify, host and study the pathogenesis of acute respiratory viral disease. The 3-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesechymal tissue-like assemblies (HLEM TLAs) share characteristics with human respiratory epithelium: tight junctions, desmosomes, microvilli, functional markers villin, keratins and production of tissue mucin. Respiratory Syntial Virus (RSV) studies demonstrate viral growth kinetics and membrane bound glycoproteins up to day 20 post infection in the human lung-orgainoid infected cell system. Peak replication of RSV occurred on day 10 at 7 log10 particles forming units per ml/day. HLEM is an advanced virus vaccine model and biosentinel system for emergent viral infectious diseases to support DoD global surveillance and military readiness.

  15. Inhaled diesel emissions alter atherosclerotic plaque composition in ApoE{sup -/-} mice

    SciTech Connect

    Campen, Matthew J.; Lund, Amie K.; Knuckles, Travis L.; Conklin, Daniel J.; Bishop, Barbara; Young, David; Seilkop, Steven; Seagrave, JeanClare; Reed, Matthew D.; McDonald, Jacob D.

    2010-02-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest that traffic-related air pollution may have detrimental effects on cardiovascular health. Previous studies reveal that gasoline emissions can induce several enzyme pathways involved in the formation and development of atherosclerotic plaques. As a direct comparison, the present study examined the impact of diesel engine emissions on these pathways, and further examined the effects on vascular lesion pathology. Apolipoprotein E-null mice were simultaneously placed on a high-fat chow diet and exposed to four concentrations, plus a high concentration exposure with particulates (PM) removed by filtration, of diesel emissions for 6 h/day for 50 days. Aortas were subsequently assayed for alterations in matrix metalloproteinase-9, endothelin-1, and several other biomarkers. Diesel induced dose-related alterations in gene markers of vascular remodeling and aortic lipid peroxidation; filtration of PM did not significantly alter these vascular responses, indicating that the gaseous portion of the exhaust was a principal driver. Immunohistochemical analysis of aortic leaflet sections revealed no net increase in lesion area, but a significant decrease in lipid-rich regions and increasing trends in macrophage accumulation and collagen content, suggesting that plaques were advanced to a more fragile, potentially more vulnerable state by diesel exhaust exposure. Combined with previous studies, these results indicate that whole emissions from mobile sources may have a significant role in promoting chronic vascular disease.

  16. Computational approaches for analyzing the mechanics of atherosclerotic plaques: a review.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Mulvihill, John J; Cunnane, Eoghan M; Walsh, Michael T

    2014-03-01

    Vulnerable and stable atherosclerotic plaques are heterogeneous living materials with peculiar mechanical behaviors depending on geometry, composition, loading and boundary conditions. Computational approaches have the potential to characterize the three-dimensional stress/strain distributions in patient-specific diseased arteries of different types and sclerotic morphologies and to estimate the risk of plaque rupture which is the main trigger of acute cardiovascular events. This review article attempts to summarize a few finite element (FE) studies for different vessel types, and how these studies were performed focusing on the used stress measure, inclusion of residual stress, used imaging modality and material model. In addition to histology the most used imaging modalities are described, the most common nonlinear material models and the limited number of models for plaque rupture used for such studies are provided in more detail. A critical discussion on stress measures and threshold stress values for plaque rupture used within the FE studies emphasizes the need to develop a more location and tissue-specific threshold value, and a more appropriate failure criterion. With this addition future FE studies should also consider more advanced strain-energy functions which then fit better to location and tissue-specific experimental data.

  17. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Alter Atherosclerotic Plaque Composition in ApoE−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Campen, Matthew J.; Lund, Amie K.; Knuckles, Travis L.; Conklin, Daniel J.; Bishop, Barbara; Young, David; Seilkop, Steven; Seagrave, JeanClare; Reed, Matthew D.; McDonald, Jacob D.

    2009-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest that traffic-related air pollution may have detrimental effects on cardiovascular health. Previous studies reveal that gasoline emissions can induce several enzyme pathways involved in the formation and development of atherosclerotic plaques. As a direct comparison, the present study examined the impact of diesel engine emissions on these pathways, and further examined the effects on vascular lesion pathology. Apolipoprotein E-null mice were simultaneously placed on a high fat chow diet and exposed to four concentrations, plus a high concentration exposure with particulates (PM) removed by filtration, of diesel emissions for 6 h/d for 50 days. Aortas were subsequently assayed for alteration in matrix metalloproteinase-9, endothelin-1, and several other biomarkers. Diesel induced dose-related alterations in gene markers of vascular remodeling and aortic lipid peroxidation; filtration of PM did not significantly alter these vascular responses, indicating that the gaseous portion of the exhaust was a principal driver. Immunohistochemical analysis of aortic leaflet sections revealed no net increase in lesion area, but a significant decrease in lipid-rich regions and increasing trends in macrophage accumulation and collagen content, suggesting that plaques were advanced to a more fragile, potentially more vulnerable state by diesel exhaust exposure. Combined with previous studies, these results indicate that whole emissions from mobile sources may have a significant role in promoting chronic vascular disease. PMID:19891982

  18. Contralateral acoustic stimulation induces a phase advance in evoked otoacoustic emissions in humans.

    PubMed

    Giraud, A L; Perrin, E; Chéry-Croze, S; Chays, A; Collet, L

    1996-05-01

    In 28 normal-hearing human subjects, the medial olivocochlear efferent system was activated by contralateral acoustic stimulation which is able to mimic the inhibitory effects of electrical stimulation of the crossed olivocochlear bundle. A first experiment on 16 subjects demonstrated that a contralateral white noise of 35 dB SL was able to induce temporal changes on transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions in response to clicks of 63 dB SPL. These temporal changes consisted of an advance of click-evoked otoacoustic signals in 87% of cases and is referred to as phase-shift effect. The phase advance, quantified using two signal processing methods in both time and frequency domains, was found to be mainly associated with lower frequencies, with a maximal effect at 1.5 kHz and minimal effects around 3.5 and 4 kHz. In a second experiment, carried out on 12 subjects, a negative relationship was found to exist between the ipsilateral stimulation level (level of clicks ranging from 57 to 69 dB SPL) and the phase-shift effect (PSE). Specifically in the range of levels tested (25-45 dB SL), a linear relationship presenting no obvious saturation effect was observed between the contralateral level and the PSE. The PSE was examined in 6 additional subjects exhibiting pathological symptoms; 2 of 3 individuals, who had no contralateral stapedial reflexes unilaterally, showed the PSE whereas this response was reduced or absent in 3 other subjects in the ear with severed efferents associated with a vestibular neurotomy. The integrity of olivocochlear efferents was, therefore, necessary to obtain a full effect, but the absence of stapedial reflex did not prevent the effect from occurring. PMID:8789811

  19. 3D MRI-based multicomponent FSI models for atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dalin; Yang, Chun; Zheng, Jie; Woodard, Pamela K; Sicard, Gregorio A; Saffitz, Jeffrey E; Yuan, Chun

    2004-07-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) MRI-based computational model with multicomponent plaque structure and fluid-structure interactions (FSI) is introduced to perform mechanical analysis for human atherosclerotic plaques and identify critical flow and stress/strain conditions which may be related to plaque rupture. Three-dimensional geometry of a human carotid plaque was reconstructed from 3D MR images and computational mesh was generated using Visualization Toolkit. Both the artery wall and the plaque components were assumed to be hyperelastic, isotropic, incompressible, and homogeneous. The flow was assumed to be laminar, Newtonian, viscous, and incompressible. The fully coupled fluid and structure models were solved by ADINA, a well-tested finite element package. Results from two-dimensional (2D) and 3D models, based on ex vivo MRI and histological images (HI), with different component sizes and plaque cap thickness, under different pressure and axial stretch conditions, were obtained and compared. Our results indicate that large lipid pools and thin plaque caps are associated with both extreme maximum (stretch) and minimum (compression when negative) stress/strain levels. Large cyclic stress/strain variations in the plaque under pulsating pressure were observed which may lead to artery fatigue and possible plaque rupture. Large-scale patient studies are needed to validate the computational findings for possible plaque vulnerability assessment and rupture predictions. PMID:15298432

  20. [18F]FDG Accumulation in Early Coronary Atherosclerotic Lesions in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Tarkia, Miikka; Saraste, Antti; Stark, Christoffer; Vähäsilta, Tommi; Savunen, Timo; Strandberg, Marjatta; Saunavaara, Virva; Tolvanen, Tuula; Teuho, Jarmo; Teräs, Mika; Metsälä, Olli; Rinne, Petteri; Heinonen, Ilkka; Savisto, Nina; Pietilä, Mikko; Saukko, Pekka; Roivainen, Anne; Knuuti, Juhani

    2015-01-01

    Objective Inflammation is an important contributor to atherosclerosis progression. A glucose analogue 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) has been used to detect atherosclerotic inflammation. However, it is not known to what extent [18F]FDG is taken up in different stages of atherosclerosis. We aimed to study the uptake of [18F]FDG to various stages of coronary plaques in a pig model. Methods First, diabetes was caused by streptozotocin injections (50 mg/kg for 3 days) in farm pigs (n = 10). After 6 months on high-fat diet, pigs underwent dual-gated cardiac PET/CT to measure [18F]FDG uptake in coronary arteries. Coronary segments (n = 33) were harvested for ex vivo measurement of radioactivity and autoradiography (ARG). Results Intimal thickening was observed in 16 segments and atheroma type plaques in 10 segments. Compared with the normal vessel wall, ARG showed 1.7±0.7 times higher [18F]FDG accumulation in the intimal thickening and 4.1±2.3 times higher in the atheromas (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003, respectively). Ex vivo mean vessel-to-blood ratio was higher in segments with atheroma than those without atherosclerosis (2.6±1.2 vs. 1.3±0.7, P = 0.04). In vivo PET imaging showed the highest target-to-background ratio (TBR) of 2.7. However, maximum TBR was not significantly different in segments without atherosclerosis (1.1±0.5) and either intimal thickening (1.2±0.4, P = 1.0) or atheroma (1.6±0.6, P = 0.4). Conclusions We found increased uptake of [18F]FDG in coronary atherosclerotic lesions in a pig model. However, uptake in these early stage lesions was not detectable with in vivo PET imaging. Further studies are needed to clarify whether visible [18F]FDG uptake in coronary arteries represents more advanced, highly inflamed plaques. PMID:26120829

  1. Defining Advancement Career Paths and Succession Plans: Critical Human Capital Retention Strategies for High-Performing Advancement Divisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croteau, Jon Derek; Wolk, Holly Gordon

    2010-01-01

    There are many factors that can influence whether a highly talented staff member will build a career within an institution or use it as a stepping stone. This article defines and explores the notions of developing career paths and succession planning and why they are critical human capital investment strategies in retaining the highest performers…

  2. Algorithm for quantifying advanced carotid artery atherosclerosis in humans using MRI and active contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Gareth; Vick, G. W., III; Bordelon, Cassius; Insull, William; Morrisett, Joel

    2002-05-01

    A new algorithm for measuring carotid artery volumes and estimating atherosclerotic plaque volumes from MRI images has been developed and validated using pressure-perfusion-fixed cadaveric carotid arteries. Our method uses an active contour algorithm with the generalized gradient vector field force as the external force to localize the boundaries of the artery on each MRI cross-section. Plaque volume is estimated by an automated algorithm based on estimating the normal wall thickness for each branch of the carotid. Triplicate volume measurements were performed by a single observer on thirty-eight pairs of cadaveric carotid arteries. The coefficient of variance (COV) was used to quantify measurement reproducibility. Aggregate volumes were computed for nine contiguous slices bounding the carotid bifurcation. The median (mean +/- SD) COV for the 76 aggregate arterial volumes was 0.93% (1.47% +/- 1.52%) for the lumen volume, 0.95% (1.06% +/- 0.67%) for the total artery volume, and 4.69% (5.39% +/- 3.97%) for the plaque volume. These results indicate that our algorithm provides repeatable measures of arterial volumes and a repeatable estimate of plaque volume of cadaveric carotid specimens through analysis of MRI images. The algorithm also significantly decreases the amount of time necessary to generate these measurements.

  3. [Cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibition in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: second act "A rebirth of hope"].

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Antonio; Rigotti, Attilio

    2011-06-01

    Despite the clinical use of statins to reduce serum levels of LDL cholesterol and treat atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, a high proportion of patients remain at significant residual cardiovascular risk. In this context, low HDL cholesterol levels are an additional risk factor and intervention studies suggest that a fraction of the cardiovascular protection achieved with pharmacotherapy is explained specifically by the increase in serum levels of HDL cholesterol. Pharmacological inhibitors of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) can induce a significant elevation in HDL cholesterol and, potentially, lead to better control of residual cardiovascular risk beyond the benefit demonstrated by statins. While the use of torcetrapib had unexpected side effects, dalcetrapib and anacetrapib are new CETP inhibitors with a better safety profile and are currently under study to evaluate their effects on vascular lesions and clinical events in patients at high cardiovascular risk. If these studies show positive findings, we will witness a new biomedical advance as significant as was the clinical.

  4. A focus on inflammation as a major risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Ida; Holm, Sverre; Dahl, Tuva B; Halvorsen, Bente; Aukrust, Pål

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a dynamic, pathogenic process in the artery wall, with potential adverse outcome for the host. Acute events such as myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke often result from rupture of unstable atherosclerotic lesions. Understanding the underlying pathology of such lesions and why and when they rupture, is therefore of great interest for the development of new diagnostics and treatment. Inflammation is one of the key drivers of atherosclerotic plaque development and the interplay between inflammation and lipids constitutes the hallmark of atherosclerotic disease. This review summarizes the role of inflammation in atherosclerosis and presents some of the latest discoveries as well as unmet needs regarding the role of inflammation as major risk factor in atherosclerotic disease.

  5. Characterization of atherosclerotic plaque-depositions by infrared, Raman and CARS microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthäus, Christian; Bergner, Gero; Krafft, Christoph; Dietzek, Benjamin; Romeike, Bernd F. M.; Brehm, Bernhard R.; Popp, Jürgen

    2011-07-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques are mainly composed of proteoglycans, triglycerides, cholesterol, cholesterolester and crystalline calcium. From histopathological characterizations it is known that the composition of these atherosclerotic plaques can vary to a great extent, due to different risk factors as smoking, hyperlipedemia, or genetic background ect. The individual plaque components can be spectroscopically easily identified. Furthermore, spectroscopic imaging technologies offer the possibility to study the plaque compositions in a more quantitative manner than traditional staining techniques. Here, we compare the potential of IR, Raman and CARS microscopy to characterize the constitution of atherosclerotic plaques as well as the structure of the surrounding tissue. For data analysis and image reconstruction spectral decomposition algorithms such as vertex component analysis (VCA) were introduced. The results are in good agreement with the histopathology. Aim of the study is to correlate the compositional characteristics of atherosclerotic plaques with individual disease patterns.

  6. Intravascular photoacoustic imaging of exogenously labeled atherosclerotic plaque through luminal blood

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Doug; Karpiouk, Andrei; Wang, Bo; Amirian, James; Sokolov, Konstantin; Smalling, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Combined intravascular ultrasound and intravascular photoacoustic (IVUS/IVPA) imaging has been previously established as a viable means for assessing atherosclerotic plaque morphological and compositional characteristics using both endogenous and exogenous contrast. In this study, IVUS/IVPA imaging of atherosclerotic rabbit aortas following systemic injection of gold nanorods (AUNRs) with peak absorbance within the tissue optical window is performed. Ex vivo imaging results reveal a high photoacoustic signal from localized AUNRs in regions with atherosclerotic plaques. Corresponding histological staining further confirms the preferential extravasation of AUNRs in atherosclerotic regions with compromised luminal endothelium and acute inflammation. The ability to detect AUNRs using combined IVUS and photoacoustic imaging in the presence of luminal saline and luminal blood is evaluated using both spectroscopic and single wavelength IVPA imaging techniques. Results demonstrate that AUNR detection within the arterial wall can be achieved using both methods, even in the case of imaging through luminal blood. PMID:23224013

  7. Atherosclerosis and Atheroma Plaque Rupture: Imaging Modalities in the Visualization of Vasa Vasorum and Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Invasive angiography has been widely accepted as the gold standard to diagnose cardiovascular pathologies. Despite its superior resolution of demonstrating atherosclerotic plaque in terms of degree of lumen stenosis, the morphological assessment for the plaque is insufficient for the analysis of plaque components, and therefore, unable to predict the risk status or vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaque. There is an increased body of evidence to show that the vasa vasorum play an important role in the initiation, progression, and complications of atherosclerotic plaque leading to major adverse cardiac events. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of various imaging modalities with regard to their potential value for comprehensive characterization of the composition, burden, and neovascularization of atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:24688380

  8. Advanced oxidative protein products induced human keratinocyte apoptosis through the NOX-MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baihui; Ding, Ruoting; Yu, Wenlin; Wu, Yanhong; Wang, Bulin; Li, Qin

    2016-07-01

    Impaired wound healing is a major diabetes-related complication. Keratinocytes play an important role in wound healing. Multiple factors have been proposed that can induce dysfunction in keratinocytes. The focus of present research is at a more specific molecular level. We investigated the role of advanced oxidative protein products (AOPPs) in inducing human immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell apoptosis and the cellular mechanism underlying the proapoptotic effect of AOPPs. HaCaT cells were treated with increasing concentrations of AOPP-human serum albumin or for increasing time durations. The cell viability was measured using the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide method, and flow cytometry was used to assess the rate of cell apoptosis. A loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed through a confocal laser scanning microscope system, and the level of ROS generation was determined using a microplate reader. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX)4, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and apoptosis-related downstream protein interactions were investigated using the Western blot analysis. We found that AOPPs triggered HaCaT cell apoptosis and MMP loss. After AOPP treatment, intracellular ROS generation increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Proapoptotic proteins, such as Bax, caspase 9/caspase 3, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 were activated, whereas anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein was downregulated. AOPPs also increased NOX4, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that extracellular AOPP accumulation triggered NOX-dependent ROS production, which activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK, and induced HaCaT cell apoptosis by activating caspase 3 and PARP-1.

  9. Next Generation Life Support Project: Development of Advanced Technologies for Human Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Next Generation Life Support (NGLS) is one of several technology development projects sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Game Changing Development Program. NGLS is developing life support technologies (including water recovery, and space suit life support technologies) needed for humans to live and work productively in space. NGLS has three project tasks: Variable Oxygen Regulator (VOR), Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing bed, and Alternative Water Processing. The selected technologies within each of these areas are focused on increasing affordability, reliability, and vehicle self sufficiency while decreasing mass and enabling long duration exploration. The RCA and VOR tasks are directed at key technology needs for the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for an Exploration Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), with focus on prototyping and integrated testing. The focus of the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing-bed ventilation task is to provide integrated carbon dioxide removal and humidity control that can be regenerated in real time during an EVA. The Variable Oxygen Regulator technology will significantly increase the number of pressure settings available to the space suit. Current spacesuit pressure regulators are limited to only two settings while the adjustability of the advanced regulator will be nearly continuous. The Alternative Water Processor efforts will result in the development of a system capable of recycling wastewater from sources expected in future exploration missions, including hygiene and laundry water, based on natural biological processes and membrane-based post treatment. The technologies will support a capability-driven architecture for extending human presence beyond low Earth orbit to potential destinations such as the Moon, near Earth asteroids and Mars.

  10. Hepatocyte growth factor protects human endothelial cells against advanced glycation end products-induced apoposis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yijun . E-mail: zhou-yijun@hotmail.com; Wang Jiahe; Zhang Jin

    2006-06-02

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) form by a non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and biological proteins, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed AGEs effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), an anti-apoptotic factor for endothelial cells, prevents AGEs-induced apoptosis of HUVECs. HUVECs were treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of HGF. Treatment of HUVECs with AGEs changed cell morphology, decreased cell viability, and induced DNA fragmentation, leading to apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced by AGEs in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGEs markedly elevated Bax and decreased NF-{kappa}B, but not Bcl-2 expression. Additionally, AGEs significantly inhibited cell growth through a pro-apoptotic action involving caspase-3 and -9 activations in HUVECs. Most importantly, pretreatment with HGF protected against AGEs-induced cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. HGF significantly promoted the expression of Bcl-2 and NF-{kappa}B, while decreasing the activities of caspase-3 and -9 without affecting Bax level. Our data suggest that AGEs induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. HGF effectively attenuate AGEs-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. These findings provide new perspectives in the role of HGF in cardiovascular disease.

  11. Macrophage uptake of low-density lipoprotein bound to aggregated C-reactive protein: possible mechanism of foam-cell formation in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tao; Borensztajn, Jayme

    2002-01-01

    Foam cells found in atherosclerotic lesions are believed to derive from macrophages that take up aggregated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles bound to the extracellular matrix of arterial walls. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase protein found in atherosclerotic lesions, which when immobilized on a solid phase, can bind and cluster LDL particles in a calcium-dependent manner. In the present study, we examined whether CRP-bound aggregated LDL could be taken up by macrophages in culture. CRP molecules were aggregated in the presence of calcium and immobilized on the surface of polystyrene microtitre wells. Human LDL added to the wells bound to and aggregated on the immobilized CRP, also in a calcium-dependent manner. On incubation with macrophages, the immobilized CRP-bound LDL aggregates were readily taken up by the cells, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy, by the cellular accumulation of cholesterol and by the overexpression of adipophilin. Immunofluorescence microscopy and flow-cytometry analysis established that the uptake of the LDL-CRP complex was not mediated by the CRP receptor CD32. These observations with immobilized CRP and LDL, approximating the conditions that exist in the extracellular matrix of the arterial wall, thus suggest that CRP may contribute to the formation of foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions by causing the aggregation of LDL molecules that are then taken up by macrophages through a CD32-independent pathway. PMID:12033985

  12. Lactones from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. reduces atherosclerotic lesions in apoE-deficient mice via inhibiting over expression of NF-kB-dependent adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yang; Wang, Ying-Chao; Li, Lai-Lai; Jin, Ye-Cheng; Sironi, Luigi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yi

    2014-06-01

    The present study aims to investigate the anti-atherosclerotic effects of lactones extracted from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort (LLC) in apoE-deficient mice (ApoE(-/-) mice) and proclaim its underlying mechanisms. Expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and NF-κB around the atherosclerotic lesions was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). To further validate the mechanism, effect of LLC on the secretion of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) induced by tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was measured by ELISA. And the activation of NF-κB was detected by western blot. Mice treated with LLC showed significant reduction in lesion sizes of thoracic segments of the aorta (p<0.01). Meanwhile, LLC treatments lead to decreases of serum TG, TC and LDL-C contents, respectively. LLC also decreased the expression of CD31, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in the atherosclerotic plaque. Moreover, LLC at 3.125-25 μg/mL can dose-dependently attenuate the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in TNF-α stimulated HUVECs. Western blot result indicated LLC inhibited activation of NF-κB. These results suggested that LLC could ameliorate atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice. The mechanism of action of LLC on anti-atherosclerotic effect may be attributed to the suppression of the production of NF-κB-dependent adhesion molecules. PMID:24594239

  13. Direct demonstration of P-selectin- and VCAM-1-dependent mononuclear cell rolling in early atherosclerotic lesions of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ramos, C L; Huo, Y; Jung, U; Ghosh, S; Manka, D R; Sarembock, I J; Ley, K

    1999-06-11

    Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice develop atherosclerotic lesions throughout the arterial tree, including the carotid bifurcation. Although the expression of adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and P-selectin on endothelium that overlie atherosclerotic plaques has been implicated in monocyte recruitment to developing lesions, monocyte adhesion in atherosclerotic vessels has not been observed directly. To investigate which adhesion molecules may be important in monocyte adhesion to atherosclerotic lesions, an isolated mouse carotid artery preparation was developed and perfused with mononuclear cells. We show rolling and attachment of the human monocytic cell line U937 and the mouse monocyte-macrophage cell line P388D1 in carotid arteries from 10- to 12-week-old ApoE-/- and C57BL/6 wild-type mice fed a Western-type diet (21% fat wt/wt) for 4 to 5 weeks. No rolling was observed in carotid arteries from C57BL/6 or BALB/c wild-type mice fed a chow diet and little was observed in BALB/c mice fed a Western-type diet. This model represents early lesion development as shown by minimal macrophage infiltration in the intima of carotid arteries from ApoE-/- mice fed a Western-type diet. Rolling was observed at shear stresses that were characteristic of the low-shear recirculation zone near the carotid bifurcation. Mononuclear cell attachment and rolling were significantly inhibited by monoclonal antibody blockade of P-selectin or its leukocyte ligand P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1. Rolling velocities increased after monoclonal antibody blockade of mononuclear cell alpha4-integrin or VCAM-1, which indicates that alpha4-integrin interacting with VCAM-1 stabilizes rolling interactions and prolongs monocyte transit times.

