Science.gov

Sample records for advanced human atherosclerotic

  1. Evidence for roles of radicals in protein oxidation in advanced human atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, S; Davies, M J; Stocker, R; Dean, R T

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative damage might be important in atherogenesis. Oxidized lipids are present at significant concentrations in advanced human plaque, although tissue antioxidants are mostly present at normal concentrations. Indirect evidence of protein modification (notably derivatization of lysine) or oxidation has been obtained by immunochemical methods; the specificities of these antibodies are unclear. Here we present chemical determinations of six protein-bound oxidation products: dopa, o-tyrosine, m-tyrosine, dityrosine, hydroxyleucine and hydroxyvaline, some of which reflect particularly oxy-radical-mediated reaction pathways, which seem to involve mainly the participation of transition- metal ions. We compared the relative abundance of these oxidation products in normal intima, and in human carotid plaque samples with that observed after radiolytically generated hydroxyl radical attack on BSA in vitro. The close similarities in relative abundances in the latter two circumstances indicate that hydroxyl radical damage might occur in plaque. The relatively higher level of dityrosine in plaque than that observed after radiolysis suggests the additional involvement of HOCl-mediated reactions in advanced plaque. PMID:9677308

  2. Whole body and hematopoietic ADAM8 deficiency does not influence advanced atherosclerotic lesion development, despite its association with human plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Kosta; van der Vorst, Emiel P C; Gijbels, Marion J; Wolfs, Ine M J; Jeurissen, Mike; Theelen, Thomas L; Sluimer, Judith C; Wijnands, Erwin; Cleutjens, Jack P; Li, Yu; Jansen, Yvonne; Weber, Christian; Ludwig, Andreas; Bentzon, Jacob F; Bartsch, Jörg W; Biessen, Erik A L; Donners, Marjo M P C

    2017-09-15

    Although A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase 8 (ADAM8) is not crucial for tissue development and homeostasis, it has been implicated in various inflammatory diseases by regulating processes like immune cell recruitment and activation. ADAM8 expression has been associated with human atherosclerosis development and myocardial infarction, however a causal role of ADAM8 in atherosclerosis has not been investigated thus far. In this study, we examined the expression of ADAM8 in early and progressed human atherosclerotic lesions, in which ADAM8 was significantly upregulated in vulnerable lesions. In addition, ADAM8 expression was most prominent in the shoulder region of human atherosclerotic lesions, characterized by the abundance of foam cells. In mice, Adam8 was highly expressed in circulating neutrophils and in macrophages. Moreover, ADAM8 deficient mouse macrophages displayed reduced secretion of inflammatory mediators. Remarkably, however, neither hematopoietic nor whole-body ADAM8 deficiency in mice affected atherosclerotic lesion size. Additionally, except for an increase in granulocyte content in plaques of ADAM8 deficient mice, lesion morphology was unaffected. Taken together, whole body and hematopoietic ADAM8 does not contribute to advanced atherosclerotic plaque development, at least in female mice, although its expression might still be valuable as a diagnostic/prognostic biomarker to distinguish between stable and unstable lesions.

  3. Physical chemistry of the lipids of human atherosclerotic lesions. Demonstration of a lesion intermediate between fatty streaks and advanced plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, S S; Shipley, G G; Small, D M

    1976-01-01

    95 individual human atherosclerotic lesions from 26 persons were classified into three groups under the dissecting microscope: fatty streaks, fibrous plaques, and gruel (atheromatous) plaques. Each lesion was isolated by microdissection, its lipid composition determined by chromatography, and the physical states of the lipids identified by polarizing microscopy and in some cases by X-ray diffraction. The composition of each lesion was plotted on the in vitro phase diagram of the major lipids of plaques: cholesterol, cholesterol ester, and phospholipid. The observed physical states were compared with those predicted by the location of the lipid composition on the phase diagram. The most severe lesions (gruel plaques) had an average lipid composition of cholesterol 31.5+/-1.9%, cholesterol ester 47.2+/-2.3%, and phospholipid 15.3+/-0.5%. Their compositions fell within the three-phase zone of the phase diagram, predicting the lipids to be separated into a cholesterol crystal phase, a cholesterol ester oily phase and a phospholipid liquid crystalline phase. In addition to the phospholipid liquid crystalline phase of membranes and myelin-like figures demonstrable by electron microscopy, polarizing microscopy revealed the other two predicted phases, isotropic cholesterol ester-rich droplets and cholesterol crystals. X-ray diffraction studies verified the identity of the crystals as cholesterol monohydrate. Fibrous plaques also had an average lipid composition within the three-phase zone of the phase diagram. Polarizing microscopy revealed the presence of cholesterol monohydrate crystals and lipid droplets in all of these lesions; the droplets were predominately isotropic in 28 of the 31 fibrous plaques. Although these lesions had less free cholesterol and more cholesterol ester than gruel plaques, they were otherwise similar. Fatty streaks had compositions within both the two- and three-phase zones of the phase diagram. Compared with gruel plaques, the fatty streaks

  4. Development of Human-Like Advanced Coronary Plaques in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Knockout Pigs and Justification for Statin Treatment Before Formation of Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuxin; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Sudo, Mitsumasa; Haruta, Hironori; Lin, Qing-Fei; Takayama, Tadateru; Morita, Shotaro; Nochi, Tomonori; Suzuki, Shunichi; Sembon, Shoichiro; Nakai, Michiko; Kojima, Misaki; Iwamoto, Masaki; Hashimoto, Michiko; Yoda, Shunichi; Kunimoto, Satoshi; Hiro, Takafumi; Matsumoto, Taro; Mitsumata, Masako; Sugitani, Masahiko; Saito, Satoshi; Hirayama, Atsushi; Onishi, Akira

    2016-04-18

    Although clinical trials have proved that statin can be used prophylactically against cardiovascular events, the direct effects of statin on plaque development are not well understood. We generated low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR(-/-)) pigs to study the effects of early statin administration on development of atherosclerotic plaques, especially advanced plaques. LDLR(-/-) pigs were generated by targeted deletion of exon 4 of the LDLR gene. Given a standard chow diet, LDLR(-/-) pigs showed atherosclerotic lesions starting at 6 months of age. When 3-month-old LDLR(-/-) pigs were fed a high-cholesterol, high-fat (HCHF) diet for 4 months (HCHF group), human-like advanced coronary plaques developed. We also fed 3-month-old LDLR(-/-) pigs an HCHF diet with pitavastatin for 4 months (Statin Prophylaxis Group). Although serum cholesterol concentrations did not differ significantly between the 2 groups, intravascular ultrasound revealed 52% reduced plaque volume in statin-treated pigs. Pathological examination revealed most lesions (87%) in the statin prophylaxis group were early-stage lesions, versus 45% in the HCHF diet group (P<0.01). Thin-cap fibroatheroma characterized 40% of the plaques in the HCHF diet group versus 8% in the statin prophylaxis group (P<0.01), intraplaque hemorrhage characterized 11% versus 1% (P<0.01), and calcification characterized 22% versus 1% (P<0.01). Results of our large animal experiment support statin prophylaxis before the occurrence of atherosclerosis. Early statin treatment appears to retard development of coronary artery atherosclerosis and ensure lesion stability. In addition, the LDLR(-/-) pigs we developed represent a large animal model of human-like advanced coronary plaque suitable for translational research. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  5. Inelasticity of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Maher, Eoghan; Creane, Arthur; Sultan, Sherif; Hynes, Niamh; Lally, Caitríona; Kelly, Daniel J

    2011-09-01

    Little mechanical test data exists regarding the inelastic behavior of atherosclerotic plaques. As a result finite element (FE) models of stenting procedures commonly use hyperelastic material models to describe the soft tissue response thus limiting the accuracy of the model to the expansion stage of stent implantation and leave them unable to predict the lumen gain. In this study, cyclic mechanical tests were performed to characterize the inelastic behavior of fresh human carotid atherosclerotic plaque tissue due to radial compressive loading. Plaques were classified clinically as either mixed (M), calcified (Ca), or echolucent (E). An approximately linear increase in the plastic deformation was observed with increases in the peak applied strain for all plaque types. While calcified plaques generally appeared stiffest, it was observed that the clinical classification of plaques had no significant effect on the magnitude of permanent deformation on unloading. The test data was characterized using a constitutive model that accounts for both permanent deformation and stress softening to describe the compressive plaque behavior on unloading. Material constants are reported for individual plaques as well as mean values for each plaque classification. This data can be considered as a first step in characterizing the inelastic behavior of atherosclerotic plaques and could be used in combination with future mechanical data to improve the predictive capabilities of FE models of angioplasty and stenting procedures particularly in relation to lumen gain.

  6. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural detection of advanced glycation end products in atherosclerotic lesions of human aorta with a novel specific monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Kume, S.; Takeya, M.; Mori, T.; Araki, N.; Suzuki, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Kodama, T.; Miyauchi, Y.; Takahashi, K.

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the deposition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in aortic atherosclerosis, aortic walls were obtained from 25 autopsy cases and examined immunohistochemically and immunoelectron microscopically with a monoclonal antibody specific for AGEs, 6D12. Among the autopsy cases, atherosclerotic lesions were found in the aortas of 22 cases and were composed of diffuse intimal thickening, fatty streaks, atherosclerotic plaques, and/or complicated lesions. In these cases, intracellular AGE accumulation was demonstrated in the intimal lesions of aortic atherosclerosis in 12 cases. Compared with the diffuse intimal thickening, intracellular AGE accumulation was marked in the fatty streaks and atherosclerotic plaques. Immunohistochemical double staining with 6D12 and monoclonal antibodies for macrophages or muscle actin or a polyclonal antibody for scavenger receptors demonstrated that the AGE accumulation in macrophages or their related foam cells was marked in the diffuse intimal thickening and fatty streak lesions and that almost all macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells possessed scavenger receptors. Immunoelectron microscopic observation revealed the localization of 6D12-positive reaction in lysosomal lipid vacuoles or electron-dense granules of the foam cells. These results indicate that AGE accumulation occurs in macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and their related foam cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:7545874

  7. Elevated levels of protein-bound p-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, an amino-acid-derived aldehyde generated by myeloperoxidase, are present in human fatty streaks, intermediate lesions and advanced atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, S L; Gaut, J P; Crowley, J R; Hsu, F F; Heinecke, J W

    2000-01-01

    Reactive aldehydes might have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by covalently modifying low-density lipoprotein (LDL). However, the identities of the aldehyde adducts that form on LDL in vivo are not yet clearly established. We previously demonstrated that the haem protein myeloperoxidase oxidizes proteins in the human artery wall. We also have shown that p-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (pHA), the aldehyde that forms when myeloperoxidase oxidizes L-tyrosine, covalently modifies the N(epsilon)-lysine residues of proteins. The resulting Schiff base can be quantified as N(epsilon)-[2-(p-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl]lysine (pHA-lysine) after reduction with NaCNBH(3). Here we demonstrate that pHA-lysine is a marker for LDL that has been modified by myeloperoxidase, and that water-soluble, but not lipid-soluble, antioxidants inhibit the modification of LDL protein. To determine whether myeloperoxidase-generated aldehydes might modify LDL in vivo, we used a combination of isotope-dilution GC-MS to quantify pHA-lysine in aortic tissues at various stages of lesion evolution. We also analysed LDL isolated from atherosclerotic aortic tissue. Comparison of normal and atherosclerotic aortic tissue demonstrated a significant elevation (more than 10-fold) of the reduced Schiff base adduct in fatty streaks, intermediate lesions and advanced lesions compared with normal aortic tissue. Moreover, the level of pHA-lysine in LDL recovered from atherosclerotic aortic intima was 200-fold that in plasma LDL of healthy donors. These results indicate that pHA-lysine, a specific covalent modification of LDL, is generated in human atherosclerotic vascular tissue. They also raise the possibility that reactive aldehydes generated by myeloperoxidase have a role in converting LDL into an atherogenic lipoprotein. PMID:11104675

  8. Presence of hypochlorite-modified proteins in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Hazell, L J; Arnold, L; Flowers, D; Waeg, G; Malle, E; Stocker, R

    1996-01-01

    Oxidation of LDL may contribute to atherogenesis, though the nature of the in vivo oxidant(s) remains obscure. Myeloperoxidase, the enzyme responsible for hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite (HOCl) production in vivo, is present in active form in human atherosclerotic lesions, and HOCl aggregates and transforms LDL into a high-uptake form for macrophages in vitro. Here we demonstrate HOCl-modified proteins in human lesions using an mAb raised against HOCl-modified LDL that recognizes HOCl-oxidized proteins but does not cross-react with Cu2+-, malondialdehyde-, or 4-hydroxynonenal-modified LDL. This antibody detected significantly more material in advanced atherosclerotic lesions than normal arteries, even though azide and methionine were included during sample work-up to inhibit myeloperoxidase and to scavenge HOCl. The epitope(s) recognized was predominantly cell associated and present in monocyte/macrophages, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells. The intima and cholesterol clefts stained more heavily than the center of the thickened vessels; adventitial staining was apparent in some cases. Immunostaining was also detected in a very early lesion from an accident victim, beside healthy areas that were unreactive. LDL oxidized by HOCl in vitro, but not native LDL, effectively competed with the epitopes in lesions for antibody binding. Density centrifugation of plaque homogenates and Western blot analysis showed that, in the apo B-containing lipoprotein fraction, the mAb recognized protein(s) of molecular mass greater than apo B, similar to those produced during oxidation of LDL with HOCl in vitro. Three major proteins were recognized by the anti-HOCl-modified protein antibody but not by an anti-apo B antibody in the apo B-free fraction. Together, these results demonstrate HOCl-oxidized proteins in human atherosclerotic lesions, implicating this oxidant in LDL modification in vivo. PMID:8617887

  9. Experience With Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging Of Human Atherosclerotic Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallery, John A.; Gessert, James M.; Maciel, Mario; Tobis, John M.; Griffith, James M.; Berns, Michael W.; Henry, Walter L.

    1989-08-01

    Normal human arteries have a well-defined structure on intravascular images. The intima appears very thin and is most likely represented by a bright reflection arising from the internal elastic lamina. The smooth muscle tunica media is echo-lucent on the ultrasound image and appears as a dark band separating the intima from the adventitia. The adventitia is a brightly reflective layer of variable thickness. The thickness of the intima, and therefore of the atherosclerotic plaque can be accurately measured from the ultrasound images and correlates well with histology. Calcification within the wall of arteries is seen as bright echo reflection with shadowing of the peripheral wall. Fibrotic regions are highly reflective but do not shadow. Necrotic liquid regions within advanced atherosclerotic plaques are seen on ultrasound images as large lucent zones surrounded by echogenic tissue. Imaging can be performed before and after interventional procedures, such as laser angioplasty, balloon angioplasty and atherectomy. Intravascular ultrasound appears to provide an imaging modality for identifying the histologic characteristics of diseased arteries and for quantifying plaque thickness. It might be possible to perform such quantification to evaluate the results of interventional procedures.

  10. Electric impedance spectroscopy of human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Streitner, Ines; Goldhofer, Markus; Cho, Sungbo; Thielecke, Hagen; Kinscherf, Ralf; Streitner, Florian; Metz, Jürgen; Haase, Karl K; Borggrefe, Martin; Suselbeck, Tim

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the feasibility of a new highly flexible microelectrode on human tissue and its potential of differentiating atherosclerotic lesions by electric impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Electric impedance measurements (EIM) were performed on 148 spots of 7 aortic and 6 femoral human arteries at 1kHz, 10kHz and 100kHz. According to the AHA classification 33 (25%) grade I lesions (PI), 34 (26%) grade II (PII), 21 (16%) grade III (PIII), 21 (16%) grade IV (PIV), 13 (10%) grade Va (PVa) and 10 (8%) grade Vb (PVb) could be identified by histology. At 1kHz, 10kHz and 100kHz the mean electric impedance (MEI) of PI, PII, PIII and PIV was statistically not different. At 100kHz the MEI of PVa showed significantly higher values compared to the MEI of PI (455+/-66Omega vs. 375+/-47Omega, p=0.05), PII (455+/-66Omega vs. 358+/-63Omega, p=0.007), PIII (455+/-66Omega vs. 342+/-52Omega, p=0.003), PIV (455+/-66Omega vs. 356+/-41Omegap=0.013) and the MEI of PVb was significantly increased compared to the MEI of PI (698+/-239Omega vs. 375+/-47Omega, p<0.001), PII (698+/-239Omega vs. 358+/-63Omegap<0.001), PIII (698+/-239Omega vs. 342+/-52Omegap<0.001), PIV (698+/-239Omega vs. 356+/-41Omegap<0.001), PVa (698+/-239Omega vs. 455+/-66Omega, p<0.001). Performing ROC analyses for the detection of grouped PVa/PVb lesions, the largest AUC was found at 100kHz with a cut-off value of 441Omega presenting a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 94%. EIM could be performed on human aortic and femoral tissue. The results show that EIS has the potential to distinguish between different plaque types.

  11. Grating interferometry-based phase microtomography of atherosclerotic human arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscema, Marzia; Holme, Margaret N.; Deyhle, Hans; Schulz, Georg; Schmitz, Rüdiger; Thalmann, Peter; Hieber, Simone E.; Chicherova, Natalia; Cattin, Philippe C.; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia; Weitkamp, Timm; Saxer, Till; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death and morbidity in the world. Understanding disease development in terms of lumen morphology and tissue composition of constricted arteries is essential to improve treatment and patient outcome. X-ray tomography provides non-destructive three-dimensional data with micrometer-resolution. However, a common problem is simultaneous visualization of soft and hard tissue-containing specimens, such as atherosclerotic human coronary arteries. Unlike absorption based techniques, where X-ray absorption strongly depends on atomic number and tissue density, phase contrast methods such as grating interferometry have significant advantages as the phase shift is only a linear function of the atomic number. We demonstrate that grating interferometry-based phase tomography is a powerful method to three-dimensionally visualize a variety of anatomical features in atherosclerotic human coronary arteries, including plaque, muscle, fat, and connective tissue. Three formalin-fixed, human coronary arteries were measured using advanced laboratory μCT. While this technique gives information about plaque morphology, it is impossible to extract the lumen morphology. Therefore, selected regions were measured using grating based phase tomography, sinograms were treated with a wavelet-Fourier filter to remove ring artifacts, and reconstructed data were processed to allow extraction of vessel lumen morphology. Phase tomography data in combination with conventional laboratory μCT data of the same specimen shows potential, through use of a joint histogram, to identify more tissue types than either technique alone. Such phase tomography data was also rigidly registered to subsequently decalcified arteries that were histologically sectioned, although the quality of registration was insufficient for joint histogram analysis.

  12. Differential expression of bone matrix regulatory proteins in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Dhore, C R; Cleutjens, J P; Lutgens, E; Cleutjens, K B; Geusens, P P; Kitslaar, P J; Tordoir, J H; Spronk, H M; Vermeer, C; Daemen, M J

    2001-12-01

    In the present study, we examined the expression of regulators of bone formation and osteoclastogenesis in human atherosclerosis because accumulating evidence suggests that atherosclerotic calcification shares features with bone calcification. The most striking finding of this study was the constitutive immunoreactivity of matrix Gla protein, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein in nondiseased aortas and the absence of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, BMP-4, osteopontin, and osteonectin in nondiseased aortas and early atherosclerotic lesions. When atherosclerotic plaques demonstrated calcification or bone formation, BMP-2, BMP-4, osteopontin, and osteonectin were upregulated. Interestingly, this upregulation was associated with a sustained immunoreactivity of matrix Gla protein, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein. The 2 modulators of osteoclastogenesis (osteoprotegerin [OPG] and its ligand, OPGL) were present in the nondiseased vessel wall and in early atherosclerotic lesions. In advanced calcified lesions, OPG was present in bone structures, whereas OPGL was only present in the extracellular matrix surrounding calcium deposits. The observed expression patterns suggest a tight regulation of the expression of bone matrix regulatory proteins during human atherogenesis. The expression pattern of both OPG and OPGL during atherogenesis might suggest a regulatory role of these proteins not only in osteoclastogenesis but also in atherosclerotic calcification.

  13. Differentially expressed genes and canonical pathway expression in human atherosclerotic plaques – Tampere Vascular Study

    PubMed Central

    Sulkava, Miska; Raitoharju, Emma; Levula, Mari; Seppälä, Ilkka; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Mennander, Ari; Järvinen, Otso; Zeitlin, Rainer; Salenius, Juha-Pekka; Illig, Thomas; Klopp, Norman; Mononen, Nina; Laaksonen, Reijo; Kähönen, Mika; Oksala, Niku; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases due to atherosclerosis are the leading cause of death globally. We aimed to investigate the potentially altered gene and pathway expression in advanced peripheral atherosclerotic plaques in comparison to healthy control arteries. Gene expression analysis was performed (Illumina HumanHT-12 version 3 Expression BeadChip) for 68 advanced atherosclerotic plaques (15 aortic, 29 carotid and 24 femoral plaques) and 28 controls (left internal thoracic artery (LITA)) from Tampere Vascular Study. Dysregulation of individual genes was compared to healthy controls and between plaques from different arterial beds and Ingenuity pathway analysis was conducted on genes with a fold change (FC) > ±1.5 and false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05. 787 genes were significantly differentially expressed in atherosclerotic plaques. The most up-regulated genes were osteopontin and multiple MMPs, and the most down-regulated were cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector C and A (CIDEC, CIDEA) and apolipoprotein D (FC > 20). 156 pathways were differentially expressed in atherosclerotic plaques, mostly inflammation-related, especially related with leukocyte trafficking and signaling. In artery specific plaque analysis 50.4% of canonical pathways and 41.2% GO terms differentially expressed were in common for all three arterial beds. Our results confirm the inflammatory nature of advanced atherosclerosis and show novel pathway differences between different arterial beds. PMID:28128285

  14. Modulation of human monocyte CD36 by type 2 diabetes mellitus and other atherosclerotic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Lopez, Rosa M; Llorente-Cortes, Vicenta; López-Carmona, Dolores; Mayas, Dolores M; Gomez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Tinahones, Francisco J; Badimon, Lina

    2011-08-01

    The pathophysiological role of CD36 in atherosclerosis seems to be largely dependent on its pro-inflammatory function and ability to take up oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Controversy exists concerning the potential beneficial/harmful effects of vascular CD36 inhibition in atherosclerosis. However, as atherosclerosis in murine models does not result in clinical end points such as plaque rupture and thrombotic ischaemia, typical of human disease, clinical studies are required to understand the functional role of CD36 in human atherosclerosis. Our aim was to investigate whether CD36 expression in monocytes is modulated by the presence of an increasing number of atherosclerotic risk factors, and specifically by hyperglycaemia because of diabetes mellitus. The study included 33 patients with advanced atherosclerosis and eight healthy blood donors, as controls. The patients were classified according to the presence of atherosclerotic risk factors. Diabetes mellitus was classified as either well-controlled or poorly controlled. Monocytes were exposed in vitro to low (5·5mM) or high glucose (26mM) concentrations for increasing times. Our results demonstrated that protein levels of glycated CD36 were significantly higher in patients with 3-4 atherosclerotic risk factors than in those with 0-2 atherosclerotic risk factors or in subjects with no atherosclerotic symptoms (P=0·04, in both cases). However, when we analysed just the poorly controlled diabetic patients, their glycated CD36 levels were lower. These data were corroborated by in vitro studies demonstrating that increasing glucose concentrations reduced glycated protein levels (P<0·05). Our results demonstrate that CD36 expression is altered by hyperglycaemia in atherosclerotic patients. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2011 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  15. Human atherosclerosis. II. Immunocytochemical analysis of the cellular composition of human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Gown, A. M.; Tsukada, T.; Ross, R.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have performed immunocytochemical investigations of the distribution of various cell types in human atherosclerotic plaques using monoclonal antibodies specific to smooth muscle cells (CGA7 [Gown et al, J Cell Biol 1985, 100:807-813] and HHF35 [Tsukada et al, Am J Pathol (In press)] ); lymphocytes (T200 antigen); endothelial cells (Factor VIII and the Ulex europeus agglutinin); and macrophages, the latter with a new macrophage-specific antibody HAM56. All studies were performed on methanol-Carnoy's-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. In areas of grossly normal aorta, significant numbers of macrophages were noted within areas of diffuse intimal thickening. The cellular composition of the following three types of raised lesions were analyzed: fibro-fatty lesions, which, despite their gross appearance, consistent with fibrous plaques, were composed almost exclusively of macrophages and lymphocytes and almost devoid of smooth muscle cells; fibrous plaques, which were predominantly composed of smooth muscle cells displaying considerable morphologic heterogeneity and an admixture of blood-borne cells; advanced plaques, which were characterized by complex layers of smooth muscle cells and macrophages with considerable variation from region to region. Also noted were foci of medial and even intimal vascularization subjacent to the more advanced plaques. These studies demonstrate the application of monoclonal antibody technology to the study of the cellular composition of human atherosclerotic lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 p195-a Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 p201-a Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3777135

  16. Research Progress on the Risk Factors and Outcomes of Human Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiang-Dong; Xiong, Wei-Dong; Xiong, Shang-Shen; Chen, Gui-Hai

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process that results in complex lesions or plaques that protrude into the arterial lumen. Carotid atherosclerotic plaque rupture, with distal atheromatous debris embolization, causes cerebrovascular events. This review aimed to explore research progress on the risk factors and outcomes of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability for therapeutic intervention. Data Sources: We searched the PubMed database for recently published research articles up to June 2016, with the key words of “risk factors”, “outcomes”, “blood components”, “molecular mechanisms”, “cellular mechanisms”, and “human carotid atherosclerotic plaques”. Study Selection: The articles, regarding the latest developments related to the risk factors and outcomes, atherosclerotic plaque composition, blood components, and consequences of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability for therapeutic intervention, were selected. Results: This review described the latest researches regarding the interactive effects of both traditional and novel risk factors for human carotid atherosclerotic plaques, novel insights into human carotid atherosclerotic plaque composition and blood components, and consequences of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque. Conclusion: Carotid plaque biology and serologic biomarkers of vulnerability can be used to predict the risk of cerebrovascular events. Furthermore, plaque composition, rather than lesion burden, seems to most predict rupture and subsequent thrombosis. PMID:28303857

  17. Effects of laser radiation on the morphology of human coronary atherosclerotic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.; Lee, M.H.; Ikeda, R.M.; Chan, M.C.; Reis, R.L.; Rink, J.L.; Peterson, L.; Hanna, E.S.; Mason, D.T.

    1984-11-01

    Laser energy delivered through optical fibers can produce potent controlled thermal dissolution of human coronary obstructive disease, thus widening the stenotic vascular lumen. The ease of vaporization and penetration depends not only on the physical properties of the laser beam but also on the physical characteristics of the atherosclerotic plaque. Lipid-laden plaques are more easily vaporized compared with plaques that are heavily calcified. In atherosclerotic animal models studied in vivo, laser radiation produced a charred lining around the evacuated area and rapid regeneration of a new endothelial lining. After several weeks, the laser-induced crater was still evident, and thrombogenesis was not a significant complication. Focal aneurysmal dilatation may develop when there is thermal injury of the medial layer, and acute perforation can occur if severe laser burn is extended beyond the adventitial layer. Further technical advances and achievements are needed before laser recanalization becomes a clinical reality.

  18. Activation of calpain-1 in human carotid artery atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Isabel; Nitulescu, Mihaela; Saido, Takaomi C; Dias, Nuno; Pedro, Luis M; e Fernandes, José Fernandes; Ares, Mikko PS; Pörn-Ares, Isabella

    2009-01-01

    Background In a previous study, we observed that oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced death of endothelial cells was calpain-1-dependent. The purpose of the present paper was to study the possible activation of calpain in human carotid plaques, and to compare calpain activity in the plaques from symptomatic patients with those obtained from patients without symptoms. Methods Human atherosclerotic carotid plaques (n = 29, 12 associated with symptoms) were removed by endarterectomy. Calpain activity and apoptosis were detected by performing immunohistochemical analysis and TUNEL assay on human carotid plaque sections. An antibody specific for calpain-proteolyzed α-fodrin was used on western blots. Results We found that calpain was activated in all the plaques and calpain activity colocalized with apoptotic cell death. Our observation of autoproteolytic cleavage of the 80 kDa subunit of calpain-1 provided further evidence for enzyme activity in the plaque samples. When calpain activity was quantified, we found that plaques from symptomatic patients displayed significantly lower calpain activity compared with asymptomatic plaques. Conclusion These novel results suggest that calpain-1 is commonly active in carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques, and that calpain activity is colocalized with cell death and inversely associated with symptoms. PMID:19538725

  19. Myeloperoxidase, a catalyst for lipoprotein oxidation, is expressed in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, A; Dunn, J L; Rateri, D L; Heinecke, J W

    1994-07-01

    Oxidatively modified lipoproteins have been implicated in atherogenesis, but the mechanisms that promote oxidation in vivo have not been identified. Myeloperoxidase, a heme protein secreted by activated macrophages, generates reactive intermediates that oxidize lipoproteins in vitro. To explore the potential role of myeloperoxidase in the development of atherosclerosis, we determined whether the enzyme was present in surgically excised human vascular tissue. In detergent extracts of atherosclerotic arteries subjected to Western blotting, a rabbit polyclonal antibody monospecific for myeloperoxidase detected a 56-kD protein, the predicted molecular mass of the heavy subunit. Both the immunoreactive protein and authentic myeloperoxidase bound to a lectin-affinity column; after elution with methyl mannoside their apparent molecular masses were indistinguishable by nondenaturing size-exclusion chromatography. Peroxidase activity in detergent extracts of atherosclerotic lesions likewise bound to a lectin column and eluted with methyl mannoside. Moreover, eluted peroxidase generated the cytotoxic oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl), indicating that enzymatically active myeloperoxidase was present in lesions. Patterns of immunostaining of arterial tissue with antihuman myeloperoxidase antibodies were similar to those produced by an antimacrophage antibody, and were especially prominent in the shoulder region of transitional lesions. Intense foci of myeloperoxidase immunostaining also appeared adjacent to cholesterol clefts in lipid-rich regions of advanced atherosclerotic lesions. These findings identify myeloperoxidase as a component of human vascular lesions. Because this heme protein can generate reactive species that damage lipids and proteins, myeloperoxidase may contribute to atherogenesis by catalyzing oxidative reactions in the vascular wall.

  20. Myeloperoxidase, a catalyst for lipoprotein oxidation, is expressed in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, A; Dunn, J L; Rateri, D L; Heinecke, J W

    1994-01-01

    Oxidatively modified lipoproteins have been implicated in atherogenesis, but the mechanisms that promote oxidation in vivo have not been identified. Myeloperoxidase, a heme protein secreted by activated macrophages, generates reactive intermediates that oxidize lipoproteins in vitro. To explore the potential role of myeloperoxidase in the development of atherosclerosis, we determined whether the enzyme was present in surgically excised human vascular tissue. In detergent extracts of atherosclerotic arteries subjected to Western blotting, a rabbit polyclonal antibody monospecific for myeloperoxidase detected a 56-kD protein, the predicted molecular mass of the heavy subunit. Both the immunoreactive protein and authentic myeloperoxidase bound to a lectin-affinity column; after elution with methyl mannoside their apparent molecular masses were indistinguishable by nondenaturing size-exclusion chromatography. Peroxidase activity in detergent extracts of atherosclerotic lesions likewise bound to a lectin column and eluted with methyl mannoside. Moreover, eluted peroxidase generated the cytotoxic oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl), indicating that enzymatically active myeloperoxidase was present in lesions. Patterns of immunostaining of arterial tissue with antihuman myeloperoxidase antibodies were similar to those produced by an antimacrophage antibody, and were especially prominent in the shoulder region of transitional lesions. Intense foci of myeloperoxidase immunostaining also appeared adjacent to cholesterol clefts in lipid-rich regions of advanced atherosclerotic lesions. These findings identify myeloperoxidase as a component of human vascular lesions. Because this heme protein can generate reactive species that damage lipids and proteins, myeloperoxidase may contribute to atherogenesis by catalyzing oxidative reactions in the vascular wall. Images PMID:8040285

  1. MR histology of advanced atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE- knockout mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumova, A.; Yarnykh, V.; Ferguson, M.; Rosenfeld, M.; Yuan, C.

    2016-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the feasibility of determining the composition of advanced atherosclerotic plaques in fixed ApoE-knockout mice and to develop a time-efficient microimaging protocol for MR histological imaging on mice. Five formalin-fixed transgenic ApoE-knockout mice were imaged at the 9.4T Bruker BioSpec MR scanner using 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence with an isotropic field of view of 24 mm3; TR 20.8 ms; TE 2.6 ms; flip angle 20°, resulted voxel size 47 × 63 × 94 pm3. MRI examination has shown that advanced atherosclerotic lesions of aorta, innominate and carotid arteries in ApoE-knockout mice are characterized by high calcification and presence of the large fibrofatty nodules. MRI quantification of atherosclerotic lesion components corresponded to histological assessment of plaque composition with a correlation coefficient of 0.98.

  2. Alternation of histone and DNA methylation in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques.

    PubMed

    Greißel, A; Culmes, M; Napieralski, R; Wagner, E; Gebhard, H; Schmitt, M; Zimmermann, A; Eckstein, H-H; Zernecke, A; Pelisek, J

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about epigenetics and its possible role in atherosclerosis. We here analysed histone and DNA methylation and the expression of corresponding methyltransferases in early and advanced human atherosclerotic carotid lesions in comparison to healthy carotid arteries. Western Blotting was performed on carotid plaques from our biobank with early (n=60) or advanced (n=60) stages of atherosclerosis and healthy carotid arteries (n=12) to analyse di-methylation patterns of histone H3 at positions K4, K9 and K27. In atherosclerotic lesions, di-methylation of H3K4 was unaltered and that of H3K9 and H3K27 significantly decreased compared to control arteries. Immunohistochemistry revealed an increased appearance of di-methylated H3K4 in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), a decreased expression of di-methylated H3K9 in SMCs and inflammatory cells, and reduced di-methylated H3K27 in inflammatory cells in advanced versus early atherosclerosis. Expression of corresponding histone methyltransferases MLL2 and G9a was increased in advanced versus early atherosclerosis. Genomic DNA hypomethylation, as determined by PCR for methylated LINE1 and SAT-alpha, was observed in early and advanced plaques compared to control arteries and in cell-free serum of patients with high-grade carotid stenosis compared to healthy volunteers. In contrast, no differences in DNA methylation were observed in blood cells. Expression of DNA-methyltransferase DNMT1 was reduced in atherosclerotic plaques versus controls, DNMT3A was undetectable, and DNMT3B not altered. DNA-demethylase TET1 was increased in atherosclerosisc plaques. The extent of histone and DNA methylation and expression of some corresponding methyltransferases are significantly altered in atherosclerosis, suggesting a possible contribution of epigenetics in disease development.

  3. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  4. Local Effects of Human PCSK9 on the Atherosclerotic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Giunzioni, Ilaria; Tavori, Hagai; Covarrubias, Roman; Major, Amy S.; Ding, Lei; Zhang, Youmin; DeVay, Rachel M.; Hong, Liang; Fan, Daping; Predazzi, Irene M.; Rashid, Shirya; Linton, MacRae F.; Fazio, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin type 9 (PCSK9) promotes atherosclerosis by increasing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels through degradation of hepatic LDL receptors (LDLR). Studies have described the systemic effects of PCSK9 on atherosclerosis, but whether PCSK9 has local and direct effects on the plaque in unknown. To study the local effect of human PCSK9 (hPCSK9) on atherosclerotic lesion composition independently of changes in serum cholesterol levels we generated chimeric mice expressing hPCSK9 exclusively from macrophages using marrow from hPCSK9 transgenic (hPCSK9tg) mice transplanted into apoE−/− and LDLR−/− mice, which were then placed on a high fat diet for 8 wk. We further characterized the effect of hPCSK9 expression on the inflammatory responses in the spleen and by mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) in vitro. We found that MPM from transgenic mice express both murine (m) Pcsk9 and hPCSK9 and that the latter reduces macrophage LDLR and LRP1 surface levels. hPCSK9 was detected in serum of mice transplanted with hPCSK9tg marrow, but did not influence lipid levels or atherosclerotic lesion size. However, marrow-derived PCSK9 progressively accumulated in lesions of apoE−/− recipient mice while increasing the infiltration of Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes by 32% compared with controls. Expression of hPCSK9 also increased CD11b and Ly6Chi positive cell numbers in spleens of apoE−/− mice. In vitro, expression of hPCSK9 in LPS-stimulated macrophages increased mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory markers Tnf and Il1b (40% and 45%, respectively) and suppressed those of the anti-inflammatory markers Il10 and Arg1 (30% and 44%, respectively). All PCSK9 effects were LDLR-dependent as PCSK9 protein was not detected in lesions of LDLR−/− recipient mice and did not affect macrophage or splenocyte inflammation. In conclusion, PCSK9 directly increases atherosclerotic lesion inflammation in an LDLR-dependent but cholesterol

  5. Local effects of human PCSK9 on the atherosclerotic lesion.

    PubMed

    Giunzioni, Ilaria; Tavori, Hagai; Covarrubias, Roman; Major, Amy S; Ding, Lei; Zhang, Youmin; DeVay, Rachel M; Hong, Liang; Fan, Daping; Predazzi, Irene M; Rashid, Shirya; Linton, MacRae F; Fazio, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) promotes atherosclerosis by increasing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels through degradation of hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR). Studies have described the systemic effects of PCSK9 on atherosclerosis, but whether PCSK9 has local and direct effects on the plaque is unknown. To study the local effect of human PCSK9 (hPCSK9) on atherosclerotic lesion composition, independently of changes in serum cholesterol levels, we generated chimeric mice expressing hPCSK9 exclusively from macrophages, using marrow from hPCSK9 transgenic (hPCSK9tg) mice transplanted into apoE(-/-) and LDLR(-/-) mice, which were then placed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks. We further characterized the effect of hPCSK9 expression on the inflammatory responses in the spleen and by mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) in vitro. We found that MPMs from transgenic mice express both murine (m) Pcsk9 and hPCSK9 and that the latter reduces macrophage LDLR and LRP1 surface levels. We detected hPCSK9 in the serum of mice transplanted with hPCSK9tg marrow, but did not influence lipid levels or atherosclerotic lesion size. However, marrow-derived PCSK9 progressively accumulated in lesions of apoE(-/-) recipient mice, while increasing the infiltration of Ly6C(hi) inflammatory monocytes by 32% compared with controls. Expression of hPCSK9 also increased CD11b- and Ly6C(hi) -positive cell numbers in spleens of apoE(-/-) mice. In vitro, expression of hPCSK9 in LPS-stimulated macrophages increased mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory markers Tnf and Il1b (40% and 45%, respectively) and suppressed those of the anti-inflammatory markers Il10 and Arg1 (30% and 44%, respectively). All PCSK9 effects were LDLR-dependent, as PCSK9 protein was not detected in lesions of LDLR(-/-) recipient mice and did not affect macrophage or splenocyte inflammation. In conclusion, PCSK9 directly increases atherosclerotic lesion inflammation in an LDLR-dependent but

  6. Dendritic Cells in Human Atherosclerosis: From Circulation to Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Van Vré, Emily A.; Van Brussel, Ilse; Bosmans, Johan M.; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Bult, Hidde

    2011-01-01

    Background. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with atherosclerotic plaques containing inflammatory infiltrates predominantly consisting of monocytes/macrophages and activated T cells. More recent is the implication of dendritic cells (DCs) in the disease. Since DCs were demonstrated in human arteries in 1995, numerous studies in humans suggest a role for these professional antigen-presenting cells in atherosclerosis. Aim. This paper focuses on the observations made in blood and arteries of patients with atherosclerosis. In principal, flow cytometric analyses show that circulating myeloid (m) and plasmacytoid (p) DCs are diminished in coronary artery disease, while immunohistochemical studies describe increased intimal DC counts with evolving plaque stages. Moreover, mDCs and pDCs appear to behave differently in atherosclerosis. Yet, the origin of plaque DCs and their relationship with blood DCs are unknown. Therefore, several explanations for the observed changes are postulated. In addition, the technical challenges and discrepancies in the research field are discussed. Future. Future studies in humans, in combination with experimental animal studies will unravel mechanisms leading to altered blood and plaque DCs in atherosclerosis. As DCs are crucial for inducing but also dampening immune responses, understanding their life cycle, trafficking and function in atherosclerosis will determine potential use of DCs in antiatherogenic therapies. PMID:21976788

  7. Heterogeneity of human macrophages in culture and in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Waldo, Stephen W; Li, Yifu; Buono, Chiara; Zhao, Bin; Billings, Eric M; Chang, Janet; Kruth, Howard S

    2008-04-01

    Research suggests that monocytes differentiate into unique lineage-determined macrophage subpopulations in response to the local cytokine environment. The present study evaluated the atherogenic potential of two divergent lineage-determined human monocyte-derived macrophage subpopulations. Monocytes were differentiated for 7 days in the presence of alternative macrophage development cytokines: granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to produce granulocyte-macrophage-CSF macrophages (GM-Mac), or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) to produce M-Mac. Gene chip analyses of three monocyte donors demonstrated differential expression of inflammatory and cholesterol homeostasis genes in the macrophage subpopulations. Quantitative PCR confirmed a fivefold elevation in the expression of genes that promote reverse cholesterol transport (PPAR-gamma, LXR-alpha, and ABCG1) and macrophage emigration from lesions (CCR7) in GM-Mac compared to that in M-Mac. Immunocytochemistry confirmed enhanced expression of the proinflammatory marker CD14 in M-Mac relative to GM-Mac. M-Mac spontaneously accumulated cholesterol when incubated with unmodified low-density lipoprotein whereas GM-Mac only accumulated similar levels of cholesterol after protein kinase C activation. Immunostained human coronary arteries showed that macrophages with similar antigen expression to that of M-Mac (CD68(+)/CD14(+)) were predominant within atherosclerotic lesions whereas macrophages with antigen expression similar to GM-Mac (CD68(+)/CD14(-)) were predominant in areas devoid of disease. The identification of macrophage subpopulations with different gene expression patterns and, thus, different potentials for promoting atherosclerosis has important experimental and clinical implications and could prove to be a valuable finding in developing therapeutic interventions in diseases dependent on macrophage function.

  8. Optical detection of structural changes in human carotid atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, R. M.; Canham, P. B.; Finlay, H. M.; Hammond, R. R.; Quantz, M.; Ferguson, G. G.; Liu, L. Y.; Lucas, A. R.

    2005-08-01

    Background: Arterial bifurcations are commonly the sites of developing atherosclerotic plaque that lead to arterial occlusions and plaque rupture (myocardial infarctions and strokes). Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy provides an effective nondestructive method supplying spectral information on extracellular matrix (ECM) protein composition, specifically collagen and elastin. Purpose: To investigate regional differences in the ECM proteins -- collagen I, III and elastin in unstable plaque by analyzing data from laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of human carotid endarterectomy specimens. Methods: Gels of ECM protein extracts (elastin, collagen types I & III) were measured as reference spectra and internal thoracic artery segments (extra tissue from bypass surgery) were used as tissue controls. Arterial segments and the endarterectomy specimens (n=21) were cut into 5mm cross-sectional rings. Ten fluorescence spectra per sampling area were then recorded at 5 sites per ring with argon laser excitation (357nm) with a penetration depth of 200 μm. Spectra were normalized to maximum intensity and analyzed using multiple regression analysis. Tissue rings were fixed in formalin (within 3 hours of surgery), sectioned and stained with H&E or Movat's Pentachrome for histological analysis. Spectroscopy data were correlated with immunohistology (staining for elastin, collagen types I, III and IV). Results: Quantitative fluorescence for the thoracic arteries revealed a dominant elastin component on the luminal side -- confirmed with immunohistology and known artery structure. Carotid endarterectomy specimens by comparison had a significant decrease in elastin signature and increased collagen type I and III. Arterial spectra were markedly different between the thoracic and carotid specimens. There was also a significant elevation (p<0.05) of collagen type I distal to the bifurcation compared to proximal tissue in the carotid specimens. Conclusion: Fluorescence

  9. Magnetic characterization of human blood in the atherosclerotic process in coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janus, B.; Bućko, M. S.; Chrobak, A.; Wasilewski, J.; Zych, M.

    2011-03-01

    In the last decades there has been an increasing interest in biomagnetism—a field of biophysics concerned with the magnetic properties of living organisms. Biomagnetism focuses on the measurement of magnetic properties of biological samples in the clinical environment. Progress in this field can provide new data for the understanding of the pathomechanism of atherosclerosis and support the diagnostic options for the evaluation and treatment of atherothrombotic complications. Lyophilized human blood samples from patients with atherosclerotic lesions (calcium scoring (CS) CS>0) and without atherosclerotic lesions (CS=0) were magnetically investigated. Magnetic measurements (performed in room and low temperature) indicated significant magnetic differences between these two groups of patients. Atherosclerotic blood samples are characterized by higher concentration of ferrimagnetic particles (magnetite and/or maghemite) and significant changes in the superparamagnetic behaviour. This research presents that magnetometry, in combination with medical research can lead to a better understanding of iron physiology in the atherosclerotic process.

  10. Combined treatment with olmesartan medoxomil and amlodipine besylate attenuates atherosclerotic lesion progression in a model of advanced atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Philipp; Uhlmann, Lorenz; Korkmaz-Icöz, Sevil; Fastner, Christian; Bea, Florian; Blessing, Erwin; Katus, Hugo A; Preusch, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Besides their blood pressure-lowering effects, olmesartan medoxomil and amlodipine besylate exhibit additional anti-inflammatory mechanisms in atherosclerosic disease. Most of the studies investigating the effects of atherosclerosis focused on early atherosclerotic lesions, whereas lesions in human disease, at the time when medical treatment is started, are already well established. Therefore, we set up a model of advanced atherosclerosis and investigated the effects of olmesartan medoxomil, amlodipine besylate, and the combination of both on atherosclerotic lesion size and lesion composition. Olmesartan medoxomil (1 mg/kg/day), amlodipine besylate (1.5 mg/kg/day), and the combination of both was added to chow and was fed to apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice at 25 weeks of age. Mice were sacrificed after 25 weeks of drug administration and perfused with formalin. Innominate arteries were dissected out and paraffin embedded. Serial sections were generated, and lesion sizes and their composition - such as minimal thickness of the fibrous cap, size of the necrotic core, and presence of calcification - were analyzed. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to detect DNA-binding activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in aortic tissue. Treatment with the combination of olmesartan medoxomil and amlodipine besylate led to a significant reduction in atherosclerotic lesion size in ApoE(-/-) mice (olmesartan medoxomil/amlodipine besylate: 122,277±6,795 μm(2), number [n]=14; versus control: 177,502±10,814 μm(2), n=9; P<0.001). Treatment with amlodipine besylate (n=5) alone did not reach significance. However, a trend toward a decrease in lesion size in the amlodipine besylate-treated animals could be observed. In the histological analysis of atherosclerotic lesion composition, significantly thicker fibrous caps were found in treatment with amlodipine besylate (amlodipine: 5.12±0.26 μm, n=6; versus control: 3.98±0.18 μm, n

  11. Deficiency of AXL in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Does Not Affect Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Proto, Jonathan D.; Matsushima, Glenn K.; Tabas, Ira

    2016-01-01

    AXL, a member of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MerTK) family of receptors, plays important roles in cell survival, clearance of dead cells (efferocytosis), and suppression of inflammation, which are processes that critically influence atherosclerosis progression. Whereas MerTK deficiency promotes defective efferocytosis, inflammation, and plaque necrosis in advanced murine atherosclerosis, the role of Axl in advanced atherosclerosis progression is not known. Towards this end, bone marrow cells from Axl−/− or wild-type mice were transplanted into lethally irradiated Ldlr−/− mice. These chimeric mice were then fed the Western-type diet (WD) for 17 weeks. We demonstrate that lesional macrophages in WT mice express Axl but that Axl deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells does not affect lesion size, cellularity, necrosis, or inflammatory parameters in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, apoptosis of lesional cells was unaffected, and we found no evidence of defective lesional efferocytosis. In contrast to previously reported findings with MerTK deficiency, hematopoietic cell-Axl deficiency in WD-fed Ldlr−/− mice does not affect the progression of advanced atherosclerosis or lesional processes associated with TAM receptor signaling. These findings suggest a heretofore unappreciated TAM receptor hierarchy in advanced atherosclerosis. PMID:27958361

  12. Deficiency of AXL in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Does Not Affect Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Proto, Jonathan D; Matsushima, Glenn K; Tabas, Ira

    2016-12-13

    AXL, a member of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MerTK) family of receptors, plays important roles in cell survival, clearance of dead cells (efferocytosis), and suppression of inflammation, which are processes that critically influence atherosclerosis progression. Whereas MerTK deficiency promotes defective efferocytosis, inflammation, and plaque necrosis in advanced murine atherosclerosis, the role of Axl in advanced atherosclerosis progression is not known. Towards this end, bone marrow cells from Axl(-/-) or wild-type mice were transplanted into lethally irradiated Ldlr(-/-) mice. These chimeric mice were then fed the Western-type diet (WD) for 17 weeks. We demonstrate that lesional macrophages in WT mice express Axl but that Axl deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells does not affect lesion size, cellularity, necrosis, or inflammatory parameters in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, apoptosis of lesional cells was unaffected, and we found no evidence of defective lesional efferocytosis. In contrast to previously reported findings with MerTK deficiency, hematopoietic cell-Axl deficiency in WD-fed Ldlr(-/-) mice does not affect the progression of advanced atherosclerosis or lesional processes associated with TAM receptor signaling. These findings suggest a heretofore unappreciated TAM receptor hierarchy in advanced atherosclerosis.

  13. 12- and 15-lipoxygenases in human carotid atherosclerotic lesions: Associations with cerebrovascular symptoms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lipoxygenase (ALOX) enzymes are implicated in both pro- and anti-atherogenic processes. The aim of this study was to investigate mRNA expression of 12- and 15-lipoxygenases (ALOX12, ALOX12B, ALOX15, ALOX15B) and the atypical ALOXE3 in human carotid atherosclerotic lesions, in relation to cerebrovasc...

  14. Expression of ACAT-1 protein in human atherosclerotic lesions and cultured human monocytes-macrophages.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, A; Sakashita, N; Lee, O; Takahashi, K; Horiuchi, S; Hakamata, H; Morganelli, P M; Chang, C C; Chang, T Y

    1998-10-01

    The acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) gene was first cloned in 1993 (Chang et al, J Biol Chem. 1993;268:20747-20755; designated ACAT-1). Using affinity-purified antibodies raised against the N-terminal portion of human ACAT-1 protein, we performed immunohistochemical localization studies and showed that the ACAT-1 protein was highly expressed in atherosclerotic lesions of the human aorta. We also performed cell-specific localization studies using double immunostaining and showed that ACAT-1 was predominantly expressed in macrophages but not in smooth muscle cells. We then used a cell culture system in vitro to monitor the ACAT-1 expression in differentiating monocytes-macrophages. The ACAT-1 protein content increased by up to 10-fold when monocytes spontaneously differentiated into macrophages. This increase occurred within the first 2 days of culturing the monocytes and reached a plateau level within 4 days of culturing, indicating that the increase in ACAT-1 protein content is an early event during the monocyte differentiation process. The ACAT-1 protein expressed in the differentiating monocytes-macrophages was shown to be active by enzyme assay in vitro. The high levels of ACAT-1 present in macrophages maintained in culture can explain the high ACAT-1 contents found in atherosclerotic lesions. Our results thus support the idea that ACAT-1 plays an important role in differentiating monocytes and in forming macrophage foam cells during the development of human atherosclerosis.

  15. High Levels of (Un)Switched Memory B Cells Are Associated With Better Outcome in Patients With Advanced Atherosclerotic Disease.

    PubMed

    Meeuwsen, John A L; van Duijvenvoorde, Amerik; Gohar, Aisha; Kozma, Maria O; van de Weg, Sander M; Gijsberts, Crystel M; Haitjema, Saskia; Björkbacka, Harry; Fredrikson, Gunilla N; de Borst, Gert J; den Ruijter, Hester M; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Binder, Christoph J; Hoefer, Imo E; de Jager, Saskia C A

    2017-09-07

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory lipid disorder and the main underlying pathology of acute ischemic events. Despite a vast amount of data from murine atherosclerosis models, evidence of B-cell involvement in human atherosclerotic disease is limited. We therefore investigated the association of circulating B-cell subtypes with the occurrence of secondary cardiovascular events in advanced atherosclerotic disease. This cohort study consists of 168 patients who were included in the Athero-Express biobank between 2009 and 2011. Before surgery, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and stored in liquid nitrogen. After gentle thawing of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells, different B-cell subtypes including naïve, (un)switched memory, and CD27(+)CD43(+) B1-like B cells, were analyzed by flow cytometry. Univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to analyze associations between B-cell subtypes, circulating antibodies and secondary cardiovascular manifestations during the 3-year follow-up period. Mean age was 70.1±9.6 years, males represented 62.8% of the population, and 54 patients had secondary manifestations during follow-up. High numbers of unswitched memory cells were protective against secondary outcome (hazard ratio, 0.30 [95% CI, 0.13-0.69]; P<0.01). Similar results were obtained for the switched memory cells that also showed to be protective against secondary outcome (hazard ratio, 0.33 [95% CI, 0.14-0.77]; P=0.01). A high number of (un)switched memory B cells is associated with better outcome following carotid artery endarterectomy. These findings suggest a potential role for B-cell subsets in prediction and prevention of secondary cardiovascular events in patients with atherosclerosis. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  16. Isolation and characterization of a complement-activating lipid extracted from human atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The major characteristics of human atherosclerotic lesions are similar to those of a chronic inflammatory reaction, namely fibrosis, mesenchymal cell proliferation, the presence of resident macrophages, and cell necrosis. Atherosclerosis exhibits in addition the feature of lipid (mainly cholesterol) accumulation. The results of the present report demonstrate that a specific cholesterol-containing lipid particle present in human atherosclerotic lesions activates the complement system to completion. Thus, lipid could represent a stimulatory factor for the inflammatory reaction, whose underlying mechanistic basis may be, at least in part, complement activation. The complement-activating lipid was purified from saline extracts of aortic atherosclerotic lesions by sucrose density gradient centrifugation followed by molecular sieve chromatography on Sepharose 2B. It contained little protein other than albumin, was 100-500 nm in size, exhibited an unesterified to total cholesterol ratio of 0.58 and an unesterified cholesterol to phospholipid ratio of 1.2. The lipid, termed lesion lipid complement (LCA), activated the alternative pathway of complement in a dose-dependent manner. Lesion-extracted low density lipoprotein (LDL) obtained during the purification procedure failed to activate complement. Specific generation of C3a desArg and C5b-9 by LCA indicated C3/C5 convertase formation with activation proceeding to completion. Biochemical and electron microscopic evaluations revealed that much of the C5b-9 present in atherosclerotic lesions is membraneous, rather than fluid phase SC5b-9. The observations reported herein establish a link between lipid insudation and inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions via the mechanism of complement activation. PMID:2373993

  17. Prednisolone-containing liposomes accumulate in human atherosclerotic macrophages upon intravenous administration

    PubMed Central

    van der Valk, Fleur M.; van Wijk, Diederik F.; Lobatto, Mark E.; Verberne, Hein J.; Storm, Gert; Willems, Martine C.M.; Legemate, Dink A.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Calcagno, Claudia; Mani, Venkatesh; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Paridaans, Maarten P.M.; Otten, Maarten J.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Nieuwdorp, Max; Schulte, Dominik M.; Metselaar, Josbert M.; Mulder, Willem J.M.; Stroes, Erik S.

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery to atherosclerotic plaques via liposomal nanoparticles may improve therapeutic agents’ risk–benefit ratios. Our paper details the first clinical studies of a liposomal nanoparticle encapsulating prednisolone (LN-PLP) in atherosclerosis. First, PLP’s liposomal encapsulation improved its pharmacokinetic profile in humans (n = 13) as attested by an increased plasma half-life of 63 h (LN-PLP 1.5 mg/kg). Second, intravenously infused LN-PLP appeared in 75% of the macrophages isolated from iliofemoral plaques of patients (n = 14) referred for vascular surgery in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. LN-PLP treatment did however not reduce arterial wall permeability or inflammation in patients with atherosclerotic disease (n = 30), as assessed by multimodal imaging in a subsequent randomized, placebo-controlled study. In conclusion, we successfully delivered a long-circulating nanoparticle to atherosclerotic plaque macrophages in patients, whereas prednisolone accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions had no anti-inflammatory effect. Nonetheless, the present study provides guidance for development and imaging-assisted evaluation of future nanomedicine in atherosclerosis. PMID:25791806

  18. Endothelin-1 and endothelin receptor mRNA expression in normal and atherosclerotic human arteries.

    PubMed

    Winkles, J A; Alberts, G F; Brogi, E; Libby, P

    1993-03-31

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoconstrictor peptide implicated in a number of human diseases including atherosclerosis. ET-1 binds to two distinct G protein-coupled receptors, known as the ETA and ETB receptor subtypes. In this study, we have examined ET-1, ETA and ETB mRNA expression levels in human vascular cells cultured in vitro and in normal and atherosclerotic human arteries. The results indicate that (a) ET-1 mRNA is constitutively expressed by endothelial cells but not by smooth muscle cells, (b) endothelial cells express only ETB mRNA but smooth muscle cells co-express ETA and ETB mRNA, and (c) in comparison to normal aorta, ET-1 mRNA expression is elevated and endothelin receptor mRNA expression is repressed in atherosclerotic lesions.

  19. Combined imaging of oxidative stress and microscopic structure reveals new features in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Lilledahl, Magnus B; Gustafsson, Håkan; Ellingsen, Pål Gunnar; Zachrisson, Helene; Hallbeck, Martin; Hagen, Vegard Stenhjem; Kildemo, Morten; Lindgren, Mikael

    2015-02-01

    Human atherosclerotic samples collected by carotid endarterectomy were investigated using electronic paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) for visualization of reactive oxygen species, and nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) to study structural features. Regions of strong EPRI signal, indicating a higher concentration of reactive oxygen species and increased inflammation, were found to colocalize with regions dense in cholesterol crystals as revealed by NLOM. © 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

  20. Combined intravascular photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging imaging of atherosclerotic calcification in human artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Chen, Zhongping

    2012-03-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is mature imaging modality to diagnose blood vessel disease, especially for calcification characterization. Based on the intrinsic optical absorption, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) works as a complementary method to IVUS. In this paper, we develop a miniature intravascular probe combined photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging. The optical components and ultrasound transducer were integrated to achieve internal illumination. Atherosclerotic human artery was imaged ex vivo, which demonstrates the imaging ability of the multi-functional probe and illustrate its clinical potential.

  1. A Proteomic Focus on the Alterations Occurring at the Human Atherosclerotic Coronary Intima*

    PubMed Central

    de la Cuesta, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Maroto, Aroa S.; Donado, Alicia; Zubiri, Irene; Posada, Maria; Padial, Luis R.; Pinto, Angel G.; Barderas, Maria G.; Vivanco, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis still represents the major cause of mortality in western societies. Initiation of atherosclerosis occurs within the intima, where major histological and molecular changes are produced during pathogenesis. So far, proteomic analysis of the atherome plaque has been mainly tackled by the analysis of the entire tissue, which may be a challenging approach because of the great complexity of this sample in terms of layers and cell type composition. Based on this, we aimed to study the intimal proteome from the human atherosclerotic coronary artery. For this purpose, we analyzed the intimal layer from human atherosclerotic coronaries, which were isolated by laser microdissection, and compared with those from preatherosclerotic coronary and radial arteries, using a two-dimensional Differential-In-Gel-Electrophoresis (DIGE) approach. Results have pointed out 13 proteins to be altered (seven up-regulated and six down-regulated), which are implicated in the migrative capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells, extracellular matrix composition, coagulation, apoptosis, heat shock response, and intraplaque hemorrhage deposition. Among these, three proteins (annexin 4, myosin regulatory light 2, smooth muscle isoform, and ferritin light chain) constitute novel atherosclerotic coronary intima proteins, because they were not previously identified at this human coronary layer. For this reason, these novel proteins were validated by immunohistochemistry, together with hemoglobin and vimentin, in an independent cohort of arteries. PMID:21248247

  2. The Impact of Macrophage Insulin Resistance on Advanced Atherosclerotic Plaque Progression

    PubMed Central

    Tabas, Ira; Tall, Alan; Accili, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    Atherothrombotic vascular disease is the major cause of death and disability in obese and diabetic subjects with insulin resistance. Although increased systemic risk factors in the setting of insulin resistance contribute to this problem, it is likely exacerbated by direct effects of insulin resistance on the arterial wall cells that participate in atherosclerosis. A critical process in the progression of atherosclerotic lesions to those that cause clinical disease is necrotic breakdown of plaques. Plaque necrosis, which is particularly prominent in the lesions of diabetics, is caused by the combination of macrophage apoptosis and defective clearance, or efferocytosis, of the apoptotic macrophages. One cause of macrophage apoptosis in advanced plaques is activation of a pro-apoptotic branch of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway known as the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). Macrophages have a functional insulin receptor signal transduction pathway, and down regulation of this pathway in the setting insulin resistance enhances UPR-induced apoptosis. Moreover, other aspects of the obesity/insulin-resistance syndrome may adversely affect efferocytosis. These processes may therefore provide an important mechanistic link among insulin resistance, plaque necrosis, and atherothrombotic vascular disease and suggest novel therapeutic approaches to this expanding health problem. PMID:20056946

  3. A fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy study of matrix metalloproteinases -2 and -9 in human atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Jennifer E.; Hatami, Nisa; Galis, Zorina S.; Baker, J. Dennis; Fishbein, Michael C.; Marcu, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2 and -9 play important roles in the progression of atherosclerosis. This study aims to determine whether MMP-2 and -9 content in the fibrotic caps of atherosclerotic plaque is correlated with plaque autofluorescence. A time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) system was used to measure the autofluorescence and assess the biochemical composition of human plaques obtained from carotid endarterectomy. Results presented here demonstrate for the first time the ability to characterize the biochemical composition as it relates to MMP-2 and -9 content in the atherosclerotic plaque cap using a label-free imaging technique implemented with a fiberoptic TR-LIFS system. PMID:21770037

  4. Ex-vivo UV autofluorescence imaging and fluorescence spectroscopy of atherosclerotic pathology in human aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, William; Williams, Maura; Franco, Walfre

    2017-02-01

    The aim of our study was to identify fluorescence excitation-emission pairs correlated with atherosclerotic pathology in ex-vivo human aorta. Wide-field images of atherosclerotic human aorta were captured using UV and visible excitation and emission wavelength pairs of several known fluorophores to investigate correspondence with gross pathologic features. Fluorescence spectroscopy and histology were performed on 21 aortic samples. A matrix of Pearson correlation coefficients were determined for the relationship between relevant histologic features and the intensity of emission for 427 wavelength pairs. A multiple linear regression analysis indicated that elastin (370/460 nm) and tryptophan (290/340 nm) fluorescence predicted 58% of the variance in intima thickness (R-squared = 0.588, F(2,18) = 12.8, p=.0003), and 48% of the variance in media thickness (R-squared = 0.483, F(2,18) = 8.42, p=.002), suggesting that endogenous fluorescence intensity at these wavelengths can be utilized for improved pathologic characterization of atherosclerotic plaques.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence: quantitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaque chemical content in human aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Erbin; Wishart, David; Khoury, Samir; Kay, Cyril M.; Jugdutt, Bodh I.; Tulip, John; Lucas, Alexandra

    1996-05-01

    We have been studying laser-induced fluorescence as a technique for identification of selected changes in the chemical composition of atherosclerotic plaque. Formulae for quantification of chemical changes have been developed based upon analysis of fluorescence emission spectra using multiple regression analysis and the principal of least squares. The intima of human aortic necropsy specimens was injected with chemical compounds present in atherosclerotic plaque. Spectra recorded after injection of selected chemical components found in plaque (collagen I, III, IV, elastin and cholesterol) at varying concentrations (0.01 - 1.0 mg) were compared with saline injection. A single fiber system was used for both fluorescence excitation (XeCl excimer laser, 308 nm, 1.5 - 2.0 mJ/ pulse, 5 Hz) and fluorescence emission detection. Average spectra for each chemical have been developed and the wavelengths of peak emission intensity identified. Curve fitting analysis as well as multiple regression analysis were used to develop formulae for assessment of chemical content. Distinctive identifying average curves were established for each chemical. Excellent correlations were identified for collagen I, III, and IV, elastin, and cholesterol (R2 equals 0.92 6- 0.997). Conclusions: (1) Fluorescence spectra of human aortas were significantly altered by collagen I, collagen III, elastin and cholesterol. (2) Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis may allow quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic plaque chemical content in situ.

  6. Ex vivo differential phase contrast and magnetic resonance imaging for characterization of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Meletta, Romana; Borel, Nicole; Stolzmann, Paul; Astolfo, Alberto; Klohs, Jan; Stampanoni, Marco; Rudin, Markus; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Herde, Adrienne Müller

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive detection of specific atherosclerotic plaque components related to vulnerability is of high clinical relevance to prevent cerebrovascular events. The feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for characterization of plaque components was already demonstrated. We aimed to evaluate the potential of ex vivo differential phase contrast X-ray tomography (DPC) to accurately characterize human carotid plaque components in comparison to high field multicontrast MRI and histopathology. Two human plaque segments, obtained from carotid endarterectomy, classified according to criteria of the American Heart Association as stable and unstable plaque, were examined by ex vivo DPC tomography and multicontrast MRI (T1-, T2-, and proton density-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging). To identify specific plaque components, the plaques were subsequently sectioned and stained for fibrous and cellular components, smooth muscle cells, hemosiderin, and fibrin. Histological data were then matched with DPC and MR images to define signal criteria for atherosclerotic plaque components. Characteristic structures, such as the lipid and necrotic core covered by a fibrous cap, calcification and hemosiderin deposits were delineated by histology and found with excellent sensitivity, resolution and accuracy in both imaging modalities. DPC tomography was superior to MRI regarding resolution and soft tissue contrast. Ex vivo DPC tomography allowed accurate identification of structures and components of atherosclerotic plaques at different lesion stages, in good correlation with histopathological findings.

  7. Relationship of MMP-14 and TIMP-3 Expression with Macrophage Activation and Human Atherosclerotic Plaque Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jason L.; Jenkins, Nicholas P.; Huang, Wei-Chun; Sala-Newby, Graciela B.; Scholtes, Vincent P. W.; Moll, Frans L.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Newby, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) promotes vulnerable plaque morphology in mice, whereas tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP-3) overexpression is protective. MMP-14hi  TIMP-3lo rabbit foam cells are more invasive and more prone to apoptosis than MMP-14lo  TIMP-3hi cells. We investigated the implications of these findings for human atherosclerosis. In vitro generated macrophages and foam-cell macrophages, together with atherosclerotic plaques characterised as unstable or stable, were examined for expression of MMP-14, TIMP-3, and inflammatory markers. Proinflammatory stimuli increased MMP-14 and decreased TIMP-3 mRNA and protein expression in human macrophages. However, conversion to foam-cells with oxidized LDL increased MMP-14 and decreased TIMP-3 protein, independently of inflammatory mediators and partly through posttranscriptional mechanisms. Within atherosclerotic plaques, MMP-14 was prominent in foam-cells with either pro- or anti-inflammatory macrophage markers, whereas TIMP-3 was present in less foamy macrophages and colocalised with CD206. MMP-14 positive macrophages were more abundant whereas TIMP-3 positive macrophages were less abundant in plaques histologically designated as rupture prone. We conclude that foam-cells characterised by high MMP-14 and low TIMP-3 expression are prevalent in rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques, independent of pro- or anti-inflammatory activation. Therefore reducing MMP-14 activity and increasing that of TIMP-3 could be valid therapeutic approaches to reduce plaque rupture and myocardial infarction. PMID:25301980

  8. Cellular imaging of human atherosclerotic lesions by intravascular electric impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Streitner, Ines; Goldhofer, Markus; Cho, Sungbo; Kinscherf, Ralf; Thielecke, Hagen; Borggrefe, Martin; Süselbeck, Tim; Streitner, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Newer techniques are required to identify atherosclerotic lesions that are prone to rupture. Electric impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is able to provide information about the cellular composition of biological tissue. The present study was performed to determine the influence of inflammatory processes in type Va (lipid core, thick fibrous cap) and Vc (abundant fibrous connective tissue while lipid is minimal or even absent) human atherosclerotic lesions on the electrical impedance of these lesions measured by EIS. EIS was performed on 1 aortic and 3 femoral human arteries at 25 spots with visually heavy plaque burden. Severely calcified lesions were excluded from analysis. A highly flexible micro-electrode mounted onto a balloon catheter was placed on marked regions to measure impedance values at 100 kHz. After paraffin embedding, visible marked cross sections (n = 21) were processed. Assessment of lesion types was performed by Movats staining. Immunostaining for CD31 (marker of neovascularisation), CD36 (scavenger cells) and MMP-3 (matrix metalloproteinase-3) was performed. The amount of positive cells was assessed semi-quantitatively. 15 type Va lesions and 6 type Vc lesions were identified. Lesions containing abundant CD36-, CD31- and MMP-3-positive staining revealed significantly higher impedance values compared to lesions with marginal or without positive staining (CD36 + 455 ± 50 Ω vs. CD36- 346 ± 53 Ω, p = 0.001; CD31 + 436 ± 43 Ω vs. CD31- 340 ± 55 Ω, p = 0.001; MMP-3 + 400 ± 68 Ω vs. MMP-3- 323 ± 33 Ω, p = 0.03). Atherosclerotic lesions with abundant neovascularisation (CD31), many scavenger receptor class B expressing cells (CD36) or high amount of MMP-3 immunoreactivity reveal significantly higher impedance values compared to lesions with marginal or no detection of immunoreactivity. Findings suggest that inflammatory processes in vulnerable plaques affect the impedance of atherosclerotic lesions and might therefore be detected by EIS.