  14. Hematopoietic specification from human pluripotent stem cells: current advances and challenges toward de novo generation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Slukvin, Igor I

    2013-12-12

    Significant advances in cellular reprogramming technologies and hematopoietic differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have already enabled the routine production of multiple lineages of blood cells in vitro and opened novel opportunities to study hematopoietic development, model genetic blood diseases, and manufacture immunologically matched cells for transfusion and cancer immunotherapy. However, the generation of hematopoietic cells with robust and sustained multilineage engraftment has not been achieved. Here, we highlight the recent advances in understanding the molecular and cellular pathways leading to blood development from hPSCs and discuss potential approaches that can be taken to facilitate the development of technologies for de novo production of hematopoietic stem cells.

  15. Molecular Imaging of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Gargiulo, Sara; Gramanzini, Matteo; Mancini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by intimal plaques of the arterial vessels that develop slowly and, in some cases, may undergo spontaneous rupture with subsequent heart attack or stroke. Currently, noninvasive diagnostic tools are inadequate to screen atherosclerotic lesions at high risk of acute complications. Therefore, the attention of the scientific community has been focused on the use of molecular imaging for identifying vulnerable plaques. Genetically engineered murine models such as ApoE−/− and ApoE−/−Fbn1C1039G+/− mice have been shown to be useful for testing new probes targeting biomarkers of relevant molecular processes for the characterization of vulnerable plaques, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1, VEGFR-2, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, P-selectin, and integrins, and for the potential development of translational tools to identify high-risk patients who could benefit from early therapeutic interventions. This review summarizes the main animal models of vulnerable plaques, with an emphasis on genetically altered mice, and the state-of-the-art preclinical molecular imaging strategies. PMID:27618031

  16. Variogram methods for texture classification of atherosclerotic plaque ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeromin, Oliver M.; Pattichis, Marios S.; Pattichis, Constantinos; Kyriacou, Efthyvoulos; Nicolaides, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the western world and the major cause of disability in adults. The type and stenosis of extracranial carotid artery disease is often responsible for ischemic strokes, transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) or amaurosis fugax (AF). The identification and grading of stenosis can be done using gray scale ultrasound scans. The appearance of B-scan pictures containing various granular structures makes the use of texture analysis techniques suitable for computer assisted tissue characterization purposes. The objective of this study is to investigate the usefulness of variogram analysis in the assessment of ultrasound plague morphology. The variogram estimates the variance of random fields, from arbitrary samples in space. We explore stationary random field models based on the variogram, which can be applied in ultrasound plaque imaging leading to a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system for the early detection of symptomatic atherosclerotic plaques. Non-parametric tests on the variogram coefficients show that the cofficients coming from symptomatic versus asymptomatic plaques come from distinct distributions. Furthermore, we show significant improvement in class separation, when a log point-transformation is applied to the images, prior to variogram estimation. Model fitting using least squares is explored for anisotropic variograms along specific directions. Comparative classification results, show that variogram coefficients can be used for the early detection of symptomatic cases, and also exhibit the largest class distances between symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque images, as compared to over 60 other texture features, used in the literature.

  17. An uncommon cause of chest pain - penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Htoo; Sadiq, Sanah; Chowdhury, Arnab; Gholamrezaee, Rashin; Yoe, Linus

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is a very common symptom and can be of cardiac or non-cardiac origin. It accounts for approximately 5.5 million annual emergency room visits in the United States, according to 2011 CDC data. Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer (PAU), an uncommon condition, is also a potential cause of chest pain. We here report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with atypical chest and back pain. The pain persisted for 4 weeks necessitating two emergency room visits. Initial tests were non-significant including cardiac troponins, an electrocardiogram (EKG), and a chest X-ray on her first visit. Upon her second visit, she underwent a computed tomography angiogram of chest with contrast which revealed a PAU with an intramural hematoma in descending aorta. The PAU was finally diagnosed with an exclusion of other chest pain causes. She was treated non-surgically with a blood pressure control strategy and pain management. After a 2-month period of smoking cessation and following the achievement of a controlled blood pressure, she felt well without chest pain. PMID:27406453

  18. Endothelial microparticles as conveyors of information in atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Schiro, A; Wilkinson, F L; Weston, R; Smyth, J V; Serracino-Inglott, F; Alexander, M Y

    2014-06-01

    Endothelial microparticles (EMPs) are complex submicron membrane-shed vesicles released into the circulation following endothelium cell activation or apoptosis. They are classified as either physiological or pathological, with anticoagulant or pro-inflammatory effects respectively. Endothelial dysfunction caused by inflammation is a key initiating event in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Athero-emboli, resulting from ruptured carotid plaques are a major cause of stroke. Current clinical techniques for arterial assessment, angiography and carotid ultrasound, give accurate information about stenosis but limited evidence on plaque composition, inflammation or vulnerability; as a result, patients with asymptomatic, or fragile carotid lesions, may not be identified and treated effectively. There is a need to discover novel biomarkers and develop more efficient diagnostic approaches in order to stratify patients at most risk of stroke, who would benefit from interventional surgery. Increasing evidence suggests that EMPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, acting as a marker of damage, either exacerbating disease progression or triggering a repair response. In this regard, it has been suggested that EMPs have the potential to act as biomarkers of disease status. In this review, we will present the evidence to support this hypothesis and propose a novel concept for the development of a diagnostic device that could be implemented in the clinic. PMID:24721189

  19. Recanalization Results After Intracranial Stenting of Atherosclerotic Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Blasel, Stella Yuekzek, Zeynep; Kurre, Wiebke; Berkefeld, Joachim; Neumann-Haefelin, Tobias; Hattingen, Elke; Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard du

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to provide a detailed description of the angiographic results after stenting of high-grade intracranial stenosis using balloon-expandable stents. Forty consecutive patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic intracranial stenosis >50% received endovascular treatment by placement of balloon-expandable stents using the concept of slight underdilation and strict avoidance of overdilation. Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography images before and after stenting in the same projection were reviewed for pre- and post-therapeutic measurement of the degree of stenosis and evaluation of morphologic criteria like plaque coverage, stent apposition, patency of side branches, and signs of dissection or vasospasm. Stenting decreased the mean percentage stenosis from 76.2 (WASID criteria) to 20.8%. Residual stenosis ranged from 0 to 55% with residual stenosis >50% in two of 40 cases. Technical success rate was 95%. There were no major vessel complications, but minor abnormalities like incomplete stent apposition (8/40) or plaque coverage (7/40), incomplete filling of side branches (13/40), and minor dissections after stenting (2/40) were seen. One case with incomplete stent apposition and two cases with side branch compromise were associated with clinical symptoms. In conclusion, intracranial stenting with slight underdilation avoided major vessel complication and created reliable luminal gain. Suboptimal recanalization results were frequently detected and may be the source of neurological complications in individual cases.

  20. Molecular Imaging of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Sara; Gramanzini, Matteo; Mancini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by intimal plaques of the arterial vessels that develop slowly and, in some cases, may undergo spontaneous rupture with subsequent heart attack or stroke. Currently, noninvasive diagnostic tools are inadequate to screen atherosclerotic lesions at high risk of acute complications. Therefore, the attention of the scientific community has been focused on the use of molecular imaging for identifying vulnerable plaques. Genetically engineered murine models such as ApoE(-/-) and ApoE(-/-)Fbn1C1039G(+/-) mice have been shown to be useful for testing new probes targeting biomarkers of relevant molecular processes for the characterization of vulnerable plaques, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1, VEGFR-2, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, P-selectin, and integrins, and for the potential development of translational tools to identify high-risk patients who could benefit from early therapeutic interventions. This review summarizes the main animal models of vulnerable plaques, with an emphasis on genetically altered mice, and the state-of-the-art preclinical molecular imaging strategies. PMID:27618031

  1. Directional spatial frequency analysis of lipid distribution in atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Clyde; Reese, Eric; Shi, Lingyan; Alfano, Robert; Russell, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the growth of fibrous plaques due to the retention of cholesterol and lipids within the artery wall, which can lead to vessel occlusion and cardiac events. One way to evaluate arterial disease is to quantify the amount of lipid present in these plaques, since a higher disease burden is characterized by a higher concentration of lipid. Although therapeutic stimulation of reverse cholesterol transport to reduce cholesterol deposits in plaque has not produced significant results, this may be due to current image analysis methods which use averaging techniques to calculate the total amount of lipid in the plaque without regard to spatial distribution, thereby discarding information that may have significance in marking response to therapy. Here we use Directional Fourier Spatial Frequency (DFSF) analysis to generate a characteristic spatial frequency spectrum for atherosclerotic plaques from C57 Black 6 mice both treated and untreated with a cholesterol scavenging nanoparticle. We then use the Cauchy product of these spectra to classify the images with a support vector machine (SVM). Our results indicate that treated plaque can be distinguished from untreated plaque using this method, where no difference is seen using the spatial averaging method. This work has the potential to increase the effectiveness of current in-vivo methods of plaque detection that also use averaging methods, such as laser speckle imaging and Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Inflammatory and atherosclerotic interactions in the depleted uremic patient.

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, P

    2001-01-01

    Despite the improvements in dialysis technology, the cardiovascular mortality rate is still unacceptably high among dialysis patients. It is obvious that traditional risk factors, such as hypertension, chronic heart failure (CHF), dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus, may account for a large part of the increased cardiovascular mortality rate in these patients. However, based on recent research it could be speculated that other, non-traditional risk factors might also contribute to the high cardiovascular mortality rate in dialysis patients. Chronic inflammation, as evidenced by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP), is a common feature in dialysis patients and is associated with an increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Indeed, elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as TNF-alpha, IL-1 and IL-6) may cause malnutrition and progressive atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by several pathogenetic mechanisms, which will be discussed in this review. Based on the strong associations observed between malnutrition, inflammation and atherosclerosis in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) we have proposed that these features constitute a specific syndrome (MIA), which carries a high mortality rate. As elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines may play a central part in the vicious circle of malnutrition, inflammation and atherosclerosis, further research is needed to investigate whether or not different anti-cytokine treatment strategies may improve survival in dialysis patients.

  3. Multimodal spectroscopy detects features of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šćepanović, Obrad R.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Miller, Arnold; Kong, Chae-Ryon; Volynskaya, Zoya; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Kramer, John R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Early detection and treatment of rupture-prone vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is critical to reducing patient mortality associated with cardiovascular disease. The combination of reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopy-termed multimodal spectroscopy (MMS)-provides detailed biochemical information about tissue and can detect vulnerable plaque features: thin fibrous cap (TFC), necrotic core (NC), superficial foam cells (SFC), and thrombus. Ex vivo MMS spectra are collected from 12 patients that underwent carotid endarterectomy or femoral bypass surgery. Data are collected by means of a unitary MMS optical fiber probe and a portable clinical instrument. Blinded histopathological analysis is used to assess the vulnerability of each spectrally evaluated artery lesion. Modeling of the ex vivo MMS spectra produce objective parameters that correlate with the presence of vulnerable plaque features: TFC with fluorescence parameters indicative of collagen presence; NC/SFC with a combination of diffuse reflectance β-carotene/ceroid absorption and the Raman spectral signature of lipids; and thrombus with its Raman signature. Using these parameters, suspected vulnerable plaques can be detected with a sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 72%. These encouraging results warrant the continued development of MMS as a catheter-based clinical diagnostic technique for early detection of vulnerable plaques.

  4. Fluorescence lifetime imaging for the characterization of the biochemical composition of atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Jennifer; Sun, Yinghua; Saroufeem, Ramez; Hatami, Nisa; Fishbein, Michael C.; Marcu, Laura

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates the ability of a flexible fiberoptic-based fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) technique to resolve biochemical features in plaque fibrotic cap associated with plaque instability and based solely on fluorescence decay characteristics. Autofluorescence of atherosclerotic human aorta (11 autopsy samples) was measured at 48 locations through two filters, F377: 377/50 and F460: 460/60 nm (center wavelength/bandwidth). The fluorescence decay dynamic was described by average lifetime (τ) and four Laguerre coefficients (LECs) retrieved through a Laguerre deconvolution technique. FLIM-derived parameters discriminated between four groups [elastin-rich (ER), elastin and macrophage-rich (E+M), collagen-rich (CR), and lipid-rich (LR)]. For example, τF377 discriminated ER from CR (R = 0.84); τF460 discriminated E+M from CR and ER (R = 0.60 and 0.54, respectively); LEC-1F377 discriminated CR from LR and E+M (R = 0.69 and 0.77, respectively); P < 0.05 for all correlations. Linear discriminant analysis was used to classify this data set with specificity >87% (all cases) and sensitivity as high as 86%. Current results demonstrate for the first time that clinically relevant features (e.g., ratios of lipid versus collagen versus elastin) can be evaluated with a flexible-fiber based FLIM technique without the need for fluorescence intensity information or contrast agents.

  5. Mechanical modeling of cholesterol crystallization in atherosclerotic plaques base on Micro-OCT images (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuemei; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Cui, Dongyao; Wang, Xianghong; Liu, Linbo

    2016-02-01

    Plaque rupture is the critical cause of cardiovascular thrombosis but this process is still under discussion. Recent studies show that, during crystallization, cholesterol crystals in atheromatous plaques accumulate rapidly in a limited space and may result in plaque rupture. However, the actual role of cholesterol crystals on plaque rupture remains unclear due to the lack of detailed morphological information of cholesterol crystals. In this study, we used a Micro-optical coherence tomography (µOCT) setup with 1-2 µm spatial resolution to extract the geometry of cholesterol crystals from human atherosclerotic artery ex vivo firstly. With measured dimensions of cholesterol crystals by this µOCT system (the average length and thickness of 269.1±80.16 µm and 3.0±0.33 µm), we developed a two-dimensional mechanical model in which rectangular shaped cholesterol crystals distribute at different locations spatially. We predicted the stress on the thin cap induced by the expansion of cholesterol crystals by use of finite-element method. Since a large portion of plaques (58%) rupture at points of peak circumferential stress (PCS), we used PCS as the primary indicator of plaque stability with blood pressure of 14.6 kPa on the lumen. The results demonstrate that loading of the concentrated crystals especially at the cap shoulder destabilize the plaque by proportionally increasing the PCS, while evenly distributed crystals loading along the cap might impose less PCS to the plaque than the concentrated case.

  6. Quantitative profiling of oxylipins in plasma and atherosclerotic plaques of hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bojic, Lazar A; McLaren, David G; Harms, Amy C; Hankemeier, Thomas; Dane, Adrie; Wang, Sheng-Ping; Rosa, Ray; Previs, Stephen F; Johns, Douglas G; Castro-Perez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Oxylipins are oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that affect a broad range of physiological processes, including cell proliferation, inflammation, inflammation resolution, and vascular function. Moreover, oxylipins are readily detectable in plasma, and certain subsets of oxylipins have been detected in human atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, we set out to produce a detailed quantitative assessment of plasma and plaque oxylipins in a widely used model of atherosclerosis, to identify potential biomarkers of disease progression. We administered regular chow or regular chow supplemented with 0.5% cholesterol (HC) to male New Zealand white rabbits for 12 weeks to induce hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Our targeted lipidomic analyses of oxylipins on plaques isolated from rabbits fed the HC diet detected 34 oxylipins, 28 of which were in compliance with our previously established quality control acceptance criteria. The arachidonic acid (AA) metabolite derived from the COX pathway, 6-keto-PGF1α was the most abundant plaque oxylipin, followed by the linoleic acid (LA) metabolites 9-HODE, 13-HODE and 9,12,13-TriHOME and the arachidonic acid (AA)-derivatives 11-HETE and 12-HETE. We additionally found that the most abundant oxylipins in plasma were three of the five most abundant oxylipins in plaque, namely 11-HETE, 13-HODE, and 9-HODE. The studies reported here make the first step towards a comprehensive characterization of oxylipins as potentially translatable biomarkers of atherosclerosis.

  7. Ciprofloxacin inhibits advanced glycation end products-induced adhesion molecule expression on human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mori, S; Takahashi, HK; Liu, K; Wake, H; Zhang, J; Liu, R; Yoshino, T; Nishibori, M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) subtypes, proteins or lipids that become glycated after exposure to sugars, can induce complications in diabetes. Among the various AGE subtypes, glyceraldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-2) and glycolaldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-3) are involved in inflammation in diabetic patients; monocytes are activated by these AGEs. Ciprofloxacin (CIP), a fluorinated 4-quinolone, is often used clinically to treat infections associated with diabetis due to its antibacterial properties. It also modulates immune responses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) therefore we investigated the involvement of AGEs in these effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 was examined by flow cytometry. The production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cAMP were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Lymphocyte proliferation was determined by [3H]-thymidine uptake. KEY RESULTS CIP induced PGE2 production in monocytes, irrespective of the presence of AGE-2 and AGE-3, by enhancing COX-2 expression; this led to an elevation of intracellular cAMP in monocytes. Non-selective and selective COX-2 inhibitors, indomethacin and NS398, inhibited CIP-induced PGE2 and cAMP production. In addition, CIP inhibited AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced expressions of ICAM-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 in monocytes, the production of TNF-α and IFN-γ and lymphocyte proliferation in PBMC. Indomethacin, NS398 and a protein kinase A inhibitor, H89, inhibited the actions of CIP. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS CIP exerts immunomodulatory activity via PGE2, implying therapeutic potential of CIP for the treatment of AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced inflammatory responses. PMID:20718752

  8. Technology Alignment and Portfolio Prioritization (TAPP): Advanced Methods in Strategic Analysis, Technology Forecasting and Long Term Planning for Human Exploration and Operations, Advanced Exploration Systems and Advanced Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funaro, Gregory V.; Alexander, Reginald A.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) at NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center is expanding its current technology assessment methodologies. ACO is developing a framework called TAPP that uses a variety of methods, such as association mining and rule learning from data mining, structure development using a Technological Innovation System (TIS), and social network modeling to measure structural relationships. The role of ACO is to 1) produce a broad spectrum of ideas and alternatives for a variety of NASA's missions, 2) determine mission architecture feasibility and appropriateness to NASA's strategic plans, and 3) define a project in enough detail to establish an initial baseline capable of meeting mission objectives ACO's role supports the decision­-making process associated with the maturation of concepts for traveling through, living in, and understanding space. ACO performs concept studies and technology assessments to determine the degree of alignment between mission objectives and new technologies. The first step in technology assessment is to identify the current technology maturity in terms of a technology readiness level (TRL). The second step is to determine the difficulty associated with advancing a technology from one state to the next state. NASA has used TRLs since 1970 and ACO formalized them in 1995. The DoD, ESA, Oil & Gas, and DoE have adopted TRLs as a means to assess technology maturity. However, "with the emergence of more complex systems and system of systems, it has been increasingly recognized that TRL assessments have limitations, especially when considering [the] integration of complex systems." When performing the second step in a technology assessment, NASA requires that an Advancement Degree of Difficulty (AD2) method be utilized. NASA has used and developed or used a variety of methods to perform this step: Expert Opinion or Delphi Approach, Value Engineering or Value Stream, Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP), Technique for the Order of

  9. 78 FR 8546 - National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and National Human Genome Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ...) and National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI): Cooperative Research and Development Agreement... the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH),...

  10. Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies: A Global Network Advancing Dignity through Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, Evelin G.; Hartling, Linda M.; Spalthoff, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Human rights are universally based on the concept of human dignity. Various international organizations are developing the theoretical, legal, and political framework for human rights. The underlying concept of human dignity is less disputed, but also receives less attention. This shortcoming is addressed by a worldwide group of scholars and…

  11. Advancement of a 30K W Solar Electric Propulsion System Capability for NASA Human and Robotic Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Bryan K.; Nazario, Margaret L.; Manzella, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Solar Electric Propulsion has evolved into a demonstrated operational capability performing station keeping for geosynchronous satellites, enabling challenging deep-space science missions, and assisting in the transfer of satellites from an elliptical orbit Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO) to a Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO). Advancing higher power SEP systems will enable numerous future applications for human, robotic, and commercial missions. These missions are enabled by either the increased performance of the SEP system or by the cost reductions when compared to conventional chemical propulsion systems. Higher power SEP systems that provide very high payload for robotic missions also trade favorably for the advancement of human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Demonstrated reliable systems are required for human space flight and due to their successful present day widespread use and inherent high reliability, SEP systems have progressively become a viable entrant into these future human exploration architectures. NASA studies have identified a 30 kW-class SEP capability as the next appropriate evolutionary step, applicable to wide range of both human and robotic missions. This paper describes the planning options, mission applications, and technology investments for representative 30kW-class SEP mission concepts under consideration by NASA

  12. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester, a 5-lipoxygenase enzyme inhibitor, alleviates diabetic atherosclerotic manifestations: effect on vascular reactivity and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Noura Ahmed; El-Bassossy, Hany M; Mahmoud, Mona Fouad; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2014-04-25

    Atherosclerosis is a major macrovascular complication of diabetes that increases the risks for myocardial infarction, stroke, and other vascular diseases. The effect of a selective 5-lipoxygenase enzyme inhibitor; caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on diabetes-induced atherosclerotic manifestations was investigated. Insulin deficiency or resistance was induced by STZ or fructose respectively. Atherosclerosis developed when rats were left for 8 or 12 weeks subsequent STZ or fructose administration respectively. CAPE (30 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was given in the last 6 weeks. Afterwards, blood pressure (BP) was recorded. Then, isolated aorta reactivity to KCl and phenylephrine (PE) was studied. Blood glucose level, serum levels of insulin, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) as well as advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were determined. Moreover aortic haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression and collagen deposition were also assessed. Insulin deficiency and resistance were accompanied with elevated BP, exaggerated response to KCl and PE, elevated serum TNF-α and AGEs levels. Both models showed marked increase in collagen deposition. However, CAPE alleviated systolic and diastolic BP elevations and the exaggerated vascular contractility to both PE and KCl in both models without affecting AGEs level. CAPE inhibited TNF-α serum level elevation, induced aortic HO-1 expression and reduced collagen deposition. CAPE prevented development of hyperinsulinemia in insulin resistance model without any impact on the developed hyperglycemia in insulin deficiency model. In conclusion, CAPE offsets the atherosclerotic changes associated with diabetes via amelioration of the significant functional and structural derangements in the vessels in addition to its antihyperinsulinemic effect in insulin resistant model.

  13. Murine atherosclerotic plaque imaging with the USPIO Ferumoxtran-10.

    PubMed

    Klug, Gert; Kampf, Thomas; Ziener, Christan; Parczyk, Marco; Bauer, Elizabeth; Herold, Volker; Rommel, Eberhard; Jakob, Peter Michael; Bauer, Wolfgang Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    In this study we intended to image plaque inflammation in a murine model of atherosclerosis with MRI and Ferumoxtran-10 (Sinerem, Guerbet, France). 8 apoE-/- mice were injected 500 micromol Fe/kg or 1000 micromol Fe/kg Ferumoxtran-10. 2 apoE-/- mice were injected NaCl. After a post-contrast time of 24 to 336 hours the mice were scarificed and the aortas were imaged ex vivo. All measurements were performed on a 17.6 Tesla Bruker AVANCE 750WB MR scanner (Bruker, Germany). Spin-echo sequences and gradient-echo sequences with variable TE were performed and T2* maps were generated. Prussian-blue and hematoxilin-eosin histology were obtained afterwards and iron-uptake was quantified by counting iron positive areas. 2 apoE-/- mice were imaged in vivo before and 48 hours after 1000 micromol Fe/kg. Atheroma iron uptake was not elevated after 24 hours compared to controls. 48 hours after 1000 micromol Fe/kg but not 500 micromol Fe/kg histology revealed a 1.3- fold increase in plaque iron content compared to NaCl injected mice. Normalized T2*-times decreased from 0.86+/-0.02 in controls to 0.66+/-0.15 after a dose of 500 micromol Fe/ml and 0.59+/-0.14 in mice injected with 1000 micromol Fe/Kg (p=0.038). These results translated into a mean of 122% increase in CNR, as measured by in vivo MRI. We have demonstrated that Ferumoxtran-10 is taken up by atherosclerotic plaques in untreated apoE-/- mice and this alters plaque signal properties.