  9. Association of serum bilirubin with oxidant damage of human atherosclerotic plaques and the severity of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lapenna, Domenico; Ciofani, Giuliano; Pierdomenico, Sante Donato; Giamberardino, Maria Adele; Ucchino, Sante; Davì, Giovanni

    2017-09-25

    Bilirubin has protective effects against atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases hypothetically due to its antioxidant-antilipoperoxidative properties. Thus, we investigated whether serum bilirubin is associated with oxidant damage, namely lipid peroxidation, of human atherosclerotic plaques and the severity of atherosclerosis. In this regard, we correlated the levels of serum total bilirubin (STB), direct (conjugated) bilirubin (SDB) and indirect (unconjugated) bilirubin (SIB) with those of fluorescent damage products of lipid peroxidation (FDPL) and lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) of 32 endarterectomy-derived carotid atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, we compared the levels of serum bilirubin and plaque lipoperoxides between two groups of patients of the study population with different severity of atherosclerosis as judged by the carotid stenosis degree, i.e., <90% (group A, n = 23) and ≥90% (group B, n = 9). Remarkably, the levels of STB were strongly inversely correlated with those of plaque FDPL (rS = -0.70, P < 0.0001) and LOOH (rS = -0.66, P < 0.0001), as were those of SIB (FDPL: rS = -0.68, P < 0.0001; LOOH: rS = -0.63, P < 0.0001). SDB had a weaker association with plaque FDPL (rS = -0.41, P < 0.05) and LOOH (rS = -0.35, P < 0.05). Moreover, the levels of STB, SDB and SIB were lower and those of plaque lipoperoxides higher in group B than in group A, pointing to the association of serum bilirubin and plaque oxidant burden with the severity of atherosclerosis. In conclusion, lowered serum bilirubin is associated with oxidant damage of human atherosclerotic plaques and the severity of atherosclerosis.

  10. Extensive demethylation of normally hypermethylated CpG islands occurs in human atherosclerotic arteries.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Díaz, Silvia A; Garay-Sevilla, María E; Hernández-González, Martha A; Solís-Martínez, Martha O; Zaina, Silvio

    2010-11-01

    Global DNA hypomethylation potentially leading to pro-atherogenic gene expression occurs in atherosclerotic lesions. However, limited information is available on the genomic location of hypomethylated sequences. We present a microarray-based survey of the methylation status of CpG islands (CGIs) in 45 human atherosclerotic arteries and 16 controls. Data from 10,367 CGIs revealed that a subset (151 or 1.4%) of these was hypermethylated in control arteries. The vast majority (142 or 94%) of this CGI subset was found to be unmethylated or partially methylated in atherosclerotic tissue, while only 17 of the normally unmethylated CGIs were hypermethylated in the diseased tissue. The most common functional classes among annotated genes adjacent to or containing differentially methylated CGIs, were transcription (23%) and signalling factors (16%). The former included HOX members, PROX1, NOTCH1 and FOXP1, which are known to regulate key steps of atherogenesis. Expression analysis revealed differential expression of all CGI-associated genes analysed. Sequence analysis identified novel DNA motifs with regulatory potential, associated with differentially methylated CGIs. This study is the first large-scale analysis of DNA methylation in atherosclerosis. Our data suggest that aberrant DNA methylation in atherosclerosis affects the transcription of critical regulatory genes for the induction of a pro-atherogenic cellular phenotype.

  11. Simulation of human atherosclerotic femoral plaque tissue: the influence of plaque material model on numerical results

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the limited number of experimental studies that mechanically characterise human atherosclerotic plaque tissue from the femoral arteries, a recent trend has emerged in current literature whereby one set of material data based on aortic plaque tissue is employed to numerically represent diseased femoral artery tissue. This study aims to generate novel vessel-appropriate material models for femoral plaque tissue and assess the influence of using material models based on experimental data generated from aortic plaque testing to represent diseased femoral arterial tissue. Methods Novel material models based on experimental data generated from testing of atherosclerotic femoral artery tissue are developed and a computational analysis of the revascularisation of a quarter model idealised diseased femoral artery from a 90% diameter stenosis to a 10% diameter stenosis is performed using these novel material models. The simulation is also performed using material models based on experimental data obtained from aortic plaque testing in order to examine the effect of employing vessel appropriate material models versus those currently employed in literature to represent femoral plaque tissue. Results Simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic aortic tissue exhibit much higher maximum principal stresses within the plaque than simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic femoral tissue. Specifically, employing a material model based on calcified aortic tissue, instead of one based on heavily calcified femoral tissue, to represent diseased femoral arterial vessels results in a 487 fold increase in maximum principal stress within the plaque at a depth of 0.8 mm from the lumen. Conclusions Large differences are induced on numerical results as a consequence of employing material models based on aortic plaque, in place of material models based on femoral plaque, to represent a diseased femoral vessel. Due to these large

  12. Expression of alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and scavenger receptor in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Luoma, J; Hiltunen, T; Särkioja, T; Moestrup, S K; Gliemann, J; Kodama, T; Nikkari, T; Ylä-Herttuala, S

    1994-01-01

    Macrophage- and smooth muscle cell (SMC)-derived foam cells are typical constituents of human atherosclerotic lesions. At least three receptor systems have been characterized that could be involved in the development of foam cells: alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/LDL receptor-related protein (alpha 2 MR/LRP), scavenger receptor, and LDL receptor. We studied the expression of these receptors in human atherosclerotic lesions with in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. An abundant expression of alpha 2MR/LRP mRNA and protein was found in SMC and macrophages in both early and advanced lesions in human aortas. alpha 2MR/LRP was also present in SMC in normal aortas. Scavenger receptor mRNA and protein were expressed in lesion macrophages but no expression was found in lesion SMC. LDL receptor was absent from the lesion area but was expressed in some aortas in medial SMC located near the adventitial border. The results demonstrate that (a) alpha 2MR/LRP is, so far, the only lipoprotein receptor expressed in lesions SMC in vivo; (b) scavenger receptors are expressed only in lesion macrophages; and (c) both receptors may play important roles in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:8182133

  13. Identification of Oxidized Phosphatidylinositols Present in OxLDL and Human Atherosclerotic Plaque.

    PubMed

    Hasanally, Devin; Edel, Andrea; Chaudhary, Rakesh; Ravandi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) plays an important role in initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Proatherogenic effects of OxLDL have been attributed to bioactive phospholipids generated during LDL oxidation. It is unknown what effect oxidation has on the phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) molecules in LDL, even though PtdIns is 6% of the total LDL phospholipid pool. We sought to identify and quantitate oxidized phosphatidylinositol (OxPtdIns) species in OxLDL and human atherosclerotic plaque. Bovine liver PtdIns was subjected to non-enzymatic and lipoxygenase-catalyzed oxidation. Reversed-phase liquid chromatography with negative ESI-MS identified and confirmed compounds by fragmentation pattern analysis from which an OxPtdIns library was generated. Twenty-three OxPtdIns molecules were identified in copper-oxidized human LDL at 0, 6, 12, 24, 30, and 48 h, and in human atherosclerotic plaque. In OxLDL, OxPtdIns species containing aldehydes and carboxylates comprised 17.3 ± 0.1 and 0.9 ± 0.2%, respectively, of total OxPtdIns in OxLDL at 48 h. Hydroperoxides and isoprostanes at 24 h (68.5 ± 0.2 and 22.8 ± 0.2%) were significantly greater than 12 h (P < 0.01) without additional changes thereafter. Hydroxides decreased with increased oxidation achieving a minimum at 24 h (5.2 ± 0.3%). Human atherosclerotic plaques contained OxPtdIns species including aldehydes, carboxylates, hydroxides, hydroperoxides and isoprostanes, comprising 18.6 ± 4.7, 1.5 ± 0.7, 16.5 ± 7.4, 33.3 ± 1.1 and 30.2 ± 3.3% of total OxPtdIns compounds. This is the first identification of OxPtdIns molecules in human OxLDL and atherosclerotic plaque. With these novel molecules identified we can now investigate their potential role in atherosclerosis.

  14. Gene expression in macrophage-rich human atherosclerotic lesions. 15-lipoxygenase and acetyl low density lipoprotein receptor messenger RNA colocalize with oxidation specific lipid-protein adducts.

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, S; Rosenfeld, M E; Parthasarathy, S; Sigal, E; Särkioja, T; Witztum, J L; Steinberg, D

    1991-01-01

    Oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein (LDL) exhibits several potentially atherogenic properties, and inhibition of LDL oxidation in rabbits decreases the rate of the development of atherosclerotic lesions. In vitro studies have suggested that cellular lipoxygenases may be involved in LDL oxidation, and we have shown previously that 15-lipoxygenase and oxidized LDL are present in rabbit atherosclerotic lesions. We now report that epitopes of oxidized LDL are also found in macrophage-rich areas of human fatty streaks as well as in more advanced human atherosclerotic lesions. Using in situ hybridization and immunostaining techniques, we also report that 15-lipoxygenase mRNA and protein colocalize to the same macrophage-rich areas. Moreover, these same lesions express abundant mRNA for the acetyl LDL receptor but no detectable mRNA for the LDL receptor. We suggest that atherogenesis in human arteries may be linked to macrophage-induced oxidative modification of LDL mediated by 15-lipoxygenase, leading to subsequent enhanced macrophage uptake, partly by way of the acetyl LDL receptor. Images PMID:2010531

  15. The influence of composition and location on the toughness of human atherosclerotic femoral plaque tissue.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, E M; Barrett, H E; Kavanagh, E G; Mongrain, R; Walsh, M T

    2016-02-01

    sections. Regression analysis highlights the potential of employing the calcified tissue content of the plaque as a preoperative tool for predicting the fracture response of a target lesion to CBA (R(2)=0.885, p<0.001). This study addresses a gap in current knowledge regarding the influence of plaque location, composition and morphology on the toughness of human femoral plaque tissue. Such information is of great importance to the continued improvement of endovascular treatments, particularly cutting balloon angioplasty (CBA), which require experimentally derived data as a framework for assessing clinical cases and advancing medical devices. This study identifies that femoral plaque tissue exhibits large inter and intra patient and location variance regarding tissue toughness. Increasing calcified plaque content is demonstrated to correlate significantly with increasing toughness. This highlights the potential for predicting target lesion toughness which may lead to an increased adoption of the CBA technique and also further the uptake of endovascular treatment. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential Inhibition of Human Atherosclerotic Plaque–Induced Platelet Activation by Dimeric GPVI-Fc and Anti-GPVI Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Jamasbi, Janina; Megens, Remco T.A.; Bianchini, Mariaelvy; Münch, Götz; Ungerer, Martin; Faussner, Alexander; Sherman, Shachar; Walker, Adam; Goyal, Pankaj; Jung, Stephanie; Brandl, Richard; Weber, Christian; Lorenz, Reinhard; Farndale, Richard; Elia, Natalie; Siess, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Background Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) is the essential platelet collagen receptor in atherothrombosis, but its inhibition causes only a mild bleeding tendency. Thus, targeting this receptor has selective antithrombotic potential. Objectives This study sought to compare compounds interfering with platelet GPVI–atherosclerotic plaque interaction to improve current antiatherothrombotic therapy. Methods Human atherosclerotic plaque–induced platelet aggregation was measured in anticoagulated blood under static and arterial flow conditions (550/s, 1,100/s, and 1,500/s). Inhibition by dimeric GPVI fragment crystallizable region of IgG (Fc) masking GPVI binding sites on collagen was compared with that of 3 anti-GPVI antibodies: BLO8-1, a human domain antibody; 5C4, a fragment antigen-binding (Fab fragment) of monoclonal rat immunoglobulin G; and m-Fab-F, a human recombinant sFab against GPVI dimers. Results GPVI-Fc reduced plaque-triggered platelet aggregation in static blood by 51%, BLO8-1 by 88%, and 5C4 by 93%. Under arterial flow conditions, BLO8-1 and 5C4 almost completely inhibited platelet aggregation while preserving platelet adhesion on plaque. Inhibition by GPVI-Fc, even at high concentrations, was less marked but increased with shear rate. Advanced optical imaging revealed rapid persistent GPVI-Fc binding to collagen under low and high shear flow, upstream and downstream of plaque fragments. At low shear particularly, platelets adhered in plaque flow niches to GPVI-Fc–free segments of collagen fibers and recruited other platelets onto aggregates via ADP and TxA2 release. Conclusions Anti-GPVI antibodies inhibit atherosclerotic plaque-induced platelet aggregation under static and flow conditions more effectively than GPVI-Fc. However, potent platelet inhibition by GPVI-Fc at a higher shear rate (1,500/s) suggests localized antithrombotic efficacy at denuded or fissured stenotic high-risk lesions without systemic bleeding. The compound-specific differences

  17. A computational fluid-structure interaction model for plaque vulnerability assessment in atherosclerotic human coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza; Haghpanahi, Mohammad

    2014-04-01

    Coronary artery disease is responsible for a third of global deaths worldwide. Computational simulations of blood flow can be used to understand the interactions of artery/plaque and blood in coronary artery disease and to better predict the rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. So far, the mechanical properties of animals' coronary artery have been mostly used for hemodynamic simulation of atherosclerotic arteries. The mechanical properties of animals' coronary arteries are often not accurate enough and can be only used for an approximate estimation and comparative assessment of the cognate parameters in human. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid-structure interactions model with three different plaque types is presented to perform a more accurate plaque vulnerability assessment for human atherosclerotic plaques. The coronary arteries of twenty-two male individuals were removed during autopsy and subjected to uniaxial tensile loading. The hyperelastic material coefficients of coronary arteries were calculated and implemented to the computational model. The fully coupled fluid and structure models were solved using the explicit dynamics finite element code LS-DYNA. The normal and shear stresses induced within the plaques were significantly affected by different plaque types. The highest von Mises (153 KPa) and shear (57 KPa) stresses were observed for hypocellular plaques, while the lowest von Mises (70 KPa) and shear (39 KPa) stresses were observed on the stiffer calcified plaques. The results suggest that the risk of plaque rupture due to blood flow is lower for cellular and hypocellular plaques, while higher for calcified plaques with low fracture stresses.

  18. Cellular Imaging of Human Atherosclerotic Lesions by Intravascular Electric Impedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Streitner, Ines; Goldhofer, Markus; Cho, Sungbo; Kinscherf, Ralf; Thielecke, Hagen; Borggrefe, Martin; Süselbeck, Tim; Streitner, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Background Newer techniques are required to identify atherosclerotic lesions that are prone to rupture. Electric impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is able to provide information about the cellular composition of biological tissue. The present study was performed to determine the influence of inflammatory processes in type Va (lipid core, thick fibrous cap) and Vc (abundant fibrous connective tissue while lipid is minimal or even absent) human atherosclerotic lesions on the electrical impedance of these lesions measured by EIS. Methods and Results EIS was performed on 1 aortic and 3 femoral human arteries at 25 spots with visually heavy plaque burden. Severely calcified lesions were excluded from analysis. A highly flexible micro-electrode mounted onto a balloon catheter was placed on marked regions to measure impedance values at 100 kHz. After paraffin embedding, visible marked cross sections (n = 21) were processed. Assessment of lesion types was performed by Movats staining. Immunostaining for CD31 (marker of neovascularisation), CD36 (scavenger cells) and MMP-3 (matrix metalloproteinase-3) was performed. The amount of positive cells was assessed semi-quantitatively. 15 type Va lesions and 6 type Vc lesions were identified. Lesions containing abundant CD36-, CD31- and MMP-3-positive staining revealed significantly higher impedance values compared to lesions with marginal or without positive staining (CD36+455±50 Ω vs. CD36- 346±53 Ω, p = 0.001; CD31+436±43 Ω vs. CD31- 340±55 Ω, p = 0.001; MMP-3+ 400±68 Ω vs. MMP-3- 323±33 Ω, p = 0.03). Conclusions Atherosclerotic lesions with abundant neovascularisation (CD31), many scavenger receptor class B expressing cells (CD36) or high amount of MMP-3 immunoreactivity reveal significantly higher impedance values compared to lesions with marginal or no detection of immunoreactivity. Findings suggest that inflammatory processes in vulnerable plaques affect the impedance of atherosclerotic lesions and

  19. STAT1 is Critical for Apoptosis in Macrophages Subjected to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Vitro and in Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesions in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Wah-Seng; Timmins, Jenelle M.; Seimon, Tracie A.; Sadler, Anthony; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Virmani, Renu; Tabas, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Background Macrophage apoptosis is a critical process in the formation of necrotic cores in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. In-vitro and in-vivo data suggest that macrophage apoptosis in advanced atheromata may be triggered by a combination of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and engagement of the type A scavenger receptor (SRA), which together induce death through a rise in cytosolic calcium and activation of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Methods and Results Using both primary peritoneal macrophages and studies in advanced atheromata in vivo, we introduce Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-1 (STAT1) as a critical and necessary component of ER stress/SRA-induced macrophage apoptosis. We show that STAT1 is serine-phosphorylated in macrophages subjected to SRA ligands and ER stress in a manner requiring cytosolic calcium, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), and TLR4. Remarkably, apoptosis was inhibited by ~80–90% (p < 0.05) by STAT1 deficiency or CaMKII inhibition. In vivo, nuclear Ser-P-STAT1 was found in macrophage-rich regions of advanced murine and human atheromata. Most importantly, macrophage apoptosis was decreased by 61% (p = 0.034) and plaque necrosis by 34% (p = 0.02) in the plaques of fat-fed Ldlr−/− mice transplanted with Stat1−/− bone marrow. Conclusions STAT1 is critical for ER stress/SRA-induced apoptosis in primary tissue macrophages and in macrophage apoptosis in advanced atheromata. These findings suggest a potentially important role for STAT1-mediated macrophage apoptosis in atherosclerotic plaque progression. PMID:18227389

  20. Serum-Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Concentrations Are Inversely Associated with Atherosclerotic Diseases in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Geissen, Markus; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Winkler, Martin S.; Geffken, Maria; Peine, Sven; Schoen, Gerhard; Debus, E. Sebastian; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Daum, Guenter

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Atherosclerotic changes of arteries are the leading cause for deaths in cardiovascular disease and greatly impair patient’s quality of life. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a signaling sphingolipid that regulates potentially pro-as well as anti-atherogenic processes. Here, we investigate whether serum-S1P concentrations are associated with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and carotid stenosis (CS). Methods and Results Serum was sampled from blood donors (controls, N = 174) and from atherosclerotic patients (N = 132) who presented to the hospital with either clinically relevant PAD (N = 102) or CS (N = 30). From all subjects, serum-S1P was measured by mass spectrometry and blood parameters were determined by routine laboratory assays. When compared to controls, atherosclerotic patients before invasive treatment to restore blood flow showed significantly lower serum-S1P levels. This difference cannot be explained by risk factors for atherosclerosis (old age, male gender, hypertension, hypercholesteremia, obesity, diabetes or smoking) or comorbidities (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, kidney insufficiency or arrhythmia). Receiver operating characteristic curves suggest that S1P has more power to indicate atherosclerosis (PAD and CS) than high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). In 35 patients, serum-S1P was measured again between one and six months after treatment. In this group, serum-S1P concentrations rose after treatment independent of whether patients had PAD or CS, or whether they underwent open or endovascular surgery. Post-treatment S1P levels were highly associated to platelet numbers measured pre-treatment. Conclusions Our study shows that PAD and CS in humans is associated with decreased serum-S1P concentrations and that S1P may possess higher accuracy to indicate these diseases than HDL-C. PMID:27973607

  1. Advances in immune-modulating therapies to treat atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Chyu, Kuang-Yuh; Shah, Prediman K

    2014-03-01

    In addition to hypercholesterolemia, innate and adaptive immune mechanisms play a critical role in atherogenesis, thus making immune-modulation therapy a potentially attractive way of managing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. These immune-modulation strategies include both active and passive immunization and confer beneficial reduction in atherosclerosis. Preclinical studies have demonstrated promising results and we review current knowledge on the complex role of the immune system and the potential for immunization as an immune-modulation therapy for atherosclerosis.

  2. Association between Human Plasma Chondroitin Sulfate Isomers and Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Zinellu, Elisabetta; Lepedda, Antonio Junior; Cigliano, Antonio; Pisanu, Salvatore; Zinellu, Angelo; Carru, Ciriaco; Bacciu, Pietro Paolo; Piredda, Franco; Guarino, Anna; Spirito, Rita; Formato, Marilena

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have evidenced variations in plasma glycosaminoglycans content in physiological and pathological conditions. In normal human plasma GAGs are present mainly as undersulfated chondroitin sulfate (CS). The aim of the present study was to evaluate possible correlations between plasma CS level/structure and the presence/typology of carotid atherosclerotic lesion. Plasma CS was purified from 46 control subjects and 47 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy showing either a soft or a hard plaque. The concentration and structural characteristics of plasma CS were assessed by capillary electrophoresis of constituent unsaturated fluorophore-labeled disaccharides. Results showed that the concentration of total CS isomers was increased by 21.4% (P < 0.01) in plasma of patients, due to a significant increase of undersulfated CS. Consequently, in patients the plasma CS charge density was significantly reduced with respect to that of controls. After sorting for plaque typology, we found that patients with soft plaques and those with hard ones differently contribute to the observed changes. In plasma from patients with soft plaques, the increase in CS content was not associated with modifications of its sulfation pattern. On the contrary, the presence of hard plaques was associated with CS sulfation pattern modifications in presence of quite normal total CS isomers levels. These results suggest that the plasma CS content and structure could be related to the presence and the typology of atherosclerotic plaque and could provide a useful diagnostic tool, as well as information on the molecular mechanisms responsible for plaque instability. PMID:22216412

  3. Association between Human Plasma Chondroitin Sulfate Isomers and Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    PubMed

    Zinellu, Elisabetta; Lepedda, Antonio Junior; Cigliano, Antonio; Pisanu, Salvatore; Zinellu, Angelo; Carru, Ciriaco; Bacciu, Pietro Paolo; Piredda, Franco; Guarino, Anna; Spirito, Rita; Formato, Marilena

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have evidenced variations in plasma glycosaminoglycans content in physiological and pathological conditions. In normal human plasma GAGs are present mainly as undersulfated chondroitin sulfate (CS). The aim of the present study was to evaluate possible correlations between plasma CS level/structure and the presence/typology of carotid atherosclerotic lesion. Plasma CS was purified from 46 control subjects and 47 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy showing either a soft or a hard plaque. The concentration and structural characteristics of plasma CS were assessed by capillary electrophoresis of constituent unsaturated fluorophore-labeled disaccharides. Results showed that the concentration of total CS isomers was increased by 21.4% (P < 0.01) in plasma of patients, due to a significant increase of undersulfated CS. Consequently, in patients the plasma CS charge density was significantly reduced with respect to that of controls. After sorting for plaque typology, we found that patients with soft plaques and those with hard ones differently contribute to the observed changes. In plasma from patients with soft plaques, the increase in CS content was not associated with modifications of its sulfation pattern. On the contrary, the presence of hard plaques was associated with CS sulfation pattern modifications in presence of quite normal total CS isomers levels. These results suggest that the plasma CS content and structure could be related to the presence and the typology of atherosclerotic plaque and could provide a useful diagnostic tool, as well as information on the molecular mechanisms responsible for plaque instability.

  4. Immunoelectron-microscopic localization of S-protein/vitronectin in human atherosclerotic wall.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, F; Rus, H G; Poruţiu, D; Ghiurca, V; Vlaicu, R

    1989-08-01

    S-protein/vitronectin is a multifunctional glycoprotein interacting with both complement activation and coagulation pathways. Its presence was investigated in 5 femoral and 5 iliac atherosclerotic human arteries, obtained at surgery, by immunoelectron microscopy using an affinity purified rabbit IgG specific for human S-protein/vitronectin. The immunoelectron dense specific deposits were found in both intimal thickenings and fibrous plaques in association with elastic fibers, collagen bundles and cell debris in the vicinity of elastin. Cell debris embedded in the collagen matrix were S-protein/vitronectin negative. S-protein/vitronectin was also absent on intact cells, lipid droplets and cholesterol clefts. All cell debris, however, was positive for C5b-9 deposits suggesting that complement activation had occurred at these sites with or without S-protein/vitronectin interaction. S-protein/vitronectin may play a role in the arterial wall defence by restricting the extent of complement activation.

  5. Cells carrying C5b-9 complement complexes in human atherosclerotic wall.

    PubMed

    Rus, H G; Niculescu, F; Poruţiu, D; Ghiurca, V; Vlaicu, R

    1989-03-01

    Fibrous plaques and intimal thickenings of 5 femoral and 5 iliac human arteries obtained at surgery were processed for indirect and double-labeling immunoelectron microscopy using an affinity purified rabbit IgG anti-C5b-9 neoantigen and the EBM 11 monoclonal antibody anti-human macrophages. The C5b-9 complexes were localized in intact cells, disintegrated cells and cell debris enmeshed in the connective tissue matrix. Some of the cell debris bearing C5b-9 deposits was found to be of macrophage origin. Endocyted or exocyted pieces of membrane with pore-forming C5b-9 complexes were also identified. Damage of cells by complement in atherosclerotic lesions may contribute to atherogenesis.

  6. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells express lipoprotein lipase in human and rabbit atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, S; Lipton, B A; Rosenfeld, M E; Goldberg, I J; Steinberg, D; Witztum, J L

    1991-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL; EC 3.1.1.34) may promote atherogenesis by producing remnant lipoproteins on the endothelial surface and by acting on lipoproteins in the artery wall. In vitro, smooth muscle cells and macrophages synthesize LPL, but in human carotid lesions only a few smooth muscle cells were reported to contain LPL protein. Endothelial cells do not synthesize LPL in vitro, but in normal arteries intense immunostaining for LPL is present on the endothelium. We used Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and immunocytochemistry of human and rabbit arteries to determine cellular distribution and the site of the synthesis of LPL in atherosclerotic lesions. Northern blot analysis showed that LPL mRNA was detectable in macrophage-derived foam cells isolated from arterial lesions of "ballooned" cholesterol-fed rabbits. In situ hybridization studies of atherosclerotic lesions with an antisense riboprobe showed a strong hybridization signal for LPL mRNA in some, but not all, lesion macrophages, which were mostly located in the subendothelial and edge areas of the lesions. Also, some smooth muscle cells in lesion areas also expressed LPL mRNA. Immunocytochemistry of frozen sections of rabbit lesions with a monoclonal antibody to human milk LPL showed intense staining for LPL protein in macrophage-rich intimal lesions. The results suggest that lesion macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells express LPL mRNA and protein. Some smooth muscle cells in the lesion areas also synthesize LPL. These data are consistent with an important role for LPL in atherogenesis. Images PMID:1719546

  7. Human macrophage scavenger receptors: Primary structure, expression, and localization in atherosclerotic lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Akiyo; Itakura, Hiroshige; Kodama, Tatsuhiko National Inst. of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo ); Naito, Makoto; Takahashi, Kiyoshi ); Ikemoto, Shinji; Asaoka, Hitoshi; Hayakawa, Ikuho ); Kanamori, Hiroshi; Takaku, Fumimaro ); Aburatani, Hiroyuki Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA ); Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kobari, Yukage; Miyai, Tatsuya ); Cohen, E.H.; Wydro, R. ); Housman, D.E. )

    1990-12-01

    Two types of cDNAs for human macrophage scavenger receptors were cloned from a cDNA library derived from the phorbol ester-treated human monocytic cell line THP-1. The type I and type II human scavenger receptors encoded by these cDNAs are homologous (73% and 71% amino acid identity) to their previously characterized bovine counterparts and consist of six domains: cytoplasmic (I), membrane-spanning (II), spacer (III), {alpha}-helical coiled-coil (IV), collagen-like (V), and a type-specific C-terminal (VI). The receptor gene is located on human chromosome 8. The human receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells mediated endocytosis of modified low density lipoproteins. Two mRNAs, 4.0 and 3.2 kilobases, have been detected in human liver, placenta, and brain. Immunohistochemical studies using an anti-peptide antibody which recognizes human scavenger receptors indicated the presence of the scavenger receptors in the macrophages of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting the involvement of scavenger receptors in atherogenesis.

  8. Selective absorption of ultraviolet laser energy by human atherosclerotic plaque treated with tetracycline

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy-Chutorian, D.; Kosek, J.; Mok, W.; Quay, S.; Huestis, W.; Mehigan, J.; Profitt, D.; Ginsburg, R.

    1985-05-01

    Tetracycline is an antibiotic that absorbs ultraviolet light at 355 nm and preferentially binds to atherosclerotic plaque both in vitro and in vivo. Tetracycline-treated human cadaveric aorta was compared with untreated aorta using several techniques: absorptive spectrophotometry; and tissue uptake of radiolabeled tetracycline, which showed 4-fold greater uptake by atheroma than by normal vessel. In addition, intravenous tetracycline administered to patients undergoing vascular surgery demonstrated characteristic fluorescence in surgically excised diseased arteries. Because of tetracycline's unique properties, the authors exposed tetracycline-treated and untreated aorta to ultraviolet laser radiation at a wavelength of 355 nm. They found enhanced ablation of tetracycline-treated atheroma compared with untreated atheroma. The plaque ablation caused by ultraviolet laser radiation was twice as extensive in tetracycline-treated vs nontreated plaque. This study demonstrates the potential of tetracycline plaque enhancement for the selective destruction of atheroma by ultraviolet laser radiation.

  9. [Immunological Analysis of Human Atherosclerotic Plaques in ex vivo Culture System].

    PubMed

    Vorobyova, D A; Lebedev, A M; Vagida, M S; Ivanova, O I; Felker, E I; Gontarenko, V N; Shpektor, A V; Margolis, L B; Vasilieva, E Yu

    2016-12-01

    to analyze the dynamics of lymphocytic composition of human atherosclerotic plaques in ex vivo culture system. The study included 15 atherosclerotic plaques obtained from patients who underwent carotid endarterectomy. Plaques were cultured as ring-shaped explants on collagen rafts in culture medium of special composition in CO2 incubator according to the previously developed technique. On day 0, and also on the 4th and 19th days of culture we extracted cells from plaque explants and analyzed B- and T-lymphocytic content of the tissue, as well as the percentage of CD16+ natural killer (NK) cells, using multichromatic flow cytometry. For this purpose we digested the explants with an original enzymatic cocktail, which allows preservation of cell surface markers, and we stained extracted cells with fluorescence-labelled monoclonal antibodies against CD45, CD3, CD19, CD4, CD8, CD16. In addition, we estimated the amount of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-)-producing T-cells by means of flow cytometry. After 4 days of culture the amount of lymphocytes in plaques explants decreased, however live lymphocytes were still preserved (2619.3 [1680.4, 3478.2] cells/100mg tissue). Viable lymphocytes population included T cells (2123.4 [484.9; 3181.2] cells/100 mg tissue), B cells (5.6 [3.4, 27.9] cell/100 mg tissue) and CD16+ NK cells (10.6 [1.8, 23.7] cell/100mg tissue). On the 4th day of culture T cells were presented by CD4+CD8- (797 [475.5, 1000.7] cells/100mg tissue, 37.5 [32.1; 46.3]%) and CD4-CD8+ (686.2 [423.6; 1158.4] cells/100 mg tissue, 45.6 [38.1; 47.9]%) populations. The percentage of CD4+CD8- T cell population decreased compared to the 1st day of culture, and this decrease correlated with the increase in CD4-CD8- T cells content (p<0.05). Additionally, after 4 days of culture we found in tissue explants both CD8+ (17.5[13.3;19.9]%) and CD8- (9.9 [6.4; 14]%) IFN--producing T-cells, however, their percentage, as well as the percentage of IL-2-producing T

  10. Cyclic Bending Contributes to High Stress in a Human Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaque and Rupture Risk

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; Tang, Dalin; Kobayashi, Shunichi; Zheng, Jie; Woodard, Pamela K.; Teng, Zhongzhao; Bach, Richard; Ku, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Many acute cardiovascular syndromes such as heart attack and stroke are caused by atherosclerotic plaque ruptures which often happen without warning. MRI-based models with fluid-structure interactions (FSI) have been introduced to perform flow and stress/strain analysis for atherosclerotic plaques and identify possible mechanical and morphological indices for accurate plaque vulnerability assessment. In this paper, cyclic bending was added to 3D FSI coronary plaque models for more accurate mechanical predictions. Curvature variation was prescribed using the data of a human left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. Five computational models were constructed based on ex vivo MRI human coronary plaque data to assess the effects of cyclic bending, pulsating pressure, plaque structure, and axial stretch on plaque stress/strain distributions. In vitro experiments using a hydrogel stenosis model with cyclical bending were performed to observe effect of cyclical bending on flow conditions. Our results indicate that cyclical bending may cause more than 100% or even up to more than 1000% increase in maximum principal stress values at locations where the plaque is bent most. Stress increase is higher when bending is coupled with axial stretch, non-smooth plaque structure, or resonant pressure conditions (zero phase angle shift). Effects of cyclic bending on flow behaviors are more modest (21.6% decrease in maximum velocity, 10.8% decrease in flow rate, maximum flow shear stress changes were < 5%). Computational FSI models including cyclic bending, plaque components and structure, axial stretch, accurate in vivo measurements of pressure, curvature, and material properties should lead to significant improvement on stress-based plaque mechanical analysis and more accurate coronary plaque vulnerability assessment. PMID:19412353

  11. Localized adhesion of monocytes to human atherosclerotic plaques demonstrated in vitro: implications for atherogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, R. N.; Johnson-Tidey, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Blood-derived macrophages in the arterial intima are a characteristic feature of active atherosclerotic plaques. Adherent monocytes on the luminal surface and increased adhesion molecules on the endothelium have suggested that specific molecular mechanisms are involved in monocyte/macrophage traffic into the arterial wall. Adhesion of human monocytes and related cell lines was therefore studied in vitro to histological sections of human plaques. At 37 degrees C, these cells bound selectively to the plaques. Binding to the endothelium occurred and was also present extensively in the diseased intima. Inhibition studies showed that the endothelial and general intimal binding had largely similar molecular properties. Strong inhibition was produced by antibodies to the monocyte-specific adhesion molecule CD14, to beta2 integrins, and to ICAM-1. Likewise, a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence was strongly inhibitory, suggesting that binding of leukocyte integrins to arterial extracellular matrix was synergistic with cell-cell interactions. A P-selectin antibody was exceptional in giving selective inhibition of endothelial adhesion, which correlates with the specific endothelial localization of this adhesion molecule. These results show that monocytes adhere to atherosclerotic plaques through the focal activation of multiple arterial wall adhesion molecules, confirming the adhesion hypothesis. A positive feedback theory for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis can be suggested, based on the ability of macrophages in the wall to activate the endothelium, induce adhesion molecules, and facilitate additional monocyte entry. The adhesion assay provides a means for the identification of adhesion inhibitors with therapeutic potential. Images Figure 2 PMID:8686764

  12. Material properties of components in human carotid atherosclerotic plaques: A uniaxial extension study

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Zhang, Yongxue; Huang, Yuan; Feng, Jiaxuan; Yuan, Jianmin; Lu, Qingsheng; Sutcliffe, Michael P.F.; Brown, Adam J.; Jing, Zaiping; Gillard, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Computational modelling to calculate the mechanical loading within atherosclerotic plaques has been shown to be complementary to defining anatomical plaque features in determining plaque vulnerability. However, its application has been partially impeded by the lack of comprehensive knowledge about the mechanical properties of various tissues within the plaque. Twenty-one human carotid plaques were collected from endarterectomy. The plaque was cut into rings, and different type of atherosclerotic tissues, including media, fibrous cap (FC), lipid and intraplaque haemorrhage/thrombus (IPH/T) was dissected for uniaxial extension testing. In total, 65 media strips from 17 samples, 59 FC strips from 14 samples, 38 lipid strips from 11 samples, and 21 IPH/T strips from 11 samples were tested successfully. A modified Mooney–Rivlin strain energy density function was used to characterize the stretch–stress relationship. The stiffnesses of media and FC are comparable, as are lipid and IPH/T. However, both media and FC are stiffer than either lipid or IPH/T. The median values of incremental Young’s modulus of media, FC, lipid and IPH/T at λ = 1 are 290.1, 244.5, 104.4, 52.9, respectively; they increase to 1019.5, 817.4, 220.7 and 176.9 at λ = 1.1; and 4302.7, 3335.0, 533.4 and 268.8 at λ = 1.15 (unit, kPa; λ, stretch ratio). The material constants of each tissue type are suggested to be: media, c1 = 0.138 kPa, D1 = 3.833 kPa and D2 = 18.803; FC, c1 = 0.186 kPa, D1 = 5.769 kPa and D2 = 18.219; lipid, c1 = 0.046 kPa, D1 = 4.885 kPa and D2 = 5.426; and IPH/T, c1 = 0.212 kPa, D1 = 4.260 kPa and D2 = 5.312. It is concluded that all soft atherosclerotic tissues are non-linear, and both media and FC are stiffer than either lipid or IPH/T. PMID:25200842

  13. Material properties of components in human carotid atherosclerotic plaques: a uniaxial extension study.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Zhang, Yongxue; Huang, Yuan; Feng, Jiaxuan; Yuan, Jianmin; Lu, Qingsheng; Sutcliffe, Michael P F; Brown, Adam J; Jing, Zaiping; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2014-12-01

    Computational modelling to calculate the mechanical loading within atherosclerotic plaques has been shown to be complementary to defining anatomical plaque features in determining plaque vulnerability. However, its application has been partially impeded by the lack of comprehensive knowledge about the mechanical properties of various tissues within the plaque. Twenty-one human carotid plaques were collected from endarterectomy. The plaque was cut into rings, and different type of atherosclerotic tissues, including media, fibrous cap (FC), lipid and intraplaque haemorrhage/thrombus (IPH/T) was dissected for uniaxial extension testing. In total, 65 media strips from 17 samples, 59 FC strips from 14 samples, 38 lipid strips from 11 samples, and 21 IPH/T strips from 11 samples were tested successfully. A modified Mooney-Rivlin strain energy density function was used to characterize the stretch-stress relationship. The stiffnesses of media and FC are comparable, as are lipid and IPH/T. However, both media and FC are stiffer than either lipid or IPH/T. The median values of incremental Young's modulus of media, FC, lipid and IPH/T at λ=1 are 290.1, 244.5, 104.4, 52.9, respectively; they increase to 1019.5, 817.4, 220.7 and 176.9 at λ=1.1; and 4302.7, 3335.0, 533.4 and 268.8 at λ=1.15 (unit, kPa; λ, stretch ratio). The material constants of each tissue type are suggested to be: media, c1=0.138kPa, D1=3.833kPa and D2=18.803; FC, c1=0.186kPa, D1=5.769kPa and D2=18.219; lipid, c1=0.046kPa, D1=4.885kPa and D2=5.426; and IPH/T, c1=0.212kPa, D1=4.260kPa and D2=5.312. It is concluded that all soft atherosclerotic tissues are non-linear, and both media and FC are stiffer than either lipid or IPH/T. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spectral characteristics of normal and atherosclerotic human coronary artery intima and media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcos, N. C.; Levy, Guy C.; Rizoiu, Ioana-Mihaela; Tomita, M.

    1994-07-01

    Efficient use and specific targeting of laser energy to atherosclerotic lesions necessitate understanding of spectral characteristics of intima and media from normal and diseased segments. We report absorption, transmission, and reflectance spectra from 19 normal and 21 diseased coronary artery segments which were obtained at autopsy within 5 to 10 h post mortem and submerged in oxygenated Ringer's solution. Spectra were obtained from the luminal surface of 1 X 1 cm full thickness arteries or bluntly dissected intima and media segments in the range 250 to 2500 nm. Water peaks were subtracted. Absorption and transmission for full thickness artery, intima, and media from normal and atherosclerotic arteries shared main bands at 1150 and 1700 nm with variation in intensity. Significant differences in reflectance showed bands at 1080, 1340, 1600, 1739 nm in normal intima and media and atherosclerotic intima but absent in media from atherosclerotic arteries. Peaks at 1340, 1600, and 1739 nm in normal intima and media are equalized in atherosclerotic intima and absent in atherosclerotic media. In conclusion, absence of reflectance at 1080, 1340, 1600, and 1739 nm in atherosclerotic media may be selectively utilized to target laser energy and ablation at intimal plaque and spare media of atherosclerotic arteries.

  15. Regression and stabilization of advanced murine atherosclerotic lesions: a comparison of LDL lowering and HDL raising gene transfer strategies.

    PubMed

    Van Craeyveld, Eline; Gordts, Stephanie C; Nefyodova, Elena; Jacobs, Frank; De Geest, Bart

    2011-06-01

    Both reductions in atherogenic lipoproteins and increases in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels may affect atherosclerosis regression. Here, the relative potential of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) lowering and HDL raising gene transfer strategies to induce regression of complex murine atherosclerotic lesions was directly compared. Male C57BL/6 LDL receptor (LDLr)(-/-) mice were fed an atherogenic diet (1.25% cholesterol and 10% coconut oil) to induce advanced atherosclerotic lesions. A baseline group was killed after 6 months and remaining mice were randomized into a control progression (Adnull or saline), an apolipoprotein (apo) A-I (AdA-I), an LDLr (AdLDLr), or a combined apo A-I/LDLr (AdA-I/AdLDLr) adenoviral gene transfer group and followed-up for another 12 weeks with continuation of the atherogenic diet. Gene transfer with AdLDLr decreased non-HDL cholesterol levels persistently by 95% (p < 0.001) compared with baseline. This drastic reduction of non-HDL cholesterol levels induced lesion regression by 28% (p < 0.001) in the aortic root and by 25% (p < 0.05) in the brachiocephalic artery at 12 weeks after transfer. Change in lesion size was accompanied by enhanced plaque stability, as evidenced by increased collagen content, reduced lesional macrophage content, a drastic reduction of necrotic core area, and decreased expression of inflammatory genes. Elevated HDL cholesterol following AdA-I transfer increased collagen content in lesions, but did not induce regression. Apo A-I gene transfer on top of AdLDLr transfer resulted in additive effects, particularly on inflammatory gene expression. In conclusion, drastic lipid lowering induced by a powerful gene transfer strategy leads to pronounced regression and stabilization of advanced murine atherosclerosis.

  16. Local axial compressive mechanical properties of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques-characterisation by indentation test and inverse finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chai, Chen-Ket; Akyildiz, Ali C; Speelman, Lambert; Gijsen, Frank J H; Oomens, Cees W J; van Sambeek, Marc R H M; van der Lugt, Aad; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2013-06-21

    The fibrous cap of an atherosclerotic plaque may be prone to rupture if the occurring stresses exceed the strength of the cap. Rupture can cause acute thrombosis and subsequent ischaemic stroke or myocardial infarction. A reliable prediction of the rupture probability is essential for the appropriate treatment of atherosclerosis. Biomechanical models, which compute stresses and strain, are promising to provide a more reliable rupture risk prediction. However, these models require knowledge of the local biomechanical properties of atherosclerotic plaque tissue. For this purpose, we examined human carotid plaques using indentation experiments. The test set-up was mounted on an inverted confocal microscope to visualise the collagen fibre structure during the tests. By using an inverse finite element (FE) approach, and assuming isotropic neo-Hookean behaviour, the corresponding Young's moduli were found in the range from 6 to 891kPa (median 30kPa). The results correspond to the values obtained by other research groups who analysed the compressive Young's modulus of atherosclerotic plaques. Collagen rich locations showed to be stiffer than collagen poor locations. No significant differences were found between the Young's moduli of structured and unstructured collagen architectures as specified from confocal collagen data. Insignificant differences between the middle of the fibrous cap, the shoulder regions, and remaining plaque tissue locations indicate that axial, compressive mechanical properties of atherosclerotic plaques are independent of location within the plaque. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Human miR-221/222 in Physiological and Atherosclerotic Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dmitry A.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of miR-221/222 is a key player in vascular biology through exhibiting its effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs). These miRNAs contribute to vascular remodeling, an adaptive process involving phenotypic and behavioral changes in vascular cells in response to vascular injury. In proliferative vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, pathological vascular remodeling plays a prominent role. The miR-221/222 cluster controls development and differentiation of ECs but inhibits their proangiogenic activation, proliferation, and migration. miR-221/222 are primarily implicated in maintaining endothelial integrity and supporting quiescent EC phenotype. Vascular expression of miR-221/222 is upregulated in initial atherogenic stages causing inhibition of angiogenic recruitment of ECs and increasing endothelial dysfunction and EC apoptosis. In contrast, these miRNAs stimulate VSMCs and switching from the VSMC “contractile” phenotype to the “synthetic” phenotype associated with induction of proliferation and motility. In atherosclerotic vessels, miR-221/222 drive neointima formation. Both miRNAs contribute to atherogenic calcification of VSMCs. In advanced plaques, chronic inflammation downregulates miR-221/222 expression in ECs that in turn could activate intralesion neoangiogenesis. In addition, both miRNAs could contribute to cardiovascular pathology through their effects on fat and glucose metabolism in nonvascular tissues such as adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscles. PMID:26221589

  18. Expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in macrophage-rich areas of human and rabbit atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, S; Lipton, B A; Rosenfeld, M E; Särkioja, T; Yoshimura, T; Leonard, E J; Witztum, J L; Steinberg, D

    1991-01-01

    The recruitment of monocyte-macrophages into the artery wall is one of the earliest events in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is a potent monocyte chemoattractant secreted by many cells in vitro, including vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells. To test whether it is expressed in the artery in vivo, we used Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and immunocytochemistry to study the expression of MCP-1 in normal and atherosclerotic human and rabbit arteries. Northern blot analysis showed that MCP-1 mRNA could be isolated from rabbit atherosclerotic lesions but not from the intima media of normal animals. Furthermore, MCP-1 mRNA was extracted from macrophage-derived foam cells isolated from arterial lesions of ballooned cholesterol-fed rabbits, whereas alveolar macrophages isolated simultaneously from the same rabbits did not express MCP-1 mRNA. MCP-1 mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization in macrophage-rich regions of both human and rabbit atherosclerotic lesions. No MCP-1 mRNA was found in sublesional medial smooth muscle cells or in normal arteries. By using immunocytochemistry, MCP-1 protein was demonstrated in human lesions, again only in macrophage-rich regions. Immunostaining of the serial sections with an antiserum against malondialdehyde-modified low density lipoprotein indicated the presence of oxidized low density lipoprotein indicated the presence of oxidized low density lipoprotein and/or other oxidation-specific lipid-protein adducts in the same areas that contained macrophages and MCP-1. We conclude that (i) MCP-1 is strongly expressed in a small subset of cells in macrophage-rich regions of human and rabbit atherosclerotic lesions and (ii) MCP-1 may, therefore, play an important role in the ongoing recruitment of monocyte-macrophages into developing lesions in vivo. Images PMID:2052604

  19. Localisation of members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family and their receptors in human atherosclerotic arteries

    PubMed Central

    Belgore, F; Blann, A; Neil, D; Ahmed, A S; Lip, G Y H

    2004-01-01

    Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mediates endothelial cell mitogenesis and enhances vascular permeability. The existence of single or multiple VEGF isoforms and receptors suggests that these proteins may have overlapping but distinct functions, which may be reflected in their cell expression and distribution. Methods: The localisation of VEGFs A–C and their receptors (VEGFRs 1–3, respectively) in 30 fresh human atherosclerotic arteries, 15 normal uterine arteries, and 15 saphenous veins using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Results: Saphenous veins showed no staining for VEGF-B or VEGFR-2. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) showed the strongest staining for VEGF-A, VEGF-B, VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 in all specimens. Conversely, VEGFR-3 and VEGF-C were predominately localised to the endothelial vasa vasorum in normal arteries, whereas medial SMCs showed the strongest staining in atherosclerotic arteries. Western blotting showed variations in VEGF protein localisation, with lower amounts of VEGF-B and VEGF-C in saphenous veins, compared with arterial tissue. Amounts of VEGF-C were lower than those of VEGF-A and VEGF-B in all specimens. Conclusion: This study provides direct evidence of the presence of VEGF proteins and receptors in human physiology and pathology, with variations in both the amounts of VEGF proteins expressed and their cellular distribution in normal arteries compared with atherosclerotic arteries. The presence of VEGFs A–C and their receptors in normal arterial tissue implies that VEGF functions may extend beyond endothelial cell proliferation. Reduced VEGFR-2 staining in atherosclerotic arteries may have implications for the atherosclerosis process and the development of vascular disease and its complications. PMID:14990597

  20. Increased platelet deposition on atherosclerotic coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    van Zanten, G H; de Graaf, S; Slootweg, P J; Heijnen, H F; Connolly, T M; de Groot, P G; Sixma, J J

    1994-01-01

    A ruptured atherosclerotic plaque leads to exposure of deeper layers of the plaque to flowing blood and subsequently to thrombus formation. In contrast to the wealth of data on the occurrence of thrombi, little is known about the reasons why an atherosclerotic plaque is thrombogenic. One of the reasons is the relative inaccessibility of the atherosclerotic plaque. We have circumvented this problem by using 6-microns cryostat cross sections of human coronary arteries. These sections were mounted on coverslips that were exposed to flowing blood in a rectangular perfusion chamber. In normal-appearing arteries, platelet deposition was seen on the luminal side of the intima and on the adventitia. In atherosclerotic arteries, strongly increased platelet deposition was seen on the connective tissue of specific parts of the atherosclerotic plaque. The central lipid core of an advanced plaque was not reactive towards platelets. The results indicate that the atherosclerotic plaque by itself is more thrombogenic than the normal vessel wall. To study the cause of the increased thrombus formation on the atherosclerotic plaque, perfusion studies were combined with immunohistochemical studies. Immunohistochemical studies of adhesive proteins showed enrichment of collagen types I, III, V, and VI, vitronectin, fibronectin, fibrinogen/fibrin, and thrombospondin in the atherosclerotic plaque. Laminin and collagen type IV were not enriched. von Willebrand Factor (vWF) was not present in the plaque. The pattern of increased platelet deposition in serial cross sections corresponded best with areas in which collagen types I and III were enriched, but there were also areas in the plaque where both collagens were enriched but no increased reactivity was seen. Inhibition of platelet adhesion with a large range of antibodies or specific inhibitors showed that vWF from plasma and collagen types I and/or III in the plaque were involved. Fibronectin from plasma and fibronectin, fibrinogen

  1. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA and protein in atherosclerotic lesions of rabbits and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, M. E.; Ylä-Herttuala, S.; Lipton, B. A.; Ord, V. A.; Witztum, J. L.; Steinberg, D.

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the authors demonstrate the expression of mRNA and the presence of protein for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF) in atherosclerotic lesions from humans and rabbits. In situ hybridization of serial sections of human fatty streaks demonstrated expression of MCSF mRNA by cells dispersed throughout the lesions. Immunocytochemical staining with a panel of MCSF-specific antibodies showed extensive cell-associated staining of all of the cell types in the lesions. Immunocytochemical studies of atherosclerotic lesions from Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) and cholesterol-fed rabbits demonstrated a similar cell-associated pattern of staining. There was no MCSF-specific staining of aortas from normal rabbits or of cultured aortic smooth muscle cells from either humans or rabbits. Macrophage-derived foam cells (MFC) were isolated from the aortas of ballooned, cholesterol-fed rabbits. A Northern blot demonstrated that RNA isolated from the MFC hybridized with a human cDNA probe for MCSF. RNA from alveolar macrophages isolated simultaneously from the same rabbits did not hybridize with the MCSF probe. Conditioned media from an 18- to 24-hour incubation of the MFC contained colony-stimulating activity as demonstrated in a mouse bone marrow culture assay. Most of this colony-stimulating activity was neutralized by preincubating the conditioned media with an MCSF-specific antibody. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:1739123

  2. Human serum albumin Cys34 oxidative modifications following infiltration in the carotid atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Lepedda, Antonio Junior; Zinellu, Angelo; Nieddu, Gabriele; De Muro, Pierina; Carru, Ciriaco; Spirito, Rita; Guarino, Anna; Piredda, Franco; Formato, Marilena

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate if the prooxidant environment present in atherosclerotic plaque may oxidatively modify filtered albumin. Fluorescein-5-maleimide labelled plasma samples and plaque extracts from 27 patients who had undergone carotid endarterectomy were analysed through nonreducing SDS-PAGE for albumin-Cys(34) oxidation. Furthermore, degree and pattern of S-thiolation in both circulating and plaque-filtered albumin were assayed. Albumin filtered in the atherosclerotic plaque showed higher levels of Cys(34) oxidative modifications than the corresponding circulating form as well as different patterns of S-thiolation. Data indicate that the circulating albumin, once filtered in plaque, undergoes Cys(34) oxidative modifications and demonstrate for the first time that albumin is a homocysteine and cysteinylglycine vehicle inside the plaque environment.

  3. Human Serum Albumin Cys34 Oxidative Modifications following Infiltration in the Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Zinellu, Angelo; De Muro, Pierina; Carru, Ciriaco; Spirito, Rita; Guarino, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate if the prooxidant environment present in atherosclerotic plaque may oxidatively modify filtered albumin. Methods. Fluorescein-5-maleimide labelled plasma samples and plaque extracts from 27 patients who had undergone carotid endarterectomy were analysed through nonreducing SDS-PAGE for albumin-Cys34 oxidation. Furthermore, degree and pattern of S-thiolation in both circulating and plaque-filtered albumin were assayed. Results. Albumin filtered in the atherosclerotic plaque showed higher levels of Cys34 oxidative modifications than the corresponding circulating form as well as different patterns of S-thiolation. Conclusions. Data indicate that the circulating albumin, once filtered in plaque, undergoes Cys34 oxidative modifications and demonstrate for the first time that albumin is a homocysteine and cysteinylglycine vehicle inside the plaque environment. PMID:24738021

  4. Lipoprotein lipase is synthesized by macrophage-derived foam cells in human coronary atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, K D; Gordon, D; Deeb, S; Ferguson, M; Chait, A

    1992-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hydrolyzes the core triglycerides of lipoproteins, thereby playing a role in their maturation. LPL may be important in the metabolic pathways that lead to atherosclerosis, since it is secreted in vitro by both of the predominant cell types of the atherosclerotic plaque, i.e., macrophages and smooth muscle cells. Because of uncertainty concerning the primary cellular source of LPL in atherosclerotic lesions, in situ hybridization assays for LPL mRNA were performed on 12 coronary arteries obtained from six cardiac allograft recipients. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells were identified on adjacent sections with cell-specific antibodies and foam cells were identified morphologically. LPL protein was localized using a polyclonal antibody. LPL mRNA was produced by a proportion of plaque macrophages, particularly macrophage-derived foam cells, but was not detected in association with any intimal or medial smooth muscle cells. These findings were confirmed by combined immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization on the same tissue sections. LPL protein was detected in association with macrophage-derived foam cells, endothelial cells, adventitial adipocytes, and medial smooth muscle cells, and, to a lesser extent, in intimal smooth muscle cells and media underlying well-developed plaque. These results indicate that macrophage-derived foam cells are the primary source of LPL in atherosclerotic plaques and are consistent with a role for LPL in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Images PMID:1569193

  5. 3-D reconstruction of tissue components for atherosclerotic human arteries using ex vivo high-resolution MRI.

    PubMed

    Auer, Martin; Stollberger, Rudolf; Regitnig, Peter; Ebner, Franz; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2006-03-01

    Automatic computer-based methods are well suited for the image analysis of the different components in atherosclerotic plaques. Although several groups work on such analysis some of the methods used are oversimplified and require improvements when used within a computational framework for predicting meaningful stress and strain distributions in the heterogeneous arterial wall under various loading conditions. Based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of excised atherosclerotic human arteries and a series of two-dimensional (2-D) contours we present a segmentation tool that permits a three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of the most important tissue components of atherosclerotic arteries. The underlying principle of the proposed approach is a model-based snake algorithm for identifying 2-D contours, which uses information about the plaque composition and geometric data of the tissue layers. Validation of the computer-generated tissue boundaries is performed with 100 MR images, which are compared with the results of a manual segmentation performed by four experts. Based on the Hausdorff distance and the average distance for computer-to-expert differences and the interexpert differences for the outer boundary of the adventitia, the adventitia-media, media-intima, intima-lumen and calcification boundaries are less than 1 pixel (0.234 mm). The percentage statistic shows similar results to the modified Williams index in terms of accuracy. Except for the identification of lipid-rich regions the proposed algorithm is automatic. The nonuniform rational B-spline-based computer-generated 3-D models of the individual tissue components provide a basis for clinical and computational analysis.

  6. Characterization of fracture behavior of human atherosclerotic fibrous caps using a miniature single edge notched tensile test.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lindsey A; Stewart, Samantha E; Carsten, Christopher G; Snyder, Bruce A; Sutton, Michael A; Lessner, Susan M

    2016-10-01

    One well-established cause of ischemic stroke is atherosclerotic plaque rupture in the carotid artery. Rupture occurs when a tear in the fibrous cap exposes highly thrombogenic material in the lipid core. Though some fibrous cap material properties have been measured, such as ultimate tensile strength and stress-strain responses, there has been very little, if any, data published regarding the fracture behavior of atherosclerotic fibrous caps. This study aims to characterize the qualitative and quantitative fracture behavior of human atherosclerotic plaque tissue obtained from carotid endarterectomy samples using two different metrics. Uniaxial tensile experiments along with miniature single edge notched tensile (MSENT) experiments were performed on strips of isolated fibrous cap. Crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) and stress in the un-cracked segment (UCS) were measured at failure in fibrous cap MSENT specimens subjected to uniaxial tensile loading. Both CTOD and the degree of crack blunting, measured as the radius of curvature of the crack tip, increased as tearing propagated through the tissue. Higher initial stress in the UCS is significantly correlated with higher collagen content and lower macrophage content in the fibrous cap (ρ=0.77, P=0.009; ρ=-0.64, P=0.047; respectively). Trends in the data show that higher CTOD is inversely related to collagen content, though the sample size in this study is insufficient to statistically substantiate this relationship. To the authors' knowledge, this is the pioneering study examining the fracture behavior of fibrous caps and the first use of the CTOD metric in vascular tissue. A tear in the fibrous cap of atherosclerotic plaque can lead to ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction. While there is some information in the literature regarding quantitative measures of fibrous cap failure, there is little information regarding the behavior of the tissue during failure. This study examines the failure behavior of fibrous

  7. In vivo MRI-based simulation of fatigue process: a possible trigger for human carotid atherosclerotic plaque rupture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Atherosclerotic plaque is subjected to a repetitive deformation due to arterial pulsatility during each cardiac cycle and damage may be accumulated over a time period causing fibrous cap (FC) fatigue, which may ultimately lead to rupture. In this study, we investigate the fatigue process in human carotid plaques using in vivo carotid magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Method Twenty seven patients with atherosclerotic carotid artery disease were included in this study. Multi-sequence, high-resolution MR imaging was performed to depict the plaque structure. Twenty patients were found with ruptured FC or ulceration and 7 without. Modified Paris law was used to govern crack propagation and the propagation direction was perpendicular to the maximum principal stress at the element node located at the vulnerable site. Results The predicted crack initiations from 20 patients with FC defect all matched with the locations of the in vivo observed FC defect. Crack length increased rapidly with numerical steps. The natural logarithm of fatigue life decreased linearly with the local FC thickness (R2 = 0.67). Plaques (n=7) without FC defect had a longer fatigue life compared with those with FC defect (p = 0.03). Conclusion Fatigue process seems to explain the development of cracks in FC, which ultimately lead to plaque rupture. PMID:23617791

  8. Genome-wide analysis of LXRα activation reveals new transcriptional networks in human atherosclerotic foam cells.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Radmila; Fischer, Cornelius; Kodelja, Vitam; Behrens, Sarah; Haas, Stefan; Vingron, Martin; Timmermann, Bernd; Geikowski, Anne; Sauer, Sascha

    2013-04-01

    Increased physiological levels of oxysterols are major risk factors for developing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Lipid-loaded macrophages, termed foam cells, are important during the early development of atherosclerotic plaques. To pursue the hypothesis that ligand-based modulation of the nuclear receptor LXRα is crucial for cell homeostasis during atherosclerotic processes, we analysed genome-wide the action of LXRα in foam cells and macrophages. By integrating chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) and gene expression profile analyses, we generated a highly stringent set of 186 LXRα target genes. Treatment with the nanomolar-binding ligand T0901317 and subsequent auto-regulatory LXRα activation resulted in sequence-dependent sharpening of the genome-binding patterns of LXRα. LXRα-binding loci that correlated with differential gene expression revealed 32 novel target genes with potential beneficial effects, which in part explained the implications of disease-associated genetic variation data. These observations identified highly integrated LXRα ligand-dependent transcriptional networks, including the APOE/C1/C4/C2-gene cluster, which contribute to the reversal of cholesterol efflux and the dampening of inflammation processes in foam cells to prevent atherogenesis.

  9. Hyperspectral characterization of atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeberg, Lise L.; Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Aksnes, Astrid; Haugen, Olav A.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2009-07-01

    Imaging modalities like hyperspectral imaging create large amounts of data. Time efficient, automated analytic techniques are therefore required to enjoy the power of such methods. In this study it was investigated if hyperspectral imaging followed by automated noise filtering and statistical image analysis is a suitable method for characterization of the macroscopic structure of atherosclerotic lesions. Ten human aorta samples (6×8 cm) were collected during autopsy. Hyperspectral white light and fluorescence images and 5 - 6 biopsies were collected from each sample. The biopsies were stained (HES, Sudan red), and grouped according to histology. All images were noise filtered and normalized. Fluorescence spectra were collected from all biopsied regions, and used to compute average spectra for each histological group. Supervised classification was performed using Spectral angle mapping (SAM) with the average spectra as endmembers. K-means- and ISO-data clustering was used for unsupervised classification. The results show that noise filtering and normalization is essential for reliable classification. Supervised classification was in general found to perform better than unsupervised classification. However, the SAM results strongly depend on the variation in the spectra used to compute the average endmember spectra. The analysis show that fatty deposits, calcifications, connective tissue and hemoglobin can be identified. The lesions were found to have a complex structure where vulnerable regions could be found next to stabile regions within the same lesion. In conclusion hyperspectral imaging, automated filtering and -analysis was found to be a suitable tool to classify advanced atherosclerotic lesions.

  10. An Experimental Study on the Ultimate Strength of the Adventitia and Media of Human Atherosclerotic Carotid Arteries in Circumferential and Axial Directions

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Tang, Dalin; Zheng, Jie; Woodard, Pamela K.; Hoffman, Allen H.

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque may rupture without warning causing heart attack or stroke. Knowledge of the ultimate strength of human atherosclerotic tissues is essential for understanding the rupture mechanism and predicting cardiovascular events. Despite its great importance, experimental data on ultimate strength of human atherosclerotic carotid artery remains very sparse. This study determined the uniaxial tensile strength of human carotid artery sections containing type II and III lesions (AHA classifications). Axial and circumferential oriented adventitia, media and intact specimens (total=73) were prepared from 6 arteries. The ultimate strength in uniaxial tension was taken as the peak stress recorded when the specimen showed the first evidence of failure and the extensibility was taken as the stretch ratio at failure. The mean adventitia strength values calculated using the 1st Piola-Kirchoff stress were 1996±867kPa and 1802±703kPa in the axial and circumferential directions respectively, while the corresponding values for the media sections were 519±270kPa and 1230±533kPa. The intact specimens showed ultimate strengths similar to media in circumferential direction but were twice as strong as the media in the axial direction. Results also indicated that adventitia, media and intact specimens exhibited similar extensibility at failure, in both the axial and circumferential directions (stretch ratio 1.50 +/−0.22). These measurements of the material strength limits for human atherosclerotic carotid arteries could be useful in improving computational models that assess plaque vulnerability. PMID:19665126

  11. Is Cadmium Exposure Associated with the Burden, Vulnerability and Rupture of Human Atherosclerotic Plaques?

    PubMed Central

    Sallsten, Gerd; Lundh, Thomas; Barregard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The general population is exposed to cadmium from food and smoking. Cadmium is a widely spread toxic pollutant that seems to be associated with cardiovascular diseases, although little is known if it contributes to the occurrence of atherosclerotic plaques and the process whereby plaques become vulnerable and are prone to rupture. We tested the hypotheses that cadmium exposure is associated not only with an increased subclinical burden of atherosclerotic plaques in different vascular territories and early signs of plaque vulnerability, but also with cadmium content and plaque-rupture in the clinical phase of the disease. Ultrasound technique was used to measure plaque prevalence and echogenicity in the carotid and femoral arteries in a population sample of women (n = 599) in whom blood cadmium was measured. In addition cadmium was measured in snap-frozen endarterectomies and whole blood obtained from patients who were referred to surgery because of symptomatic carotid plaques (n = 37). Sixteen endarterectomies were divided into three parts corresponding to different flow conditions and plaque vulnerability. In the population sample blood cadmium was associated with the number of vascular territories with plaques (p = 0.003 after adjustment for potential confounders). The cadmium concentrations in symptomatic plaques were 50-fold higher in plaque tissue than in blood. Cadmium levels in blood and plaque correlated, also after adjustment for smoking and other cardiovascular risk factors (p<0.001). Compared with the other parts of the plaque, the cadmium content was double as high in the part where plaque rupture usually occurs. In conclusion, the results show that cadmium exposure is associated with the burden of subclinical atherosclerosis in middle-aged women with different degrees of glucose tolerance, and that the content of cadmium in symptomatic plaques in patients is related to that in blood, but much higher, and preferentially located in the part of plaque

  12. Lipoprotein(a) Promotes Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Dedifferentiation in Atherosclerotic Lesions of Human Apo(a) Transgenic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Unoki, Hiroyuki; Sun, Huijun; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Marcovina, Santica; Shikama, Hisataka; Watanabe, Teruo; Fan, Jianglin

    2002-01-01

    Elevated plasma lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels constitute an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism underlying Lp(a) atherogenicity is unclear. Recently, we demonstrated that Lp(a) may potentially be proatherogenic in transgenic rabbits expressing human apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)]. In this study, we further investigated atherosclerotic lesions of transgenic rabbits by morphometry and immunohistochemistry. On a cholesterol diet, human apo(a) transgenic rabbits had more extensive atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta, carotid artery, iliac artery, and coronary artery than did nontransgenic littermate rabbits as defined by increased intimal lesion area. Enhanced lesion development in transgenic rabbits was characterized by increased accumulation of smooth muscle cells, that was often associated with the Lp(a) deposition. To explore the possibility that Lp(a) may be involved in the smooth-muscle cell phenotypic modulation, we stained the lesions using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against smooth-muscle myosin heavy-chain isoforms (SM1, SM2, and SMemb) and basic transcriptional element binding protein-2 (BTEB2). We found that a large number of smooth muscle cells located in the apo(a)-containing areas of transgenic rabbits were positive for SMemb and BTEB2, suggesting that these smooth muscle cells were either immature or in the state of activation. In addition, transgenic rabbits showed delayed fibrinolytic activity accompanied by increased plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. We conclude that Lp(a) may enhance the lesion development by mediating smooth muscle cell proliferation and dedifferentiation possibly because of impaired fibrinolytic activity. PMID:11786416

  13. A negative correlation between human carotid atherosclerotic plaque progression and plaque wall stress: in vivo MRI-based 2D/3D FSI models.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dalin; Yang, Chun; Mondal, Sayan; Liu, Fei; Canton, Gador; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Yuan, Chun

    2008-01-01

    It is well accepted that atherosclerosis initiation and progression correlate positively with low and oscillating flow wall shear stresses (FSS). However, this mechanism cannot explain why advanced plaques continue to grow under elevated FSS conditions. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based 2D/3D multi-component models with fluid-structure interactions (FSI, 3D only) for human carotid atherosclerotic plaques were introduced to quantify correlations between plaque progression measured by wall thickness increase (WTI) and plaque wall (structure) stress (PWS) conditions. A histologically validated multi-contrast MRI protocol was used to acquire multi-year in vivo MRI images. Our results using 2D models (200-700 data points/patient) indicated that 18 out of 21 patients studied showed significant negative correlation between WTI and PWS at time 2 (T2). The 95% confidence interval for the Pearson correlation coefficient is (-0.443,-0.246), p<0.0001. Our 3D FSI model supported the 2D correlation results and further indicated that combining both plaque structure stress and flow shear stress gave better approximation results (PWS, T2: R(2)=0.279; FSS, T1: R(2)=0.276; combining both: R(2)=0.637). These pilot studies suggest that both lower PWS and lower FSS may contribute to continued plaque progression and should be taken into consideration in future investigations of diseases related to atherosclerosis.

  14. A Negative Correlation between Human Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaque Progression and Plaque Wall Stress: In Vivo MRI-Based 2D/3D FSI Models

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dalin; Yang, Chun; Mondal, Sayan; Liu, Fei; Canton, Gador; Hatsukami, Thomas S.; Yuan, Chun

    2008-01-01

    It is well accepted that atherosclerosis initiation and progression correlate positively with low and oscillating flow wall shear stresses (FSS). However, this mechanism cannot explain why advanced plaques continue to grow under elevated FSS conditions. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based 2D/3D multi-component models with fluid-structure interactions (FSI, 3D only) for human carotid atherosclerotic plaques were introduced to quantify correlations between plaque progression measured by wall thickness increase (WTI) and plaque wall (structure) stress (PWS) conditions. A histologically validated multi-contrast MRI protocol was used to acquire multi-year in vivo MRI images. Our results using 2D models (200–700 data points/patient) indicated that 18 out of 21 patients studied showed significant negative correlation between WTI and PWS at time 2 (T2). The 95% confidence interval for the Pearson correlation coefficient is (−0.443, −0.246), p < 0.0001. Our 3D FSI model supported the 2D correlation results and further indicated that combining both plaque structure stress and flow shear stress gave better approximation results (PWS, T2: R2 = 0.279; FSS, T1: R2 = 0.276; Combining both: R2 = 0.637). These pilot studies suggest that both lower PWS and lower FSS may contribute to continued plaque progression and should be taken into consideration in future investigations of diseases related to atherosclerosis. PMID:18191138

  15. Layer-specific damage experiments and modeling of human thoracic and abdominal aortas with non-atherosclerotic intimal thickening.

    PubMed

    Weisbecker, Hannah; Pierce, David M; Regitnig, Peter; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2012-08-01

    Many treatments for cardiovascular diseases include an endovascular insertion of stents or stent grafts into arteries, a procedure which may cause high tissue stresses and even damage in the arterial wall. In order to study such problems by using finite element methods, both appropriate constitutive models and experimental data on human tissue samples are required. Layer-specific experimental data for human tissue tested up to the supra-physiological loading range are rare in the literature. In this study, intact and layer-separated experimental data from uniaxial extension tests are presented for human thoracic and abdominal aortas with non-atherosclerotic intimal thickening undergoing supra-physiological loading. A novel pseudo-elastic damage model, proposed to describe discontinuous softening in aortic arterial tissues, is fit to the obtained experimental data. Fitting of the model with and without consideration of damage accumulation in the non-collagenous matrix material reveals that tissue damage is primarily related to the collagen fiber fabric. By employing the fit model, the effect of aortic tissue pre-conditioning on the material parameters from the resulting data fits is evaluated. Histological examination of the collagen fibers under different applied stretches is used to gain more insights into the structural changes of the tissue under supra-physiological loading.

  16. Non-invasive assessment of atherosclerotic plaques effects on the segment-to-segment human carotid visco-elasticity and filtering.

    PubMed

    Bia, D; Pessana, F; Forcada, P; Zócalo, Y; Kotliar, C; Armentano, R L

    2010-01-01

    Although a variety of factors have been proposed as key factors of the atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability, the mechanisms that contribute to this problem are not yet fully characterized. In previous works we demonstrated that changes in arterial wall viscosity and elasticity and/or in the filtering function (FF) could be in the basis of arterial wall alterations. If these properties are altered in arterial wall with atherosclerotic plaques remain to be analyzed. Our aims were to analyze, the arterial wall visco-elasticity and FF of human carotid arteries with atherosclerotic plaques. To this end, instantaneous arterial diameter waveforms were obtained non-invasively (B-Mode Echography), in five sites (S1-S5) on the carotid artery. After that, diameter waveform obtained in S1 (first segment of the common carotid artery) was calibrated using pressure values, and used to quantify the pressure-diameter relationship for each segment. From pressure-diameter relationships, viscosity, elasticity and FF were quantified. Central portions of atherosclerotic plaques showed a reduced FF. At least in theoretical terms, the FF reduction could be related with the plaque vulnerability.

  17. Assessment of human atherosclerotic carotid plaque components with multisequence MR imaging: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Cappendijk, Vincent C; Cleutjens, Kitty B J M; Kessels, Alfons G H; Heeneman, Sylvia; Schurink, Geert Willem H; Welten, Rob J T J; Mess, Werner H; Daemen, Mat J A P; van Engelshoven, Jos M A; Kooi, M Eline

    2005-02-01

    To prospectively determine, by using a stepwise logistic regression model, the optimal magnetic resonance (MR) weighting (ie, pulse sequence) combinations for plaque assessment and corresponding cutoff values of relative signal intensities (rSIs). Institutional review board approval and patient consent were obtained. Eleven patients (seven men, four women; mean age +/- standard deviation, 68 years +/- 4) with symptomatic carotid disease and stenosis of more than 70% were investigated at MR imaging before carotid endarterectomy. The MR images were matched with histologic features of the endarterectomy specimens (reference standard). The rSIs (compared with that of muscle tissue) from regions of interest were assessed qualitatively and semiquantitatively. For all major components (calcification, lipid core, intraplaque hemorrhage, and fibrous tissue), optimal cutoff points for the rSIs were determined for five MR weightings by means of receiver operating characteristic curves. The best predicting combinations of these five dichotomized MR weightings were selected by means of stepwise logistic regression analysis. The potential sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for vulnerable plaque with hemorrhage and/or lipid core were determined. The same optimal MR weighting combinations for identifying the four plaque components were found with qualitative and semiquantitative analysis. Sensitivity and specificity for vulnerable plaque were 93% (95% confidence interval: 77%, 99%) and 96% (95% confidence interval: 86%, 100%), respectively, for the qualitative analysis and 76% (95% confidence interval: 56%, 90%) and 100% (95% confidence interval: 93%, 100%) for the semiquantitative analysis. This study demonstrates the potential of a systematic approach of atherosclerotic plaque assessment with multisequence MR imaging by using the information provided from five different MR weightings in a stepwise logistic regression model. (c) RSNA, 2005.

  18. Ultrastructure of the human aortic fibrolipid lesion. Formation of the atherosclerotic lipid-rich core.

    PubMed Central

    Bocan, T. M.; Schifani, T. A.; Guyton, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of the atherosclerotic lipid-rich core has been elucidated by electron microscopy of the core region in small, raised fibrolipid lesions. The relationship among lipid deposits, extracellular matrix, and cells found in distinct regions of the fibrolipid lesion was examined. Extracellular lipid droplets, verified by osmium-thiocarbohydrazide-osmium staining, made up approximately 40% of the lipid-rich core volume. The lipid droplets were often found distinctly associated with elastin and/or collagen; these associations were dependent upon the location examined within or near the lipid-rich core. Within areas of intense extracellular lipid deposits, crystalline clefts suggesting cholesterol monohydrate were observed. Stereologic analysis of the lipid-rich core components revealed marked reductions in the volume fractions of cells, reticular ground substance, and basement membrane; while the extent of extracellular lipid increased 7-10-fold. Eleven percent or less of lipid in the core region was found within cells, usually smooth muscle cells. Above the core region in the lesion cap, monocyte-macrophage foam cells were prominent. Cellular lipid droplets were much larger (profile diameters sixfold higher) than extracellular droplets. With these data as well as transitional morphologic features at the boundaries of the core region, it is suggested that the abundant extracellular lipid does not derive from cell necrosis, and lipid deposition in association with extracellular matrix constituents is an early event in the development of the lipid-rich core. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3717297

  19. Regional differences in the distribution of the proteoglycans biglycan and decorin in the extracellular matrix of atherosclerotic and restenotic human coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Riessen, R.; Isner, J. M.; Blessing, E.; Loushin, C.; Nikol, S.; Wight, T. N.

    1994-01-01

    Proteoglycans are important constituents of blood vessels and accumulate in various forms of vascular disease. Little is known concerning the proteoglycan composition of restenotic lesions formed after angioplasty and whether the proteoglycan composition of these lesions differs from that of primary atherosclerosis. Accordingly, we sought to characterize the distribution of two proteoglycans, biglycan and decorin, in primary atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions of human coronary arteries. Restenosis (n = 37) and primary (n = 11) lesions obtained from 48 patients by directional atherectomy of human coronary arteries were stained with antibodies against biglycan and decorin. To further characterize the extracellular matrix of restenotic tissues, we studied the co-distribution of these proteoglycans with collagen types I, III, and IV. The loose fibroproliferative tissue seen predominantly in restenosis lesions consistently stained positively for biglycan in patterns of deposition ranging from disseminated to homogeneous. The density and intensity of biglycan staining was correlated with the density of collagen type I and III fiber networks, both of which were observed to interweave among the loose fibroproliferative tissue. The compact connective tissue of primary atherosclerotic plaque was characterized by strong biglycan staining which co-localized with intense collagen type I and III staining. Only basement membrane-like structures rich in collagen type IV demonstrated negative biglycan staining. In contrast, loose fibroproliferative tissue exhibited no significant staining for decorin. Strong immunostaining for decorin, however, was found in primary atherosclerotic plaque. There are thus regional differences in the distribution of extracellular matrix proteoglycans of restenotic and primary human atherosclerotic lesions; these observations suggest that differences established for the biological roles of biglycan and decorin in other organ systems may extend as

  20. A Combination of Constitutive Damage Model and Artificial Neural Networks to Characterize the Mechanical Properties of the Healthy and Atherosclerotic Human Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Alireza; Rahmati, Seyed Mohammadali; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2017-02-02

    It has been indicated that the content and structure of the elastin and collagen of the arterial wall can subject to a significant alteration due to the atherosclerosis. Consequently, a high tissue stiffness, stress, and even damage/rupture are triggered in the arterial wall. Although many studies so far have been conducted to quantify the mechanical properties of the coronary arteries, none of them consider the role of collagen damage of the healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arterial walls. Recently, a fiber family-based constitutive equation was proposed to capture the anisotropic mechanical response of the healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arteries via both the histostructural and uniaxial data. In this study, experimental mechanical measurements along with histological data of the healthy and atherosclerotic arterial walls were employed to determine the constitutive damage parameters and remodeling of the collagen fibers. To do this, the preconditioned arterial tissues were excised from human cadavers within 5-h postmortem, and the mean angle of their collagen fibers was precisely determined. Thereafter, a group of quasistatic axial and circumferential loadings were applied to the arterial walls, and the constrained nonlinear minimization method was employed to identify the arterial parameters according to the axial and circumferential extension data. The remodeling of the collagen fibers during the tensile test was also predicted via Artificial Neural Networks algorithm. Regardless of loading direction, the results presented a noteworthy load-bearing capability and stiffness of the atherosclerotic arteries compared to the healthy ones (P < 0.005). Theoretical fiber angles were found to be consistent with the experimental histological data with less than 2 and 5° difference for the healthy and atherosclerotic arterial walls, respectively. The pseudoelastic damage model data were also compared with that of the experimental data, and

  1. 3D MRI-based anisotropic FSI models with cyclic bending for human coronary atherosclerotic plaque mechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dalin; Yang, Chun; Kobayashi, Shunichi; Zheng, Jie; Woodard, Pamela K; Teng, Zhongzhao; Billiar, Kristen; Bach, Richard; Ku, David N

    2009-06-01

    Heart attack and stroke are often caused by atherosclerotic plaque rupture, which happens without warning most of the time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based atherosclerotic plaque models with fluid-structure interactions (FSIs) have been introduced to perform flow and stress/strain analysis and identify possible mechanical and morphological indices for accurate plaque vulnerability assessment. For coronary arteries, cyclic bending associated with heart motion and anisotropy of the vessel walls may have significant influence on flow and stress/strain distributions in the plaque. FSI models with cyclic bending and anisotropic vessel properties for coronary plaques are lacking in the current literature. In this paper, cyclic bending and anisotropic vessel properties were added to 3D FSI coronary plaque models so that the models would be more realistic for more accurate computational flow and stress/strain predictions. Six computational models using one ex vivo MRI human coronary plaque specimen data were constructed to assess the effects of cyclic bending, anisotropic vessel properties, pulsating pressure, plaque structure, and axial stretch on plaque stress/strain distributions. Our results indicate that cyclic bending and anisotropic properties may cause 50-800% increase in maximum principal stress (Stress-P1) values at selected locations. The stress increase varies with location and is higher when bending is coupled with axial stretch, nonsmooth plaque structure, and resonant pressure conditions (zero phase angle shift). Effects of cyclic bending on flow behaviors are more modest (9.8% decrease in maximum velocity, 2.5% decrease in flow rate, 15% increase in maximum flow shear stress). Inclusion of cyclic bending, anisotropic vessel material properties, accurate plaque structure, and axial stretch in computational FSI models should lead to a considerable improvement of accuracy of computational stress/strain predictions for coronary plaque vulnerability

  2. Osteopontin is elevated during neointima formation in rat arteries and is a novel component of human atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Giachelli, C M; Bae, N; Almeida, M; Denhardt, D T; Alpers, C E; Schwartz, S M

    1993-01-01

    In an earlier report, we used differential cloning to identify genes that might be critical in controlling arterial neointima formation (Giachelli, C., N. Bae, D. Lombardi, M. Majesky, and S. Schwartz. 1991. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 177:867-873). In this study, we sequenced the complete cDNA and conclusively identified one of these genes, 2B7, as rat osteopontin. Using immunochemistry and in situ hybridization, we found that medial smooth muscle cells (SMC) in uninjured arteries contained very low levels of osteopontin protein and mRNA. Injury to either the adult rat aorta or carotid artery using a balloon catheter initiated a qualitatively similar time-dependent increase in both osteopontin protein and mRNA in arterial SMC. Expression was transient and highly localized to neointimal SMC during the proliferative and migratory phases of arterial injury, suggesting a possible role for osteopontin in these processes. In vitro, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and angiotensin II (AII), all proteins implicated in the rat arterial injury response, elevated osteopontin expression in confluent vascular SMC. Finally, we found that osteopontin was a novel component of the human atherosclerotic plaque found most strikingly associated with calcified deposits. These data implicate osteopontin as a potentially important mediator of arterial neointima formation as well as dystrophic calcification that often accompanies this process. Images PMID:8408622

  3. The role of PGE(2) in human atherosclerotic plaque on platelet EP(3) and EP(4) receptor activation and platelet function in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Schober, Lisa J; Khandoga, Anna L; Dwivedi, Suman; Penz, Sandra M; Maruyama, Takayuki; Brandl, Richard; Siess, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    Atherosclerosis has an important inflammatory component. Macrophages accumulating in atherosclerotic arteries produce prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), a main inflammatory mediator. Platelets express inhibitory receptors (EP(2), EP(4)) and a stimulatory receptor (EP(3)) for this prostanoid. Recently, it has been reported in ApoE(-/-) mice that PGE(2) accumulating in inflammatory atherosclerotic lesions might contribute to atherothrombosis after plaque rupture by activating platelet EP(3), and EP(3) blockade has been proposed to be a promising new approach in anti-thrombotic therapy. The aim of our investigation was to study the role of PGE(2) in human atherosclerotic plaques on human platelet function and thrombus formation. Plaque PGE(2) might either activate or inhibit platelets depending on stimulation of either EP(3) or EP(4), respectively. We found that the two EP(3)-antagonists AE5-599 (300 nM) and AE3-240 (300 nM) specifically and completely inhibited the synergistic effect of the EP(3)-agonist sulprostone on U46619-induced platelet aggregation in blood. However, these two EP(3)-antagonists neither inhibited atherosclerotic plaque-induced platelet aggregation, GPIIb/IIIa exposure, dense and alpha granule secretion in blood nor reduced plaque-induced platelet thrombus formation under arterial flow. The EP(4)-antagonist AE3-208 (1-3 μM) potentiated in combination with PGE(2) (1 μM) ADP-induced aggregation, demonstrating that PGE(2) enhances platelet aggregation when the inhibitory EP(4)-receptor is inactivated. However, plaque-induced platelet aggregation was not augmented after platelet pre-treatment with AE3-208, indicating that plaque PGE(2) does not stimulate the EP(4)-receptor. We found that PGE(2) was present in plaques only at very low levels (15 pg PGE(2)/mg plaque). We conclude that PGE(2) in human atherosclerotic lesions does not modulate (i.e. stimulate or inhibit) atherothrombosis in blood after plaque rupture.

  4. In vitro angioplasty of atherosclerotic human femoral arteries: analysis of the geometrical changes in the individual tissues using MRI and image processing.

    PubMed

    Auer, Martin; Stollberger, Rudolf; Regitnig, Peter; Ebner, Franz; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2010-04-01

    Existing atherosclerotic plaque imaging techniques such as intravascular ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography, optical coherence tomography, and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (hrMRI) require computerized methods to separate and analyze the plaque morphology. In this work, we perform in vitro balloon angioplasty experiments with 10 human femoral arteries using hrMRI and image processing. The vessel segments contain low-grade to high-grade lesions with very different plaque compositions. The experiments are designed to mimic the in vivo situation. We use a semi-automatic image processing tool to extract the three-dimensional (3D) geometries of the tissue components at four characteristic stages of the angioplasty procedure. The obtained geometries are then used to determine geometrical and mechanical indices in order to characterize, classify, and analyze the atherosclerotic plaques by their specific geometrical changes. During inflation, three vessels ruptured via helical crack propagation. The adventitia, media, and intima did not preserve their area/volume during inflation; the area changes of the lipid pool during inflation were significant. The characterization of changes in individual 3D tissue geometries, together with tissue-specific mechanical properties, may serve as a basis for refined finite element (FE) modeling, which is key to better understand stress evolution in various atherosclerotic plaque configurations.

  5. Uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages of large cholesteryl ester-rich particles isolated from human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Hoff, H F; Clevidence, B A

    1987-06-01

    We have previously shown that a lipoprotein fraction consisting of large cholesteryl ester-rich particles can be isolated from homogenates of human aortic plaques by gel exclusion chromatography. This fraction was recognized by a high-affinity binding site on mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) resulting in unregulated uptake, stimulation of cholesterol esterification, and massive accumulation of cholesteryl esters. In this report we have further characterized such a fraction, designated lipid-protein complex (LP), which can be isolated from the void volume fraction of a Bio-Gel A-150m column following chromatography of plaque extracts. LP possessed a mean cholesterol-to-protein ratio of 2.3; it was heterogeneous in size and structure as observed by electron microscopy after negative staining, and it stimulated cholesterol esterification in MPM in a linear fashion over a 48-hr time interval, suggesting that the binding site on MPM recognizing LP was not down-regulated by intracellular cholesterol content. This uptake resulted in the presence of oil red O-positive intracellular droplets and numerous vacuoles containing electron-dense structures, whereas MPM incubated without lipoprotein showed few vacuoles or lipid droplets. Using SDS-PAGE and immunoblot and dot-blot techniques, we found that the major proteins associated with LP were albumin and fibronectin, whereas apoB and apoE were present in lower amounts. These proteins may be responsible for opsonization of LP, making it recognizable to receptors on MPM and facilitating LP uptake by MPM. LP isolated from tissue extracts without homogenization had the same structural and functional characteristics, suggesting that homogenization per se was not responsible for creating a particle that was recognized by MPM. However, homogenization yielded two to three times more LP. MPM uptake of LP derived from lysed foam cells may represent one of the mechanisms by which fatty streak lesions may grow to larger atherosclerotic

  6. Phenotypic alterations in human saphenous vein culture induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and lipoproteins: a preliminary development of an initial atherosclerotic plaque model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease of blood vessels particularly the arteries. The development of atherosclerotic plaques or atherogenesis is a complex process that is influenced by cardiovascular risk factors such as vascular inflammation and dyslipidemia. This study demonstrates the ability of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) to induce atherosclerotic plaque in human saphenous vein (HSV) organ culture. Methods Normal HSV segments, from male patients who had coronary bypass graft, were cultured in DMEM containing 5% heat inactivated fetal bovine serum. TNF-α (5 ng/ml) was applied in combination with native LDL (nLDL) or oxidized LDL (oxLDL) at the dose of 50 μg/ml for 14 days. The phenotypic changes of the organ cultures characteristic of initial atherosclerotic plaques were evaluated. The effect of anti-atherogenic agent, 17-β estradiol (E2), was also determined. Results Histologic, histomorphometric, and immunohistochemical examinations revealed that HSV rings stimulated with TNF-α + nLDL or TNF-α + oxLDL can exhibit the essential morphological features of atherogenesis, including fibrous cap formation, cholesterol clefts, evident thickening of the intimal layer, increased proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMC) and migration to the subendothelial layer, significant SMC foam cell formation, and increased expression of adhesion molecules in the vascular wall. Addition of E2 (50 nM) to the culture significantly modulated the critical changes. Consistently, mRNA profiling of the HSV model revealed that 50 of 84 genes of atherosclerosis were up-regulated. Conclusions Phenotypic changes characteristic of the initial development of atherosclerotic plaques can be induced in HSV organ culture. PMID:24010774

  7. Detection of Human Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in Coronary Atherosclerotic Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Imbronito, Ana Vitória; Marcelino, Silvia Linardi; Grande, Sabrina Rosa; Nunes, Fabio Daumas; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that patients with atherosclerosis are predominantly infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), but rarely infected by type 1 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-1). In this study, atheromas of 30 patients who underwent aortocoronary bypass surgery with coronary endartherectomy were tested for the presence of these two viruses. HCMV occurred in 93.3% of the samples and EBV-1 was present in 50% of them. Concurrent presence of both pathogens was detected in 43.3% of the samples. PMID:24031529

  8. X-ray micro computed tomography for the visualization of an atherosclerotic human coronary artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matviykiv, Sofiya; Buscema, Marzia; Deyhle, Hans; Pfohl, Thomas; Zumbuehl, Andreas; Saxer, Till; Müller, Bert

    2017-06-01

    Atherosclerosis refers to narrowing or blocking of blood vessels that can lead to a heart attack, chest pain or stroke. Constricted segments of diseased arteries exhibit considerably increased wall shear stress, compared to the healthy ones. One of the possibilities to improve patient’s treatment is the application of nano-therapeutic approaches, based on shear stress sensitive nano-containers. In order to tailor the chemical composition and subsequent physical properties of such liposomes, one has to know precisely the morphology of critically stenosed arteries at micrometre resolution. It is often obtained by means of histology, which has the drawback of offering only two-dimensional information. Additionally, it requires the artery to be decalcified before sectioning, which might lead to deformations within the tissue. Micro computed tomography (μCT) enables the three-dimensional (3D) visualization of soft and hard tissues at micrometre level. μCT allows lumen segmentation that is crucial for subsequent flow simulation analysis. In this communication, tomographic images of a human coronary artery before and after decalcification are qualitatively and quantitatively compared. We analyse the cross section of the diseased human coronary artery before and after decalcification, and calculate the lumen area of both samples.

  9. Comparing Raman and fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy from human atherosclerotic lesions using a bimodal probe.

    PubMed

    Dochow, Sebastian; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Phipps, Jennifer E; Ma, Dinglong; Bocklitz, Thomas; Schmitt, Michael; Bishop, John W; Margulies, Kenneth B; Marcu, Laura; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and Raman spectroscopy are two promising methods to support morphological intravascular imaging techniques with chemical contrast. Both approaches are complementary and may also be used in combination with OCT/IVUS to add chemical specificity to these morphologic intravascular imaging modalities. In this contribution, both modalities were simultaneously acquired from two human coronary specimens using a bimodal probe. A previously trained SVM model was used to interpret the fluorescence lifetime data; integrated band intensities displayed in RGB false color images were used to interpret the Raman data. Both modalities demonstrate unique strengths and weaknesses and these will be discussed in comparison to histologic analyses from the two coronary arteries imaged.

  10. Reduced Necrosis and Content of Apoptotic M1 Macrophages in Advanced Atherosclerotic Plaques of Mice With Macrophage-Specific Loss of Trpc3

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Sumeet; Dube, Prabhatchandra R.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Vazquez, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    In previous work we reported that ApoeKO mice transplanted with bone marrow cells deficient in the Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 3 (TRPC3) channel have reduced necrosis and number of apoptotic macrophages in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Also, in vitro studies with polarized macrophages derived from mice with macrophage-specific loss of TRPC3 showed that M1, but not M2 macrophages, deficient in Trpc3 are less susceptible to ER stress-induced apoptosis than Trpc3 expressing cells. The questions remained (a) whether the plaque phenotype in transplanted mice resulted from a genuine effect of Trpc3 on macrophages, and (b) whether the reduced necrosis and macrophage apoptosis in plaques of these mice was a manifestation of the selective effect of TRPC3 on apoptosis of M1 macrophages previously observed in vitro. Here, we addressed these questions using Ldlr knockout (Ldlr−/−) mice with macrophage-specific loss of Trpc3 (MacTrpc3−/−/Ldlr−/− → Ldlr−/−). Compared to controls, we observed decreased plaque necrosis and number of apoptotic macrophages in MacTrpc3−/−/Ldlr−/− → Ldlr−/− mice. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a reduction in apoptotic M1, but not apoptotic M2 macrophages. These findings confirm an effect of TRPC3 on plaque necrosis and support the notion that this is likely a reflection of the reduced susceptibility of Trpc3-deficient M1 macrophages to apoptosis. PMID:28186192

  11. High expression of genes for calcification-regulating proteins in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, C M; Cary, N R; Metcalfe, J C; Weissberg, P L

    1994-01-01

    Calcification is common in atheromatous plaques and may contribute to plaque rupture and subsequent thrombosis. However, little is known about the mechanisms which regulate the calcification process. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we show that two bone-associated proteins, osteopontin (OP) and matrix Gla protein (MGP), are highly expressed in human atheromatous plaques. High levels of OP mRNA and protein were found in association with necrotic lipid cores and areas of calcification. The predominant cell type in these areas was the macrophage-derived foam cell, although some smooth muscle cells could also be identified. MGP was expressed uniformly by smooth muscle cells in the normal media and at high levels in parts of the atheromatous intima. Highest levels of this matrix-associated protein were found in lipid-rich areas of the plaque. The pattern of expression of these two genes contrasted markedly with that of calponin and SM22 alpha, genes expressed predominantly by differentiated smooth muscle cells and whose expression was generally confined to the media of the vessel. The postulated function of OP and MGP as regulators of calcification in bone and the high levels and colocalization of both in atheromatous plaques suggest they have an important role in plaque pathogenesis and stability. Images PMID:8200973

  12. Characterising human atherosclerotic carotid plaque tissue composition and morphology using combined spectroscopic and imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Calcification is a marked pathological component in carotid artery plaque. Studies have suggested that calcification may induce regions of high stress concentrations therefore increasing the potential for rupture. However, the mechanical behaviour of the plaque under the influence of calcification is not fully understood. A method of accurately characterising the calcification coupled with the associated mechanical plaque properties is needed to better understand the impact of calcification on the mechanical behaviour of the plaque during minimally invasive treatments. This study proposes a comparison of biochemical and structural characterisation methods of the calcification in carotid plaque specimens to identify plaque mechanical behaviour. Biochemical analysis, by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, was used to identify the key components, including calcification, in each plaque sample. However, FTIR has a finite penetration depth which may limit the accuracy of the calcification measurement. Therefore, this FTIR analysis was coupled with the identification of the calcification inclusions located internally in the plaque specimen using micro x-ray computed tomography (μX-CT) which measures the calcification volume fraction (CVF) to total tissue content. The tissue characterisation processes were then applied to the mechanical material plaque properties acquired from experimental circumferential loading of human carotid plaque specimen for comparison of the methods. FTIR characterised the degree of plaque progression by identifying the functional groups associated with lipid, collagen and calcification in each specimen. This identified a negative relationship between stiffness and 'lipid to collagen' and 'calcification to collagen' ratios. However, μX-CT results suggest that CVF measurements relate to overall mechanical stiffness, while peak circumferential strength values may be dependent on specific calcification geometries. This study

  13. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy to Characterize Inflammatory Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Dai, Xiaohu; Beebe, Tyler; Hsiai, Tzung

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and therapy, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Predicting metabolically active atherosclerotic lesions has remained an unmet clinical need. We hereby developed an electrochemical strategy to characterize the inflammatory states of high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Using the concentric bipolar microelectrodes, we sought to demonstrate distinct Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopic (EIS) measurements for unstable atherosclerotic plaques that harbored active lipids and inflammatory cells. Using equivalent circuits to simulate vessel impedance at the electrode-endoluminal tissue interface, we demonstrated specific electric elements to model working and counter electrode interfaces as well as the tissue impedance. Using explants of human coronary, carotid, and femoral arteries at various Stary stages of atherosclerotic lesions (n = 15), we performed endoluminal EIS measurements (n = 147) and validated with histology and immunohistochemistry. We computed the vascular tissue resistance using the equivalent circuit model and normalized the resistance to the lesion-free regions. Tissue resistance was significantly elevated in the oxLDL-rich thin-cap atheromas (1.57±0.40, n = 14, p < 0.001) and fatty streaks (1.36±0.28, n = 33, p < 0.001) as compared with lesion-free region (1.00±0.18, n = 82) or oxLDL-absent fibrous atheromas (0.86±0.30, n = 12). Tissue resistance was also elevated in the calcified core of fibrous atheroma (2.37±0.60, n = 6, p < 0.001). Despite presence of fibrous structures, tissue resistance between ox-LDL-absent fibroatheroma and the lesion-free regions was statistically insignificant (0.86±0.30, n = 12, p > 0.05). Hence, we demonstrate that the application of EIS strategy was sensitive to detect fibrous cap oxLDL-rich lesions and specific to distinguish oxLDL-absent fibroatheroma. PMID:21959227

  14. Impaired muscarinic endothelium-dependent relaxation and cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate formation in atherosclerotic human coronary artery and rabbit aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Bossaller, C; Habib, G B; Yamamoto, H; Williams, C; Wells, S; Henry, P D

    1987-01-01

    The dependence of vascular relaxation on an intact endothelium and the relationship between relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation were determined in coronary arteries isolated from cardiac transplantation patients with or without coronary atherosclerosis. In nonatherosclerotic arteries, the endothelium-dependent agent acetylcholine produced concentration-related relaxations. In atherosclerotic arteries, endothelium-dependent relaxations were abolished with acetylcholine, partly suppressed with substance P and histamine, and completely preserved with the ionophore A23187. In these arteries, the endothelium-independent agent nitroglycerin remained fully active. Accumulation of cyclic GMP in atherosclerotic strips was suppressed with acetylcholine but unattenuated with A23187 and nitroglycerin. In aortas from rabbits with diet-induced atherosclerosis, there was likewise an impaired cholinergic relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation in the presence of preserved responses to A23187 and nitroglycerin. The results demonstrate that impaired cholinergic responses in atherosclerotic arteries reflect a muscarinic defect and not an inability of endothelium to release endothelial factor or smooth muscle to respond to it. PMID:2432088

  15. Propionibacterium acnes Recovered from Atherosclerotic Human Carotid Arteries Undergoes Biofilm Dispersion and Releases Lipolytic and Proteolytic Enzymes in Response to Norepinephrine Challenge In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lanter, Bernard B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, human atherosclerotic carotid arteries were examined following endarterectomy for the presence of the Gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and its potential association with biofilm structures within the arterial wall. The P. acnes 16S rRNA gene was detectable in 4 of 15 carotid artery samples, and viable P. acnes was one among 10 different bacterial species recoverable in culture. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of 5 additional atherosclerotic carotid arteries demonstrated biofilm bacteria within all samples, with P. acnes detectable in 4 samples. We also demonstrated that laboratory-grown cultures of P. acnes biofilms were susceptible to induction of a biofilm dispersion response when challenged with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine in the presence of iron-bound transferrin or with free iron. The production and release of lipolytic and proteolytic extracellular enzymes by P. acnes were shown to increase in iron-induced dispersed biofilms, and these dispersion-induced P. acnes VP1 biofilms showed increased expression of mRNAs for the triacylglycerol lipases PPA2105 and PPA1796 and the hyaluronate lyase PPA380 compared to that in untreated biofilms. These results demonstrate that P. acnes can infect the carotid arteries of humans with atherosclerosis as a component of multispecies biofilms and that dispersion is inducible for this organism, at least in vitro, with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine resulting in the production and release of degradative enzymes. PMID:26216428

  16. In Vivo/Ex Vivo MRI-Based 3D Non-Newtonian FSI Models for Human Atherosclerotic Plaques Compared with Fluid/Wall-Only Models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Tang, Dalin; Yuan, Chun; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Zheng, Jie; Woodard, Pamela K

    2007-01-01

    It has been recognized that fluid-structure interactions (FSI) play an important role in cardiovascular disease initiation and development. However, in vivo MRI multi-component FSI models for human carotid atherosclerotic plaques with bifurcation and quantitative comparisons of FSI models with fluid-only or structure-only models are currently lacking in the literature. A 3D non-Newtonian multi-component FSI model based on in vivo/ex vivo MRI images for human atherosclerotic plaques was introduced to investigate flow and plaque stress/strain behaviors which may be related to plaque progression and rupture. Both artery wall and plaque components were assumed to be hyperelastic, isotropic, incompressible and homogeneous. Blood flow was assumed to be laminar, non-Newtonian, viscous and incompressible. In vivo/ex vivo MRI images were acquired using histologically-validated multi-spectral MRI protocols. The 3D FSI models were solved and results were compared with those from a Newtonian FSI model and wall-only/fluid-only models. A 145% difference in maximum principal stresses (Stress-P(1)) between the FSI and wall-only models and 40% difference in flow maximum shear stress (MSS) between the FSI and fluid-only models were found at the throat of the plaque using a severe plaque sample (70% severity by diameter). Flow maximum shear stress (MSS) from the rigid wall model is much higher (20-40% in maximum MSS values, 100-150% in stagnation region) than those from FSI models.

  17. C-Reactive Protein Binds to Cholesterol Crystals and Co-Localizes with the Terminal Complement Complex in Human Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    PubMed

    Pilely, Katrine; Fumagalli, Stefano; Rosbjerg, Anne; Genster, Ninette; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Perego, Carlo; Ferrante, Angela M R; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Garred, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is a part of the initial process leading to atherosclerosis and cholesterol crystals (CC), found in atherosclerotic plaques, which are known to induce complement activation. The pentraxins C-reactive protein (CRP), long pentraxin 3 (PTX3), and serum amyloid P component (SAP) are serum proteins associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events and these proteins have been shown to interact with the complement system. Whether the pentraxins binds to CC and mediate downstream complement-dependent inflammatory processes remains unknown. Binding of CRP, PTX3, and SAP to CC was investigated in vitro by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. CRP, PTX3, and SAP bound to CC in a concentration-dependent manner. CRP and PTX3 interacted with the complement pattern recognition molecule C1q on CC by increasing the binding of both purified C1q and C1q in plasma. However, CRP was the strongest mediator of C1q binding and also the pentraxin that most potently elevated C1q-mediated complement activation. In a phagocytic assay using whole blood, we confirmed that phagocytosis of CC is complement dependent and initiated by C1q-mediated activation. The pathophysiological relevance of the in vitro observations was examined in vivo in human atherosclerotic plaques. CRP, PTX3, and SAP were all found in atherosclerotic plaques and were located mainly in the cholesterol-rich necrotic core, but co-localization with the terminal C5b-9 complement complex was only found for CRP. In conclusion, this study identifies CRP as a strong C1q recruiter and complement facilitator on CC, which may be highly relevant for the development of atherosclerosis.

  18. The influence of constitutive law choice used to characterise atherosclerotic tissue material properties on computing stress values in human carotid plaques

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Yuan, Jianmin; Feng, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Yongxue; Brown, Adam J.; Wang, Shuo; Lu, Qingsheng; Gillard, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    Calculating high stress concentration within carotid atherosclerotic plaques has been shown to be complementary to anatomical features in assessing vulnerability. Reliability of stress calculation may depend on the constitutive laws/strain energy density functions (SEDFs) used to characterize tissue material properties. Different SEDFs, including neo-Hookean, one-/two-term Ogden, Yeoh, 5-parameter Mooney–Rivlin, Demiray and modified Mooney–Rivlin, have been used to describe atherosclerotic tissue behavior. However, the capacity of SEDFs to fit experimental data and the difference in the stress calculation remains unexplored. In this study, seven SEDFs were used to fit the stress–stretch data points of media, fibrous cap, lipid and intraplaque hemorrhage/thrombus obtained from 21 human carotid plaques. Semi-analytic solution, 2D structure-only and 3D fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analyses were used to quantify stress using different SEDFs and the related material stability examined. Results show that, except for neo-Hookean, all other six SEDFs fitted the experimental points well, with vessel stress distribution in the circumferential and radial directions being similar. 2D structural-only analysis was successful for all seven SEDFs, but 3D FSI were only possible with neo-Hookean, Demiray and modified Mooney–Rivlin models. Stresses calculated using Demiray and modified Mooney–Rivlin models were nearly identical. Further analyses indicated that the energy contours of one-/two-term Ogden and 5-parameter Mooney–Rivlin models were not strictly convex and the material stability indictors under homogeneous deformations were not always positive. In conclusion, considering the capacity in characterizing material properties and stabilities, Demiray and modified Mooney–Rivlin SEDF appear practical choices for mechanical analyses to predict the critical mechanical conditions within carotid atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:26472305

  19. The influence of constitutive law choice used to characterise atherosclerotic tissue material properties on computing stress values in human carotid plaques.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Yuan, Jianmin; Feng, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Yongxue; Brown, Adam J; Wang, Shuo; Lu, Qingsheng; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2015-11-05

    Calculating high stress concentration within carotid atherosclerotic plaques has been shown to be complementary to anatomical features in assessing vulnerability. Reliability of stress calculation may depend on the constitutive laws/strain energy density functions (SEDFs) used to characterize tissue material properties. Different SEDFs, including neo-Hookean, one-/two-term Ogden, Yeoh, 5-parameter Mooney-Rivlin, Demiray and modified Mooney-Rivlin, have been used to describe atherosclerotic tissue behavior. However, the capacity of SEDFs to fit experimental data and the difference in the stress calculation remains unexplored. In this study, seven SEDFs were used to fit the stress-stretch data points of media, fibrous cap, lipid and intraplaque hemorrhage/thrombus obtained from 21 human carotid plaques. Semi-analytic solution, 2D structure-only and 3D fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analyses were used to quantify stress using different SEDFs and the related material stability examined. Results show that, except for neo-Hookean, all other six SEDFs fitted the experimental points well, with vessel stress distribution in the circumferential and radial directions being similar. 2D structural-only analysis was successful for all seven SEDFs, but 3D FSI were only possible with neo-Hookean, Demiray and modified Mooney-Rivlin models. Stresses calculated using Demiray and modified Mooney-Rivlin models were nearly identical. Further analyses indicated that the energy contours of one-/two-term Ogden and 5-parameter Mooney-Rivlin models were not strictly convex and the material stability indictors under homogeneous deformations were not always positive. In conclusion, considering the capacity in characterizing material properties and stabilities, Demiray and modified Mooney-Rivlin SEDF appear practical choices for mechanical analyses to predict the critical mechanical conditions within carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

  20. Active macrophage-associated TGF-beta co-localizes with type I procollagen gene expression in atherosclerotic human pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, L.; Milder, J.; Gold, L.; Botney, M.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular remodeling in adult atherosclerotic pulmonary arteries is characterized by discrete areas of neointimal smooth muscle cell extracellular matrix gene expression in close proximity to non-foamy macrophages, suggesting regulation by local macrophage-associated factors. The purpose of these studies was to begin addressing the role of putative macrophage-associated factors such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), by determining the spatial relationship between TGF-beta and neointimal matrix gene expression in human atherosclerotic pulmonary arteries. For example, the participation of TGF-beta in vascular remodeling could be inferred by its colocalization with non-foamy macrophages in areas of active matrix synthesis. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry demonstrated focal neointimal procollagen gene expression in close association with non-foamy but not foamy macrophages. Immunohistochemistry with isoform-specific anti-TGF-beta antibodies demonstrated all three isoforms of TGF-beta associated with non-foamy macrophages, but foamy macrophages were not immunoreactive. Neointimal and medial smooth muscle cells stained lightly. In contrast, intense TGF-beta immunoreactivity was also associated with medial smooth muscle cells in normal nonremodeling vessels. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies specific for latent TGF-beta was similar to immunohistochemistry for mature TGF-beta in both remodeling and nonremodeling vessels. Finally, using an antibody specific for active TGF-beta 1, immunoreactivity was only seen in non-foamy neointimal macrophages but not in foamy macrophages or medial smooth muscle cells from hypertensive or normal vessels. These observations suggest non-foamy macrophages may participate in modulating matrix gene expression in atherosclerotic remodeling via a TGF-beta-dependent mechanism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7747808

  1. Soluble levels and endogenous vascular gene expression of KLOTHO are related to inflammation in human atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Martín-Núñez, Ernesto; López-Castillo, Ángel; Delgado-Molinos, Alejandro; Ferri, Carla; Rodríguez-Ramos, Sergio; Cerro, Purificación; Pérez-Delgado, Nayra; Castro, Victoria; Hernández-Carballo, Carolina; Mora-Fernández, Carmen; Donate-Correa, Javier; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2017-09-28

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting the artery wall. Klotho, an anti-aging factor expressed in the vessel wallsthat participates in the maintenance of vascular homeostasis, can be downregulated by inflammation. In this proof-of-concept work we seek to characterize the arterial KLOTHO expression in the vascular wall, as well as the serum concentration of this protein, in a group of patients with clinical atherosclerotic disease. In addition, we aim to analyze the relationship between Klotho and inflammation. Vascular samples were obtained from 27 patients with atherosclerotic disease under an elective vascular surgery procedure, and from 11 control subjects (cadaveric organ donation programme). qRT-PCR was performed to analyze the gene expression of KLOTHO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 Serum levels of soluble KLOTHO were measured by ELISA. As compared with control subjects, serum concentrations and vascular expression of Klothowere lower in patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease, whereas inflammatory status wassignificantly higher. There was a negative and significant correlation between inflammatory parameters and Klotho. After controlling for the effect of other variables, partial correlation showed a direct relationship between vascular KLOTHO gene expression and IL-10 mRNA levels, whereas there was a negative association with serum LDL concentrations and vascular TNF-α expression. Our study indicates an inverse interrelationship between inflammation and Klotho in atherosclerosis. Further studies are necessary to elucidate whether the inflammatory state causes Klotho deficiency or, on the contrary, reduction of Klotho could be responsible for greater inflammation, and finally, to investigate the potential clinical relevance of this association. ©2017 The Author(s).

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid mediates the rapid activation of platelets and endothelial cells by mildly oxidized low density lipoprotein and accumulates in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Siess, W; Zangl, K J; Essler, M; Bauer, M; Brandl, R; Corrinth, C; Bittman, R; Tigyi, G; Aepfelbacher, M

    1999-06-08

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) is a key factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and its thrombotic complications, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. It activates endothelial cells and platelets through mechanisms that are largely unknown. Here, we show that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was formed during mild oxidation of LDL and was the active compound in mildly oxidized LDL and minimally modified LDL, initiating platelet activation and stimulating endothelial cell stress-fiber and gap formation. Antagonists of the LPA receptor prevented platelet and endothelial cell activation by mildly oxidized LDL. We also found that LPA accumulated in and was the primary platelet-activating lipid of atherosclerotic plaques. Notably, the amount of LPA within the human carotid atherosclerotic lesion was highest in the lipid-rich core, the region most thrombogenic and most prone to rupture. Given the potent biological activity of LPA on platelets and on cells of the vessel wall, our study identifies LPA as an atherothrombogenic molecule and suggests a possible strategy to prevent and treat atherosclerosis and cardiocerebrovascular diseases.

  3. Various cell types in human atherosclerotic lesions express ICAM-1. Further immunocytochemical and immunochemical studies employing monoclonal antibody 10F3.

    PubMed Central

    Printseva OYu; Peclo, M. M.; Gown, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    The specificity of monoclonal antibody 10F3, generated to smooth muscle cells isolated from fetal human aorta, has been further explored in a series of biological, biochemical, and immunocytochemical studies. In the first assay, it was found that 10F3 could inhibit aggregation of phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced lymphocytes in a manner comparable to that of antibody RR1/1, an anti-intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) monoclonal antibody. In immunoprecipitation experiments followed by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, both 10F3 and RR1/1 immunoprecipitated 90 kd proteins, with results suggesting that the two antibodies recognized different epitopes of the same molecule. A series of immunocytochemical studies on human atherosclerotic lesions was performed; using single-labeling techniques, 10F3-positive cells were found in the vessel wall and in lesions of virtually all specimens of fatty streaks and fibrous plaques. Using double-labeling techniques, 10F3-positive macrophages and 10F3-positive smooth muscle cells were found; however, there were also a significant number of non-smooth muscle, nonmacrophage 10F3-positive cells. These studies demonstrate that 10F3 identifies ICAM-1, and that this protein is expressed on a variety of cell types in human atherosclerotic lesions. ICAM-1 may represent a developmentally regulated protein that is expressed in fetal but not adult mesenchymal cells, but can be re-expressed in pathologic processes such as atherosclerosis. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1348606

  4. Introduction. Teaching Advanced Placement Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Alexander B.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces this special issue of "Journal of Geography" focusing on the teaching of Advanced Placement (AP) human geography. States that essays were developed by members of the AP Human Geography Development Committee focusing on areas in the human geography course outline which are included in the appendix. (CMK)

  5. In Vivo/Ex Vivo MRI-Based 3D Non-Newtonian FSI Models for Human Atherosclerotic Plaques Compared with Fluid/Wall-Only Models

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; Tang, Dalin; Yuan, Chun; Hatsukami, Thomas S.; Zheng, Jie; Woodard, Pamela K.

    2009-01-01

    It has been recognized that fluid-structure interactions (FSI) play an important role in cardiovascular disease initiation and development. However, in vivo MRI multi-component FSI models for human carotid atherosclerotic plaques with bifurcation and quantitative comparisons of FSI models with fluid-only or structure-only models are currently lacking in the literature. A 3D non-Newtonian multi-component FSI model based on in vivo/ex vivo MRI images for human atherosclerotic plaques was introduced to investigate flow and plaque stress/strain behaviors which may be related to plaque progression and rupture. Both artery wall and plaque components were assumed to be hyperelastic, isotropic, incompressible and homogeneous. Blood flow was assumed to be laminar, non-Newtonian, viscous and incompressible. In vivo/ex vivo MRI images were acquired using histologically-validated multi-spectral MRI protocols. The 3D FSI models were solved and results were compared with those from a Newtonian FSI model and wall-only/fluid-only models. A 145% difference in maximum principal stresses (Stress-P1) between the FSI and wall-only models and 40% difference in flow maximum shear stress (MSS) between the FSI and fluid-only models were found at the throat of the plaque using a severe plaque sample (70% severity by diameter). Flow maximum shear stress (MSS) from the rigid wall model is much higher (20–40% in maximum MSS values, 100–150% in stagnation region) than those from FSI models. PMID:19784387

  6. Cyclic Bending Contributes to High Stress in a Human Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaque and Rupture Risk: In Vitro Experimental Modeling and Ex Vivo MRI-Based Computational Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Tang, Dalin; Kobayashi, Shunichi; Zheng, Jie; Woodard, Pamela K; Teng, Zhongzhao; Bach, Richard; Ku, David N

    2008-01-01

    Many acute cardiovascular syndromes such as heart attack and stroke are caused by atherosclerotic plaque ruptures which often happen without warning. MRI-based models with fluid-structure interactions (FSI) have been introduced to perform flow and stress/strain analysis for atherosclerotic plaques and identify possible mechanical and morphological indices for accurate plaque vulnerability assessment. In this paper, cyclic bending was added to 3D FSI coronary plaque models for more accurate mechanical predictions. Curvature variation was prescribed using the data of a human left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. Five computational models were constructed based on ex vivo MRI human coronary plaque data to assess the effects of cyclic bending, pulsating pressure, plaque structure, and axial stretch on plaque stress/strain distributions. In vitro experiments using a hydrogel stenosis model with cyclical bending were performed to observe effect of cyclical bending on flow conditions. Our results indicate that cyclical bending may cause more than 100% or even up to more than 1000% increase in maximum principal stress values at locations where the plaque is bent most. Stress increase is higher when bending is coupled with axial stretch, non-smooth plaque structure, or resonant pressure conditions (zero phase angle shift). Effects of cyclic bending on flow behaviors are more modest (21.6% decrease in maximum velocity, 10.8% decrease in flow rate, maximum flow shear stress changes were < 5%). Computational FSI models including cyclic bending, plaque components and structure, axial stretch, accurate in vivo measurements of pressure, curvature, and material properties should lead to significant improvement on stress-based plaque mechanical analysis and more accurate coronary plaque vulnerability assessment.

  7. Advances in Human Neuroconnectivity Research

    PubMed Central

    Cservenka, Anita; Alarcón, Gabriela; Jones, Scott A.; Nagel, Bonnie J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in brain imaging have allowed researchers to further study the networks connecting brain regions. Specifically, research examining the functioning of these networks in groups with a genetic predisposition for alcoholism has found atypical circuitry in the brains of such individuals. Further research with larger sample sizes and multimodal method integration are necessary to confirm these intriguing findings. PMID:26259090

  8. Site-specific Nitration of Apolipoprotein A-I at Tyrosine 166 Is Both Abundant within Human Atherosclerotic Plaque and Dysfunctional*

    PubMed Central

    DiDonato, Joseph A.; Aulak, Kulwant; Huang, Ying; Wagner, Matthew; Gerstenecker, Gary; Topbas, Celalettin; Gogonea, Valentin; DiDonato, Anthony J.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Mehl, Ryan A.; Fox, Paul L.; Plow, Edward F.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Fisher, Edward A.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2014-01-01

    We reported previously that apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is oxidatively modified in the artery wall at tyrosine 166 (Tyr166), serving as a preferred site for post-translational modification through nitration. Recent studies, however, question the extent and functional importance of apoA-I Tyr166 nitration based upon studies of HDL-like particles recovered from atherosclerotic lesions. We developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb 4G11.2) that recognizes, in both free and HDL-bound forms, apoA-I harboring a 3-nitrotyrosine at position 166 apoA-I (NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I) to investigate the presence, distribution, and function of this modified apoA-I form in atherosclerotic and normal artery wall. We also developed recombinant apoA-I with site-specific 3-nitrotyrosine incorporation only at position 166 using an evolved orthogonal nitro-Tyr-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair for functional studies. Studies with mAb 4G11.2 showed that NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I was easily detected in atherosclerotic human coronary arteries and accounted for ∼8% of total apoA-I within the artery wall but was nearly undetectable (>100-fold less) in normal coronary arteries. Buoyant density ultracentrifugation analyses showed that NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I existed as a lipid-poor lipoprotein with <3% recovered within the HDL-like fraction (d = 1.063–1.21). NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I in plasma showed a similar distribution. Recovery of NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I using immobilized mAb 4G11.2 showed an apoA-I form with 88.1 ± 8.5% reduction in lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activity, a finding corroborated using a recombinant apoA-I specifically designed to include the unnatural amino acid exclusively at position 166. Thus, site-specific nitration of apoA-I at Tyr166 is an abundant modification within the artery wall that results in selective functional impairments. Plasma levels of this modified apoA-I form may provide insights into a pathophysiological process within the diseased artery wall. PMID:24558038

  9. Enhanced External Counterpulsation Treatment May Intervene The Advanced Atherosclerotic Plaque Progression by Inducing The Variations of Mechanical Factors: A 3D FSI Study Based on in vivo Animal Experiment.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianhang; Wang, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Growing evidences suggest that long-term enhanced external counter-pulsation (EECP) treatment can inhibit the initiation of atherosclerotic lesion by improving the hemodynamic environment in aortas. However, whether this kind procedure will intervene the progression of advanced atherosclerotic plaque remains elusive and causes great concern in its clinical application presently. In the current paper, a pilot study combining animal experiment and numerical simulation was conducted to investigate the acute mechanical stress variations during EECP intervention, and then to assess the possible chronic effects. An experimentally induced hypercholesterolemic porcine model was developed and the basic hemodynamic measurement was performed in vivo before and during EECP treatment. Meanwhile, A 3D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model of blood vessel with symmetric local stenosis was developed for the numerical calculation of some important mechanical factors. The results show that EECP augmented 12.21% of the plaque wall stress (PWS), 57.72% of the time average wall shear stress (AWSS) and 43.67% of the non-dimensional wall shear stress gradient (WSSGnd) at throat site of the stenosis. We suggest that long-term EECP treatment may intervene the advanced plaque progression by inducing the significant variations of some important mechanical factors, but its proper effects will need a further research combined follow-up observation in clinic.

  10. A combination of experimental and numerical methods to investigate the role of strain rate on the mechanical properties and collagen fiber orientations of the healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Alireza; Rahmati, Seyyed Mohammadali; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2017-03-04

    Atherosclerosis enables to alter not only the microstructural but also the physical properties of the arterial walls by plaque forming. Few studies so far have been conducted to calculate the isotropic or anisotropic mechanical properties of the healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arteries. To date there is a paucity of knowledge on the mechanical response of the arteries under different strain rates. Therefore, the objective of the concurrent research was to comprehend whether the alteration in the strain rates of the human atherosclerotic arteries in comparison with the healthy ones contribute to the biomechanical behaviors. To do this, healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arteries were removed from 18 individuals during autopsy. Histological analyses by both an expert histopathologist and an imaged-based recognizer software were performed to figure out the average angle of collagen fibers in the healthy and atherosclerotic arterial walls. Thereafter, the samples were subjected to 3 diverse strain rates, i.e., 5, 20, and 50 mm/min, until the material failure occurs. The stress-strain diagrams of the arterial tissues were calculated in order to capture their linear elastic and nonlinear hyperelastic mechanical properties. In addition, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) was employed to predict the alteration of mean angle of collagen fibers during load bearing up to failure. The findings suggest that strain rate has a significant (p < 0.05) role in the linear elastic and nonlinear hyperelastic mechanical properties as well as the mean angle of collagen fibers of the atherosclerotic arteries, whereas no specific impact on the healthy ones. Furthermore, the mean angle of collagen fibers during the load bearing up to the failure at each strain rate was well predicted by the proposed ANNs code.

  11. A combination of experimental and numerical methods to investigate the role of strain rate on the mechanical properties and collagen fiber orientations of the healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Alireza; Rahmati, Seyyed Mohammadali; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Atherosclerosis enables to alter not only the microstructural but also the physical properties of the arterial walls by plaque forming. Few studies so far have been conducted to calculate the isotropic or anisotropic mechanical properties of the healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arteries. To date there is a paucity of knowledge on the mechanical response of the arteries under different strain rates. Therefore, the objective of the concurrent research was to comprehend whether the alteration in the strain rates of the human atherosclerotic arteries in comparison with the healthy ones contribute to the biomechanical behaviors. To do this, healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arteries were removed from 18 individuals during autopsy. Histological analyses by both an expert histopathologist and an imaged-based recognizer software were performed to figure out the average angle of collagen fibers in the healthy and atherosclerotic arterial walls. Thereafter, the samples were subjected to 3 diverse strain rates, i.e., 5, 20, and 50 mm/min, until the material failure occurs. The stress-strain diagrams of the arterial tissues were calculated in order to capture their linear elastic and nonlinear hyperelastic mechanical properties. In addition, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) was employed to predict the alteration of mean angle of collagen fibers during load bearing up to failure. The findings suggest that strain rate has a significant (p < 0.05) role in the linear elastic and nonlinear hyperelastic mechanical properties as well as the mean angle of collagen fibers of the atherosclerotic arteries, whereas no specific impact on the healthy ones. Furthermore, the mean angle of collagen fibers during the load bearing up to the failure at each strain rate was well predicted by the proposed ANNs code. PMID:27588460

  12. Influence of non-Newtonian Properties of Blood on the Wall Shear Stress in Human Atherosclerotic Right Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Biyue; Tang, Dalin

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the effect of non-Newtonian properties of blood on the wall shear stress (WSS) in atherosclerotic coronary arteries using both Newtonian and non-Newtonian models. Numerical simulations were performed to examine how the spatial and temporal WSS distributions are influenced by the stenosis size, blood viscosity, and flow rate. The computational results demonstrated that blood viscosity properties had considerable effect on the magnitude of the WSS, especially where disturbed flow was observed. The WSS distribution is highly non-uniform both temporally and spatially, especially in the stenotic region. The maximum WSS occurred at the proximal side of the stenosis, near the outer wall in the curved artery with no stenosis. The lumen area near the inner wall distal to the stenosis region experienced a lower WSS during the entire cardiac cycle. Among the factors of stenosis size, blood viscosity, and flow rate, the size of the stenosis has the most significant effect on the spatial and temporal WSS distributions qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:21379375

  13. A method to compensate for the underestimation of collagen with polarized picrosirius red imaging in human artery atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, C. A.; Grainger, S. J.; Su, J. L.; Madden, S. P.; Muller, J. E.

    2016-04-01

    Although picrosirius red (PSR) is known to be in quantifying collagen under polarized light (PL), commonly used linearly PL can result in an underestimation of collagen, as some of the fibers may appear dark if aligned with the transmission axis of the polarizers. To address this, a sample may be imaged with circularly polarized light at the expense of higher background intensity. However, the quality and alignment of the microscope illumination optics, polarizers and waveplates can still produce imaging variability with circular polarization. A simpler technique was tested that minimized variability and background intensity with linear polarization by acquiring images at multiple angles of histology slide rotation to create a composite co-registered image, permitting the optimal semi-quantitative visualization of collagen. Linear polarization imaging was performed on PSR stained artery sections. By rotating the slide at 60° intervals while maintaining illumination, polarization and exposure parameters, 6 images were acquired for each section. A composite image was created from the 6 co-registered images, and comprised of the maximum pixel intensity at each point. Images from any of the 6 rotation positions consistently showed variation in PSR signal. A composite image compensates for this variability, without loss of spatial resolution. Additionally, grayscale analysis showed an increased intensity range of 15 - 50% with a linearly polarized composite image over a circularly polarized image after background correction, indicating better SNR. This proposed technique will be applied in the development of a near infrared spectroscopy algorithm to detect vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques in vivo.

  14. Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression Changes Lysophosphatidic Acid Homeostasis to Favor its Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Martine; Bot, Ilze; Lopez-Vales, Rubén; van de Lest, Chris H.A.; Saulnier-Blache, Jean Sébastien; Helms, J. Bernd; David, Samuel; van Berkel, Theo J.C.; Biessen, Erik A.L.

    2010-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) accumulates in the central atheroma of human atherosclerotic plaques and is the primary platelet-activating lipid constituent of plaques. Here, we investigated the enzymatic regulation of LPA homeostasis in atherosclerotic lesions at various stages of disease progression. Atherosclerotic lesions were induced in carotid arteries of low-density lipoprotein receptor–deficient mice by semiconstrictive collar placement. At 2-week intervals after collar placement, lipids and RNA were extracted from the vessel segments carrying the plaque. Enzymatic-and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry–based lipid profiling revealed progressive accumulation of LPA species in atherosclerotic tissue preceded by an increase in lysophosphatidylcholine, a precursor in LPA synthesis. Plaque expression of LPA-generating enzymes cytoplasmic phospholipase A2IVA (cPLA2IVA) and calcium-independent PLA2VIA (iPLA2VIA) was gradually increased, whereas that of the LPA-hydrolyzing enzyme LPA acyltransferase α was quenched. Increased expression of cPLA2IVA and iPLA2VIA in advanced lesions was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, LPA receptors 1 and 2 were 50% decreased and sevenfold upregulated, respectively. Therefore, key proteins in LPA homeostasis are increasingly dysregulated in the plaque during atherogenesis, favoring intracellular LPA production. This might at least partly explain the observed progressive accumulation of this thrombogenic proinflammatory lipid in human and mouse plaques. Thus, intervention in the enzymatic LPA production may be an attractive measure to lower intraplaque LPA content, thereby reducing plaque progression and thrombogenicity. PMID:20431029

  15. Advancing Human Centered Augmented Reality Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    ADVANCING HUMAN CENTERED AUGMENTED REALITY RESEARCH Brian Goldiez1, Mark A. Livingston 2, Jeffrey Dawson1, Dennis Brown2, Peter Hancock1, Yohan...Advanced Engineering & Sciences Alexandria, VA 22303 ABSTRACT Augmented Reality (AR) is an emerging technology that offers possibilities that...other technologies are not able to fulfill. AR uses a computer to add information to the real world. Future AR technology will be low cost

  16. Advances in gene technology: Human genetic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.A.; Ahmad, F.; Black, S.; Schultz, J.; Whelan, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the papers presented at the conference on the subject of ''advances in Gene technology: Human genetic disorders''. Molecular biology of various carcinomas and inheritance of metabolic diseases is discussed and technology advancement in diagnosis of hereditary diseases is described. Some of the titles discussed are-Immunoglobulin genes translocation and diagnosis; hemophilia; oncogenes; oncogenic transformations; experimental data on mice, hamsters, birds carcinomas and sarcomas.

  17. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is expressed in vascularized human atherosclerotic plaques: IFN-γ/JAK/STAT1 signaling is critical for the expression of PTN in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuqiang; Tian, Fang; Wang, Lai; Williamson, Ian K.; Sharifi, Behrooz G.; Shah, Prediman K.

    2010-01-01

    Neovascularization is critical to destabilization of atheroma. We previously reported that the angiogenic growth factor pleiotrophin (PTN) coaxes monocytes to assume the phenotype of functional endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study we show that PTN expression is colocalized with capillaries of human atherosclerotic plaques. Among the various reagents that are critical to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, interferon (IFN)-γ was found to markedly induce PTN mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner in macrophages. Mechanistic studies revealed that the Janus kinase inhibitors, WHI-P154 and ATA, efficiently blocked STAT1 phosphorylation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Notably, the level of phosphorylated STAT1 was found to correlate directly with the PTN mRNA levels. In addition, STAT1/STAT3/p44/42 signaling molecules were found to be phosphorylated by IFN-γ in macrophages, and they were translocated into the nucleus. Further, PTN promoter analysis showed that a gamma-activated sequence (GAS) located at −2086 to −2078 bp is essential for IFN-γ-regulated promoter activity. Moreover, electrophoretic mobility shift, supershift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that both STAT1 and STAT3 bind to the GAS at the chromatin level in the IFN-γ stimulated cells. Finally, to test whether the combined effect of STAT1/STAT3/p44/42 signaling is required for the expression of PTN in macrophages, gene knockdowns of these transcription factors were performed using siRNA. Cells lacking STAT1, but not STAT3 or p42, have markedly reduced PTN mRNA levels. These data suggest that PTN expression in the human plaques may be in part regulated by IFN-γ and that PTN is involved in the adaptive immunity.—Li, F., Tian, F., Wang, L., Williamson, I. K., Sharifi, B. G., Shah, P. K. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is expressed in vascularized human atherosclerotic plaques: IFN-γ/JAK/STAT1 signaling is critical for the expression of PTN in macrophages

  18. Technological advances for studying human behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roske-Hofstrand, Renate J.

    1990-01-01

    Technological advances for studying human behavior are noted in viewgraph form. It is asserted that performance-aiding systems are proliferating without a fundamental understanding of how they would interact with the humans who must control them. Two views of automation research, the hardware view and the human-centered view, are listed. Other viewgraphs give information on vital elements for human-centered research, a continuum of the research process, available technologies, new technologies for persistent problems, a sample research infrastructure, the need for metrics, and examples of data-link technology.

  19. Human factors challenges for advanced process control

    SciTech Connect

    Stubler, W.F.; O`Hara, J..M.

    1996-08-01

    New human-system interface technologies provide opportunities for improving operator and plant performance. However, if these technologies are not properly implemented, they may introduce new challenges to performance and safety. This paper reports the results from a survey of human factors considerations that arise in the implementation of advanced human-system interface technologies in process control and other complex systems. General trends were identified for several areas based on a review of technical literature and a combination of interviews and site visits with process control organizations. Human factors considerations are discussed for two of these areas, automation and controls.

  20. A framework for the co-registration of hemodynamic forces and atherosclerotic plaque components

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Bernard; Chen, Huijun; Chen, Yimin; Hatsukami, Thomas S.; Kerwin, William S.; Yuan, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Local hemodynamic forces, such as wall shear stress, are thought to trigger cellular and molecular mechanisms that determine atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability to rupture. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful tool to characterize human carotid atherosclerotic plaque composition and morphology, and to identify plaque features shown to be key determinants of plaque vulnerability. Image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has allowed researchers to obtain time-resolved wall shear stress (WSS) information of atherosclerotic carotid arteries. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms of initiation and progression of atherosclerosis can be obtained through the comparison of WSS and plaque composition and morphology. To date, however, advance in knowledge has been limited greatly due to the lack of a reliable infrastructure to perform such analysis. The aim of this study is to establish a framework that will allow for the co-registration and analysis of the three-dimensional (3D) distribution ofWSS and plaque components and morphology. The use of this framework will lead to future studies targeted to determining the role of WSS in atherosclerotic plaque progression and vulnerability. PMID:23945133

  1. Caspase-3 Deletion Promotes Necrosis in Atherosclerotic Plaques of ApoE Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Grootaert, Mandy O J; Schrijvers, Dorien M; Hermans, Marthe; Van Hoof, Viviane O; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Martinet, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis of macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in advanced atherosclerotic plaques contributes to plaque progression and instability. Caspase-3, a key executioner protease in the apoptotic pathway, has been identified in human and mouse atherosclerotic plaques but its role in atherogenesis is not fully explored. We therefore investigated the impact of caspase-3 deletion on atherosclerosis by crossbreeding caspase-3 knockout (Casp3(-/-)) mice with apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice. Bone marrow-derived macrophages and VSMCs isolated from Casp3(-/-)ApoE(-/-) mice were resistant to apoptosis but showed increased susceptibility to necrosis. However, caspase-3 deficiency did not sensitize cells to undergo RIP1-dependent necroptosis. To study the effect on atherosclerotic plaque development, Casp3(+/+)ApoE(-/-) and Casp3(-/-)ApoE(-/-) mice were fed a western-type diet for 16 weeks. Though total plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL cholesterol levels were not altered, both the plaque size and percentage necrosis were significantly increased in the aortic root of Casp3(-/-)ApoE(-/-) mice as compared to Casp3(+/+)ApoE(-/-) mice. Macrophage content was significantly decreased in plaques of Casp3(-/-)ApoE(-/-) mice as compared to controls, while collagen content and VSMC content were not changed. To conclude, deletion of caspase-3 promotes plaque growth and plaque necrosis in ApoE(-/-) mice, indicating that this antiapoptotic strategy is unfavorable to improve atherosclerotic plaque stability.

  2. Modern Agriculture in Advanced Placement Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanegran, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the four sections of the Advanced Placement (AP) human geography course focusing on agriculture: (1) development and diffusion of agriculture; (2) major agricultural production regions; (3) rural land use and change; and (4) impacts of modern agricultural change. Includes references and a resource list. (CMK)

  3. Inhibitory effects of oleoylethanolamide (OEA) on H₂O₂-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury and apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) atherosclerotic mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Guo, Xiaobing; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is initiated by vascular endothelial cell injury, which is induced by lipid and protein oxidation. Oleoylethanolamide (OEA), a dietary fat-derived lipid, has shown atheroprotective effect. In vitro studies demonstrated that OEA showed cytoprotective effects on H2O2-induced primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury model. Further investigation of the cytoprotective effects of OEA demonstrated that OEA exerted its function by scavenging for reactive oxygen species, as well as increasing anti-oxidative enzymes, reducing lipid peroxidation, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and apoptosis-related proteins expression. The in vivo study using an ApoE-/- mouse model fed with high-fat diet for 8 weeks showed that OEA (10 mg/kg/day, i.g.) administration reduced blood lipid levels, prevented endothelial cell damage and inhibited early AS plaque formation. In conclusion, our results suggested that OEA exerted a pharmacological effect on ameliorating atherosclerotic plaque formation through the inhibition of oxidative stress-induced endothelial cell injury and therefore OEA can be a potential candidate drug for anti-atherosclerosis.

  4. Inhibitory effects of oleoylethanolamide (OEA) on H2O2-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury and apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) atherosclerotic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Guo, Xiaobing; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is initiated by vascular endothelial cell injury, which is induced by lipid and protein oxidation. Oleoylethanolamide (OEA), a dietary fat-derived lipid, has shown atheroprotective effect. In vitro studies demonstrated that OEA showed cytoprotective effects on H2O2-induced primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury model. Further investigation of the cytoprotective effects of OEA demonstrated that OEA exerted its function by scavenging for reactive oxygen species, as well as increasing anti-oxidative enzymes, reducing lipid peroxidation, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and apoptosis-related proteins expression. The in vivo study using an ApoE-/- mouse model fed with high-fat diet for 8 weeks showed that OEA (10 mg/kg/day, i.g.) administration reduced blood lipid levels, prevented endothelial cell damage and inhibited early AS plaque formation. In conclusion, our results suggested that OEA exerted a pharmacological effect on ameliorating atherosclerotic plaque formation through the inhibition of oxidative stress-induced endothelial cell injury and therefore OEA can be a potential candidate drug for anti-atherosclerosis. PMID:26261506

  5. The lipid-rich core region of human atherosclerotic fibrous plaques. Prevalence of small lipid droplets and vesicles by electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, J. R.; Klemp, K. F.