  14. Global Overview of the Epidemiology of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Barquera, Simon; Pedroza-Tobías, Andrea; Medina, Catalina; Hernández-Barrera, Lucía; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Lozano, Rafael; Moran, Andrew E

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of the global burden of ACD and its risk factors and to discuss the main challenges and opportunities for prevention. Publicly available data from the Global Burden of Disease Study were analyzed for ischemic heart disease (IHD), ischemic stroke and ACD risk factors. Data from the WHO Global Health Observatory were used to describe prevalence of diverse cardiometabolic risk factors. World Bank Gross Domestic Product per capita (GDPc) information was used to categorize countries according to income level. Cardiovascular mortality decreased globally from 1990-2010 with important differences by GDPc; during 1990 there was a positive association between IHD mortality and GDPc. Higher-income countries had higher rates compared to those of lower-income countries. High levels of body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, glucose and cholesterol have a differential contribution to mortality by income group over time; high-income countries have been able to reduce the contribution from these risk factors in the last 20 years, whereas lower/middle income countries show an increasing trend in mortality attributable to high BMI and glucose. Although age-adjusted ACD mortality rate trends decreased globally, the absolute number of ACD deaths is increasing in part due to the growth of the population and aging, as well as to important lifestyle and food-system changes that likely attenuate gains in prevention. Population and individual level preventable causes of ACD must be aggressively and efficiently targeted in countries of lower economic development in order to reduce the growing burden of disease due to ACD. PMID:26135634

  15. HMGB1 binds to activated platelets via the receptor for advanced glycation end products and is present in platelet rich human coronary artery thrombi.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Ingo; Chen, Yung-Chih; Topcic, Danijal; Bode, Michael; Haenel, David; Hagemeyer, Christoph E; Seeba, Hannah; Duerschmied, Daniel; Bassler, Nicole; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A; Sweet, Matthew J; Agrotis, Alex; Bobik, Alex; Peter, Karlheinz

    2015-11-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) acts as both a nuclear protein that regulates gene expression, as well as a pro-inflammatory alarmin that is released from necrotic or activated cells. Recently, HMGB1-expression in human atherosclerotic plaques was identified. Therapeutic blockade of HMGB1 reduced the development of diet-induced atherosclerosis in ApoE knockout mice. Thus, we hypothesised an interaction between HMGB1 and activated platelets. Binding of recombinant HMGB1 to platelets was assessed by flow cytometry. HMGB1 bound to thrombin-activated human platelets (MFI 2.49 vs 25.01, p=0.0079). Blood from wild-type, TLR4 and RAGE knockout mice was used to determine potential HMGB1 receptors on platelets. HMGB1 bound to platelets from wild type C57Bl6 (MFI 2.64 vs 20.3, p< 0.05), and TLR4-/- mice (MFI 2.11 vs 25.65, p< 0.05) but failed to show binding to platelets from RAGE-/- mice (p > 0.05). RAGE expression on human platelets was detected by RT-PCR with mRNA extracted from highly purified platelets and confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Platelet activation increased RAGE surface expression (MFI 4.85 vs 6.74, p< 0.05). Expression of HMGB1 in human coronary artery thrombi was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and revealed high expression levels. Platelets bind HMGB1 upon thrombin-induced activation. Platelet specific expression of RAGE could be detected at the mRNA and protein level and is involved in the binding of HMGB1. Furthermore, platelet activation up-regulates platelet surface expression of RAGE. HMGB1 is highly expressed in platelet-rich human coronary artery thrombi pointing towards a central role for HMGB1 in atherothrombosis, thereby suggesting the possibility of platelet targeted anti-inflammatory therapies for atherothrombosis.

  16. Statins meditate anti-atherosclerotic action in smooth muscle cells by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Kazuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Ishii, Norio; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Sarie; Murakami, Saiko; Nakao, Saya; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Kukidome, Daisuke; Kawasaki, Shuji; Kawada, Teruo; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Statins induce PPARγ activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statin-induced PPARγ activation is mediated by COX-2 expression. • Statins suppress cell migration and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statins inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory responses by PPARγ activation. • Fluvastatin suppress the progression of atherosclerosis and induces PPARγ activation in the aorta of apoE-deficient mice. - Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is an important regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism, and its activation is reported to suppress the progression of atherosclerosis. We have reported that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) activate PPARγ in macrophages. However, it is not yet known whether statins activate PPARγ in other vascular cells. In the present study, we investigated whether statins activate PPARγ in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) and thus mediate anti-atherosclerotic effects. Human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) and human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) were used in this study. Fluvastatin and pitavastatin activated PPARγ in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Statins induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Moreover, treatment with COX-2-siRNA abrogated statin-mediated PPARγ activation in HASMCs. Statins suppressed migration and proliferation of HASMCs, and inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in HASMCs. These effects of statins were abrogated by treatment with PPARγ-siRNA. Treatment with statins suppressed atherosclerotic lesion formation in Apoe{sup −/−} mice. In addition, transcriptional activity of PPARγ and CD36 expression were increased, and the expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α was decreased, in the aorta of statin-treated Apoe{sup −/−} mice. In conclusion, statins mediate anti-atherogenic effects

  17. Support vector machine based classification and mapping of atherosclerotic plaques using fluorescence lifetime imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatakdawala, Hussain; Gorpas, Dimitris S.; Bec, Julien; Ma, Dinglong M.; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Bishop, John W.; Marcu, Laura

    2016-02-01

    The progression of atherosclerosis in coronary vessels involves distinct pathological changes in the vessel wall. These changes manifest in the formation of a variety of plaque sub-types. The ability to detect and distinguish these plaques, especially thin-cap fibroatheromas (TCFA) may be relevant for guiding percutaneous coronary intervention as well as investigating new therapeutics. In this work we demonstrate the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) derived parameters (lifetime values from sub-bands 390/40 nm, 452/45 nm and 542/50 nm respectively) for generating classification maps for identifying eight different atherosclerotic plaque sub-types in ex vivo human coronary vessels. The classification was performed using a support vector machine based classifier that was built from data gathered from sixteen coronary vessels in a previous study. This classifier was validated in the current study using an independent set of FLIm data acquired from four additional coronary vessels with a new rotational FLIm system. Classification maps were compared to co-registered histological data. Results show that the classification maps allow identification of the eight different plaque sub-types despite the fact that new data was gathered with a different FLIm system. Regions with diffuse intimal thickening (n=10), fibrotic tissue (n=2) and thick-cap fibroatheroma (n=1) were correctly identified on the classification map. The ability to identify different plaque types using FLIm data alone may serve as a powerful clinical and research tool for studying atherosclerosis in animal models as well as in humans.

  18. Th1/Th17 Plasticity Is a Marker of Advanced β Cell Autoimmunity and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Reinert-Hartwall, Linnea; Honkanen, Jarno; Salo, Harri M.; Nieminen, Janne K.; Luopajärvi, Kristiina; Härkönen, Taina; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Ilonen, Jorma; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Knip, Mikael; Knip, Mikael; Koski, Katriina; Koski, Matti; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Ormisson, Anne; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Ulich, Valentina; Kuzmicheva, Elena; Mokurov, Sergei; Markova, Svetlana; Pylova, Svetlana; Isakova, Marina; Shakurova, Elena; Petrov, Vladimir; Dorshakova, Natalya V.; Karapetyan, Tatyana; Varlamova, Tatyana; Ilonen, Jorma; Kiviniemi, Minna; Alnek, Kristi; Janson, Helis; Uibo, Raivo; Salum, Tiit; von Mutius, Erika; Weber, Juliane; Ahlfors, Helena; Kallionpää, Henna; Laajala, Essi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Moulder, Robert; Nieminen, Janne; Ruohtula, Terhi; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Hanna; Hyöty, Heikki; Kondrashova, Anita; Oikarinen, Sami; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; De Goffau, Marcus C.; Welling, Gjalt; Alahuhta, Kirsi; Virtanen, Suvi M.

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of IL-17 immunity and detrimental effects of IL-17 on human islets have been implicated in human type 1 diabetes. In animal models, the plasticity of Th1/Th17 cells contributes to the development of autoimmune diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that the upregulation of the IL-17 pathway and Th1/Th17 plasticity in peripheral blood are markers of advanced β cell autoimmunity and impaired β cell function in human type 1 diabetes. Activated Th17 immunity was observed in the late stage of preclinical diabetes in children with β cell autoimmunity and impaired glucose tolerance, but not in children with early β cell autoimmunity. We found an increased ratio of IFN-γ/IL-17 expression in Th17 cells in children with advanced β cell autoimmunity, which correlated with HbA1c and plasma glucose concentrations in an oral glucose tolerance test, and thus impaired β cell function. Low expression of Helios was seen in Th17 cells, suggesting that Th1/Th17 cells are not converted thymus-derived regulatory T cells. Our results suggest that the development of Th1/Th17 plasticity may serve as a biomarker of disease progression from β cell autoantibody positivity to type 1 diabetes. These data in human type 1 diabetes emphasize the role of Th1/Th17 plasticity as a potential contributor to tissue destruction in autoimmune conditions. PMID:25480564

  19. Recent findings from the Human Proteome Project: opening the mass spectrometry toolbox to advance cancer diagnosis, surveillance and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cantor, David I; Nice, Edouard C; Baker, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    The Human Proteome Project stands to eclipse the Human Genome Project in terms of scope, content and interpretation. Its outputs, in conjunction with recent developments across the proteomics community, provide new tools for cancer research with the potential of providing clinically relevant insights into the disease. These collectively may guide the development of future diagnosis, surveillance and treatment strategies. Having established a robust organizational framework within the international community, the Human Proteome Organization and the proteomics community at large have made significant advances in biomarker discovery, detection, molecular imaging and in exploring tumor heterogeneity. Here, the authors discuss some developments in cancer proteomics and how they can be implemented to reduce the global burden of the disease.

  20. Advancing human rights in patient care through strategic litigation: challenging medical confidentiality issues in countries in transition.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Susie

    2013-12-12

    The concept of human rights in patient care offers a framework, relevant to both patients and providers, for identifying and addressing human rights violations within a state's health system. While a range of legal and non-legal mechanisms are available to advance this concept (and, indeed, are generally used to best effect in combination as part of a wider advocacy strategy), this paper considers the use of strategic litigation to hold states to account and encourage broader systemic change. As an illustration of such an approach, this article focuses on the issue of breaches of medical confidentiality-a pervasive problem in certain countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, with serious implications for vulnerable or marginalized individuals. This paper presents an overview of the European Court of Human Rights' approach to this topic and discusses the potential for further strategic litigation in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

  1. Protein profile in vascular wall of atherosclerotic mice analyzed ex vivo using FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Tomasz P.; Majzner, Katarzyna; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2012-10-01

    The structure of proteins in a tissue can undergo changes on account of disease state such as diabetes or atherosclerosis. In this work the protein profile in atherosclerotic tissue is monitored by FT-IR imaging coupled with Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA). Additionally, a model for prediction of secondary structure of proteins content based on amide I and II range is used to show the distribution of analyzed proteins. A new protein class emerged in atherosclerotic tissue in the region of the plaque and additionally the plaque was found to be strongly mixed with smooth muscle cell. The calculated secondary structure contents of proteins in atherosclerotic tissue in comparison to healthy tissue showed an increase of structures related to beta-sheet (E and T) and a decrease of helical (H) and unassigned arrangements.

  2. Texture based segmentation method to detect atherosclerotic plaque from optical tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Ammu; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael; Sherif, Sherif

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has been widely employed in assessing cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is one of the major cause cardio vascular diseases. However visual detection of atherosclerotic plaque from OCT images is often limited and further complicated by high frame rates. We developed a texture based segmentation method to automatically detect plaque and non plaque regions from OCT images. To verify our results we compared them to photographs of the vascular tissue with atherosclerotic plaque that we used to generate the OCT images. Our results show a close match with photographs of vascular tissue with atherosclerotic plaque. Our texture based segmentation method for plaque detection could be potentially used in clinical cardiovascular OCT imaging for plaque detection.

  3. Chronic miR-29 antagonism promotes favorable plaque remodeling in atherosclerotic mice.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Victoria; Rotllan, Noemi; Araldi, Elisa; Luciano, Amelia; Skroblin, Philipp; Abonnenc, Mélanie; Perrotta, Paola; Yin, Xiaoke; Bauer, Ashley; Leslie, Kristen L; Zhang, Pei; Aryal, Binod; Montgomery, Rusty L; Thum, Thomas; Martin, Kathleen; Suarez, Yajaira; Mayr, Manuel; Fernandez-Hernando, Carlos; Sessa, William C

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques can lead to rupture, acute myocardial infarction, and death. Enhancement of plaque extracellular matrix (ECM) may improve plaque morphology and stabilize lesions. Here, we demonstrate that chronic administration of LNA-miR-29 into an atherosclerotic mouse model improves indices of plaque morphology. This occurs due to upregulation of miR-29 target genes of the ECM (col1A and col3A) resulting in reduced lesion size, enhanced fibrous cap thickness, and reduced necrotic zones. Sustained LNA-miR-29 treatment did not affect circulating lipids, blood chemistry, or ECM of solid organs including liver, lung, kidney, spleen, or heart. Collectively, these data support the idea that antagonizing miR-29 may promote beneficial plaque remodeling as an independent approach to stabilize vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27137489

  4. Serum cyclin-dependent kinase 9 is a potential biomarker of atherosclerotic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yeming; Zhao, Shanshan; Gong, Yaoqin; Hou, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. Atherosclerosis was considered to be the single most important contributor to CAD. In this study, a distinct serum protein expression pattern in CAD patients was demonstrated by proteomic analysis with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. In particular, CDK9 was found to be highly elevated in serum, monocytes and artery plaque samples of CAD patients. Furthermore, there was high infiltration of CD14+ monocytes/macrophages within artery plaques correlated with the expression of CDK9. Moreover, Flavopiridol (CDK9 inhibitor) could inhibit THP-1 cell (monocytic acute leukemia cell line) proliferation by targeting CDK9. Altogether, These findings indicate that CDK9 represent an important role for inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. It may be a potential biomarker of atherosclerotic inflammation and offer insights into the pathophysiology and targeted therapy for atherosclerotic CAD. PMID:26636538

  5. Mapping elasticity moduli of atherosclerotic plaque in situ via atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tracqui, Philippe; Broisat, Alexis; Toczek, Jackub; Mesnier, Nicolas; Ohayon, Jacques; Riou, Laurent

    2011-04-01

    Several studies have suggested that evolving mechanical stresses and strains drive atherosclerotic plaque development and vulnerability. Especially, stress distribution in the plaque fibrous capsule is an important determinant for the risk of vulnerable plaque rupture. Knowledge of the stiffness of atherosclerotic plaque components is therefore of critical importance. In this work, force mapping experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) were conducted in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mouse, which represents the most widely used experimental model for studying mechanisms underlying the development of atherosclerotic lesions. To obtain the elastic material properties of fibrous caps and lipidic cores of atherosclerotic plaques, serial cross-sections of aortic arch lesions were probed at different sites. Atherosclerotic plaque sub-structures were subdivided into cellular fibrotic, hypocellular fibrotic and lipidic rich areas according to histological staining. Hertz's contact mechanics were used to determine elasticity (Young's) moduli that were related to the underlying histological plaque structure. Cellular fibrotic regions exhibit a mean Young modulus of 10.4±5.7kPa. Hypocellular fibrous caps were almost six-times stiffer, with average modulus value of 59.4±47.4kPa, locally rising up to ∼250kPa. Lipid rich areas exhibit a rather large range of Young's moduli, with average value of 5.5±3.5kPa. Such precise quantification of plaque stiffness heterogeneity will allow investigators to have prospectively a better monitoring of atherosclerotic disease evolution, including arterial wall remodeling and plaque rupture, in response to mechanical constraints imposed by vascular shear stress and blood pressure.

  6. Vitamin A supplementation reduces IL-17 and RORc gene expression in atherosclerotic patients.

    PubMed

    Mottaghi, A; Ebrahimof, S; Angoorani, P; Saboor-Yaraghi, A-A

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin A is a potential mediator of T helper cells in atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin A supplementation on expression of Th17 cells-related IL-17 and RORc genes in atherosclerotic patients. Thirty one atherosclerotic patients and 15 healthy controls were studied for 4 months. Atherosclerotic patients were randomly divided into vitamin A or placebo groups. Healthy controls and patients in vitamin A group received 25,000 IU retinyl palmitate per day. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultured and divided into three groups including fresh cells, phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated T cells and ox-LDL-activated T cells. Gene expressions of T cells were studied by real-time PCR. In atherosclerotic patients, vitamin A supplementation resulted in significant decrease in IL-17 gene expression by 0.63-fold in fresh cell, 0.82-fold in PHA-activated cells and 0.65-fold in ox-LDL-activated cells (P < 0.05 for all). RORc gene expression in fresh cells as well as ox-LDL-activated cells decreased significantly after vitamin A supplementation in atherosclerotic patients (P = 0.0001 for both). In PHA-activated cells, vitamin A supplementation significantly decreased RORc gene in both atherosclerotic patients and healthy subjects by 0.87-fold and 0.72, respectively, while in placebo group, the RORc gene expression significantly increased by 1.17-fold (P < 0.05 for all). Findings of this study suggest that vitamin A supplementation may be an effective approach to slow progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:24845870

  7. Plasma viscosity increase with progression of peripheral arterial atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Poredos, P; Zizek, B

    1996-03-01

    -macroglobulin (r=0.78, P < 0.01). These results indicate that in patients with peripheral arterial disease plasma viscosity increases with the progression of the atherosclerotic process and is correlated with the clinical stages of the disease.

  8. Distribution of selected elements in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE/LDLR-double knockout mice subjected to dietary and pharmacological treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Mariusz; Kowalska, Joanna; Banaś, Agnieszka; Banaś, Krzysztof; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Kostogrys, Renata B.; Mateuszuk, łukasz; ChŁopicki, Stefan; Litwin, Jan A.; Appel, Karen

    2011-10-01

    Gene-targeted, apolipoprotein E and LDL receptor-double knockout (apoE/LDLR -/-) mice represent a new animal model that displays severe hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to show changes in histomorphology and in distribution of selected elements in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE/LDLR -/- mice fed egg-rich proatherosclerotic diet (5% egg-yolk lyophilisate) supplemented or not with perindopril (inhibitor of angiotensin converting enzyme; 2 mg/kg b.w.). Synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry was combined with histological stainings to determine distribution and concentration of trace and essential elements in atherosclerotic lesions. More advanced atherosclerotic lesions expressed by total area occupied by lipids (oil red-O staining) and by macrophages (CD68 immunohistochemistry) were observed in animals fed egg-rich diet. The perindopril treatment attenuated these effects. No significant differences were observed in the number of intimal smooth muscle cells (smooth muscle actin immunohistochemistry). In animals fed egg-rich diet significantly higher concentrations of Ca and significantly lower contents of S, Cl, , Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in atheromas were seen in comparison to chow diet-fed animals. After pharmacological treatment, concentrations of S, Cl, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se showed the tendency to achieve levels like in animals fed normal diet. K level differed only in group treated with perindopril. Concentration of P did not significantly vary in all experimental groups. Perindopril showed its potency to reduce atherosclerosis, as estimated by the size of the atheroma and content of pro- and antiatherogenic elements.

  9. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  10. Characterization of atherosclerotic plaques by cross-polarization optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarkova, Ekaterina V.; Dudenkova, Varvara V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Timofeeva, Lidia B.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Kuznetsov, Sergei S.; Moiseev, Alexander A.; Gelikonov, Gregory V.; Vitkin, Alex I.; Gladkova, Natalia D.

    2016-02-01

    We combined cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP OCT) and non-linear microscopy based on second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon-excited fluorescence (2PEF) to assess collagen and elastin fibers in the development of the atherosclerotic plaque (AP). The study shows potential of CP OCT for the assessment of collagen and elastin fibers condition in atherosclerotic arteries. Specifically, the additional information afforded by CP OCT, related to birefringence and cross-scattering properties of arterial tissues, may improve the robustness and accuracy of assessment about the microstructure and composition of the plaque for different stages of atherosclerosis.

  11. Enhanced Biosensor Platforms for Detecting the Atherosclerotic Biomarker VCAM1 Based on Bioconjugation with Uniformly Oriented VCAM1-Targeting Nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Duy Tien; Guedens, Wanda; Vranken, Tom; Vanschoenbeek, Katrijn; Steen Redeker, Erik; Michiels, Luc; Adriaensens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Surface bioconjugation of biomolecules has gained enormous attention for developing advanced biomaterials including biosensors. While conventional immobilization (by physisorption or covalent couplings using the functional groups of the endogenous amino acids) usually results in surfaces with low activity, reproducibility and reusability, the application of methods that allow for a covalent and uniformly oriented coupling can circumvent these limitations. In this study, the nanobody targeting Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (NbVCAM1), an atherosclerotic biomarker, is engineered with a C-terminal alkyne function via Expressed Protein Ligation (EPL). Conjugation of this nanobody to azidified silicon wafers and Biacore™ C1 sensor chips is achieved via Copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) “click” chemistry to detect VCAM1 binding via ellipsometry and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), respectively. The resulting surfaces, covered with uniformly oriented nanobodies, clearly show an increased antigen binding affinity, sensitivity, detection limit, quantitation limit and reusability as compared to surfaces prepared by random conjugation. These findings demonstrate the added value of a combined EPL and CuAAC approach as it results in strong control over the surface orientation of the nanobodies and an improved detecting power of their targets—a must for the development of advanced miniaturized, multi-biomarker biosensor platforms. PMID:27399790

  12. Addressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nokes, Kathleen M.; Stein, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 23 advanced practice nursing programs showed only 3 had HIV-specific graduate-level nursing courses. Recommendations were made for HIV-specific courses, integration of HIV content into other courses, use of Centers for Disease Control and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, and subspecialties in HIV nursing. (SK)

  13. Automatic plaque characterization and vessel wall segmentation in magnetic resonance images of atherosclerotic carotid arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adame, Isabel M.; van der Geest, Rob J.; Wasserman, Bruce A.; Mohamed, Mona; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.

    2004-05-01

    Composition and structure of atherosclerotic plaque is a primary focus of cardiovascular research. In vivo MRI provides a meanse to non-invasively image and assess the morphological features of athersclerotic and normal human carotid arteries. To quantitatively assess the vulnerability and the type of plaque, the contours of the lumen, outer boundary of the vessel wall and plaque components, need to be traced. To achieve this goal, we have developed an automated contou detection technique, which consists of three consecutive steps: firstly, the outer boundary of the vessel wall is detected by means of an ellipse-fitting procedure in order to obtain smoothed shapes; secondly, the lumen is segnented using fuzzy clustering. Thre region to be classified is that within the outer vessel wall boundary obtained from the previous step; finally, for plaque detection we follow the same approach as for lumen segmentation: fuzzy clustering. However, plaque is more difficult to segment, as the pixel gray value can differ considerably from one region to another, even when it corresponds to the same type of tissue. That makes further processing necessary. All these three steps might be carried out combining information from different sequences (PD-, T2-, T1-weighted images, pre- and post-contrast), to improve the contour detection. The algorithm has been validated in vivo on 58 high-resolution PD and T1 weighted MR images (19 patients). The results demonstrate excellent correspondence between automatic and manual area measurements: lumen (r=0.94), outer (r=0.92), and acceptable for fibrous cap thickness (r=0.76).