    1989-01-01

    Abundant extracellular lipid deposits are associated with cell necrosis and tissue weakening in the core region of human atherosclerotic fibrous plaques. The ultrastructural morphology of the core region, previously undefined because of lipid extraction artifacts, was studied with the aid of new osmium-thiocarbohydrazide-osmium and osmium-tannic acid-paraphenylenediamine sequences for tissue processing. Small droplets of neutral lipid (30 to 400 nm profile diameter) and lipid vesicles with aqueous centers accounted for more than 90% of the area occupied by lipid-rich structures in the core region. No foam cells were present. Cholesterol crystals, lipid droplets of a size similar to those in foam cells (0.4 to 6 mu), and larger neutral lipid deposits (greater than 6 mu) together occupied less than 10% of the total area of lipid structures. Abundant lipid vesicles were associated with the nearby presence of cholesterol crystals, whereas small lipid droplets were predominant in areas without crystals. Many droplets had surface defects in the form of pits and vesicular blebs. These morphologic findings are explained most concisely by postulating direct accumulation of extracellular lipid from interstitial lipoproteins as a major process in core region formation. Moreover, a dynamic state of ongoing physical/metabolic transformation of extracellular lipid deposits is suggested. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2646938

  6. Inhibiting macrophage proliferation suppresses atherosclerotic plaque inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Lobatto, Mark E; Hassing, Laurien; van der Staay, Susanne; van Rijs, Sarian M; Calcagno, Claudia; Braza, Mounia S; Baxter, Samantha; Fay, Francois; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Sager, Hendrik; Astudillo, Yaritzy M; Leong, Wei; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Storm, Gert; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Reiner, Thomas; Cormode, David P; Strijkers, Gustav J; Stroes, Erik S G; Swirski, Filip K; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Fisher, Edward A; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M

    2015-04-01

    Inflammation drives atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture, and is a compelling therapeutic target. Consequently, attenuating inflammation by reducing local macrophage accumulation is an appealing approach. This can potentially be accomplished by either blocking blood monocyte recruitment to the plaque or increasing macrophage apoptosis and emigration. Because macrophage proliferation was recently shown to dominate macrophage accumulation in advanced plaques, locally inhibiting macrophage proliferation may reduce plaque inflammation and produce long-term therapeutic benefits. To test this hypothesis, we used nanoparticle-based delivery of simvastatin to inhibit plaque macrophage proliferation in apolipoprotein E deficient mice (Apoe(-/-) ) with advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This resulted in rapid reduction of plaque inflammation and favorable phenotype remodeling. We then combined this short-term nanoparticle intervention with an eight-week oral statin treatment, and this regimen rapidly reduced and continuously suppressed plaque inflammation. Our results demonstrate that pharmacologically inhibiting local macrophage proliferation can effectively treat inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  7. Inhibiting macrophage proliferation suppresses atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jun; Lobatto, Mark E.; Hassing, Laurien; van der Staay, Susanne; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Calcagno, Claudia; Braza, Mounia S.; Baxter, Samantha; Fay, Francois; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Sager, Hendrik B.; Astudillo, Yaritzy M.; Leong, Wei; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Storm, Gert; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Reiner, Thomas; Cormode, David P.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Swirski, Filip K.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation drives atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture, and is a compelling therapeutic target. Consequently, attenuating inflammation by reducing local macrophage accumulation is an appealing approach. This can potentially be accomplished by either blocking blood monocyte recruitment to the plaque or increasing macrophage apoptosis and emigration. Because macrophage proliferation was recently shown to dominate macrophage accumulation in advanced plaques, locally inhibiting macrophage proliferation may reduce plaque inflammation and produce long-term therapeutic benefits. To test this hypothesis, we used nanoparticle-based delivery of simvastatin to inhibit plaque macrophage proliferation in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice (Apoe−/−) with advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This resulted in the rapid reduction of plaque inflammation and favorable phenotype remodeling. We then combined this short-term nanoparticle intervention with an 8-week oral statin treatment, and this regimen rapidly reduced and continuously suppressed plaque inflammation. Our results demonstrate that pharmacologically inhibiting local macrophage proliferation can effectively treat inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26295063

  8. The Advancement of Humans in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The advancement of humans into space and potentially beyond started slow but has greatly increased in speed over the past 2 generations. NASA has been at the forefront of this development and coontinues to lead the way into space exploration. This presentation provides a brief historical overview of NASA's space exploration efforts and touches on the abilityof each new generation to greatly expand our presence in space.

  9. [The relationship between Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta].

    PubMed

    Gloria Breceda, F; Meaney Mendiolea, E; Valero Elizondo, G; Vela Huerta, A

    1997-01-01

    Although atherogenic main factors have been extensively studied, there are others whose real importance has not been well defined. There are some pathologic and immunologic evidences relating several infectious agents with the genesis or development of coronary atherosclerosis. Recently, a link has been established between Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherogenesis, due to immunological evidence of infection in human atherosclerotic lesions. We studied 16 aortic specimens obtained from necropsies performed in subjects who died with coronary heart disease. The infection of Ch. pneumoniae was determined by means of an immunofluorescent technique using a specific monoclonal murine antibody. A positive reaction was found in advanced non-ulcerated fibrolipid lesions in just 2 patients (13%), according with several other observations. It is not known the true relationship between the chlamydia infection and atherogenesis, neither if the infection starts or aggravates the atherosclerotic process or if it is an independent phenomenon.

  10. Percutaneous endovascular management of atherosclerotic axillary artery stenosis: Report of 2 cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Vijayvergiya, Rajesh; Yadav, Mukesh; Grover, Anil

    2011-05-26

    With recent advancement in percutaneous endovascular management, most atherosclerotic peripheral arterial diseases are amenable for intervention. However, there is limited published literature about atherosclerotic axillary artery involvement and its endovascular management. We report two cases of atherosclerotic axillary artery stenosis, which were successfully managed with stent angioplasty using self expanding nitinol stents. The associated coronary artery disease was treated by percutaneous angioplasty and stenting. The long term follow-up revealed patent axillary stents in both cases.

  11. Advances in Human B Cell Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Denise A.; Wei, Chungwen; Qian, Yu; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (“Big Biology”), necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort. PMID:23087687

  12. In vivo and ex vivo measurements of the mean ADC values of lipid necrotic core and hemorrhage obtained from diffusion weighted imaging in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Eun; Treiman, Gerald S; Roberts, John A; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Shi, Xianfeng; Hadley, J Rock; Parker, Dennis L

    2011-11-01

    To determine the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of lipid and hemorrhage in atherosclerotic plaque in human carotid arteries in vivo and compare the values obtained from ex vivo carotid endarterectomy specimens. In vivo diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of carotid plaques was performed using a 2D single shot Interleaved Multislice Inner Volume Diffusion Weighted Echo Planar Imaging (2D ss-IMIV DWEPI) on 8 subjects who subsequently underwent carotid endarterectomy. A total of 32 slices used to construct the ADC maps were reviewed for the measurement of the mean ADC values in vessel wall, hemorrhage, and lipid necrotic core. The 8 endarterectomy specimens were scanned using by three-dimensional ms-IV-DWEPI. After the ADC maps were created, the mean ADC values in the same locations selected for in vivo values were calculated. The mean ADC values obtained from in vivo DWI in normal vessel wall, lipid rich core, and hemorrhage were 1.27 ± 0.16, 0.38 ± 0.1, and 0.98 ± 0.25 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s, respectively. The mean ADC values in ex vivo lipid necrotic core, and hemorrhage were 0.33 ± 0.08, 1.28 ± 0.10 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s, respectively. These components mean ADC values obtained from in vivo and ex vivo ADC maps were compared. ADC values of the carotid plaque components in vivo are consistent with values obtained from ex vivo endarterectomy specimens. The ability to obtain consistent plaque ADC values in vivo indicates that this technique could be an integral part of the basis for plaque component identification in conjunction with other MRI techniques. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Advancing a vaccine to prevent human schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Merrifield, Maureen; Hotez, Peter J; Beaumier, Coreen M; Gillespie, Portia; Strych, Ulrich; Hayward, Tara; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2016-06-03

    Several candidate human schistosomiasis vaccines are in different stages of preclinical and clinical development. The major targets are Schistosoma haematobium (urogenitial schistosomiasis) and Schistosoma mansoni (intestinal schistosomiasis) that account for 99% of the world's 252 million cases, with 90% of these cases in Africa. Two recombinant S. mansoni vaccines - Sm-TSP-2 and Sm-14 are in Phase 1 trials, while Smp80 (calpain) is undergoing testing in non-human primates. Sh28GST, also known as Bilhvax is in advanced clinical development for S. haematobium infection. The possibility remains that some of these vaccines may cross-react to target both schistosome species. These vaccines were selected on the basis of their protective immunity in preclinical challenge models, through human immune-epidemiological studies or both. They are being advanced through a combination of academic research institutions, non-profit vaccine product development partnerships, biotechnology companies, and developing country vaccine manufacturers. In addition, new schistosome candidate vaccines are being identified through bioinformatics, OMICs approaches, and moderate throughput screening, although the full potential of reverse vaccinology for schistosomiasis has not yet been realized. The target product profiles of these vaccines vary but many focus on vaccinating children, in some cases following mass treatment with praziquantel, also known as vaccine-linked chemotherapy. Several regulatory pathways have been proposed, some of which rely on World Health Organization prequalification. Copyright © 2016 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Human carotid atherosclerotic plaque protein(s) change HDL protein(s) composition and impair HDL anti-oxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elad; Aviram, Michael; Khatib, Soliman; Volkova, Nina; Vaya, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) anti-atherogenic functions are closely associated with cardiovascular disease risk factor, and are dictated by its composition, which is often affected by environmental factors. The present study investigates the effects of the human carotid plaque constituents on HDL composition and biological functions. To this end, human carotid plaques were homogenized and incubated with HDL. Results showed that after incubation, most of the apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1) protein was released from the HDL, and HDL diameter increased by an average of approximately 2 nm. In parallel, HDL antioxidant activity was impaired. In response to homogenate treatment HDL could not prevent the accelerated oxidation of LDL caused by the homogenate. Boiling of the homogenate prior to its incubation with HDL abolished its effects on HDL composition changes. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence quenching assay revealed an interaction between plaque component(s) and HDL, an interaction that was reduced by 50% upon using pre-boiled homogenate. These results led to hypothesize that plaque protein(s) interacted with HDL-associated Apo A1 and altered the HDL composition. Immuno-precipitation of Apo A1 that was released from the HDL after its incubation with the homogenate revealed a co-precipitation of three isomers of actin. However, beta-actin alone did not significantly affect the HDL composition, and yet the active protein within the plaque was elusive. In conclusion then, protein(s) in the homogenate interact with HDL protein(s), leading to release of Apo A1 from the HDL particle, a process that was associated with an increase in HDL diameter and with impaired HDL anti-oxidant activity.

  15. Adipo/cytokines in atherosclerotic secretomes: increased visfatin levels in unstable carotid plaque.

    PubMed

    Auguet, Teresa; Aragonès, Gemma; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Berlanga, Alba; Curriu, Marta; Martinez, Salomé; Alibalic, Ajla; Aguilar, Carmen; Camara, María-Luisa; Hernández, Esteban; Ruyra, Xavier; Martín-Paredero, Vicente; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-07-08

    Novel pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory derivatives from adipose tissue, known as adipokines, act as metabolic factors. The aim of this study was to analyse the secreted expression of different adipo/cytokines in secretomes of unstable carotid atherosclerotic plaque versus non-atherosclerotic mammary artery. We evaluated the secretion levels of adiponectin, visfatin, lipocalin-2, resistin, IL-6 and TNFR2 by ELISA in human secretomes from cultured unstable carotid atherosclerotic plaque (n = 18) and non-atherosclerotic mammary artery (n = 13). We also measured visfatin serum levels in patients suffering from atherosclerosis and in a serum cohort of healthy subjects (n = 16). We found that visfatin levels were significantly increased in unstable carotid atherosclerotic plaque secretome than in non-atherosclerotic mammary artery secretome. No differences were found with regard the other adipo/cytokines studied. Regarding visfatin circulating levels, there were no differences between unstable carotid atherosclerotic plaque and non-atherosclerotic mammary artery group. However, these visfatin levels were increased in comparison to serum cohort of healthy subjects. Of all the adipo/cytokines analysed, only visfatin showed increased levels in secretomes of unstable carotid atherosclerotic plaque. Additional human studies are needed to clarify the possible role of visfatin as prognostic factor of unstable carotid atherosclerotic plaque.

  16. Application of IR and NIR fiber optic imaging in thermographic and spectroscopic diagnosis of atherosclerotic vulnerable plaques: preliminary experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghavi, Morteza; Khan, Tania; Gu, Bujin; Soller, Babs R.; Melling, Peter; Asif, Mohammed; Gul, Khawar; Madjid, Mohammad; Casscells, S. W.; Willerson, James T.

    2000-12-01

    Despite major advances in cardiovascular science and technology during the past three decades, approximately half of all myocardial infarctions and sudden deaths occur unexpectedly. It is widely accepted that coronary atherosclerotic plaques and thrombotic complications resulting from their rupture or erosion are the underlying causes of this major health problem. The majority of these vulnerable plaques exhibit active inflammation, a large necrotic lipid core, a thin fibrous cap, and confer a stenosis of less than 70%. These lesions are not detectable by stress testing or coronary angiography. Our group is exploring the possibility of a functional classification based on physiological variables such as plaque temperature, pH, oxygen consumption, lactate production etc. We have shown that heat accurately locates the inflamed plaques. We also demonstrated human atherosclerotic plaques are heterogeneous with regard to pH and hot plaques and are more likely to be acidic. To develop a nonsurgical method for locating the inflamed plaques, we are developing both IR fiber optic imaging and NIR spectroscopic systems in our laboratory to detect hot and acidic plaque in atherosclerotic arterial walls. Our findings introduce the possibility of an isolated/combined IR and NIR fiber optic catheter that can bring new insight into functional assessment of atherosclerotic plaque and thereby detection of active and inflamed lesions responsible for heart attacks and strokes.

  17. Laboratory Diagnosis of Human Rabies: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Reeta Subramaniam; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Rabies, an acute progressive, fatal encephalomyelitis, transmitted most commonly through the bite of a rabid animal, is responsible for an estimated 61,000 human deaths worldwide. The true disease burden and public health impact due to rabies remain underestimated due to lack of sensitive laboratory diagnostic methods. Rapid diagnosis of rabies can help initiate prompt infection control and public health measures, obviate the need for unnecessary treatment/medical tests, and assist in timely administration of pre- or postexposure prophylactic vaccination to family members and medical staff. Antemortem diagnosis of human rabies provides an impetus for clinicians to attempt experimental therapeutic approaches in some patients, especially after the reported survival of a few cases of human rabies. Traditional methods for antemortem and postmortem rabies diagnosis have several limitations. Recent advances in technology have led to the improvement or development of several diagnostic assays which include methods for rabies viral antigen and antibody detection and assays for viral nucleic acid detection and identification of specific biomarkers. These assays which complement traditional methods have the potential to revolutionize rabies diagnosis in future. PMID:24348170

  18. Management of Atherosclerotic Aortoiliac Occlusive Disease.

    PubMed

    Bujak, Marcin; Gamberdella, Jacqueline; Mena, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Development of aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD) is associated with classic risk factors for atherosclerotic disease such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, or smoking. Risk factor modification, smoking cessation, and prevention of cardiovascular events remain the cornerstones of AIOD management. Symptom improvement and limb loss prevention are considered secondary goals of therapy. Continuous technological advances, new devices, as well as new revascularization techniques are constantly changing the landscape of AIOD management. Surgical interventions, which were considered a gold standard therapy for nearly 50 years, currently give way to newer and less invasive endovascular techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Recent advances in human viruses imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Florian, Paula Ecaterina; Rouillé, Yves; Ruta, Simona; Nichita, Norica; Roseanu, Anca

    2016-06-01

    Microscopy techniques are often exploited by virologists to investigate molecular details of critical steps in viruses' life cycles such as host cell recognition and entry, genome replication, intracellular trafficking, and release of mature virions. Fluorescence microscopy is the most attractive tool employed to detect intracellular localizations of various stages of the viral infection and monitor the pathogen-host interactions associated with them. Super-resolution microscopy techniques have overcome the technical limitations of conventional microscopy and offered new exciting insights into the formation and trafficking of human viruses. In addition, the development of state-of-the art electron microscopy techniques has become particularly important in studying virus morphogenesis by revealing ground-braking ultrastructural details of this process. This review provides recent advances in human viruses imaging in both, in vitro cell culture systems and in vivo, in the animal models recently developed. The newly available imaging technologies bring a major contribution to our understanding of virus pathogenesis and will become an important tool in early diagnosis of viral infection and the development of novel therapeutics to combat the disease.

  20. Caspase-3 Deletion Promotes Necrosis in Atherosclerotic Plaques of ApoE Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schrijvers, Dorien M.; Hermans, Marthe; Van Hoof, Viviane O.; De Meyer, Guido R. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis of macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in advanced atherosclerotic plaques contributes to plaque progression and instability. Caspase-3, a key executioner protease in the apoptotic pathway, has been identified in human and mouse atherosclerotic plaques but its role in atherogenesis is not fully explored. We therefore investigated the impact of caspase-3 deletion on atherosclerosis by crossbreeding caspase-3 knockout (Casp3−/−) mice with apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE−/−) mice. Bone marrow-derived macrophages and VSMCs isolated from Casp3−/−ApoE−/− mice were resistant to apoptosis but showed increased susceptibility to necrosis. However, caspase-3 deficiency did not sensitize cells to undergo RIP1-dependent necroptosis. To study the effect on atherosclerotic plaque development, Casp3+/+ApoE−/− and Casp3−/−ApoE−/− mice were fed a western-type diet for 16 weeks. Though total plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL cholesterol levels were not altered, both the plaque size and percentage necrosis were significantly increased in the aortic root of Casp3−/−ApoE−/− mice as compared to Casp3+/+ApoE−/− mice. Macrophage content was significantly decreased in plaques of Casp3−/−ApoE−/− mice as compared to controls, while collagen content and VSMC content were not changed. To conclude, deletion of caspase-3 promotes plaque growth and plaque necrosis in ApoE−/− mice, indicating that this antiapoptotic strategy is unfavorable to improve atherosclerotic plaque stability. PMID:27847551

  1. Advancing palliative care as a human right.

    PubMed

    Gwyther, Liz; Brennan, Frank; Harding, Richard

    2009-11-01

    a matter of priority, [these] obligations." This article describes recent advocacy activities and explores practical strategies for the palliative care community to use within a human rights framework to advance palliative care development worldwide.

  2. Plaque and arterial vulnerability investigation in a three-layer atherosclerotic human coronary artery using computational fluid-structure interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is the common form of cardiovascular diseases and known to be the main reason of deaths in the world. Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) simulations can be employed to assess the interactions of artery/plaque and blood to provide a more precise anticipation for rupture of arterial tissue layers and plaque tissues inside an atherosclerotic artery. To date, the arterial tissue in computational FSI simulations has been considered as a one-layer structure. However, a single layer assumption might have deeply bounded the results and, consequently, more computational simulation is needed by considering the arterial tissue as a three-layer structure. In this study, a three-dimensional computational FSI model of an atherosclerotic artery with a three-layer structure and different plaque types was established to perform a more accurate arterial wall/plaque tissue vulnerability assessment. The hyperelastic material coefficients of arterial layers were calculated and implemented in the computational model. The fully coupled fluid and structure models were solved using the explicit dynamics finite element code LS-DYNA. The results revealed the significant role of plaque types in the normal and shear stresses induced within the arterial tissue layers. The highest von Mises and shear stresses were observed on the stiffest calcified plaque with 3.59 and 3.27 MPa, while the lowest von Mises and shear stresses were seen on the hypocellular plaque with 1.15 and 0.63 MPa, respectively. Regardless of plaque types, the media and adventitia layers were played protective roles by displaying less stress on their wall, whilst the intima layer was at a high risk of rupture. The findings of this study have implications not only for determining the most vulnerable arterial layer/plaque tissue inside an atherosclerotic coronary artery but also for balloon-angioplasty, stenting, and bypass surgeries.

  3. Advancing swine models for human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Walters, Eric M; Prather, Randall S

    2013-01-01

    Swine models are relatively new kids on the block for modeling human health and diseases when compared to rodents and dogs. Because of the similarity to humans in size, physiology, and genetics, the pig has made significant strides in advancing the understanding of the human condition, and is thus an excellent choice for an animal model. Recent technological advances to genetic engineering of the swine genome enhance the utility of swine as models of human genetic diseases.

  4. Atherosclerotic Oxalosis in Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Gregory A.; Micheletti, Robert G.; Currier, Judith S.; Singer, Elyse; Fishbein, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Summary There are many forms of oxalosis, with deposition of oxalate crystals in various organs, including arteries. In this retrospective study we describe deposition of calcium oxalate crystals within atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries of 4 patients, a site of oxalate deposition not previously reported. We suggest the phrase “atherosclerotic oxalosis” for this finding. Background Systemic oxalosis may be hereditary or acquired. In these cases, calcium oxalate deposits have been reported in numerous tissues, including the media of arteries. In any category, calcium oxalate deposition has not been described within atherosclerotic plaques in any arteries. Methods As part of a retrospective clinicopathologic study, 80 hearts were obtained from the National Neurologic AIDS Bank in an effort to study coronary atherosclerosis in patients infected with HIV. The population consisted of 66 HIV-positive and 14 HIV-negative patients with an average age of 47 years; 79% were males. Proximal coronary arteries were serially-sectioned and processed routinely. Sections were studied by H&E staining, and in selected cases, von Kossa stain, and alizarin red S under different conditions, including polarized light, to allow distinction of calcium phosphate from calcium oxalate. Medical histories, autopsy reports, and general autopsy slides were reviewed. Results In 4 patients (3 with AIDS) calcium oxalate crystals were observed within atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries. Similar deposits were seen in the thyroid gland and other organs, but not in the kidneys. None of the patients had chronic renal failure. Conclusion The calcium oxalate crystal deposits observed in the atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries of these 4 patients are unique in two ways: 1) these deposits have not previously been described in atherosclerotic plaques, 2) the patients did not demonstrate any of the recognized patterns of oxalosis. We suggest the phrase “atherosclerotic

  5. Advanced Video Activity Analytics (AVAA): Human Factors Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    ARL-TR-7286 ● MAY 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Advanced Video Activity Analytics (AVAA): Human Factors Evaluation by...TR-7286 ● MAY 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Advanced Video Activity Analytics (AVAA): Human Factors Evaluation Patricia L McDermott...

  6. Atherosclerotic oxalosis in coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Micheletti, Robert G; Currier, Judith S; Singer, Elyse; Fishbein, Michael C

    2008-01-01

    Systemic oxalosis may be hereditary or acquired. In these cases, calcium oxalate deposits have been reported in numerous tissues, including the media of arteries. In any category, calcium oxalate deposition has not been described within atherosclerotic plaques in any arteries. As part of a retrospective clinicopathologic study, 80 hearts were obtained from the National Neurological AIDS Bank in an effort to study coronary atherosclerosis in patients infected with HIV. The population consisted of 66 HIV-positive and 14 HIV-negative patients with an average age of 47 years; 79% were males. Proximal coronary arteries were serially sectioned and processed routinely. Sections were studied by hematoxylin and eosin staining and, in selected cases, von Kossa stain and alizarin red S under different conditions, including polarized light, to allow distinction of calcium phosphate from calcium oxalate. Medical histories, autopsy reports, and general autopsy slides were reviewed. In four patients (three with AIDS), calcium oxalate crystals were observed within atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries. Similar deposits were seen in the thyroid gland and other organs but not in the kidneys. None of the patients had chronic renal failure. The calcium oxalate crystal deposits observed in the atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries of these four patients are unique in two ways: (a) these deposits have not previously been described in atherosclerotic plaques; (b) the patients did not demonstrate any of the recognized patterns of oxalosis. We suggest the phrase "atherosclerotic oxalosis" to describe this finding.

  7. Targeting macrophage Histone deacetylase 3 stabilizes atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hoeksema, Marten A; Gijbels, Marion JJ; Van den Bossche, Jan; van der Velden, Saskia; Sijm, Ayestha; Neele, Annette E; Seijkens, Tom; Stöger, J Lauran; Meiler, Svenja; Boshuizen, Marieke CS; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Levels, Johannes HM; Boon, Louis; Mullican, Shannon E; Spann, Nathanael J; Cleutjens, Jack P; Glass, Chris K; Lazar, Mitchell A; de Vries, Carlie JM; Biessen, Erik AL; Daemen, Mat JAP; Lutgens, Esther; de Winther, Menno PJ

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are key immune cells found in atherosclerotic plaques and critically shape atherosclerotic disease development. Targeting the functional repertoire of macrophages may hold novel approaches for future atherosclerosis management. Here, we describe a previously unrecognized role of the epigenomic enzyme Histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) in regulating the atherosclerotic phenotype of macrophages. Using conditional knockout mice, we found that myeloid Hdac3 deficiency promotes collagen deposition in atherosclerotic lesions and thus induces a stable plaque phenotype. Also, macrophages presented a switch to anti-inflammatory wound healing characteristics and showed improved lipid handling. The pro-fibrotic phenotype was directly linked to epigenetic regulation of the Tgfb1 locus upon Hdac3 deletion, driving smooth muscle cells to increased collagen production. Moreover, in humans, HDAC3 was the sole Hdac upregulated in ruptured atherosclerotic lesions, Hdac3 associated with inflammatory macrophages, and HDAC3 expression inversely correlated with pro-fibrotic TGFB1 expression. Collectively, we show that targeting the macrophage epigenome can improve atherosclerosis outcome and we identify Hdac3 as a potential novel therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease. PMID:25007801

  8. Morpheus: Advancing Technologies for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olansen, Jon B.; Munday, Stephen R.; Mitchell, Jennifer D.; Baine, Michael

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Morpheus Project has developed and tested a prototype planetary lander capable of vertical takeoff and landing. Designed to serve as a vertical testbed (VTB) for advanced spacecraft technologies, the vehicle provides a platform for bringing technologies from the laboratory into an integrated flight system at relatively low cost. This allows individual technologies to mature into capabilities that can be incorporated into human exploration missions. The Morpheus vehicle is propelled by a LOX/Methane engine and sized to carry a payload of 1100 lb to the lunar surface. In addition to VTB vehicles, the Project s major elements include ground support systems and an operations facility. Initial testing will demonstrate technologies used to perform autonomous hazard avoidance and precision landing on a lunar or other planetary surface. The Morpheus vehicle successfully performed a set of integrated vehicle test flights including hot-fire and tethered hover tests, leading up to un-tethered free-flights. The initial phase of this development and testing campaign is being conducted on-site at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), with the first fully integrated vehicle firing its engine less than one year after project initiation. Designed, developed, manufactured and operated in-house by engineers at JSC, the Morpheus Project represents an unprecedented departure from recent NASA programs that traditionally require longer, more expensive development lifecycles and testing at remote, dedicated testing facilities. Morpheus testing includes three major types of integrated tests. A hot-fire (HF) is a static vehicle test of the LOX/Methane propulsion system. Tether tests (TT) have the vehicle suspended above the ground using a crane, which allows testing of the propulsion and integrated Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) in hovering flight without the risk of a vehicle departure or crash. Morpheus free-flights (FF) test the complete Morpheus system without the additional

  9. Advanced Human Factors Engineering Tool Technologies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-20

    identified the types of tools they would like to see V developed to fill the existing technology gaps. The advanced tools were catego- rized using an...the prototype phase of development were considered candidates for inclusion. The advanced tools were next categorized using an eight point...role, application, status and cost. Decision criteria were then developed as the basis for the tradeoff process to aid in tool selection. To

  10. Atherosclerotic plaque characterization by spatial and temporal speckle pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tearney, Guillermo J.; Bouma, Brett E.

    2002-04-01

    Improved methods are needed to identify the vulnerable coronary plaques responsible for acute myocardial infraction or sudden cardiac death. We describe a method for characterizing the structure and biomechanical properties of atherosclerotic plaques based on speckle pattern fluctuations. Near-field speckle images were acquired from five human aortic specimens ex vivo. The speckle decorrelation time constant varied significantly for vulnerable aortic plaques (τ = 40 ms) versus stable plaques (τ = 400 ms) and normal aorta (τ = 500 ms). These initial results indicate that different atherosclerotic plaque types may be distinguished by analysis of temporal and spatial speckle pattern fluctuations.

  11. Atherosclerotic plaque behind the stent changes after bare-metal and drug-eluting stent implantation in humans: implications for late stent failure?

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Ioannis; Takahashi, Saeko; Tsuda, Masaya; Shishido, Koki; Antoniadis, Antonios P.; Papafaklis, Michail I.; Mizuno, Shingo; Coskun, Ahmet U.; Saito, Shigeru; Feldman, Charles L.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Stone, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The natural history and the role of atherosclerotic plaque located behind the stent (PBS) are still poorly understood. We evaluated the serial changes in PBS following bare-metal (BMS) compared to first-generation drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation and the impact of these changes on in-stent neointimal hyperplasia (NIH). Methods Three-dimensional coronary reconstruction by angiography and intravascular ultrasound was performed after intervention and at 6–10-month follow-up in 157 patients with 188 lesions treated with BMS (n=89) and DES (n=99). Results There was a significant decrease in PBS area (−7.2%; p<0.001) and vessel area (−1.7%; p<0.001) after BMS and a respective increase in both areas after DES implantation (6.1%; p<0.001 and 4.1%; p<0.001, respectively). The decrease in PBS area significantly predicted neointimal area at follow-up after BMS (β: 0.15; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.10–0.20, p<0.001) and DES (β: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.07–0.11; p<0.001) implantation. The decrease in PBS area was the most powerful predictor of significant NIH after BMS implantation (odds ratio: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.02–1.26; p=0.02). Conclusions The decrease in PBS area after stent implantation is significantly associated with the magnitude of NIH development at follow-up. This finding raises the possibility of a communication between the lesion within the stent and the underlying native atherosclerotic plaque, and may have important implications regarding the pathobiology of in-stent restenosis and late/very late stent thrombosis. PMID:27494445

  12. Advancing Humanities Studies at Community, Technical, and Junior Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Diane U.; And Others

    The American Association of Community and Junior Colleges' (AACJC's) two-year Advancing the Humanities Project (AHP) has assisted selected community colleges in promoting the humanities on their campuses. Parts I and II of this report on the AHP present statements by Dale Parnell and Judith Jeffrey Howard about the AACJC's humanities initiatives…

  13. Human factors survey of advanced instrumentation and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A survey oriented towards identifying the human factors issues in regard to the use of advanced instrumentation and controls (I C) in the nuclear industry was conducted. A number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities were participants in the survey. Human factors items, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays (CGD), controls, organizational support, training, and related topics, were discussed. The survey found the industry to be concerned about the human factors issues related to the implementation of advanced I C. Fifteen potential human factors problems were identified. They include: the need for an advanced I C guideline equivalent to NUREG-0700; a role change in the control room from operator to supervisor; information overload; adequacy of existing training technology for advanced I C; and operator acceptance and trust. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Nuclear Molecular Imaging for Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease as well as a lipid disorder. Atherosclerotic plaque formed in vessel walls may cause ischemia, and the rupture of vulnerable plaque may result in fatal events, like myocardial infarction or stroke. Because morphological imaging has limitations in diagnosing vulnerable plaque, molecular imaging has been developed, in particular, the use of nuclear imaging probes. Molecular imaging targets various aspects of vulnerable plaque, such as inflammatory cell accumulation, endothelial activation, proteolysis, neoangiogenesis, hypoxia, apoptosis, and calcification. Many preclinical and clinical studies have been conducted with various imaging probes and some of them have exhibited promising results. Despite some limitations in imaging technology, molecular imaging is expected to be used both in the research and clinical fields as imaging instruments become more advanced. PMID:26357491

  15. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy for the characterization of atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Jennifer; Sun, Yinghua; Saroufeem, Ramez; Hatami, Nisa; Marcu, Laura

    2009-02-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque composition has been associated with plaque instability and rupture. This study investigates the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for mapping plaque composition and assessing features of vulnerability. Measurements were conducted in atherosclerotic human aortic samples using an endoscopic FLIM system (spatial resolution of 35 µm temporal resolution 200 ps) developed in our lab which allows mapping in one measurement the composition within a volume of 4 mm diameter x 250 µm depth. Each pixel in the image represents a corresponding fluorescence lifetime value; images are formed through a flexible 0.6 mm side-viewing imaging bundle which allows for further intravascular applications. Based on previously recorded spectra of human atherosclerotic plaque, fluorescence emission was collected through two filters: f1: 377/50 and f2: 460/60 (center wavelength/bandwidth), which together provides the greatest discrimination between intrinsic fluorophores related to plaque vulnerability. We have imaged nine aortas and lifetime images were retrieved using a Laguerre expansion deconvolution technique and correlated with histopathology. Early results demonstrate discrimination using fluorescence lifetime between early, lipid-rich, and collagen-rich lesions which are consistent with previously reported time-resolved atherosclerotic plaque measurements.

  16. Nuclear microscopy of atherosclerotic tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Selley, M.; Thong, P. S. P.; Tang, S. M.

    1995-09-01

    Of the many proposed coronary disease risk factors, the link between heart disease and stored iron has been the subject of recent interest. Samples of proximal thoracic aorta were taken from rabbits fed with 1% cholesterol for 12 weeks, and also from control animals. Unstained freeze dried sections were scanned using the nuclear microscope at the National University of Singapore (NUS) and results indicate that there is an eightfold increase in iron (from 12 ppm to 90 ppm) within the atherosclerotic lesion compared with normal tissue. This result adds weight to the theory that iron may act as a factor in the oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which induces the formation of foam cells, characteristic of early atherosclerotic lesions.

  17. Progress in atherosclerotic plaque imaging

    PubMed Central

    Soloperto, Giulia; Casciaro, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the primary cause of mortality in the industrialized world, and arterial obstruction, triggered by rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques, lead to myocardial infarction and cerebral stroke. Vulnerable plaques do not necessarily occur with flow-limiting stenosis, thus conventional luminographic assessment of the pathology fails to identify unstable lesions. In this review we discuss the currently available imaging modalities used to investigate morphological features and biological characteristics of the atherosclerotic plaque. The different imaging modalities such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear imaging and their intravascular applications are illustrated, highlighting their specific diagnostic potential. Clinically available and upcoming methodologies are also reviewed along with the related challenges in their clinical translation, concerning the specific invasiveness, accuracy and cost-effectiveness of these methods. PMID:22937215

  18. Advancing Usability Evaluation through Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman

    2005-07-01

    This paper introduces a novel augmentation to the current heuristic usability evaluation methodology. The SPAR-H human reliability analysis method was developed for categorizing human performance in nuclear power plants. Despite the specialized use of SPAR-H for safety critical scenarios, the method also holds promise for use in commercial off-the-shelf software usability evaluations. The SPAR-H method shares task analysis underpinnings with human-computer interaction, and it can be easily adapted to incorporate usability heuristics as performance shaping factors. By assigning probabilistic modifiers to heuristics, it is possible to arrive at the usability error probability (UEP). This UEP is not a literal probability of error but nonetheless provides a quantitative basis to heuristic evaluation. When combined with a consequence matrix for usability errors, this method affords ready prioritization of usability issues.

  19. Advanced Human Factors Engineering Tool Technologies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    representing the government, the military, academe, and private industry were surveyed to identify those tools that are most frequently used or viewed...tools by HFE researchers and practitioners within the academic, industrial , and military settings. % .. J. &@ossion For XTIS GR&&I DTIC TAS 0...267 E. Human Factors Engineering Tools Questionnaire .. ......... . 279 F. Listing of Industry , Government, and Academe

  20. Histomorphological evaluation of atherosclerotic lesions in patients with peripheral artery occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Alexander; Senner, Simon; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Pelisek, Jaroslav

    2015-09-01

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is mainly caused by atherosclerosis of the vessel wall. These pathological changes are classified into different stages and are well described for carotid and coronary vessels, but not for PAOD. The aim of our study was to analyze plaque morphology of femoral arteries in patients with intermittent claudication and critical limb ischemia. In this retrospective study 85 atherosclerotic plaques (common and superficial femoral artery) of 71 patients with a clinical symptomatic PAOD were analyzed, by histology (01/2009-07/2010). Atherosclerotic lesions were classified according to Stary (type I-VIII). For further characterization, plaques were evaluated for the presence of collagen, elastin, calcifications, smooth muscle cells, macrophages, leucocytes, and cellularity. The majority (91%) of atherosclerotic lesions were of advanced types according to Stary (V-VII). Atherosclerotic lesion type VI was associated with significant higher amount of inflammatory cells in comparison to all other atherosclerotic plaque types (CD45: p<0.001; CD68: p=0.013). In addition, atherosclerotic plaques with a pronounced neovascularization contained a higher amount of CD45 (p=0.015; rho=0.273) and CD68 (p=0.016; rho=0.275) positive cells. Atherosclerotic lesions of femoral arteries show similar morphological changes as coronary or carotid arteries. But inflammatory cells had a higher impact on plaque progression and destabilization than any other factor. Copyright © 2015 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  1. Human factors aspects of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    An important consideration in regards to the use of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry is the interface between the instrumentation system and the human. A survey, oriented towards identifying the human factors aspects of digital instrumentation, was conducted at a number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities. Human factors issues, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays, controls, organizational support, training, and related topics were identified. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. 18F-FDG imaging of human atherosclerotic carotid plaques reflects gene expression of the key hypoxia marker HIF-1α

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Sune Folke; Græbe, Martin; Hag, Anne Mette F; Højgaard, Liselotte; Sillesen, Henrik; Kjær, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the association between gene expression of key molecular markers of hypoxia and inflammation in atherosclerotic carotid lesions with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) uptake as determined clinically by positron emission tomography (PET). Studies using PET have demonstrated 18F-FDG-uptake in patients with confirmed plaques of the carotid artery. Inflammatory active or “vulnerable” plaques progressively increase in bulk, develop necrotic cores, poor vessel-wall vascularization and become prone to hypoxia. We used quantitative polymerase-chain reaction (qPCR) to determine gene expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and cluster of differentiation 68 (CD68) on plaques recovered by carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in 18 patients. Gene expression was compared with 18F-FDG-uptake quantified as the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on co-registered PET/computed tomography (CT) scans performed the day before CEA. Immunohistochemistry was used to validate target-gene protein expression. In univariate linear regression analysis HIF-1α was significantly correlated with 18F-FDG-uptake (SUVmax) as was CD68. A two-tailed Pearson regression model demonstrated that HIF-1α and CD68 gene expression co-variated and accordingly when entering the variables into multivariate linear regression models with SUV-values as dependent variables, HIF-1α was eliminated in the final models. 18F-FDG-uptake (SUVmax) is correlated with HIF-1α gene expression indicating an association between hypoxia and glucose metabolism in vivo. The marker of inflammation CD68 is also associated with 18F-FDG-uptake (SUVmax). As CD68 and HIF-1α gene expression co-variate their information is overlapping. PMID:24116346

  3. Advanced Solid State Lighting for Human Evaluation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Holbert, Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Lighting intensity and color have a significant impact on human circadian rhythms. Advanced solid state lighting was developed for the Advanced Exploration System (AES) Deep Space Habitat(DSH) concept demonstrator. The latest generation of assemblies using the latest commercially available LED lights were designed for use in the Bigelow Aerospace Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) simulator and the University of Hawaii's Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (Hi-SEAS) habitat. Agreements with both these organizations will allow the government to receive feedback on the lights and lighting algorithms from long term human interaction.

  4. MRI-based patient-specific human carotid atherosclerotic vessel material property variations in patients, vessel location and long-term follow up

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingyu; Canton, Gador; Guo, Jian; Guo, Xiaoya; Hatsukami, Thomas S.; Billiar, Kristen L.; Yuan, Chun; Wu, Zheyang

    2017-01-01

    Background Image-based computational models are widely used to determine atherosclerotic plaque stress/strain conditions and investigate their association with plaque progression and rupture. However, patient-specific vessel material properties are in general lacking in those models, limiting the accuracy of their stress/strain measurements. A noninvasive approach of combining in vivo 3D multi-contrast and Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational modeling was introduced to quantify patient-specific carotid plaque material properties for potential plaque model improvements. Vessel material property variation in patients, along vessel segment, and between baseline and follow up were investigated. Methods In vivo 3D multi-contrast and Cine MRI carotid plaque data were acquired from 8 patients with follow-up (18 months) with written informed consent obtained. 3D thin-layer models and an established iterative procedure were used to determine parameter values of the Mooney-Rivlin models for the 81slices from 16 plaque samples. Effective Young’s Modulus (YM) values were calculated for comparison and analysis. Results Average Effective Young’s Modulus (YM) and circumferential shrinkage rate (C-Shrink) value of the 81 slices was 411kPa and 5.62%, respectively. Slice YM value varied from 70 kPa (softest) to 1284 kPa (stiffest), a 1734% difference. Average slice YM values by vessel varied from 109 kPa (softest) to 922 kPa (stiffest), a 746% difference. Location-wise, the maximum slice YM variation rate within a vessel was 311% (149 kPa vs. 613 kPa). The average slice YM variation rate for the 16 vessels was 134%. The average variation of YM values for all patients from baseline to follow up was 61.0%. The range of the variation of YM values was [-28.4%, 215%]. For plaque progression study, YM at follow-up showed negative correlation with plaque progression measured by wall thickness increase (WTI) (r = -0.7764, p = 0.0235). Wall thickness at baseline

  5. MRI-based patient-specific human carotid atherosclerotic vessel material property variations in patients, vessel location and long-term follow up.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingyu; Canton, Gador; Guo, Jian; Guo, Xiaoya; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Billiar, Kristen L; Yuan, Chun; Wu, Zheyang; Tang, Dalin

    2017-01-01

    Image-based computational models are widely used to determine atherosclerotic plaque stress/strain conditions and investigate their association with plaque progression and rupture. However, patient-specific vessel material properties are in general lacking in those models, limiting the accuracy of their stress/strain measurements. A noninvasive approach of combining in vivo 3D multi-contrast and Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational modeling was introduced to quantify patient-specific carotid plaque material properties for potential plaque model improvements. Vessel material property variation in patients, along vessel segment, and between baseline and follow up were investigated. In vivo 3D multi-contrast and Cine MRI carotid plaque data were acquired from 8 patients with follow-up (18 months) with written informed consent obtained. 3D thin-layer models and an established iterative procedure were used to determine parameter values of the Mooney-Rivlin models for the 81slices from 16 plaque samples. Effective Young's Modulus (YM) values were calculated for comparison and analysis. Average Effective Young's Modulus (YM) and circumferential shrinkage rate (C-Shrink) value of the 81 slices was 411kPa and 5.62%, respectively. Slice YM value varied from 70 kPa (softest) to 1284 kPa (stiffest), a 1734% difference. Average slice YM values by vessel varied from 109 kPa (softest) to 922 kPa (stiffest), a 746% difference. Location-wise, the maximum slice YM variation rate within a vessel was 311% (149 kPa vs. 613 kPa). The average slice YM variation rate for the 16 vessels was 134%. The average variation of YM values for all patients from baseline to follow up was 61.0%. The range of the variation of YM values was [-28.4%, 215%]. For plaque progression study, YM at follow-up showed negative correlation with plaque progression measured by wall thickness increase (WTI) (r = -0.7764, p = 0.0235). Wall thickness at baseline correlated with WTI negatively, with

  6. Human life support for advanced space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzkopf, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    The requirements for a human life support system for long-duration space missions are reviewed. The system design of a controlled ecological life support system is briefly described, followed by a more detailed account of the study of the conceptual design of a Lunar Based CELSS. The latter is to provide a safe, reliable, recycling lunar base life support system based on a hybrid physicochemical/biological representative technology. The most important conclusion reached by this study is that implementation of a completely recycling CELSS approach for a lunar base is not only feasible, but eminently practical. On a cumulative launch mass basis, a 4-person Lunar Base CELSS would pay for itself in approximately 2.6 years relative to a physicochemical air/water recycling system with resupply of food from the Earth. For crew sizes of 30 and 100, the breakeven point would come even sooner, after 2.1 and 1.7 years, respectively, due to the increased mass savings that can be realized with the larger plant growth units. Two other conclusions are particularly important with regard to the orientation of future research and technology development. First, the mass estimates of the Lunar Base CELSS indicate that a primary design objective in implementing this kind of system must be to minimized the mass and power requirement of the food production plant growth units, which greatly surpass those of the other air and water recycling systems. Consequently, substantial research must be directed at identifying ways to produce food more efficiently. On the other hand, detailed studies to identify the best technology options for the other subsystems should not be expected to produce dramatic reductions in either mass or power requirement of a Lunar Base CELSS. The most crucial evaluation criterion must, therefore, be the capability for functional integration of these technologies into the ultimate design of the system. Secondly, this study illustrates that existing or near

  7. Human life support for advanced space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzkopf, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    The requirements for a human life support system for long-duration space missions are reviewed. The system design of a controlled ecological life support system is briefly described, followed by a more detailed account of the study of the conceptual design of a Lunar Based CELSS. The latter is to provide a safe, reliable, recycling lunar base life support system based on a hybrid physicochemical/biological representative technology. The most important conclusion reached by this study is that implementation of a completely recycling CELSS approach for a lunar base is not only feasible, but eminently practical. On a cumulative launch mass basis, a 4-person Lunar Base CELSS would pay for itself in approximately 2.6 years relative to a physicochemical air/water recycling system with resupply of food from the Earth. For crew sizes of 30 and 100, the breakeven point would come even sooner, after 2.1 and 1.7 years, respectively, due to the increased mass savings that can be realized with the larger plant growth units. Two other conclusions are particularly important with regard to the orientation of future research and technology development. First, the mass estimates of the Lunar Base CELSS indicate that a primary design objective in implementing this kind of system must be to minimized the mass and power requirement of the food production plant growth units, which greatly surpass those of the other air and water recycling systems. Consequently, substantial research must be directed at identifying ways to produce food more efficiently. On the other hand, detailed studies to identify the best technology options for the other subsystems should not be expected to produce dramatic reductions in either mass or power requirement of a Lunar Base CELSS. The most crucial evaluation criterion must, therefore, be the capability for functional integration of these technologies into the ultimate design of the system. Secondly, this study illustrates that existing or near

  8. Human life support for advanced space exploration.

    PubMed

    Schwartzkopf, S H

    1997-01-01

    The requirements for a human life support system for long-duration space missions are reviewed. The system design of a controlled ecological life support system is briefly described, followed by a more detailed account of the study of the conceptual design of a Lunar Based CELSS. The latter is to provide a safe, reliable, recycling lunar base life support system based on a hybrid physicochemical/biological representative technology. The most important conclusion reached by this study is that implementation of a completely recycling CELSS approach for a lunar base is not only feasible, but eminently practical. On a cumulative launch mass basis, a 4-person Lunar Base CELSS would pay for itself in approximately 2.6 years relative to a physicochemical air/water recycling system with resupply of food from the Earth. For crew sizes of 30 and 100, the breakeven point would come even sooner, after 2.1 and 1.7 years, respectively, due to the increased mass savings that can be realized with the larger plant growth units. Two other conclusions are particularly important with regard to the orientation of future research and technology development. First, the mass estimates of the Lunar Base CELSS indicate that a primary design objective in implementing this kind of system must be to minimized the mass and power requirement of the food production plant growth units, which greatly surpass those of the other air and water recycling systems. Consequently, substantial research must be directed at identifying ways to produce food more efficiently. On the other hand, detailed studies to identify the best technology options for the other subsystems should not be expected to produce dramatic reductions in either mass or power requirement of a Lunar Base CELSS. The most crucial evaluation criterion must, therefore, be the capability for functional integration of these technologies into the ultimate design of the system. Secondly, this study illustrates that existing or near

  9. Advanced human-system interface design review guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced, computer-based, human-system interface designs are emerging in nuclear power plant (NPP) control rooms. These developments may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will greatly affect the ways in which operators interact with systems. At present, however, the only guidance available to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the review of control room-operator interfaces, NUREG-0700, was written prior to these technological changes and is thus not designed to address them. The objective of the project reported in this paper is to develop an Advanced Control Room Design Review Guideline for use in performing human factors reviews of advanced operator interfaces. This guideline will be implemented, in part, as a portable, computer-based, interactive document for field use. The paper describes the overall guideline development methodology, the present status of the document, and the plans for further guideline testing and development. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Advanced Placement Human Geography: The First Five Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Paul T., Jr.; Hidlebrant, Barbara S.; Strauss, Tim R.

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Placement Human Geography (APHG) has grown steadily from 3,272 tests at the first test administration in 2001 to 14,139 tests in 2005. This paper examines the dynamics of growth throughout the United States through numbers of students and numbers of high schools involved in the program. APHG is discussed relative to the establishment of…

  11. Human Ecology and Health Advancement: The Newcastle Experience and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Jenny; Honari, Morteza

    1992-01-01

    Argues for the necessity of adopting a human ecological framework for the advancement of health. Focusing on the Australian experience, highlights the difficulties in moving beyond the narrow mold of Western Medical Science to a more holistic, quality of life orientation, and suggests that the role of education at all levels of the community is…

  12. Cities and Urban Land Use in Advanced Placement Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the cities and urban land use section of the Advanced Placement (AP) human geography course, focusing on the: (1) definitions of urbanism; (2) origin and evolution of cities; (3) functional character of contemporary cities; (4) built environment and social space; and (5) responses to urban growth. (CMK)

  13. Imagining STEM Higher Education Futures: Advancing Human Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores a conceptual approach to the question of what it means to provide a university education that addresses equity, and encourages the formation of STEM graduates oriented to public-good values and with commitments to making professional contributions to society which will advance human well-being. It considers and rejects…

  14. Imagining STEM Higher Education Futures: Advancing Human Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores a conceptual approach to the question of what it means to provide a university education that addresses equity, and encourages the formation of STEM graduates oriented to public-good values and with commitments to making professional contributions to society which will advance human well-being. It considers and rejects…

  15. Cities and Urban Land Use in Advanced Placement Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the cities and urban land use section of the Advanced Placement (AP) human geography course, focusing on the: (1) definitions of urbanism; (2) origin and evolution of cities; (3) functional character of contemporary cities; (4) built environment and social space; and (5) responses to urban growth. (CMK)

  16. Advanced Placement Human Geography: The First Five Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Paul T., Jr.; Hidlebrant, Barbara S.; Strauss, Tim R.

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Placement Human Geography (APHG) has grown steadily from 3,272 tests at the first test administration in 2001 to 14,139 tests in 2005. This paper examines the dynamics of growth throughout the United States through numbers of students and numbers of high schools involved in the program. APHG is discussed relative to the establishment of…

  17. Live Observation of Atherosclerotic Plaque Disruption in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Daeichin, V.; Sluimer, J. C.; van der Heiden, K.; Skachkov, I.; Kooiman, K.; Janssen, A.; Janssen, B.; Bosch, J. G.; de Jong, N.; Daemen, M. J. A. P.; van der Steen, A. F. W.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The actual occurrence of spontaneous plaque rupture in mice has been a matter of debate. We report on an in vivo observation of the actual event of possible plaque disruption in a living ApoE-/- mouse. Methods and Results: During live contrast-enhanced ultrasonography of a 50-week-old ApoE-/- male mouse, symptoms suggesting plaque disruption in the brachiocephalic artery were observed. Histological analysis confirmed the presence of advanced atherosclerotic lesions with dissections and intraplaque hemorrhage in the affected brachiocephalic trunk, pointing towards plaque rupture as the cause of the observed event. However, we did not detect a luminal thrombus or cap rupture, which is a key criterion for plaque rupture in human atherosclerosis. Conclusion: This study reports the real-time occurrence of a possible plaque rupture in a living ApoE-/- mouse. PMID:27689156

  18. Flow in Atherosclerotic Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Stroud, Jenn S.

    2000-11-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions occur in arteries where there are major changes in flow structure, e.g. bifurcations and junctions. The reduction of vessel lumen alters the flow, including the mechanical forces on the walls. We have examined the flow in carotid artery bifurcations with realistic plaque contours. The unsteady, incompressible, Navier-Stokes equations are solved in finite-volume form. Steady and pulsatile flows have been analyzed for laminar and turbulent flows, using for the latter a low-Reynolds number k- ɛ model and a k-ω model. Non-Newtonian viscosity is also considered using a power-law model. In general the very irregular contours of the vessels lead to recirculating regions, strong spatial variations of wall shear stresses, and in some cases, vortex shedding. Even steady inlet flow exhibits fluctuating, unsteady behavior. Neither turbulence models captures all the physics of the flow. The flow, in fact, appears to be transitional and not fully turbulent. For unsteady flow, there are also strong temporal variations of normal and shear stresses, which together with the strong spatial variations, has important implications for the onset and progression of atherosclerotic disease.

  19. Lysophosphatidic acid in atherosclerotic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schober, Andreas; Siess, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a potent bioactive phospholipid. As many other biological active lipids, LPA is an autacoid: it is formed locally on demand, and it acts locally near its site of synthesis. LPA has a plethora of biological activities on blood cells (platelets, monocytes) and cells of the vessel wall (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, macrophages) that are all key players in atherosclerotic and atherothrombotic processes. The specific cellular actions of LPA are determined by its multifaceted molecular structures, the expression of multiple G-protein coupled LPA receptors at the cell surface and their diverse coupling to intracellular signalling pathways. Numerous studies have now shown that LPA has thrombogenic and atherogenic actions. Here, we aim to provide a comprehensive, yet concise, thoughtful and critical review of this exciting research area and to pinpoint potential pharmacological targets for inhibiting thrombogenic and atherogenic activities of LPA. We hope that the review will serve to accelerate knowledge of basic and clinical science, and to foster drug development in the field of LPA and atherosclerotic/atherothrombotic diseases. PMID:22568609

  20. Geometric morphometrics and virtual anthropology: advances in human evolutionary studies.

    PubMed

    Rein, Thomas R; Harvati, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    Geometric morphometric methods have been increasingly used in paleoanthropology in the last two decades, lending greater power to the analysis and interpretation of the human fossil record. More recently the advent of the wide use of computed tomography and surface scanning, implemented in combination with geometric morphometrics (GM), characterizes a new approach, termed Virtual Anthropology (VA). These methodological advances have led to a number of developments in human evolutionary studies. We present some recent examples of GM and VA related research in human evolution with an emphasis on work conducted at the University of Tübingen and other German research institutions.

  1. Ethics education in advanced practice nursing: respect for human dignity.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Kathleen A; O'Conner-Von, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Ethics education is an essential component of academic programs that prepare nurses for advanced practice; the concept of respect for human dignity is integral to this education. Sixty-three graduate students enrolled in their first course of a nurse practitioner program completed a researcher-developed Ethics Questionnaire that was designed to elicit their baseline ethics-related knowledge, including their understanding of the concept "respect for human dignity". Qualitative analysis of data yielded findings that validate the importance of using the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements as an essential foundation for ethics content and as a framework for understanding the meaning of human dignity in advanced practice nursing. Assessment and learning strategies are recommended.

  2. Advanced Video Analysis Needs for Human Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Paul D.

    1994-01-01

    Evaluators of human task performance in space missions make use of video as a primary source of data. Extraction of relevant human performance information from video is often a labor-intensive process requiring a large amount of time on the part of the evaluator. Based on the experiences of several human performance evaluators, needs were defined for advanced tools which could aid in the analysis of video data from space missions. Such tools should increase the efficiency with which useful information is retrieved from large quantities of raw video. They should also provide the evaluator with new analytical functions which are not present in currently used methods. Video analysis tools based on the needs defined by this study would also have uses in U.S. industry and education. Evaluation of human performance from video data can be a valuable technique in many industrial and institutional settings where humans are involved in operational systems and processes.

  3. Advanced Video Analysis Needs for Human Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Paul D.

    1994-01-01

    Evaluators of human task performance in space missions make use of video as a primary source of data. Extraction of relevant human performance information from video is often a labor-intensive process requiring a large amount of time on the part of the evaluator. Based on the experiences of several human performance evaluators, needs were defined for advanced tools which could aid in the analysis of video data from space missions. Such tools should increase the efficiency with which useful information is retrieved from large quantities of raw video. They should also provide the evaluator with new analytical functions which are not present in currently used methods. Video analysis tools based on the needs defined by this study would also have uses in U.S. industry and education. Evaluation of human performance from video data can be a valuable technique in many industrial and institutional settings where humans are involved in operational systems and processes.

  4. Complement factor C5a induces atherosclerotic plaque disruptions

    PubMed Central

    Wezel, Anouk; de Vries, Margreet R; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Foks, Amanda C; Kuiper, Johan; Quax, Paul HA; Bot, Ilze

    2014-01-01

    Complement factor C5a and its receptor C5aR are expressed in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques; however, a causal relation between C5a and plaque rupture has not been established yet. Accelerated atherosclerosis was induced by placing vein grafts in male apoE−/− mice. After 24 days, when advanced plaques had developed, C5a or PBS was applied locally at the lesion site in a pluronic gel. Three days later mice were killed to examine the acute effect of C5a on late stage atherosclerosis. A significant increase in C5aR in the plaque was detectable in mice treated with C5a. Lesion size and plaque morphology did not differ between treatment groups, but interestingly, local treatment with C5a resulted in a striking increase in the amount of plaque disruptions with concomitant intraplaque haemorrhage. To identify the potential underlying mechanisms, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were treated in vitro with C5a. Both cell types revealed a marked increase in apoptosis after stimulation with C5a, which may contribute to lesion instability in vivo. Indeed, apoptosis within the plaque was seen to be significantly increased after C5a treatment. We here demonstrate a causal role for C5a in atherosclerotic plaque disruptions, probably by inducing apoptosis. Therefore, intervention in complement factor C5a signalling may be a promising target in the prevention of acute atherosclerotic complications. PMID:25124749

  5. Automatic classification of atherosclerotic plaques imaged with intravascular OCT

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Jimenez, Jose J.; Campos-Delgado, Daniel U.; Villiger, Martin; Otsuka, Kenichiro; Bouma, Brett E.; Jo, Javier A.

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT) allows evaluation of atherosclerotic plaques; however, plaque characterization is performed by visual assessment and requires a trained expert for interpretation of the large data sets. Here, we present a novel computational method for automated IV-OCT plaque characterization. This method is based on the modeling of each A-line of an IV-OCT data set as a linear combination of a number of depth profiles. After estimating these depth profiles by means of an alternating least square optimization strategy, they are automatically classified to predefined tissue types based on their morphological characteristics. The performance of our proposed method was evaluated with IV-OCT scans of cadaveric human coronary arteries and corresponding tissue histopathology. Our results suggest that this methodology allows automated identification of fibrotic and lipid-containing plaques. Moreover, this novel computational method has the potential to enable high throughput atherosclerotic plaque characterization. PMID:27867716

  6. Advanced automated glass cockpit certification: Being wary of human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amalberti, Rene; Wilbaux, Florence

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents some facets of the French experience with human factors in the process of certification of advanced automated cockpits. Three types of difficulties are described: first, the difficulties concerning the hotly debated concept of human error and its non-linear relationship to risk of accident; a typology of errors to be taken into account in the certification process is put forward to respond to this issue. Next, the difficulties connected to the basically gradual and evolving nature of pilot expertise on a given type of aircraft, which contrasts with the immediate and definitive style of certifying systems. The last difficulties to be considered are those related to the goals of certification itself on these new aircraft and the status of findings from human factor analyses (in particular, what should be done with disappointing results, how much can the changes induced by human factors investigation economically affect aircraft design, how many errors do we need to accumulate before we revise the system, what should be remedied when human factor problems are discovered at the certification stage: the machine? pilot training? the rules? or everything?). The growth of advanced-automated glass cockpits has forced the international aeronautical community to pay more attention to human factors during the design phase, the certification phase and pilot training. The recent creation of a human factor desk at the DGAC-SFACT (Official French services) is a direct consequence of this. The paper is divided into three parts. Part one debates human error and its relationship with system design and accident risk. Part two describes difficulties connected to the basically gradual and evolving nature of pilot expertise on a given type of aircraft, which contrasts with the immediate and definitive style of certifying systems. Part three focuses on concrete outcomes of human factors for certification purposes.

  7. Approach to atherosclerotic renovascular disease: 2016

    PubMed Central

    Daloul, Reem; Morrison, Aubrey R.

    2016-01-01

    The management of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis in patients with hypertension or impaired renal function remains a clinical dilemma. The current general consensus, supported by the results of the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions and Cardiovascular Outcomes for Renal Artery Lesions trials, argues strongly against endovascular intervention in favor of optimal medical management. We discuss the limitations and implications of the contemporary clinical trials and present our approach and formulate clear recommendations to help with the management of patients with atherosclerotic narrowing of the renal artery. PMID:27679718

  8. Primary Stenting of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Straube, T. Stingele, Robert; Jansen, Olav

    2005-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and safety of stenting intracranial atherosclerotic stenoses.Methods: In 12 patients the results of primary intracranial stenting were evaluated retrospectively. Patient ages ranged from 49 to 79 years (mean 64 years). Six patients presented with stenoses in the anterior circulation, and six had stenosis in the posterior circulation. One patient presented with extra- and intracranial tandem stenosis of the left internal carotid artery. Three patients presented with acute basilar thrombosis, caused by high-grade basilar stenoses.Results: Intracranial stenoses were successfully stented in 11 of 12 patients. In one patient the stent could not be advanced over the carotid siphon to reach the stenosis of the ophthalmic internal carotid artery. Follow-up digital subtraction angiographic studies were obtained in two patients who had presented with new neurologic signs or symptoms. In both cases the angiogram did not show any relevant stenotic endothelial hyperplasia. In one patient, after local thrombolysis the stenosis turned out to be so narrow that balloon angioplasty had to be performed before stent deployment. All three patients treated for stenosis-related basilar thrombosis died due to brainstem infarction that had ensued before the intervention.Conclusions: Prophylactic primary stenting of intracranial stenoses of the anterior or posterior cerebral circulation can be performed with a low complication rate; technical problems such as stent flexibility must still be solved. Local thrombolysis followed by stenting in stenosis-related thrombotic occlusion is technically possible.

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Symptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Short, Jody L.; Majid, Arshad; Hussain, Syed I.

    2011-01-01

    Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is responsible for approximately 10% of all ischemic strokes in the United States. The risk of recurrent stroke may be as high as 35% in patient with critical stenosis >70% in diameter narrowing. Recent advances in medical and endovascular therapy have placed ICAD at the forefront of clinical stroke research to optimize the best medical and endovascular approach to treat this important underlying stroke etiology. Analysis of symptomatic ICAD studies lead to the question that whether angioplasty and/or stenting is a safe, suitable, and efficacious therapeutic strategy in patients with critical stenoses that are deemed refractory to medical management. Most of the currently available data in support of angioplasty and/or stenting in high risk patients with severe symptomatic ICAD is in the form of case series and randomized trial results of endovascular therapy versus medical treatment are awaited. This is a comprehensive review of the state of the art in the endovascular approach with angioplasty and/or stenting of symptomatic ICAD. PMID:21359195

  10. Mucosal Administration of Collagen V Ameliorates the Atherosclerotic Plaque Burden by Inducing Interleukin 35-dependent Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Park, Arick C; Huang, Guorui; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Massoudi, Dawiyat; Kernien, John F; Vignali, Dario A; Sullivan, Jeremy A; Wilkes, David S; Burlingham, William J; Greenspan, Daniel S

    2016-02-12

    We have shown previously that collagen V (col(V)) autoimmunity is a consistent feature of atherosclerosis in human coronary artery disease and in the Apoe(-/-) mouse model. We have also shown sensitization of Apoe(-/-) mice with col(V) to markedly increase the atherosclerotic burden, providing evidence of a causative role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic pathogenesis. Here we sought to determine whether induction of immune tolerance to col(V) might ameliorate atherosclerosis, providing further evidence for a causal role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherogenesis and providing insights into the potential for immunomodulatory therapeutic interventions. Mucosal inoculation successfully induced immune tolerance to col(V) with an accompanying reduction in plaque burden in Ldlr(-/-) mice on a high-cholesterol diet. The results therefore demonstrate that inoculation with col(V) can successfully ameliorate the atherosclerotic burden, suggesting novel approaches for therapeutic interventions. Surprisingly, tolerance and reduced atherosclerotic burden were both dependent on the recently described IL-35 and not on IL-10, the immunosuppressive cytokine usually studied in the context of induced tolerance and amelioration of atherosclerotic symptoms. In addition to the above, using recombinant protein fragments, we were able to localize two epitopes of the α1(V) chain involved in col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic Ldlr(-/-) mice, suggesting future courses of experimentation for the characterization of such epitopes.

  11. Human carotid atherosclerotic lesion protein components decrease cholesterol biosynthesis rate in macrophages through 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase regulation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elad; Aviram, Michael; Khatib, Soliman; Rosenblat, Mira; Vaya, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the formation of cholesterol-loaded macrophages, which are turned into foam cells, the hallmark of early atherogenesis. As part of ongoing research on the interactions among human carotid lesion components and blood elements, the effect of plaque homogenate on macrophage cholesterol biosynthesis rate was examined. Human carotid plaques were ground, extracted with phosphate-buffered saline (homogenate), and then added to the macrophage medium. This extract decreased macrophage cholesterol biosynthesis rate up to 50% in a dose-dependent manner. Cholesterol or lipoproteins were separated from the homogenate and added to the MQ medium. Unlike the homogenate, neither free cholesterol nor the lipoproteins were able to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis rate under the above experimental concentration, suggesting that the homogenate-induced cholesterol biosynthesis inhibition in our experimental system was not owing to the feedback inhibition of cholesterol. Furthermore, the homogenate remaining after lipoprotein removal (lipoprotein-deficient homogenate) also decreased cholesterol biosynthesis rate, whereas boiled homogenate or phospholipids extracted from the homogenate decreased macrophage cholesterol biosynthesis rate only partially. Finally, cholesterol biosynthesis inhibition was achieved only upon using the precursor [(3)H]acetate, but not [(14)C]mevalonate, suggesting that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCoA Reductase), the rate-limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, is involved in the above antiatherogenic effect of the homogenate, whereas the treatment with homogenate decreased HMGCoA Reductase mRNA. Proteins and phospholipids from human carotid lesion homogenate decrease cholesterol biosynthesis rate in macrophages secondary to HMGCoA Reductase feedback regulation. Such an effect may delay foam cell formation and atherosclerosis progression.

  12. Vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque detection by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-hui; Boydston-White, Susie; Weisberg, Arel; Wang, Wubao; Sordillo, Laura A.; Perotte, Adler; Tomaselli, Vincent P.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Pei, Zhe; Shi, Lingyan; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-12-01

    A clear correlation has been observed between the resonance Raman (RR) spectra of plaques in the aortic tunica intimal wall of a human corpse and three states of plaque evolution: fibrolipid plaques, calcified and ossified plaques, and vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques (VPs). These three states of atherosclerotic plaque lesions demonstrated unique RR molecular fingerprints from key molecules, rendering their spectra unique with respect to one another. The vibrational modes of lipids, cholesterol, carotenoids, tryptophan and heme proteins, the amide I, II, III bands, and methyl/methylene groups from the intrinsic atherosclerotic VPs in tissues were studied. The salient outcome of the investigation was demonstrating the correlation between RR measurements of VPs and the thickness measurements of fibrous caps on VPs using standard histopathology methods, an important metric in evaluating the stability of a VP. The RR results show that VPs undergo a structural change when their caps thin to 66 μm, very close to the 65-μm empirical medical definition of a thin cap fibroatheroma plaque, the most unstable type of VP.

  13. High speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging of atherosclerotic arteries (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Zhonglie; Ma, Teng; Qu, Yueqiao; Li, Jiawen; Yu, Mingyue; He, Youmin; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the industrialized nations. Accurate quantification of both the morphology and composition of lipid-rich vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque are essential for early detection and optimal treatment in clinics. In previous works, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging for detection of lipid-rich plaque within coronary artery walls has been demonstrated in ex vivo, but the imaging speed is still limited. In order to increase the imaging speed, a high repetition rate laser is needed. In this work, we present a high speed integrated IVPA/US imaging system with a 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator laser at 1725 nm. A miniature catheter with 1.0 mm outer diameter was designed with a 200 μm multimode fiber and an ultrasound transducer with 45 MHz center frequency. The fiber was polished at 38 degree and enclosed in a glass capillary for total internal reflection. An optical/electrical rotary junction and pull-back mechanism was applied for rotating and linearly scanning the catheter to obtain three-dimensional imaging. Atherosclerotic rabbit abdominal aorta was imaged as two frame/second at 1725 nm. Furthermore, by wide tuning range of the laser wavelength from 1680 nm to 1770 nm, spectroscopic photoacoustic analysis of lipid-mimicking phantom and an human atherosclerotic artery was performed ex vivo. The results demonstrated that the developed IVPA/US imaging system is capable for high speed intravascular imaging for plaque detection.

  14. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Wezel, Anouk; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van der Velden, Daniël; de Jager, Saskia C A; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2015-08-01

    Activated mast cells have been identified in the intima and perivascular tissue of human atherosclerotic plaques. As mast cells have been described to release a number of chemokines that mediate leukocyte fluxes, we propose that activated mast cells may play a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression. Systemic IgE-mediated mast cell activation in apoE(-/-)μMT mice resulted in an increase in atherosclerotic lesion size as compared to control mice, and interestingly, the number of neutrophils was highly increased in these lesions. In addition, peritoneal mast cell activation led to a massive neutrophil influx into the peritoneal cavity in C57Bl6 mice, whereas neutrophil numbers in mast cell deficient Kit(W(-sh)/W(-sh)) mice were not affected. Within the newly recruited neutrophil population, increased levels of CXCR2(+) and CXCR4(+) neutrophils were observed after mast cell activation. Indeed, mast cells were seen to contain and release CXCL1 and CXCL12, the ligands for CXCR2 and CXCR4. Intriguingly, peritoneal mast cell activation in combination with anti-CXCR2 receptor antagonist resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment, thus establishing a prominent role for the CXCL1/CXCR2 axis in mast cell-mediated neutrophil recruitment. Our data suggest that chemokines, and in particular CXCL1, released from activated mast cells induce neutrophil recruitment to the site of inflammation, thereby aggravating the ongoing inflammatory response and thus affecting plaque progression and destabilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Advanced haptic sensor for measuring human skin conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimi, Daisuke; Okuyama, Takeshi; Tanaka, Mami

    2009-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a tactile sensor using PVDF (Polyvinylidene Fluoride) film as a sensory receptor of the sensor to evaluate softness, smoothness, and stickiness of human skin. Tactile sense is the most important sense in the sensation receptor of the human body along with eyesight, and we can examine skin condition quickly using these sense. But, its subjectivity and ambiguity make it difficult to quantify skin conditions. Therefore, development of measurement device which can evaluate skin conditions easily and objectively is demanded by dermatologists, cosmetic industries, and so on. In this paper, an advanced haptic sensor system that can measure multiple information of skin condition in various parts of human body is developed. The applications of the sensor system to evaluate softness, smoothness, and stickiness of skin are investigated through two experiments.

  16. Advanced haptic sensor for measuring human skin conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimi, Daisuke; Okuyama, Takeshi; Tanaka, Mami

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a tactile sensor using PVDF (Polyvinylidene Fluoride) film as a sensory receptor of the sensor to evaluate softness, smoothness, and stickiness of human skin. Tactile sense is the most important sense in the sensation receptor of the human body along with eyesight, and we can examine skin condition quickly using these sense. But, its subjectivity and ambiguity make it difficult to quantify skin conditions. Therefore, development of measurement device which can evaluate skin conditions easily and objectively is demanded by dermatologists, cosmetic industries, and so on. In this paper, an advanced haptic sensor system that can measure multiple information of skin condition in various parts of human body is developed. The applications of the sensor system to evaluate softness, smoothness, and stickiness of skin are investigated through two experiments.

  17. Evidence for apoptosis in advanced human atheroma. Colocalization with interleukin-1 beta-converting enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Y. J.; Libby, P.

    1995-01-01

    This study sought evidence for apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, in human atheromatous coronary and carotid arteries. Markers for apoptotic cells included in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), genomic DNA electrophoresis, and morphological analysis. Intimal lesions contained more TUNEL+ cells (34 +/- 6%, n = 8) than non-atherosclerotic arterial intima (8 +/- 3%, n = 5, P < 0.05). The tunica media of the diseased arteries had a percentage of TUNEL+ cells (5 +/- 1%) similar to that in the normal vessels (3 +/- 1%, N.S.). Oligonucleosomal DNA fragments were visualized in extracts from 12 atheromatous plaques but in none of 5 non-atherosclerotic vessels. Both smooth muscle cells (SMC) and macrophages, two major cell types in the atherosclerotic intima, bore markers of apoptosis, but with different patterns, as determined by double histochemical labeling for cell types and TUNEL. The TUNEL+ SMC localized mainly in the fibrotic portion of the atheroma, whereas TUNEL+ macrophages clustered near or within the lipid-rich core of the lesion. Atheromatous lesions expressed mRNA encoding interleukin-1 beta-converting enzyme (ICE), a mammalian cell death gene, as demonstrated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry revealed that ICE localized in regions of TUNEL+ SMC and macrophages. TUNEL- cells showed little or no immunoreactive ICE. These data point to a role for apoptosis in regulation of cell accumulation during atherogenesis and suggest involvement of ICE in SMC death in fibrous regions of complex atheroma, and in macrophage death in the lipid-rich core of the lesion. Apoptosis of vascular cells in fibrous cap may impede maintenance or repair of the matrix in this region and affect stability of the plaques. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:7639325

  18. LOX-1 in atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Tatsuya; Wakabayashi, Ichiro; Okamura, Tomonori

    2015-02-02

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) exhibits various biological activities and accumulates in atheromas. LOX-1 (lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor) is the receptor that mediates oxidized LDL activity in vascular endothelial cells. Activation of LOX-1 results in oxidized LDL-induced endothelial dysfunction and hyperlipidemia-induced vascular lipid deposition. We hypothesized that LOX-1 is a candidate risk factor beyond LDL cholesterol (LDLC) and developed a novel assay to quantify LOX-1 ligand containing apoB (LAB). In men from the United States, serum LAB showed a significant positive association with carotid intima-media thickness, independent of LDLC. LAB and the LOX index (obtained by multiplying LAB by sLOX-1) were significantly associated with the incidence of coronary artery disease and ischemic stroke after adjusting for confounding factors, including non-HDL cholesterol. sLOX-1 is thought to be a better biomarker for early diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome than traditional biomarkers, including troponin T. LAB was associated with various atherosclerotic risk factors such as smoking, obesity, diabetes, diastolic hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and metabolic syndrome. Measurement of the soluble form of LOX-1 (sLOX-1) and LAB seems to be useful for evaluating the state and risk of atherosclerosis and atherosclerosis-related diseases. Further prospective studies using large populations and randomized clinical trials on sLOX-1, LAB, and the LOX index are needed.

  19. Smooth-muscle-specific gene transfer with the human maxi-k channel improves erectile function and enhances sexual behavior in atherosclerotic cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Christ, George J; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Williams, Koudy; Zhao, Weixin; D'Agostino, Ralph; Kaplan, Jay; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Yoo, James; Calenda, Giulia; Davies, Kelvin P; Sellers, Rani S; Melman, Arnold

    2009-12-01

    Despite the advent of effective oral therapies for erectile dysfunction (ED), many patients are not successfully treated, and side effects have been documented. To further evaluate the potential utility of naked DNA-based gene transfer as an attractive treatment option for ED. The effects of gene transfer on erectile function and sexual behavior were evaluated in eight male cynomolgus monkeys with ED secondary to moderately severe, diet-induced atherosclerosis. Following establishment of baseline characteristics, animals were subjected to intracavernous injection of a smooth-muscle-specific gene transfer vector (pSMAA-hSlo) encoding the pore-forming subunit of the human large-conductance, calcium-sensitive potassium channel (Maxi-K). For the sexual behavior studies, 2 wk of baseline data were obtained, and then animals were placed in the presence of estrogen-implanted females (n=2) three times per week for 30 min, and sexual behavior was recorded. The intracavernous pressure response to papaverine injection was also monitored. Dramatic changes in erectile function and sexual behavior were observed after intracorporal gene transfer. The frequency of partial (6±2 to 10±2) and full (2±1.5 to 5±1.4) erections were significantly increased, with a parallel 2-3-fold increase in the duration of the observed erections. The frequency and latency of ejaculation were increased and decreased, respectively. Frequency and duration of grooming by the female were increased, and the latency decreased. Increased latency and decreased frequency of body contact was also observed, and this is characteristic of the typical drop in consort intimacy that occurs after mating in most macaque species. In addition, an increased responsiveness to intracavernous papaverine injection was observed. The data indicate that intracorporal Maxi-K-channel gene transfer enhances erectile capacity and sexual behavior; the data imply that increased erectile function per se may lead to increased sexual

  20. Recent advances in research on climate and human conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiang, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    A rapidly growing body of empirical, quantitative research examines whether rates of human conflict can be systematically altered by climatic changes. We discuss recent advances in this field, including Bayesian meta-analyses of the effect of temperature and rainfall on current and future large-scale conflicts, the impact of climate variables on gang violence and suicides in Mexico, and probabilistic projections of personal violence and property crime in the United States under RCP scenarios. Criticisms of this research field will also be explained and addressed.

  1. Multiscale investigation of USPIO nanoparticles in atherosclerotic plaques and their catabolism and storage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Maraloiu, Valentin-Adrian; Appaix, Florence; Broisat, Alexis; Le Guellec, Dominique; Teodorescu, Valentin Serban; Ghezzi, Catherine; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Blanchin, Marie-Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    The storage and catabolism of Ultrasmall SuperParamagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles were analyzed through a multiscale approach combining Two Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (TPLSM) and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) at different times after intravenous injection in an atherosclerotic ApoE(-/-) mouse model. The atherosclerotic plaque features and the USPIO heterogeneous biodistribution were revealed down from organ's scale to subcellular level. The biotransformation of the nanoparticle iron oxide (maghemite) core into ferritin, the non-toxic form of iron storage, was demonstrated for the first time ex vivo in atherosclerotic plaques as well as in spleen, the iron storage organ. These results rely on an innovative spatial and structural investigation of USPIO's catabolism in cellular phagolysosomes. This study showed that these nanoparticles were stored as non-toxic iron compounds: maghemite oxide or ferritin, which is promising for MRI detection of atherosclerotic plaques in clinics using these USPIOs. From the Clinical Editor: Advance in nanotechnology has brought new contrast agents for clinical imaging. In this article, the authors investigated the use and biotransformation of Ultrasmall Super-paramagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles for analysis of atherosclerotic plagues in Two Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (TPLSM) and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The biophysical data generated from this study could enable the possible use of these nanoparticles for the benefits of clinical patients.

  2. Vorapaxar in atherosclerotic disease management.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Judy W M; Colucci, Vincent; Howard, Patricia A; Nappi, Jean M; Spinler, Sarah A

    2015-05-01

    To review the pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of vorapaxar, a protease activator receptor-1 (PAR-1) antagonist, in the management of atherosclerotic diseases. Peer-reviewed clinical trials and review articles were identified from MEDLINE and Current Content database (both 1966 to December 31, 2014) using the search terms vorapaxar and protease activator receptor antagonist. A total of 30 clinical studies were identified (16 clinical trials, including subanalyses, 14 related to pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics and drug interactions). Two phase III clinical trials with vorapaxar have been published. In patients with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI), vorapaxar failed to significantly reduce the primary efficacy end point (composite of cardiovascular death, MI, stroke, recurrent ischemia with hospitalization, and urgent coronary revascularization). Conversely, in a study of secondary prevention for patients with cardiovascular disease, the composite end point of cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke was significantly reduced. In both trials, the safety end points of major/minor bleeding were increased compared with placebo. In the secondary prevention trial, an increased incidence of intracranial hemorrhage led to the exclusion of patients with a prior history of stroke. Vorapaxar is approved for use with aspirin and/or clopidogrel in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in stable patients with peripheral arterial disease or a history of MI. However, the addition of vorapaxar to other antiplatelets can significantly increase the risk of bleeding. It is, therefore, essential to balance the need for further reduction of risk of thrombotic event with patient's individual bleeding risk. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. NASA's Advanced Life Support Systems Human-Rated Test Facility.

    PubMed

    Henninger, D L; Tri, T O; Packham, N J

    1996-01-01

    Future NASA missions to explore the solar system will be long-duration missions, requiring human life support systems which must operate with very high reliability over long periods of time. Such systems must be highly regenerative, requiring minimum resupply, to enable the crews to be largely self-sufficient. These regenerative life support systems will use a combination of higher plants, microorganisms, and physicochemical processes to recycle air and water, produce food, and process wastes. A key step in the development of these systems is establishment of a human-rated test facility specifically tailored to evaluation of closed, regenerative life supports systems--one in which long-duration, large-scale testing involving human test crews can be performed. Construction of such a facility, the Advanced Life Support Program's (ALS) Human-Rated Test Facility (HRTF), has begun at NASA's Johnson Space Center, and definition of systems and development of initial outfitting concepts for the facility are underway. This paper will provide an overview of the HRTF project plan, an explanation of baseline configurations, and descriptive illustrations of facility outfitting concepts.

  4. NASA's Advanced Life Support Systems Human-Rated Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, D. L.; Tri, T. O.; Packham, N. J.

    1996-01-01

    Future NASA missions to explore the solar system will be long-duration missions, requiring human life support systems which must operate with very high reliability over long periods of time. Such systems must be highly regenerative, requiring minimum resupply, to enable the crews to be largely self-sufficient. These regenerative life support systems will use a combination of higher plants, microorganisms, and physicochemical processes to recycle air and water, produce food, and process wastes. A key step in the development of these systems is establishment of a human-rated test facility specifically tailored to evaluation of closed, regenerative life supports systems--one in which long-duration, large-scale testing involving human test crews can be performed. Construction of such a facility, the Advanced Life Support Program's (ALS) Human-Rated Test Facility (HRTF), has begun at NASA's Johnson Space Center, and definition of systems and development of initial outfitting concepts for the facility are underway. This paper will provide an overview of the HRTF project plan, an explanation of baseline configurations, and descriptive illustrations of facility outfitting concepts.

  5. Human Research Program Advanced Exercise Concepts (AEC) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perusek, Gail; Lewandowski, Beth; Nall, Marsha; Norsk, Peter; Linnehan, Rick; Baumann, David

    2015-01-01

    Exercise countermeasures provide benefits that are crucial for successful human spaceflight, to mitigate the spaceflight physiological deconditioning which occurs during exposure to microgravity. The NASA Human Research Program (HRP) within the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) is managing next generation Advanced Exercise Concepts (AEC) requirements development and candidate technology maturation to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 7 (ground prototyping and flight demonstration) for all exploration mission profiles from Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Exploration Missions (up to 21 day duration) to Mars Transit (up to 1000 day duration) missions. These validated and optimized exercise countermeasures systems will be provided to the ISS Program and MPCV Program for subsequent flight development and operations. The International Space Station (ISS) currently has three major pieces of operational exercise countermeasures hardware: the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), the second-generation (T2) treadmill, and the cycle ergometer with vibration isolation system (CEVIS). This suite of exercise countermeasures hardware serves as a benchmark and is a vast improvement over previous generations of countermeasures hardware, providing both aerobic and resistive exercise for the crew. However, vehicle and resource constraints for future exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit will require that the exercise countermeasures hardware mass, volume, and power be minimized, while preserving the current ISS capabilities or even enhancing these exercise capabilities directed at mission specific physiological functional performance and medical standards requirements. Further, mission-specific considerations such as preservation of sensorimotor function, autonomous and adaptable operation, integration with medical data systems, rehabilitation, and in-flight monitoring and feedback are being developed for integration with the exercise

  6. Studying human immunodeficiencies in humans: advances in fundamental concepts and therapeutic interventions

    PubMed Central

    Su, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Immunodeficiencies reveal the crucial role of the immune system in defending the body against microbial pathogens. Given advances in genomics and other technologies, this is currently best studied in humans who have inherited monogenic diseases. Such investigations have provided insights into how gene products normally function in the natural environment and have opened the door to new, exciting treatments for these diseases. PMID:28408979

  7. Regulation of cellular proliferation and intimal formation following balloon injury in atherosclerotic rabbit arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Simari, R D; San, H; Rekhter, M; Ohno, T; Gordon, D; Nabel, G J; Nabel, E G

    1996-01-01

    Injury to atherosclerotic arteries induces the expression of growth regulatory genes that stimulate cellular proliferation and intimal formation. Intimal expansion has been reduced in vivo in nonatherosclerotic balloon-injured arteries by transfer of genes that inhibit cell proliferation. It is not known, however, whether vascular cell proliferation can be inhibited after injury in more extensively diseased atherosclerotic arteries. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether expression of recombinant genes in atherosclerotic arteries after balloon injury could inhibit intimal cell proliferation. To test this hypothesis, we examined the response to balloon injury in atherosclerotic rabbit arteries after gene transfer of herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene (tk) and administration of ganciclovir. Smooth muscle cells from hyperlipidemic rabbit arteries infected with adenoviral vectors encoding tk were sensitive to ganciclovir, and bystander killing was observed in vitro. In atherosclerotic arteries, a human placental alkaline phosphatase reporter gene was expressed in intimal and medial smooth muscle cells and macrophages, identifying these cells as targets for gene transfer. Expression of tk in balloon-injured hyperlipidemic rabbit arteries followed by ganciclovir treatment resulted in a 64% reduction in intimal cell proliferation 7 d after gene transfer (P = 0.004), and a 35-49% reduction in internal area 21 d after gene transfer, compared with five different control groups (P < 0.05). Replication of smooth muscle cells and macrophages was inhibited by tk expression and ganciclovir treatment. These findings indicate that transfer of a gene that inhibits cellular proliferation limits the intimal area in balloon-injured atherosclerotic arteries. Molecular approaches to the inhibition of cell proliferation in atherosclerotic arteries constitute a possible treatment for vascular proliferative diseases. PMID:8690797

  8. Does human cognition allow Human Factors (HF) certification of advanced aircrew systems?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, Iain S.; Taylor, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper has examined the requirements of HF specification and certification within advanced or complex aircrew systems. It suggests reasons for current inadequacies in the use of HF in the design process, giving some examples in support, and suggesting an avenue towards the improvement of the HF certification process. The importance of human cognition to the operation and performance of advanced aircrew systems has been stressed. Many of the shortfalls of advanced aircrew systems must be attributed to over automated designs that show little consideration on either the mental limits or the cognitive capabilities of the human system component. Traditional approaches to system design and HF certification are set within an over physicalistic foundation. Also, traditionally it was assumed that physicalistic system functions could be attributed to either the human or the machine on a one to one basis. Moreover, any problems associated with the parallel needs, or promoting human understanding alongside system operation and direction, were generally equated in reality by the natural flexibility and adaptability of human skills. The consideration of the human component of a complex system is seen as being primarily based on manifestations of human behavior to the almost total exclusion of any appreciation of unobservable human mental and cognitive processes. The argument of this paper is that the considered functionality of any complex human-machine system must contain functions that are purely human and purely cognitive. Human-machine system reliability ultimately depends on human reliability and dependability and, therefore, on the form and frequency of cognitive processes that have to be conducted to support system performance. The greater the demand placed by an advanced aircraft system on the human component's basic knowledge processes or cognition, rather than on skill, the more insiduous the effects the human may have on that system. This paper discusses one

  9. [Is regression of atherosclerotic plaque possible?

    PubMed

    Páramo, José A; Civeira, Fernando

    As it is well-known, a thrombus evolving into a disrupted/eroded atherosclerotic plaque causes most acute coronary syndromes. Plaque stabilization via reduction of the lipid core and/or thickening of the fibrous cap is one of the possible mechanisms accounted for the clinical benefits displayed by different anti-atherosclerotic strategies. The concept of plaque stabilization was developed to explain how lipid-lowering agents could decrease adverse coronary events without substantial modifications of the atherosclerotic lesion ('angiographic paradox'). A number of imaging modalities (vascular ultrasound and virtual histology, MRI, optical coherence tomography, positron tomography, etc.) are used for non-invasive assessment of atherosclerosis; most of them can identify plaque volume and composition beyond lumen stenosis. An 'aggressive' lipid-lowering strategy is able to reduce the plaque burden and the incidence of cardiovascular events; this may be attributable, at least in part, to plaque-stabilizing effects.

  10. Advancing biomaterials of human origin for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterials have played an increasingly prominent role in the success of biomedical devices and in the development of tissue engineering, which seeks to unlock the regenerative potential innate to human tissues/organs in a state of deterioration and to restore or reestablish normal bodily function. Advances in our understanding of regenerative biomaterials and their roles in new tissue formation can potentially open a new frontier in the fast-growing field of regenerative medicine. Taking inspiration from the role and multi-component construction of native extracellular matrices (ECMs) for cell accommodation, the synthetic biomaterials produced today routinely incorporate biologically active components to define an artificial in vivo milieu with complex and dynamic interactions that foster and regulate stem cells, similar to the events occurring in a natural cellular microenvironment. The range and degree of biomaterial sophistication have also dramatically increased as more knowledge has accumulated through materials science, matrix biology and tissue engineering. However, achieving clinical translation and commercial success requires regenerative biomaterials to be not only efficacious and safe but also cost-effective and convenient for use and production. Utilizing biomaterials of human origin as building blocks for therapeutic purposes has provided a facilitated approach that closely mimics the critical aspects of natural tissue with regard to its physical and chemical properties for the orchestration of wound healing and tissue regeneration. In addition to directly using tissue transfers and transplants for repair, new applications of human-derived biomaterials are now focusing on the use of naturally occurring biomacromolecules, decellularized ECM scaffolds and autologous preparations rich in growth factors/non-expanded stem cells to either target acceleration/magnification of the body's own repair capacity or use nature's paradigms to create new tissues for

  11. Advancing biomaterials of human origin for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Liu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    Biomaterials have played an increasingly prominent role in the success of biomedical devices and in the development of tissue engineering, which seeks to unlock the regenerative potential innate to human tissues/organs in a state of deterioration and to restore or reestablish normal bodily function. Advances in our understanding of regenerative biomaterials and their roles in new tissue formation can potentially open a new frontier in the fast-growing field of regenerative medicine. Taking inspiration from the role and multi-component construction of native extracellular matrices (ECMs) for cell accommodation, the synthetic biomaterials produced today routinely incorporate biologically active components to define an artificial in vivo milieu with complex and dynamic interactions that foster and regulate stem cells, similar to the events occurring in a natural cellular microenvironment. The range and degree of biomaterial sophistication have also dramatically increased as more knowledge has accumulated through materials science, matrix biology and tissue engineering. However, achieving clinical translation and commercial success requires regenerative biomaterials to be not only efficacious and safe but also cost-effective and convenient for use and production. Utilizing biomaterials of human origin as building blocks for therapeutic purposes has provided a facilitated approach that closely mimics the critical aspects of natural tissue with regard to its physical and chemical properties for the orchestration of wound healing and tissue regeneration. In addition to directly using tissue transfers and transplants for repair, new applications of human-derived biomaterials are now focusing on the use of naturally occurring biomacromolecules, decellularized ECM scaffolds and autologous preparations rich in growth factors/non-expanded stem cells to either target acceleration/magnification of the body's own repair capacity or use nature's paradigms to create new tissues for

  12. A new murine model of stress-induced complex atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Amir H.; Aghili, Nima; Tilan, Justin U.; Andrews, James A.; Peng, XinZhi; Lassance-Soares, Roberta M.; Sood, Subeena; Alderman, Lee O.; Abe, Ken; Li, Lijun; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Virmani, Renu; Zukowska, Zofia; Epstein, Stephen E.; Burnett, Mary Susan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ApoE−/− mice, when subjected to chronic stress, exhibit lesions characteristic of human vulnerable plaque and, if so, to determine the time course of such changes. We found that the lesions were remarkably similar to human vulnerable plaque, and that the time course of lesion progression raised interesting insights into the process of plaque development. Lard-fed mixed-background ApoE−/− mice exposed to chronic stress develop lesions with large necrotic core, thin fibrous cap and a high degree of inflammation. Neovascularization and intraplaque hemorrhage are observed in over 80% of stressed animals at 20 weeks of age. Previously described models report a prevalence of only 13% for neovascularization observed at a much later time point, between 36 and 60 weeks of age. Thus, our new stress-induced model of advanced atherosclerotic plaque provides an improvement over what is currently available. This model offers a tool to further investigate progression of plaque phenotype to a more vulnerable phenotype in humans. Our findings also suggest a possible use of this stress-induced model to determine whether therapeutic interventions have effects not only on plaque burden, but also, and importantly, on plaque vulnerability. PMID:23324329

  13. Controlled Human Malaria Infection: Applications, Advances and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Stanisic, Danielle I; McCarthy, James S; Good, Michael F

    2017-09-18

    Controlled Human Malaria Infection (CHMI) entails deliberate infection with malaria parasites either by mosquito bite or direct injection of sporozoites or parasitised erythrocytes. When required, the resulting blood-stage infection is curtailed by the administration of anti-malarial drugs. Inducing a malaria infection via inoculation with infected blood was first used as a treatment (malariotherapy) for neurosyphilis in Europe and the United States in the early 1900s. More recently, CHMI has been applied to the fields of malaria vaccine and drug development where it is used to evaluate products in well-controlled early phase proof-of-concept clinical studies thus facilitating progression of only the most promising candidates for further evaluation in malaria-endemic areas. Controlled infections have also been used to immunise against malaria infection. Historically, CHMI studies have been restricted by the need for access to insectaries housing infected mosquitoes or suitable malaria-infected individuals. Evaluation of vaccine and drug candidates has been constrained in these studies by the availability of a limited number of P. falciparum isolates. Recent advances have included cryopreservation of sporozoites, the manufacture of well characterised and genetically distinct cultured malaria cell banks for blood-stage infection, and P. vivax-specific reagents. These advances will help to accelerate malaria vaccine and drug development by making the reagents for CHMI more widely accessible and also enabling a more rigorous evaluation with multiple parasite strains and species. Here we discuss the different applications of CHMI, recent advances in the use of CHMI and ongoing challenges for consideration. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Consciousness in humans and non-human animals: recent advances and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Boly, Melanie; Seth, Anil K.; Wilke, Melanie; Ingmundson, Paul; Baars, Bernard; Laureys, Steven; Edelman, David B.; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2013-01-01

    This joint article reflects the authors' personal views regarding noteworthy advances in the neuroscience of consciousness in the last 10 years, and suggests what we feel may be promising future directions. It is based on a small conference at the Samoset Resort in Rockport, Maine, USA, in July of 2012, organized by the Mind Science Foundation of San Antonio, Texas. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of subjectivity in humans and other animals, including empirical, applied, technical, and conceptual insights. These include the evidence for the importance of fronto-parietal connectivity and of “top-down” processes, both of which enable information to travel across distant cortical areas effectively, as well as numerous dissociations between consciousness and cognitive functions, such as attention, in humans. In addition, we describe the development of mental imagery paradigms, which made it possible to identify covert awareness in non-responsive subjects. Non-human animal consciousness research has also witnessed substantial advances on the specific role of cortical areas and higher order thalamus for consciousness, thanks to important technological enhancements. In addition, much progress has been made in the understanding of non-vertebrate cognition relevant to possible conscious states. Finally, major advances have been made in theories of consciousness, and also in their comparison with the available evidence. Along with reviewing these findings, each author suggests future avenues for research in their field of investigation. PMID:24198791

  15. Advanced Plasma Propulsion for Human Missions to Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Benjamin B.; Pearson, J. Boise

    1999-01-01

    This paper will briefly identify a promising fusion plasma power source, which when coupled with a promising electric thruster technology would provide for an efficient interplanetary transfer craft suitable to a 4 year round trip mission to the Jovian system. An advanced, nearly radiation free Inertial Electrostatic Confinement scheme for containing fusion plasma was judged as offering potential for delivering the performance and operational benefits needed for such high energy human expedition missions, without requiring heavy superconducting magnets for containment of the fusion plasma. Once the Jovian transfer stage has matched the heliocentric velocity of Jupiter, the energy requirements for excursions to its outer satellites (Callisto, Ganymede and Europa) by smaller excursion craft are not prohibitive. The overall propulsion, power and thruster system is briefly described and a preliminary vehicle mass statement is presented.

  16. Human umbilical cord blood cells and diabetes mellitus: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Alluru S; Kothari, Neil; Kuppasani, Kishore; Ende, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy for patients with diabetes is an area of great interest to both scientists and clinicians. Human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs) are being increasingly used as a source of stem cells for cell-based therapy for diabetes because these cells can differentiate into pancreatic islet β-cells. Administration of HUCBCs has been shown to lower blood glucose levels in diabetic animal models. The use of autologous HUCBC transfusion in type 1 diabetic children has not shown any benefit. However, "Stem Cell Educator" therapy has shown promise in long term lowering of blood glucose levels in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. In this review, we will briefly discuss recent advances in HUCBC therapy in the treatment of diabetes and some of its complications.

  17. Advanced plasma propulsion for human missions to Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Benjamin B.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2000-01-01

    This paper will briefly identify a promising fusion plasma power source, which when coupled with a promising electric thruster technology would provide for an efficient interplanetary transfer craft suitable to a 4 year round trip mission to the Jovian system. An advanced, nearly radiation free Inertial Electrostatic Confinement scheme for containing fusion plasma was judged as offering potential for delivering the performance and operational benefits needed for such high energy human expedition missions, without requiring heavy superconducting magnets for containment of the fusion plasma. Once the Jovian transfer stage has matched the heliocentric velocity of Jupiter, the energy requirements for excursions to its outer satellites (Callisto, Ganymede and Europa) by smaller excursion craft are not prohibitive. The overall propulsion, power and thruster system is briefly described and a preliminary vehicle mass statement is presented. .

  18. Advancing our understanding of the human microbiome using QIIME

    PubMed Central

    Navas-Molina, José A.; Peralta-Sánchez, Juan M.; González, Antonio; McMurdie, Paul J.; Vázquez-Baeza, Yoshiki; Xu, Zhenjiang; Ursell, Luke K.; Lauber, Christian; Zhou, Hongwei; Song, Se Jin; Huntley, James; Ackermann, Gail L.; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Holmes, Susan; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Knight, Rob

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technologies, coupled with advanced bioinformatics tools, have enabled rapid advances in microbial ecology and our understanding of the human microbiome. QIIME (Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology) is an open-source bioinformatics software package designed for microbial community analysis based on DNA sequence data, which provides a single analysis framework for analysis of raw sequence data through publication quality statistical analyses and interactive visualizations. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of the QIIME pipeline to analyze microbial communities obtained from several sites on the bodies of transgenic and wild-type mice, as assessed using 16S rRNA gene sequences generated on the Illumina MiSeq platform. We present our recommended pipeline for performing microbial community analysis, and provide guidelines for making critical choices in the process. We present examples of some of the types of analyses that are enabled by QIIME, and discuss how other tools, such as phyloseq and R, can be applied to expand upon these analyses. PMID:24060131

  19. Microcomposition of Human Urinary Calculi Using Advanced Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Blaschko, Sarah D.; Miller, Joe; Chi, Thomas; Flechner, Lawrence; Fakra, Sirine; Kahn, Arnold; Kapahi, Pankaj; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Common methods of commercial urolithiasis analysis, such as light microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, provide limited or no information on the molecular composition of stones, which is vital when studying early stone pathogenesis. We used synchrotron radiation based microfocused x-ray fluorescence, x-ray absorption and x-ray diffraction advanced imaging techniques to identify and map the elemental composition, including trace elements, of urinary calculi on a μm (0.0001 cm) scale. Materials and Methods Human stone samples were obtained during serial percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureteroscopy procedures. A portion of each sample was sent for commercial stone analysis and a portion was retained for synchrotron radiation based advanced imaging analysis. Results Synchrotron radiation based methods of stone analysis correctly identified stone composition and provided additional molecular detail on elemental components and spatial distribution in uroliths. Resolution was on the order of a few μm. Conclusions Knowledge of all elements present in lithogenesis at this detail allows for better understanding of early stone formation events, which may provide additional insight to prevent and treat stone formation. PMID:23021997

  20. Microcomposition of human urinary calculi using advanced imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Blaschko, Sarah D; Miller, Joe; Chi, Thomas; Flechner, Lawrence; Fakra, Sirine; Kahn, Arnold; Kapahi, Pankaj; Stoller, Marshall L

    2013-02-01

    Common methods of commercial urolithiasis analysis, such as light microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, provide limited or no information on the molecular composition of stones, which is vital when studying early stone pathogenesis. We used synchrotron radiation based microfocused x-ray fluorescence, x-ray absorption and x-ray diffraction advanced imaging techniques to identify and map the elemental composition, including trace elements, of urinary calculi on a μm (0.0001 cm) scale. Human stone samples were obtained during serial percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureteroscopy procedures. A portion of each sample was sent for commercial stone analysis and a portion was retained for synchrotron radiation based advanced imaging analysis. Synchrotron radiation based methods of stone analysis correctly identified stone composition and provided additional molecular detail on elemental components and spatial distribution in uroliths. Resolution was on the order of a few μm. Knowledge of all elements present in lithogenesis at this detail allows for better understanding of early stone formation events, which may provide additional insight to prevent and treat stone formation. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Zebrafish Models of Human Leukemia: Technological Advances and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Nicholas R.; Laroche, Fabrice J.F.; Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Insights concerning leukemic pathophysiology have been acquired in various animal models and further efforts to understand the mechanisms underlying leukemic treatment resistance and disease relapse promise to improve therapeutic strategies. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a vertebrate organism with a conserved hematopoietic program and unique experimental strengths suiting it for the investigation of human leukemia. Recent technological advances in zebrafish research including efficient transgenesis, precise genome editing, and straightforward transplantation techniques have led to the generation of a number of leukemia models. The transparency of the zebrafish when coupled with improved lineage-tracing and imaging techniques has revealed exquisite details of leukemic initiation, progression, and regression. With these advantages, the zebrafish represents a unique experimental system for leukemic research and additionally, advances in zebrafish-based high-throughput drug screening promise to hasten the discovery of novel leukemia therapeutics. To date, investigators have accumulated knowledge of the genetic underpinnings critical to leukemic transformation and treatment resistance and without doubt, zebrafish are rapidly expanding our understanding of disease mechanisms and helping to shape therapeutic strategies for improved outcomes in leukemic patients. PMID:27165361

  2. Developing Advanced Human Support Technologies for Planetary Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdich, Debra P.; Campbell, Paul D.; Jernigan, J. Mark

    2004-01-01

    The United States Vision for Space Exploration calls for sending robots and humans to explore the Earth's moon, the planet Mars, and beyond. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing a set of design reference missions that will provide further detail to these plans. Lunar missions are expected to provide a stepping stone, through operational research and evaluation, in developing the knowledge base necessary to send crews on long duration missions to Mars and other distant destinations. The NASA Exploration Systems Directorate (ExSD), in its program of bioastronautics research, manages the development of technologies that maintain human life, health, and performance in space. Using a system engineering process and risk management methods, ExSD's Human Support Systems (HSS) Program selects and performs research and technology development in several critical areas and transfers the results of its efforts to NASA exploration mission/systems development programs in the form of developed technologies and new knowledge about the capabilities and constraints of systems required to support human existence beyond Low Earth Orbit. HSS efforts include the areas of advanced environmental monitoring and control, extravehicular activity, food technologies, life support systems, space human factors engineering, and systems integration of all these elements. The HSS Program provides a structured set of deliverable products to meet the needs of exploration programs. These products reduce the gaps that exist in our knowledge of and capabilities for human support for long duration, remote space missions. They also reduce the performance gap between the efficiency of current space systems and the greater efficiency that must be achieved to make human planetary exploration missions economically and logistically feasible. In conducting this research and technology development program, it is necessary for HSS technologists and program managers to develop a

  3. Leukocyte trafficking-associated vascular adhesion protein 1 is expressed and functionally active in atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Silvola, Johanna M. U.; Virtanen, Helena; Siitonen, Riikka; Hellberg, Sanna; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Metsälä, Olli; Ståhle, Mia; Saanijoki, Tiina; Käkelä, Meeri; Hakovirta, Harri; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Saukko, Pekka; Jauhiainen, Matti; Veres, Tibor Z.; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Knuuti, Juhani; Saraste, Antti; Roivainen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Given the important role of inflammation and the potential association of the leukocyte trafficking-associated adhesion molecule vascular adhesion protein 1 (VAP-1) with atherosclerosis, this study examined whether functional VAP-1 is expressed in atherosclerotic lesions and, if so, whether it could be targeted by positron emission tomography (PET). First, immunohistochemistry revealed that VAP-1 localized to endothelial cells of intra-plaque neovessels in human carotid endarterectomy samples from patients with recent ischemic symptoms. In low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice expressing only apolipoprotein B100 (LDLR−/−ApoB100/100), VAP-1 was expressed on endothelial cells lining inflamed atherosclerotic lesions; normal vessel walls in aortas of C57BL/6N control mice were VAP-1-negative. Second, we discovered that the focal uptake of VAP-1 targeting sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 based PET tracer [68Ga]DOTA-Siglec-9 in atherosclerotic plaques was associated with the density of activated macrophages (r = 0.58, P = 0.022). As a final point, we found that the inhibition of VAP-1 activity with small molecule LJP1586 decreased the density of macrophages in inflamed atherosclerotic plaques in mice. Our results suggest for the first time VAP-1 as a potential imaging target for inflamed atherosclerotic plaques, and corroborate VAP-1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27731409

  4. Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banker, Brian F.; Robinson, Travis

    2016-01-01

    The proposed paper will cover ongoing effort named HESTIA (Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement), led at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) to promote a cross-subsystem approach to developing Mars-enabling technologies with the ultimate goal of integrated system optimization. HESTIA also aims to develop the infrastructure required to rapidly test these highly integrated systems at a low cost. The initial focus is on the common fluids architecture required to enable human exploration of mars, specifically between life support and in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) subsystems. An overview of the advancements in both integrated technologies, in infrastructure, in simulation, and in modeling capabilities will be presented, as well as the results and findings of integrated testing,. Due to the enormous mass gear-ratio required for human exploration beyond low-earth orbit, (for every 1 kg of payload landed on Mars, 226 kg will be required on Earth), minimization of surface hardware and commodities is paramount. Hardware requirements can be minimized by reduction of equipment performing similar functions though for different subsystems. If hardware could be developed which meets the requirements of both life support and ISRU it could result in the reduction of primary hardware and/or reduction in spares. Minimization of commodities to the surface of mars can be achieved through the creation of higher efficiency systems producing little to no undesired waste, such as a closed-loop life support subsystem. Where complete efficiency is impossible or impractical, makeup commodities could be manufactured via ISRU. Although, utilization of ISRU products (oxygen and water) for crew consumption holds great promise of reducing demands on life support hardware, there exist concerns as to the purity and transportation of commodities. To date, ISRU has been focused on production rates and purities for

  5. Specific imaging of atherosclerotic plaque lipids with two-wavelength intravascular photoacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Jansen, Krista; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; van Soest, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    The lipid content in plaques is an important marker for identifying atherosclerotic lesions and disease states. Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging can be used to visualize lipids in the artery. In this study, we further investigated lipid detection in the 1.7-µm spectral range. By exploiting the relative difference between the IVPA signal strengths at 1718 and 1734 nm, we could successfully detect and differentiate between the plaque lipids and peri-adventitial fat in human coronary arteries ex vivo. Our study demonstrates that IVPA imaging can positively identify atherosclerotic plaques using only two wavelengths, which could enable rapid data acquisition in vivo. PMID:26417500

  6. Genesis and growth of extracellular vesicle-derived microcalcification in atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Goettsch, Claudia; Bertazzo, Sergio; Maldonado, Natalia; Ruiz, Jessica L.; Goh, Wilson; Yabusaki, Katsumi; Faits, Tyler; Bouten, Carlijn; Franck, Gregory; Quillard, Thibaut; Libby, Peter; Aikawa, Masanori; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence links arterial calcification and cardiovascular risk. Finite-element modelling of the stress distribution within atherosclerotic plaques has suggested that subcellular microcalcifications in the fibrous cap may promote material failure of the plaque, but that large calcifications can stabilize it. Yet the physicochemical mechanisms underlying such mineral formation and growth in atheromata remain unknown. Here, by using three-dimensional collagen hydrogels that mimic structural features of the atherosclerotic fibrous cap, and high-resolution microscopic and spectroscopic analyses of both the hydrogels and of calcified human plaques, we demonstrate that calcific mineral formation and maturation results from a series of events involving the aggregation of calcifying extracellular vesicles, and the formation of microcalcifications and ultimately large calcification zones. We also show that calcification morphology and the plaque’s collagen content – two determinants of atherosclerotic plaque stability - are interlinked. PMID:26752654

  7. Genesis and growth of extracellular-vesicle-derived microcalcification in atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Goettsch, Claudia; Bertazzo, Sergio; Maldonado, Natalia; Ruiz, Jessica L.; Goh, Wilson; Yabusaki, Katsumi; Faits, Tyler; Bouten, Carlijn; Franck, Gregory; Quillard, Thibaut; Libby, Peter; Aikawa, Masanori; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Aikawa, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Clinical evidence links arterial calcification and cardiovascular risk. Finite-element modelling of the stress distribution within atherosclerotic plaques has suggested that subcellular microcalcifications in the fibrous cap may promote material failure of the plaque, but that large calcifications can stabilize it. Yet the physicochemical mechanisms underlying such mineral formation and growth in atheromata remain unknown. Here, by using three-dimensional collagen hydrogels that mimic structural features of the atherosclerotic fibrous cap, and high-resolution microscopic and spectroscopic analyses of both the hydrogels and of calcified human plaques, we demonstrate that calcific mineral formation and maturation results from a series of events involving the aggregation of calcifying extracellular vesicles, and the formation of microcalcifications and ultimately large calcification areas. We also show that calcification morphology and the plaque’s collagen content--two determinants of atherosclerotic plaque stability--are interlinked.

  8. Ultrasound imaging versus morphopathology in cardiovascular diseases. Coronary collateral circulation and atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Baroldi, Giorgio; Bigi, Riccardo; Cortigiani, Lauro

    2005-01-01

    This review article is aimed at comparing the results of histopathological and clinical imaging studies to assess coronary collateral circulation in humans. The role of collaterals, as emerging from morphological studies in both normal and atherosclerotic coronary vessels, is described; in addition, present role and future perpectives of echocardiographic techniques in assessing collateral circulation are briefly summarized. PMID:15740620

  9. Lipidome of Atherosclerotic Plaques from Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Bojic, Lazar A.; McLaren, David G.; Shah, Vinit; Previs, Stephen F.; Johns, Douglas G.; Castro-Perez, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular, macromolecular and neutral lipid composition of the atherosclerotic plaque has been extensively characterized. However, a comprehensive lipidomic analysis of the major lipid classes within atherosclerotic lesions has not been reported. The objective of this study was to produce a detailed framework of the lipids that comprise the atherosclerotic lesion of a widely used pre-clinical model of plaque progression. Male New Zealand White rabbits were administered regular chow supplemented with 0.5% cholesterol (HC) for 12 weeks to induce hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Our lipidomic analyses of plaques isolated from rabbits fed the HC diet, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry, detected most of the major lipid classes including: Cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, diacylglycerols, fatty acids, phosphatidylserines, lysophosphatidylcholines, ceramides, phosphatidylglycerols, phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylethanolamines. Given that cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines comprise greater than 75% of total plasma lipids, we directed particular attention towards the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the fatty acid composition of these lipids. We additionally found that sphingomyelins were relatively abundant lipid class within lesions, and compared the abundance of sphingomyelins to their precursor phosphatidylcholines. The studies presented here are the first approach to a comprehensive characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque lipidome. PMID:25517033

  10. Lipidome of atherosclerotic plaques from hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bojic, Lazar A; McLaren, David G; Shah, Vinit; Previs, Stephen F; Johns, Douglas G; Castro-Perez, Jose M

    2014-12-15

    The cellular, macromolecular and neutral lipid composition of the atherosclerotic plaque has been extensively characterized. However, a comprehensive lipidomic analysis of the major lipid classes within atherosclerotic lesions has not been reported. The objective of this study was to produce a detailed framework of the lipids that comprise the atherosclerotic lesion of a widely used pre-clinical model of plaque progression. Male New Zealand White rabbits were administered regular chow supplemented with 0.5% cholesterol (HC) for 12 weeks to induce hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Our lipidomic analyses of plaques isolated from rabbits fed the HC diet, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry, detected most of the major lipid classes including: Cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, diacylglycerols, fatty acids, phosphatidylserines, lysophosphatidylcholines, ceramides, phosphatidylglycerols, phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylethanolamines. Given that cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines comprise greater than 75% of total plasma lipids, we directed particular attention towards the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the fatty acid composition of these lipids. We additionally found that sphingomyelins were relatively abundant lipid class within lesions, and compared the abundance of sphingomyelins to their precursor phosphatidylcholines. The studies presented here are the first approach to a comprehensive characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque lipidome.

  11. Using In Vivo Cine and 3D Multi-Contrast MRI to Determine Human Atherosclerotic Carotid Artery Material Properties and Circumferential Shrinkage Rate and Their Impact on Stress/Strain Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haofei; Canton, Gador; Yuan, Chun; Yang, Chun; Billiar, Kristen; Teng, Zhongzhao; Hoffman, Allen H.; Tang, Dalin

    2012-01-01

    In vivo magnetic resonance image (MRI)-based computational models have been introduced to calculate atherosclerotic plaque stress and strain conditions for possible rupture predictions. However, patient-specific vessel material properties are lacking in those models, which affects the accuracy of their stress/strain predictions. A noninvasive approach of combining in vivo Cine MRI, multicontrast 3D MRI, and computational modeling was introduced to quantify patient-specific carotid artery material properties and the circumferential shrinkage rate between vessel in vivo and zero-pressure geometries. In vivo Cine and 3D multicontrast MRI carotid plaque data were acquired from 12 patients after informed consent. For each patient, one nearly-circular slice and an iterative procedure were used to quantify parameter values in the modified Mooney-Rivlin model for the vessel and the vessel circumferential shrinkage rate. A sample artery slice with and without a lipid core and three material parameter sets representing stiff, median, and soft materials from our patient data were used to demonstrate the effect of material stiffness and circumferential shrinkage process on stress/strain predictions. Parameter values of the Mooney-Rivlin models for the 12 patients were quantified. The effective Young's modulus (YM, unit: kPa) values varied from 137 (soft), 431 (median), to 1435 (stiff), and corresponding circumferential shrinkages were 32%, 12.6%, and 6%, respectively. Using the sample slice without the lipid core, the maximum plaque stress values (unit: kPa) from the soft and median materials were 153.3 and 96.2, which are 67.7% and 5% higher than that (91.4) from the stiff material, while the maximum plaque strain values from the soft and median materials were 0.71 and 0.293, which are about 700% and 230% higher than that (0.089) from the stiff material, respectively. Without circumferential shrinkages, the maximum plaque stress values (unit: kPa) from the soft, median

  12. Using in vivo Cine and 3D multi-contrast MRI to determine human atherosclerotic carotid artery material properties and circumferential shrinkage rate and their impact on stress/strain predictions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haofei; Canton, Gador; Yuan, Chun; Yang, Chun; Billiar, Kristen; Teng, Zhongzhao; Hoffman, Allen H; Tang, Dalin

    2012-01-01

    In vivo magnetic resonance image (MRI)-based computational models have been introduced to calculate atherosclerotic plaque stress and strain conditions for possible rupture predictions. However, patient-specific vessel material properties are lacking in those models, which affects the accuracy of their stress/strain predictions. A noninvasive approach of combining in vivo Cine MRI, multicontrast 3D MRI, and computational modeling was introduced to quantify patient-specific carotid artery material properties and the circumferential shrinkage rate between vessel in vivo and zero-pressure geometries. In vivo Cine and 3D multicontrast MRI carotid plaque data were acquired from 12 patients after informed consent. For each patient, one nearly-circular slice and an iterative procedure were used to quantify parameter values in the modified Mooney-Rivlin model for the vessel and the vessel circumferential shrinkage rate. A sample artery slice with and without a lipid core and three material parameter sets representing stiff, median, and soft materials from our patient data were used to demonstrate the effect of material stiffness and circumferential shrinkage process on stress/strain predictions. Parameter values of the Mooney-Rivlin models for the 12 patients were quantified. The effective Young's modulus (YM, unit: kPa) values varied from 137 (soft), 431 (median), to 1435 (stiff), and corresponding circumferential shrinkages were 32%, 12.6%, and 6%, respectively. Using the sample slice without the lipid core, the maximum plaque stress values (unit: kPa) from the soft and median materials were 153.3 and 96.2, which are 67.7% and 5% higher than that (91.4) from the stiff material, while the maximum plaque strain values from the soft and median materials were 0.71 and 0.293, which are about 700% and 230% higher than that (0.089) from the stiff material, respectively. Without circumferential shrinkages, the maximum plaque stress values (unit: kPa) from the soft, median, and

  13. Advances in human papilloma virus vaccines: a patent review.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee-Jeong; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2011-03-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is the main factor associated with the development of cervical cancer. The currently available HPV vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix, can prevent infection by certain HPV types, but not all. At present, research efforts are being devoted to developing more broad spectrum preventative vaccines, as well as therapeutic vaccines. Recent advances in HPV vaccine development are reviewed in this paper, with a focus on worldwide patents and patent applications. In principle, patents that have been granted since 2002 are covered. Exceptions are the patents pending at PCT stage and recent patent applications since 2009. Readers will gain insights into the cutting-edge technologies being used in the development and production of vaccines, as well as adjuvant systems. In the future, the use of mosaic virus-like particles (VLPs,) comprising at least one L1 protein of each HPV type, may be able to prevent infection by all HPV types while patented codon-optimization techniques and the use of edible or DNA-based vaccines may be good places to start for reducing costs. Future vaccines should ideally have both preventive and therapeutic efficacies. Enhanced immunogenicity could be achieved by the use of more effective adjuvants, such as nanoparticle-based delivery systems, or new classes of adjuvants.

  14. Bacterial Communities Associated with Atherosclerotic Plaques from Russian Individuals with Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ziganshina, Elvira E.; Sharifullina, Dilyara M.; Lozhkin, Andrey P.; Khayrullin, Rustem N.; Ignatyev, Igor M.; Ziganshin, Ayrat M.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is considered a chronic disease of the arterial wall and is the major cause of severe disease and death among individuals all over the world. Some recent studies have established the presence of bacteria in atherosclerotic plaque samples and suggested their possible contribution to the development of cardiovascular disease. The main objective of this preliminary pilot study was to better understand the bacterial diversity and abundance in human atherosclerotic plaques derived from common carotid arteries of individuals with atherosclerosis (Russian nationwide group) and contribute towards the further identification of a main group of atherosclerotic plaque bacteria by 454 pyrosequencing their 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes. The applied approach enabled the detection of bacterial DNA in all atherosclerotic plaques. We found that distinct members of the order Burkholderiales were present at high levels in all atherosclerotic plaques obtained from patients with atherosclerosis with the genus Curvibacter being predominant in all plaque samples. Moreover, unclassified Burkholderiales as well as members of the genera Propionibacterium and Ralstonia were typically the most significant taxa for all atherosclerotic plaques. Other genera such as Burkholderia, Corynebacterium and Sediminibacterium as well as unclassified Comamonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae and Burkholderiaceae were always found but at low relative abundances of the total 16S rRNA gene population derived from all samples. Also, we found that some bacteria found in plaque samples correlated with some clinical parameters, including total cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase and fibrinogen levels. Finally, our study indicates that some bacterial agents at least partially may be involved in affecting the development of cardiovascular disease through different mechanisms. PMID:27736997

  15. Bacterial Communities Associated with Atherosclerotic Plaques from Russian Individuals with Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ziganshina, Elvira E; Sharifullina, Dilyara M; Lozhkin, Andrey P; Khayrullin, Rustem N; Ignatyev, Igor M; Ziganshin, Ayrat M

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is considered a chronic disease of the arterial wall and is the major cause of severe disease and death among individuals all over the world. Some recent studies have established the presence of bacteria in atherosclerotic plaque samples and suggested their possible contribution to the development of cardiovascular disease. The main objective of this preliminary pilot study was to better understand the bacterial diversity and abundance in human atherosclerotic plaques derived from common carotid arteries of individuals with atherosclerosis (Russian nationwide group) and contribute towards the further identification of a main group of atherosclerotic plaque bacteria by 454 pyrosequencing their 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes. The applied approach enabled the detection of bacterial DNA in all atherosclerotic plaques. We found that distinct members of the order Burkholderiales were present at high levels in all atherosclerotic plaques obtained from patients with atherosclerosis with the genus Curvibacter being predominant in all plaque samples. Moreover, unclassified Burkholderiales as well as members of the genera Propionibacterium and Ralstonia were typically the most significant taxa for all atherosclerotic plaques. Other genera such as Burkholderia, Corynebacterium and Sediminibacterium as well as unclassified Comamonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae and Burkholderiaceae were always found but at low relative abundances of the total 16S rRNA gene population derived from all samples. Also, we found that some bacteria found in plaque samples correlated with some clinical parameters, including total cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase and fibrinogen levels. Finally, our study indicates that some bacterial agents at least partially may be involved in affecting the development of cardiovascular disease through different mechanisms.

  16. Paracrine osteogenic signals via bone morphogenetic protein-2 accelerate the atherosclerotic intimal calcification in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yusuke; Ikeda, Koji; Akakabe, Yoshiki; Koide, Masahiro; Uraoka, Maki; Yutaka, Ko-Taro; Kurimoto-Nakano, Ritsuko; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Matoba, Satoaki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Okigaki, Mitsuhiko; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2010-10-01

    Vascular calcification is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Here, we investigated a role of dedifferentiated vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the atherosclerotic intimal calcification. We prepared human cultured VSMCs in either redifferentiatiated or dedifferentiated state and analyzed the gene expressions of bone-calcification regulatory factors. Expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), a potent initiator for osteoblast differentiation, was significantly enhanced in dedifferentiated VSMCs. Furthermore, endogenous BMP-2 antagonists, such as noggin, chordin, and matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid protein, were all downregulated in the dedifferentiated VSMCs. Conditioned medium from dedifferentiated VSMCs, but not from redifferentiated VSMCs, stimulated the osteoblastic differentiation of the mesenchymal progenitor C2C12 cells, which was abolished by BMP-2 knockdown. In atherosclerotic intima from apolipoprotein (apo)E-deficient mice, αSM-actin-positive cells, presumably dedifferentiated VSMCs, expressed BMP-2. We generated BMP-2-transgenic mice using αSM-actin promoter and crossed them with apoE-deficient mice (BMP-2-transgenic/apoE-knockout). Significantly accelerated atherosclerotic intimal calcification was detected in BMP-2-transgenic/apoE-knockout mice, although serum lipid concentration and atherosclerotic plaque size were not different from those in apoE-knockout mice. Enhanced calcification appeared to be associated with the frequent emergence of osteoblast-like cells in atherosclerotic intima in BMP-2-transgenic/apoE-knockout mice. Our findings collectively demonstrate an important role of dedifferentiated VSMCs in the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic calcification through activating paracrine BMP-2 osteogenic signals.

  17. Atherosclerotic risk factors, vascular cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Jason C; Fuster, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of vascular factors in Alzheimer dementia was first appreciated over 100 years ago. Recently, significant advances in our understanding of these brain-vascular relationships have taken place. Vascular cognitive impairment is now recognized as a distinct group of interrelated vascular-based neurological insults that can accumulate and lead to dementia. Importantly, the pathology of vascular cognitive impairment extends far beyond brain destruction wrought by major stroke. Other subtle changes may also arise that contribute to vascular cognitive impairment and dementia, including subclinical stroke, white-matter changes such as hyperintensities and lipohyalinosis, small lacunar infarcts, cerebral hypoperfusion, and compromise of the blood-brain barrier. In this review we critically examine the emerging body of evidence that relates atherosclerotic risk factors, brain functioning, and Alzheimer disease. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  18. The prevention and regression of atherosclerotic plaques: emerging treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kalanuria, Atul Ashok; Nyquist, Paul; Ling, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Occlusive vascular diseases, such as sudden coronary syndromes, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease, are a huge burden on the health care systems of developed and developing countries. Tremendous advances have been made over the last few decades in the diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerotic diseases. Intravascular ultrasound has been able to provide detailed information of plaque anatomy and has been used in several studies to assess outcomes. The presence of atherosclerosis disrupts the normal protective mechanism provided by the endothelium and this mechanism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and stroke. Efforts are being put into the prevention of atherosclerosis, which has been shown to begin in childhood. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and discusses the current options available for the prevention and reversal of plaque formation. PMID:23049260

  19. Physical training and metabolic supplementation reduce spontaneous atherosclerotic plaque rupture and prolong survival in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Claudio; Williams-Ignarro, Sharon; de Nigris, Filomena; Lerman, Lilach O; D'Armiento, Francesco P; Crimi, Ettore; Byrns, Russell E; Casamassimi, Amelia; Lanza, Alessandro; Gombos, Fernando; Sica, Vincenzo; Ignarro, Louis J

    2006-07-05

    Moderate physical exercise (PE) combined with metabolic treatment (MT) (antioxidants and l-arginine) are well known to reduce atherosclerotic lesion formation in hypercholesterolemic mice. However, the long-term beneficial effects on unstable atheroma remain poorly understood. We started early PE training in large groups of 6-week-old hypercholesterolemic mice (by graduated swimming) alone or in combination with nutritional supplementation (1.0% vitamin E added to the chow and 0.05% vitamin C and 6% l-arginine added to the drinking water). Inactive controls did not receive PE. The spontaneous development of atherosclerotic plaque rupture (associated with advanced atherosclerosis) and survival rates were evaluated. Moderate PE elicited an increase in plasma levels of nitric oxide. Early combined treatment with PE and MT in the hypercholesterolemic mice significantly reduced lesions (also detected noninvasively at 10 months) and spontaneous atherosclerotic plaque rupture and prolonged survival more effectively than each intervention alone. Thus, early concerted actions of MT and PE improve the natural history of atherosclerotic lesions and reduce the plaque instability in hypercholesterolemic mice.

  20. Potential beneficial effects of ixmyelocel-T in the treatment of atherosclerotic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Advanced atherosclerotic lesions are characterized by lipid accumulation, inflammation, and defective efferocytosis. An ideal therapy should address all aspects of this multifactorial disease. Ixmyelocel-T therapy, an expanded autologous multicellular therapy showing clinical promise in the treatment of diseases associated with advanced atherosclerosis, includes a novel population of M2-like macrophages. Here, we examine the macrophages of ixmyelocel-T and determine their ability to influx modified cholesterol in an atheroprotective manner, maintaining cholesterol homeostasis and preventing cellular dysfunction and death, ultimately promoting reverse cholesterol efflux. Methods Approximately 50 ml of whole bone marrow was obtained from healthy donors and shipped overnight. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) were produced by using density gradient separation and cultured for approximately 12 days to generate ixmyelocel-T. CD14+ cells were isolated from ixmyelocel-T via positive selection for analysis. Ixmyelocel-T and human leukemia monocyte (THP-1) cells were loaded with acetylated low-density lipoprotein (Ac-LDL) for analysis. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence were used to examine Ac-LDL uptake, expression of cytokines was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunofluorescence assay (ELISA), and quantitative real-time PCR was used to analyze expression of cholesterol-transport genes. Both the in vitro cholesterol efflux assay and in vivo reverse cholesterol transport assay were used to examine cholesterol transport. Results Ixmyelocel-T macrophages take up acetylated low-density lipoprotein and express the scavenger receptors CD36 and scavenger receptor-B1 (SR-B1). Ixmyelocel-T did not become apoptotic or proinflammatory after lipid loading. The cholesterol transporter genes ABAC1 and ABCG1 were both statistically significantly upregulated when ixmyelocel-T macrophages were loaded with cholesterol. Ixmyelocel-T also exhibited enhanced apolipoprotein A

  1. Technical Advancement and Human Progress and The Problems of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bixby, Louis W.

    1980-01-01

    Projects and discusses possible future developments resulting from electrochemical technological advancements. Educational implications are explored, and examples of integrated learning in diverse interest areas are given. (CS)

  2. Opening plenary speaker: Human genomics, precision medicine, and advancing human health.

    PubMed

    Green, Eric D

    2016-08-01

    Starting with the launch of the Human Genome Project in 1990, the past quarter-century has brought spectacular achievements in genomics that dramatically empower the study of human biology and disease. The human genomics enterprise is now in the midst of an important transition, as the growing foundation of genomic knowledge is being used by researchers and clinicians to tackle increasingly complex problems in biomedicine. Of particular prominence is the use of revolutionary new DNA sequencing technologies for generating prodigious amounts of DNA sequence data to elucidate the complexities of genome structure, function, and evolution, as well as to unravel the genomic bases of rare and common diseases. Together, these developments are ushering in the era of genomic medicine. Augmenting the advances in human genomics have been innovations in technologies for measuring environmental and lifestyle information, electronic health records, and data science; together, these provide opportunities of unprecedented scale and scope for investigating the underpinnings of health and disease. To capitalize on these opportunities, U.S. President Barack Obama recently announced a major new research endeavor - the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative. This bold effort will be framed around several key aims, which include accelerating the use of genomically informed approaches to cancer care, making important policy and regulatory changes, and establishing a large research cohort of >1 million volunteers to facilitate precision medicine research. The latter will include making the partnership with all participants a centerpiece feature in the cohort's design and development. The Precision Medicine Initiative represents a broad-based research program that will allow new approaches for individualized medical care to be rigorously tested, so as to establish a new evidence base for advancing clinical practice and, eventually, human health.

  3. The development and evaluation of guidelines for the review of advanced human-system interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.M.; Wachtel, J.

    1992-12-31

    Advanced control rooms for future nuclear power plants are being designed utilizing computer-based technologies. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews the human engineering aspects of such control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported in order to protect public health and safety. This paper describes a general approach to advanced human-system interface review, development of human factors guidelines to support NRC safety reviews of advanced systems, and the results of a guideline test and evaluation program.

  4. Dengue human infection models to advance dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christian P; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P

    2015-12-10

    Dengue viruses (DENV) currently infect approximately 400 million people each year causing millions to seek care and overwhelming the health care infrastructure in endemic areas. Vaccines to prevent dengue and therapeutics to treat dengue are not currently available. The efficacy of the most advanced candidate vaccine against symptomatic dengue in general and DENV-2 in particular was much lower than expected, despite the ability of the vaccine to induce neutralizing antibody against all four DENV serotypes. Because seroconversion to the DENV serotypes following vaccination was thought to be indicative of induced protection, these results have made it more difficult to assess which candidate vaccines should or should not be evaluated in large studies in endemic areas. A dengue human infection model (DHIM) could be extremely valuable to down-select candidate vaccines or therapeutics prior to engaging in efficacy trials in endemic areas. Two DHIM have been developed to assess the efficacy of live attenuated tetravalent (LATV) dengue vaccines. The first model, developed by the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at the U. S. National Institutes of Health, utilizes a modified DENV-2 strain DEN2Δ30. This virus was derived from the DENV-2 Tonga/74 that caused only very mild clinical infection during the outbreak from which it was recovered. DEN2Δ30 induced viremia in 100%, rash in 80%, and neutropenia in 27% of the 30 subjects to whom it was given. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) is developing a DHIM the goal of which is to identify DENV that cause symptomatic dengue fever. WRAIR has evaluated seven viruses and has identified two that meet dengue fever criteria. Both of these models may be very useful in the evaluation and down-selection of candidate dengue vaccines and therapeutics.

  5. Short rendezvous missions for advanced Russian human spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtazin, Rafail F.; Budylov, Sergey G.

    2010-10-01

    The two-day stay of crew in a limited inhabited volume of the Soyuz-TMA spacecraft till docking to ISS is one of the most stressful parts of space flight. In this paper a number of possible ways to reduce the duration of the free flight phase are considered. The duration is defined by phasing strategy that is necessary for reduction of the phase angle between the chaser and target spacecraft. Some short phasing strategies could be developed. The use of such strategies creates more comfortable flight conditions for crew thanks to short duration and additionally it allows saving spacecraft's life support resources. The transition from the methods of direct spacecraft rendezvous using one orbit phasing (first flights of " Vostok" and " Soyuz" vehicles) to the currently used methods of two-day rendezvous mission can be observed in the history of Soviet manned space program. For an advanced Russian human rated spacecraft the short phasing strategy is recommended, which can be considered as a combination between the direct and two-day rendezvous missions. The following state of the art technologies are assumed available: onboard accurate navigation; onboard computations of phasing maneuvers; launch vehicle with high accuracy injection orbit, etc. Some operational requirements and constraints for the strategies are briefly discussed. In order to provide acceptable phase angles for possible launch dates the experience of the ISS altitude profile control can be used. As examples of the short phasing strategies, the following rendezvous missions are considered: direct ascent, short mission with the phasing during 3-7 orbits depending on the launch date (nominal or backup). For each option statistical modeling of the rendezvous mission is fulfilled, as well as an admissible phase angle range, accuracy of target state vector and addition fuel consumption coming out of emergency is defined. In this paper an estimation of pros and cons of all options is conducted.

  6. Image segmentation applied to atherosclerotic lesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, R. Rodríguez; Martínez, T. E. Alarcón; Cuello, L. Sánchez; Fernández-Britto, J. E.; Taylor, Charles

    2000-10-01

    The results obtained using two techniques: a supervised method and other unsupervised for image segmentation of atherosclerotic lesions of the thoracic aorta, are presented. Segmentation was used both with and without pre-processing. In this paper, the advantages of pre-processing prior to are shown for discriminating among the different atherosclerotic lesions (fatty streaks, fibrous plaque, complicated plaques and calcified plaques) and identifying them. The results using a supervised method were poor when searching vector consisted of two components, the mean and the variance. This digital image processing was done in order to use the automated atherometric system. This methodology has been considered to be suitable for the characterization of the atherosclerotic lesions in any artery and its organ-related damage in any vascular sector or group of patients. Final results were compared with manual segmentation realized by an expert, where difference errors less than 3% were observed. It is demonstrated by extensive experimentation, using real image data, that proposed strategy is fast and robust in the environment of a personal computer.

  7. Morphology of atherosclerotic coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Margaret N.; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Hieber, Simone Elke; Weitkamp, Timm; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia; Lobrinus, Johannes A.; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Mach, François; Zumbuehl, Andreas; Saxer, Till; Müller, Bert

    2012-10-01

    Atherosclerosis, the narrowing of vessel diameter and build-up of plaques in coronary arteries, leads to an increase in the shear stresses present, which can be used as a physics-based trigger for targeted drug delivery. In order to develop appropriate nanometer-size containers, one has to know the morphology of the critical stenoses with isotropic micrometer resolution. Micro computed tomography in absorption and phase contrast mode provides the necessary spatial resolution and contrast. The present communication describes the pros and cons of the conventional and synchrotron radiation-based approaches in the visualization of diseased human and murine arteries. Using registered datasets, it also demonstrates that multi-modal imaging, including established histology, is even more powerful. The tomography data were evaluated with respect to cross-section, vessel radius and maximal constriction. The average cross-section of the diseased human artery (2.31 mm2) was almost an order of magnitude larger than the murine one (0.27 mm2), whereas the minimal radius differs only by a factor of two (0.51 mm versus 0.24 mm). The maximal constriction, however, was much larger for the human specimen (85% versus 49%). We could also show that a plastic model used for recent experiments in targeted drug delivery represents a very similar morphology, which is, for example, characterized by a maximal constriction of 82%. The tomography data build a sound basis for flow simulations, which allows for conclusions on shear stress distributions in stenosed blood vessels.

  8. Human factors of advanced technology (glass cockpit) transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.

    1989-01-01

    A three-year study of airline crews at two U.S. airlines who were flying an advanced technology aircraft, the Boeing 757 is discussed. The opinions and experiences of these pilots as they view the advanced, automated features of this aircraft, and contrast them with previous models they have flown are discussed. Training for advanced automation; (2) cockpit errors and error reduction; (3) management of cockpit workload; and (4) general attitudes toward cockpit automation are emphasized. The limitations of the air traffic control (ATC) system on the ability to utilize the advanced features of the new aircraft are discussed. In general the pilots are enthusiastic about flying an advanced technology aircraft, but they express mixed feelings about the impact of automation on workload, crew errors, and ability to manage the flight.

  9. Photon counting spectral CT component analysis of coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque samples

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, P; Thran, A; Roessl, E; Martens, G; Sigovan, M; Douek, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the capabilities of photon counting spectral CT to differentiate components of coronary atherosclerotic plaque based on differences in spectral attenuation and iodine-based contrast agent concentration. Methods: 10 calcified and 13 lipid-rich non-calcified histologically demonstrated atheromatous plaques from post-mortem human coronary arteries were scanned with a photon counting spectral CT scanner. Individual photons were counted and classified in one of six energy bins from 25 to 70 keV. Based on a maximum likelihood approach, maps of photoelectric absorption (PA), Compton scattering (CS) and iodine concentration (IC) were reconstructed. Intensity measurements were performed on each map in the vessel wall, the surrounding perivascular fat and the lipid-rich and the calcified plaques. PA and CS values are expressed relative to pure water values. A comparison between these different elements was performed using Kruskal–Wallis tests with pairwise post hoc Mann–Whitney U-tests and Sidak p-value adjustments. Results: Results for vessel wall, surrounding perivascular fat and lipid-rich and calcified plaques were, respectively, 1.19 ± 0.09, 0.73 ± 0.05, 1.08 ± 0.14 and 17.79 ± 6.70 for PA; 0.96 ± 0.02, 0.83 ± 0.02, 0.91 ± 0.03 and 2.53 ± 0.63 for CS; and 83.3 ± 10.1, 37.6 ± 8.1, 55.2 ± 14.0 and 4.9 ± 20.0 mmol l−1 for IC, with a significant difference between all tissues for PA, CS and IC (p < 0.012). Conclusion: This study demonstrates the capability of energy-sensitive photon counting spectral CT to differentiate between calcifications and iodine-infused regions of human coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque samples by analysing differences in spectral attenuation and iodine-based contrast agent concentration. Advances in knowledge: Photon counting spectral CT is a promising technique to identify plaque components by analysing differences in iodine-based contrast agent

  10. An imbalance between specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators and pro-inflammatory leukotrienes promotes instability of atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Fredman, Gabrielle; Hellmann, Jason; Proto, Jonathan D.; Kuriakose, George; Colas, Romain A.; Dorweiler, Bernhard; Connolly, E. Sander; Solomon, Robert; Jones, David M.; Heyer, Eric J.; Spite, Matthew; Tabas, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Chronic unresolved inflammation plays a causal role in the development of advanced atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms that prevent resolution in atherosclerosis remain unclear. Here, we use targeted mass spectrometry to identify specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPM) in histologically-defined stable and vulnerable regions of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques. The levels of SPMs, particularly resolvin D1 (RvD1), and the ratio of SPMs to pro-inflammatory leukotriene B4 (LTB4), are significantly decreased in the vulnerable regions. SPMs are also decreased in advanced plaques of fat-fed Ldlr−/− mice. Administration of RvD1 to these mice during plaque progression restores the RvD1:LTB4 ratio to that of less advanced lesions and promotes plaque stability, including decreased lesional oxidative stress and necrosis, improved lesional efferocytosis, and thicker fibrous caps. These findings provide molecular support for the concept that defective inflammation resolution contributes to the formation of clinically dangerous plaques and offer a mechanistic rationale for SPM therapy to promote plaque stability. PMID:27659679

  11. Stress and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    Recent major advances in medical science have introduced a wide variety of treatments against atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular diseases, which has led to a significant reduction in mortality associated with these diseases. However, atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death. Furthermore, progress in medical science has demonstrated the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease to be complicated, with a wide variety of underlying factors. Among these factors, stress is thought to be pivotal. Several types of stress are involved in the development of cardiovascular disease, including oxidative stress, mental stress, hemodynamic stress and social stress. Accumulating evidence indicates that traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, including diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and smoking, induce oxidative stress in the vasculature. Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction, atherogenesis, hypertension and remodeling of blood vessels. Meanwhile, mental stress is a well-known major contributor to the development of cardiovascular disease. The cardiovascular system is constantly exposed to hemodynamic stress by the blood flow and/or pulsation, and hemodynamic stress exerts profound effects on the biology of vascular cells and cardiomyocytes. In addition, social stress, such as that due to a lack of social support, poverty or living alone, has a negative impact on the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, there are interactions between mental, oxidative and hemodynamic stress. The production of reactive oxygen species is increased under high levels of mental stress in close association with oxidative stress. These stress responses and their interactions play central roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, the pathophysiological and clinical implications of stress are discussed in this article.