  14. Human Exploration System Test-Bed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) Support of Future NASA Deep-Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmolejo, Jose; Ewert, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Engineering Directorate at the NASA - Johnson Space Center is outfitting a 20-Foot diameter hypobaric chamber in Building 7 to support future deep-space Environmental Control & Life Support System (ECLSS) research as part of the Human Exploration System Test-bed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) Project. This human-rated chamber is the only NASA facility that has the unique experience, chamber geometry, infrastructure, and support systems capable of conducting this research. The chamber was used to support Gemini, Apollo, and SkyLab Missions. More recently, it was used to conduct 30-, 60-, and 90-day human ECLSS closed-loop testing in the 1990s to support the International Space Station and life support technology development. NASA studies show that both planetary surface and deep-space transit crew habitats will be 3-4 story cylindrical structures driven by human occupancy volumetric needs and launch vehicle constraints. The HESTIA facility offers a 3-story, 20-foot diameter habitat consistent with the studies' recommendations. HESTIA operations follow stringent processes by a certified test team that including human testing. Project management, analysis, design, acquisition, fabrication, assembly and certification of facility build-ups are available to support this research. HESTIA offers close proximity to key stakeholders including astronauts, Human Research Program (who direct space human research for the agency), Mission Operations, Safety & Mission Assurance, and Engineering Directorate. The HESTIA chamber can operate at reduced pressure and elevated oxygen environments including those proposed for deep-space exploration. Data acquisition, power, fluids and other facility resources are available to support a wide range of research. Recently completed HESTIA research consisted of unmanned testing of ECLSS technologies. Eventually, the HESTIA research will include humans for extended durations at reduced pressure and elevated oxygen to demonstrate

  15. Impact of palbociclib combinations on treatment of advanced estrogen receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor 2-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boér, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with multiple subgroups based on clinical and molecular characteristics. For the largest subgroup of breast cancers, hormone receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-negative tumors, hormone treatment is the mainstay of therapy and is likely to result in significant improvement in disease outcomes. However, some of these cancers demonstrate de novo or acquired resistance to endocrine therapy. Despite intensive research to develop new strategies to enhance the efficacy of currently available treatment options for hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, progress has been slow, and there were few advances for a period of 10 years. In 2012, a new molecularly targeted therapeutic strategy, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin with everolimus, was introduced into clinical practice. Everolimus, in combination with a steroidal aromatase inhibitor, exemestane, resulted in an increase in progression-free survival, but not overall survival in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)+ve advanced disease who had progressed on hormone therapy. In 2015, the first cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (CDK4/6) inhibitor, palbociclib, received accelerated US Food and Drug Administration approval for use in combination with letrozole for the treatment of postmenopausal ER+ve/HER2−ve advanced breast cancer as initial, endocrine-based therapy. The addition of palbociclib to endocrine therapy resulted in longer progression-free survival than letrozole alone. One year later, palbociclib received a new indication, use in combination with fulvestrant, in both premenopausal and postmenopausal females with advanced breast cancer of the same subtype with disease progression following endocrine therapy. Adding palbociclib to fulvestrant resulted in a significantly increased median progression-free survival compared to fulvestrant monotherapy. These new combination regimens of palbociclib with endocrine agents represent an important

  16. Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies for the Detection of Volatile Biomarker Metabolites in the Human Breath

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alphus D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in the use of electronic-nose (e-nose) devices to analyze human breath profiles for the presence of specific volatile metabolites, known as biomarkers or chemical bio-indicators of specific human diseases, metabolic disorders and the overall health status of individuals, are providing the potential for new noninvasive tools and techniques useful to point-of-care clinical disease diagnoses. This exciting new area of electronic disease detection and diagnosis promises to yield much faster and earlier detection of human diseases and disorders, allowing earlier, more effective treatments, resulting in more rapid patient recovery from various afflictions. E-nose devices are particularly suited for the field of disease diagnostics, because they are sensitive to a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and can effectively distinguish between different complex gaseous mixtures via analysis of electronic aroma sensor-array output profiles of volatile metabolites present in the human breath. This review provides a summary of some recent developments of electronic-nose technologies, particularly involving breath analysis, with the potential for providing many new diagnostic applications for the detection of specific human diseases associated with different organs in the body, detectable from e-nose analyses of aberrant disease-associated VOCs present in air expired from the lungs. PMID:25738426

  17. Diabetes mellitus--advances and challenges in human β-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M; Vasavada, Rupangi C; Scott, Donald K; García-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F

    2015-04-01

    The treatment of diabetes mellitus represents one of the greatest medical challenges of our era. Diabetes results from a deficiency or functional impairment of insulin-producing β cells, alone or in combination with insulin resistance. It logically follows that the replacement or regeneration of β cells should reverse the progression of diabetes and, indeed, this seems to be the case in humans and rodents. This concept has prompted attempts in many laboratories to create new human β cells using stem-cell strategies to transdifferentiate or reprogramme non-β cells into β cells or to discover small molecules or other compounds that can induce proliferation of human β cells. This latter approach has shown promise, but has also proven particularly challenging to implement. In this Review, we discuss the physiology of normal human β-cell replication, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the cell cycle in human β cells, the upstream intracellular signalling pathways that connect them to cell surface receptors on β cells, the epigenetic mechanisms that control human β-cell proliferation and unbiased approaches for discovering novel molecules that can drive human β-cell proliferation. Finally, we discuss the potential and challenges of implementing strategies that replace or regenerate β cells.

  18. Numerical observer for atherosclerotic plaque classification in spectral computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lorsakul, Auranuch; Fakhri, Georges El; Worstell, William; Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; Laine, Andrew F; Li, Quanzheng

    2016-07-01

    Spectral computed tomography (SCT) generates better image quality than conventional computed tomography (CT). It has overcome several limitations for imaging atherosclerotic plaque. However, the literature evaluating the performance of SCT based on objective image assessment is very limited for the task of discriminating plaques. We developed a numerical-observer method and used it to assess performance on discrimination vulnerable-plaque features and compared the performance among multienergy CT (MECT), dual-energy CT (DECT), and conventional CT methods. Our numerical observer was designed to incorporate all spectral information and comprised two-processing stages. First, each energy-window domain was preprocessed by a set of localized channelized Hotelling observers (CHO). In this step, the spectral image in each energy bin was decorrelated using localized prewhitening and matched filtering with a set of Laguerre-Gaussian channel functions. Second, the series of the intermediate scores computed from all the CHOs were integrated by a Hotelling observer with an additional prewhitening and matched filter. The overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were obtained, yielding an overall discrimination performance metric. The performance of our new observer was evaluated for the particular binary classification task of differentiating between alternative plaque characterizations in carotid arteries. A clinically realistic model of signal variability was also included in our simulation of the discrimination tasks. The inclusion of signal variation is a key to applying the proposed observer method to spectral CT data. Hence, the task-based approaches based on the signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly (SKE/BKE) framework and the clinical-relevant signal-known-statistically/background-known-exactly (SKS/BKE) framework were applied for analytical computation of figures of merit (FOM). Simulated data of a

  19. Numerical observer for atherosclerotic plaque classification in spectral computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lorsakul, Auranuch; Fakhri, Georges El; Worstell, William; Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; Laine, Andrew F; Li, Quanzheng

    2016-07-01

    Spectral computed tomography (SCT) generates better image quality than conventional computed tomography (CT). It has overcome several limitations for imaging atherosclerotic plaque. However, the literature evaluating the performance of SCT based on objective image assessment is very limited for the task of discriminating plaques. We developed a numerical-observer method and used it to assess performance on discrimination vulnerable-plaque features and compared the performance among multienergy CT (MECT), dual-energy CT (DECT), and conventional CT methods. Our numerical observer was designed to incorporate all spectral information and comprised two-processing stages. First, each energy-window domain was preprocessed by a set of localized channelized Hotelling observers (CHO). In this step, the spectral image in each energy bin was decorrelated using localized prewhitening and matched filtering with a set of Laguerre-Gaussian channel functions. Second, the series of the intermediate scores computed from all the CHOs were integrated by a Hotelling observer with an additional prewhitening and matched filter. The overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were obtained, yielding an overall discrimination performance metric. The performance of our new observer was evaluated for the particular binary classification task of differentiating between alternative plaque characterizations in carotid arteries. A clinically realistic model of signal variability was also included in our simulation of the discrimination tasks. The inclusion of signal variation is a key to applying the proposed observer method to spectral CT data. Hence, the task-based approaches based on the signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly (SKE/BKE) framework and the clinical-relevant signal-known-statistically/background-known-exactly (SKS/BKE) framework were applied for analytical computation of figures of merit (FOM). Simulated data of a

  20. Human Engineering Operations and Habitability Assessment: A Process for Advanced Life Support Ground Facility Testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Janis H.; Arch, M.; Elfezouaty, Eileen Schultz; Novak, Jennifer Blume; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Design and Human Engineering (HE) processes strive to ensure that the human-machine interface is designed for optimal performance throughout the system life cycle. Each component can be tested and assessed independently to assure optimal performance, but it is not until full integration that the system and the inherent interactions between the system components can be assessed as a whole. HE processes (which are defining/app lying requirements for human interaction with missions/systems) are included in space flight activities, but also need to be included in ground activities and specifically, ground facility testbeds such as Bio-Plex. A unique aspect of the Bio-Plex Facility is the integral issue of Habitability which includes qualities of the environment that allow humans to work and live. HE is a process by which Habitability and system performance can be assessed.

  1. Admixed human embryos and stem cells: legislative, ethical and scientific advances.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, G; Iqbal, M; Malik, S; Sanyal, A; Wafa, R; Noble, R

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the regulatory framework currently governing the creation of animal-human hybrids and chimera embryos in stem cell research, and some of the ethical implications of such research. It discusses the findings of a recent government select committee that considered the topic. It considers the debate around the precise definition of a human embryo, and whether such hybrids therefore fall within the remit of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority. It outlines the advantages of such hybrids, in lessening the need for human egg donors, as well as the moral objections to species boundary violation. It calls for an examination of the scientific benefits of such research to inform debate on the question, and argues for the need to take genuine account of the public's views on this matter.

  2. [Advances in humans and animals opportunistic pathogens from environment infecting plants by crossing kingdoms].

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Wu, Yixin; He, Pengfei

    2016-02-01

    Some pathogenic microorganisms ubiquitous in the environment could cross kingdoms to infect diverse hosts. Several cross-kingdom human pathogens were summarized in this paper, including Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas aeuriginosa. They are ubiquitous in the nature and could cause plant diseases using the same or different infection strategies with which they infect humans and broaden host range. Among these bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae causes top rot disease of maize in the nature, revealing some plants in the environment could serve as a reservoir of various pathogens which might infect animals and probably humans when conditions are favorable, and even potentially harm food. Research on these cross-kingdom pathogens may play a very important role in the epidemiology of human, animal and plant diseases and be a hot topic in environment science. PMID:27373067

  3. VCAM-1-targeting gold nanoshell probe for photoacoustic imaging of atherosclerotic plaque in mice.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Leonie; Berti, Romain; Ng, Vanessa W K; Matteau-Pelletier, Carl; Lam, Tina; Saboural, Pierre; Kakkar, Ashok K; Lesage, Frédéric; Rhéaume, Eric; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    The development of molecular probes and novel imaging modalities, allowing better resolution and specificity, is associated with an increased potential for molecular imaging of atherosclerotic plaques especially in basic and pre-clinical research applications. In that context, a photoacoustic molecular probe based on gold nanoshells targeting VCAM-1 in mice (immunonanoshells) was designed. The molecular probe was validated in vitro and in vivo, showing no noticeable acute toxic effects. We performed the conjugation of gold nanoshells displaying near-infrared absorption properties with VCAM-1 antibody molecules and PEG to increase their biocompatibility. The resulting immunonanoshells obtained under different conditions of conjugation were then assessed for specificity and sensitivity. Photoacoustic tomography was performed to determine the ability to distinguish gold nanoshells from blood both in phantoms and in vivo. Ex vivo optical projection tomography of hearts and aortas from atherosclerotic and control mice confirmed the selective accumulation of the immunonanoshells in atherosclerotic-prone regions in mice, thus validating the utility of the probe in vivo in small animals for pre-clinical research. These immunonanoshells represent an adequate mean to target atherosclerotic plaques in small animals, leading to new tools to follow the effect of therapies on the progression or regression of the disease. PMID:23109390

  4. Detection of atherosclerotic lesions and intimal macrophages using CD36-targeted nanovesicles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current approaches to the diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis cannot target to lesion-determinant cells in the artery wall. Intimal macrophage infiltration promotes atherosclerotic lesion development by facilitating the accumulation of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) and increasing in...

  5. Characterization of atherosclerotic arterial tissue using combined SHG and FLIM microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchi, Riccardo; Baria, Enrico; Matthäus, Christian; Lange, Marta; Lattermann, Annika; Brehm, Bernhard R.; Popp, Jürgen; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is among the most widespread cardiovascular diseases and one of the leading cause of death in the Western World. Characterization of arterial tissue in atherosclerotic condition is extremely interesting from the diagnostic point of view, especially for what is concerning collagen content and organization because collagen plays a crucial role in plaque vulnerability. Routinely used diagnostic methods, such as histopathological examination, are limited to morphological analysis of the examined tissues, whereas an exhaustive characterization requires immunehistochemical examination and a morpho-functional approach. Non-linear microscopy techniques offer the potential for providing morpho-functional information on the examined tissues in a label-free way. In this study, we employed combined SHG and FLIM microscopy for characterizing collagen organization in both normal arterial wall and within atherosclerotic plaques. Image pattern analysis of SHG images allowed characterizing collagen organization in different tissue regions. In addition, the analysis of collagen fluorescence decay contributed to the characterization of the samples based on collagen fluorescence lifetime. Different values of collagen fiber mean size, collagen distribution, and collagen anisotropy and collagen fluorescence lifetime were found in normal arterial wall and within plaque depositions, prospectively allowing for automated classification of atherosclerotic lesions and plaque vulnerability. The presented method represents a promising diagnostic tool for evaluating atherosclerotic tissue and has the potential to find a stable place in clinical setting as well as to be applied in vivo in the near future.

  6. Non-linear imaging and characterization of atherosclerotic arterial tissue using combined SHG and FLIM microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchi, Riccardo; Matthäus, Christian; Meyer, Tobias; Lattermann, Annika; Dietzek, Benjamin; Brehm, Bernhard R.; Popp, Jürgen; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is among the most widespread cardiovascular diseases and one of the leading cause of death in the Western World. Characterization of arterial tissue in atherosclerotic condition is extremely interesting from the diagnostic point of view, especially for what is concerning collagen content and organization because collagen plays a crucial role in plaque vulnerability. Routinely used diagnostic methods, such as histopathological examination, are limited to morphological analysis of the examined tissues, whereas an exhaustive characterization requires immune-histochemical examination and a morpho-functional approach. Non-linear microscopy techniques offer the potential for providing morpho-functional information on the examined tissues in a label-free way. In this study, we employed combined SHG and FLIM microscopy for characterizing collagen organization in both normal arterial wall and within atherosclerotic plaques. Image pattern analysis of SHG images allowed characterizing collagen organization in different tissue regions. In addition, the analysis of collagen fluorescence decay contributed to the characterization of the samples on the basis of collagen fluorescence lifetime. Different values of collagen fiber mean size, collagen distribution, collagen anisotropy and collagen fluorescence lifetime were found in normal arterial wall and within plaque depositions, prospectively allowing for automated classification of atherosclerotic lesions and plaque vulnerability. The presented method represents a promising diagnostic tool for evaluating atherosclerotic tissue and has the potential to find a stable place in clinical setting as well as to be applied in vivo in the near future.

  7. Zinc Restored the Decreased Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Viability under Atherosclerotic Calcification Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mee-Young; Kwun, In-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is considered to be involved in maintaining healthy vascular condition. Atherosclerotic calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) occurs via the mechanism of cell death; therefore, cell viability is a critical factor for preventing VSMC calcification. In this study, we tested whether zinc affected VSMC viability under both normal physiological non-calcifying (0 mM P) and atherosclerotic calcifying conditions (3 and 5 mM P), since VSMC physiological characters change during the VSMC calcification process. The study results showed that an optimal zinc level (15 μM) restored the decreased VSMC viability which was induced under low zinc levels (0 and 1 μM) and calcifying conditions (3 and 5 mM P) at 9 and 15 days culture. This zinc-protecting effect for VSMC viability is more prominent under atherosclerotic calcifying condition (3 and 5 mM P) than normal condition (0 mM P). Also, the increased VSMC viability was consistent with the decreased Ca and P accumulation in VSMC cell layers. The results suggested that zinc could be an effective biomineral for preventing VSMC calcification under atherosclerotic calcifying conditions. PMID:25580404

  8. Detection of Fungal Elements in Atherosclerotic Plaques Using Mycological, Pathological and Molecular Methods

    PubMed Central

    MASOUMI, Omid; SHAHZADI, Mahmoud; KORDBACHEH, Parivash; ZAINI, Farideh; MAHMOUDI, Shahram; MAHMOUDI, Mahmoud; BAHREINI, Hesamoddin; SAFARA, Mahin; MIRHENDI, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to detect fungi in atherosclerotic plaques and investigate their possible role in atherosclerosis. Methods: Coronary atherosclerotic plaques specimen were obtained from patients with atherosclerosis. Direct examination, culture, histopathology study, PCR and sequencing were performed to detect/identify the mycotic elements in the plaques. Age, sex, smoking, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, family history of heart diseases and diabetes were considered and data were analyzed using Chi Square test by SPSS version 15. Results: A total of 41 specimens were analyzed. Direct examination for fungal elements was negative in all cases but in culture only one specimen grew as a mold colony. The presence of fungal elements were confirmed in 6 and 2 tissue sections stained by Gomori methenamine silver and Hematoxylin and Eosin methods, respectively. Using PCR, 11 cases were positive for fungi. The DNA sequence analysis of six positive specimens which were randomly selected revealed fungi as Candida albicans (n=3), Candida guilliermondii (n=2) and Monilia sp. (n=1). Conclusion: A significant association between the presence of fungi in atherosclerotic plaques and severity of atherogenesis and atherosclerotic disease was not found. This could be due to limited numbers of patients included in our study. However, the presence of fungal elements in 26.8% of our specimens is considerable and the results does not exclude the correlation between the presence of fungi with atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. PMID:26587476

  9. Distinct metabolic and vascular effects of dietary triglycerides and cholesterol in atherosclerotic and diabetic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Laplante, Marc-André; Charbonneau, Alexandre; Avramoglu, Rita Kohen; Pelletier, Patricia; Fang, Xiangping; Bachelard, Hélène; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Laakso, Markku; Després, Jean-Pierre; Deshaies, Yves; Sweeney, Gary; Mathieu, Patrick; Marette, André

    2013-09-01

    Cholesterol and triglyceride-rich Western diets are typically associated with an increased occurrence of type 2 diabetes and vascular diseases. This study aimed to assess the relative impact of dietary cholesterol and triglycerides on glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, atherosclerotic plaque formation, and endothelial function. C57BL6 wild-type (C57) mice were compared with atherosclerotic LDLr(-/-) ApoB(100/100) (LRKOB100) and atherosclerotic/diabetic IGF-II × LDLr(-/-) ApoB(100/100) (LRKOB100/IGF) mice. Each group was fed either a standard chow diet, a 0.2% cholesterol diet, a high-fat diet (HFD), or a high-fat 0.2% cholesterol diet for 6 mo. The triglyceride-rich HFD increased body weight, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance but did not alter endothelial function or atherosclerotic plaque formation. Dietary cholesterol, however, increased plaque formation in LRKOB100 and LRKOB100/IGF animals and decreased endothelial function regardless of genotype. However, cholesterol was not associated with an increase of insulin resistance in LRKOB100 and LRKOB100/IGF mice and, unexpectedly, was even found to reduce the insulin-resistant effect of dietary triglycerides in these animals. Our data indicate that dietary triglycerides and cholesterol have distinct metabolic and vascular effects in obese atherogenic mouse models resulting in dissociation between the impairment of glucose homeostasis and the development of atherosclerosis.

  10. Treatment with a GnRH receptor agonist, but not the GnRH receptor antagonist degarelix, induces atherosclerotic plaque instability in ApoE−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Knutsson, Anki; Hsiung, Sabrina; Celik, Selvi; Rattik, Sara; Mattisson, Ingrid Yao; Wigren, Maria; Scher, Howard I.; Nilsson, Jan; Hultgårdh-Nilsson, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer has been associated with increased risk for development of cardiovascular events and recent pooled analyses of randomized intervention trials suggest that this primarily is the case for patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) agonists. In the present study we investigated the effects of the GnRH-R agonist leuprolide and the GnRH-R antagonist degarelix on established atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE−/− mice. A shear stress modifier was used to produce both advanced and more stable plaques in the carotid artery. After 4 weeks of ADT, increased areas of necrosis was observed in stable plaques from leuprolide-treated mice (median and IQR plaque necrotic area in control, degarelix and leuprolide-treated mice were 0.6% (IQR 0–3.1), 0.2% (IQR 0–4.4) and 11.0% (IQR 1.0-19.8), respectively). There was also evidence of increased inflammation as assessed by macrophage immunohistochemistry in the plaques from leuprolide-treated mice, but we found no evidence of such changes in plaques from control mice or mice treated with degarelix. Necrosis destabilizes plaques and increases the risk for rupture and development of acute cardiovascular events. Destabilization of pre-existing atherosclerotic plaques could explain the increased cardiovascular risk in prostate cancer patients treated with GnRH-R agonists. PMID:27189011

  11. In-111 polyclonal HIG identifies patients but not atherosclerotic lesions at risk - a 5 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Berent, Robert; Auer, Johann; Granegger, Susanne; Sinzinger, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong need for non-invasive detection of human atherosclerotic lesions. One of the radioisotopic approaches using Indium-111-HIG has been shown to accumulate in oxidized LDL-rich foam cells and inflammatory vascular lesions. Earlier human studies in 200 patients, 100 with peripheral vascular disease and 100 with carotid artery disease comparing In-111-HIG scintigraphy with sonographic data revealed a high sensitivity (70%-77%) but a very low specificity (33%-41%). At this time we concluded the approach "not promising" for human studies. However, clinical follow-up over 5 years now shows that those patients with positive In-111-HIG scintigraphy exhibited a significantly higher vascular morbidity (P<0,01) and mortality (P<0,01), especially in the immediate follow-up period. Retrospective analysis discovered higher CRP and isoprostane (8-epi-prostaglandin (PG) F2α) levels in HIG-positive patients at the time of scintigraphy. These findings indicate that In-111-HIG reflecting vascular lesions with a high inflammatory component, probably more prone to rupture, may identify a population at high vascular risk rather than a lesion at risk. The clinical impact of this finding should be assessed in prospective studies.

  12. Towards Precision Medicine: Advances in Computational Approaches for the Analysis of Human Variants

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Thomas A; Doughty, Emily; Kann, Maricel G

    2013-01-01

    Variations and similarities in our individual genomes are part of our history, our heritage, and our identity. Some human genomic variants are associated with common traits such as hair and eye color, while others are associated with susceptibility to disease or response to drug treatment. Identifying the human variations producing clinically relevant phenotypic changes is critical for providing accurate and personalized diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment for diseases. Furthermore, a better understanding of the molecular underpinning of disease can lead to development of new drug targets for precision medicine. Several resources have been designed for collecting and storing human genomic variations in highly structured, easily accessible databases. Unfortunately, a vast amount of information about these genetic variants and their functional and phenotypic associations is currently buried in the literature, only accessible by manual curation or sophisticated text mining technology to extract the relevant information. In addition, the low cost of sequencing technologies coupled with increasing computational power has enabled the development of numerous computational methodologies to predict the pathogenicity of human variants. This review provides a detailed comparison of current human variant resources, including HGMD, OMIM, ClinVar, and UniProt/Swiss-Prot, followed by an overview of the computational methods and techniques used to leverage the available data to predict novel deleterious variants. We expect these resources and tools to become the foundation for understanding the molecular details of genomic variants leading to disease, which in turn will enable the promise of precision medicine. PMID:23962656

  13. Advancing sexual health through human rights: The role of the law

    PubMed Central

    Kismödi, Eszter; Cottingham, Jane; Gruskin, Sofia; Miller, Alice M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the International Conference on Population and Development, definitions of sexuality and sexual health have been greatly elaborated alongside widely accepted recognition that sexual health requires respect, protection and fulfilment of human rights. Considerable progress has also been made in enacting or changing laws that affect sexuality and sexual health, in line with human rights standards. These measures include legal guarantees against non-discrimination and violence, decriminalisation of consensual sexual conduct and guaranteeing availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of sexual health information and services to all. Such legal actions have had positive effects on health and specifically on sexual health, particularly for marginalised populations. Yet in all regions of the world, laws still exist which jeopardise health, including sexual health, and violate human rights. In order to ensure accountability for the rights and health of their populations, states have an obligation to bring their laws into line with international, regional and national human rights standards. These rights-based legal guarantees, while insufficient alone, are essential for effective systems of accountability, achieving positive sexual health outcomes and the respect and protection of human rights. PMID:25539286

  14. Advancing sexual health through human rights: the role of the law.

    PubMed

    Kismödi, Eszter; Cottingham, Jane; Gruskin, Sofia; Miller, Alice M

    2015-01-01

    Since the International Conference on Population and Development, definitions of sexuality and sexual health have been greatly elaborated alongside widely accepted recognition that sexual health requires respect, protection and fulfilment of human rights. Considerable progress has also been made in enacting or changing laws that affect sexuality and sexual health, in line with human rights standards. These measures include legal guarantees against non-discrimination and violence, decriminalisation of consensual sexual conduct and guaranteeing availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of sexual health information and services to all. Such legal actions have had positive effects on health and specifically on sexual health, particularly for marginalised populations. Yet in all regions of the world, laws still exist which jeopardise health, including sexual health, and violate human rights. In order to ensure accountability for the rights and health of their populations, states have an obligation to bring their laws into line with international, regional and national human rights standards. These rights-based legal guarantees, while insufficient alone, are essential for effective systems of accountability, achieving positive sexual health outcomes and the respect and protection of human rights.