  12. Indium-111-labeled LDL: A potential agent for imaging atherosclerotic disease and lipoprotein biodistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.M.; Butler, S.P.; Meinken, G.E.; Wang, T.S.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Srivastava, S.C.; Alderson, P.O.; Ginsberg, H.N. )

    1990-03-01

    Radiolabeling of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and external imaging with a gamma camera would offer a means of taking advantage of the metabolic activity of developing atherosclerotic lesions in order to noninvasively detect and determine the extent of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Indium-111-({sup 111}In) labeled LDL was prepared and its purity demonstrated by agarose electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. In vitro studies with cultured human fibroblasts demonstrated significant inhibition of iodine-125-({sup 125}I) LDL binding to LDL receptors by {sup 111}In-LDL, although this was less than the inhibition produced by unlabeled LDL. Adrenal gland uptake of {sup 111}In-LDL by hypercholesterolemic rabbits was reduced by 86% compared to the level of uptake observed in normal rabbits. These results were compatible with downregulation of adrenal LDL receptors in the hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Uptake of {sup 111}In-LDL in the atherosclerotic proximal aorta of hypercholesterolemic rabbits was 2.5 times higher than in normal rabbits. These results suggest that {sup 111}In-LDL has the potential to be a useful agent for external imaging of atherosclerotic lesions and lipoprotein biodistribution.

  13. The development and evaluation of human factors guidelines for the review of advanced human-system interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.M.

    1992-09-01

    Advanced control rooms for future nuclear power plants are being designed utilizing computer-based technologies. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews the human engineering of such control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are approximately supported in order to protect public health and safety. This paper describes the rationale, general approach, and initial development of an NRC Advanced Control Room Design Review Guideline.

  14. The development and evaluation of human factors guidelines for the review of advanced human-system interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced control rooms for future nuclear power plants are being designed utilizing computer-based technologies. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews the human engineering of such control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are approximately supported in order to protect public health and safety. This paper describes the rationale, general approach, and initial development of an NRC Advanced Control Room Design Review Guideline.

  15. Macrophage heterogeneity in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jason L; Newby, Andrew C

    2009-10-01

    The varied behaviour of macrophages and foam cells during atherosclerosis and its clinical sequelae prompt the question whether all these activities can be the property of a single cell population. Subsets of monocytes with distinct patterns of surface markers and behaviours during inflammation have recently been characterized and shown to have complementary roles during progression of atherosclerosis. A variety of macrophage phenotypes derived from these monocyte subsets in response to mediators of innate and acquired immunity have also been found in plaques. Based on functional properties and genomic signatures, they may have different impacts on facets of plaque development, including fibrous cap and lipid core formation. Monocyte and macrophage phenotypic diversity is important in atherogenesis. More work is needed to define consistent marker sets for the different foam cell phenotypes in experimental animals and humans. Cell tracking studies are needed to establish their relationship with monocyte subtypes. In addition, genetic and pharmacological manipulation of phenotypes will be useful to define their functions and exploit the resulting therapeutic potential.

  16. Lymphatic vessels: an emerging actor in atherosclerotic plaque development.

    PubMed

    Kutkut, Issa; Meens, Merlijn J; McKee, Thomas A; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Kwak, Brenda R

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of large- to medium-sized arteries and is the main underlying cause of death worldwide. The lymphatic vasculature is critical for processes that are intimately linked to atherogenesis such as the immune response and cholesterol metabolism. However, whether lymphatic vessels truly contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is less clear despite increasing research efforts in this field. PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE databases were searched. In addition, key review articles were screened for relevant original publications. Current knowledge about lymphatic vessels in the arterial wall came from studies that examined the presence and location of such vessels in human atherosclerotic plaque specimens, as well as in a variety of arteries in animal models for atherosclerosis (e.g. rabbits, dogs, rats and mice). Generally, three experimental approaches have been used to investigate the functional role of plaque-associated lymphatic vessels; experimental lymphostasis was used to investigate lymphatic drainage of the arterial wall, and more recently, studies with genetic interventions and/or surgical transplantation have been performed. Lymphatic vessels seem to be mostly present in the adventitial layer of the arterial walls of animals and humans. They are involved in reverse cholesterol transport from atherosclerotic lesions, and arteries with a dense lymphatic network seem naturally protected against atherosclerosis. Lymphangiogenesis is a process that is an important part of the inflammatory loop in atherosclerosis. However, how augmenting or impeding the distribution of lymphatic vessels impacts disease progression remains to be investigated in future studies. © 2014 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  17. [Advancement and goals of the aviation human engineering].

    PubMed

    Stupakov, G P; Ushakov, I B; Turzin, P S

    1997-01-01

    Analyzed were the efforts of the State Scientific-Research Test Institute of Aviation and Space Medicine to weigh and account the human factor in designing and upgrading avionics and aviation machinery. Described are the policy of human engineering support to the development, evaluation, and operation of aviation machinery, and the benefits from the human factor knowledge to the specifications for aviation machinery and allowance for the psychophysiological aptitudes of human on different phases of development of ergatic aviation systems. Outlined is the mainstream of ergonomic enhancement of the quality and safety, and humanization of the activities of different aviation specialists.

  18. 18-kDa translocator protein ligand (18)F-FEMPA: Biodistribution and uptake into atherosclerotic plaques in mice.

    PubMed

    Hellberg, Sanna; Silvola, Johanna M U; Kiugel, Max; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Savisto, Nina; Li, Xiang-Guo; Thiele, Andrea; Lehmann, Lutz; Heinrich, Tobias; Vollmer, Sonja; Hakovirta, Harri; Laine, V Jukka O; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Knuuti, Juhani; Roivainen, Anne; Saraste, Antti

    2017-06-01

    Radioligands of 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) expressed on activated macrophages are a potential approach for imaging of inflammation in atherosclerosis. We evaluated a novel TSPO-targeted tracer (18)F-FEMPA for the detection of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation in mice. The distribution kinetics of (18)F-FEMPA was evaluated by in vivo PET/CT imaging. (18)F-FEMPA uptake was compared in atherosclerotic (LDLR(-/-)ApoB(100/100), n = 10) and healthy mice (C57BL/6 N, n = 7) ex vivo at twenty minutes post-injection. Biodistribution was analyzed from harvested tissue samples, and aortas were sectioned for autoradiography. Aortas of LDLR(-/-)ApoB(100/100) mice showed large, macrophage-rich atherosclerotic plaques. In vivo, (18)F-FEMPA showed rapid blood clearance but no difference in aortic uptake between atherosclerotic and healthy mice. In the mice studied ex vivo at 20 minutes post-injection, quantification of radioactivity in the whole aorta showed 1.3-fold higher (18)F-FEMPA accumulation in atherosclerotic than healthy mice (P = .028). Autoradiography showed higher tracer uptake in plaque areas with high macrophage content as compared with areas of no macrophages (count densities 190 ± 54 vs 40 ± 13 PSL/mm(2), P < .001), but the uptake in the plaques was not higher than in the normal vessel wall (230 ± 78 PSL/mm(2)). In vitro blocking showed specific accumulation in mouse and human atherosclerotic plaques. Immunohistochemistry confirmed co-localization of TSPO and macrophages. (18)F-FEMPA shows rapid blood clearance and uptake in the mouse aorta. Uptake in atherosclerotic plaques correlated with the amount of macrophages, but did not exceed that in the normal vessel wall.

  19. Quercetin modulates toll-like receptor-mediated protein kinase signaling pathways in oxLDL-challenged human PBMCs and regulates TLR-activated atherosclerotic inflammation in hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Shobha; Helen, A

    2016-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that have a unique and essential function in innate immunity. The effect of quercetin on TLR-mediated downstream signaling mechanism and its effect on TLR-mediated MAP kinase and Akt pathways were studied in oxLDL-stimulated hPBMCs using specific inhibitors. The pretreatment of hPBMCs with specific TLR inhibitor, CLI-095, decreased the NF-κB nuclear translocation and TNF-α release by oxLDL. When the cells treated with inhibitor and quercetin together, the inhibition was more effective. The specific inhibitor for p38 MAPK, SB203580, reduced the phosphorylated p38 level and decreased the NF-κB activation and TNF-α release by oxLDL-challenged hPBMCs. This inhibitor showed enhanced inhibition when treated with quercetin together. The inhibitors for ERK1/2, PD98059, and for JNK, SP606125, also showed inhibitory effect on NF-κB activation and TNF-α release by oxLDL-simulated hPBMCs. Quercetin supplementation enhanced the inhibition of nuclear translocation of NF-κB and the release of cytokines. TLR4 inhibition study confirmed the downstream signaling mechanism mediated by NF-κB which is involved in the oxLDL-induced inflammatory response, and quercetin suppresses the cytokine, TNF-α release by modulating TLR-NF-κB signaling pathway. In addition to NF-κB signaling pathway, inflammation induced by oxLDL was also related to the activation of p38MAPK, ERK1/2 and JNK, and Akt pathways, and the protective effect of quercetin may be also related to the inhibition of activation of these pathways. Quercetin significantly downregulated the elevated mRNA expression of TLRs and cytokine TNF-α in HCD-fed atherosclerotic rats in vivo. As quercetin possesses inhibition on both TLR-NF-κB signaling pathway and TLR-mediated MAPK pathway, it is evident that it can be used as a therapeutic agent to ameliorate atherosclerotic inflammation. Since quercetin is the major flavonoid and forms the backbone of many other

  20. Osteoporosis, osteopenia, and atherosclerotic vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Aronow, Wilbert S.

    2011-01-01

    Older women with low bone mineral density (BMD) have a higher prevalence of atherosclerotic vascular disease (coronary artery disease, ischemic stroke, or peripheral arterial disease) than older women with normal BMD. Three coronary angiographic studies have shown that low BMD is associated with obstructive coronary artery disease. Low BMD has been shown to be associated with stress test-induced myocardial ischemia, reduced exercise capacity, and with aortic valve calcification. Women with osteoporosis have an increased risk for cardiovascular events. Treatment of osteoporosis or osteopenia should include therapeutic measures to prevent cardiovascular events. PMID:22291728

  1. Endovascular revascularization for aortoiliac atherosclerotic disease

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vikas; Waldo, Stephen W; Armstrong, Ehrin J

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic iliac artery disease is increasingly being treated with endovascular techniques. A number of new stent technologies can be utilized with high long-term patency, including self-expanding stents, balloon-expandable stents, and covered stents, but comparative data on these stent types and in more complex lesions are lacking. This article provides a review of currently available iliac stent technologies, as well as complex procedural aspects of iliac artery interventions, including approaches to the treatment of iliac bifurcation disease, long segment occlusions, choice of stent type, and treatment of iliac artery in-stent restenosis. PMID:27099509

  2. Pulsatile Flow Studies in Atherosclerotic Carotid Bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale-Glickman, Jocelyn; Selby, Kathy; Saloner, David; Savas, Omer

    2001-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry and flow visualization techniques are used to study flows in models of atherosclerotic carotid bifurcations. The flow models exactly replicate the interior geometry of plaque excised from patients. The input flows are physiological wave forms derived from Doppler Ultrasound scans done on patients before surgery. The systolic and diastolic Reynolds numbers are 300 and 900. The complex internal geometry of the diseased artery combined with the pulsatile input flow results in exceedingly complex flow patterns. These flow patterns include internal jets, three-dimensional shear layers, stagnation lines, and multiple recirculation and separation regions. The physiological input flows are compared to flows when the wave form is sinusoidal.

  3. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) remains a major cause of secondary hypertension and renal failure. Randomized, prospective trials show that medical treatment should constitute the main therapeutic approach in ARAS. Regardless of intensive treatment and adequate blood pressure control, however, renal and extra-renal complications are not uncommon. Yet, the precise mechanisms, accurate detection, and optimal treatment in ARAS remain elusive. Strategies oriented to early detection and targeting these pathogenic pathways might prevent development of clinical endpoints. Here, we review the results of recent clinical trials, current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, novel imaging techniques to assess renal damage in ARAS, and treatment options. PMID:25908472

  4. Installation of Computerized Procedure System and Advanced Alarm System in the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Le Blanc, Katya Lee; Spielman, Zachary Alexander; Rice, Brandon Charles

    2016-04-01

    This report describes the installation of two advanced control room technologies, an advanced alarm system and a computerized procedure system, into the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). Installation of these technologies enables future phases of this research by providing a platform to systematically evaluate the effect of these technologies on operator and plant performance.

  5. Xyloketal B Attenuates Atherosclerotic Plaque Formation and Endothelial Dysfunction in Apolipoprotein E Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li-Yan; Li, Jie; Yuan, Feng; Li, Mei; Zhang, Quan; Huang, Yun-Ying; Pang, Ji-Yan; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Fang-Yun; Sun, Hong-Shuo; Li, Qian; Cao, Lu; Xie, Yu; Lin, Yong-Cheng; Liu, Jie; Tan, Hong-Mei; Wang, Guan-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that xyloketal B, a novel marine compound with a unique chemical structure, has strong antioxidant actions and can protect against endothelial injury in different cell types cultured in vitro and model organisms in vivo. The oxidative endothelial dysfunction and decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability are critical for the development of atherosclerotic lesion. We thus examined whether xyloketal B had an influence on the atherosclerotic plaque area in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice fed a high-fat diet and investigated the underlying mechanisms. We found in our present study that the administration of xyloketal B dose-dependently decreased the atherosclerotic plaque area both in the aortic sinus and throughout the aorta in apoE−/− mice fed a high-fat diet. In addition, xyloketal B markedly reduced the levels of vascular oxidative stress, as well as improving the impaired endothelium integrity and NO-dependent aortic vasorelaxation in atherosclerotic mice. Moreover, xyloketal B significantly changed the phosphorylation levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Akt without altering the expression of total eNOS and Akt in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Here, it increased eNOS phosphorylation at the positive regulatory site of Ser-1177, while inhibiting phosphorylation at the negative regulatory site of Thr-495. Taken together, these findings indicate that xyloketal B has dramatic anti-atherosclerotic effects in vivo, which is partly due to its antioxidant features and/or improvement of endothelial function. PMID:25874925

  6. Human Intelligence: An Introduction to Advances in Theory and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohman, David F.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in three research traditions are summarized: trait theories of intelligence, information-processing theories of intelligence, and general theories of thinking. Work on fluid and crystallized abilities by J. Horn and R. Snow, mental speed, spatial visualization, cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence, and the construct of…

  7. Human Intelligence: An Introduction to Advances in Theory and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohman, David F.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in three research traditions are summarized: trait theories of intelligence, information-processing theories of intelligence, and general theories of thinking. Work on fluid and crystallized abilities by J. Horn and R. Snow, mental speed, spatial visualization, cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence, and the construct of…

  8. [Advances on research of human exposure to triclosan].

    PubMed

    Jin, Chenye; Chen, Yiming; Zhang, Peiqi; Xiong, Zhezhen; Wang, Caifeng; Tian, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Triclosan, a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent, was reported to have been widely detected in various human biological samples such as urine, blood and human milk among foreign populations. In China, limited reports have been found on human exposure to triclosan, and the reported urinary triclosan concentrations were significantly lower than that of American populations. Besides, the potential influencing factors still remain unclear regarding human exposure to triclosan, but evidences suggest that those in middle age and with higher household income and higher social class tend to have higher urinary triclosan concentrations. Furthermore, triclosan exposure tend to differ by sex, geography, heredity, metabolism and life style.

  9. Human factors design review guidelines for advanced nuclear control room technologies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.; Brown, W. ); Granda, T.; Baker, C. )

    1991-01-01

    Advanced control rooms (ACRs) for future nuclear power plants are being designed utilizing computer-based technologies. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews the human engineering aspects of such control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported in order to protect public health and safety. This paper describes the rationale, general approach, and initial development of an NRC Advanced Control Room Design Review Guideline. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Fiber-Optic System for Dual-Modality Imaging of Glucose Probes 18F-FDG and 6-NBDG in Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Raiyan T.; Kosuge, Hisanori; Pratx, Guillem; Carpenter, Colin; Xing, Lei; McConnell, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a progressive inflammatory condition that underlies coronary artery disease (CAD)–the leading cause of death in the United States. Thus, the ultimate goal of this research is to advance our understanding of human CAD by improving the characterization of metabolically active vulnerable plaques within the coronary arteries using a novel catheter-based imaging system. The aims of this study include (1) developing a novel fiber-optic imaging system with a scintillator to detect both 18F and fluorescent glucose probes, and (2) validating the system on ex vivo murine plaques. Methods A novel design implements a flexible fiber-optic catheter consisting of both a radio-luminescence and a fluorescence imaging system to detect radionuclide 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and the fluorescent analog 6-(N-(7-Nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-6-Deoxyglucose (6-NBDG), respectively. Murine macrophage-rich atherosclerotic carotid plaques were imaged ex vivo after intravenous delivery of 18F-FDG or 6-NBDG. Confirmatory optical imaging by IVIS-200 and autoradiography were also performed. Results Our fiber-optic imaging system successfully visualized both 18F-FDG and 6-NBDG probes in atherosclerotic plaques. For 18F-FDG, the ligated left carotid arteries (LCs) exhibited 4.9-fold higher radioluminescence signal intensity compared to the non-ligated right carotid arteries (RCs) (2.6×104±1.4×103 vs. 5.4×103±1.3×103 A.U., P = 0.008). Similarly, for 6-NBDG, the ligated LCs emitted 4.3-fold brighter fluorescent signals than the control RCs (1.6×102±2.7×101 vs. 3.8×101±5.9 A.U., P = 0.002). The higher uptake of both 18F-FDG and 6-NBDG in ligated LCs were confirmed with the IVIS-200 system. Autoradiography further verified the higher uptake of 18F-FDG by the LCs. Conclusions This novel fiber-optic imaging system was sensitive to both radionuclide and fluorescent glucose probes taken up by murine atherosclerotic plaques. In addition, 6

  11. Planetary protection issues in advance of human exploration of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Davis, Wanda L.

    1989-01-01

    The major planetary quarantine issues associated with human exploration of Mars, which is viewed as being more likely to harbor indigenous life than is the moon, are discussed. Special attention is given to the environmental impact of human missions to Mars due to contamination and mechanical disturbances of the local environment, the contamination issues associated with the return of humans, and the planetary quarantine strategy for a human base. It is emphasized that, in addition to the question of indigenous life, there may be some concern of returning to earth the earth microorganisms that have spent some time in the Martian environment. It is suggested that, due to the fact that a robot system can be subjected to more stringent controls and protective treatments than a mission involving humans, a robotic sample return mission can help to eliminate many planetary-quarantine concerns about returning samples.

  12. Planetary protection issues in advance of human exploration of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Davis, Wanda L.

    1989-01-01

    The major planetary quarantine issues associated with human exploration of Mars, which is viewed as being more likely to harbor indigenous life than is the moon, are discussed. Special attention is given to the environmental impact of human missions to Mars due to contamination and mechanical disturbances of the local environment, the contamination issues associated with the return of humans, and the planetary quarantine strategy for a human base. It is emphasized that, in addition to the question of indigenous life, there may be some concern of returning to earth the earth microorganisms that have spent some time in the Martian environment. It is suggested that, due to the fact that a robot system can be subjected to more stringent controls and protective treatments than a mission involving humans, a robotic sample return mission can help to eliminate many planetary-quarantine concerns about returning samples.

  13. Thermal compression and molding of atherosclerotic vascular tissue with use of radiofrequency energy: implications for radiofrequency balloon angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.I.; Becker, G.J.; Waller, B.F.; Barry, K.J.; Connolly, R.J.; Kaplan, J.; Shapiro, A.R.; Nardella, P.C.

    1989-04-01

    The combined delivery of pressure and thermal energy may effectively remodel intraluminal atherosclerotic plaque and fuse intimal tears. To test these hypotheses with use of a non-laser thermal energy source, radiofrequency energy was delivered to postmortem human atherosclerotic vessels from a metal hot-tip catheter, block-mounted bipolar electrodes and from a prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter. Sixty-two radiofrequency doses delivered from a metal electrode tip produced dose-dependent ablation of atherosclerotic plaque, ranging from clean and shallow craters with histologic evidence of thermal compression at doses less than 40 J to tissue charring and vaporization at higher (greater than 80 J) doses. Lesion dimensions ranged between 3.14 and 3.79 mm in diameter and 0.20 and 0.47 mm in depth. Tissue perforation was not observed. To test the potential for radiofrequency fusion of intimal tears, 5 atm of pressure and 200 J radiofrequency energy were delivered from block-mounted bipolar electrodes to 48 segments of human atherosclerotic aorta, which had been manually separated into intima-media and media-adventitial layers. Significantly stronger tissue fusion resulted (28.5 +/- 3.3 g) with radiofrequency compared with that with pressure alone (4.8 +/- 0.26 g; p less than 0.0001). A prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter was used to deliver 3 atm of balloon pressure with or without 200 J radiofrequency energy to 20 postmortem human atherosclerotic arterial segments. In 10 of 10 radiofrequency-treated vessels, thermal molding of both normal and atherosclerotic vessel wall segments resulted with increased luminal diameter and histologic evidence of medial myocyte damage.

  14. Thermal compression and molding of atherosclerotic vascular tissue with use of radiofrequency energy: implications for radiofrequency balloon angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, B I; Becker, G J; Waller, B F; Barry, K J; Connolly, R J; Kaplan, J; Shapiro, A R; Nardella, P C

    1989-04-01

    The combined delivery of pressure and thermal energy may effectively remodel intraluminal atherosclerotic plaque and fuse intimal tears. To test these hypotheses with use of a non-laser thermal energy source, radiofrequency energy was delivered to postmortem human atherosclerotic vessels from a metal "hot-tip" catheter, block-mounted bipolar electrodes and from a prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter. Sixty-two radiofrequency doses delivered from a metal electrode tip produced dose-dependent ablation of atherosclerotic plaque, ranging from clean and shallow craters with histologic evidence of thermal compression at doses less than 40 J to tissue charring and vaporization at higher (greater than 80 J) doses. Lesion dimensions ranged between 3.14 and 3.79 mm in diameter and 0.20 and 0.47 mm in depth. Tissue perforation was not observed. To test the potential for radiofrequency fusion of intimal tears, 5 atm of pressure and 200 J radiofrequency energy were delivered from block-mounted bipolar electrodes to 48 segments of human atherosclerotic aorta, which had been manually separated into intima-media and media-adventitial layers. Significantly stronger tissue fusion resulted (28.5 +/- 3.3 g) with radiofrequency compared with that with pressure alone (4.8 +/- 0.26 g; p less than 0.0001). A prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter was used to deliver 3 atm of balloon pressure with or without 200 J radiofrequency energy to 20 postmortem human atherosclerotic arterial segments. In 10 of 10 radiofrequency-treated vessels, thermal "molding" of both normal and atherosclerotic vessel wall segments resulted with increased luminal diameter and histologic evidence of medial myocyte damage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. The vulnerable and unstable atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    The lesion responsible for the overwhelming majority of acute coronary events is plaque disruption or erosion with superimposed thrombosis. The term "vulnerable plaque" has been used to describe those atherosclerotic plaques that are particularly susceptible to disruption. Vulnerable plaques are generally characterized as those having a thin inflamed fibrous cap over a very large lipid core. However, only a small percentage of such plaques rupture, and plaques with different characteristics may also rupture and thrombose. Most autopsy, intravascular ultrasound, and recent computed tomography angiographic studies of coronary arteries reveal large plaques at sites of rupture. While angiographic data are said to show less severe narrowing at sites of plaque rupture, actual review of data indicates that, even angiographically, more than 50% of plaques have greater than 75% cross-sectional area stenosis at sites of plaque rupture. If plaque rupture is more common at the shoulder region of a plaque, one could envision that this would be at a peripheral site of the plaque where the plaque may not be as large or occlusive. New knowledge about vulnerable plaques is emerging through the evolution of novel techniques used to study plaques in vivo. These methods combine sophisticated imaging techniques, often in conjunction with molecular biomarkers, that provide new insights into plaque biology. Since atherosclerotic coronary artery disease is such a widespread and fatal disease, it is important that we continue to strive for a greater understanding of the nature of the vulnerable plaque. Only then can rational interventions for this disorder be developed and implemented.

  16. The effects of human interest framing in television news coverage of medical advances.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyehyun

    2013-01-01

    The last few decades have witnessed the increasing dissemination of information on medical advances such as new medical treatments and prevention/diagnosis technologies through television news. To engage lay audiences with complex information, medical journalists often personalize news stories about medical advances by exemplifying individual patients and their personal experiences. This study investigates the effects of this journalistic technique, which is referred to as human interest framing, on audiences. The results of an experiment provide empirical evidence that the human interest framing of medical news stories can increase audiences' involvement in those stories and facilitate their positive perception of medical advances.

  17. Advance techniques for monitoring human tolerance to positive Gz accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R.; Sandler, H.; Rositano, S.; Skrettingland, K.; Mancini, R.

    1973-01-01

    Tolerance to positive g accelerations was measured in ten normal male subjects using both standard and advanced techniques. In addition to routine electrocardiogram, heart rate, respiratory rate, and infrared television, monitoring techniques during acceleration exposure included measurement of peripheral vision loss, noninvasive temporal, brachial, and/or radial arterial blood flow, and automatic measurement of indirect systolic and diastolic blood pressure at 60-sec intervals. Although brachial and radial arterial flow measurements reflected significant cardiovascular changes during and after acceleration, they were inconsistent indices of the onset of grayout or blackout. Temporal arterial blood flow, however, showed a high correlation with subjective peripheral light loss.

  18. Bacteriophage Therapy: Advances in Formulation Strategies and Human Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Lavigne, Rob; Brüssow, Harald

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a number of phage therapy phase I and II safety trials have been concluded, showing no notable safety concerns associated with the use of phage. Though hurdles for efficient treatment remain, these trials hold promise for future phase III clinical trials. Interestingly, most phage formulations used in these clinical trials are straightforward phage suspensions, and not much research has focused on the processing of phage cocktails in specific pharmaceutical dosage forms. Additional research on formulation strategies and the stability of phage-based drugs will be of key importance, especially with phage therapy advancing toward phase III clinical trials.

  19. Cell proliferation in human coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, D; Reidy, M A; Benditt, E P; Schwartz, S M

    1990-01-01

    Despite the lack of direct evidence for cell multiplication, proliferation of smooth muscle cells in human atherosclerotic lesions has been assumed to play a central role in ontogeny of the plaque. We used antibodies to cell cycle-related proteins on tissue sections of human arteries and coronary atherosclerotic plaques. Specific cell types were identified by immunochemical reagents for smooth muscle, monocyte-macrophages, and other blood cells. Low rates of smooth muscle cell proliferation were observed. Macrophages were also observed with rates of proliferation comparable to that of the smooth muscle. Additional replicating cells could not be defined as belonging to specific cell types with the reagents used in this study. These findings imply that smooth muscle replication in advanced plaques is indolent and raise the possibility of a role for proliferating leukocytes. Images PMID:1972277

  20. Advanced control rooms and crew performance issues: Implications for human reliability

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.M.; Hall, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Recent trends in advanced control room (ACR) design are considered with respect to their impact on human performance. It is concluded that potentially negative influences exist, however, a variety of factors make it difficult to model, analyze, and quantify these effects for human reliability analyses (HRAs).

  1. Advanced control rooms and crew performance issues: Implications for human reliability

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.M.; Hall, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    Recent trends in advanced control room (ACR) design are considered with respect to their impact on human performance. It is concluded that potentially negative influences exist, however, a variety of factors make it difficult to model, analyze, and quantify these effects for human reliability analyses (HRAs).

  2. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. Evaluation procedures and guidelines for human factors engineering reviews

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.; Baker, C.C.; Welch, D.L.; Granda, T.M.; Vingelis, P.J.

    1994-07-01

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator`s overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support. NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use.

  3. Human rights advances in women's reproductive health in Africa.

    PubMed

    Ngwena, Charles G; Brookman-Amissah, Eunice; Skuster, Patty

    2015-05-01

    The African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights recently adopted General Comment No 2 to interpret provisions of Article 14 of the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights Women. The provisions relate to women's rights to fertility control, contraception, family planning, information and education, and abortion. The present article highlights the General Comment's potential to promote women's sexual and reproductive rights in multiple ways. The General Comment's human rights value goes beyond providing states with guidance for framing their domestic laws, practices, and policies to comply with treaty obligations. General Comment No 2 is invaluable in educating all stakeholders-including healthcare providers, lawyers, policymakers, and judicial officers at the domestic level-about pertinent jurisprudence. Civil society and human rights advocates can use the General Comment to render the state accountable for failure to implement its treaty obligations.

  4. Generating human serotonergic neurons in vitro: Methodological advances.

    PubMed

    Vadodaria, Krishna C; Marchetto, Maria C; Mertens, Jerome; Gage, Fred H

    2016-11-01

    Technologies for deriving human neurons in vitro have transformed our ability to study cellular and molecular components of human neurotransmission. Three groups, including our own, have recently published methods for efficiently generating human serotonergic neurons in vitro. Remarkably, serotonergic neurons derived from each method robustly produce serotonin, express raphe genes, are electrically active, and respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in vitro. Two of the methods utilize transdifferentiation technology by overexpressing key serotonergic transcription factors. The third and most recent method involves differentiating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to serotonergic neurons using developmental patterning cues. In this mini-review, we briefly describe the developmental programs governing serotonergic specification in vivo and how they have been harnessed to achieve serotonergic differentiation in vitro. We discuss the distinct and overlapping features of the recently published methodologies and their value in the context of in vitro disease modeling. Also see the video abstract here.

  5. Histological changes and risk factor associations in type 2 atherosclerotic lesions (fatty streaks) in young adults.

    PubMed

    Homma, Satoki; Troxclair, Dana A; Zieske, Arthur W; Malcom, Gray T; Strong, Jack P

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate which histological changes associated with risk factors could contribute to the progression from the initial atherosclerotic lesions including fatty streaks to the advanced lesions. We examined the associations of histomorphometric findings in the determined anatomical sites of mid-thoracic aortas (TAs) and left anterior descending coronary arteries (LADs) with major risk factors for atherosclerosis, using a young autopsied series from the the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) study. The histological classification by the American Heart Association was graded for 1013 TAs and 1009 LADs. Histometric study, including immunohistochemistry, was performed in type 2 lesions (fatty streaks) of TAs from 59 subjects and LADs from 45 ones. For the progression from the initial lesions into the advanced atherosclerotic lesions, the most effective lipid profiles were low plasma HDL-C in TA and elevated serum non-HDL-C in LAD. This lipid profile of each artery correlated with number or density of intimal smooth muscle cell-derived foam cells, respectively. The serum concentration of non-HDL-C correlated with macrophage foam cells in TAs. Hypertension and hyperglycemia were associated with increase of intimal area and/or collagen content in both arteries, but not with either types of foam cell proliferation. Smoking correlated with increased collagen content in TAs. There were histologically different ways of progressing from fatty streaks to advanced atherosclerotic lesions depending on the risk factors. For the atherosclerosis progression from type 2 lesions to advanced lesions, increase in number of smooth muscle cell-derived foam cells could be an important indicator. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Positron emission tomography of the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque in man – a contemporary review

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Sune F; Hag, Anne Mette F; Klausen, Thomas L; Ripa, Rasmus S; Bodholdt, Rasmus P; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the primary underlying cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world today and is set to become the prevailing disease and major cause of death worldwide by 2020. In the 1950s surgical intervention was introduced to treat symptomatic patients with high-grade carotid artery stenosis due to atherosclerosis – a procedure known as carotid endarterectomy (CEA). By removing the atherosclerotic plaque from the affected carotid artery of these patients, CEA is beneficial by preventing subsequent ipsilateral ischemic stroke. However, it is known that patients with low to intermediate artery stenosis may still experience ischemic events, leading clinicians to consider plaque composition as an important feature of atherosclerosis. Today molecular imaging can be used for characterization, visualization and quantification of cellular and subcellular physiological processes as they take place in vivo; using this technology we can obtain valuable information on atherosclerostic plaque composition. Applying molecular imaging clinically to atherosclerotic disease therefore has the potential to identify atherosclerotic plaques vulnerable to rupture. This could prove to be an important tool for the selection of patients for CEA surgery in a health system increasingly focused on individualized treatment. This review focuses on current advances and future developments of in vivo atherosclerosis PET imaging in man. PMID:24289282

  7. A statin-loaded reconstituted high-density lipoprotein nanoparticle inhibits atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Tang, Jun; Cormode, David P.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ozcan, Canturk; Otten, Maarten J.; Zaidi, Neeha; Lobatto, Mark E.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Kuan, Emma L.; Martel, Catherine; Hewing, Bernd; Sager, Hendrik; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. Statins have potent anti-inflammatory properties but these cannot be fully exploited with oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability. Here we present an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle that delivers statins to atherosclerotic plaques. We demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and show that this effect is mediated through the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. We also apply statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and show that they accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions in which they directly affect plaque macrophages. Finally, we demonstrate that a 3-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibits plaque inflammation progression, while a 1-week high-dose regimen markedly decreases inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Statin-rHDL represents a novel potent atherosclerosis nanotherapy that directly affects plaque inflammation.

  8. A Statin-Loaded Reconstituted High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticle Inhibits Atherosclerotic Plaque Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Tang, Jun; Cormode, David P.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ozcan, Canturk; Otten, Maarten J.; Zaidi, Neeha; Lobatto, Mark E.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Kuan, Emma L.; Martel, Catherine; Hewing, Bernd; Sager, Hendrik; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Stroes, Erik S.G.; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. Statins have potent anti-inflammatory properties but these cannot be fully exploited with oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability. Here we present an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle that delivers statins to atherosclerotic plaques. We demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and show this effect is mediated through inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. We also apply statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and show they accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions where they directly affect plaque macrophages. Finally we demonstrate that a three-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibits plaque inflammation progression, while a one-week high-dose regimen markedly decreases inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Statin-rHDL represents a novel potent atherosclerosis nanotherapy that directly affects plaque inflammation. PMID:24445279

  9. A statin-loaded reconstituted high-density lipoprotein nanoparticle inhibits atherosclerotic plaque inflammation.

    PubMed

    Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Tang, Jun; Cormode, David P; Mieszawska, Aneta J; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ozcan, Canturk; Otten, Maarten J; Zaidi, Neeha; Lobatto, Mark E; van Rijs, Sarian M; Priem, Bram; Kuan, Emma L; Martel, Catherine; Hewing, Bernd; Sager, Hendrik; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Stroes, Erik S G; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. Statins have potent anti-inflammatory properties but these cannot be fully exploited with oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability. Here we present an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle that delivers statins to atherosclerotic plaques. We demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and show that this effect is mediated through the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. We also apply statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and show that they accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions in which they directly affect plaque macrophages. Finally, we demonstrate that a 3-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibits plaque inflammation progression, while a 1-week high-dose regimen markedly decreases inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Statin-rHDL represents a novel potent atherosclerosis nanotherapy that directly affects plaque inflammation.

  10. Prognostic significance of tumour progression and human papillomavirus in advanced tonsillar cancer classified as stage IVa.

    PubMed

    Park, E; Jung, K-Y; Kwon, S-Y; Woo, J-S; Cho, J-G; Park, M W; Kim, I S; Kim, S J; Baek, S-K

    2015-01-01

    To identify clinical factors that can explain the differences in treatment outcome, and examine the value of human papillomavirus infection as a prognostic biomarker in stage IVa tonsillar carcinomas. Fifty-nine patients with tonsillar carcinoma classified as stage IVa were retrospectively analysed for survival outcomes according to various clinical factors. Human papillomavirus infection was evaluated using a human papillomavirus DNA chip test and immunohistochemical staining for p16 and p53. Lower disease-free survival rates were associated with increasing local invasiveness and nodal status. Although human papillomavirus positivity and p16 expression was more common in locally advanced tonsillar carcinomas with advanced nodal status, the overall survival rate was better for patients with human papillomavirus positive, p16-positive tumours. The disease-free survival rate may differ according to local tumour invasiveness and nodal status, even for stage IVa tonsillar cancers. Human papillomavirus infection may be a useful biomarker for predicting treatment outcomes for stage VIa tumours.

  11. Advanced Research Training in Human Geography: The Scottish Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwanzura-Ottemoeller, Fungisai; Hopkins, Peter; Lorimer, Hayden; Philip, Lorna J.

    2005-01-01

    Formal research training is integral to research degrees in human geography completed in UK higher education institutions today. The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) has been the driving force behind the formalization of research training. Arguably less well known among the ESRC research training recommendations is the stipulation that…

  12. Human Factors Evaluation of Advanced Electric Power Grid Visualization Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Dauenhauer, Peter M.; Wierks, Tamara G.; Podmore, Robin

    2009-04-01

    This report describes initial human factors evaluation of four visualization tools (Graphical Contingency Analysis, Force Directed Graphs, Phasor State Estimator and Mode Meter/ Mode Shapes) developed by PNNL, and proposed test plans that may be implemented to evaluate their utility in scenario-based experiments.

  13. Human toxocariasis: current advances in diagnostics, treatment, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmidt Garcia; Telmo, Paula de Lima; Mendonça, Marcelo; Moreira, Angela Nunes; McBride, Alan John Alexander; Scaini, Carlos James; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo

    2014-09-01

    Toxocariasis is a neglected zoonosis caused by the nematodes Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati. This disease is widespread in many countries, reaching high prevalence independently of the economic conditions. However, the true number of cases of toxocariasis is likely to be underestimated owing to the lack of adequate surveillance programs. Although some diagnostic tests are available, their sensitivity and specificity need to be improved. In addition, treatment options for toxocariasis are limited and are non-specific. Toxocariasis is listed as one of the five most important neglected diseases by the CDC. This review presents recent advances related to the control of toxocariasis, including new immunodiagnostics, therapies, and drug formulations, as well as novel interventions using DNA vaccines, immunomodulators, and probiotics.

  14. Oncolytic virotherapy for human malignant mesothelioma: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Boisgerault, Nicolas; Achard, Carole; Delaunay, Tiphaine; Cellerin, Laurent; Tangy, Frédéric; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Cancer virotherapy is an attractive alternative to conventional treatments because it offers a wide range of antitumor effects due to 1) the diversity of the oncolytic viruses that are now available and 2) their multifaceted activities against both tumor cells and tumor vessels, in addition to their ability to induce antitumor immune responses. In this review, we summarize preclinical and clinical data regarding the targeting of malignant mesothelioma (MM) by oncolytic viruses. We also discuss the potential of other oncolytic viruses that have already shown antitumor effects against several malignancies in advanced clinical trials but are yet to be tested against MM cells. Finally, we review how the activation of the immune system and combinations with other types of anticancer treatments could support the development of oncolytic virotherapy for the treatment of MM. PMID:27512676

  15. Oncolytic virotherapy for human malignant mesothelioma: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Boisgerault, Nicolas; Achard, Carole; Delaunay, Tiphaine; Cellerin, Laurent; Tangy, Frédéric; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Cancer virotherapy is an attractive alternative to conventional treatments because it offers a wide range of antitumor effects due to 1) the diversity of the oncolytic viruses that are now available and 2) their multifaceted activities against both tumor cells and tumor vessels, in addition to their ability to induce antitumor immune responses. In this review, we summarize preclinical and clinical data regarding the targeting of malignant mesothelioma (MM) by oncolytic viruses. We also discuss the potential of other oncolytic viruses that have already shown antitumor effects against several malignancies in advanced clinical trials but are yet to be tested against MM cells. Finally, we review how the activation of the immune system and combinations with other types of anticancer treatments could support the development of oncolytic virotherapy for the treatment of MM.

  16. Discrimination of atherosclerotic plaque constituents based on local measurements of optical attenuation coefficents by OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Freek J.; Perree, Jop; Faber, Dirk J.; Baraznji Sassoon, David M.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2005-04-01

    Imaging of human autopsy samples was performed from the luminal side with a high (3.5 μm axial and 7 μm lateral) resolution OCT system (around 800 nm) or a regular (15-20 μm axial and 20 μm lateral resolution) OCT system (around 1300 nm). For each sample, dimensions were measured by histomorphometry and OCT and the optical attenuation was measured. Quantitative analysis showed a strong and significant correlation between OCT and histology cap thickness measurements for both OCT systems. For both systems, the measured attenuation coefficients of diffuse intimal thickening and lipid-rich regions differed significantly from media and calcifications. Both the high and regular resolution OCT systems can precisely image the atherosclerotic plaques. Quantitative analysis of the OCT signals allowed in situ determination of the intrinsic optical attenuation coefficient of atherosclerotic tissue components within regions of interest, which can further help to discriminate the plaque and arterial wall components.

  17. Discrimination of atherosclerotic plaque constituents based on local measurements of optical attenuation coefficients by OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Freek J.; Perree, Jop; Faber, Dirk J.; Baraznji Bassoon, David M.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2005-04-01

    Imaging of human autopsy samples was performed from the luminal side with a high (3.5 μm axial and 7 μm lateral) resolution OCT system (around 800 nm) or a regular (15-20 μm axial and 20 μm lateral resolution) OCT system (around 1300 nm). For each sample, dimensions were measured by histomorphometry and OCT and the optical attenuation was measured. Quantitative analysis showed a strong and significant correlation between OCT and histology cap thickness measurements for both OCT systems. For both systems, the measured attenuation coefficients of diffuse intimal thickening and lipid-rich regions differed significantly from media and calcifications. Both the high and regular resolution OCT systems can precisely image the atherosclerotic plaques. Quantitative analysis of the OCT signals allowed in situ determination of the intrinsic optical attenuation coefficient of atherosclerotic tissue components within regions of interest, which can further help to discriminate the plaque and arterial wall components.

  18. Recent advances in computational mechanics of the human knee joint.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, M; Dabiri, Y; Li, L P

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling.

  19. Recent Advances in Computational Mechanics of the Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, M.; Dabiri, Y.; Li, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling. PMID:23509602

  20. Potential Anti-Atherosclerotic Properties of Astaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a naturally occurring red carotenoid pigment classified as a xanthophyll, found in microalgae and seafood such as salmon, trout, and shrimp. This review focuses on astaxanthin as a bioactive compound and outlines the evidence associated with its potential role in the prevention of atherosclerosis. Astaxanthin has a unique molecular structure that is responsible for its powerful antioxidant activities by quenching singlet oxygen and scavenging free radicals. Astaxanthin has been reported to inhibit low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and adiponectin levels in clinical studies. Accumulating evidence suggests that astaxanthin could exert preventive actions against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) via its potential to improve oxidative stress, inflammation, lipid metabolism, and glucose metabolism. In addition to identifying mechanisms of astaxanthin bioactivity by basic research, much more epidemiological and clinical evidence linking reduced CVD risk with dietary astaxanthin intake is needed. PMID:26861359

  1. Potential Anti-Atherosclerotic Properties of Astaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-02-05

    Astaxanthin is a naturally occurring red carotenoid pigment classified as a xanthophyll, found in microalgae and seafood such as salmon, trout, and shrimp. This review focuses on astaxanthin as a bioactive compound and outlines the evidence associated with its potential role in the prevention of atherosclerosis. Astaxanthin has a unique molecular structure that is responsible for its powerful antioxidant activities by quenching singlet oxygen and scavenging free radicals. Astaxanthin has been reported to inhibit low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and adiponectin levels in clinical studies. Accumulating evidence suggests that astaxanthin could exert preventive actions against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) via its potential to improve oxidative stress, inflammation, lipid metabolism, and glucose metabolism. In addition to identifying mechanisms of astaxanthin bioactivity by basic research, much more epidemiological and clinical evidence linking reduced CVD risk with dietary astaxanthin intake is needed.

  2. Atherosclerotic plaque regression: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Nesan; Román-Rego, Ana; Ong, Peter; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2010-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is the major cause of death in the western world. The formation and rapid progression of atheromatous plaques can lead to serious cardiovascular events in patients with atherosclerosis. The better understanding, in recent years, of the mechanisms leading to atheromatous plaque growth and disruption and the availability of powerful HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins) has permitted the consideration of plaque regression as a realistic therapeutic goal. This article reviews the existing evidence underpinning current therapeutic strategies aimed at achieving atherosclerotic plaque regression. In this review we also discuss imaging modalities for the assessment of plaque regression, predictors of regression and whether plaque regression is associated with a survival benefit.

  3. Pulsatile Flow Studies in Atherosclerotic Carotid Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale-Glickman, Jocelyn; Selby, Kathy; Saloner, David; Savas, Omer

    2002-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry and flow visualization techniques are used to study flow in models of atherosclerotic carotid bifurcations. The models exactly replicate the interior geometry of plaque excised from patients. The input flow is a physiological waveform derived from Doppler Ultrasound scans done on the patients before surgery. The systolic and diastolic Reynolds numbers are 200 and 900 respectively. The complex internal geometry of the diseased artery combined with the pulsatile input flows give exceedingly complex flow patterns. These flow patterns include internal jets, three-dimensional shear layers, stagnation lines, and multiple recirculation and separation regions. Ensemble averaged and instantaneous flow fields are compared. Wall shear stresses at the stenoses are estimated to be on the order of 10 PA. The physiological input flows are also compared to flows when the waveform is sinusoidal.

  4. Ophthalmic masquerades of the atherosclerotic carotids

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Anupriya; Alexander, Anika; Bal, Simerpreet; Sivadasan, Ajith; Aaron, Sanjith

    2014-01-01

    Patients with carotid atherosclerosis can present with ophthalmic symptoms. These symptoms and signs can be due to retinal emboli, hypoperfusion of the retina and choroid, opening up of collateral channels, or chronic hypoperfusion of the globe (ocular ischemic syndrome). These pathological mechanisms can produce many interesting signs and a careful history can bring out important past symptoms pointing toward the carotid as the source of the patient's presenting symptom. Such patients are at high risk for an ischemic stroke, especially in the subsequent few days following their first acute symptom. It is important for clinicians to be familiar with these ophthalmic symptoms and signs caused by carotid atherosclerosis for making an early diagnosis and to take appropriate measures to prevent a stroke. This review elaborates the clinical features, importance, and implications of various ophthalmic symptoms and signs resulting from atherosclerotic carotid artery disease. PMID:24817748

  5. Overexpression of ABCG1 protein attenuates arteriosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerotic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Münch, Götz; Bültmann, Andreas; Li, Zhongmin; Holthoff, Hans-Peter; Ullrich, Julia; Wagner, Silvia; Ungerer, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The ABCG1 protein is centrally involved in reverse cholesterol transport from the vessel wall. Investigation of the effects of ABCG1 overexpression or knockdown in vivo has produced controversial results and strongly depended on the gene intervention model in which it was studied. Therefore, we investigated the effect of local overexpression of human ABCG1 in a novel model of vessel wall-directed adenoviral gene transfer in atherosclerotic rabbits. We conducted local, vascular-specific gene transfer by adenoviral delivery of human ABCG1 (Ad-ABCG1-GFP) in cholesterol-fed atherosclerotic rabbits in vivo. Endothelial overexpression of ABCG1 markedly reduced atheroprogression (plaque size) and almost blunted vascular inflammation, as shown by markedly reduced macrophage and smooth muscle cell invasion into the vascular wall. Also endothelial function, as determined by vascular ultrasound in vivo, was improved in rabbits after gene transfer with Ad-ABCG1-GFP. Therefore, both earlier and later stages of atherosclerosis were improved in this model of somatic gene transfer into the vessel wall. In contrast to results in transgenic mice, over-expression of ABCG1 by somatic gene transfer to the atherosclerotic vessel wall results in a significant improvement of plaque morphology and composition, and of vascular function in vivo. PMID:23185679

  6. Diesel exhaust particulate increases the size and complexity of lesions in atherosclerotic mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark R; McLean, Steven G; Duffin, Rodger; Lawal, Akeem O; Araujo, Jesus A; Shaw, Catherine A; Mills, Nicholas L; Donaldson, Ken; Newby, David E; Hadoke, Patrick W F

    2013-12-11

    Diesel exhaust particulate (DEP), a major component of urban air pollution, has been linked to atherogenesis and precipitation of myocardial infarction. We hypothesized that DEP exposure would increase and destabilise atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE-/-) mice. ApoE-/- mice were fed a 'Western diet' (8 weeks) to induce 'complex' atherosclerotic plaques, with parallel experiments in normal chow fed wild-type mice. During the last 4 weeks of feeding, mice received twice weekly instillation (oropharyngeal aspiration) of 35 μL DEP (1 mg/mL, SRM-2975) or vehicle (saline). Atherosclerotic burden was assessed by en-face staining of the thoracic aorta and histological examination of the brachiocephalic artery. Brachiocephalic atherosclerotic plaques were larger in ApoE-/- mice treated with DEP (59 ± 10%) than in controls (32 ± 7%; P = 0.017). In addition, DEP-treated mice had more plaques per section of artery (2.4 ± 0.2 vs 1.8 ± 0.2; P = 0.048) and buried fibrous layers (1.2 ± 0.2 vs 0.4 ± 0.1; P = 0.028). These changes were associated with lung inflammation and increased antioxidant gene expression in the liver, but not with changes in endothelial function, plasma lipids or systemic inflammation. Increased atherosclerosis is caused by the particulate component of diesel exhaust producing advanced plaques with a potentially more vulnerable phenotype. These results are consistent with the suggestion that removal of the particulate component would reduce the adverse cardiovascular effects of diesel exhaust.

  7. Selepressin and Arginine Vasopressin Do Not Display Cardiovascular Risk in Atherosclerotic Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Boucheix, Olivier; Blakytny, Robert; Haroutunian, Gerard; Henriksson, Marie; Laporte, Regent; Milano, Stephane; Reinheimer, Torsten M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock remains associated with significant mortality rates. Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and analogs with V1A receptor agonist activity are increasingly used to treat fluid-resistant vasodilatory hypotension, including catecholamine-refractory septic shock. Clinical studies have been restricted to healthy volunteers and catecholamine-refractory septic shock patients excluding subjects with cardiac co-morbidities because of presumed safety issues. The novel selective V1A receptor agonist selepressin, with short half-life, has been designed to avoid V2 receptor-related complications and long-term V1A receptor activation. Cardiovascular safety of selepressin, AVP, and the septic shock standard of care norepinephrine was investigated in a rabbit model of early-stage atherosclerosis. Methods Atherosclerosis was established in New Zealand White rabbits using a 1% cholesterol-containing diet. Selepressin, AVP, or norepinephrine was administered as cumulative intravenous infusion rates to atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic animals. Results Selepressin and AVP induced a slight dose-dependent increase in arterial pressure (AP) associated with a moderate decrease in heart rate, no change in stroke volume, and a moderate decrease in aortic blood flow (ABF). In contrast, norepinephrine induced a marked dose-dependent increase in AP associated with a lesser decrease in the heart rate, an increase in stroke volume, and a moderate increase in ABF. For all three vasopressors, there was no difference in responses between atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic animals. Conclusion Further studies should be considered using more advanced atherosclerosis models, including with septic shock, before considering septic shock clinical trials of patients with comorbidities. Here, selepressin and AVP treatments did not display relevant cardiovascular risk in early-stage rabbit atherosclerosis. PMID:27788216

  8. Human Factors Engineering Review Model for advanced nuclear power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.; Higgins, J. ); Goodman, C.; Galletti, G.: Eckenrode, R. )

    1993-01-01

    One of the major issues to emerge from the initial design reviews under the certification process was that detailed human-systems interface (HSI) design information was not available for staff review. To address the lack of design detail issue. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is performing the design certification reviews based on a design process plan which describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification. Since the review of a design process is unprecedented in the nuclear industry. The criteria for review are not addressed by current regulations or guidance documents and. therefore, had to be developed. Thus, an HFE Program Review Model was developed. This paper will describe the model's rationale, scope, objectives, development, general characteristics. and application.

  9. Human Factors Engineering Review Model for advanced nuclear power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.; Higgins, J.; Goodman, C.; Galletti, G.: Eckenrode, R.

    1993-05-01

    One of the major issues to emerge from the initial design reviews under the certification process was that detailed human-systems interface (HSI) design information was not available for staff review. To address the lack of design detail issue. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is performing the design certification reviews based on a design process plan which describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification. Since the review of a design process is unprecedented in the nuclear industry. The criteria for review are not addressed by current regulations or guidance documents and. therefore, had to be developed. Thus, an HFE Program Review Model was developed. This paper will describe the model`s rationale, scope, objectives, development, general characteristics. and application.

  10. Recent advances in understanding the endocrinology of human birth.

    PubMed

    Smith, Roger; Paul, Jonathan; Maiti, Kaushik; Tolosa, Jorge; Madsen, Gemma

    2012-10-01

    The timing of human birth has a crucial impact upon the survival of the fetus. New knowledge on the regulation of human birth includes the role of endogenous retroviruses in the formation of the syncytiotrophoblast cells and consequently the secretion of corticotrophin releasing hormone, a hormone linked to gestational length determination. miRNAs have been identified that mediate progesterone withdrawal at labor by suppressing progesterone-induced transcription factors. Progress has also been made in understanding how the contractile machinery of the uterine myocytes is activated at labor and the role of small heat-shock proteins in this process. From this work, new therapeutic targets have been identified that may be used to regulate the onset of labor and improve neonatal mortality. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Advances in Analysis of Human Milk Oligosaccharides123

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2012-01-01

    Oligosaccharides in human milk strongly influence the composition of the gut microflora of neonates. Because it is now clear that the microflora play important roles in the development of the infant immune system, human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) are studied frequently. Milk samples contain complex mixtures of HMO, usually comprising several isomeric structures that can be either linear or branched. Traditionally, HMO profiling was performed using HPLC with fluorescence or UV detection. By using porous graphitic carbon liquid chromatography MS, it is now possible to separate and identify most of the isomers, facilitating linkage-specific analysis. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis allows fast profiling, but does not allow isomer separation. Novel MS fragmentation techniques have facilitated structural characterization of HMO that are present at lower concentrations. These techniques now facilitate more accurate studies of HMO consumption as well as Lewis blood group determinations. PMID:22585919

  12. Advance techniques for monitoring human tolerance to +Gz accelerations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R.; Sandler, H.; Rositano, S.; Skrettingland, K.; Mancini, R.

    1972-01-01

    Standard techniques for monitoring the acceleration-stressed human subject have been augmented by measuring (1) temporal, brachial and/or radial arterial blood flow, and (2) indirect systolic and diastolic blood pressure at 60-sec intervals. Results show that the response of blood pressure to positive accelerations is complex and dependent on an interplay of hydrostatic forces, diminishing venous return, redistribution of blood, and other poorly defined compensatory reflexes.

  13. Technological Advances, Human Performance, and the Operation of Nuclear Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrado, Jonathan K.

    Many unfortunate and unintended adverse industrial incidents occur across the United States each year, and the nuclear industry is no exception. Depending on their severity, these incidents can be problematic for people, the facilities, and surrounding environments. Human error is a contributing factor in many such incidents. This dissertation first explored the hypothesis that technological changes that affect how operators interact within the systems of the nuclear facilities exacerbate the cost of incidents caused by human error. I conducted a review of nuclear incidents in the United States from 1955 through 2010 that reached Level 3 (serious incident) or higher on the International Nuclear Events Scale (INES). The cost of each incident at facilities that had recently undergone technological changes affecting plant operators' jobs was compared to the cost of events at facilities that had not undergone changes. A t-test determined a statistically significant difference between the two groups, confirming the hypothesis. Next, I conducted a follow-on study to determine the impact of the incorporation of new technologies into nuclear facilities. The data indicated that spending more money on upgrades increased the facility's capacity as well as the number of incidents reported, but the incident severity was minor. Finally, I discuss the impact of human error on plant operations and the impact of evolving technology on the 21st-century operator, proposing a methodology to overcome these challenges by applying the systems engineering process.

  14. Transcriptome Profiling in Human Diseases: New Advances and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Casamassimi, Amelia; Federico, Antonio; Rienzo, Monica; Esposito, Sabrina; Ciccodicola, Alfredo

    2017-07-29

    In the last decades, transcriptome profiling has been one of the most utilized approaches to investigate human diseases at the molecular level. Through expression studies, many molecular biomarkers and therapeutic targets have been found for several human pathologies. This number is continuously increasing thanks to total RNA sequencing. Indeed, this new technology has completely revolutionized transcriptome analysis allowing the quantification of gene expression levels and allele-specific expression in a single experiment, as well as to identify novel genes, splice isoforms, fusion transcripts, and to investigate the world of non-coding RNA at an unprecedented level. RNA sequencing has also been employed in important projects, like ENCODE (Encyclopedia of the regulatory elements) and TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas), to provide a snapshot of the transcriptome of dozens of cell lines and thousands of primary tumor specimens. Moreover, these studies have also paved the way to the development of data integration approaches in order to facilitate management and analysis of data and to identify novel disease markers and molecular targets to use in the clinics. In this scenario, several ongoing clinical trials utilize transcriptome profiling through RNA sequencing strategies as an important instrument in the diagnosis of numerous human pathologies.

  15. Transcriptome Profiling in Human Diseases: New Advances and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Rienzo, Monica; Esposito, Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, transcriptome profiling has been one of the most utilized approaches to investigate human diseases at the molecular level. Through expression studies, many molecular biomarkers and therapeutic targets have been found for several human pathologies. This number is continuously increasing thanks to total RNA sequencing. Indeed, this new technology has completely revolutionized transcriptome analysis allowing the quantification of gene expression levels and allele-specific expression in a single experiment, as well as to identify novel genes, splice isoforms, fusion transcripts, and to investigate the world of non-coding RNA at an unprecedented level. RNA sequencing has also been employed in important projects, like ENCODE (Encyclopedia of the regulatory elements) and TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas), to provide a snapshot of the transcriptome of dozens of cell lines and thousands of primary tumor specimens. Moreover, these studies have also paved the way to the development of data integration approaches in order to facilitate management and analysis of data and to identify novel disease markers and molecular targets to use in the clinics. In this scenario, several ongoing clinical trials utilize transcriptome profiling through RNA sequencing strategies as an important instrument in the diagnosis of numerous human pathologies. PMID:28758927

  16. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. PMID:26203381

  17. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal.

  18. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. General evaluation model, technical development, and guideline description

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator`s overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use.

  19. Recent advances in knowledge of zinc nutrition and human health.

    PubMed

    Hess, Sonja Y; Lönnerdal, Bo; Hotz, Christine; Rivera, Juan A; Brown, Kenneth H

    2009-03-01

    Zinc deficiency increases the risk and severity of a variety of infections, restricts physical growth, and affects specific outcomes of pregnancy. Global recognition of the importance of zinc nutrition in public health has expanded dramatically in recent years, and more experience has accumulated on the design and implementation of zinc intervention programs. Therefore, the Steering Committee of the International Zinc Nutrition Consultative Group (IZiNCG) completed a second IZiNCG technical document that reexamines the latest information on the intervention strategies that have been developed to enhance zinc nutrition and control zinc deficiency. In particular, the document reviews the current evidence regarding preventive zinc supplementation and the role of zinc as adjunctive therapy for selected infections, zinc fortification, and dietary diversification or modification strategies, including the promotion and protection of breastfeeding and biofortification. The purposes of this introductory paper are to summarize new guidelines on the assessment of population zinc status, as recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and IZiNCG, and to provide an overview on several new advances in zinc metabolism. The following papers will then review the intervention strategies individually.

  20. Human body composition: advances in models and methods.

    PubMed

    Heymsfield, S B; Wang, Z; Baumgartner, R N; Ross, R

    1997-01-01

    The field of human body composition research is reaching a mature stage in its development: The three interconnected areas that define body composition research--models and their rules, methodology, and biological effects--are well-defined and are actively investigated by scientists in diverse disciplines from many different nations; and methods are available for measuring all major atomic, molecular, cellular, and tissue-system level body composition components in research, clinical, and epidemiological settings. This review summarizes main body composition research concepts, examines new component-measurement methodologies, and identifies potential areas of future research.

  1. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 inhibits inflammatory response and regulates atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shu-jian; Zhang, Ming-xiang; Wang, Xu-ping; Yuan, Qiu-huan; Xue, Li; Wang, Jia-li; Cui, Zhao-qiang; Zhang, Yun; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yu-guo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) rs671 polymorphism, which eliminates ALDH2 activity down to 1%-6%, is a susceptibility gene for coronary disease. Here we investigated the underlying mechanisms based on our prior clinical and experimental studies. Male apoE−/− mice were transfected with GFP, ALDH2-overexpression and ALDH2-RNAi lentivirus respectively (n=20 each) after constrictive collars were placed around the right common carotid arteries. Consequently, ALDH2 gene silencing led to an increased en face plaque area, more unstable plaque with heavier accumulation of lipids, more macrophages, less smooth muscle cells and collagen, which were associated with aggravated inflammation. However, ALDH2 overexpression displayed opposing effects. We also found that ALDH2 activity decreased in atherosclerotic plaques of human and aged apoE−/− mice. Moreover, in vitro experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells further illustrated that, inhibition of ALDH2 activity resulted in elevating inflammatory molecules, an increase of nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and enhanced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65, AP-1 c-Jun, Jun-N terminal kinase and p38 MAPK, while ALDH2 activation could trigger contrary effects. These findings suggested that ALDH2 can influence plaque development and vulnerability, and inflammation via MAPK, NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. PMID:27191745

  2. Assessing human exposure to airborne pollutants: Advances and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J. )

    1991-08-01

    A committee which was convened by the National Research Council, recently completed an analysis of new methods and technologies for assessing exposure to air pollutants. The committee identified three major ways of determining human exposure to airborne pollutants. Monitoring the air around an individual with a portable personal air sampler is, of course, the most comprehensive and most accurate. It is also the costliest and most time consuming. The second method is more indirect and involves techniques such as measuring the amount of a contaminant with a stationary monitor and extrapolating exposure by means of personal activity records or mathematical models. Exposure to carbon monoxide inside a car, for example, might be roughly calculated from the amount of time spent in the car and the quantity of carbon monoxide in the car under typical operating conditions. The third method involves biological markers as a measure of the integrated dose within the body and of past contact with pollutants. For example, a marker for airborne lead exposure can be elevated lead levels in the blood. However, this must be weighed against contributions from other media. A final and major point made in the report is the need to have accurate and realistic assessments to ensure optimal reduction of human exposure. To accomplish this, exposure assessment research should be supported by government programs. Although not stated, such research should also be supported by other sectors, including the regulated community.

  3. Intravascular photoacoustic imaging of gold nanorod-labeled atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeager, Doug; Karpiouk, Andrei; Wang, Bo; Amirian, James; Sokolov, Konstantin; Smalling, Richard; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Combined intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging has been previously established as a viable means for imaging atherosclerotic plaques using both endogenous and exogenous contrast. In this study, IVUS/IVPA imaging of an atherosclerotic rabbit aorta following injection of gold nanorods (AuNR) with peak absorbance within the tissue optical window was performed. Ex-vivo imaging results revealed high photoacoustic signal from localized AuNR. Corresponding histological cross-sections and digital photographs of the artery lumen confirmed the presence of AuNR preferentially located at atherosclerotic regions and in agreement with IVPA signal. Furthermore, an integrated IVUS/IVPA imaging catheter was used to image the AuNR in the presence of luminal blood. The results suggest that AuNR allow for IVPA imaging of exogenously labeled atherosclerotic plaques with a comparatively low background signal and without the need for arterial flushing.

  4. How to manage hypertension with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis?

    PubMed

    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste; Belmonte, Romain; Illuminati, Guilio; Barral, Xavier; Schneider, Fabrice; Chavent, Bertrand

    2017-04-01

    The management of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) in patients with hypertension has been the topic of great controversy. Major contemporary clinical trials such as the Cardiovascular Outcomes for Renal Artery lesions (CORAL) and Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic lesions (ASTRAL) have failed to show significant benefit of revascularization over medical management in controlling blood pressure and preserving renal function. We present here the implications and limitations of these trials and formulate recommendations for management of ARAS.

  5. Imaging of oxidation-specific epitopes with targeted nanoparticles to detect high-risk atherosclerotic lesions: Progress and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Briley-Saebo, Karen; Yeang, Calvin; Witztum, Joseph L.; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation-specific epitopes (OSE) within developing atherosclerotic lesions are key antigens that drive innate and adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis, leading to chronic inflammation. Oxidized phospholipids and malondialdehyde-lysine epitopes are well-characterized OSE present in human atherosclerotic lesions, particularly in pathologically defined vulnerable plaques. Using murine and human OSE-specific antibodies as targeting agents, we have developed radionuclide and magnetic resonance based nanoparticles, containing gadolinium, manganese or lipid-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide, to noninvasively image OSE within experimental atherosclerotic lesions. These methods quantitate plaque burden, allow detection of lesion progression and regression, plaque stabilization, and accumulation of OSE within macrophage-rich areas of the artery wall, suggesting they detect the most active lesions. Future studies will focus on using “natural” antibodies, lipopeptides and mimotopes for imaging applications. These approaches should enhance the clinical translation of this technique to image, monitor, evaluate efficacy of novel therapeutic agents and guide optimal therapy of high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:25297940

  6. High-Density Lipoprotein Mimetics: a Therapeutic Tool for Atherosclerotic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Masahiro; Higaki, Yasuki; Saku, Keijiro; Uehara, Yoshinari

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials and epidemiological studies have revealed a negative correlation between serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and the risk of cardiovascular events. Currently, statin treatment is the standard therapy for cardiovascular diseases, reducing plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. However, more than half of the patients have not been able to receive the beneficial effects of this treatment.The reverse cholesterol transport pathway has several potential anti-atherogenic properties. An important approach to HDL-targeted therapy is the optimization of HDL cholesterol levels and function in the blood to enhance the removal of circulating cholesterol and to prevent or mitigate inflammation that causes atherosclerosis. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors increase HDL cholesterol levels in humans, but whether they reduce the risk of atherosclerotic diseases is unknown. HDL therapies using HDL mimetics, including reconstituted HDL, apolipoprotein (Apo) A-IMilano, ApoA-I mimetic peptides, or full-length ApoA-I, are highly effective in animal models. In particular, the Fukuoka University ApoA-I-mimetic peptide (FAMP) effectively removes cholesterol via the ABCA1 transporter and acts as an anti-atherosclerotic agent by enhancing the biological functions of HDL without elevating HDL cholesterol levels.Our literature review suggests that HDL mimetics have significant atheroprotective potential and are a therapeutic tool for atherosclerotic diseases.

  7. Modeling of Mechanical Stress Exerted by Cholesterol Crystallization on Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dongyao; Yu, Xiaojun; Chen, Si; Liu, Xinyu; Tang, Hongying; Wang, Xianghong; Liu, Linbo

    2016-01-01

    Plaque rupture is the critical cause of cardiovascular thrombosis, but the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent studies have found abundant cholesterol crystals in ruptured plaques, and it has been proposed that the rapid expansion of cholesterol crystals in a limited space during crystallization may contribute to plaque rupture. To evaluate the effect of cholesterol crystal growth on atherosclerotic plaques, we modeled the expansion of cholesterol crystals during the crystallization process in the necrotic core and estimated the stress on the thin cap with different arrangements of cholesterol crystals. We developed a two-dimensional finite element method model of atherosclerotic plaques containing expanding cholesterol crystals and investigated the effect of the magnitude and distribution of crystallization on the peak circumferential stress born by the cap. Using micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT), we extracted the cross-sectional geometric information of cholesterol crystals in human atherosclerotic aorta tissue ex vivo and applied the information to the model. The results demonstrate that (1) the peak circumference stress is proportionally dependent on the cholesterol crystal growth; (2) cholesterol crystals at the cap shoulder impose the highest peak circumference stress; and (3) spatial distributions of cholesterol crystals have a significant impact on the peak circumference stress: evenly distributed cholesterol crystals exert less peak circumferential stress on the cap than concentrated crystals. PMID:27149381

  8. Advanced Analysis of Pharmaco-Sleep Data in Humans.

    PubMed

    Anderer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaco-sleep studies in humans aim at the description of the effects of drugs, most frequently substances that act on the central nervous system, by means of quantitative analysis of biosignals recorded in subjects during sleep. Up to 2007, the only standard for the classification of sleep macrostructure that found worldwide acceptance were the rules published in 1968 by Rechtschaffen and Kales. In May 2007, the AASM Manual for the Scoring of Sleep and Associated Events was published by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, and concerning the classification of sleep stages, these new rules are supposed to replace those developed by Rechtschaffen and Kales. As compared to the rather low interrater reliability of manual sleep scoring, semiautomated approaches may achieve a reliability close to 1 (Cohen's kappa 0.99 for 2 semiautomated scorings as compared to 0.76 for 2 manual scorings) without any decline in validity. Depending on the aim of the pharmaco-sleep study, additional analyses concerning sleep fragmentation, sleep microstructure, sleep depth, sleep processes and local aspects of sleep should be considered. For some of these additional features, rules for visual scoring have been established, while for others automatic analysis is obligatory. Generally, for reasons of cost-effectiveness but also reliability, automatic analysis is preferable to visual analysis. However, the validity of the automatic method applied has to be proven.

  9. Management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Advanced Age

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meredith; Justice, Amy C.; Lampiris, Harry W.; Valcour, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Importance Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients treated with antiretroviral therapy now have increased life expectancy and develop chronic illnesses that are often seen in older HIV-negative patients. Objective To address emerging issues related to aging with HIV. Screening older adults for HIV, diagnosis of concomitant diseases, management of multiple comorbid medical illnesses, social isolation, polypharmacy, and factors associated with end-of-life care are reviewed. Evidence Acquisition Published guidelines and consensus statements were reviewed. PubMed and PsycINFO were searched between January 2000 and February 2013. Articles not appearing in the search that were referenced by reviewed articles were also evaluated. Findings The population of older HIV-positive patients is rapidly expanding. It is estimated that by 2015 one-half of the individuals in the United States with HIV will be older than age 50. Older HIV-infected patients are prone to having similar chronic diseases as their HIV-negative counterparts, as well as illnesses associated with co-infections. Medical treatments associated with these conditions, when added to an antiretroviral regimen, increase risk for polypharmacy. Care of aging HIV-infected patients involves a need to balance a number of concurrent comorbid medical conditions. Conclusions and Relevance HIV is no longer a fatal disease. Management of multiple comorbid diseases is a common feature associated with longer life expectancy in HIV-positive patients. There is a need to better understand how to optimize the care of these patients. PMID:23549585

  10. Advanced Nuclear Power Concepts for Human Exploration Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Robert L. Cataldo; Lee S. Mason

    2000-06-04

    The design reference mission for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) human mission to Mars supports a philosophy of living off the land in order to reduce crew risk, launch mass, and life-cycle costs associated with logistics resupply to a Mars base. Life-support materials, oxygen, water, and buffer gases, and the crew's ascent-stage propellant would not be brought from Earth but rather manufactured from the Mars atmosphere. The propellants would be made over {approx}2 yr, the time between Mars mission launch window opportunities. The production of propellants is very power intensive and depends on type, amount, and time to produce the propellants. Closed-loop life support and food production are also power intensive. With the base having several habitats, a greenhouse, and propellant production capability, total power levels reach well over 125 kW(electric). The most mass-efficient means of satisfying these requirements is through the use of nuclear power. Studies have been performed to identify a potential system concept, described in this paper, using a mobile cart to transport the power system away from the Mars lander and provide adequate separation between the reactor and crew. The studies included an assessment of reactor and power conversion technology options, selection of system and component redundancy, determination of optimum separation distance, and system performance sensitivity to some key operating parameters.

  11. Advanced UV Absorbers for the Protection of Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Hüglin, Dietmar

    The increasing awareness of the damaging effects of UV radiation to human skin triggered the market introduction of new cosmetic UV absorbers. This article summarizes the outcome of a multi-year research program, in which the author contributed to the development of different new UV filters. First of all, the molecular design and the basic properties of bis-ethylhexyloxyphenol methoxyphenyl triazine (BEMT) will be presented. This oil-soluble filter, which today is widely used in both beach products and skin care products, exhibits inherent photostability and strong broad-spectrum UV-A+B absorbance. Based on the concept of micronized organic UV absorbers, the UV-B filter tris biphenyl triazine (TBPT) will be introduced. At present TBPT exhibits the highest efficacy of all cosmetic UV absorbers in the market (measured by area under the UV spectrum). Finally, the concept of liposomogenic UV absorbers will be featured. This approach was developed to create water-resistant UV filters, as liposomogenic structures are thought to integrate into the lipids of the horny layer. Due to prohibitively high costs, this technology did not result in a commercial product so far.

  12. Inhibition of MicroRNA-494 Reduces Carotid Artery Atherosclerotic Lesion Development and Increases Plaque Stability.

    PubMed

    Wezel, Anouk; Welten, Sabine M J; Razawy, Wida; Lagraauw, H Maxime; de Vries, Margreet R; Goossens, Eveline A C; Boonstra, Martin C; Hamming, Jaap F; Kandimalla, Ekambar R; Kuiper, Johan; Quax, Paul H A; Nossent, A Yaël; Bot, Ilze

    2015-11-01

    Unstable atherosclerotic lesions in carotid arteries require surgical endarterectomy to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke. We aimed to identify microRNAs that exert a broad effect on atherosclerotic plaque formation and stability in the carotid artery. We made a selection of 164 genes involved in atherosclerosis. Using www.targetscan.org, we determined which microRNAs potentially regulate expression of these genes. We identified multiple microRNAs from the 14q32 microRNA cluster, which is highly involved in vascular remodeling. In human plaques, collected during carotid endarterectomy surgery, we found that 14q32 microRNA (miR-494) was abundantly expressed in unstable lesions. We induced atherosclerotic plaque formation in hypercholesterolemic ApoE mice by placing semiconstrictive collars around both carotid arteries. We injected "Gene Silencing Oligonucleotides" against miR-494 (GSO-494) or negative control (GSO-control). Using fluorescently labeled GSOs, we confirmed uptake of GSOs in affected areas of the carotids, but not elsewhere in the vasculature. After injection of GSO-494, we observed significant downregulation of miR-494 expression in the carotid arteries, although miR-494 target genes were upregulated. Further analyses revealed a 65% decrease in plaque size after GSO-494 treatment. Plaque stability was increased in GSO-494-treated mice, determined by an 80% decrease in necrotic core size and a 50% increase in plaque collagen content. Inhibition of miR-494 also resulted in decreased cholesterol levels and decreased very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) fractions. Treatment with GSO-494 results in smaller atherosclerotic lesions with increased plaque stability. Inhibition of miR-494 may decrease the risk of surgical complications or even avert endarterectomy surgery in some cases.

  13. A Distributed Simulation Facility to Support Human Factors Research in Advanced Air Transportation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amonlirdviman, Keith; Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Ladik, John F.; Sherer, Dana Z.

    1998-01-01

    A distributed real-time simulation of the civil air traffic environment developed to support human factors research in advanced air transportation technology is presented. The distributed environment is based on a custom simulation architecture designed for simplicity and flexibility in human experiments. Standard Internet protocols are used to create the distributed environment, linking all advanced cockpit simulator, all Air Traffic Control simulator, and a pseudo-aircraft control and simulation management station. The pseudo-aircraft control station also functions as a scenario design tool for coordinating human factors experiments. This station incorporates a pseudo-pilot interface designed to reduce workload for human operators piloting multiple aircraft simultaneously in real time. The application of this distributed simulation facility to support a study of the effect of shared information (via air-ground datalink) on pilot/controller shared situation awareness and re-route negotiation is also presented.

  14. Advanced human machine interaction for an image interpretation workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, S.; Martin, M.; van de Camp, F.; Peinsipp-Byma, E.; Beyerer, J.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, many new interaction technologies have been developed that enhance the usability of computer systems and allow for novel types of interaction. The areas of application for these technologies have mostly been in gaming and entertainment. However, in professional environments, there are especially demanding tasks that would greatly benefit from improved human machine interfaces as well as an overall improved user experience. We, therefore, envisioned and built an image-interpretation-workstation of the future, a multi-monitor workplace comprised of four screens. Each screen is dedicated to a complex software product such as a geo-information system to provide geographic context, an image annotation tool, software to generate standardized reports and a tool to aid in the identification of objects. Using self-developed systems for hand tracking, pointing gestures and head pose estimation in addition to touchscreens, face identification, and speech recognition systems we created a novel approach to this complex task. For example, head pose information is used to save the position of the mouse cursor on the currently focused screen and to restore it as soon as the same screen is focused again while hand gestures allow for intuitive manipulation of 3d objects in mid-air. While the primary focus is on the task of image interpretation, all of the technologies involved provide generic ways of efficiently interacting with a multi-screen setup and could be utilized in other fields as well. In preliminary experiments, we received promising feedback from users in the military and started to tailor the functionality to their needs

  15. Advancing human health risk assessment: integrating recent advisory committee recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dourson, Michael; Becker, Richard A; Haber, Lynne T; Pottenger, Lynn H; Bredfeldt, Tiffany; Fenner-Crisp, Penelope A

    2013-07-01

    Over the last dozen years, many national and international expert groups have considered specific improvements to risk assessment. Many of their stated recommendations are mutually supportive, but others appear conflicting, at least in an initial assessment. This review identifies areas of consensus and difference and recommends a practical, biology-centric course forward, which includes: (1) incorporating a clear problem formulation at the outset of the assessment with a level of complexity that is appropriate for informing the relevant risk management decision; (2) using toxicokinetics and toxicodynamic information to develop Chemical Specific Adjustment Factors (CSAF); (3) using mode of action (MOA) information and an understanding of the relevant biology as the key, central organizing principle for the risk assessment; (4) integrating MOA information into dose-response assessments using existing guidelines for non-cancer and cancer assessments; (5) using a tiered, iterative approach developed by the World Health Organization/International Programme on Chemical Safety (WHO/IPCS) as a scientifically robust, fit-for-purpose approach for risk assessment of combined exposures (chemical mixtures); and (6) applying all of this knowledge to enable interpretation of human biomonitoring data in a risk context. While scientifically based defaults will remain important and useful when data on CSAF or MOA to refine an assessment are absent or insufficient, assessments should always strive to use these data. The use of available 21st century knowledge of biological processes, clinical findings, chemical interactions, and dose-response at the molecular, cellular, organ and organism levels will minimize the need for extrapolation and reliance on default approaches.

  16. Advanced age increases chromosome structural abnormalities in human spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Templado, Cristina; Donate, Anna; Giraldo, Jesús; Bosch, Mercè; Estop, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between sperm structural aberrations and age by using a multicolor multichromosome FISH strategy that provides information on the incidence of duplications and deletions on all the autosomes. ToTelvysion kit (Abbott Molecular, Abbott Park, IL, USA) with telomere-specific probes was used. We investigated the sperm of 10 male donors aged from 23 to 74 years old. The donors were divided into two groups according to age, a cohort of five individuals younger than 40 and a cohort of five individuals older than 60 years. The goal of this study was to determine (1) the relationship between donor age and frequency and type of chromosome structural abnormalities and (2) chromosomes more frequently involved in sperm structural aberrations. We found that the older patients had a higher rate of structural abnormalities (6.6%) compared with the younger cohort (4.9%). Although both duplications and deletions were seen more frequently in older men, our findings demonstrate the presence of an excess of duplications versus deletions in both groups at a ratio of 2 to 1. We demonstrate that the distribution of duplications and deletions was not linear along the chromosomes, although a trend toward a higher rate of abnormalities in larger chromosomes was observed. This work is the first study addressing the frequencies of sperm chromosome structural aberrations of all autosomes in a single assay thus making a contribution to the clarification of the amount and origin of damage present in human spermatozoa and in relation to age. PMID:21045871

  17. Advanced Analysis of Pharmaco-EEG Data in Humans.

    PubMed

    Jobert, Marc; Wilson, Frederick J

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaco-electroencephalography (EEG) is a non-invasive method used to assess the effects of pharmacological compounds on the central nervous system by processing the EEG signals which directly reveal the spontaneous synchronised postsynaptic neuronal activity of the cortex with high temporal resolution. The International Pharmaco-Encephalography Society (IPEG) has recently published guidelines, which were produced by a global panel of EEG experts, with the goal to increase the standardisation of pharmaco-EEG studies in human subjects and facilitate the comparability of data across laboratories, thus enabling data-pooling and meta-analyses. The recommended standard experimental procedure is to measure EEG activity under vigilance-controlled and resting conditions. The IPEG guidelines thoroughly present the technical details and therefore constitute a robust reference. The complementary aim of the present paper is to focus on practical aspects, pitfalls and precautions to be considered when processing pharmaco-EEG data by covering the following topics: (1) investigate the stability and reliability of 5-min EEG recordings under both vigilance-controlled and resting conditions; (2) assess the spontaneous time-dependent changes in spectral activity over time, and (3) apply the data-processing strategies suggested in the pharmaco-EEG guidelines and designed to optimally capture drug effects. For this purpose, the EEG data from a randomised, double-blind, crossover trial aimed at comparing the effect of diazepam (10 mg) and placebo in 16 healthy male volunteers is used to illustrate the discussion of the processing techniques and difficulties commonly faced when analysing pharmaco-EEG data.

  18. Advancing human health risk assessment: Integrating recent advisory committee recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Richard A.; Haber, Lynne T.; Pottenger, Lynn H.; Bredfeldt, Tiffany; Fenner-Crisp, Penelope A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last dozen years, many national and international expert groups have considered specific improvements to risk assessment. Many of their stated recommendations are mutually supportive, but others appear conflicting, at least in an initial assessment. This review identifies areas of consensus and difference and recommends a practical, biology-centric course forward, which includes: (1) incorporating a clear problem formulation at the outset of the assessment with a level of complexity that is appropriate for informing the relevant risk management decision; (2) using toxicokinetics and toxicodynamic information to develop Chemical Specific Adjustment Factors (CSAF); (3) using mode of action (MOA) information and an understanding of the relevant biology as the key, central organizing principle for the risk assessment; (4) integrating MOA information into dose–response assessments using existing guidelines for non-cancer and cancer assessments; (5) using a tiered, iterative approach developed by the World Health Organization/International Programme on Chemical Safety (WHO/IPCS) as a scientifically robust, fit-for-purpose approach for risk assessment of combined exposures (chemical mixtures); and (6) applying all of this knowledge to enable interpretation of human biomonitoring data in a risk context. While scientifically based defaults will remain important and useful when data on CSAF or MOA to refine an assessment are absent or insufficient, assessments should always strive to use these data. The use of available 21st century knowledge of biological processes, clinical findings, chemical interactions, and dose–response at the molecular, cellular, organ and organism levels will minimize the need for extrapolation and reliance on default approaches. PMID:23844697

  19. A Framework for Human Performance Criteria for Advanced Reactor Operational Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques V Hugo; David I Gertman; Jeffrey C Joe

    2014-08-01

    This report supports the determination of new Operational Concept models needed in support of the operational design of new reactors. The objective of this research is to establish the technical bases for human performance and human performance criteria frameworks, models, and guidance for operational concepts for advanced reactor designs. The report includes a discussion of operating principles for advanced reactors, the human performance issues and requirements for human performance based upon work domain analysis and current regulatory requirements, and a description of general human performance criteria. The major findings and key observations to date are that there is some operating experience that informs operational concepts for baseline designs for SFR and HGTRs, with the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as a best-case predecessor design. This report summarizes the theoretical and operational foundations for the development of a framework and model for human performance criteria that will influence the development of future Operational Concepts. The report also highlights issues associated with advanced reactor design and clarifies and codifies the identified aspects of technology and operating scenarios.

  20. Inspiring engineering minds to advance human health: the Henry Samueli School of Engineering's Department of BME.

    PubMed

    Lee, Abraham; Wirtanen, Erik

    2012-07-01

    The growth of biomedical engineering at The Henry Samueli School of Engineering at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) has been rapid since the Center for Biomedical Engineering was first formed in 1998 [and was later renamed as the Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) in 2002]. Our current mission statement, “Inspiring Engineering Minds to Advance Human Health,” serves as a reminder of why we exist, what we do, and the core principles that we value and by which we abide. BME exists to advance the state of human health via engineering innovation and practices. To attain our goal, we are empowering our faculty to inspire and mobilize our students to address health problems. We treasure the human being, particularly the human mind and health. We believe that BME is where minds are nurtured, challenged, and disciplined, and it is also where the health of the human is held as a core mission value that deserves our utmost priority (Figure 1). Advancing human health is not a theoretical practice; it requires bridging between disciplines (engineering and medicine) and between communities (academic and industry).

  1. Unmet needs in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: Is there a role for emerging anti-inflammatory interventions?

    PubMed

    Lorenzatti, Alberto J; Retzlaff, Brenda M

    2016-10-15

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Despite extraordinary advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and the utilization of very effective medications such as statins, there still remains a significant residual risk. In fact, even after optimal interventional and medical therapy, the possibility of recurrent myocardial infarction remains at approximately one third for five years after acute coronary syndromes, thus emphasizing the urgent need for novel therapies to prevent the progress of atherosclerosis. In addition, over the past two decades, although atherosclerosis has been clearly identified as an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall from compelling data of animal and human studies, clinical applications related to this accumulated knowledge are scarce. This review presents a brief description of the role of inflammation in atherogenesis, and examines selected potential anti-inflammatory interventions that are being tested in on-going clinical trials which have been designed to prevent adverse cardiovascular events as well as provide a proof of concept regarding the inflammatory hypothesis of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Advanced Placement Human Geography and the Annual Meetings of the National Council for Geographic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sublett, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Members of the National Council for Geographic Education have been instrumental in the creation, launch, and early success of Advanced Placement Human Geography. Annual meetings of the Council have served as a forum for spreading the word about the course and its follow-up national examination and in helping teachers develop content confidence and…

  3. Placing Advanced Placement® Human Geography: Its Role in U.S. Geography Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Advanced Placement Human Geography (AP HG) in the context of its place in efforts to reform geography education. It presents a critical analysis of the AP program and its curriculum, asserting that it represents "powerful knowledge" as conceptualized by Young. It concludes with a call for research in AP HG aligned…

  4. Perspectives on the Development and Future of Advanced Placement® Human Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrant, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography faced a number of hurdles that nearly derailed the course before it launched in 2000-2001. A dedicated cadre of geography professionals and high school teachers rose to the challenge and the course remains one of the fastest growing AP courses currently offered by College Board. Seventeen readers and leaders…

  5. Advanced Placement Human Geography and the Annual Meetings of the National Council for Geographic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sublett, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Members of the National Council for Geographic Education have been instrumental in the creation, launch, and early success of Advanced Placement Human Geography. Annual meetings of the Council have served as a forum for spreading the word about the course and its follow-up national examination and in helping teachers develop content confidence and…

  6. Perspectives on the Development and Future of Advanced Placement® Human Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrant, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography faced a number of hurdles that nearly derailed the course before it launched in 2000-2001. A dedicated cadre of geography professionals and high school teachers rose to the challenge and the course remains one of the fastest growing AP courses currently offered by College Board. Seventeen readers and leaders…

  7. Placing Advanced Placement® Human Geography: Its Role in U.S. Geography Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Advanced Placement Human Geography (AP HG) in the context of its place in efforts to reform geography education. It presents a critical analysis of the AP program and its curriculum, asserting that it represents "powerful knowledge" as conceptualized by Young. It concludes with a call for research in AP HG aligned…

  8. Glyoxalase 1 overexpression does not affect atherosclerotic lesion size and severity in ApoE-/- mice with or without diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, Nordin M J; Brouwers, Olaf; Gijbels, Marion J; Wouters, Kristiaan; Wijnands, Erwin; Cleutjens, Jack P M; De Mey, Jo G; Miyata, Toshio; Biessen, Erik A; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2014-10-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and their precursors have been associated with the development of atherosclerosis. We recently discovered that glyoxalase 1 (GLO1), the major detoxifying enzyme for AGE precursors, is decreased in ruptured human plaques, and that levels of AGEs are higher in rupture-prone plaques. We here investigated whether overexpression of human GLO1 in ApoE(-/-) mice could reduce the development of atherosclerosis. We crossed C57BL/6 ApoE(-/-) mice with C57BL/6 GLO1 overexpressing mice (huGLO1(+/-)) to generate ApoE(-/-) (n = 16) and ApoE(-/-) huGLO1(+/-) (n = 20) mice. To induce diabetes, we injected a subset with streptozotocin (STZ) to generate diabetic ApoE(-/-) (n = 8) and ApoE(-/-) huGLO1(+/-) (n = 13) mice. All mice were fed chow and sacrificed at 25 weeks of age. The GLO1 activity was three-fold increased in huGLO1(+/-) aorta, but aortic root lesion size and phenotype did not differ between mice with and without huGLO1(+/-) overexpression. We detected no differences in gene expression in aortic arches, in AGE levels and cytokines, in circulating cells, and endothelial function between ApoE(-/-) mice with and without huGLO1(+/-) overexpression. Although diabetic mice showed decreased GLO1 expression (P < 0.05) and increased lesion size (P < 0.05) in comparison with non-diabetic mice, GLO1 overexpression also did not affect the aortic root lesion size or inflammation in diabetic mice. In ApoE(-/-) mice with or without diabetes, GLO1 overexpression did not lead to decreased atherosclerotic lesion size or systemic inflammation. Increasing GLO1 levels does not seem to be an effective strategy to reduce glycation in atherosclerotic lesions, likely due to increased AGE formation through GLO1-independent mechanisms. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Heat Shock Proteins: Mediators of Atherosclerotic Development.

    PubMed

    Deniset, Justin F; Pierce, Grant N

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins play important housekeeping roles in a variety of cells within the body during normal control conditions. The many different functions for heat shock proteins in the cell depend upon the specific heat shock protein involved. Each protein is nominally differentiated based upon its molecular size. However, in addition to their role in normal cell function, heat shock proteins may play an even more important role as pro-survival proteins conserved through evolution to protect the cell from a variety of stresses. The ability of a cell to withstand these environmental stresses is critical to its capacity to adapt and remain viable. Loss of this ability may lead to pathological states. Abnormal localization, structure or function of the heat shock proteins has been associated with many pathologies, including those involving heart disease. Heat shock proteins like HSP60 and HSP70 in particular have been identified as playing important roles in inflammation and immune reactions. Inflammation has been identified recently as an important pathological risk factor for heart disease. It is perhaps not surprising therefore, that heat shock protein family has been increasingly identified as an important intracellular pathway associated with inflammatory-mediated heart conditions including atherosclerosis. This paper reviews the evidence in support of a role for heat shock proteins in cardiovascular disease and the potential to target these proteins to alter the progression of atherosclerotic disease.

  10. Advanced glycation end products in human cancer tissues: detection of Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine and argpyrimidine.

    PubMed

    van Heijst, Jeroen W J; Niessen, Hans W M; Hoekman, Klaas; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2005-06-01

    Tumors are generally characterized by an increased glucose uptake and a high rate of glycolysis. Since one consequence of an elevated glycolysis is the nonenzymatic glycation of proteins, we studied the presence of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in human cancer tissues. We detected the presence of the AGEs N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and argpyrimidine in several human tumors using specific antibodies. Because AGEs have been associated with the etiology of a variety of different diseases, these results suggest that CML and argpyrimidine could be implicated in the biology of human cancer.

  11. Workshop on Critical Issues in Microgravity Fluids, Transport, and Reaction Processes in Advanced Human Support Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Joshi, Jitendra A.

    2004-01-01

    This workshop was designed to bring the experts from the Advanced Human Support Technologies communities together to identify the most pressing and fruitful areas of research where success hinges on collaborative research between the two communities. Thus an effort was made to bring together experts in both advanced human support technologies and microgravity fluids, transport and reaction processes. Expertise was drawn from academia, national laboratories, and the federal government. The intent was to bring about a thorough exchange of ideas and develop recommendations to address the significant open design and operation issues for human support systems that are affected by fluid physics, transport and reaction processes. This report provides a summary of key discussions, findings, and recommendations.

  12. Advances in Robotic, Human, and Autonomous Systems for Missions of Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Briggs, Geoffrey A.; Glass, Brian J.; Pedersen, Liam; Kortenkamp, David M.; Wettergreen, David S.; Nourbakhsh, I.; Clancy, Daniel J.; Zornetzer, Steven (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Space exploration missions are evolving toward more complex architectures involving more capable robotic systems, new levels of human and robotic interaction, and increasingly autonomous systems. How this evolving mix of advanced capabilities will be utilized in the design of new missions is a subject of much current interest. Cost and risk constraints also play a key role in the development of new missions, resulting in a complex interplay of a broad range of factors in the mission development and planning of new missions. This paper will discuss how human, robotic, and autonomous systems could be used in advanced space exploration missions. In particular, a recently completed survey of the state of the art and the potential future of robotic systems, as well as new experiments utilizing human and robotic approaches will be described. Finally, there will be a discussion of how best to utilize these various approaches for meeting space exploration goals.

  13. The Myth of “The Vulnerable Plaque”: Transitioning from a Focus on Individual Lesions to Atherosclerotic Disease Burden for Coronary Artery Disease Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Fuster, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular science community has pursued the quest to identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque in patients for decades, hoping to prevent acute coronary events. However, despite major advancements in imaging technology that allow visualization of rupture-prone plaques, clinical studies have not demonstrated improved risk prediction compared to traditional approaches. Considering the complex relationship between plaque rupture and acute coronary event risk suggested by pathology studies and confirmed by clinical investigations, these results are not surprising. This review summarizes the evidence supporting a multifaceted hypothesis of the natural history of atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Managing patients at risk of suffering acute coronary events mandates a greater focus on the atherosclerotic disease burden, rather than on features of individual plaques. PMID:25601032

  14. Human-System Safety Methods for Development of Advanced Air Traffic Management Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.

    1999-05-24

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is supporting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in the development of advanced air traffic management (ATM) systems as part of the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies program. As part of this program INEEL conducted a survey of human-system safety methods that have been applied to complex technical systems, to identify lessons learned from these applications and provide recommendations for the development of advanced ATM systems. The domains that were surveyed included offshore oil and gas, commercial nuclear power, commercial aviation, and military. The survey showed that widely different approaches are used in these industries, and that the methods used range from very high-level, qualitative approaches to very detailed quantitative methods such as human reliability analysis (HRA) and probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). In addition, the industries varied widely in how effectively they incorporate human-system safety assessment in the design, development, and testing of complex technical systems. In spite of the lack of uniformity in the approaches and methods used, it was found that methods are available that can be combined and adapted to support the development of advanced air traffic management systems.

  15. Effects of an Advanced Reactor’s Design, Use of Automation, and Mission on Human Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Joe; Johanna H. Oxstrand

    2014-06-01

    The roles, functions, and tasks of the human operator in existing light water nuclear power plants (NPPs) are based on sound nuclear and human factors engineering (HFE) principles, are well defined by the plant’s conduct of operations, and have been validated by years of operating experience. However, advanced NPPs whose engineering designs differ from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) will impose changes on the roles, functions, and tasks of the human operators. The plans to increase the use of automation, reduce staffing levels, and add to the mission of these advanced NPPs will also affect the operator’s roles, functions, and tasks. We assert that these factors, which do not appear to have received a lot of attention by the design engineers of advanced NPPs relative to the attention given to conceptual design of these reactors, can have significant risk implications for the operators and overall plant safety if not mitigated appropriately. This paper presents a high-level analysis of a specific advanced NPP and how its engineered design, its plan to use greater levels of automation, and its expanded mission have risk significant implications on operator performance and overall plant safety.

  16. Increased apolipoprotein E and c-fms gene expression without elevated interleukin 1 or 6 mRNA levels indicates selective activation of macrophage functions in advanced human atheroma.

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, R N; Underwood, R; Doyle, M V; Wang, A; Libby, P

    1992-01-01

    Cells found within atherosclerotic lesions can produce in culture protein mediators that may participate in atherogenesis. To test whether human atheromata actually contain transcripts for certain of these genes, we compared levels of mRNAs in carotid or coronary atheromata and in nonatherosclerotic human vessels by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of cDNAs reverse-transcribed from RNA. We measured PCR products (generated during exponential amplification) by incorporation of 32P-labeled primers. Levels of interleukin 1 alpha, 1 beta, or 6 mRNAs in plaques and controls did not differ. Compared to uninvolved vessels, plaques did contain higher levels of mRNA encoding platelet-derived growth factor A chain (42 +/- 24 vs. 12 +/- 10 fmol of product; mean +/- SD; n = 8 and 8, respectively; P = 0.007) and B chain (41 +/- 36 vs. 4 +/- 3 fmol of product, n = 14 and 6, respectively; P = 0.024). Atherosclerotic lesions consistently had much higher levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE) mRNA than did control vessels (131 +/- 71 vs. 5 +/- 3 fmol of product; n = 12 and 10, respectively; P less than 0.001). Direct RNA blot analyses confirmed elevated levels of apoE mRNA in plaque extracts. To test whether mononuclear phagocytes might be a source of the apoE mRNA, we studied a selective marker for cells of the monocytic lineage, the c-fms protooncogene, which encodes the receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Plaques also contained elevated levels of c-fms mRNA (30 +/- 17 vs. 5 +/- 3 fmol of product; n = 10 and 7, respectively; P = 0.002). Immunohistochemical colocalization demonstrated apoE protein in association with macrophages in plaques, whereas nonatherosclerotic vessels showed no immunoreactive apoE. ApoE produced locally in atheroma might modulate the functions of lesional T cells or promote "reverse cholesterol transport" by associating with high density lipoprotein particles, thus targeting them for peripheral uptake. Macrophages within the advanced

  17. Therapy of atherosclerotic arteriopathy of lower limbs. Aspects and results.

    PubMed

    Tesi, M; Bronchi, G F; Carini, A; Karavassili, M

    1985-10-01

    As far as therapy is concerned, atherosclerotic arteriopathy may be divided into acute and chronic forms. In acute embolic forms, therapy should be surgical. Only in cases of peripheral embolism or polyembolism, and in rare cases for which vascular surgery cannot be adopted, can thrombolysis be carried out with UK. In acute thrombotic forms, therapy should be medical, because a thrombus of recent formation is rich in fibrin and may be lyzed by UK. Total recanalization takes place in 61% of cases treated, partial recanalization in 23%. Subsequently perviousness is maintained by adequate antithrombotic therapy. In chronic arteriopathy, the thrombus is lacking or almost lacking in fibrin and thrombolytic therapy is not indicated. Special therapeutic combinations are used containing platelet inhibitors (ticlopidine), antifibrin drugs (subcutaneous heparin), minor fibrinolytic agents (mesoglycan) and hemorheological drugs (pentoxyphylline). This therapy seems to give good results, as showed by the low percentage in amputation calculated on 2,565 patients treated and kept under observation for 5 years. Finally let us consider chronic progressive arteriopathy. This term indicates a very advanced stage, characterized by a gradual irreversible change for the worse leading towards gangrene. As a last resort, before amputating, a thrombolytic therapy with UK was tried to see if with strong fibrinolysis continued for 3 days amputation might be avoided. In a pilot study carried out on 12 patients, the angiographic data showed only partial lysis in small arteries or arterial branches. Clinical data showed reduction or disappearance of pain at rest in 80% of cases. In 70% of cases gangrene disappeared if it was initial and superficial, it was delimited if already in progress.

  18. Improving human forensics through advances in genetics, genomics and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Manfred; de Knijff, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Forensic DNA profiling currently allows the identification of persons already known to investigating authorities. Recent advances have produced new types of genetic markers with the potential to overcome some important limitations of current DNA profiling methods. Moreover, other developments are enabling completely new kinds of forensically relevant information to be extracted from biological samples. These include new molecular approaches for finding individuals previously unknown to investigators, and new molecular methods to support links between forensic sample donors and criminal acts. Such advances in genetics, genomics and molecular biology are likely to improve human forensic case work in the near future.

  19. Nuclear microscopy of atherosclerotic tissue: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Frank; Ren, M. Q.; Xie, J. P.; Tan, B. K. H.; Halliwell, B.

    2001-07-01

    This paper reviews the work carried out in the Research Centre for Nuclear Microscopy, NUS on the role of iron in coronary heart disease, using the technique of nuclear microscopy to determine the levels of iron and other trace elements in the artery wall and lesions. These investigations have indicated that iron may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis, probably through the promotion of cytotoxic free radicals leading to the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Using a rabbit model we have observed that early atherosclerotic lesions, induced by feeding the animals on a 1% cholesterol diet, contain increased levels of iron (up to 8 times) compared with the adjacent healthy artery wall. In a follow-up time sequence study, we have shown that iron accumulation occurs at the onset of lesion formation, which takes place around 4-6 weeks after exposure to the 1% cholesterol diet. As the lesions mature, they enlarge to occupy a significant fraction of the artery wall, and at about 16 weeks the lesions begin to show signs of calcification. In an additional experiment, where the cholesterol fed rabbits were kept anaemic through weekly bleeding, the iron content of the artery wall was reduced and the onset of atherogenesis was delayed. In a further investigation, rabbits were fed on a 1% cholesterol diet and after 6 weeks (corresponding to the period of early lesion formation) a test group was subjected to treatment using the iron chelator desferal. Preliminary results indicate that during the treatment with desferal, lesion development was slowed down.

  20. Optimizing the imaging protocol for ex vivo coronary artery wall using high-resolution MRI: an experimental study on porcine and human.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiong; Li, Tao; Cui, Xiaoming; Zhou, Weihua; Li, Xin; Zhang, Xinwu

    2013-01-01

    To optimize the MR imaging protocol for coronary arterial wall depiction in vitro and characterize the coronary atherosclerotic plaques. MRI examination was prospectively performed in ten porcine hearts in order to optimize the MR imaging protocol. Various surface coils were used for coronary arterial wall imaging with the same parameters. Then, the image parameters were further optimized for high-resolution coronary wall imaging. The signal-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-noise ratio (CNR) of images were measured. Finally, 8 human cadaver hearts with coronary atherosclerotic plaques were prospectively performed with MRI examination using optimized protocol in order to characterize the coronary atherosclerotic plaques. The SNR and CNR of MR image with temporomandibular coil were the highest of various surface coils. High-resolution and high SNR and CNR for ex vivo coronary artery wall depiction can be achieved using temporomandibular coil with 512 × 512 in matrix. Compared with histopathology, the sensitivity and specificity of MRI for identifying advanced plaques were: type IV-V (lipid, necrosis, fibrosis), 94% and 95%; type VI (hemorrhage), 100% and 98%; type VII (calcification), 91% and 100%; and type VIII (fibrosis without lipid core), 100% and 98%, respectively. Temporomandibular coil appears to be dramatically superior to eight-channel head coil and knee coil for ex vivo coronary artery wall imaging, providing higher spatial resolution and improved the SNR. Ex vivo high-resolution MRI has capability to distinguish human coronary atherosclerotic plaque compositions and accurately classify advanced plaques.

  1. Detection of atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE-deficient mice using (99m)Tc-duramycin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhonglin; Larsen, Brandon T; Lerman, Lilach O; Gray, Brian D; Barber, Christy; Hedayat, Ahmad F; Zhao, Ming; Furenlid, Lars R; Pak, Koon Y; Woolfenden, James M

    2016-08-01

    Apoptosis of macrophages and smooth muscle cells is linked to atherosclerotic plaque destabilization. The apoptotic cascade leads to exposure of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane, thereby making apoptosis detectable using probes targeting PE. The objective of this study was to exploit capabilities of a PE-specific imaging probe, (99m)Tc-duramycin, in localizing atherosclerotic plaque and assessing plaque evolution in apolipoprotein-E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice. Atherosclerosis was induced in ApoE(-/-) mice by feeding an atherogenic diet. (99m)Tc-duramycin images were acquired using a small-animal SPECT imager. Six ApoE(-/-) mice at 20weeks of age (Group I) were imaged and then sacrificed for ex vivo analyses. Six additional ApoE(-/-) mice (Group II) were imaged at 20 and 40weeks of age before sacrifice. Six ApoE wild-type (ApoE(+/+)) mice (Group III) were imaged at 40weeks as controls. Five additional ApoE(-/-) mice (40weeks of age) (Group IV) were imaged with a (99m)Tc-labeled inactive peptide, (99m)Tc-LinDUR, to assess (99m)Tc-duramycin targeting specificity. Focal (99m)Tc-duramycin uptake in the ascending aorta and aortic arch was detected at 20 and 40weeks in the ApoE(-/-) mice but not in ApoE(+/+) mice. (99m)Tc-duramycin uptake in the aortic lesions increased 2.2-fold on quantitative imaging in the ApoE(-/-) mice between 20 and 40weeks. Autoradiographic and histological data indicated significantly increased (99m)Tc-duramycin uptake in the ascending aorta and aortic arch associated with advanced plaques. Quantitative autoradiography showed that the ratio of activity in the aortic arch to descending thoracic aorta, which had no plaques or radioactive uptake, was 2.1 times higher at 40weeks than at 20weeks (6.62±0.89 vs. 3.18±0.29, P<0.01). There was barely detectable focal uptake of (99m)Tc-duramycin in the aortic arch of ApoE(+/+) mice. No detectable (99m)Tc-LinDUR uptake was observed in the aortas of ApoE(-/-) mice. PE

  2. Decreased early atherosclerotic lesions in hypertriglyceridemic mice expressing cholesteryl ester transfer protein transgene.

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, T; Masucci-Magoulas, L; Jiang, X; Walsh, A; Rubin, E; Breslow, J L; Tall, A R

    1995-01-01

    The human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) facilitates the transfer of cholesteryl ester from HDL to triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. The activity of CETP results in a reduction in HDL cholesterol levels, but CETP may also promote reverse cholesterol transport. Thus, the net impact of CETP expression on atherogenesis is uncertain. The influence of hypertriglyceridemia and CETP on the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the proximal aorta was assessed by feeding transgenic mice a high cholesterol diet for 16 wk. 13 out of 14 (93%) hypertriglyceridemic human apo CIII (HuCIII) transgenic (Tg) mice developed atherosclerotic lesions, compared to 18 out of 29 (62%) controls. In HuCIII/CETPTg, human apo AI/CIIITg and HuAI/CIII/CETPTg mice, 7 of 13 (54%), 5 of 10 (50%), and 5 of 13 (38%), respectively, developed lesions in the proximal aorta (P < .05 compared to HuCIIITg). The average number of aortic lesions per mouse in HuCIIITg and controls was 3.4 +/- 0.8 and 2.7 +/- 0.6, respectively in HuCIII/CETPTg, HuAI/CIIIg, and HuAI/CIII/CETPTg mice the number of lesions was significantly lower than in HuCIIITg and control mice: 0.9 +/- 0.4, 1.5 +/- 0.5, and 0.9 +/- 0.4, respectively. There were parallel reductions in mean lesion area. In a separate study, we found an increased susceptibility to dietary atherosclerosis in nonhypertriglyceridemic CETP transgenic mice compared to controls. We conclude that CETP expression inhibits the development of early atherosclerotic lesions but only in hypertriglyceridemic mice. PMID:7560101

  3. Spontaneous recanalization of atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery occlusion: Case report.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Zhang, Li; Nan, Guangxian

    2017-07-01

    Intracranial vascular atherosclerotic occlusion is one of the most common causes of ischemic stroke world wide. The involvement of large intracranial vessels, in particular, the middle cerebral artery, is usually associated with unfavorable outcomes in patients. Spontaneous recanalization of atherosclerotic occlusion is relatively rare. The first patient was a 43-year-old male with slurred speech and left-sided weakness for a duration of 24 hours. The second was a 59-year-old male with left-sided weakness over a period of 13 hours. The last was a 49-year-old female patient presented with a 1-month history of right-sided headache. Atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery occlusion. In all cases, oral aspirin (100 mg; once daily), Plavix (75 mg; once daily), and Lipitor (40 mg; once daily) were used . Oral Plavix was stopped 3 months. Spontaneous recanalization occured in the three cases of atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery occlusion. Spontaneous recanalization may occur in both early and late stages of atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery occlusion. Clinicians should be aware of this particular condition, as it may represent a relatively favorable prognosis.

  4. CD44 targeting magnetic glyconanoparticles for atherosclerotic plaque imaging.

    PubMed

    El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H; El-Boubbou, Kheireddine; Kamat, Medha; Huang, Ruiping; Abela, George S; Kiupel, Matti; Zhu, David C; Huang, Xuefei

    2014-06-01

    The cell surface adhesion molecule CD44 plays important roles in the initiation and development of atherosclerotic plaques. We aim to develop nanoparticles that can selectively target CD44 for the non-invasive detection of atherosclerotic plaques by magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic glyconanoparticles with hyaluronan immobilized on the surface have been prepared. The binding of these nanoparticles with CD44 was evaluated in vitro by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging of plaques was performed on an atherosclerotic rabbit model. The magnetic glyconanoparticles can selectively bind CD44. In T2* weighted magnetic resonance images acquired in vivo, significant contrast changes in aorta walls were observed with a very low dose of the magnetic nanoparticles, allowing the detection of atherosclerotic plaques. Furthermore, imaging could be performed without significant delay after probe administration. The selectivity of hyaluronan nanoparticles in plaque imaging was established by several control experiments. Magnetic nanoparticles bearing surface hyaluronan enabled the imaging of atherosclerotic plaques in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. The low dose of nanoparticles required, the possibility to image without much delay and the high biocompatibility are the advantages of these nanoparticles as contrast agents for plaque imaging.

  5. Application of infrared fiber optic imaging in atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bujin; Casscells, S. W.; Bearman, Gregory H.; McNatt, Janice; Naghevi, Morteza; Malik, Basit A.; Gul, Khawar; Willerson, James T.

    1999-07-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques - the main cause of heart attach and stokes - is not predictable. Hence even treadmill stress tests fail to detect many persons at risk. Fatal plaques are found at autopsies to be associated with active inflammatory cells. Classically, inflammation is detected by its swelling, red color, pain and heat. We have found that heat accurately locates the dangerous plaques that are significantly warmer then atherosclerotic plaques without the same inflammation. In order to develop a non-surgical method of locating these plaques, an IR fiber optic imaging system has been developed in our laboratory to evalute the causes and effect of heat in atherosclerotic plaques. The fiber optical imagin bundle consists of 900 individual As2S3 chalcogenide glass fibers which transmit IR radiation from 0.7 micrometers 7 micrometers with little energy loss. By combining that with a highly sensitive Indium Antimonide IR focal plane array detector, we are able to obtain thermal graphic images in situ. The temperature heterogeneity of atherosclerotic plaques developed in the arteral of the experimental animal models is under study with the new device. The preliminary experimental results from the animal model are encouraging. The potential of using this new technology in diagnostic evaluation of the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is considerable.

  6. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  7. CD44 Targeting Magnetic Glyconanoparticles for Atherosclerotic Plaque Imaging

    PubMed Central

    El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H.; El-Boubbou, Kheireddine; Kamat, Medha; Huang, Ruiping; Abela, George S.; Kiupel, Matti; Zhu, David C.; Huang, Xuefei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The cell surface adhesion molecule CD44 plays important roles in the initiation and development of atherosclerotic plaques. We aim to develop nanoparticles that can selectively target CD44 for the non-invasive detection of atherosclerotic plaques by magnetic resonance imaging. Methods Magnetic glyco-nanoparticles with hyaluronan immobilized on the surface have been prepared. The binding of these nanoparticles with CD44 in vitro was evaluated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging of plaques was performed on an atherosclerotic rabbit model. Results The magnetic glyconanoparticles can selectively bind CD44. In T2* weighted magnetic resonance images acquired in vivo, significant contrast changes in aorta walls were observed with a very low dose of the magnetic nanoparticles, allowing the detection of atherosclerotic plaques. Furthermore, imaging could be performed without significant delay after probe administration. The selectivity of hyaluronan nanoparticles in plaque imaging was established by several control experiments. Conclusions Magnetic nanoparticles bearing surface hyaluronan enabled the imaging of atherosclerotic plaques in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. The low dose of nanoparticles required, the possibility to image without much delay and the high biocompatibility are the advantages of these nanoparticles as contrast agents for plaque imaging. PMID:23568520

  8. Alloimmune responses and atherosclerotic disease after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ducloux, Didier; Courivaud, Cécile; Bamoulid, Jamal; Bisaccia, Vincent; Roubiou, Caroline; Crepin, Thomas; Gaugler, Béatrice; Laheurte, Caroline; Rebibou, Jean-Michel; Chalopin, Jean-Marc; Saas, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to exogenous antigens causes accumulation of proinflammatory CD57(+)CD28(-) hyperactivated CD8(+) T cells that may promote atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that persistent alloimmune responses may induce immune activation and contribute to posttransplant atherosclerosis. This hypothesis was tested in a single-center cohort of 577 kidney transplant patients. Propensity score analysis was performed to address potential confounding variables by indication. Immune exhaustion was studied in subcohort of 103 patients. Five hundred seventy-seven consecutive renal transplant recipients were included. Seventy-seven atherosclerotic events (AE) (12.3%) occurred during a mean follow-up of 7 years. The cumulative incidence of AE increased with the number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches (18%, 10%, and 5% in patients with 5-6, 3-4, and 0-2 mismatches, respectively; P=0.012). Human leukocyte antigen mismatch number (hazards ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.66, for each supplementary mismatch; P=0.005) was an independent risk factor for AE. In the propensity score match analysis, having received a well-matched kidney conferred a reduced risk of AE (hazards ratio, 0.22; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.95; P=0.044). We observed a significant correlation between HLA mismatch numbers and circulating CD57(+)CD28(-) CD8(+) T cells (R=0.31; P=0.017). These CD8(+) T cells were more frequent in patients with more HLA mismatches (P<0.0001). Overall, our results suggest that chronic allogeneic stimulation participates to accelerated atherosclerosis observed after transplantation.

  9. Validating a bimodal intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) catheter for atherosclerotic plaque detection in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Abran, Maxime; Stähli, Barbara E.; Merlet, Nolwenn; Mihalache-Avram, Teodora; Mecteau, Mélanie; Rhéaume, Eric; Busseuil, David; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lesage, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is characterized by atherosclerotic plaque formation. Despite impressive advances in intravascular imaging modalities, in vivo molecular plaque characterization remains challenging, and different multimodality imaging systems have been proposed. We validated an engineered bimodal intravascular ultrasound imaging (IVUS) / near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging catheter in vivo using a balloon injury atherosclerosis rabbit model. Rabbit aortas and right iliac arteries were scanned in vivo after indocyanine green (ICG) injection, and compared to corresponding ex vivo fluorescence and white light images. Areas of ICG accumulation were colocalized with macroscopic atherosclerotic plaque formation. In vivo imaging was performed with the bimodal catheter integrating ICG-induced fluorescence signals into cross-sectional IVUS imaging. In vivo ICG accumulation corresponded to ex vivo fluorescence signal intensity and IVUS identified plaques. PMID:26504648

  10. Validating a bimodal intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) catheter for atherosclerotic plaque detection in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Abran, Maxime; Stähli, Barbara E; Merlet, Nolwenn; Mihalache-Avram, Teodora; Mecteau, Mélanie; Rhéaume, Eric; Busseuil, David; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lesage, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    Coronary artery disease is characterized by atherosclerotic plaque formation. Despite impressive advances in intravascular imaging modalities, in vivo molecular plaque characterization remains challenging, and different multimodality imaging systems have been proposed. We validated an engineered bimodal intravascular ultrasound imaging (IVUS) / near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging catheter in vivo using a balloon injury atherosclerosis rabbit model. Rabbit aortas and right iliac arteries were scanned in vivo after indocyanine green (ICG) injection, and compared to corresponding ex vivo fluorescence and white light images. Areas of ICG accumulation were colocalized with macroscopic atherosclerotic plaque formation. In vivo imaging was performed with the bimodal catheter integrating ICG-induced fluorescence signals into cross-sectional IVUS imaging. In vivo ICG accumulation corresponded to ex vivo fluorescence signal intensity and IVUS identified plaques.

  11. High shear stress induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation through angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Qiu, Juhui; Luo, Shisui; Xie, Xiang; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Kang; Ye, Zhiyi; Liu, Wanqian; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques causing thrombosis is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic strokes. Inhibition of thrombosis is one of the important tasks developing biomedical materials such as intravascular stents and vascular grafts. Shear stress (SS) influences the formation and development of atherosclerosis. The current review focuses on the vulnerable plaques observed in the high shear stress (HSS) regions, which localizes at the proximal region of the plaque intruding into the lumen. The vascular outward remodelling occurs in the HSS region for vascular compensation and that angiogenesis is a critical factor for HSS which induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation. These results greatly challenge the established belief that low shear stress is important for expansive remodelling, which provides a new perspective for preventing the transition of stable plaques to high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27482467

  12. Gingival vascular damage in atherosclerotic rabbits: hydroxytyrosol and squalene benefits.

    PubMed

    Bullon, Pedro; Quiles, Jose L; Morillo, Juan M; Rubini, Corrado; Goteri, Gaia; Granados-Principal, Sergio; Battino, Maurizio; Ramirez-Tortosa, McArmen

    2009-09-01

    Cardiovascular alterations and periodontal disease have been associated, although cardiovascular disease treatments have not yet been tested against periodontal alterations. We investigated effects of squalene, hydroxytyrosol and coenzyme Q(10) on gingival tissues of rabbits fed on an atherosclerotic diet. Forty-eight rabbits were distributed in six groups. Control group was fed on standard chow for 80 days. The rest were fed with an atherogenic diet for 50 days. After that, a group was sacrificed and the rest were subjected for another extra 30 days on commercial chow alone or supplemented with coenzyme Q(10), squalene or hydroxytyrosol. Atherosclerotic rabbits had higher fibrosis and endothelial activation and lower cellularity in gingival mucosa than controls (P<0.05). Hydroxytyrosol reduced endothelial activation (P<0.05) and squalene additionally decreased fibrosis (P<0.05). Results suggest that gingival vascular changes after the atherosclerotic diet have been reversed by hydroxytyrosol and squalene, natural products from the minor fraction of virgin olive oil.

  13. Some inadequacies of the current human factors certification process of advanced aircraft technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paries, Jean

    1994-01-01

    Automation related accidents or serious incidents are not limited to advanced technology aircraft. There is a full history of such accidents with conventional technology aircraft. However, this type of occurrence is far from sparing the newest 'glass cockpit' generation, and it even seems to be a growing contributor to its accident rate. Nevertheless, all these aircraft have been properly certificated according to the relevant airworthiness regulations. Therefore, there is a growing concern that with the technological advancement of air transport aircraft cockpits, the current airworthiness regulations addressing cockpit design and human factors may have reached some level of inadequacy. This paper reviews some aspects of the current airworthiness regulations and certification process related to human factors of cockpit design and focuses on questioning their ability to guarantee the intended safety objectives.

  14. Advances in diffusion MRI acquisition and processing in the Human Connectome Project

    PubMed Central

    Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Jbabdi, Saad; Xu, Junqian; Andersson, Jesper L; Moeller, Steen; Auerbach, Edward J; Glasser, Matthew F; Hernandez, Moises; Sapiro, Guillermo; Jenkinson, Mark; Feinberg, David A; Yacoub, Essa; Lenglet, Christophe; Ven Essen, David C; Ugurbil, Kamil; Behrens, Timothy EJ

    2013-01-01

    The Human Connectome Project (HCP) is a collaborative 5-year effort to map human brain connections and their variability in healthy adults. A consortium of HCP investigators will study a population of 1200 healthy adults using multiple imaging modalities, along with extensive behavioral and genetic data. In this overview, we focus on diffusion MRI (dMRI) and the structural connectivity aspect of the project. We present recent advances in acquisition and processing that allow us to obtain very high-quality in-vivo MRI data, while enabling scanning of a very large number of subjects. These advances result from 2 years of intensive efforts in optimising many aspects of data acquisition and processing during the piloting phase of the project. The data quality and methods described here are representative of the datasets and processing pipelines that will be made freely available to the community at quarterly intervals, beginning in 2013. PMID:23702418

  15. Open Innovation at NASA: A New Business Model for Advancing Human Health and Performance Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.; Keeton, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new business model for advancing NASA human health and performance innovations and demonstrates how open innovation shaped its development. A 45 percent research and technology development budget reduction drove formulation of a strategic plan grounded in collaboration. We describe the strategy execution, including adoption and results of open innovation initiatives, the challenges of cultural change, and the development of virtual centers and a knowledge management tool to educate and engage the workforce and promote cultural change.

  16. Advanced Information Systems Design: Technical Basis and Human Factors Review Guidance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    H^ NUREG /CR-6633 BNL- NUREG -52563 Advanced Information Systems Design: Technical Basis and Human Factors Review Guidance Brookhaven National...AVAILABILITY NOTICE Availability of Reference Materials Cited in NRC Publications NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regu- lations, and Title...Information Service Springfield, VA 22161 -0002 <http://www.ntis.gov> 1 -800-553-6847 or locally 703-605-6000 The NUREG series comprises (1) brochures

  17. Human-monoclonal-antibody therapy protects nonhuman primates against advanced Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Mire, Chad E; Cross, Robert W; Geisbert, Joan B; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Agans, Krystle N; Deer, Daniel J; Heinrich, Megan L; Rowland, Megan M; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Boisen, Mathew L; Grant, Donald S; Fullah, Mohamed; Khan, Sheik Humarr; Fenton, Karla A; Robinson, James E; Branco, Luis M; Garry, Robert F; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2017-09-04

    There are no approved treatments for Lassa fever, which is endemic to the same regions of West Africa that were recently devastated by Ebola. Here we show that a combination of human monoclonal antibodies that cross-react with the glycoproteins of all four clades of Lassa virus is able to rescue 100% of cynomolgus macaques when treatment is initiated at advanced stages of disease, including up to 8 d after challenge.

  18. Advancements in remote physiological measurement and applications in human-computer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDuff, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Physiological signals are important for tracking health and emotional states. Imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) is a set of techniques for remotely recovering cardio-pulmonary signals from video of the human body. Advances in iPPG methods over the past decade combined with the ubiquity of digital cameras presents the possibility for many new, lowcost applications of physiological monitoring. This talk will highlight methods for recovering physiological signals, work characterizing the impact of video parameters and hardware on these measurements, and applications of this technology in human-computer interfaces.

  19. Advances in radiation biology: Relative radiation sensitivities of human organ systems. Volume 12

    SciTech Connect

    Lett, J.T.; Altman, K.I.; Ehmann, U.K.; Cox, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is a thematically focused issue of Advances in Radiation Biology. The topic surveyed is relative radiosensitivity of human organ systems. Topics considered include relative radiosensitivities of the thymus, spleen, and lymphohemopoietic systems; relative radiosensitivities of the small and large intestine; relative rediosensitivities of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus; relative radiation sensitivity of the integumentary system; dose response of the epidermal; microvascular, and dermal populations; relative radiosensitivity of the human lung; relative radiosensitivity of fetal tissues; and tolerance of the central and peripheral nervous system to therapeutic irradiation.

  20. On recent advances in human engineering Provocative trends in embryology, genetics, and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Anton, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Advances in embryology, genetics, and regenerative medicine regularly attract attention from scientists, scholars, journalists, and policymakers, yet implications of these advances may be broader than commonly supposed. Laboratories culturing human embryos, editing human genes, and creating human-animal chimeras have been working along lines that are now becoming intertwined. Embryogenic methods are weaving traditional in vivo and in vitro distinctions into a new "in vivitro" (in life in glass) fabric. These and other methods known to be in use or thought to be in development promise soon to bring society to startling choices and discomfiting predicaments, all in a global effort to supply reliably rejuvenating stem cells, to grow immunologically non-provocative replacement organs, and to prevent, treat, cure, or even someday eradicate diseases having genetic or epigenetic mechanisms. With humanity's human-engineering era now begun, procedural prohibitions, funding restrictions, institutional controls, and transparency rules are proving ineffective, and business incentives are migrating into the most basic life-sciences inquiries, wherein lie huge biomedical potentials and bioethical risks. Rights, health, and heritage are coming into play with bioethical presumptions and formal protections urgently needing reassessment.

  1. Divergent JAM-C Expression Accelerates Monocyte-Derived Cell Exit from Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Miljkovic-Licina, Marijana; Lee, Boris P.; Fischer, Nicolas; Fish, Richard J.; Kwak, Brenda; Fisher, Edward A.; Imhof, Beat A.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, caused in part by monocytes in plaques, continues to be a disease that afflicts the modern world. Whilst significant steps have been made in treating this chronic inflammatory disease, questions remain on how to prevent monocyte and macrophage accumulation in atherosclerotic plaques. Junctional Adhesion Molecule C (JAM-C) expressed by vascular endothelium directs monocyte transendothelial migration in a unidirectional manner leading to increased inflammation. Here we show that interfering with JAM-C allows reverse-transendothelial migration of monocyte-derived cells, opening the way back out of the inflamed environment. To study the role of JAM-C in plaque regression we used a mouse model of atherosclerosis, and tested the impact of vascular JAM-C expression levels on monocyte reverse transendothelial migration using human cells. Studies in-vitro under inflammatory conditions revealed that overexpression or gene silencing of JAM-C in human endothelium exposed to flow resulted in higher rates of monocyte reverse-transendothelial migration, similar to antibody blockade. We then transplanted atherosclerotic, plaque-containing aortic arches from hyperlipidemic ApoE-/- mice into wild-type normolipidemic recipient mice. JAM-C blockade in the recipients induced greater emigration of monocyte-derived cells and further diminished the size of atherosclerotic plaques. Our findings have shown that JAM-C forms a one-way vascular barrier for leukocyte transendothelial migration only when present at homeostatic copy numbers. We have also shown that blocking JAM-C can reduce the number of atherogenic monocytes/macrophages in plaques by emigration, providing a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27442505

  2. Divergent JAM-C Expression Accelerates Monocyte-Derived Cell Exit from Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    PubMed

    Bradfield, Paul F; Menon, Arjun; Miljkovic-Licina, Marijana; Lee, Boris P; Fischer, Nicolas; Fish, Richard J; Kwak, Brenda; Fisher, Edward A; Imhof, Beat A

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, caused in part by monocytes in plaques, continues to be a disease that afflicts the modern world. Whilst significant steps have been made in treating this chronic inflammatory disease, questions remain on how to prevent monocyte and macrophage accumulation in atherosclerotic plaques. Junctional Adhesion Molecule C (JAM-C) expressed by vascular endothelium directs monocyte transendothelial migration in a unidirectional manner leading to increased inflammation. Here we show that interfering with JAM-C allows reverse-transendothelial migration of monocyte-derived cells, opening the way back out of the inflamed environment. To study the role of JAM-C in plaque regression we used a mouse model of atherosclerosis, and tested the impact of vascular JAM-C expression levels on monocyte reverse transendothelial migration using human cells. Studies in-vitro under inflammatory conditions revealed that overexpression or gene silencing of JAM-C in human endothelium exposed to flow resulted in higher rates of monocyte reverse-transendothelial migration, similar to antibody blockade. We then transplanted atherosclerotic, plaque-containing aortic arches from hyperlipidemic ApoE-/- mice into wild-type normolipidemic recipient mice. JAM-C blockade in the recipients induced greater emigration of monocyte-derived cells and further diminished the size of atherosclerotic plaques. Our findings have shown that JAM-C forms a one-way vascular barrier for leukocyte transendothelial migration only when present at homeostatic copy numbers. We have also shown that blocking JAM-C can reduce the number of atherogenic monocytes/macrophages in plaques by emigration, providing a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic inflammatory pathologies.

  3. Recent Advances in Understanding the Role of Nutrition in Human Genome Evolution12

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Kaixiong; Gu, Zhenglong

    2011-01-01

    Dietary transitions in human history have been suggested to play important roles in the evolution of mankind. Genetic variations caused by adaptation to diet during human evolution could have important health consequences in current society. The advance of sequencing technologies and the rapid accumulation of genome information provide an unprecedented opportunity to comprehensively characterize genetic variations in human populations and unravel the genetic basis of human evolution. Series of selection detection methods, based on various theoretical models and exploiting different aspects of selection signatures, have been developed. Their applications at the species and population levels have respectively led to the identification of human specific selection events that distinguish human from nonhuman primates and local adaptation events that contribute to human diversity. Scrutiny of candidate genes has revealed paradigms of adaptations to specific nutritional components and genome-wide selection scans have verified the prevalence of diet-related selection events and provided many more candidates awaiting further investigation. Understanding the role of diet in human evolution is fundamental for the development of evidence-based, genome-informed nutritional practices in the era of personal genomics. PMID:22332091

  4. Advances in probing the blood vessels of the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacke, E. Mark

    2002-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers a marvelous means to probe the vasculature of the human body non-invasively. The first major advances came when the physics of the effects of motion in MRI were first understood well enough that new methods could be designed to compensate for the motion. This led to the development of MR angiography. The second major advance occurred when a contrast agent was used to enhance the signal from vessels independent of blood flow. This made it possible to image much smaller vessels because of the increased signal-to-noise ratio. The third major advance occurred when the susceptibility of the venous blood was used to create a new contrast unique to veins even in the presence of the contrast agent to enhance their signal. The fourth advance is close behind with the potential to use the susceptibility to measure the local oxygen content. Each of these advances involved some interesting physics and raised questions about local magnetic field effects, some of which remain unanswered yet today. We will show results from the first three levels with hints at how to proceed to the fourth. The development of this technology has important clinical implications. With new higher relaxivity contrast agents and higher field magnets coming on the market, the possibility to image vessels down to on the order of 100 microns may be viable. Each advance has enhanced the range of applications from just imaging vessels to occult vascular disease, trauma, the detection of blood products, and physiologic function of the tissue itself.

  5. Combination of Light and Melatonin Time Cues for Phase Advancing the Human Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Tina M.; Markwald, Rachel R.; Chinoy, Evan D.; Snider, Jesse A.; Bessman, Sara C.; Jung, Christopher M.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Photic and non-photic stimuli have been shown to shift the phase of the human circadian clock. We examined how photic and non-photic time cues may be combined by the human circadian system by assessing the phase advancing effects of one evening dose of exogenous melatonin, alone and in combination with one session of morning bright light exposure. Design: Randomized placebo-controlled double-blind circadian protocol. The effects of four conditions, dim light (∼1.9 lux, ∼0.6 Watts/m2)-placebo, dim light-melatonin (5 mg), bright light (∼3000 lux, ∼7 Watts/m2)-placebo, and bright light-melatonin on circadian phase was assessed by the change in the salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) prior to and following treatment under constant routine conditions. Melatonin or placebo was administered 5.75 h prior to habitual bedtime and 3 h of bright light exposure started 1 h prior to habitual wake time. Setting: Sleep and chronobiology laboratory environment free of time cues. Participants: Thirty-six healthy participants (18 females) aged 22 ± 4 y (mean ± SD). Results: Morning bright light combined with early evening exogenous melatonin induced a greater phase advance of the DLMO than either treatment alone. Bright light alone and melatonin alone induced similar phase advances. Conclusion: Information from light and melatonin appear to be combined by the human circadian clock. The ability to combine circadian time cues has important implications for understanding fundamental physiological principles of the human circadian timing system. Knowledge of such principles is important for designing effective countermeasures for phase-shifting the human circadian clock to adapt to jet lag, shift work, and for designing effective treatments for circadian sleep-wakefulness disorders. Citation: Burke TM; Markwald RR; Chinoy ED; Snider JA; Bessman SC; Jung CM; Wright Jr KP. Combination of light and melatonin time cues for phase advancing the human circadian

  6. In vitro atherosclerotic plaque and calcium quantitation by intravascular ultrasound and electron-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gutfinger, D E; Leung, C Y; Hiro, T; Maheswaran, B; Nakamura, S; Detrano, R; Kang, X; Tang, W; Tobis, J M

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the accuracy of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) in quantitating human atherosclerotic plaque and calcium. In experiment 1, 12 human atherosclerotic arterial segments were obtained at autopsy and imaged by using IVUS and EBCT. The plaque from each arterial segment was dissected and a volume measurement of the dissected plaque was obtained by water displacement. The plaque from each arterial segment was ashed at 700 degrees F, and the weight of the remaining ashes was used as an estimate of the calcium mass. In experiment II, 11 calcified arterial segments were obtained at autopsy and imaged by using IVUS at one site along the artery. A corresponding histologic cross section stained with Masson's trichrome was prepared. In experiment I, the mean plaque volume measured by water displacement was 165.3 +/- 118.4 microliters. The mean plaque volume calculated by IVUS was 166.1 +/- 114.4 microliters and correlated closely with that by water displacement (r = 0.98, p < 0.0001). The mean calcium mass measured by ashing was 19.4 +/- 15.8 mg. The mean calculated calcium mass by EBCT was 19.9 mg and correlated closely with that by ashing (r=0.98, p<0.001). The mean calculated calcium volume by IVUS was 18.6 +/- 11.2 microliters and correlated linearly with the calcium mass by ashing (r = 0.87, p < 0.0003). In experiment II, the mean cross-sectional area of the calcified matrix was 1.71 +/- 0.66 mm2 by histologic examination compared with 1.44 +/- 0.66 mm2 by IVUS. There was a good correlation between the calcified cross-sectional area by histologic examination and IVUS (r = 0.76, p < 0.007); however, IVUS may underestimate the amount of calcium present depending on the intralesional calcium morphologic characteristics. In conclusion, IVUS accurately quantitates atherosclerotic plaque volume as well as the cross-sectional area and volume of intralesional calcium, especially if the

  7. Zebrafish models in translational research: tipping the scales toward advancements in human health.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jennifer B; Westerfield, Monte

    2014-07-01

    Advances in genomics and next-generation sequencing have provided clinical researchers with unprecedented opportunities to understand the molecular basis of human genetic disorders. This abundance of information places new requirements on traditional disease models, which have the potential to be used to confirm newly identified pathogenic mutations and test the efficacy of emerging therapies. The unique attributes of zebrafish are being increasingly leveraged to create functional disease models, facilitate drug discovery, and provide critical scientific bases for the development of new clinical tools for the diagnosis and treatment of human disease. In this short review and the accompanying poster, we highlight a few illustrative examples of the applications of the zebrafish model to the study of human health and disease.

  8. Advanced imaging and tissue engineering of the human limbal epithelial stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Massie, Isobel; Dziasko, Marc; Kureshi, Alvena; Levis, Hannah J; Morgan, Louise; Neale, Michael; Sheth, Radhika; Tovell, Victoria E; Vernon, Amanda J; Funderburgh, James L; Daniels, Julie T

    2015-01-01

    The limbal epithelial stem cell niche provides a unique, physically protective environment in which limbal epithelial stem cells reside in close proximity with accessory cell types and their secreted factors. The use of advanced imaging techniques is described to visualize the niche in three dimensions in native human corneal tissue. In addition, a protocol is provided for the isolation and culture of three different cell types, including human limbal epithelial stem cells from the limbal niche of human donor tissue. Finally, the process of incorporating these cells within plastic compressed collagen constructs to form a tissue-engineered corneal limbus is described and how immunohistochemical techniques may be applied to characterize cell phenotype therein.

  9. Advanced Imaging and Tissue Engineering of the Human Limbal Epithelial Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Isobel; Dziasko, Marc; Kureshi, Alvena; Levis, Hannah J.; Morgan, Louise; Neale, Michael; Sheth, Radhika; Tovell, Victoria E.; Vernon, Amanda J.; Funderburgh, James L.; Daniels, Julie T.

    2015-01-01

    The limbal epithelial stem cell niche provides a unique, physically protective environment in which limbal epithelial stem cells reside in close proximity with accessory cell types and their secreted factors. The use of advanced imaging techniques is described to visualize the niche in three dimensions in native human corneal tissue. In addition, a protocol is provided for the isolation and culture of three different cell types, including human limbal epithelial stem cells from the limbal niche of human donor tissue. Finally, the process of incorporating these cells within plastic compressed collagen constructs to form a tissue-engineered corneal limbus is described and how immunohistochemical techniques may be applied to characterize cell phenotype therein. PMID:25388395

  10. A framework for advanced methods of control of human-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Paul

    2012-04-01

    The vibration serviceability of civil engineering structures under human dynamic excitation is becoming ever more critical with the design and redevelopment of structures with reduced mass, stiffness and damping. A large number of problems have been reported in floors, footbridges, sports stadia, staircases and other structures. Unfortunately, the range of options available to fix such problems are very limited and are primarily limited to structural modification or the implementation of passive vibration control measures, such as tuned mass dampers. This paper presents the initial development of a new framework for advanced methods of control of humaninduced vibrations in civil engineering structures. This framework includes both existing passive methods of vibration control and more advanced active, semi-active and hybrid control techniques, which may be further developed as practical solutions for these problems. Through the use of this framework, rational decisions as to the most appropriate technologies for particular human vibration problems may be made and pursued further. This framework is also intended to be used in the design of new civil engineering structures, where advanced control technologies may be used both to increase the achievable slenderness and to reduce the amount of construction materials used and hence their embodied energy. This will be an ever more important consideration with the current drive for structures with reduced environmental impact.