  15. Functionalization of gadolinium metallofullerenes for detecting atherosclerotic plaque lesions by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The hallmark of atherosclerosis is the accumulation of plaque in vessel walls. This process is initiated when monocytic cells differentiate into macrophage foam cells under conditions with high levels of atherogenic lipoproteins. Vulnerable plaque can dislodge, enter the blood stream, and result in acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Imaging techniques such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides one strategy to identify patients with plaque accumulation. Methods We synthesized an atherosclerotic-targeting contrast agent (ATCA) in which gadolinium (Gd)-containing endohedrals were functionalized and formulated into liposomes with CD36 ligands intercalated into the lipid bilayer. In vitro assays were used to assess the specificity of the ATCA for foam cells. The ability of ATCA to detect atherosclerotic plaque lesions in vivo was assessed using CMR. Results The ATCA was able to detect scavenger receptor (CD36)-expressing foam cells in vitro and were specifically internalized via the CD36 receptor as determined by focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) and Western blotting analysis of CD36 receptor-specific signaling pathways. The ATCA exhibited time-dependent accumulation in atherosclerotic plaque lesions of ApoE −/− mice as determined using CMR. No ATCA accumulation was observed in vessels of wild type (C57/b6) controls. Non-targeted control compounds, without the plaque-targeting moieties, were not taken up by foam cells in vitro and did not bind plaque in vivo. Importantly, the ATCA injection was well tolerated, did not demonstrate toxicity in vitro or in vivo, and no accumulation was observed in the major organs. Conclusions The ATCA is specifically internalized by CD36 receptors on atherosclerotic plaque providing enhanced visualization of lesions under physiological conditions. These ATCA may provide new tools for physicians to non-invasively detect atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23324435

  16. Advancing the sexual and reproductive health and human rights of women living with HIV: a review of UN, regional and national human rights norms and standards

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Rajat; Van Belle, Nuna; Temmerman, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    regarding the human rights of women living with HIV in relation to SRH. Conclusions A systematic approach to health and human rights considerations related to women living with HIV and SRH by international, regional and national bodies is needed to advance the agenda and ensure that policies and programmes related to SRH systematically take into account the health and human rights of women living with HIV. PMID:26643455

  17. Human performance measurement: Validation procedures applicable to advanced manned telescience systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    As telescience systems become more and more complex, autonomous, and opaque to their operators it becomes increasingly difficult to determine whether the total system is performing as it should. Some of the complex and interrelated human performance measurement issues are addressed as they relate to total system validation. The assumption is made that human interaction with the automated system will be required well into the Space Station Freedom era. Candidate human performance measurement-validation techniques are discussed for selected ground-to-space-to-ground and space-to-space situations. Most of these measures may be used in conjunction with an information throughput model presented elsewhere (Haines, 1990). Teleoperations, teleanalysis, teleplanning, teledesign, and teledocumentation are considered, as are selected illustrative examples of space related telescience activities.

  18. "The state of the heart": Recent advances in engineering human cardiac tissue from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sirabella, Dario; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-08-01

    The pressing need for effective cell therapy for the heart has led to the investigation of suitable cell sources for tissue replacement. In recent years, human pluripotent stem cell research expanded tremendously, in particular since the derivation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells. In parallel, bioengineering technologies have led to novel approaches for in vitro cell culture. The combination of these two fields holds potential for in vitro generation of high-fidelity heart tissue, both for basic research and for therapeutic applications. However, this new multidisciplinary science is still at an early stage. Many questions need to be answered and improvements need to be made before clinical applications become a reality. Here we discuss the current status of human stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and the combined use of bioengineering approaches for cardiac tissue formation and maturation in developmental studies, disease modeling, drug testing, and regenerative medicine.

  19. Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: From Animal Models to Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Nathen J; Moore, Eileen M; Thomas, Jennifer D; Riley, Edward P

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can cause a number of physical, behavioral, cognitive, and neural impairments, collectively known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). This article examines basic research that has been or could be translated into practical applications for the diagnosis or treatment of FASD. Diagnosing FASD continues to be a challenge, but advances are being made at both basic science and clinical levels. These include identification of biomarkers, recognition of subtle facial characteristics of exposure, and examination of the relation between face, brain, and behavior. Basic research also is pointing toward potential new interventions for FASD involving pharmacotherapies, nutritional therapies, and exercise interventions. Although researchers have assessed the majority of these treatments in animal models of FASD, a limited number of recent clinical studies exist. An assessment of this literature suggests that targeted interventions can improve some impairments resulting from developmental alcohol exposure. However, combining interventions may prove more efficacious. Ultimately, advances in basic and clinical sciences may translate to clinical care, improving both diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Leveraging Small Aquarium Fishes to Advance Understanding of Environmentally Influenced Human Disorders and Diseases

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small aquarium fishes provide a model organism that recapitulates the development, physiology and specific disease processes present in humans without the many limitations of rodent-based models currently in use. Fish models offer advantages in cost, rapid life-cycles, and extern...

  1. Advances in homology directed genetic engineering of human pluripotent and adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthi, Kalpith; Curtis, Donald; Asuri, Prashanth

    2013-10-26

    The ability to introduce precise genomic modifications in human cells has profound implications for both basic and applied research in stem cells, ranging from identification of genes regulating stem cell self-renewal and multilineage differentiation to therapeutic gene correction and creation of in vitro models of human diseases. However, the overall efficiency of this process is challenged by several factors including inefficient gene delivery into stem cells and low rates of homology directed site-specific targeting. Recent studies report the development of novel techniques to improve gene targeting efficiencies in human stem cells; these methods include molecular engineering of viral vectors to efficiently deliver episomal genetic sequences that can participate in homology directed targeting, as well as the design of synthetic proteins that can introduce double-stranded breaks in DNA to initiate such recombination events. This review focuses on the potential of these new technologies to precisely alter the human stem cell genome and also highlights the possibilities offered by the combination of these complementary strategies.

  2. Transformational Learning and Human Resource Development: Advances toward a Knowledge Based Society through Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parke, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    A common thread within a growing globalism is the creation of an emerging knowledge-based workforce. This paper will discuss a message supported by adult education theory that is beginning to manifest itself in human resource development and the growing globalism that steeped in communication and information. Theoretical implications are reviewed…

  3. The i5K Initiative: Advancing arthropod genomics for knowledge, human health, agriculture, and the environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insects and their arthropod relatives including mites, spiders, and crustaceans, play major roles in the world’s terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. Arthropods compete with humans for food and transmit devastating diseases. They also comprise the most diverse and successful branch of metazo...

  4. Toward A Multilevel Theory of Career Development: Advancing Human Resource Development Theory Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upton, Matthew G.; Egan, Toby Marshall

    2007-01-01

    The established limitations of career development (CD) theory and human resource development (HRD) theory building are addressed by expanding the framing of these issues to multilevel contexts. Multilevel theory building is an approach most effectively aligned with HRD literature and CD and HRD practice realities. An innovative approach multilevel…

  5. International Programs: Advancing Human Rights and Social Justice for African American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acquaye, Lucinda A.; Crewe, Sandra Edmonds

    2012-01-01

    The social work profession has a long standing commitment to human rights and social justice, bridging the divide between national and international interests. There is a call for social workers to understand the global community that awaits our service. Yet international experiences are not within the grasp of nor embraced by all. Students of…

  6. Perspectives on Urban Geography in Advanced Placement® Human Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton-Short, Lisa; Monk, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    "Perspectives on Urban Geography" constitutes a major part of the AP Human Geography course outline. In this article, urban core revitalization and rising suburban poverty are considered as two challenges facing cities in developed countries; and industrialization and the growth of megacities as two challenges facing cities in developing…

  7. Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land Use in Advanced Placement® Human Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, William G.; Watson, Nancy H.

    2016-01-01

    ''Agriculture, Food, and Rural Land Use" constitutes a major part of the AP Human Geography course outline. This article explores challenging topics to teach, emerging research trends in agricultural geography, and sample teaching approaches for concretizing abstract topics. It addresses content identified as "essential knowledge"…

  8. A Human Capital Framework for a Stronger Teacher Workforce. Advancing Teaching--Improving Learning. White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myung, Jeannie; Martinez, Krissia; Nordstrum, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Building a stronger teacher workforce requires the thoughtful orchestration of multiple processes working together in a human capital system. This white paper presents a framework that can be used to take stock of current efforts to enhance the teacher workforce in school districts or educational organizations, as well as their underlying theories…

  9. Advanced Placement® Human Geography: Looking Back and Looking Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanegran, David A.; Zeigler, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, AP Human Geography has grown in numbers and spread to almost every state. This article synopsizes the early history of the subject, summarizes the course and the exam, highlights positive impacts on the discipline of geography, and focuses on the following three issues: teachers who come to the course having majored in…

  10. Space Station Human Factors Research Review. Volume 4: Inhouse Advanced Development and Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Trieve (Editor); Clearwater, Yvonne A. (Editor); Cohen, Marc M. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    A variety of human factors studies related to space station design are presented. Subjects include proximity operations and window design, spatial perceptual issues regarding displays, image management, workload research, spatial cognition, virtual interface, fault diagnosis in orbital refueling, and error tolerance and procedure aids.

  11. The successful management of programs for human factors certification of advanced aviation technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Rod

    1994-01-01

    In recent years there have been immense pressures to enact changes on the air traffic control organizations of most states. In addition, many of these states are or have been subject to great political, sociological and economic changes. Consequently, any new schemes must be considered within the context of national or even international changes. Europe has its own special problems, and many of these are particularly pertinent when considering human factors certification programs. Although these problems must also be considered in the wider context of change, it is usually very difficult to identify which forces are pressing in support of human factors aspects and which forces are resisting change. There are a large number of aspects which must be taken into account if human factors certification programs are to be successfully implemented. Certification programs would be new ventures, and like many new ventures it will be essential to ensure that managers have the skills, commitment and experience to manage the programs effectively. However, they must always be aware of the content and the degree of certainty to which the human factors principles can be applied - as Debons and Horne have carefully described. It will be essential to avoid the well known pitfalls which occur in the implementation of performance appraisal schemes. While most appraisal schemes are usually extremely well thought out, they often do not produce good results because they are not implemented properly and staff therefore do not have faith in them. If the manager does not have the commitment and interest in his/her staff as human beings, then the schemes will not be effective. Thus, one aspect of considering human factors certification schemes is within the context of a managed organization. This paper outlines some of the management factors which need to be considered for the air traffic control services. Many of the points received attention during the plenary sessions while others were

  12. Immunolocalization of BMP-6, a novel TGF-beta-related cytokine, in normal and atherosclerotic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Schluesener, H J; Meyermann, R

    1995-03-01

    We have analyzed expression of a novel transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta)-related cytokine, bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) in normal and atherosclerotic brain arteries. BMP-6 immunoreactivity was detected in smooth muscle cells of normal cerebral blood vessels. It is also expressed by smooth muscle cells of intimal plaques in atherosclerotically changed blood vessels. The BMPs regulate tissue modeling and remodeling and aberrant expression of BMPs might contribute to smooth muscle cell migration, proliferation, tissue reorganization and macrophage attraction, which are known mechanisms of atherosclerotic plaque formation. PMID:7605353

  13. Increased expression of phosphorylated forms of heat-shock protein-27 and p38MAPK in macrophage-rich regions of fibro-fatty atherosclerotic lesions in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Shahida; Codrington, Rosalind; Gidden, Lewis Michael; Ferns, Gordon Ashley Anthony

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to assess the expression and distribution of Hsp27, pHsp27 (Ser82), p38MAPK and p-p38MAPK in fibro-fatty atherosclerotic lesions and the myocardium of hypercholesterolaemic rabbits. Male New Zealand white rabbits were fed a high-cholesterol diet for 18 weeks, maintaining serum cholesterol at approximately 20 mmol/l over this period. Aortic arch and myocardial tissues were analysed by Western blot, immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence. Plasma Hsp27 levels were measured by ELISA. There was a significant increase in the expression of monomeric and dimeric forms of Hsp27, together with pHsp27 (Ser82), p38MAPK and p-p38MAPK in the fibro-fatty atherosclerotic lesions (P < 0.01; P < 0.05; P < 0.001; and P < 0.001, respectively) and the myocardial tissues (P < 0.001) from the cholesterol-fed rabbits compared with equivalent tissues from controls when the plasma concentration was low. Immunohistochemical analysis of the fibro-fatty lesions showed marked increases in Hsp27 and pHsp27 (Ser82) immunoreactivity. Double immunostaining showed intense expression of pHsp27 and p-p38MAPK in regions that were rich in macrophages, suggesting a close association with these inflammatory cells, whereas, in regions rich in smooth muscle cells, only p-p38MAPK was found to be strongly expressed. An increased expression of pHsp27 (Ser82) was spatially associated with increased p-p38MAPK within fibro-fatty atherosclerotic lesions and was colocalized to regions rich in macrophages. The initial increase in plasma Hsp27 levels may reflect the increase in systemic inflammation and oxidative stress in the early phases of disease. The falling concentrations subsequently may be coincident with the development of the advanced atherosclerotic lesions.

  14. Advanced Technologies for Robotic Exploration Leading to Human Exploration: Results from the SpaceOps 2015 Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupisella, Mark L.; Mueller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This paper will provide a summary and analysis of the SpaceOps 2015 Workshop all-day session on "Advanced Technologies for Robotic Exploration, Leading to Human Exploration", held at Fucino Space Center, Italy on June 12th, 2015. The session was primarily intended to explore how robotic missions and robotics technologies more generally can help lead to human exploration missions. The session included a wide range of presentations that were roughly grouped into (1) broader background, conceptual, and high-level operations concepts presentations such as the International Space Exploration Coordination Group Roadmap, followed by (2) more detailed narrower presentations such as rover autonomy and communications. The broader presentations helped to provide context and specific technical hooks, and helped lay a foundation for the narrower presentations on more specific challenges and technologies, as well as for the discussion that followed. The discussion that followed the presentations touched on key questions, themes, actions and potential international collaboration opportunities. Some of the themes that were touched on were (1) multi-agent systems, (2) decentralized command and control, (3) autonomy, (4) low-latency teleoperations, (5) science operations, (6) communications, (7) technology pull vs. technology push, and (8) the roles and challenges of operations in early human architecture and mission concept formulation. A number of potential action items resulted from the workshop session, including: (1) using CCSDS as a further collaboration mechanism for human mission operations, (2) making further contact with subject matter experts, (3) initiating informal collaborative efforts to allow for rapid and efficient implementation, and (4) exploring how SpaceOps can support collaboration and information exchange with human exploration efforts. This paper will summarize the session and provide an overview of the above subjects as they emerged from the SpaceOps 2015

  15. Certify for success: A methodology for human-centered certification of advanced aviation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Ronald L.; Rouse, William B.

    1994-01-01

    This position paper uses the methodology in Design for Success as a basis for a human factors certification program. The Design for Success (DFS) methodology espouses a multi-step process to designing and developing systems in a human-centered fashion. These steps are as follows: (1) naturalizing - understand stakeholders and their concerns; (2) marketing - understand market-oriented alternatives to meeting stakeholder concerns; (3) engineering - detailed design and development of the system considering tradeoffs between technology, cost, schedule, certification requirements, etc.; (4) system evaluation - determining if the system meets its goal(s); and (5) sales and service - delivering and maintaining the system. Because the main topic of this paper is certification, we will focus our attention on step 4, System Evaluation, since it is the natural precursor to certification. Evaluation involves testing the system and its parts for their correct behaviors. Certification focuses not only on ensuring that the system exhibits the correct behaviors, but ONLY the correct behaviors.

  16. Plant-based vaccines for animals and humans: recent advances in technology and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Natsumi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-09-01

    It has been about 30 years since the first plant engineering technology was established. Although the concept of plant-based pharmaceuticals or vaccines motivates us to develop practicable commercial products using plant engineering, there are some difficulties in reaching the final goal: to manufacture an approved product. At present, the only plant-made vaccine approved by the United States Department of Agriculture is a Newcastle disease vaccine for poultry that is produced in suspension-cultured tobacco cells. The progress toward commercialization of plant-based vaccines takes much effort and time, but several candidate vaccines for use in humans and animals are in clinical trials. This review discusses plant engineering technologies and regulations relevant to the development of plant-based vaccines and provides an overview of human and animal vaccines currently under clinical trials.

  17. Plant-based vaccines for animals and humans: recent advances in technology and clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Takeyama, Natsumi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    It has been about 30 years since the first plant engineering technology was established. Although the concept of plant-based pharmaceuticals or vaccines motivates us to develop practicable commercial products using plant engineering, there are some difficulties in reaching the final goal: to manufacture an approved product. At present, the only plant-made vaccine approved by the United States Department of Agriculture is a Newcastle disease vaccine for poultry that is produced in suspension-cultured tobacco cells. The progress toward commercialization of plant-based vaccines takes much effort and time, but several candidate vaccines for use in humans and animals are in clinical trials. This review discusses plant engineering technologies and regulations relevant to the development of plant-based vaccines and provides an overview of human and animal vaccines currently under clinical trials. PMID:26668752

  18. The most effective and promising population health strategies to advance human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; Agunwamba, Amenah A; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2016-01-01

    The US is failing to make substantive progress toward improving rates of human papillomavirus vaccine uptake. While the Healthy People 2020 goal for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is 80%, the three-dose completion rate in the US in 2014 for 13- to 17-year-old females is less than 40%, and the rate for males is just above 20%. Experts point to a number of reasons for the poor HPV vaccination rates including parental concerns about safety, necessity, and timing. However, the evidence refuting these concerns is substantial. Efforts focusing on education and communication have not shown promise, but several population health strategies have reminder/recall systems; practice-focused strategies targeting staff, clinicians, and parents; assessment and feedback activities; and school-based HPV vaccination programs. PMID:26559567

  19. Recent key advances in human immunodeficiency virus medicine and implications for China

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this article we summarize several recent major developments in human immunodeficiency virus treatment, prevention, outcome, and social policy change. Updated international guidelines endorse more aggressive treatment strategies and safer antiretroviral drugs. New antiretroviral options are being tested. Important lessons were learned in the areas of human immunodeficiency virus vaccines and microbicide gels from clinical studies, and additional trials in prevention, especially pre-exposure prophylaxis, are nearing completion. Insight into the role of the virus in the pathogenesis of diseases traditionally thought to be unrelated to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome has become a driving force for earlier and universal therapy. Lastly, we review important achievements of and future challenges facing China as she steps into her eighth year of the National Free Antiretroviral Treatment Program. PMID:20500898

  20. A new medical research model: ethically and responsibly advancing health for humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Olson, Patricia N; Ganzert, Robin R

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing use of genomics, computational analytics, emerging technologies, and personalized medicine, the possibility of a new research model is emerging. Using the clues from thousands of species living on our planet, scientists from many disciplines (medicine, veterinary medicine, wildlife) must collaborate, prioritize, and strategize on how to address causes of health and disease. Such clues should guide disease prevention, as well as the development of innovative, efficacious, and gentler therapies. Geographic and language barriers must be broken down, and scientists--even within a single academic, corporate, or government research site--must be vigilant in seeking the help of nonmedical disciplines of colleagues from whence answers might come. The public will become more interested in and demanding of such a model, desiring that all family members (humans and animals) have an opportunity for a long and healthy life. Above all, such activities will be humanely conducted with outcomes having the greatest chance for success.

  1. Proceedings of the topical meeting on advances in human factors research on man/computer interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: expert systems and knowledge engineering-I; verification and validation of software; methods for modeling UMAN/computer performance; MAN/computer interaction problems in producing procedures -1-2; progress and problems with automation-1-2; experience with electronic presentation of procedures-2; intelligent displays and monitors; modeling user/computer interface; and computer-based human decision-making aids.

  2. Advances in alloimmune thrombocytopenia: perspectives on current concepts of human platelet antigens, antibody detection strategies, and genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Tomoya; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunisation to platelets leads to the production of antibodies against platelet antigens and consequently to thrombocytopenia. Numerous molecules located on the platelet surface are antigenic and induce immune-mediated platelet destruction with symptoms that can be serious. Human platelet antigens (HPA) cause thrombocytopenias, such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. Thirty-four HPA are classified into 28 systems. Assays to identify HPA and anti-HPA antibodies are critically important for preventing and treating thrombocytopenia caused by anti-HPA antibodies. Significant progress in furthering our understanding of HPA has been made in the last decade: new HPA have been discovered, antibody-detection methods have improved, and new genotyping methods have been developed. We review these advances and discuss issues that remain to be resolved as well as future prospects for preventing and treating immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:26057488

  3. An advanced computational bioheat transfer model for a human body with an embedded systemic circulation.

    PubMed

    Coccarelli, Alberto; Boileau, Etienne; Parthimos, Dimitris; Nithiarasu, Perumal

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, an elaborate one-dimensional thermofluid model for a human body is presented. By contrast to the existing pure conduction-/perfusion-based models, the proposed methodology couples the arterial fluid dynamics of a human body with a multi-segmental bioheat model of surrounding solid tissues. In the present configuration, arterial flow is included through a network of elastic vessels. More than a dozen solid segments are employed to represent the heat conduction in the surrounding tissues, and each segment is constituted by a multilayered circular cylinder. Such multi-layers allow flexible delineation of the geometry and incorporation of properties of different tissue types. The coupling of solid tissue and fluid models requires subdivision of the arterial circulation into large and small arteries. The heat exchange between tissues and arterial wall occurs by convection in large vessels and by perfusion in small arteries. The core region, including the heart, provides the inlet conditions for the fluid equations. In the proposed model, shivering, sweating, and perfusion changes constitute the basis of the thermoregulatory system. The equations governing flow and heat transfer in the circulatory system are solved using a locally conservative Galerkin approach, and the heat conduction in the surrounding tissues is solved using a standard implicit backward Euler method. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed model, temperature field evolutions are monitored at different points of the arterial tree and in the surrounding tissue layers. To study the differences due to flow-induced convection effects on thermal balance, the results of the current model are compared against those of the widely used modelling methodologies. The results show that the convection significantly influences the temperature distribution of the solid tissues in the vicinity of the arteries. Thus, the inner convection has a more predominant role in the human body heat

  4. Phase I trial of human lymphoblastoid interferon with whole body hyperthermia in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Robins, H I; Sielaff, K M; Storer, B; Hawkins, M J; Borden, E C

    1989-03-15

    Laboratory studies have shown a potentiation of the biological effects of interferons (IFN) by elevated temperatures (39.5-40.5 degrees C). Based on such observations a Phase I clinical trial involving 17 cancer patients was conducted to assess the toxicity and biological effects of combining whole body hyperthermia (WBH) (40.5 degrees C for 75 min) and IFN. The study design incorporated a treatment schedule which allowed comparisons of WBH alone, to IFN administered i.m., to combinations of the two modalities. Human lymphoblastoid IFN was given for 6 days in weeks, 2, 4, and 6. At least 4 patients were entered at each of three IFN dose levels (1 x 10(6) units/m2; 3 x 10(6) units/m2; 10 x 10(6) units/m2). WBH was delivered on day 1 of week 1, day 6 of week 4, and days 4 and 6 of week 6. IFN was administered 1 h prior to WBH. The schedule used allowed for the development of tachyphylaxis to IFN-induced fever. Maximum temperatures were not significantly higher 24 h post-IFN/WBH than after a comparable number of days of human lymphoblastoid IFN alone. There was no statistically significant difference in toxicity assessments, hematological and hepatic blood parameters, serum IFN levels, or biological response modulation (i.e., 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity; beta 2-microglobulin levels; natural killer cell cytotoxicity, using K562 target cells and Chang cells) 24 h posttreatment between human lymphoblastoid IFN alone or combined modality therapy. No cumulative toxicity was observed in 6 patients receiving maintenance therapy for up to 1 year. Prior preclinical observations, together with the clinical safety reported in this study, encourage further investigation into the interactions between IFNs and hyperthermia.

  5. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is activated during advanced arterial aging in humans.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Alexandre; Atassi, Fabrice; Gaaya, Amira; Leprince, Pascal; Le Feuvre, Claude; Soubrier, Florent; Lompré, Anne-Marie; Nadaud, Sophie

    2011-04-01

    Aging is the main risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, but the associated molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The Wnt signaling pathway was shown to be induced during aging in muscle and in the skin, but the regulation and role of Wnt signaling in the aged vessel have not yet been addressed. While screening for age-related changes in gene expression in the intima/media of human mammary arteries, we observed that the expression of frizzled 4 (Fzd4), a Wnt receptor, and of several targets of the Wnt/β-catenin/TCF signaling pathway [Wnt-inducible secreted protein 1 (WISP1), versican, osteopontin (SPP1), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP-2), and p21] were modified with age, suggesting an activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In contrast, we did not observe any regulation of forkhead transcription factor (FoxO) target genes. Beta-catenin-activating phosphorylation at position Ser675 was increased in aging mammary arteries, confirming the activation of this pathway. We confirmed in vitro that Wnt3a or Wnt1 treatment of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced β-catenin phosphorylation at Ser675 and WISP1, SPP1, and IGFBP-2 expression. In vitro, Wnt treatment induced proliferation and cyclin D1 expression in VSMC from young (6 weeks old) rats but not in cells from older rats (8 months old), even though low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 and β-catenin phosphorylation, and β-catenin nuclear translocation demonstrated β-catenin activation in both cell types. Beta-catenin silencing demonstrated that Wnt induction of cyclin D1 expression is β-catenin dependent. Altogether, our data show that the Wnt/β-catenin/TCF pathway is activated in aging human mammary artery cells, but fails to induce the proliferation of aging vascular cells. PMID:21108734

  6. Anthropology and Geosciences: Training and Collaboration Advancing Interdisciplinary Research of Human-environment Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brondizio, E.; Moran, E.

    2005-05-01

    Over the past thirteen years the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change (ACT) at Indiana University has pioneered the use of anthropological and environmental research approaches to address issues of land use change, and population-environment interaction, particularly in the Amazon. Our research and training objectives focus on how particular local populations manage resources and how those activities may be studied by integrating time-tested ethnographic methods, survey instruments, ecological field studies, and the spatial and temporal perspectives of remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems. The globalization of the environment crisis bears the risk of the research and training at universities being purely global or large scale in nature. This would fail to take into account the highly variable local causes of human activities or to discover sustainable solutions to the use, conservation, and restoration of human ecosystems. Our approach combines institutional and international collaboration, formal and hands-on laboratory and field activities developed within an interdisciplinary environment, but based on the strength of disciplinary programs. Over the past years, we have particularly emphasized collaboration between American and Brazilian scholars and students and intense work with local farmers and communities both during data collection and field research, as well as in returning data and results using different formats. In this paper, we address our experience, the challenges and advantages of theoretical and methodological development for students approaching interdisciplinary problems, innovations in linking levels of analysis, and new opportunities for international and collaborative training and research on human-environment interaction.

  7. Novel genotype-phenotype associations in human cancers enabled by advanced molecular platforms and computational analysis of whole slide images

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lee A.D.; Kong, Jun; Gutman, David A.; Dunn, William D.; Nalisnik, Michael; Brat, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances in computing, imaging and genomics have created new opportunities for exploring relationships between histology, molecular events and clinical outcomes using quantitative methods. Slide scanning devices are now capable of rapidly producing massive digital image archives that capture histological details in high-resolution. Commensurate advances in computing and image analysis algorithms enable mining of archives to extract descriptions of histology, ranging from basic human annotations to automatic and precisely quantitative morphometric characterization of hundreds of millions of cells. These imaging capabilities represent a new dimension in tissue-based studies, and when combined with genomic and clinical endpoints, can be used to explore biologic characteristics of the tumor microenvironment and to discover new morphologic biomarkers of genetic alterations and patient outcomes. In this paper we review developments in quantitative imaging technology and illustrate how image features can be integrated with clinical and genomic data to investigate fundamental problems in cancer. Using motivating examples from the study of glioblastomas (GBMs), we demonstrate how public data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) can serve as an open platform to conduct in silico tissue based studies that integrate existing data resources. We show how these approaches can be used to explore the relation of the tumor microenvironment to genomic alterations and gene expression patterns and to define nuclear morphometric features that are predictive of genetic alterations and clinical outcomes. Challenges, limitations and emerging opportunities in the area of quantitative imaging and integrative analyses are also discussed. PMID:25599536

  8. [Human origin and evolution. A review of advances in paleoanthropology, comparative genetics, and evolutionary psychology].

    PubMed

    Markov, A V

    2009-01-01

    In his main work, "On the origin of species", Darwin has refrained from discusion of the origin of man; be only mentioned that his theory would "throw light" on this problem. This famous Darwin's phrase turned out to be one of the most succesful scientific predictions. In the present paper some of the most important recent adavnces in paleoanthroplogy, comparative genetics and evolutionary psychology are reviewed. These three disciplines currently contribute most to our knowledge of anthropogenesis. The review demonstrates that Darwin's ideas not only "threw light" on human origin and evolution; they provided a comprehensive framework for a great variety of studies concerning different aspects of anthropogenesis.

  9. Advances in Human-Computer Interaction: Graphics and Animation Components for Interface Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipolla Ficarra, Francisco V.; Nicol, Emma; Cipolla-Ficarra, Miguel; Richardson, Lucy

    We present an analysis of communicability methodology in graphics and animation components for interface design, called CAN (Communicability, Acceptability and Novelty). This methodology has been under development between 2005 and 2010, obtaining excellent results in cultural heritage, education and microcomputing contexts. In studies where there is a bi-directional interrelation between ergonomics, usability, user-centered design, software quality and the human-computer interaction. We also present the heuristic results about iconography and layout design in blogs and websites of the following countries: Spain, Italy, Portugal and France.

  10. Human-centered design of a cyber-physical system for advanced response to Ebola (CARE).

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Velin; Jagtap, Vinayak; Skorinko, Jeanine; Chernova, Sonia; Gennert, Michael; Padir, Taşkin

    2015-01-01

    We describe the process towards the design of a safe, reliable, and intuitive emergency treatment unit to facilitate a higher degree of safety and situational awareness for medical staff, leading to an increased level of patient care during an epidemic outbreak in an unprepared, underdeveloped, or disaster stricken area. We start with a human-centered design process to understand the design challenge of working with Ebola treatment units in Western Africa in the latest Ebola outbreak, and show preliminary work towards cyber-physical technologies applicable to potentially helping during the next outbreak. PMID:26737868

  11. Human-centered design of a cyber-physical system for advanced response to Ebola (CARE).

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Velin; Jagtap, Vinayak; Skorinko, Jeanine; Chernova, Sonia; Gennert, Michael; Padir, Taşkin

    2015-01-01

    We describe the process towards the design of a safe, reliable, and intuitive emergency treatment unit to facilitate a higher degree of safety and situational awareness for medical staff, leading to an increased level of patient care during an epidemic outbreak in an unprepared, underdeveloped, or disaster stricken area. We start with a human-centered design process to understand the design challenge of working with Ebola treatment units in Western Africa in the latest Ebola outbreak, and show preliminary work towards cyber-physical technologies applicable to potentially helping during the next outbreak.

  12. The advancement of human pluripotent stem cell-derived therapies into the clinic.

    PubMed

    Thies, R Scott; Murry, Charles E

    2015-09-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offer many potential applications for drug screening and 'disease in a dish' assay capabilities. However, a more ambitious goal is to develop cell therapeutics using hPSCs to generate and replace somatic cells that are lost as a result of disease or injury. This Spotlight article will describe the state of progress of some of the hPSC-derived therapeutics that offer the most promise for clinical use. Lessons from developmental biology have been instrumental in identifying signaling molecules that can guide these differentiation processes in vitro, and will be described in the context of these cell therapy programs.

  13. A single dose of alcohol does not meaningfully alter circadian phase advances and phase delays to light in humans.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Helen J; Rizvydeen, Muneer; Fogg, Louis F; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2016-04-15

    Central circadian timing influences mental and physical health. Research in nocturnal rodents has demonstrated that when alcohol is consumed, it reaches the central hypothalamic circadian pacemaker (suprachiasmatic nuclei) and can directly alter circadian phase shifts to light. In two separate studies, we examined, for the first time, the effects of a single dose of alcohol on circadian phase advances and phase delays to light in humans. Two 23-day within-subjects placebo-controlled counterbalanced design studies were conducted. Both studies consisted of 6 days of fixed baseline sleep to stabilize circadian timing, a 2-day laboratory session, a 6-day break, and a repeat of 6 days of fixed sleep and a 2-day laboratory session. In the phase advance study (n= 10 light drinkers, 24-45 yr), the laboratory sessions consisted of a baseline dim light phase assessment, sleep episode, alcohol (0.6 g/kg) or placebo, 2-h morning bright light pulse, and final phase assessment. In the phase-delay study (n= 14 light drinkers, 22-44 yr), the laboratory sessions consisted of a baseline phase assessment, alcohol (0.8 g/kg) or placebo, 2-h late night bright light pulse, sleep episode, and final phase assessment. In both studies, alcohol either increased or decreased the observed phase shifts to light (interaction P≥ 0.46), but the effect of alcohol vs. placebo on phase shifts to light was always on average smaller than 30 min. Thus, no meaningful effects of a single dose of alcohol vs. placebo on circadian phase shifts to light in humans were observed. PMID:26936778

  14. A single dose of alcohol does not meaningfully alter circadian phase advances and phase delays to light in humans.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Helen J; Rizvydeen, Muneer; Fogg, Louis F; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2016-04-15

    Central circadian timing influences mental and physical health. Research in nocturnal rodents has demonstrated that when alcohol is consumed, it reaches the central hypothalamic circadian pacemaker (suprachiasmatic nuclei) and can directly alter circadian phase shifts to light. In two separate studies, we examined, for the first time, the effects of a single dose of alcohol on circadian phase advances and phase delays to light in humans. Two 23-day within-subjects placebo-controlled counterbalanced design studies were conducted. Both studies consisted of 6 days of fixed baseline sleep to stabilize circadian timing, a 2-day laboratory session, a 6-day break, and a repeat of 6 days of fixed sleep and a 2-day laboratory session. In the phase advance study (n= 10 light drinkers, 24-45 yr), the laboratory sessions consisted of a baseline dim light phase assessment, sleep episode, alcohol (0.6 g/kg) or placebo, 2-h morning bright light pulse, and final phase assessment. In the phase-delay study (n= 14 light drinkers, 22-44 yr), the laboratory sessions consisted of a baseline phase assessment, alcohol (0.8 g/kg) or placebo, 2-h late night bright light pulse, sleep episode, and final phase assessment. In both studies, alcohol either increased or decreased the observed phase shifts to light (interaction P≥ 0.46), but the effect of alcohol vs. placebo on phase shifts to light was always on average smaller than 30 min. Thus, no meaningful effects of a single dose of alcohol vs. placebo on circadian phase shifts to light in humans were observed.

  15. Impaired skeletal muscle blood flow control with advancing age in humans: attenuated ATP release and local vasodilation during erythrocyte deoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Brett S.; Crecelius, Anne R.; Voyles, Wyatt F.; Dinenno, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Skeletal muscle blood flow is coupled with the oxygenation state of hemoglobin in young adults, whereby the erythrocyte functions as an oxygen sensor and releases ATP during deoxygenation to evoke vasodilation. Whether this function is impaired in humans of advanced age is unknown. Objective To test the hypothesis that older adults demonstrate impaired muscle blood flow and lower intravascular ATP during conditions of erythrocyte deoxygenation. Methods and Results We show impaired forearm blood flow (FBF) responses during two conditions of erythrocyte deoxygenation (systemic hypoxia and graded handgrip exercise) with age, and this is due to reduced local vasodilation. In young adults, both hypoxia and exercise significantly increased venous [ATP] and ATP effluent (FBF × [ATP]) draining skeletal muscle. In contrast, hypoxia and exercise did not increase [ATP]v in older adults, and both [ATP]v and ATP effluent were substantially reduced compared with young despite similar levels of deoxygenation. Next, we demonstrate that this cannot be explained by augmented extracellular ATP hydrolysis in whole blood with age. Finally, we found that deoxygenation-mediated ATP release from isolated erythrocytes is essentially non-existent in older adults. Conclusions Skeletal muscle blood flow during conditions of erythrocyte deoxygenation is markedly reduced in aging humans, and reductions in plasma ATP and erythrocyte-mediated ATP release may be a novel mechanism underlying impaired vasodilation and oxygen delivery during hypoxemia with advancing age. Because aging is associated with elevated risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease and exercise intolerance, interventions targeting erythrocyte-mediated ATP release may offer therapeutic potential. PMID:22647875

  16. [Advances in new vaccines against human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli--A review].

    PubMed

    Xia, Pengpeng; Meng, Xianchen; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2016-02-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common cause of diarrhea, which is a second leading cause of death for the children under five years old from all over the world. The key factors of ETEC contain both colonization factors (CFs) and enterotoxins including heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and heat-stable enterotoxin (ST). CFs mediated the binding of bacteria to the host intestinal epithelial cells, whereas LT and ST stimulated the over-secretion of body fluids and electrolytes, resulting in the destruction of the host fluid balance and leading diarrhea. The vaccine against CFs and enterotoxins could stimulate the host immune response, blocking ETEC adhesion and neutralizing enterotoxins, which is effective in the prevention of ETEC diarrhea. For the moment, depending on the stimulated immune response against LT, a cholera vaccine called Dukoral has been approved for use in some countries for the short-term protection and prevention of travelers' diarrhea. ETEC candidate vaccines are still in progress, which is designed to provide a long and wide-spectrum protection for ETEC infections. This paper briefly summarizes the advanced findings and key problems of vaccine development, and discusses prospects for future research. PMID:27373068

  17. [Advances in new vaccines against human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli--A review].

    PubMed

    Xia, Pengpeng; Meng, Xianchen; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2016-02-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common cause of diarrhea, which is a second leading cause of death for the children under five years old from all over the world. The key factors of ETEC contain both colonization factors (CFs) and enterotoxins including heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and heat-stable enterotoxin (ST). CFs mediated the binding of bacteria to the host intestinal epithelial cells, whereas LT and ST stimulated the over-secretion of body fluids and electrolytes, resulting in the destruction of the host fluid balance and leading diarrhea. The vaccine against CFs and enterotoxins could stimulate the host immune response, blocking ETEC adhesion and neutralizing enterotoxins, which is effective in the prevention of ETEC diarrhea. For the moment, depending on the stimulated immune response against LT, a cholera vaccine called Dukoral has been approved for use in some countries for the short-term protection and prevention of travelers' diarrhea. ETEC candidate vaccines are still in progress, which is designed to provide a long and wide-spectrum protection for ETEC infections. This paper briefly summarizes the advanced findings and key problems of vaccine development, and discusses prospects for future research.

  18. Advances In very high resolution satellite imagery analysis for Monitoring human settlements

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju; Cheriyadat, Anil M; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2014-01-01

    The high rate of urbanization, political conflicts and ensuing internal displacement of population, and increased poverty in the 20th century has resulted in rapid increase of informal settlements. These unplanned, unauthorized, and/or unstructured homes, known as informal settlements, shantytowns, barrios, or slums, pose several challenges to the nations, as these settlements are often located in most hazardous regions and lack basic services. Though several World Bank and United Nations sponsored studies stress the importance of poverty maps in designing better policies and interventions, mapping slums of the world is a daunting and challenging task. In this paper, we summarize our ongoing research on settlement mapping through the utilization of Very high resolution (VHR) remote sensing imagery. Most existing approaches used to classify VHR images are single instance (or pixel-based) learning algorithms, which are inadequate for analyzing VHR imagery, as single pixels do not contain sufficient contextual information (see Figure 1). However, much needed spatial contextual information can be captured via feature extraction and/or through newer machine learning algorithms in order to extract complex spatial patterns that distinguish informal settlements from formal ones. In recent years, we made significant progress in advancing the state of art in both directions. This paper summarizes these results.

  19. Advanced Spacecraft Designs in Support of Human Missions to Earth's Neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, David

    2002-01-01

    NASA's strategic planning for technology investment draws on engineering studies of potential future missions. A number of hypothetical mission architectures have been studied. A recent study completed by The NASA/JSC Advanced Design Team addresses one such possible architecture strategy for missions to the moon. This conceptual study presents an overview of each of the spacecraft elements that would enable such missions. These elements include an orbiting lunar outpost at lunar L1 called the Gateway, a lunar transfer vehicle (LTV) which ferries a crew of four from the ISS to the Gateway, a lunar lander which ferries the crew from the Gateway to the lunar surface, and a one-way lunar habitat lander capable of supporting the crew for 30 days. Other supporting elements of this architecture discussed below include the LTV kickstage, a solar-electric propulsion (SEP) stage, and a logistics lander capable of re-supplying the 30-day habitat lander and bringing other payloads totaling 10.3 mt in support of surface mission activities. Launch vehicle infrastructure to low-earth orbit includes the Space Shuttle, which brings up the LTV and crew, and the Delta-IV Heavy expendable launch vehicle which launches the landers, kickstage, and SEP.

  20. Advanced spacecraft designs in support of human missions to earth's neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, David

    2002-01-01

    NASA's strategic planning for technology investment draws on engineering studies of potential future missions. A number of hypothetical mission architectures have been studied. A recent study completed by the NASA/JSC Advanced Design Team addresses one such possible architecture strategy for missions to the moon. This conceptual study presents an overview of each of the spacecraft elements that would enable such missions. These elements include an orbiting lunar outpost at lunar L1 called the Gateway, a crew transfer vehicle (CTV) which ferries a crew of four from the ISS to the Gateway, a lunar lander which ferries the crew from the Gateway to the lunar surface, and a one-way lunar habitat lander capable of supporting the crew for 30 days. Other supporting elements of this architecture discussed below include the CTV kickstage, a solar-electric propulsion (SEP) stage, and a logistics lander capable of re-supplying the 30-day habitat lander and bringing other payloads totaling 10.3 mt in support of surface mission activities. Launch vehicle infrastructure to low-earth orbit includes the Space Shuttle, which brings up the CTV and crew, and the Delta-IV Heavy expendable launch vehicle which launches the landers, kickstage, and SEP. .

  1. Final LDRD report human interaction with complex systems: advances in hybrid reachability and control.

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Meeko M.

    2006-08-01

    This document describes new advances in hybrid reachability techniques accomplished during the course of a one-year Truman Postdoctoral Fellowship. These techniques provide guarantees of safety in complex systems, which is especially important in high-risk, expensive, or safety-critical systems. My work focused on new approaches to two specific problems motivated by real-world issues in complex systems: (1) multi-objective controller synthesis, and (2) control for recovery from error. Regarding the first problem, a novel application of reachability analysis allowed controller synthesis in a single step to achieve (a) safety, (b) stability, and (c) prevent input saturation. By extending the state to include the input parameters, constraints for stability, saturation, and envelope protection are incorporated into a single reachability analysis. Regarding the second problem, a new approach to the problem of recovery provides (a) states from which recovery is possible, and (b) controllers to guide the system during a recovery maneuver from an error state to a safe state in minimal time. Results are computed in both problems on nonlinear models of single longitudinal aircraft dynamics and two-aircraft lateral collision avoidance dynamics.

  2. David M. Hume memorial lecture. In situ vein bypass in the treatment of femoropopliteal atherosclerotic disease: a ten year study.

    PubMed

    Hall, K V; Rostad, H

    1978-08-01

    The in situ vein bypass technic for femoropopliteal atherosclerotic disease is described. Several factors influence the long-term results, the most important being a history of myocardial disease, the size of the vein graft, and sufficient runoff.

  3. Approaches to advancing quantitative human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Euling, Susan Y.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Subramaniam, Ravi P.

    2013-09-15

    The contribution of genomics and associated technologies to human health risk assessment for environmental chemicals has focused largely on elucidating mechanisms of toxicity, as discussed in other articles in this issue. However, there is interest in moving beyond hazard characterization to making more direct impacts on quantitative risk assessment (QRA) — i.e., the determination of toxicity values for setting exposure standards and cleanup values. We propose that the evolution of QRA of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era will involve three, somewhat overlapping phases in which different types of approaches begin to mature. The initial focus (in Phase I) has been and continues to be on “augmentation” of weight of evidence — using genomic and related technologies qualitatively to increase the confidence in and scientific basis of the results of QRA. Efforts aimed towards “integration” of these data with traditional animal-based approaches, in particular quantitative predictors, or surrogates, for the in vivo toxicity data to which they have been anchored are just beginning to be explored now (in Phase II). In parallel, there is a recognized need for “expansion” of the use of established biomarkers of susceptibility or risk of human diseases and disorders for QRA, particularly for addressing the issues of cumulative assessment and population risk. Ultimately (in Phase III), substantial further advances could be realized by the development of novel molecular and pathway-based biomarkers and statistical and in silico models that build on anticipated progress in understanding the pathways of human diseases and disorders. Such efforts would facilitate a gradual “reorientation” of QRA towards approaches that more directly link environmental exposures to human outcomes.

  4. Recent advances in animal and human pluripotent stem cell modeling of cardiac laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee-Ki; Jiang, Yu; Ran, Xin-Ru; Lau, Yee-Man; Ng, Kwong-Man; Lai, Wing-Hon Kevin; Siu, Chung-Wah; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2016-01-01

    Laminopathy is a disease closely related to deficiency of the nuclear matrix protein lamin A/C or failure in prelamin A processing, and leads to accumulation of the misfold protein causing progeria. The resultant disrupted lamin function is highly associated with abnormal nuclear architecture, cell senescence, apoptosis, and unstable genome integrity. To date, the effects of loss in nuclear integrity on the susceptible organ, striated muscle, have been commonly associated with muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiac myopathy (DCM), and conduction defeats, but have not been studied intensively. In this review, we aim to summarize recent breakthroughs in an in vivo laminopathy model and in vitro study using patient-specific human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that reproduce the pathophysiological phenotype for further drug screening. We describe several in-vivo transgenic mouse models to elucidate the effects of Lmna H222P, N195K mutations, and LMNA knockout on cardiac function, in terms of hemodynamic and electrical signal propagation; certain strategies targeted on stress-related MAPK are mentioned. We will also discuss human iPSC cardiomyocytes serving as a platform to reveal the underlying mechanisms, such as the altered mechanical sensation in electrical coupling of the heart conduction system and ion channel alternation in relation to altered nuclear architecture, and furthermore to enable screening of drugs that can attenuate this cardiac premature aging phenotype by inhibition of prelamin misfolding and oxidative stress, and also enhancement of autophagy protein clearance and cardiac-protective microRNA. PMID:27649756

  5. Recent advances in animal and human pluripotent stem cell modeling of cardiac laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee-Ki; Jiang, Yu; Ran, Xin-Ru; Lau, Yee-Man; Ng, Kwong-Man; Lai, Wing-Hon Kevin; Siu, Chung-Wah; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2016-09-20

    Laminopathy is a disease closely related to deficiency of the nuclear matrix protein lamin A/C or failure in prelamin A processing, and leads to accumulation of the misfold protein causing progeria. The resultant disrupted lamin function is highly associated with abnormal nuclear architecture, cell senescence, apoptosis, and unstable genome integrity. To date, the effects of loss in nuclear integrity on the susceptible organ, striated muscle, have been commonly associated with muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiac myopathy (DCM), and conduction defeats, but have not been studied intensively. In this review, we aim to summarize recent breakthroughs in an in vivo laminopathy model and in vitro study using patient-specific human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that reproduce the pathophysiological phenotype for further drug screening. We describe several in-vivo transgenic mouse models to elucidate the effects of Lmna H222P, N195K mutations, and LMNA knockout on cardiac function, in terms of hemodynamic and electrical signal propagation; certain strategies targeted on stress-related MAPK are mentioned. We will also discuss human iPSC cardiomyocytes serving as a platform to reveal the underlying mechanisms, such as the altered mechanical sensation in electrical coupling of the heart conduction system and ion channel alternation in relation to altered nuclear architecture, and furthermore to enable screening of drugs that can attenuate this cardiac premature aging phenotype by inhibition of prelamin misfolding and oxidative stress, and also enhancement of autophagy protein clearance and cardiac-protective microRNA.

  6. Advancing probiotic research in humans in the United States: Challenges and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Mary Ellen; Shane, Andi L.; Merenstein, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This is a summary from a workshop convened as part of the 13th annual meeting of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics. A group of 24 stakeholders, including clinical experts, researchers, federal government officials, funding agencies, lawyers and industry experts met to review the challenges of the current regulatory approach to human research on probiotics in the USA and to discuss ways to move research forward. There was agreement that some of the current regulatory requirements imposed on probiotic research in the United States hindered research progress and increased cost without improving study subject safety. Many situations were outlined by clinical investigators demonstrating the impact of regulatory delays on research progress. Additionally, research is compromised when study designs and outcomes require manipulation so as to invoke less burdensome regulatory requirements. These responses by investigators to regulatory requirements have placed United States' researchers at a disadvantage. The public ultimately suffer when research to clarify the role of these products on health is stalled. Workshop participants concurred that regulatory oversight should balance study subject vulnerability with documented safety for the intended use for the probiotic strain, and that human research on foods and supplements should not be be regulated as drug research. Challenges and potential improvement strategies are discussed. PMID:26963522

  7. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C.; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity. PMID:25717144

  8. New advances in human embryology: morphofunctional relationship between the embryo and the yolk sac.

    PubMed

    Pereda T, J.; Motta, Pietro M.

    1999-09-01

    Organogenesis occurs during the first 8 weeks of human embryonic development; in consequence, early human growth and development take place before and in the absence of fully developed internal organs. During this period, normal development depends on several factors, but two are imperative: nutrition and a functional transport system for the distribution of nutrients and for waste disposal. The yolk sac (YS), a highly differentiated adnexal organ, is known to accomplish this fundamental task during early pregnancy. In this review, we summarize our contribution to the understanding of early human embryology, focusing interest on analysis of the morphofunctional link that is established between the human embryo and the YS during the embryonic period. Embryos were collected from the gestational sac after salpingectomies performed on patients with singleton pregnancies occurring in the fallopian tube. Samples of YS were taken from 20 human embryos at Carnegie stages ranging from 12 to 20. The age of the embryo was estimated from data of the patient's last menstrual history and confirmed from crown-rump length measurements and morphological characteristics of the specimen. The samples were fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde and then postfixed in 2% osmium tetroxide and prepared for light, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy according to conventional techniques. The samples were examined with a Philips 301 EM and an S-4000 Hitachi field emission SEM. The yolk stalk, and the YS wall with its corresponding endodermal, mesenchymal, and mesothelial layers, were analyzed. In accordance with their morphological features, the endodermal cells are equipped with organelles to fulfill several functions that are expressed in absorption from the vitelline cavity via microvilli present into the outer cell surface, in secretion to the extracellular space, and in the synthesis of numerous proteins which are transported by the bloodstream to the embryo. The mesothelial surface is

  9. Rosiglitazone modulates pigeon atherosclerotic lipid accumulation and gene expression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. L.; Keeley, M. C.; Smith, S. C.; Smith, E. C.; Taylor, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major contributor to the overall United States mortality rate, primarily in the form of heart attacks and stroke. Unlike the human disease, which is believed to be multifactorial, pigeon atherosclerosis is due to a single gene autosomal recessive trait. The White Carneau (WC-As) strain develops atherosclerotic plaques without the presence of known environmental risk factors such as diet and classic predictors such as blood pressure or blood cholesterol levels. With similar parameters, the Show Racer (SR-Ar) is resistant to plaque development. Thiazolidinediones, including rosiglitazone, activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) raising cellular sensitivity to insulin. The effect of rosiglitazone was evaluated in aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) from these 2 pigeon breeds. Primary SMC cultures were prepared from WC-As and SR-Ar squabs. Cell monolayers, which achieved confluence in 7 d, were treated with 0 or 4 µM rosiglitazone for 24 h. Cellular lipid accumulation was evaluated by oil red O staining. Control WC-As cells had significantly higher vacuole scores and lipid content than did the SR-Ar control cells. Rosiglitazone treatment decreased WC-As lipid vacuoles significantly compared with the control cells. On the other hand, lipid vacuoles in the treated and untreated SR-Ar cells did not differ significantly. The effect of rosiglitazone on WC-As SMC gene expression was compared with control SMC using representational difference analysis. Significant transcript increases were found for caveolin and RNA binding motif in the control cells compared with the rosiglitazone-treated cells as well as cytochrome p450 family 17 subfamily A polypeptide 1 (CYP171A) in the rosiglitazone-treated cells compared with the control cells. Although rosiglitazone was selected for these experiments because of its role as a PPARγ agonist, it appears that the drug also tempers c-myc expression, as genes related to this second

  10. Growth hormone (GH) treatment reverses early atherosclerotic changes in GH-deficient adults.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B; Prezelj, J; Poredos, P; Clayton, R N

    1999-02-01

    Hypopituitary patients have increased mortality from vascular disease, and in these patients, early markers of atherosclerosis [increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and reduced distensibility] are more prevalent. As GH replacement can reverse some risk factors of atherosclerosis, the present study examined the effect of GH treatment on morphological and functional changes in the carotid and brachial arteries of GH-deficient (GHD) adults. Eleven GHD hypopituitary men (24-49 yr old) were treated with recombinant human GH (0.018 U/kg BW x day) for 18 months. IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA) and the carotid bifurcation (CB), and flow-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) of the brachial artery were measured by B mode ultrasound before and at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months of treatment, and values were compared with those in 12 age-matched control men. Serum concentrations of lipids, lipoprotein(a), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) were also measured. In GHD men before treatment the IMTs of the CCA [mean(SD), 0.67(0.05) mm] and CB [0.75(0.04) mm] were significantly greater (P < 0.001) than those in control men [0.52(0.07) and 0.65(0.07) mm, respectively]. GH treatment normalized the IMT of the CCA by 6 months [0.53(0.04) mm] and that of the CB by 3 months [0.68(0.05) mm]. The IMT of the carotid artery (CCA and CB) was negatively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = -0.53; P < 0.0001). There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated EDD of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6 and 18 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). GH treatment increased high density lipoprotein cholesterol at 3 and 6 months, but did not reduce total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol and was without effect on lipoprotein(a). There was no correlation between plasma lipids and changes in IMT or EDD of the arteries examined. In conclusion, GH treatment of hypopituitary GHD men reverses early morphological and

  11. Rosiglitazone modulates pigeon atherosclerotic lipid accumulation and gene expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J L; Keeley, M C; Smith, S C; Smith, E C; Taylor, R L

    2014-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major contributor to the overall United States mortality rate, primarily in the form of heart attacks and stroke. Unlike the human disease, which is believed to be multifactorial, pigeon atherosclerosis is due to a single gene autosomal recessive trait. The White Carneau (WC-As) strain develops atherosclerotic plaques without the presence of known environmental risk factors such as diet and classic predictors such as blood pressure or blood cholesterol levels. With similar parameters, the Show Racer (SR-Ar) is resistant to plaque development. Thiazolidinediones, including rosiglitazone, activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) raising cellular sensitivity to insulin. The effect of rosiglitazone was evaluated in aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) from these 2 pigeon breeds. Primary SMC cultures were prepared from WC-As and SR-Ar squabs. Cell monolayers, which achieved confluence in 7 d, were treated with 0 or 4 µM rosiglitazone for 24 h. Cellular lipid accumulation was evaluated by oil red O staining. Control WC-As cells had significantly higher vacuole scores and lipid content than did the SR-Ar control cells. Rosiglitazone treatment decreased WC-As lipid vacuoles significantly compared with the control cells. On the other hand, lipid vacuoles in the treated and untreated SR-Ar cells did not differ significantly. The effect of rosiglitazone on WC-As SMC gene expression was compared with control SMC using representational difference analysis. Significant transcript increases were found for caveolin and RNA binding motif in the control cells compared with the rosiglitazone-treated cells as well as cytochrome p450 family 17 subfamily A polypeptide 1 (CYP171A) in the rosiglitazone-treated cells compared with the control cells. Although rosiglitazone was selected for these experiments because of its role as a PPARγ agonist, it appears that the drug also tempers c-myc expression, as genes related to this second

  12. An advanced computational bioheat transfer model for a human body with an embedded systemic circulation.

    PubMed

    Coccarelli, Alberto; Boileau, Etienne; Parthimos, Dimitris; Nithiarasu, Perumal

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, an elaborate one-dimensional thermofluid model for a human body is presented. By contrast to the existing pure conduction-/perfusion-based models, the proposed methodology couples the arterial fluid dynamics of a human body with a multi-segmental bioheat model of surrounding solid tissues. In the present configuration, arterial flow is included through a network of elastic vessels. More than a dozen solid segments are employed to represent the heat conduction in the surrounding tissues, and each segment is constituted by a multilayered circular cylinder. Such multi-layers allow flexible delineation of the geometry and incorporation of properties of different tissue types. The coupling of solid tissue and fluid models requires subdivision of the arterial circulation into large and small arteries. The heat exchange between tissues and arterial wall occurs by convection in large vessels and by perfusion in small arteries. The core region, including the heart, provides the inlet conditions for the fluid equations. In the proposed model, shivering, sweating, and perfusion changes constitute the basis of the thermoregulatory system. The equations governing flow and heat transfer in the circulatory system are solved using a locally conservative Galerkin approach, and the heat conduction in the surrounding tissues is solved using a standard implicit backward Euler method. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed model, temperature field evolutions are monitored at different points of the arterial tree and in the surrounding tissue layers. To study the differences due to flow-induced convection effects on thermal balance, the results of the current model are compared against those of the widely used modelling methodologies. The results show that the convection significantly influences the temperature distribution of the solid tissues in the vicinity of the arteries. Thus, the inner convection has a more predominant role in the human body heat

  13. Impairment of human keratinocyte mobility and proliferation by advanced glycation end products-modified BSA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ping; Yang, Chuan; Chen, Li-Hong; Ren, Meng; Lao, Guo-Juan; Yan, Li

    2011-07-01

    The migration and proliferation of keratinocytes is critical to wound re-epithelialization and defects in this function are associated with the clinical phenomenon of chronic non-healing wounds. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) occur through non-enzymatic glycation of long-lived proteins in diabetes and play important roles in diabetic complications. However, specific roles for AGEs in keratinocyte migration and proliferation, and the underlying molecular mechanisms, have not been fully established. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the interaction between AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) and keratinocytes. As a result, we found that AGE-BSA had no effect on the viability of keratinocytes for up to 48 h of incubation with 50 μg/ml of AGE-BSA. AGE-BSA (but not non-glycated BSA) exerted a concentration-dependent suppression of keratinocyte migration at a range of concentrations. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was significantly up-regulated in keratinocytes incubated with increasing AGE-BSA, but tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) expression was down-regulated. AGE-BSA also profoundly depressed phospho-focal adhesion kinase-Tyr397 (p-FAK) and α2β1 integrin expression, while total-FAK expression levels remained constant, in keratinocytes. The proliferative capacity of keratinocytes was diminished after 72 h AGE-BSA incubation. Taken together, these findings suggested that in the presence of AGE-BSA, keratinocytes lose their migratory and proliferation abilities. These data also indicated that, in the context of the chronic hyperglycemia in diabetes, the effects of AGE-BSA on keratinocyte migration might be mediated through MMP-9/TIMP-1, p-FAK and α2β1 integrin.

  14. Advances in functional and structural imaging of the human lung using proton MRI.

    PubMed

    Miller, G Wilson; Mugler, John P; Sá, Rui C; Altes, Talissa A; Prisk, G Kim; Hopkins, Susan R

    2014-12-01

    The field of proton lung MRI is advancing on a variety of fronts. In the realm of functional imaging, it is now possible to use arterial spin labeling (ASL) and oxygen-enhanced imaging techniques to quantify regional perfusion and ventilation, respectively, in standard units of measurement. By combining these techniques into a single scan, it is also possible to quantify the local ventilation-perfusion ratio, which is the most important determinant of gas-exchange efficiency in the lung. To demonstrate potential for accurate and meaningful measurements of lung function, this technique was used to study gravitational gradients of ventilation, perfusion, and ventilation-perfusion ratio in healthy subjects, yielding quantitative results consistent with expected regional variations. Such techniques can also be applied in the time domain, providing new tools for studying temporal dynamics of lung function. Temporal ASL measurements showed increased spatial-temporal heterogeneity of pulmonary blood flow in healthy subjects exposed to hypoxia, suggesting sensitivity to active control mechanisms such as hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, and illustrating that to fully examine the factors that govern lung function it is necessary to consider temporal as well as spatial variability. Further development to increase spatial coverage and improve robustness would enhance the clinical applicability of these new functional imaging tools. In the realm of structural imaging, pulse sequence techniques such as ultrashort echo-time radial k-space acquisition, ultrafast steady-state free precession, and imaging-based diaphragm triggering can be combined to overcome the significant challenges associated with proton MRI in the lung, enabling high-quality three-dimensional imaging of the whole lung in a clinically reasonable scan time. Images of healthy and cystic fibrosis subjects using these techniques demonstrate substantial promise for non-contrast pulmonary angiography and detailed

  15. Shape-based segmentation and visualization techniques for evaluation of atherosclerotic plaques in coronary artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinck, Daniel; Krüger, Sebastian; Reimann, Anja; Scheuering, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) has developed strongly in the emerging field of cardiovascular imaging. The manual analysis of atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries is a very time consuming and labor intensive process and today only qualitative analysis is possible. In this paper we present a new shape-based segmentation and visualization technique for quantitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaques in coronary artery disease. The new technique takes into account several aspects of the vascular anatomy. It uses two surface representations, one for the contrast filled vessel lumen and also one for the vascular wall. The deviation between these two surfaces is defined as plaque volume. These surface representations can be edited by the user manually. With this kind of representation it is possible to calculate sub plaque volumes (such as: lipid rich core, fibrous tissue, calcified tissue) inside this suspicious area. Also a high quality 3D visualization, using Open Inventor is possible.

  16. The i5K Initiative: advancing arthropod genomics for knowledge, human health, agriculture, and the environment.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Insects and their arthropod relatives including mites, spiders, and crustaceans play major roles in the world's terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. Arthropods compete with humans for food and transmit devastating diseases. They also comprise the most diverse and successful branch of metazoan evolution, with millions of extant species. Here, we describe an international effort to guide arthropod genomic efforts, from species prioritization to methodology and informatics. The 5000 arthropod genomes initiative (i5K) community met formally in 2012 to discuss a roadmap for sequencing and analyzing 5000 high-priority arthropods and is continuing this effort via pilot projects, the development of standard operating procedures, and training of students and career scientists. With university, governmental, and industry support, the i5K Consortium aspires to deliver sequences and analytical tools for each of the arthropod branches and each of the species having beneficial and negative effects on humankind. PMID:23940263

  17. The i5K Initiative: Advancing Arthropod Genomics for Knowledge, Human Health, Agriculture, and the Environment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Insects and their arthropod relatives including mites, spiders, and crustaceans play major roles in the world’s terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. Arthropods compete with humans for food and transmit devastating diseases. They also comprise the most diverse and successful branch of metazoan evolution, with millions of extant species. Here, we describe an international effort to guide arthropod genomic efforts, from species prioritization to methodology and informatics. The 5000 arthropod genomes initiative (i5K) community met formally in 2012 to discuss a roadmap for sequencing and analyzing 5000 high-priority arthropods and is continuing this effort via pilot projects, the development of standard operating procedures, and training of students and career scientists. With university, governmental, and industry support, the i5K Consortium aspires to deliver sequences and analytical tools for each of the arthropod branches and each of the species having beneficial and negative effects on humankind. PMID:23940263

  18. Past, Present and Future Advanced ECLS Systems for Human Exploration of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kenny

    2004-01-01

    This paper will review the historical record of NASA's regenerative life support systems flight hardware with emphasis on the complexity of spiral development of technology as related to the International Space Station program. A brief summary of what constitutes ECLSS designs for human habitation will be included and will provide illustrations of the complex system/system integration issues. The new technology areas which need to be addressed in our future Code T initiatives will be highlighted. The development status of the current regenerative ECLSS for Space Station will be provided for the Oxygen Generation System and the Water Recovery System. In addition, the NASA is planning to augment the existing ISS capability with a new technology development effort by Code U/Code T for CO2 reduction (Sabatier Reactor). This latest ISS spiral development activity will be highlighted in this paper.

  19. Development of an Advanced Primary Human In Vitro Model of the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Schweinlin, Matthias; Wilhelm, Sabine; Schwedhelm, Ivo; Hansmann, Jan; Rietscher, Rene; Jurowich, Christian; Walles, Heike; Metzger, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Intestinal in vitro models are valuable tools in drug discovery and infection research. Despite several advantages, the standard cell line-based Transwell(®) models based for example on colonic epithelial Caco-2 cells, lack the cellular complexity and transport activity associated with native small intestinal tissue. An additional experimental set-back arises from the most commonly used synthetic membranes, on which the cells are routinely cultured. These can lead to an additional barrier activity during in vitro testing. To overcome these limitations, we developed an alternative primary human small intestinal tissue model. This novel approach combines previously established gut organoid technology with a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) based on porcine small intestinal scaffold (SIS). Intestinal crypts from healthy human small intestine were expanded as gut organoids and seeded as single cells on SIS in a standardized Transwell-like setting. After only 7 days on the ECM scaffold, the primary cells formed an epithelial barrier while a subpopulation differentiated into intestinal specific cell types such as mucus-producing goblet cells or hormone-secreting enteroendocrine cells. Furthermore, we tested the influence of subepithelial fibroblasts and dynamic culture conditions on epithelial barrier function. The barrier integrity was stabilized by coculture in the presence of gut-derived fibroblasts. Compared to static or dynamic culture on an orbital shaker, dynamic culture in a defined perfusion bioreactor had an additional significant impact on epithelial cell differentiation, indicated by high prismatic cell morphology and upregulation of CYP3A4 enzyme and Mdr1 transporter activity. In summary, more physiological tissue models as presented in our study might be useful tools in preclinical research and development. PMID:27481569

  20. A hybrid approach to advancing quantitative prediction of tissue distribution of basic drugs in human

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Patrick; Ekins, Sean; Theil, Frank-Peter

    2011-01-15

    A general toxicity of basic drugs is related to phospholipidosis in tissues. Therefore, it is essential to predict the tissue distribution of basic drugs to facilitate an initial estimate of that toxicity. The objective of the present study was to further assess the original prediction method that consisted of using the binding to red blood cells measured in vitro for the unbound drug (RBCu) as a surrogate for tissue distribution, by correlating it to unbound tissue:plasma partition coefficients (Kpu) of several tissues, and finally to predict volume of distribution at steady-state (V{sub ss}) in humans under in vivo conditions. This correlation method demonstrated inaccurate predictions of V{sub ss} for particular basic drugs that did not follow the original correlation principle. Therefore, the novelty of this study is to provide clarity on the actual hypotheses to identify i) the impact of pharmacological mode of action on the generic correlation of RBCu-Kpu, ii) additional mechanisms of tissue distribution for the outlier drugs, iii) molecular features and properties that differentiate compounds as outliers in the original correlation analysis in order to facilitate its applicability domain alongside the properties already used so far, and finally iv) to present a novel and refined correlation method that is superior to what has been previously published for the prediction of human V{sub ss} of basic drugs. Applying a refined correlation method after identifying outliers would facilitate the prediction of more accurate distribution parameters as key inputs used in physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and phospholipidosis models.

  1. Human scFv antibodies (Afribumabs) against Africanized bee venom: Advances in melittin recognition.

    PubMed

    Pessenda, Gabriela; Silva, Luciano C; Campos, Lucas B; Pacello, Elenice M; Pucca, Manuela B; Martinez, Edson Z; Barbosa, José E

    2016-03-15

    Africanized Apis mellifera bees, also known as killer bees, have an exceptional defensive instinct, characterized by mass attacks that may cause envenomation or death. From the years 2000-2013, 77,066 bee accidents occurred in Brazil. Bee venom comprises several substances, including melittin and phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Due to the lack of antivenom for bee envenomation, this study aimed to produce human monoclonal antibody fragments (single chain fragment variable; scFv), by using phage display technology. These fragments targeted melittin and PLA2, the two major components of bee venom, to minimize their toxic effects in cases of mass envenomation. Two phage antibody selections were performed using purified melittin. As the commercial melittin is contaminated with PLA2, phages specific to PLA2 were also obtained during one of the selections. Specific clones for melittin and PLA2 were selected for the production of soluble scFvs, named here Afribumabs: prefix: afrib- (from Africanized bee); stem/suffix: -umab (fully human antibody). Afribumabs 1 and 2 were tested in in vitro and in vivo assays to assess their ability to inhibit the toxic actions of purified melittin, PLA2, and crude bee venom. Afribumabs reduced hemolysis caused by purified melittin and PLA2 and by crude venom in vitro and reduced edema formation in the paws of mice and prolonged the survival of venom-injected animals in vivo. These results demonstrate that Afribumabs may contribute to the production of the first non-heterologous antivenom treatment against bee envenomation. Such a treatment may overcome some of the difficulties associated with conventional immunotherapy techniques. PMID:26829652

  2. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and recent advances in vaccination against human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Broomall, Eileen M; Reynolds, Sonya M; Jacobson, Robert M

    2010-03-01

    In October 2009, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved a newly licensed vaccine, Cervarix, directed against human papillomavirus (HPV) to prevent cervical cancer. The ACIP also expanded its recommendations against HPV by giving permission to physicians to vaccinate males aged 9 to 26 years with the previously licensed vaccine, Gardasil, to prevent genital warts, in addition to its previous recommendation for females aged 9 to 26 years to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts. The marketing, expense, safety, and reactivity of Gardasil continue to be the subject of controversy. Of the >100 types of HPVs, approximately 40 are sexually transmitted, and HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease. By age 50 years, 80% of women will have contracted a sexually transmitted HPV infection. While most individuals are clear of infection by 2 years, some types of HPV carry a high risk for progressing to cancer, and HPV is identified in >99% of patients with cervical cancer. Each year in the United States approximately 12,000 women develop cervical cancer and nearly 4000 die of it. Human papillomavirus is also associated with genital warts and other anogenital cancers. The United States has now licensed 2 vaccines against HPV, Gardasil and Cervarix. Gardasil has been shown to be safe and effective in preventing HPV infections by types 6, 11, 16, and 18; types 16 and 18 are associated with 2 high-risk types of cervical cancer and are associated with 70% of all cervical cancers. Types 6 and 11 are associated with 90% of anogenital warts. Cervarix has also been shown to be safe and effective in preventing HPV infections by types 16 and 18, but offers no known protection against anogenital warts. PMID:20203463

  3. Quantitative evaluation of lipid concentration in atherosclerotic plaque phantom by near-infrared multispectral angioscope at wavelengths around 1200 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Daichi; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a primary cause of critical ischemic diseases like heart infarction or stroke. A method that can provide detailed information about the stability of atherosclerotic plaques is required. We focused on spectroscopic techniques that could evaluate the chemical composition of lipid in plaques. A novel angioscope using multispectral imaging at wavelengths around 1200 nm for quantitative evaluation of atherosclerotic plaques was developed. The angioscope consists of a halogen lamp, an indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) camera, 3 optical band pass filters transmitting wavelengths of 1150, 1200, and 1300 nm, an image fiber having 0.7 mm outer diameter, and an irradiation fiber which consists of 7 multimode fibers. Atherosclerotic plaque phantoms with 100, 60, 20 vol.% of lipid were prepared and measured by the multispectral angioscope. The acquired datasets were processed by spectral angle mapper (SAM) method. As a result, simulated plaque areas in atherosclerotic plaque phantoms that could not be detected by an angioscopic visible image could be clearly enhanced. In addition, quantitative evaluation of atherosclerotic plaque phantoms based on the lipid volume fractions was performed up to 20 vol.%. These results show the potential of a multispectral angioscope at wavelengths around 1200 nm for quantitative evaluation of the stability of atherosclerotic plaques.

  4. Red and black rice decrease atherosclerotic plaque formation and increase antioxidant status in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ling, W H; Cheng, Q X; Ma, J; Wang, T

    2001-05-01

    The influence of white, red and black rice consumption on atherosclerotic plaque formation induced by hypercholesterolemia was investigated in rabbits. Male rabbits (n = 36) were divided into five groups. They were fed a normal laboratory purified diet (normal group, n = 6), a high cholesterol (0.5 g/100 g) diet (HC group, n = 6), a high cholesterol diet with 30 g/100 g white rice (WR group, n = 8), 30 g/100 g red rice (RR group, n = 8), or 30 g/100 g black rice (BR group, n = 8) for 10 wk. Blood samples were collected for lipid measurements and aorta were removed for assessment of atherosclerotic plaques at the end of the protocol. The oxidant and antioxidant status of blood, erythrocytes, liver and aorta was evaluated. The area of atherosclerotic plaque was 50% lower in rabbits fed the red or black rice diets than in those fed the white rice diet. Compared with the HC and WR groups, serum HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I concentration were greater (P < 0.05) in the RR and BR groups. Liver reactive oxygen species (ROS) and aortic malondialdehyde (MDA) were significantly lower, and the liver total antioxidative capacity (TAC) and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were significantly higher in the RR and BR groups compared with the HC and WR groups. Red or black rice consumption reduced or retarded the progression of atherosclerotic plaque development induced by dietary cholesterol. The enhanced serum HDL cholesterol and apo A-I concentrations, and the increased antioxidant and decreased oxidative status may be mechanisms of the antiatherogenic effect of red or black rice. PMID:11340093

  5. IL-35 improves Treg-mediated immune suppression in atherosclerotic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Linlin; Zhu, Jie; Chen, Yuefeng; Wang, Qinghang; Pan, Ying; Yu, Qianqian; Zhou, Birong; Zhu, Huaqing

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that may have a protective role in atherosclerosis (AS). However, the exact role of IL-35 in the disease, and the etiology of AS, remain incompletely understood. The present study aimed to investigate whether exogenous IL-35 was able to attenuate the formation of atherosclerotic lesions in apoE−/− mice, and analyze alterations in the expression levels of forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) in peripheral blood and the lesions during the progression of AS. ApoE−/− mice were randomly divided into two groups that received either a basal diet (negative control group) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 4 weeks. The HFD group was further subdivided into groups that received IL-35, atorvastatin or no treatment for 12 weeks. Diagnostic enzyme assay kits were applied for the detection of plasma lipids, and hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to analyze the severity of atherosclerotic lesions in apoE−/− mice. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry were performed to analyze the expression of Foxp3 in the plasma and atherosclerotic plaques. As compared with the negative control group, the plasma lipids were significantly increased, and the lesions were obviously formed, in the HFD groups. Furthermore, the area of the lesion was reduced in IL-35- and atorvastatin-treated groups, as compared with the AS control group. In addition, Foxp3 expression was upregulated in the plasma and lesions of the IL-35- and atorvastatin-treated groups, as compared with the AS control group. The present study demonstrated that IL-35 improved Treg-mediated immune suppression in atherosclerotic mice, thus suggesting that IL-35 may be a novel therapeutic target for AS.

  6. IL-35 improves Treg-mediated immune suppression in atherosclerotic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Linlin; Zhu, Jie; Chen, Yuefeng; Wang, Qinghang; Pan, Ying; Yu, Qianqian; Zhou, Birong; Zhu, Huaqing

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that may have a protective role in atherosclerosis (AS). However, the exact role of IL-35 in the disease, and the etiology of AS, remain incompletely understood. The present study aimed to investigate whether exogenous IL-35 was able to attenuate the formation of atherosclerotic lesions in apoE−/− mice, and analyze alterations in the expression levels of forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) in peripheral blood and the lesions during the progression of AS. ApoE−/− mice were randomly divided into two groups that received either a basal diet (negative control group) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 4 weeks. The HFD group was further subdivided into groups that received IL-35, atorvastatin or no treatment for 12 weeks. Diagnostic enzyme assay kits were applied for the detection of plasma lipids, and hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to analyze the severity of atherosclerotic lesions in apoE−/− mice. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry were performed to analyze the expression of Foxp3 in the plasma and atherosclerotic plaques. As compared with the negative control group, the plasma lipids were significantly increased, and the lesions were obviously formed, in the HFD groups. Furthermore, the area of the lesion was reduced in IL-35- and atorvastatin-treated groups, as compared with the AS control group. In addition, Foxp3 expression was upregulated in the plasma and lesions of the IL-35- and atorvastatin-treated groups, as compared with the AS control group. The present study demonstrated that IL-35 improved Treg-mediated immune suppression in atherosclerotic mice, thus suggesting that IL-35 may be a novel therapeutic target for AS. PMID:27698748

  7. Oral rapamycin inhibits growth of atherosclerotic plaque in apoE knock-out mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, Ron; Pakala, Rajbabu; Burnett, Mary S.; Gulick, Cindy P.; Leborgne, Laurent; Fournadjiev, Jana; Wolfram, Roswitha; Hellinga, David

    2003-03-01

    Introduction: Inflammatory and immunological responses of vascular cells are known to play significant roles in atherosclerotic plaque development. Rapamycin with antiinflammatory, immunosuppressive and antiproliferative properties has been shown to reduce neointima formation when coated on stents. This study is designed to test the potential of oral rapamycin to inhibit atherosclerotic plaque development. Methods: Eight-week-old apoE knock-out mice were fed with 0.25% cholesterol supplemented diet (control diet), control diet containing 50 {mu}g/kg rapamycin (low-dose rapamycin) or 100 {mu}g/kg rapamycin (high-dose rapamycin) for 4 or 8 weeks. Subsets of mice from each group (n=10) were weighed and euthanized. Whole blood rapamycin levels were determined using HPLC-MS/MS, and histological analyses of atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic root were performed. Results: Mice fed with high-dose rapamycin did not gain weight (18.5{+-}1.5 vs. 20.6{+-}0.9 g, P=.01). Blood levels of rapamycin 117{+-}7 pg/ml were detected in the blood of mice fed with high-dose rapamycin for 8 weeks. The plaque area in mice fed with high dose oral rapamycin is significantly less as compared to control (0.168{+-}0.008 vs. 0.326{+-}0.013 mm{sup 2}, P=.001 at 4 weeks; 0.234{+-}0.013 vs. 0.447{+-}0.011 mm{sup 2}, P=.001 at 8 weeks). Lumen area was inversely proportional to the plaque area. Conclusions: The results indicate that oral rapamycin is effective in attenuating the progression of atherosclerotic plaque in the mice.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and atherosclerotic lesions targeting effects of tanshinone IIA discoidal and spherical biomimetic high density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenli; He, Hongliang; Liu, Jianping; Wang, Ji; Zhang, Suyang; Zhang, Shuangshuang; Wu, Zimei

    2013-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) have been successfully reconstructed to deliver a large number of lipophilic drugs. Here, discoidal and spherical recombinant HDL loaded with cardiovascular drug tanshinone IIA (TA) were constructed (TA-d-rHDL and TA-s-rHDL), respectively. And next their in vitro physiochemical and biomimetic properties were characterized. Furthermore, pharmacokinetics, atherosclerotic lesions targeting effects and antiatherogenic efficacies were elaborately performed and compared in atherosclerotic New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In vitro characterizations results showed that both TA-d-rHDL and TA-s-rHDL had nano-size diameter, high entrapment efficiency (EE) and drug-loading capacity (DL). Additionally, similar to their native counterparts, TA-d-rHDL maintained remodeling behaviors induced by lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), and TA leaked during remodeling behaviors. Pharmacokinetic studies manifested that both TA-d-rHDL and TA-s-rHDL markedly improved pharmacokinetic behaviors of TA in vivo. Ex vivo imaging demonstrated that both d-rHDL and s-rHDL bound more avidly to atherosclerotic lesions than to normal vessel walls, and s-rHDL had better targeting effect than d-rHDL. Pharmacodynamic tests illustrated that both TA-d-rHDL and TA-s-rHDL had much stronger antiatherogenic efficacies than conventional TA nanostructured lipid carriers (TA-NLC), TA liposomes (TA-L) and commercially available preparation Sulfotanshinone Sodium Injection (SSI). Moreover, TA-s-rHDL had more potent antiatherogenic efficacies than TA-d-rHDL. Collectively our studies indicated that rHDL could be exploited as potential delivery vehicles of TA targeting atherosclerotic lesions as well as synergistically improving efficacies, especially for s-rHDL. PMID:23069716

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Ameliorate Atherosclerotic Lesions via Restoring Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Ling; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yuan-Tong

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is beneficial in myocardial infarction and hind limb ischemia, but its ability to ameliorate atherosclerosis remains unknown. Here, the effects of MSCs on inhibiting endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis were investigated in human/mouse endothelial cells treated with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice fed a high-fat diet. Treatment with oxLDL inactivated the Akt/endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway, induced eNOS degradation, and inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Coculture with human MSCs reversed the effects of oxLDL on endothelial cells and restored Akt/eNOS activity, eNOS level, and NO production. Reduction of endothelium-dependent relaxation and subsequent plaque formation were developed in apoE−/− mice fed a high-fat diet. Systemic infusion with mouse MSCs ameliorated endothelial dysfunction and plaque formation in high-fat diet-fed apoE−/− mice. Interestingly, treatment with interleukin-8 (IL8)/macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) alone induced the similar effects of human/mouse MSCs on oxLDL-treated human/mouse endothelial cells. Neutralization antibodies (Abs) against IL8/MIP-2 also blocked the effects of human/mouse MSCs on oxLDL-treated human/mouse endothelial cells. Consistently, MIP-2 injection alone induced the similar effect of MSCs on the endothelial function in high-fat diet-fed apoE−/− mice. The improvement in endothelial dysfunction by mouse MSCs was also blocked when pretreating MSCs with anti-MIP-2 Abs. In conclusion, MSC transplantation improved endothelial function and plaque formation in high-fat diet-fed apoE−/− mice. Activation of the Akt/eNOS pathway in endothelium by IL8/MIP-2 is involved in the protective effect of MSCs. The study helps support the use and clarify the mechanism of MSCs for ameliorating atherosclerosis. PMID:25504897

  10. Overexpression of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Human Dental Pulp Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tancharoen, Salunya; Tengrungsun, Tassanee; Suddhasthira, Theeralaksna; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Vechvongvan, Nuttavun; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nonhistone DNA-binding protein, is released into the extracellular space and promotes inflammation. HMGB1 binds to related cell signaling transduction receptors, including receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), which actively participate in vascular and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the pathogenesis of pulpitis and investigate the effect of Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on RAGE and HMGB1 expression in odontoblast-like cells (OLC-1). RAGE and HMGB1 expression levels in clinically inflamed dental pulp were higher than those in healthy dental pulp. Upregulated expression of RAGE was observed in odontoblasts, stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells, and endothelial-like cell lining human pulpitis tissue. Strong cytoplasmic HMGB1 immunoreactivity was noted in odontoblasts, whereas nuclear HMGB1 immunoreactivity was seen in stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells in human pulpitis tissue. LPS stimulated OLC-1 cells produced HMGB1 in a dose-dependent manner through RAGE. HMGB1 translocation towards the cytoplasm and secretion from OLC-1 in response to LPS was inhibited by TPCA-1, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that RAGE and HMGB1 play an important role in the pulpal immune response to oral bacterial infection. PMID:25114379

  11. 50 years of physical growth and impressive technological advances unmatched by health human resources reform and cultural change.

    PubMed

    Scott, Graham W S

    2012-01-01

    The year 1962 was pre-medicare. The public was concerned about access and individual affordability of care. Funding involved public or private responsibility and the role of government. Physicians, the most influential providers, were concerned that government funding would result in the loss of their independence and their becoming state employees. The retrospective analysis "Looking Back 50 Years in Hospital Administration" by Graham and Sibbald is arresting as it underlines just how much progress we have made in what could be termed "hardware" in support of healthcare policy and hospital administration. From this perspective, the progress has been eye opening, given the advent of universal healthcare, the advancement in our physical facilities, the development of high-quality diagnostic equipment, the explosion of new research centres and new and complex clinical procedures. The development of this hardware has given our providers better weapons and contributed to a remarkable improvement in life expectancy. But progress in health administration and policy management involves more than hardware. If the hardware constitutes the tools, then the "software" of the healthcare system involves the human resources and the culture change that must be positioned to make maximum use of the hardware. In 2062, looking back at the 2012 experience, the legacy test may be whether we dealt with health human resources and culture change at a rate that matched our progress in hardware.

  12. Effect of Watermarking on Diagnostic Preservation of Atherosclerotic Ultrasound Video in Stroke Telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Dey, Nilanjan; Bose, Soumyo; Das, Achintya; Chaudhuri, Sheli Sinha; Saba, Luca; Shafique, Shoaib; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-04-01

    Embedding of diagnostic and health care information requires secure encryption and watermarking. This research paper presents a comprehensive study for the behavior of some well established watermarking algorithms in frequency domain for the preservation of stroke-based diagnostic parameters. Two different sets of watermarking algorithms namely: two correlation-based (binary logo hiding) and two singular value decomposition (SVD)-based (gray logo hiding) watermarking algorithms are used for embedding ownership logo. The diagnostic parameters in atherosclerotic plaque ultrasound video are namely: (a) bulb identification and recognition which consists of identifying the bulb edge points in far and near carotid walls; (b) carotid bulb diameter; and (c) carotid lumen thickness all along the carotid artery. The tested data set consists of carotid atherosclerotic movies taken under IRB protocol from University of Indiana Hospital, USA-AtheroPoint™ (Roseville, CA, USA) joint pilot study. ROC (receiver operating characteristic) analysis was performed on the bulb detection process that showed an accuracy and sensitivity of 100 % each, respectively. The diagnostic preservation (DPsystem) for SVD-based approach was above 99 % with PSNR (Peak signal-to-noise ratio) above 41, ensuring the retention of diagnostic parameter devalorization as an effect of watermarking. Thus, the fully automated proposed system proved to be an efficient method for watermarking the atherosclerotic ultrasound video for stroke application.

  13. [Inflammatory-destructive biomarkers of atherosclerotic plaques instability. Study of arterial wall and blood].

    PubMed

    Ragino, Iu I; Cherniavskiĭ, A M; Polonskaia, Ia V; Volkov, A M; Kashtanova, E V; Tsymbal, S Iu; Polovnikova, E M

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1- and its receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, IL-2, ligand of CD40 receptor (CD40L), high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), monocyte chemotactic protein -1, endothelial monocyte activating protein II, adhesive molecules (sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) and endothelin-1 were studied in blood and in coronary artery intima/media of men with coronary atherosclerosis without acute coronary syndrome. Blood levels of hsCRP, IL-8, IL-6 and CD40L were higher, while blood levels of sVCAM and TIMP-1 were lower in men with prevalence of unstable atherosclerotic plaques compared to men with prevalence of stable atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries. Blood levels of hsCRP, IL-6 and IL-8 correlated with characteristics of coronary artery atherosclerotic plaques instability. Correlation between hsCRP blood level and hsCRP concentration in coronary artery intima/media material was also revealed. PMID:22839584

  14. Fluorescence imaging of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques using plasmonic gold nanorose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianyi; Sapozhnikova, Veronika; Mancuso, J. Jacob; Willsey, Brian; Qiu, Jinze; Ma, Li L.; Li, Xiankai; Johnston, Keith P.; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2011-03-01

    Macrophages are one of the most important cell types involved in the progression of atherosclerosis which can lead to myocardial infarction. To detect macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques, plasmonic gold nanorose is introduced as a nontoxic contrast agent for fluorescence imaging. We report macrophage cell culture and ex vivo tissue studies to visualize macrophages targeted by nanorose using scanning confocal microscopy. Atherosclerotic lesions were created in the aorta of a New Zealand white rabbit model subjected to a high cholesterol diet and double balloon injury. The rabbit was injected with nanoroses coated with dextran. A HeNe laser at 633 nm was used as an excitation light source and a acousto-optical beam splitter was utilized to collect fluorescence emission in 650-760 nm spectral range. Results of scanning confocal microscopy of macrophage cell culture and ex vivo tissue showed that nanoroses produce a strong fluorescence signal. The presence of nanorose in ex vivo tissue was further confirmed by photothermal wave imaging. These results suggest that scanning confocal microscopy can identify the presence and location of nanorose-loaded macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques.

  15. Nanorose and lipid detection in atherosclerotic plaque using dual-wavelength photothermal wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianyi; Qiu, Jinze; Ma, Li Leo; Li, Xiankai; Sun, Jingjing; Ryoo, Seungyup; Johnston, Keith P.; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2010-02-01

    Atherosclerosis and specifically rupture of vulnerable plaques account for 23% of all deaths worldwide, far surpassing both infectious diseases and cancer. In atherosclerosis, macrophages can infiltrate plaques which are often associated with lipid deposits. Photothermal wave imaging is based on the periodic thermal modulation of a sample using intensity modulated light. Intensity modulated light enters the sample and is absorbed by targeted chromophores and generates a periodic thermal modulation. We report use of photothermal wave imaging to visualize nanoroses (taken up by macrophages via endocytosis) and lipids in atherosclerotic plaques. Two excitation wavelengths were selected to image nanoroses (800 nm) and lipids (1210 nm). Atherosclerotic plaque in a rabbit abdominal artery was irradiated (800 nm and 1210 nm separately) at a frequency of 4 Hz to generate photothermal waves. The radiometric temperature at the tissue surface was recorded by an infrared (IR) camera over a 10 second time period at the frame rate of 25.6 Hz. Extraction of images (256 × 256 pixels) at various frequencies was performed by Fourier transform at each pixel. Frequency amplitude images were obtained corresponding to 800 nm and 1210 nm laser irradiation. Computed images suggest that the distributions of both nanorose and lipid can be identified in amplitude images at a frequency of 4 Hz. Nanoroses taken up by macrophages are distributed at the edges of lipid deposits. Observation of high concentration of nanoroses in atherosclerotic plaque confirms that nanoroses are present at locations associated with lipid deposits.

  16. Anti-Atherosclerotic and Anti-Inflammatory Actions of Sesame Oil

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Selvarajan, Krithika; Litvinov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerosis, a major form of cardiovascular disease, has now been recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Nonpharmacological means of treating chronic diseases have gained attention recently. We previously reported that sesame oil has anti-atherosclerotic properties. In this study, we have determined the mechanisms by which sesame oil might modulate atherosclerosis by identifying genes and inflammatory markers. Low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR−/−) female mice were fed with either an atherogenic diet or an atherogenic diet reformulated with sesame oil (sesame oil diet). Plasma lipids and atherosclerotic lesions were quantified after 3 months of feeding. Plasma samples were used for cytokine analysis. RNA was extracted from the liver tissue and used for global gene arrays. The sesame oil diet significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesions, plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL cholesterol levels in LDLR−/− mice. Plasma inflammatory cytokines, such as MCP-1, RANTES, IL-1α, IL-6, and CXCL-16, were significantly reduced, demonstrating an anti-inflammatory property of sesame oil. Gene array analysis showed that sesame oil induced many genes, including ABCA1, ABCA2, APOE, LCAT, and CYP7A1, which are involved in cholesterol metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport. In conclusion, our studies suggest that a sesame oil-enriched diet could be an effective nonpharmacological treatment for atherosclerosis by controlling inflammation and regulating lipid metabolism. PMID:25562618

  17. Influence of particle size on the distributions of liposomes to atherosclerotic lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio; Tauchi, Yoshihiko; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2006-01-01

    In order to confirm the efficacy of liposomes as a drug carrier for atherosclerotic therapy, the influence of particle size on the distribution of liposomes to atherosclerotic lesions in mice was investigated. In brief, liposomes of three different particle sizes (500, 200, and 70 nm) were prepared, and the uptake of liposomes by the macrophages and foam cells in vitro and the biodistributions of liposomes administered intravenously to atherogenic mice in vivo were examined. The uptake by the macrophages and foam cells increased with the increase in particle size. Although the elimination rate from the blood circulation and the hepatic and splenic distribution increased with the increase in particle size in atherogenic mice, the aortic distribution was independent of the particle size. The aortic distribution of 200 nm liposomes was the highest in comparison with the other sizes. Surprisingly, the aortic distribution of liposomes in vivo did not correspond with the uptake by macrophages and foam cells in vitro. These results suggest that there is an optimal size for the distribution of liposomes to atherosclerotic lesions.

  18. Detecting microcalcifications in atherosclerotic plaques by a simple trichromic staining method for epoxy embedded carotid endarterectomies

    PubMed Central

    Relucenti, M.; Heyn, R.; Petruzziello, L.; Pugliese, G.; Taurino, M.; Familiari, G.

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques have a high probability of undergoing rapid progression to stenosis, becoming responsible of acute coronary syndrome or stroke. Microcalcifications may act as enhancers of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. Considering that calcifications with a diameter smalller than 10 µm in paraffin embedded tissue are rather difficult to detect, our aim was to analyze microcalcifications on semithin sections from epoxy resin embedded samples of carotid endarterectomies using an original trichromic stain (methylene blue-azur B - basic fuchsine - alizarin red). We have compared samples stained either with our method, methylene blue-azur B alone or with Von Kossa staining, and methylene blue-azur B -basic fuchsine alone or with Von Kossa staining. Our method resulted to be simple and fast (ca. 2 min), it gives a sharp general contrast for all structures and allows to easy identify collagen and elastin. In addition, gray-green colour associated to intracellular lipid droplets evidences foam cells, which are particularly abundant in endarterectomies samples. Mast cells and their metachromatic granules are also well recognized. Calcifications over 0,5 µm are clearly recognizable. In conclusion, microcalcifications are clearly distinguished from the extracellular matrix in spite of their reduced dimensions. Methylene blue-azur B-basic fuchsine-alizarin red method is easy to use, reproducible, and is particularly suitable for the identification of microcalcifications in the morphological analysis of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:20819772

  19. Anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory actions of sesame oil.

    PubMed

    Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Selvarajan, Krithika; Litvinov, Dmitry; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a major form of cardiovascular disease, has now been recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Nonpharmacological means of treating chronic diseases have gained attention recently. We previously reported that sesame oil has anti-atherosclerotic properties. In this study, we have determined the mechanisms by which sesame oil might modulate atherosclerosis by identifying genes and inflammatory markers. Low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR(-/-)) female mice were fed with either an atherogenic diet or an atherogenic diet reformulated with sesame oil (sesame oil diet). Plasma lipids and atherosclerotic lesions were quantified after 3 months of feeding. Plasma samples were used for cytokine analysis. RNA was extracted from the liver tissue and used for global gene arrays. The sesame oil diet significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesions, plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL cholesterol levels in LDLR(-/-) mice. Plasma inflammatory cytokines, such as MCP-1, RANTES, IL-1α, IL-6, and CXCL-16, were significantly reduced, demonstrating an anti-inflammatory property of sesame oil. Gene array analysis showed that sesame oil induced many genes, including ABCA1, ABCA2, APOE, LCAT, and CYP7A1, which are involved in cholesterol metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport. In conclusion, our studies suggest that a sesame oil-enriched diet could be an effective nonpharmacological treatment for atherosclerosis by controlling inflammation and regulating lipid metabolism. PMID:25562618

  20. Aqueous extract of rhubarb stabilizes vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques due to depression of inflammation and lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunfang; Yan, Fangfang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Cheng; Yu, Huiming; Zhang, Yun; Zhao, Yuxia

    2008-07-01

    The study evaluated the effect of the traditional Chinese medicine rhubarb on the stability of atherosclerotic plaque. Atherosclerotic lesions were induced in rabbits through balloon injury with a high-cholesterol diet and then were divided into a control group, a rhubarb group and a simvastatin group. At week 24 recombinant-p53 adenoviruses were locally delivered to the atherosclerotic plaques. At week 26 plaque rupture was triggered by the intra-arterial Chinese Russell's viper venom and histamine. Serological, ultrasonographic, pathologic, immunohistochemical and gene expression studies were performed. The results showed that the incidence of plaque rupture in the rhubarb group and the simvastatin group was significantly lower than that in the control group (42.86% and 35.71% versus 80.00%, both p < 0.05). Serum TC, LDL-C (p < 0.05-0.01), IMT (both p < 0.01), PA (both p < 0.01), PB (%) (both p < 0.01) and the mRNA and protein expressions of TLR2, TLR4 and NF-kappaB (p < 0.05, 0.01, respectively) in the rhubarb group and the simvastatin group were significantly lower than those in the control group. In contrast, AIIc% (both p < 0.05) in the two treatment groups were significantly higher than those in the control group. These results suggest that rhubarb has antiatherosclerotic and plaque-stabilizing properties due to antiinflammation and lipid-lowering effects.