  11. Defined Engineered Human Myocardium With Advanced Maturation for Applications in Heart Failure Modeling and Repair.

    PubMed

    Tiburcy, Malte; Hudson, James E; Balfanz, Paul; Schlick, Susanne; Meyer, Tim; Chang Liao, Mei-Ling; Levent, Elif; Raad, Farah; Zeidler, Sebastian; Wingender, Edgar; Riegler, Johannes; Wang, Mouer; Gold, Joseph D; Kehat, Izhak; Wettwer, Erich; Ravens, Ursula; Dierickx, Pieterjan; van Laake, Linda W; Goumans, Marie Jose; Khadjeh, Sara; Toischer, Karl; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Couture, Larry A; Unger, Andreas; Linke, Wolfgang A; Araki, Toshiyuki; Neel, Benjamin; Keller, Gordon; Gepstein, Lior; Wu, Joseph C; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2017-05-09

    Advancing structural and functional maturation of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes remains a key challenge for applications in disease modeling, drug screening, and heart repair. Here, we sought to advance cardiomyocyte maturation in engineered human myocardium (EHM) toward an adult phenotype under defined conditions. We systematically investigated cell composition, matrix, and media conditions to generate EHM from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts with organotypic functionality under serum-free conditions. We used morphological, functional, and transcriptome analyses to benchmark maturation of EHM. EHM demonstrated important structural and functional properties of postnatal myocardium, including: (1) rod-shaped cardiomyocytes with M bands assembled as a functional syncytium; (2) systolic twitch forces at a similar level as observed in bona fide postnatal myocardium; (3) a positive force-frequency response; (4) inotropic responses to β-adrenergic stimulation mediated via canonical β1- and β2-adrenoceptor signaling pathways; and (5) evidence for advanced molecular maturation by transcriptome profiling. EHM responded to chronic catecholamine toxicity with contractile dysfunction, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte death, and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide release; all are classical hallmarks of heart failure. In addition, we demonstrate the scalability of EHM according to anticipated clinical demands for cardiac repair. We provide proof-of-concept for a universally applicable technology for the engineering of macroscale human myocardium for disease modeling and heart repair from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes under defined, serum-free conditions. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Challenges and advances in mouse modeling for human pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wanglong

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is critical for developed countries, where its rate of diagnosis has been increasing steadily annually. In the past decade, the advances of pancreatic cancer research have not contributed to the decline in mortality rates from pancreatic cancer—the overall 5-year survival rate remains about 5% low. This number only underscores an obvious urgency for us to better understand the biological features of pancreatic carcinogenesis, to develop early detection methods, and to improve novel therapeutic treatments. To achieve these goals, animal modeling that faithfully recapitulates the whole process of human pancreatic cancer is central to making the advancements. In this review, we summarize the currently available animal models for pancreatic cancer and the advances in pancreatic cancer animal modeling. We compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of three major categories of these models: (1) carcinogen-induced; (2) xenograft and allograft; and (3) genetically engineered mouse models. We focus more on the genetically engineered mouse models, a category which has been rapidly expanded recently for their capacities to mimic human pancreatic cancer and metastasis, and highlight the combinations of these models with various newly developed strategies and cell-lineage labeling systems. PMID:23114842

  13. Antiinflammatory actions of inorganic nitrate stabilize the atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Khambata, Rayomand S.; Ghosh, Suborno M.; Rathod, Krishnaraj S.; Thevathasan, Tharssana; Filomena, Federica; Xiao, Qingzhong; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2017-01-01

    Reduced bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in the enhanced leukocyte recruitment reflective of systemic inflammation thought to precede and underlie atherosclerotic plaque formation and instability. Recent evidence demonstrates that inorganic nitrate (NO3−) through sequential chemical reduction in vivo provides a source of NO that exerts beneficial effects upon the cardiovascular system, including reductions in inflammatory responses. We tested whether the antiinflammatory effects of inorganic nitrate might prove useful in ameliorating atherosclerotic disease in Apolipoprotein (Apo)E knockout (KO) mice. We show that dietary nitrate treatment, although having no effect upon total plaque area, caused a reduction in macrophage accumulation and an elevation in smooth muscle accumulation within atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE KO mice, suggesting plaque stabilization. We also show that in nitrate-fed mice there is reduced systemic leukocyte rolling and adherence, circulating neutrophil numbers, neutrophil CD11b expression, and myeloperoxidase activity compared with wild-type littermates. Moreover, we show in both the ApoE KO mice and using an acute model of inflammation that this effect upon neutrophils results in consequent reductions in inflammatory monocyte expression that is associated with elevations of the antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10. In summary, we demonstrate that inorganic nitrate suppresses acute and chronic inflammation by targeting neutrophil recruitment and that this effect, at least in part, results in consequent reductions in the inflammatory status of atheromatous plaque, and suggest that this effect may have clinical utility in the prophylaxis of inflammatory atherosclerotic disease. PMID:28057862

  14. Cryotherapy increases features of plaque stability in atherosclerotic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Verheye, Stefan; Roth, Lynn; De Meyer, Inge; Van Hove, Cor E; Nahon, Daniel; Santoianni, Domenic; Yianni, John; Martinet, Wim; Buchbinder, Maurice; De Meyer, Guido R Y

    2016-08-20

    In the last 10 years, cryotherapy has been investigated as a new technology to treat vascular disease. The efficiency of cryotherapy in stabilising atherosclerotic plaques has never been described. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of catheter-based cryotherapy on atherosclerotic plaque composition in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were fed a 0.3% cholesterol-supplemented diet for 24 weeks. At two predefined sites of the atherosclerotic thoracic aorta, catheter-based cryotherapy, applying either single-dose, double-dose cryotherapy or control inflation, was performed after randomisation. Rabbits were continued on a cholesterol-supplemented diet for one day (acute) or four weeks (chronic). One day after cryotherapy, apoptotic cell death of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) was observed, whereas macrophages were unaffected. Four weeks later, the amount of SMCs was restored, the EC layer was regenerated, and a subendothelial macrophage-free layer was formed, indicative of a more stable plaque. In addition, both the thickness and the type I collagen content of the fibrous cap were increased. The present study demonstrated that cryotherapy is feasible and appears to stabilise atherosclerotic plaques in a rabbit model.

  15. In vivo determination of arterial collagen synthesis in atherosclerotic rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Opsahl, W.P.; DeLuca, D.J.; Ehrhart, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    Collagen and non-collagen protein synthesis rates were determined in vivo in tissues from rabbits fed a control or atherogenic diet supplemented with 2% peanut oil and 0.25% cholesterol for 4 months. Rabbits received a bolus intravenous injection of L-(/sup 3/H)-proline (1.0 mCi/kg) and unlabeled L-proline (7 mmoles/kg) in 0.9% NaCl. Plasma proline specific activity decreased only 20% over 5 hr and was similar to the specific activity of free proline in tissues. Thoracic aortas from atherosclerotic rabbits exhibited raised plaques covering at least 75% of the surface. Thoracic intima plus a portion of the media (TIM) was separated from the remaining media plus adventitia (TMA). Dry delipidated weight, total collagen content, and collagen as a percent of dry weight were increased significantly in the TIM of atherosclerotic rabbits. Collagen synthesis rates and collagen synthesis as a percent of total protein synthesis were likewise increased both in the TIM and in the abdominal aortas. No differences from controls either in collagen content or collagen synthesis rates were observed in the TMA, lung or skin. These results demonstrate for the first time in vivo that formation of atherosclerotic plaques is associated with increased rates of collagen synthesis. Furthermore, as previously observed with incubations in vitro, collagen synthesis was elevated to a greater extent than noncollagen protein synthesis in atherosclerotic aortas from rabbits fed cholesterol plus peanut oil.

  16. Cap buckling as a potential mechanism of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Abdelali, Maria; Reiter, Steven; Mongrain, Rosaire; Bertrand, Michel; L'Allier, Philippe L; Kritikou, Ekaterini A; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2014-04-01

    Plaque rupture in atherosclerosis is the primary cause of potentially deadly coronary events, yet about 40% of ruptures occur away from the plaque cap shoulders and cannot be fully explained with the current biomechanical theories. Here, cap buckling is considered as a potential destabilizing factor which increases the propensity of the atherosclerotic plaque to rupture and which may also explain plaque failure away from the cap shoulders. To investigate this phenomenon, quasistatic 2D finite element simulations are performed, considering the salient geometrical and nonlinear material properties of diverse atherosclerotic plaques over the range of physiological loads. The numerical results indicate that buckling may displace the location of the peak von Mises stresses in the deflected caps. Plaque buckling, together with its deleterious effects is further observed experimentally in plaque caps using a physical model of deformable mock coronary arteries with fibroatheroma. Moreover, an analytical approach combining quasistatic equilibrium equations with the Navier-Bresse formulas is used to demonstrate the buckling potential of a simplified arched slender cap under intraluminal pressure and supported by foundations. This analysis shows that plaque caps - calcified, fibrotic or cellular - may buckle in specific undulated shapes once submitted to critical loads. Finally, a preliminary analysis of intravascular ultrasonography recordings of patients with atherosclerotic coronary arteries corroborates the numerical, experimental and theoretical findings and shows that various plaque caps buckle in vivo. By displacing the sites of high stresses in the plaque cap, buckling may explain the atherosclerotic plaque cap rupture at various locations, including cap shoulders.

  17. Atherosclerotic changes of vessels caused by restriction of movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gvishiani, G. S.; Kobakhidze, N. G.; Mchedlishvili, M. G.; Dekanosidze, T. I.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of restriction of movement on the development of atheroscelerosis was studied in rabbits. Drastic restriction of movement for 20 and 30 days causes atherosclerotic alterations of the aorta and shifts in ECG which are characteristic of coronary atherosclerosis. At the same time, shortening of the duration of blood coagulation and an increase in the content of catecholamines and beta-lipoproteids occur.

  18. Reducing the Human Burden of Breast Cancer: Advanced Radiation Therapy Yields Improved Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Currey, Adam D; Bergom, Carmen; Kelly, Tracy R; Wilson, J Frank

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important modality in the treatment of patients with breast cancer. While its efficacy in the treatment of breast cancer was known shortly after the discovery of x-rays, significant advances in radiation delivery over the past 20 years have resulted in improved patient outcomes. With the development of improved systemic therapy, optimizing local control has become increasingly important and has been shown to improve survival. Better understanding of the magnitude of treatment benefit, as well as patient and biological factors that confer an increased recurrence risk, have allowed radiation oncologists to better tailor treatment decisions to individual patients. Furthermore, significant technological advances have occurred that have reduced the acute and long-term toxicity of radiation treatment. These advances continue to reduce the human burden of breast cancer. It is important for radiation oncologists and nonradiation oncologists to understand these advances, so that patients are appropriately educated about the risks and benefits of this important treatment modality. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. MicroRNA-containing microvesicles regulating inflammation in association with atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Hulsmans, Maarten; Holvoet, Paul

    2013-10-01

    In addition to intracellular organelles, eukaryotic cells contain extracellular organelles which are released, or shed, into the microenvironment. In practice, most human studies have examined mixed populations containing both exosomes and shedding microvesicles (also called ectosomes or microparticles); only a few studies have rigorously distinguished between the two. Accordingly, in this review, exosomes and shedding microvesicles are collectively called microvesicles. The first aim of this review was to discuss the role of microvesicles in cell-to-cell communication in general and in specific interactions between cells in chronic inflammation associated with atherosclerotic disease. Hereby, we focused on cell-specific microvesicles derived from platelets, endothelial cells and monocyte and monocyte-derived cells. The latter were also found to be associated with inflammation in obesity and type 2 diabetes prior to atherosclerotic disease, and cancer. Our second aim was to discuss specific changes in microvesicle content in relation with inflammation associated with metabolic and atherosclerotic disease, and cancer. Because many studies supported the putative diagnostic value of microRNAs, we emphasized therein changes in microRNA content rather than protein or lipid content. The most interesting microRNAs in inflammatory microvesicles in association with metabolic and cardiovascular diseases were found to be the let-7 family, miR-17/92 family, miR-21, miR-29, miR-126, miR-133, miR-146, and miR-155. These data warrant further investigation of the potential of microvesicles as putative biomarkers and as novel carriers for the cell-specific transfer of microRNAs and other therapeutic agents.

  20. Comprehensive Plasma Metabolomic Analyses of Atherosclerotic Progression Reveal Alterations in Glycerophospholipid and Sphingolipid Metabolism in Apolipoprotein E-deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Vi T.; Huang, Aric; Zhong, Lexy H.; Shi, Yuanyuan; Werstuck, Geoff H.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major underlying cause of most cardiovascular diseases. Despite recent advances, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of atherogenesis are not clear. In this study, comprehensive plasma metabolomics were used to investigate early-stage atherosclerotic development and progression in chow-fed apolipoprotein E-deficient mice at 5, 10 and 15 weeks of age. Comprehensive plasma metabolomic profiles, based on 4365 detected metabolite features, differentiate atherosclerosis-prone from atherosclerosis-resistant models. Metabolites in the sphingomyelin pathway were significantly altered prior to detectable lesion formation and at all subsequent time-points. The cytidine diphosphate-diacylglycerol pathway was up-regulated during stage I of atherosclerosis, while metabolites in the phosphatidylethanolamine and glycosphingolipid pathways were augmented in mice with stage II lesions. These pathways, involving glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism, were also significantly affected during the course of atherosclerotic progression. Our findings suggest that distinct plasma metabolomic profiles can differentiate the different stages of atherosclerotic progression. This study reveals that alteration of specific, previously unreported pathways of glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism are associated with atherosclerosis. The clear difference in the level of several metabolites supports the use of plasma lipid profiling as a diagnostic tool of atherogenesis. PMID:27721472

  1. Competing risk of atherosclerotic risk factors for arterial and venous thrombosis in a general population: the Tromso study.

    PubMed

    Brækkan, Sigrid K; Hald, Erin M; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B; Njølstad, Inger; Wilsgaard, Tom; Rosendaal, Frits R; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2012-02-01

    To investigate and compare the impact of traditional atherosclerotic risk factors for the risk of arterial and venous thrombosis, taking into account competing risks. In 1994-1995, 26,185 subjects were screened in the Tromsø study. Information on traditional atherosclerotic risk factors was obtained by physical examination, blood samples, and questionnaires. Subjects were followed to the first incident event of myocardial infarction (MI) or venous thromboembolism (VTE), or December 31, 2005. During a median of 10.8 years of follow-up, there were 1279 cases of incident MI and 341 VTE events. Advancing age and high body mass index were both associated with MI and VTE. Hazard ratio per decade of age was 2.34 (95% CI: 2.25-2.43) for MI and 1.87 (1.74-2.01) for VTE, and 3 kg/m(2) increase in body mass index was associated with 1.16 (1.11-1.21) and 1.20 (1.12-1.29) increased risk of MI and VTE, respectively. Blood pressure, high levels of triglycerides and total cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, self-reported diabetes, and smoking were all associated with increased risk of MI but not associated with VTE. Our findings imply that traditional atherosclerotic risk factors, such as smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus are not shared by arterial and venous thrombosis.

  2. A feasibility study of carotid elastography for risk assessment of atherosclerotic plaques validated by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaochang; Huang, Lingyun; Huang, Manwei; Zhao, Xihai; He, Le; Yuan, Chun; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2014-03-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. One of its main reasons is rupture of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. Conventional B-mode ultrasound images and Doppler/color flow measurements are mostly used to evaluate degree of stenosis, which underestimates plaque vulnerability. Alternatively, the correspondence between multi-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features, plaque composition and histology has been well established. In this study, the feasibility of ultrasound carotid elastography in risk assessment of carotid atherosclerotic plaques is investigated. Preliminarily in-vivo results on a small number of human subjects are initially validated by multi-contrast, highresolution MRI, and it shows that maximum strain rate might be feasible to evaluate the plaque vulnerability.

  3. Closing the loop: integrating human impacts on water resources to advanced land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitchik, B. F.; Nie, W.; Rodell, M.; Kumar, S.; Li, B.

    2016-12-01

    Advanced Land Surface Models (LSMs), including those used in the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS), offer a physically consistent and spatially and temporally complete analysis of the distributed water balance. These models are constrained both by physically-based process representation and by observations ingested as meteorological forcing or as data assimilation updates. As such, they have become important tools for hydrological monitoring and long-term climate analysis. The representation of water management, however, is extremely limited in these models. Recent advances have brought prognostic irrigation routines into models used in NLDAS, while assimilation of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) derived estimates of terrestrial water storage anomaly has made it possible to nudge models towards observed states in water storage below the root zone. But with few exceptions these LSMs do not account for the source of irrigation water, leading to a disconnect between the simulated water balance and the observed human impact on water resources. This inconsistency is unacceptable for long-term studies of climate change and human impact on water resources in North America. Here we define the modeling challenge, review instances of models that have begun to account for water withdrawals (e.g., CLM), and present ongoing efforts to improve representation of human impacts on water storage across models through integration of irrigation routines, water withdrawal information, and GRACE Data Assimilation in NLDAS LSMs.

  4. Association between human papillomavirus and EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Deng, Fang; Qian, Li-Ting; Meng, Shui-Ping; Zhang, Yang; Shan, Wu-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Bao-Long

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene in lung cancer patients; however, few studies have investigated this association in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients undergoing gefitinib treatment. The present study investigated the association between HPV and EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients. A total of 95 advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients were enrolled in the study. The HPV infection status and presence of EGFR mutations in tumor tissue was evaluated. Patient clinical characteristics were also determined and compared with HPV infection and EGFR mutation status to analyze their impact on progression-free survival. HPV DNA was identified in 27/95 (28.4%) lung adenocarcinoma tumors and was most common in patients with lymph node metastasis (P=0.016). A total of 44/95 (46.3%) cases exhibited EGFR mutations, which were predominantly observed in female patients and non-smokers. The presence of HPV DNA was significantly associated with EGFR mutations (P=0.012) and multivariate analysis also revealed that HPV DNA was significantly associated with EGFR mutations (odds ratio=3.971) in advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Patients with both HPV infections and EGFR mutations exhibit a marked decrease in the risk of lung cancer progression when compared with those without HPV infection or EGFR mutations (adjusted HR=0.640; 95% confidence interval: 0.488–0.840; P=0.001). HPV infection was significantly associated with EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients. Furthermore, patients with HPV infections exhibited the longest progression-free survival times, which may be due to good response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor- or platinum-based-adjuvant therapy in these patients. Patients with EGFR mutations exhibited a better prognosis when compared with those exhibiting wild-type EGFR, regardless of HPV status. PMID:27602120

  5. Advancing functional engineered cardiac tissues toward a preclinical model of human myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Irene C.; Karakikes, Ioannis; Serrao, Gregory W.; Backeris, Peter; Lee, Jia-Jye; Xie, Chaoqin; Senyei, Grant; Gordon, Ronald E.; Li, Ronald A.; Akar, Fadi G.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Costa, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac experimental biology and translational research would benefit from an in vitro surrogate for human heart muscle. This study investigated structural and functional properties and interventional responses of human engineered cardiac tissues (hECTs) compared to human myocardium. Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs, >90% troponin-positive) were mixed with collagen and cultured on force-sensing elastomer devices. hECTs resembled trabecular muscle and beat spontaneously (1.18±0.48 Hz). Microstructural features and mRNA expression of cardiac-specific genes (α-MHC, SERCA2a, and ACTC1) were comparable to human myocardium. Optical mapping revealed cardiac refractoriness with loss of 1:1 capture above 3 Hz, and cycle length dependence of the action potential duration, recapitulating key features of cardiac electrophysiology. hECTs reconstituted the Frank-Starling mechanism, generating an average maximum twitch stress of 660 μN/mm2 at Lmax, approaching values in newborn human myocardium. Dose-response curves followed exponential pharmacodynamics models for calcium chloride (EC50 1.8 mM) and verapamil (IC50 0.61 μM); isoproterenol elicited a positive chronotropic but negligible inotropic response, suggesting sarcoplasmic reticulum immaturity. hECTs were amenable to gene transfer, demonstrated by successful transduction with Ad.GFP. Such 3-D hECTs recapitulate an early developmental stage of human myocardium and promise to offer an alternative preclinical model for cardiology research.—Turnbull, I. C., Karakikes, I., Serrao, G. W., Backeris, P., Lee, J.-J., Xie, C., Senyei, G., Gordon, R. E., Li, R. A., Akar, F. G., Hajjar, R. J., Hulot, J.-S., Costa, K. D. Advancing functional engineered cardiac tissues toward a preclinical model of human myocardium. PMID:24174427

  6. Classification of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic individuals using multiclass state vector machine.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Paulraj Ranjith; Priya, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease due to atherosclerosis is an epidemic in India. An estimated 1.3 million Indians died from this in 2000. The projected death from coronary artery disease by 2016 is 2.98 million. To build an effective model which assorts the individuals, whether they belong to the normal group, risk group and pathologic group regarding atherosclerosis in real time by doing necessary preprocessing techniques and to compare the performance with other state-of-the-art machine learning techniques. In this work we have employed STULONG dataset. We have made a deep case study in selecting the attributes which contributes for higher accuracy in predicting the target. The selected attributes includes missing values. Initially our work includes imputation of missing values using Iterative Principal Component Analysis (IPCA). The second step includes selecting best features using Fast Correlation Based Filter (FCBF). Finally the classifier Multiclass Support Vector Machine (SVM) with kernel Radial Basis Function (RBF) is used for classification of atherosclerotic community. For the subjects belonging to the classes of normal, risk and pathologic, our methodology has outperformed with an accuracy of 99.85%, 99.80% and 99.46% respectively. The combined optimization methods such as Iterative Principal Component Analysis (IPCA) for missing value imputation, Multiclass SVM for classifying normal, risk and pathologic community in real time has performed with overall accuracy of about 98.97%. The essential pre-processing technique, Fast Correlation Based Filter (FCBF) was employed to further intensifying the target.

  7. A significant correlation between C - reactive protein levels in blood monocytes derived macrophages versus content in carotid atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a complex disease involving different cell types, including macrophages that play a major role in the inflammatory events occurring in atherogenesis. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) is a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation and was identified as a biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. Histological studies demonstrate CRP presence in human atherosclerotic lesions, and we have previously shown that macrophages express CRP mRNA. CRP could be locally secreted in the atherosclerotic lesion by arterial macrophages and local regulation of CRP could affect its pro-atherogenic effects. Moreover, human blood derived macrophages (HMDM) expression of CRP could reflect atherosclerotic lesion secretion of CRP. Methods Ten type 2 diabetic patients and ten non-diabetic patients scheduled to undergo carotid endarterectomy were enrolled in this study, and their blood samples were used for serum CRP, lipid determination, and for preparation of HMDM further analyzed for their CRP mRNA expression and CRP content. Carotid lesions obtained from the patients were analyzed for their CRP and interleukin 6 (IL-6) content by immunohistochemistry. Results Lesions from diabetic patients showed substantially higher CRP levels by 62% (p = 0.05) than lesions from non diabetic patients, and CRP staining that co-localized with arterial macrophages. CRP carotid lesion levels positively correlated with CRP mRNA expression (r2 = 0.661) and with CRP content (r2 = 0.611) in the patient’s HMDM. Conclusions Diabetes up-regulated carotid plaques CRP levels and CRP measurements in HMDM could reflect atherosclerotic lesion macrophages secretion of CRP. Understanding the regulation of locally produced macrophage CRP in the arterial wall during atherogenesis could be of major importance in identifying the underlying mechanisms of inflammatory response pathways during atherogenesis. PMID:24588988

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING GUIDANCE FOR SAFETY EVALUATIONS OF ADVANCED REACTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    O'HARA, J.; PERSENSKY, J.; SZABO, A.

    2006-10-01

    Advanced reactors are expected to be based on a concept of operations that is different from what is currently used in today's reactors. Therefore, regulatory staff may need new tools, developed from the best available technical bases, to support licensing evaluations. The areas in which new review guidance may be needed and the efforts underway to address the needs will be discussed. Our preliminary results focus on some of the technical issues to be addressed in three areas for which new guidance may be developed: automation and control, operations under degraded conditions, and new human factors engineering methods and tools.

  9. The development of transgenic crops to improve human health by advanced utilization of seed storage proteins.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Nobuyuki; Mikami, Bunzo; Utsumi, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Seed storage proteins are a major component of mature seeds. They are utilized as protein sources in foods. We designed seed storage proteins containing bioactive peptides based on their three-dimensional structures. Furthermore, to create crops with enhanced food qualities, we developed transgenic crops producing seed storage proteins with bioactive peptides. This strategy promises to prevent lifestyle-related diseases by simple daily food consumption. In this review, we discuss a strategy to develop transgenic crops to improve human health by advanced utilization of seed storage proteins.

  10. How Can Diet Affect the Accumulation of Advanced Glycation End-Products in the Human Body?

    PubMed Central

    Guilbaud, Axel; Niquet-Leridon, Celine; Boulanger, Eric; Tessier, Frederic J.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is associated with the complications of diabetes, kidney disease, metabolic disorders and degenerative diseases. It is recognized that the pool of glycation products found in the human body comes not only from an endogenous formation, but also from a dietary exposure to exogenous AGEs. In recent years, the development of pharmacologically-active ingredients aimed at inhibiting endogenous glycation has not been successful. Since the accumulation of AGEs in the human body appears to be progressive throughout life, an early preventive action against glycation could be effective through dietary adjustments or supplementation with purified micronutrients. The present article provides an overview of current dietary strategies tested either in vitro, in vivo or both to reduce the endogenous formation of AGEs and to limit exposure to food AGEs. PMID:28231179

  11. Human response to nuclear and advanced technology weapons effects. Final report, January-December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.L.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to help the system survivability analyst estimate hardness requirements for systems exposed to nuclear weapons and advanced technology weapons (ATWs). The system survivability analyst is often asked to make quick, order-of-magnitude estimates on the hardness requirements for existing or proposed systems based upon human responses to the effects of nuclear weapons and ATWs. The intent of this report is to identity the general range of human survivability to nuclear weapons and ATWs and to provide simple example calcuiations and scenarios that can give the reader rough estimates of the effects of these weapons. While high-powered microwave (HPM) and laser weapons are considered in this report, the main emphasis is on nuclear weapons and their ionizing radiation effects.

  12. Requirements for CD8 T-cell migration into the human arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Gewaltig, Jan; Kummer, Marco; Koella, Christoph; Cathomas, Gieri; Biedermann, Barbara C

    2008-12-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions develop in the arterial intima. Among the leukocytes that accumulate in advanced atherosclerotic plaques, CD8 T cells play a quantitatively important role. They may be involved in disease progression and plaque destabilization, leading to plaque rupture or erosion. These events finally precipitate cardiovascular events. Therefore, we wished to determine the accessibility of the human arterial wall, particularly the arterial intima, for CD8-positive, cytotoxic T lymphocytes. We quantified the number of CD8-positive T cells in the arterial wall using human arterial tissue microarrays. The conditions for efficient cytotoxic T-lymphocyte migration into the arterial wall were determined in an in vitro tissue invasion assay. The invasion pattern of resting or activated cytotoxic T-lymphocyte clones was morphometrically analyzed by confocal microscopy. CD8 T cells represented up to 50% of the lymphocytes in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. Resting CD8-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes were able to migrate into the arterial intima when it was affected by advanced lesions but not at the earliest stages of the disease. After T-cell receptor and/or proinflammatory cytokine activation, cytotoxic T lymphocytes migrated efficiently into the arterial intima, even in the healthy or mildly affected sites. This in vitro tissue invasion assay mimics conditions under which effector cytotoxic T lymphocytes migrate into the arterial wall to reach similar cell densities as observed in arterial tissue sections from autopsies. Interference with T-cell activation may be important to inhibit cytotoxic T-lymphocyte invasion into the unaffected, healthy artery but may not prevent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte invasion into arteries that are severely affected by atherosclerotic lesions.

  13. The Chinese Visible Human (CVH) datasets incorporate technical and imaging advances on earlier digital humans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Heng, Pheng-Ann; Liu, Zheng-Jin; Tan, Li-Wen; Qiu, Ming-Guo; Li, Qi-Yu; Liao, Rong-Xia; Li, Kai; Cui, Gao-Yu; Guo, Yan-Li; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Guang-Jiu; Shan, Jing-Lu; Liu, Ji-Jun; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Chen, Xian-Hong; Chen, Jin-Hua; Wang, Jian; Chen, Wei; Lu, Ming; You, Jian; Pang, Xue-Li; Xiao, Hong; Xie, Yong-Ming; Cheng, Jack Chun-Yiu

    2004-01-01

    We report the availability of a digitized Chinese male and a digitzed Chinese female typical of the population and with no obvious abnormalities. The embalming and milling procedures incorporate three technical improvements over earlier digitized cadavers. Vascular perfusion with coloured gelatin was performed to facilitate blood vessel identification. Embalmed cadavers were embedded in gelatin and cryosectioned whole so as to avoid section loss resulting from cutting the body into smaller pieces. Milling performed at −25 °C prevented small structures (e.g. teeth, concha nasalis and articular cartilage) from falling off from the milling surface. The male image set (.tiff images each of 36 Mb) has a section resolution of 3072 × 2048 pixels (∼170 μm, the accompanying magnetic resonance imaging and computer tomography data have a resolution of 512 × 512, i.e. ∼440 μm). The Chinese Visible Human male and female datasets are available at http://www.chinesevisiblehuman.com. (The male is 90.65 Gb and female 131.04 Gb). MPEG videos of direct records of real-time volume rendering are at: http://www.cse.cuhk.edu.hk/~crc PMID:15032906

  14. Bright morning light advances the human circadian system without affecting NREM sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dijk, D J; Beersma, D G; Daan, S; Lewy, A J

    1989-01-01

    Eight male subjects were exposed to either bright light or dim light between 0600 and 0900 h for 3 consecutive days each. Relative to the dim light condition, the bright light treatment advanced the evening rise in plasma melatonin and the time of sleep termination (sleep onset was held constant) for an average approximately 1 h. The magnitude of the advance of the plasma melatonin rise was dependent on its phase in dim light. The reduction in sleep duration was at the expense of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. Spectral analysis of the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed that the advance of the circadian pacemaker did not affect EEG power densities between 0.25 and 15.0 Hz during either non-REM or REM sleep. The data show that shifting the human circadian pacemaker by 1 h does not affect non-REM sleep homeostasis. These findings are in accordance with the predictions of the two-process model of sleep regulation.

  15. Advances in Pemphigus and its Endemic Pemphigus Foliaceus (Fogo Selvagem) Phenotype: A Paradigm of Human Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Culton, Donna A.; Qian, Ye; Li, Ning; Rubenstein, David; Aoki, Valeria; Filhio, Gunter Hans; Rivitti, Evandro A.; Diaz, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    Pemphigus encompasses a group of organ specific, antibody mediated autoimmune diseases of the skin characterized by keratinocyte detachment that leads to the development of blisters and erosions, which can become life-threatening. The pathogenic autoantibodies recognize desmogleins, which are members of the desmosomal cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules. Desmoglein 3 is targeted in pemphigus vulgaris while desmoglein 1 is targeted in pemphigus foliaceus and its endemic form, fogo selvagem. This review will briefly define the salient features of pemphigus and the proposed steps in pathogenesis. We will then summarize the most recent advances in three important areas of investigation: (i) epidemiologic, genetic, and immunologic features of fogo selvagem, (ii) molecular mechanisms of injury to the epidermis, and (iii) novel therapeutic strategies targeting specific steps in disease pathogenesis. The advances in each of these three seemingly separate areas contribute to the overall understanding of the pemphigus disease model. These recent advancements also underscore the dynamic interplay between the treatment of patients in a clinical setting and basic science research, which has led to an integrative understanding disease pathogenesis and treatment and allow pemphigus to serve as a paradigm of human autoimmunity. PMID:18838249

  16. Technology Roadmap Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-03-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order.Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies.

  17. Molecular Imaging of Activated von Willebrand Factor to Detect High-Risk Atherosclerotic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Owen J. T.; Conley, Robert B.; Shentu, Weihui; Tormoen, Garth W.; Zha, Daogang; Xie, Aris; Qi, Yue; Zhao, Yan; Carr, Chad; Belcik, Todd; Keene, Douglas R.; de Groot, Philip G.; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We hypothesized that noninvasive molecular imaging of activated von Willebrand factor (vWF) on the vascular endothelium could be used to detect a high-risk atherosclerotic phenotype. BACKGROUND Platelet-endothelial interactions have been linked to increased inflammatory activation and prothrombotic state in atherosclerosis. These interactions are mediated, in part, by platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, suggesting that dysregulated endothelial vWF is a marker for high-risk atherosclerotic disease. METHODS Microbubbles targeted to activated vWF were prepared by surface conjugation of recombinant GPIbα. Flow-chamber studies were used to evaluate attachment of targeted microbubbles to immobile platelet aggregates bearing activated vWF. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) molecular imaging of the aorta from mice was performed: 1) ex vivo after focal crush injury and blood perfusion; and 2) in vivo in mice with advanced atherosclerosis produced by deletion of the low-density lipoprotein receptor and ApoBec-1 editing peptide (LDLR−/−/ApoBec-1−/−). RESULTS In flow-chamber studies, tracer attachment to vWF was >10-fold greater for microbubbles bearing GPIbα compared with control microbubbles (p < 0.01). In the ex vivo aortic injury model, CEU signal enhancement for vWF-targeted microbubbles occurred primarily at the injury site and was 4-fold greater than at noninjured sites (p < 0.05). In LDLR−/−/ApoBec-1−/− mice, inflammatory cell infiltrates and dense vWF expression on the intact endothelium were seen in regions of severe plaque formation. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated widespread platelet-endothelial interaction and only few sites of endothelial erosion. On CEU, signal enhancement for vWF-targeted microbubbles was approximately 4-fold greater (p < 0.05) in LDLR−/−/ApoBec-1−/− compared with wild-type mice. En face aortic microscopy demonstrated regions where platelet adhesion and microbubble attachment colocalized. CONCLUSIONS

  18. Paraoxonase 1: a better atherosclerotic risk predictor than HDL in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Patra, Surajeet Kumar; Singh, Kamna; Singh, Ritu

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a state of glycative stress and oxidative stress. Lower level of serum PON 1 has been correlated to higher morbidity and mortality related to cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus. To estimate and compare the serum PON 1 levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus and controls and to predict which one is the better atherosclerotic risk predictor among HDL and PON 1 in T2DM patients. An observational analytical case-control study was conducted with a sample size of 30 in two groups like group I (30 cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosed by ADA 2010 criteria) and group II (30 age and sex matched controls). Human serum paroxonase 1 levels were measured by ELISA. Both HDL and PON 1 were negatively correlated with the various atherogenic indices (AIP, AC, CRI I, CRI II) but the strength of negative correlation is always greater for PON 1. In multiple linear regression analysis, we found that the regression coefficient (β) is always higher for PON 1 than for HDL while taking the atherogenic indices as outcome variable. PON 1 can be a better predictor than HDL for atherosclerotic risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2013 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Endothelial to mesenchymal transition is common in atherosclerotic lesions and is associated with plaque instability.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Solene M; Lecce, Laura; Michelis, Katherine C; Nomura-Kitabayashi, Aya; Pandey, Gaurav; Purushothaman, K-Raman; d'Escamard, Valentina; Li, Jennifer R; Hadri, Lahouaria; Fujitani, Kenji; Moreno, Pedro R; Benard, Ludovic; Rimmele, Pauline; Cohain, Ariella; Mecham, Brigham; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Nabel, Elizabeth G; Hajjar, Roger; Fuster, Valentin; Boehm, Manfred; Kovacic, Jason C

    2016-06-24

    Endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EndMT) plays a major role during development, and also contributes to several adult cardiovascular diseases. Importantly, mesenchymal cells including fibroblasts are prominent in atherosclerosis, with key functions including regulation of: inflammation, matrix and collagen production, and plaque structural integrity. However, little is known about the origins of atherosclerosis-associated fibroblasts. Here we show using endothelial-specific lineage-tracking that EndMT-derived fibroblast-like cells are common in atherosclerotic lesions, with EndMT-derived cells expressing a range of fibroblast-specific markers. In vitro modelling confirms that EndMT is driven by TGF-β signalling, oxidative stress and hypoxia; all hallmarks of atherosclerosis. 'Transitioning' cells are readily detected in human plaques co-expressing endothelial and fibroblast/mesenchymal proteins, indicative of EndMT. The extent of EndMT correlates with an unstable plaque phenotype, which appears driven by altered collagen-MMP production in EndMT-derived cells. We conclude that EndMT contributes to atherosclerotic patho-biology and is associated with complex plaques that may be related to clinical events.

  20. Endothelial to mesenchymal transition is common in atherosclerotic lesions and is associated with plaque instability

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Solene M.; Lecce, Laura; Michelis, Katherine C.; Nomura-Kitabayashi, Aya; Pandey, Gaurav; Purushothaman, K-Raman; d'Escamard, Valentina; Li, Jennifer R.; Hadri, Lahouaria; Fujitani, Kenji; Moreno, Pedro R.; Benard, Ludovic; Rimmele, Pauline; Cohain, Ariella; Mecham, Brigham; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Hajjar, Roger; Fuster, Valentin; Boehm, Manfred; Kovacic, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EndMT) plays a major role during development, and also contributes to several adult cardiovascular diseases. Importantly, mesenchymal cells including fibroblasts are prominent in atherosclerosis, with key functions including regulation of: inflammation, matrix and collagen production, and plaque structural integrity. However, little is known about the origins of atherosclerosis-associated fibroblasts. Here we show using endothelial-specific lineage-tracking that EndMT-derived fibroblast-like cells are common in atherosclerotic lesions, with EndMT-derived cells expressing a range of fibroblast-specific markers. In vitro modelling confirms that EndMT is driven by TGF-β signalling, oxidative stress and hypoxia; all hallmarks of atherosclerosis. ‘Transitioning' cells are readily detected in human plaques co-expressing endothelial and fibroblast/mesenchymal proteins, indicative of EndMT. The extent of EndMT correlates with an unstable plaque phenotype, which appears driven by altered collagen-MMP production in EndMT-derived cells. We conclude that EndMT contributes to atherosclerotic patho-biology and is associated with complex plaques that may be related to clinical events. PMID:27340017

  1. Biophysical regulation of Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected monocyte recruitment to atherosclerotic foci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evani, Shankar J.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is implicated in atherosclerosis although the contributory mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize that C. pneumoniae infection favors the recruitment of monocytes to atherosclerotic foci by altering monocyte biophysics. Primary, fresh human monocytes were infected with C. pneumoniae for 8 h, and the interactions between monocytes and E-selectin or aortic endothelium under flow were characterized by video microscopy and image analysis. The distribution of membrane lipid rafts and adhesion receptors were analyzed by imaging flow cytometry. Infected cells rolled on E-selectin and endothelial surfaces, and this rolling was slower, steady and uniform compared to uninfected cells. Infection decreases cholesterol levels, increases membrane fluidity, disrupts lipid rafts, and redistributes CD44, which is the primary mediator of rolling interactions. Together, these changes translate to higher firm adhesion of infected monocytes on endothelium, which is enhanced in the presence of LDL. Uninfected monocytes treated with LDL or left untreated were used as baseline control. Our results demonstrate that the membrane biophysical changes due to infection and hyperlipidemia are one of the key mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae can exacerbate atherosclerotic pathology. These findings provide a framework to characterize the role of ‘infectious burden’ in the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  2. Folic acid attenuates homocysteine and enhances antioxidative capacity in atherosclerotic rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shanshan; Li, Wen; Lv, Xin; Wang, Pengyan; Huang, Guowei; Gao, Yuxia

    2017-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease that can seriously endanger human life. Folic acid supplementation modulates several disorders, including atherosclerosis, via its antiapoptotic and antioxidative properties. This study investigated whether folic acid alleviates atherogenesis by restoring homocysteine levels and antioxidative capacity in atherosclerosis Wistar rats. To this end, 28 Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (7 rats/group) as follows: (i) wild-type group, fed only the AIN-93 semi-purified rodent diet (folic acid: 2.1 mg/kg); (ii) high-fat + folic acid-deficient group (HF+DEF) (folic acid: 0.2 mg/kg); (iii) high-fat + normal folic acid group (folic acid: 2.1 mg/kg); and (iv) high-fat + folic acid-supplemented group (folic acid: 4.2 mg/kg). After 12 weeks, histopathological changes in the atherosclerotic lesions of the aortic arch were determined. In addition, serum folate levels, plasma homocysteine levels, plasma S-adenosyl-homocysteine levels, antioxidant status, oxidant status, and lipid profiles were evaluated. The results show aggravated atherosclerotic lesions in the HF+DEF group. Folic acid supplementation increased concentrations of serum folate. Further, folic acid supplementation increased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, decreased plasma homocysteine levels, and improved antioxidant capacity in atherogenic rats. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that folic acid alleviates atherogenesis by reducing plasma homocysteine levels and improving antioxidant capacity in rats fed a high-fat diet.

  3. Ultrafast optical-ultrasonic system and miniaturized catheter for imaging and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiawen; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Steward, Earl; Yu, Mingyue; Piao, Zhonglie; He, Youmin; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav M.; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) is the number one cause of death worldwide. The majority of CAD-induced deaths are due to the rupture of vulnerable plaques. Accurate assessment of plaques is crucial to optimize treatment and prevent death in patients with CAD. Current diagnostic techniques are often limited by either spatial resolution or penetration depth. Several studies have proved that the combined use of optical and ultrasonic imaging techniques increase diagnostic accuracy of vulnerable plaques. Here, we introduce an ultrafast optical-ultrasonic dual-modality imaging system and flexible miniaturized catheter, which enables the translation of this technology into clinical practice. This system can perform simultaneous optical coherence tomography (OCT)-intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging at 72 frames per second safely in vivo, i.e., visualizing a 72 mm-long artery in 4 seconds. Results obtained in atherosclerotic rabbits in vivo and human coronary artery segments show that this ultrafast technique can rapidly provide volumetric mapping of plaques and clearly identify vulnerable plaques. By providing ultrafast imaging of arteries with high resolution and deep penetration depth simultaneously, this hybrid IVUS-OCT technology opens new and safe opportunities to evaluate in real-time the risk posed by plaques, detect vulnerable plaques, and optimize treatment decisions. PMID:26678300

  4. Activation of activator protein 2 alpha by aspirin alleviates atherosclerotic plaque growth and instability in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing-Jing; Li, Peng; Wang, Fu; Liang, Wen-Jing; Ma, Hui; Chen, Yuan; Ma, Zhi-Min; Li, Quan-Zhong; Peng, Qi-Sheng; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Shuang-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Aims Aspirin has been used for the secondary prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease for several decades. We investigated the roles of transcriptional factor activator protein 2α (AP-2α) in the beneficial effects of aspirin in the growth and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaque. Methods and Results In mice deficient of apolipoprotein E (Apoe-/-), aspirin (20, 50 mg/kg/day) suppressed the progression of atherosclerosis in aortic roots and increased the plaque stability in carotid atherosclerotic plaques induced by collar-placement. In vivo lentivirus-mediated RNA interference of AP-2α reversed the inhibitory effects of aspirin on atherosclerosis in Apoe-/- mice. Mechanically, aspirin increased AP-2α phosphorylation and its activity, upregulated IkBα mRNA and protein levels, and reduced oxidative stress in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, deficiency of AP-2α completely abolished aspirin-induced upregulation of IkBα levels and inhibition of oxidative stress in Apoe-/- mice. Clinically, conventional doses of aspirin increased AP-2α phosphorylation and IkBα protein expression in humans subjects. Conclusion Aspirin activates AP-2α to upregulate IkBα gene expression, resulting in attenuations of plaque development and instability in atherosclerosis. PMID:27391154

  5. Lipid droplets in atherosclerotic fatty streaks of human aorta

    PubMed Central

    Lang, P. Dieter; Insull, William

    1970-01-01

    Preparations of lipid droplets and droplet-free tissue residue (cytoplasm + membranes + nuclei) were obtained by homogenization and centrifugal separation from intimal fatty streak lesions of aortic atherosclerosis of 21 adults who had died suddenly. Neutral lipids and phospholipids were analyzed by quantitative thin-layer chromatography and cholesteryl ester fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography. Optical properties of droplets were evaluated by differential counting and sizing procedures with the polarizing microscope. The droplets occurred in mixtures of two forms distinguished by their optical properties, anisotropic (i.e. liquid crystals) and isotropic (true liquids). Both forms had average diameters of about 1.8 μ, with a range of 0.5-5μ. The proportions of the two forms varied with temperature as individual droplets changed their form; anisotropic forms averaged 83.7% at °C and 37.8% at 37°C, with isotropic forms being 16.3 and 62.2% respectively. The proportions of anisotropic forms at 22°C decreased with age. These forms were not separated for chemical analysis. The droplets contained about half the lipid in the lesions. The composition of the lipids of the droplet mixture was remarkably uniform and strikingly different from that of the droplet-free residue, respectively: cholesteryl esters 94.9% vs. 38.7%, free cholesterol 1.7% vs. 18.6%, total phospholipids 1.0% vs. 38.6%, and triglycerides 2.4% vs. 4.0%. The proportions of individual phospholipids, with the exception of lysolecithin, were also different between the preparations. In the droplets only the proportions of lecithin correlated positively with the proportion of anisotropic forms (at 22°C). Droplet cholesteryl esters were particularly rich in oleic acid and when compared to residue esters had more palmitoleic (+0.7%), oleic (+12.3%), and eicosatrienoic (+2.4%) and less palmitic (-2.2%), linoleic (-12.4%), and arachidonic (-1.6%) acids. The proportions of most individual fatty acids of droplets and residue correlated positively. The lipids of the residue closely resemble those reported for the normal intima. The observations that these droplets are prominent in the morphology of the fatty streak lesions, and that their high content of oleate-rich cholesteryl esters is similar to that reported for analysis of the whole lesions, suggest that the droplets may be involved in the pathogenesis of the fatty streak lesions of artherosclerosis in man. PMID:5431659

  6. Identifying human disease genes: advances in molecular genetics and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, S M; Ali, A; Baig, S M; Barh, D; Miyoshi, A; Azevedo, V

    2014-07-04

    The human genome project is one of the significant achievements that have provided detailed insight into our genetic legacy. During the last two decades, biomedical investigations have gathered a considerable body of evidence by detecting more than 2000 disease genes. Despite the imperative advances in the genetic understanding of various diseases, the pathogenesis of many others remains obscure. With recent advances, the laborious methodologies used to identify DNA variations are replaced by direct sequencing of genomic DNA to detect genetic changes. The ability to perform such studies depends equally on the development of high-throughput and economical genotyping methods. Currently, basically for every disease whose origen is still unknown, genetic approaches are available which could be pedigree-dependent or -independent with the capacity to elucidate fundamental disease mechanisms. Computer algorithms and programs for linkage analysis have formed the foundation for many disease gene detection projects, similarly databases of clinical findings have been widely used to support diagnostic decisions in dysmorphology and general human disease. For every disease type, genome sequence variations, particularly single nucleotide polymorphisms are mapped by comparing the genetic makeup of case and control groups. Methods that predict the effects of polymorphisms on protein stability are useful for the identification of possible disease associations, whereas structural effects can be assessed using methods to predict stability changes in proteins using sequence and/or structural information.

  7. Fenton Reaction-Generated Advanced Oxidation Protein Products Induces Inflammation in Human Embryonic Kidney Cells.

    PubMed

    Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; Torbitz, Vanessa Dorneles; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; Cubillos-Rojas, Monica; López, José Luis Rosa; Siebel, Anna Maria; Gomes, Patrícia; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues; Moresco, Rafael Noal

    2016-08-01

    Fenton reaction is a new mechanism able to generate advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) by exposing the human serum albumin to the Fenton system. Here, we characterized the effects of Fenton reaction-generated advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP-FR) on the gene transcription of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293). To investigate the effects of AOPP-FR and AOPP-HOCl on transcription of inflammatory genes, the NF-κB, COX-2, and IL-6 luciferase promoter activities were analyzed. AOPP-FR and AOPP-HOCl were able to induce the activation of the gene transcription of NF-κB, COX-2, and IL-6 in HEK 293 cells. However, the effects of AOPP-FR were significantly higher than the effects of AOPP-HOCl in relation to COX-2 and IL-6. AOPP-FR induces the activation of the gene transcription of NF-κB, COX-2, and IL-6 and may represent a novel pathogenic mediator of inflammation in kidney.

  8. Cryptic parasite revealed improved prospects for treatment and control of human cryptosporidiosis through advanced technologies.

    PubMed

    Jex, Aaron R; Smith, Huw V; Nolan, Matthew J; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Young, Neil D; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Gasser, Robin B

    2011-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important genus of parasitic protozoa of humans and other vertebrates and is a major cause of intestinal disease globally. Unlike many common causes of infectious enteritis, there are no widely available, effective vaccine or drug-based intervention strategies for Cryptosporidium, and control is focused mainly on prevention. This approach is particularly deficient for infections of severely immunocompromised and/or suppressed, the elderly or malnourished people. However, cryptosporidiosis also presents a significant burden on immunocompetent individuals, and can, for example have lasting effects on the physical and mental development of children infected at an early age. In the last few decades, our understanding of Cryptosporidium has expanded significantly in numerous areas, including the parasite life-cycle, the processes of excystation, cellular invasion and reproduction, and the interplay between parasite and host. Nonetheless, despite extensive research, many aspects of the biology of Cryptosporidium remain unknown, and treatment and control are challenging. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of Cryptosporidium, with a focus on major advances arising from the recently completed genome sequences of the two species of greatest relevance in humans, namely Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum. In addition, we discuss the potential of next-generation sequencing technologies, new advances in in silico analyses and progress in in vitro culturing systems to bridge these gaps and to lead toward effective treatment and control of cryptosporidiosis.

  9. A Human-Type Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Model with Advanced Fibrosis in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomohiro; Fujii, Hideki; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Kawada, Norifumi

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) progresses to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, which can lead to life-threatening liver failure and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of the present study was to create a rabbit model of NASH with advanced fibrosis (almost cirrhosis) by feeding the animals a diet supplemented with 0.75% cholesterol and 12% corn oil. After 9 months of feeding with this diet, the rabbits showed high total cholesterol levels in serum and liver tissues in the absence of insulin resistance. The livers became whitish and nodular. In addition, the number of rabbit macrophage antigen-positive cells and the expression of mRNAs for inflammatory cytokines showed a significant increase. Moreover, fibrotic septa composed of collagens and α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells were found between the central and portal veins, indicating alteration of the parenchymal architecture. There was also a marked increase of mRNAs for transforming growth factor-β1 and collagen 1A1. Comprehensive analysis of protein and gene expression revealed an imbalance of the antioxidant system and methionine metabolism. We also found that ezetimibe attenuated steatohepatitis in this model. In conclusion, the present rabbit model of NASH features advanced fibrosis that is close to cirrhosis and may be useful for analyzing the molecular mechanisms of human NASH. Ezetimibe blunted the development of NASH in this model, suggesting its potential clinical usefulness for human steatohepatitis. PMID:20489159

  10. Phase II study of recombinant human endostatin in patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Kulke, Matthew H; Bergsland, Emily K; Ryan, David P; Enzinger, Peter C; Lynch, Thomas J; Zhu, Andrew X; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Heymach, John V; Fogler, William E; Sidor, Carolyn; Michelini, Ann; Kinsella, Kate; Venook, Alan P; Fuchs, Charles S

    2006-08-01

    Endostatin is a 20-kd proteolytic fragment of collagen XVIII that, in preclinical studies, has been shown to have antiangiogenic and antitumor activity. Both preclinical and human phase I studies of recombinant human endostatin (rhEndostatin) suggested activity in neuroendocrine tumors, which are known to be hypervascular. We therefore performed a multicenter phase II study of rhEndostatin in patients with carcinoid or pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Forty-two patients with advanced pancreatic endocrine tumors or carcinoid tumors were treated with rhEndostatin administered as a bid subcutaneous injection at a starting dose of 60 mg/m2/d. Steady-state trough levels were obtained after 6 weeks of therapy; patients who did not achieve a target therapeutic level of 300 ng/mL underwent dose escalation to 90 mg/m2/d. Patients were observed for evidence of toxicity, response, and survival. rhEndostatin was associated with minimal toxicity. However, among 40 patients assessable for radiologic response, none experienced partial response to therapy, as defined by WHO criteria. The median steady-state trough level achieved after dose escalation was 331 ng/mL, within the postulated therapeutic range. Treatment with rhEndostatin did not result in significant tumor regression in patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors.

  11. Treatment of advanced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 disease with the viral entry inhibitor PRO 542.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Israel, Robert J; Lowy, Israel; Ostrow, Nancy A; Vassilatos, Linda S; Barish, Melanie; Tran, Diep N H; Sullivan, Brian M; Ketas, Thomas J; O'Neill, Tobias J; Nagashima, Kirsten A; Huang, Wei; Petropoulos, Christos J; Moore, John P; Maddon, Paul J; Olson, William C

    2004-02-01

    Viral entry inhibitors represent an emerging mode of therapy for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. PRO 542 (CD4-immunoglobulin G2) is a tetravalent CD4-immunoglobulin fusion protein that broadly neutralizes primary HIV-1 isolates. PRO 542 binds to the viral surface glycoprotein gp120 and blocks attachment and entry of virus into CD4(+) cells. Previously, PRO 542 demonstrated antiviral activity without significant toxicity when tested at single doses ranging to 10 mg/kg. In this study, 12 HIV-infected individuals were treated with 25-mg/kg single-dose PRO 542 and then monitored for safety, antiviral effects, and PRO 542 pharmacokinetics for 6 weeks. The study examined two treatment cohorts that differed in the extent of HIV-1 disease progression. PRO 542 at 25 mg/kg was well tolerated and demonstrated a serum half-life of 3 days. Statistically significant acute reductions in HIV-1 RNA levels were observed across all study patients, and greater antiviral effects were observed in the cohort of patients with more advanced HIV-1 disease. In advanced disease (HIV-1 RNA > 100,000 copies/ml; CD4 lymphocytes < 200 cells/mm(3)), PRO 542 mediated an 80% response rate and statistically significant approximately 0.5 log(10) mean reductions in viral load for 4 to 6 weeks posttreatment. Similar findings were obtained in an analysis of all (n = 11) advanced disease patients treated to date with single doses of PRO 542 ranging from 1 to 25 mg/kg. In addition, a significant correlation was observed between antiviral effects observed in vivo and viral susceptibility to PRO 542 in vitro. The findings support continued development of PRO 542 for salvage therapy of advanced HIV-1 disease.

  12. Lin28 Enhances Tumorigenesis and is Associated With Advanced Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Srinivas R.; Powers, John T.; Einhorn, William; Hoshida, Yujin; Ng, Tony; Toffanin, Sara; O'Sullivan, Maureen; Lu, Jun; Philips, Letha A.; Lockhart, Victoria L.; Shah, Samar P.; Tanwar, Pradeep S.; Mermel, Craig H.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Azam, Mohammad; Teixeira, Jose; Meyerson, Matthew; Hughes, Timothy P.; Llovet, Josep M; Radich, Jerald; Mullighan, Charles G.; Golub, Todd R.; Sorensen, Poul H.; Daley, George Q.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple members of the let-7 family of miRNAs are often repressed in human cancers1,2, thereby promoting oncogenesis by de-repressing the targets K-Ras, c-Myc, and HMGA2 3,4. However, the mechanism by which let-7 miRNAs are coordinately repressed is unclear. The RNA-binding proteins Lin28 and Lin28B block let-7 precursors from being processed to mature miRNAs5–8, suggesting that over-expression of Lin28/Lin28B might promote malignancy via repression of let-7. Here we show that LIN28 and LIN28B are over-expressed in primary human tumors and human cancer cell lines (overall frequency ∼15%), and that over-expression is linked to repression of let-7 family miRNAs and de-repression of let-7 targets. Lin28/Lin28B facilitate cellular transformation in vitro, and over-expression is associated with advanced disease across multiple tumor types. Our work provides a mechanism for the coordinate repression of let-7 miRNAs observed in a subset of human cancers, and associates activation of LIN28/LIN28B with poor clinical prognosis. PMID:19483683

  13. Heart research advances using database search engines, Human Protein Atlas and the Sydney Heart Bank.

    PubMed

    Li, Amy; Estigoy, Colleen; Raftery, Mark; Cameron, Darryl; Odeberg, Jacob; Pontén, Fredrik; Lal, Sean; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G

    2013-10-01

    This Methodological Review is intended as a guide for research students who may have just discovered a human "novel" cardiac protein, but it may also help hard-pressed reviewers of journal submissions on a "novel" protein reported in an animal model of human heart failure. Whether you are an expert or not, you may know little or nothing about this particular protein of interest. In this review we provide a strategic guide on how to proceed. We ask: How do you discover what has been published (even in an abstract or research report) about this protein? Everyone knows how to undertake literature searches using PubMed and Medline but these are usually encyclopaedic, often producing long lists of papers, most of which are either irrelevant or only vaguely relevant to your query. Relatively few will be aware of more advanced search engines such as Google Scholar and even fewer will know about Quertle. Next, we provide a strategy for discovering if your "novel" protein is expressed in the normal, healthy human heart, and if it is, we show you how to investigate its subcellular location. This can usually be achieved by visiting the website "Human Protein Atlas" without doing a single experiment. Finally, we provide a pathway to discovering if your protein of interest changes its expression level with heart failure/disease or with ageing.

  14. Ultra-high field MRI: Advancing systems neuroscience towards mesoscopic human brain function.

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, Serge O; Fracasso, Alessio; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Siero, Jeroen C W; Petridou, Natalia

    2017-01-16

    Human MRI scanners at ultra-high magnetic field strengths of 7 T and higher are increasingly available to the neuroscience community. A key advantage brought by ultra-high field MRI is the possibility to increase the spatial resolution at which data is acquired, with little reduction in image quality. This opens a new set of opportunities for neuroscience, allowing investigators to map the human cortex at an unprecedented level of detail. In this review, we present recent work that capitalizes on the increased signal-to-noise ratio available at ultra-high field and discuss the theoretical advances with a focus on sensory and motor systems neuroscience. Further, we review research performed at sub-millimeter spatial resolution and discuss the limits and the potential of ultra-high field imaging for structural and functional imaging in human cortex. The increased spatial resolution achievable at ultra-high field has the potential to unveil the fundamental computations performed within a given cortical area, ultimately allowing the visualization of the mesoscopic organization of human cortex at the functional and structural level.

  15. Advances in electronic-nose technologies for the detection of volatile biomarker metabolites in the human breath

    Treesearch

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in the use of electronic-nose (e-nose) devices to analyze human breath profiles for the presence of specific volatile metabolites, known as biomarkers or chemical bio-indicators of specific human diseases, metabolic disorders and the overall health status of individuals, are providing the potential for new noninvasive tools and techniques useful to...

  16. Quality assurance and risk management: Perspectives on Human Factors Certification of Advanced Aviation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Robert M.; Macleod, Iain S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is based on the experience of engineering psychologists advising the U.K. Ministry of Defense (MoD) on the procurement of advanced aviation systems that conform to good human engineering (HE) practice. Traditional approaches to HE in systems procurement focus on the physical nature of the human-machine interface. Advanced aviation systems present increasingly complex design requirements for human functional integration, information processing, and cognitive task performance effectiveness. These developing requirements present new challenges for HE quality assurance (QA) and risk management, requiring focus on design processes as well as on design content or product. A new approach to the application of HE, recently adopted by NATO, provides more systematic ordering and control of HE processes and activities to meet the challenges of advanced aircrew systems design. This systematic approach to HE has been applied by MoD to the procurement of mission systems for the Royal Navy Merlin helicopter. In MoD procurement, certification is a judicial function, essentially independent of the service customer and industry contractor. Certification decisions are based on advice from MoD's appointed Acceptance Agency. Test and evaluation (T&E) conducted by the contractor and by the Acceptance Agency provide evidence for certification. Certification identifies limitations of systems upon release to the service. Evidence of compliance with HE standards traditionally forms the main basis of HE certification and significant non-compliance could restrict release. The systems HE approach shows concern for the quality of processes as well as for the content of the product. Human factors certification should be concerned with the quality of HE processes as well as products. Certification should require proof of process as well as proof of content and performance. QA criteria such as completeness, consistency, timeliness, and compatibility provide generic guidelines for

  17. Correlation of Respirator Fit Measured on Human Subjects and a Static Advanced Headform

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Michael S.; He, Xinjian; Joseph, Michael E.; Zhuang, Ziqing; Heimbuch, Brian K.; Shaffer, Ronald E.; Choe, Melanie; Wander, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the correlation of N95 filtering face-piece respirator (FFR) fit between a Static Advanced Headform (StAH) and 10 human test subjects. Quantitative fit evaluations were performed on test subjects who made three visits to the laboratory. On each visit, one fit evaluation was performed on eight different FFRs of various model/size variations. Additionally, subject breathing patterns were recorded. Each fit evaluation comprised three two-minute exercises: “Normal Breathing,” “Deep Breathing,” and again “Normal Breathing.” The overall test fit factors (FF) for human tests were recorded. The same respirator samples were later mounted on the StAH and the overall test manikin fit factors (MFF) were assessed utilizing the recorded human breathing patterns. Linear regression was performed on the mean log10-transformed FF and MFF values to assess the relationship between the values obtained from humans and the StAH. This is the first study to report a positive correlation of respirator fit between a headform and test subjects. The linear regression by respirator resulted in R2 = 0.95, indicating a strong linear correlation between FF and MFF. For all respirators the geometric mean (GM) FF values were consistently higher than those of the GM MFF. For 50% of respirators, GM FF and GM MFF values were significantly different between humans and the StAH. For data grouped by subject/respirator combinations, the linear regression resulted in R2 = 0.49. A weaker correlation (R2 = 0.11) was found using only data paired by subject/respirator combination where both the test subject and StAH had passed a real-time leak check before performing the fit evaluation. For six respirators, the difference in passing rates between the StAH and humans was < 20%, while two respirators showed a difference of 29% and 43%. For data by test subject, GM FF and GM MFF values were significantly different for 40% of the subjects. Overall, the advanced headform system has

  18. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Sunny; Miller, Avraham; Agarwal, Chirag; Zakin, Elina; Acholonu, Michael; Gidwani, Umesh; Sharma, Abhishek; Kulbak, Guy; Shani, Jacob; Chen, On

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstable or vulnerable to rupture. The presence of inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaque has been considered as one of the initial events which convert a stable plaque into an unstable and vulnerable plaque. This paper systemically reviews the noninvasive and invasive imaging modalities that are currently available to detect this inflammatory process, at least in the intermediate stages, and discusses the ongoing studies that will help us to better understand and identify it at the molecular level. PMID:26798515

  19. Intravascular photoacoustic tomography for characterization of atherosclerotic lipid and inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Qin, Huan; Shi, Yujiao; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a fast growing imaging technology depending on its high optical resolution of optics while taking the advantage of the high penetration depth of ultrasound. In this paper, we demonstrate the new progress in the photoacoustic imaging. Atherosclerosis is characterized by a progressive build-up of lipid in the arterial wall, which is known as plaque. Histological studies demonstrate that the primary cause of acute cardiovascular events is the rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Lipid and inflammation within the plaque are related to influence the propensity of plaques to disrupt. Photoacoustic intravascular tomography (IVPAT) holds a great advantage in providing comprehensive morphological and functional information of plaques. Lipid relative concentration maps of atherosclerotic aorta were obtained and compared with histology. Furthermore, by selectively targeting the intravascular inflammatory cytokines, IVPAT is also capable of mapping the inflamed area and determining the degree of inflammation.

  20. Adventitial inflammation and its interaction with intimal atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Wangler, Susanne; Gleissner, Christian A.; Korosoglou, Grigorios; Katus, Hugo A.; Erbel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The presence of adventitial inflammation in correlation with atherosclerotic lesions has been recognized for decades. In the last years, several studies have investigated the relevance and impact of adventitial inflammation on atherogenesis. In the abdominal aorta of elderly Apoe−/− mice, adventitial inflammatory structures were characterized as organized ectopic lymphoid tissue, and therefore termed adventitial tertiary lymphoid organs (ATLOs). These ATLOs possess similarities in development, structure and function to secondary lymphoid organs. A crosstalk between intimal atherosclerotic lesions and ATLOs has been suggested, and several studies could demonstrate a potential role for medial vascular smooth muscle cells in this process. We here review the development, phenotypic characteristics, and function of ATLOs in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we discuss the possible role of medial vascular smooth muscle cells and their interaction between plaque and ATLOs. PMID:25152736

  1. Photodynamic diagnostic in atherosclerotic artery wall of rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbani, Elaine A.; Rodrigues, Katia C.; Hage, Raduan; Duarte, Janaina; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.; Villaverde, Antonio G. J. B.; Zangaro, Renato A.; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.

    2001-05-01

    A growing number of studies have demonstrated that autofluorescence and induced fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to distinguish normal and abnormal tissues in vivo. Through photochemical accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions it is possible to obtain induced fluorescence, this accumulation has been demonstrated in many researches. The aim of this study was to diagnose, by aluminum phthalocyanine transadventitial fluorescence, atherosclerotic plaques in artery wall of rabbits. Five male Norfolk rabbits were submitted to a high level cholesterol diet for 9 weeks. When the blood cholesterol level reached around 1000 mg/dl three of these animals were injected intravenously 50(M/50(l of aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPc). After 24 hours these animals were submitted to a surgery to expose the iliac artery. The transadventitial fluorescence spectra were acquired in several points over the artery. Characteristic peaks of the collagen, the porphyrin and the induced by AlPc were observed.

  2. Shear stress-induced atherosclerotic plaque composition in ApoE(-/-) mice is modulated by connexin37.

    PubMed

    Pfenniger, A; Meens, M J; Pedrigi, R M; Foglia, B; Sutter, E; Pelli, G; Rochemont, V; Petrova, T V; Krams, R; Kwak, B R

    2015-11-01

    Shear stress patterns influence atherogenesis and plaque stability; low laminar shear stress (LLSS) promotes unstable plaques whereas oscillatory shear stress (OSS) induces more stable plaques. Endothelial connexin37 (Cx37) expression is also regulated by shear stress, which may contribute to localization of atherosclerotic disease. Moreover, Cx37 reduces initiation of atherosclerosis by inhibiting monocyte adhesion. The present work investigates the effect of Cx37 on the phenotype of plaques induced by LLSS or OSS. Shear stress-modifying casts were placed around the common carotid artery of ApoE(-/-) or ApoE(-/-)Cx37(-/-) mice, and animals were placed on a high-cholesterol diet for 6 or 9 weeks. Atherosclerotic plaque size and composition were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Plaque size in response to OSS was increased in ApoE(-/-)Cx37(-/-) mice compared to ApoE(-/-) animals. Most plaques contained high lipid and macrophage content and a low amount of collagen. In ApoE(-/-) mice, macrophages were more prominent in LLSS than OSS plaques. This difference was reversed in ApoE(-/-)Cx37(-/-) animals, with a predominance of macrophages in OSS plaques. The increase in macrophage content in ApoE(-/-)Cx37(-/-) OSS plaques was mainly due to increased accumulation of M1 and Mox macrophage subtypes. Cx37 expression in macrophages did not affect their proliferation or their polarization in vitro. Cx37 deletion increased the size of atherosclerotic lesions in OSS regions and abrogated the development of a stable plaque phenotype under OSS in ApoE(-/-) mice. Hence, local hemodynamic factors may modify the risk for adverse atherosclerotic disease outcomes associated to a polymorphism in the human Cx37 gene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Deficiency of Endogenous Acute Phase Serum Amyloid A Does Not Impact Atherosclerotic Lesions in ApoE-/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    De Beer, Maria C; Wroblewski, Joanne M; Noffsinger, Victoria P; Rateri, Debra L; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Ji, Ailing; Shridas, Preetha; Thompson, Joel C; van der Westhuyzen, Deneys R; Tannock, Lisa R; Daugherty, Alan; Webb, Nancy R; De Beer, Frederick C

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although elevated plasma concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA) are strongly associated with increased risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in humans, the role of SAA in the pathogenesis of lesion formation remains obscure. Our goal was to determine the impact of SAA deficiency on atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice. Approach and Results ApoE-/- mice, either wild type or deficient in both major acute phase SAA isoforms, SAA1.1 and SAA2.1 (SAAWT and SAAKO, respectively), were fed a normal rodent diet for 50 weeks. Female, but not male SAAKO mice had a modest increase (22%; p ≤ 0.05) in plasma cholesterol concentrations and a 53% increase in adipose mass compared to SAAWT mice that did not impact the plasma cytokine levels or the expression of adipose tissue inflammatory markers. SAA deficiency did not impact lipoprotein cholesterol distributions or plasma triglyceride concentrations in either male or female mice. Atherosclerotic lesion areas measured on the intimal surfaces of the arch, thoracic, and abdominal regions were not significantly different between SAAKO and SAAWT mice in either gender. To accelerate lesion formation, mice were fed a Western diet for 12 weeks. SAA deficiency had no effect on diet-induced alterations in plasma cholesterol, triglyceride or cytokine concentrationsn or on aortic atherosclerotic lesion areas in either male or female mice. In addition, SAA deficiency in male mice had no effect on lesion areas or macrophage accumulation in the aortic roots. Conclusions The absence of endogenous SAA1.1 and 2.1 does not impact atherosclerotic lipid deposition in apoE-/- mice fed either normal or Western diets. PMID:24265416

  4. Macrophage-targeted photodynamic detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque