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Sample records for advanced human immunodeficiency

  1. Addressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nokes, Kathleen M.; Stein, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 23 advanced practice nursing programs showed only 3 had HIV-specific graduate-level nursing courses. Recommendations were made for HIV-specific courses, integration of HIV content into other courses, use of Centers for Disease Control and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, and subspecialties in HIV nursing. (SK)

  2. Recent advances in synthetic carbohydrate-based human immunodeficiency virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenyuan; Qin, Chunjun; Hu, Jing; Guo, Xiaoqiang; Yin, Jian

    2016-04-01

    An effective vaccine for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is urgently needed to prevent HIV infection and progression to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). As glycosylation of viral proteins becomes better understood, carbohydrate-based antiviral vaccines against special viruses have attracted much attention. Significant efforts in carbohydrate synthesis and immunogenicity research have resulted in the development of multiple carbohydrate-based HIV vaccines. This review summarizes recent advances in synthetic carbohydrate-based vaccines design strategies and the applications of these vaccines in the prevention of HIV. PMID:26992403

  3. Passive immunotherapy in the treatment of advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J M; Colman, N; Ostrow, N A; Simson, R W; Tomesch, D; Marlin, L; Rao, M; Mills, J L; Clemens, J; Prince, A M

    1993-08-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of passive immunotherapy for advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of human anti-HIV hyperimmune plasma was conducted. Sixty-three subjects with stage IV HIV disease (AIDS) were randomized to received 250 mL of either HIV-immune plasma or HIV antibody-negative plasma every 4 weeks. Although nonsignificant trends toward improved survival and delayed occurrence of a new opportunistic infection were noted, no significant effects on absolute CD4 lymphocyte counts or quantitative HIV viremia were seen. The only notable toxicity was the allergenicity to be expected from infusing plasma products, usually manifesting as urticaria. Thus, results do not rule out the potential usefulness of passive immunization with different preparations, but did fail to demonstrate clinical benefit of the product studied. PMID:8101550

  4. Patients Presenting with Advanced Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease: Epidemiological Features by Age Group

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We explored factors influencing presentation with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease by age group. Data were derived from a city-wide cross-sectional survey of 759 HIV-infected adults living in Seoul, Korea. The significance of each observed factor was assessed via multivariate logistic regression. Of subjects aged 20-34 years, lower educational level had a positive influence on presentation with advanced HIV disease (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-4.34); those recently diagnosed with HIV were more likely to be presented with advanced HIV disease (aOR, 3.17; 95% CI, 0.99-10.2). Of the subjects aged 35-49 years, those w ith advanced HIV disease were more likely to have been diagnosed during health check-ups (aOR, 2.91; 95% CI, 1.15-7.32) or via clinical manifestations (aOR, 3.61; 95% CI, 1.39-9.36). Of the subjects aged ≥ 50 years, presentation with advanced HIV disease was significantly more common in older subjects (aOR per increment of 5 years, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.32-3.23) and less common among individuals diagnosed with HIV in 2000-2006 (aOR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.04-0.83). In conclusion, a lower educational level in younger subjects and more advanced age in older subjects positively influence the presentation of advanced HIV disease. PMID:26839469

  5. Recent key advances in human immunodeficiency virus medicine and implications for China

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this article we summarize several recent major developments in human immunodeficiency virus treatment, prevention, outcome, and social policy change. Updated international guidelines endorse more aggressive treatment strategies and safer antiretroviral drugs. New antiretroviral options are being tested. Important lessons were learned in the areas of human immunodeficiency virus vaccines and microbicide gels from clinical studies, and additional trials in prevention, especially pre-exposure prophylaxis, are nearing completion. Insight into the role of the virus in the pathogenesis of diseases traditionally thought to be unrelated to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome has become a driving force for earlier and universal therapy. Lastly, we review important achievements of and future challenges facing China as she steps into her eighth year of the National Free Antiretroviral Treatment Program. PMID:20500898

  6. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... incisions made in the mother’s abdomen and uterus. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Immune System: ...

  7. Advances of gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Candotti, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    In the recent past, the gene therapy field has witnessed a remarkable series of successes, many of which have involved primary immunodeficiency diseases, such as X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. While such progress has widened the choice of therapeutic options in some specific cases of primary immunodeficiency, much remains to be done to extend the geographical availability of such an advanced approach and to increase the number of diseases that can be targeted. At the same time, emerging technologies are stimulating intensive investigations that may lead to the application of precise genetic editing as the next form of gene therapy for these and other human genetic diseases. PMID:27508076

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention.

    PubMed

    Davis, Teaniese Latham; DiClemente, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. Surveillance data from 2012 indicate an estimated 1.2 million people aged 13 years and older were living with HIV infection in the United States, and 12.8% do not know their status. There are approximately 50,000 new HIV infections annually. With no available cure for HIV, primary prevention to reduce incident cases of HIV is essential. Strategies to prevent HIV transmission include reducing sexual risk behavior and needle sharing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has multiple resources available for primary and secondary prevention to reduce disease transmission and severity. PMID:26980130

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus endocrinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Uma; Sengupta, Nilanjan; Mukhopadhyay, Prasanta; Roy, Keshab Sinha

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) endocrinopathy encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders. Almost all the endocrine organs are virtually affected by HIV infection. HIV can directly alter glandular function. More commonly secondary endocrine dysfunction occurs due to opportunistic infections and neoplasms in immunocompromised state. The complex interaction between HIV infection and endocrine system may be manifested as subtle biochemical and hormonal perturbation to overt glandular failure. Antiretroviral therapy as well as other essential medications often result in adverse endocrinal consequences. Apart from adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism, diabetes and bone loss, AIDS wasting syndrome and HIV lipodystrophy need special reference. Endocrinal evaluation should proceed as in other patients with suspected endocrine dysfunction. Available treatment options have been shown to improve quality of life and long-term mortality in AIDS patients. PMID:22028995

  10. Cryptococcal Antigenemia in Nigerian Patients With Advanced Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Influence of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Oladele, Rita O.; Akanmu, Alani S.; Nwosu, Augustina O.; Ogunsola, Folasade T.; Richardson, Malcolm D.; Denning, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cryptococcal meningitis has a high mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. This is preventable with early screening and preemptive therapy. We evaluated the prevalence of cryptococcal disease by antigen testing, possible associated factors, and outcomes in HIV-infected patients being managed in a tertiary hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods. Sera were collected from 214 consenting HIV-infected participants with CD4+ counts <250 cells/mm3, irrespective of their antiretroviral therapy (ART) status, between November 2014 and May 2015. A cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) lateral flow assay was used for testing. Pertinent clinical data were obtained from patients and their case notes. Results. Of the 214 participants, females (124; 57.9%) outnumbered males. Mean age was 41.3 ± 9.4 (standard deviation) years. The majority (204; 95.3%) were ART experienced. The median CD4+ cell count was 160 cells/mm3 (interquartile range, 90–210). The overall seroprevalence of cryptococcal antigenemia was 8.9% (19 of 214); 6 of 61 (9.8%) in those with CD4+ cell counts <100 cells/mm3, 4 of 80 (5.0%) in the 100–200 group, and 9 of 73 (12.3%) in 200–250 cells/mm3 group. Among ART-naive patients, 1 of 10 (10%) was CrAg positive. Twenty-seven of 214 (12.6%) had associated oral thrush. Potential baseline meningitis symptoms (3 of 214 [1.4%] experienced neck pain or stiffness and 21 of 214 [9.8%] experienced headache) were common in the study group, but the result was not statistically significant in relation to CrAg positivity. Two of 19 (10.5%) CrAg-positive patients died, 10 of 19 (52.6%) were lost to follow up, and 7 of 19 (36.8%) were alive. Empirical fluconazole was routinely given to those with low CD4 counts <100 cells/mm3, which was unrelated to CrAg positivity (P = .018). Conclusions. We report a prevalence of 8.9% cryptococcal antigenemia in a setting where first-line antifungals are not readily available. We recommend Cr

  11. Cryptococcal Antigenemia in Nigerian Patients With Advanced Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Influence of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence.

    PubMed

    Oladele, Rita O; Akanmu, Alani S; Nwosu, Augustina O; Ogunsola, Folasade T; Richardson, Malcolm D; Denning, David W

    2016-03-01

    Background.  Cryptococcal meningitis has a high mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. This is preventable with early screening and preemptive therapy. We evaluated the prevalence of cryptococcal disease by antigen testing, possible associated factors, and outcomes in HIV-infected patients being managed in a tertiary hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods.  Sera were collected from 214 consenting HIV-infected participants with CD4(+) counts <250 cells/mm(3), irrespective of their antiretroviral therapy (ART) status, between November 2014 and May 2015. A cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) lateral flow assay was used for testing. Pertinent clinical data were obtained from patients and their case notes. Results.  Of the 214 participants, females (124; 57.9%) outnumbered males. Mean age was 41.3 ± 9.4 (standard deviation) years. The majority (204; 95.3%) were ART experienced. The median CD4(+) cell count was 160 cells/mm(3) (interquartile range, 90-210). The overall seroprevalence of cryptococcal antigenemia was 8.9% (19 of 214); 6 of 61 (9.8%) in those with CD4(+) cell counts <100 cells/mm(3), 4 of 80 (5.0%) in the 100-200 group, and 9 of 73 (12.3%) in 200-250 cells/mm(3) group. Among ART-naive patients, 1 of 10 (10%) was CrAg positive. Twenty-seven of 214 (12.6%) had associated oral thrush. Potential baseline meningitis symptoms (3 of 214 [1.4%] experienced neck pain or stiffness and 21 of 214 [9.8%] experienced headache) were common in the study group, but the result was not statistically significant in relation to CrAg positivity. Two of 19 (10.5%) CrAg-positive patients died, 10 of 19 (52.6%) were lost to follow up, and 7 of 19 (36.8%) were alive. Empirical fluconazole was routinely given to those with low CD4 counts <100 cells/mm(3), which was unrelated to CrAg positivity (P = .018). Conclusions.  We report a prevalence of 8.9% cryptococcal antigenemia in a setting where first-line antifungals are not readily available. We

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection Information for adults A A ... weeks following exposure to HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus). Chronic infection with this virus can cause AIDS ( ...

  13. Phase I trial of valaciclovir, the L-valyl ester of acyclovir, in patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, M A; Gallant, J; Wang, L H; Coakley, D; Weller, S; Gary, D; Squires, L; Smiley, M L; Blum, M R; Feinberg, J

    1994-01-01

    Valaciclovir, the L-valyl ester of acyclovir, is rapidly and extensively converted in humans to acyclovir after oral administration by first-pass metabolism. A phase I study was conducted in two cohorts of volunteers with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease (absolute CD4 lymphocyte count of < 150 cells per microliters) who received oral valaciclovir at dosages of 1,000 or 2,000 mg four times daily for 30 days. All patients were clinically stable without any changes in underlying HIV-related medications for > or = 6 weeks prior to entry in study; these medications were continued throughout the study. Multiple-dose administration of valaciclovir showed a generally favorable safety profile. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain each were reported in < or = 31% of the patients; of these symptoms, only one episode of diarrhea was considered causally related to valaciclovir exposure. Four patients developed neutropenia (two at each dose level) which was not clinically significant. There were no renal or neurologic adverse events. Valaciclovir was rapidly absorbed and converted to acyclovir, with plasma valaciclovir levels generally undetectable or levels of < or = 0.4 microgram/ml. After 3 h postdosing, valaciclovir was not detectable in plasma. Acyclovir was measurable in plasma as early as 15 min following valaciclovir dosing, and plasma concentrations of acyclovir greatly exceeded those of valaciclovir. The mean values for the maximum concentration of drug in plasma, time to maximum concentration of drug in plasma, area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity, and apparent half-life of acyclovir obtained after single- and multiple-dose valaciclovir administration in HIV-infected patients were similar to those reported in normal healthy volunteers. The time to maximum concentration in serum and half-life of acyclovir after valaciclovir administration were approximately 2 and 3 h, respectively, which were similar to those

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Eirini; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Madesis, Athanasios; Karaiskos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a serious and relatively frequent complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that may associate with increased morbidity and mortality and may prove difficult to manage, especially in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:25337392

  15. Adolescents and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J R

    1992-12-01

    As of March 31, 1992, individuals 13 to 19 years of age had been diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; over one third were diagnosed in the past 2 years alone. Because of the long incubation period from initial infection to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosis, the majority of young adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were probably initially infected as adolescents. In 1991, 34% of adolescents with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were female, and their predominant mode of transmission was heterosexual contact. Human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence studies of adolescents show a male-to-female ratio approaching 1:1, with many human immunodeficiency virus-infected adolescent women identifying none of the standard risk. Factors such as sexual and drug experimentation, risk taking, and sense of invulnerability so characteristic of adolescence put adolescents at special risk for human immunodeficiency virus. There is no published information on if or how clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus disease in adolescents might differ from those seen in adults. Medical care should be broad-based and should include access to clinical trials for new drug treatments. General knowledge levels about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are high among US adolescents, but behavioral changes have lagged behind. All adolescents should be targeted for intensive education about human immunodeficiency virus along with interventions designed to enhance their general coping, communication, and decision-making skills. PMID:1450349

  16. Pediatric human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, J B

    1996-01-01

    In the past decade, an increase in pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has had a substantial impact on childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. The vertical transmission of HIV from mother to infant accounts for the vast majority of these cases. Identification of HIV-infected pregnant women needs to be impoved so that appropriate therapy can be initiated for both mothers and infants. While recent data demonstrate a dramatic decrease in HIV transmission from a subset of women treated with zidovudine during pregnancy, further efforts at reducing transmission are desperately needed. This review focuses on vertically transmitted HIV infection in children, its epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, natural history, and clinical manifestations including infectious and noninfectious complications. An overview of the complex medical management of these children ensues, including the use of antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infection prophylaxis is reviewed, along with the important role of other supportive therapies. PMID:8894346

  17. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of this screening: (1) Everyone aged 15 to ... the disease to other people. Potential Benefits and Harms of Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The ...

  18. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jake; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell

    2016-08-01

    Improved survival with combination antiretroviral therapy has led to a dramatic increase in the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals 50 years of age or older such that by 2020 more than 50% of HIV-infected persons in the United States will be above this age. Recent studies confirm that antiretroviral therapy should be offered to all HIV-infected patients regardless of age, symptoms, CD4+ cell count, or HIV viral load. However, when compared with HIV-uninfected populations, even with suppression of measurable HIV replication, older individuals are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease, malignancies, liver disease, and other comorbidities. PMID:27394024

  19. The Epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasner, Peter D.; Kaslow, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews epidemiology and natural history of human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Discusses early and late clinical manifestations, diagnosis of infection, incubation and latency periods, and survival time. Reviews data from published literature on distribution of HIV infection in adult United States population and factors that…

  20. Women at Risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadagno, David; And Others

    This article reports results from a survey among women at risk for contracting Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) as well as transmitting it in a vertical (to offspring) and horizontal (sexual partner or intravenous [IV] drug usage) mode. Little is known about the extent of HIV knowledge, sexual behaviors, and IV drug usage for women at risk for…

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic is clearly one of the most serious health-care crises in the professional lives of contemporary physicians. It cannot be regarded as a curiosity to be dealt with by inner-city infectious-disease experts, but rather must be considered a problem for all health-care providers and a problem in which the obstetrician-gynecologist has a special role to play. PMID:18475370

  2. Practical diagnostic testing for human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J B; Balfour, H H

    1988-01-01

    Since the discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in 1983, there has been a proliferation of diagnostic tests. These assays can be used to detect the presence of HIV antibody, HIV antigen, HIV ribonucleic and deoxyribonucleic acids, and HIV reverse transcriptase. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blot, radioimmunoprecipitation assays, indirect immunofluorescence assays, reverse transcriptase assays, and several molecular hybridization techniques are currently available. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent, Western blot, and indirect immunofluorescence assays for HIV antibody are very sensitive, specific, and adaptable to most laboratories. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for HIV antigen is also readily adaptable to most laboratories and will be commercially available soon. While the other assays are more tedious, they are valuable confirmatory tests and are suitable for reference laboratories. The biohazards of performing HIV testing can be minimized with proper biosafety measures. Images PMID:3060241

  3. 78 FR 29755 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... (78 FR 21613), FDA published a document that announced the disease ] areas for meetings in fiscal... Federal Register document for public comment that was published on September 24, 2012 (77 FR 58849), and a... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused...

  4. 78 FR 46969 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... of May 21, 2013 (78 FR 29755). In that notice, FDA requested public comment regarding patients... INFORMATION: I. Background In the Federal Register of May 21, 2013 (78 FR 29755), FDA announced the notice of... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused...

  5. Recent Advances in DOCK8 Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Jing, Huie; Su, Helen C

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of the genetic basis of DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome (DIDS) in 2009, several hundred patients worldwide have been reported, validating and extending the initial clinical descriptions. Importantly, the beneficial role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for this disease has emerged, providing impetus for improved diagnosis. Additionally, several groups have further elucidated the biological functions of DOCK8 in the immune system that help explain disease pathogenesis. Here, we summarize these recent developments. PMID:27207373

  6. 78 FR 33848 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Human Immunodeficiency Virus... availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing... guidance for industry entitled ``Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing Antiretroviral...

  7. Intrinsic cellular defenses against human immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Melo, Daniel; Venkatesh, Siddarth; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2012-09-21

    Viral infections are often detrimental to host survival and reproduction. Consequently, hosts have evolved a variety of mechanisms to defend themselves against viruses. A component of this arsenal is a set of proteins, termed restriction factors, which exhibit direct antiviral activity. Among these are several classes of proteins (APOBEC3, TRIM5, Tetherin, and SAMHD1) that inhibit the replication of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses. Here, we outline the features, mechanisms, and evolution of these defense mechanisms. We also speculate on how restriction factors arose, how they might interact with the conventional innate and adaptive immune systems, and how an understanding of these intrinsic cellular defenses might be usefully exploited. PMID:22999946

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alaa M.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV-) related pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare complication of HIV infection. The pathophysiology of HIV-related PAH is complex, with viral proteins seeming to play the major role. However, other factors, such as coinfection with other microorganisms and HIV-related systemic inflammation, might also contribute. The clinical presentation of HIV-related PAH and diagnosis is similar to other forms of pulmonary hypertension. Both PAH-specific therapies and HAART are important in HIV-related PAH management. Future studies investigating the pathogenesis are needed to discover new therapeutic targets and treatments. PMID:24027641

  9. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b)...

  10. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b)...

  11. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b)...

  12. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b)...

  13. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b)...

  14. Ocular syphilis in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John P; Huang, Lynn L; Rosberger, Daniel F

    2015-06-01

    As Acquired Immunodeficiency Disease (AIDS) turns thirty-years old, much progress has been made. 56,000 new cases of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are expected in Americans this year. At least half or more will be in African Americans. Reports of the association between syphilis and HIV infection are well documented. We present a case of bilateral optic neuritis and panuveitis as the initial presentation in a previously undiagnosed patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis. PMID:27269502

  15. Update on Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Yesufu, Omobolaji T.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) occurs mainly in West Africa, but an increasing number of cases have been recognized in Europe, India, and the United States. In this era of global integration, clinicians must be aware of when to consider the diagnosis of HIV-2 infection and how to test for this virus. Although there is debate regarding when therapy should be initiated and which regimen should be chosen, recent trials have provided important information on treatment options for HIV-2 infection. In this review, we present information on recent clinical advances in our understanding of HIV-2 infection and highlight remaining diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. PMID:21367732

  16. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Related Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Nájera, Rafael; Herrera, M. I.; Andrés, R. de

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current knowledge on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and related retroviruses, describing basic characteristics of this new group of viruses such as morphologic and genetic structure, biological and cultural properties, virus growth characteristics, genetic variability and virus replication. The discovery of new human and simian retroviruses has prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to convene a group of experts to establish criteria for their characterization. This will allow rapid identification of new variants that may arise and allow public health measures to be implemented accordingly. Different approaches are made to nomenclature in view of the evolution of knowledge about these viruses, and a system of nomenclature has been proposed by the WHO working group. This system, inspired by the one developed for the influenza viruses, is practical and descriptive, providing information on the origins of the organism and its type. Images PMID:2829446

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis in SCID mice.

    PubMed Central

    Persidsky, Y.; Limoges, J.; McComb, R.; Bock, P.; Baldwin, T.; Tyor, W.; Patil, A.; Nottet, H. S.; Epstein, L.; Gelbard, H.; Flanagan, E.; Reinhard, J.; Pirruccello, S. J.; Gendelman, H. E.

    1996-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is neuroinvasive and commonly causes cognitive and motor deficits during the later stages of viral infection. (referred to as HIV dementia). The mechanism(s) for disease revolves around secretory products produced from immune-activated brain macrophages/microglia. Recently, we developed an animal model system for HIV dementia that contains xenografts of HIV-1-infected cells inoculated into brains of mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). This animal system was used to quantitatively evaluate HIV-induced neuropathology. Xenografts of HIV-1-infected human monocytes (placed into the putamen and cortex of SCID mice) remained viable for 5 weeks. HIV-1 p24 antigen expression in mouse brain was persistent. Progressive inflammatory responses (including astrogliosis and cytokine production), which began at 3 days, peaked at day 12. The range of astrocyte proliferative reactions exceeded the inoculation site by > 1000 microns. Brains with virus-infected monocytes showed a > or = 1.6-fold increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (staining distribution and intensity) as compared with similarly inoculated brains with uninfected control monocytes. These findings paralleled the accumulation and activation of murine microglia (increased branching of cell processes, formation of microglial nodules, interleukin (IL)-1 beta and IL-6 expression). An inflammatory reaction of human monocytes (as defined by HLA-DR, IL-1 beta, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression) and neuronal injury (apoptosis) also developed after virus-infected monocyte xenograft placement into mouse brain tissue. These data, taken together, demonstrate that this SCID mouse model of HIV-1 neuropathogenesis can reproduce key aspects of disease (virus-infected macrophages, astrocytosis, microglial activation, and neuronal damage). This model may serve as an important means for therapeutic development directed toward improving mental function in HIV

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus induced oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, S. Aravind; Sathasivasubramanian, S.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide health problem, which affects in both developing and developed countries. The oral lesions caused due to this disease can drastically change the life of the patient, in terms of quality. We can also know the progression of the disease and also the important immune status of the patient. Lots of information on HIV is known in the developed countries and very less reports are available in the developing countries. The morbidity of HIV disease is due to its association with opportunistic fungal infection and the most common among them is oral candidiasis. Here, we present a case report on an apparently healthy male patient of 39 years, who had oral candidiasis and was one of the indicators for HIV infection. PMID:26538978

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and the liver

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Megan; Iser, David; Lewin, Sharon R

    2012-01-01

    Liver disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals encompasses the spectrum from abnormal liver function tests, liver decompensation, with and without evidence of cirrhosis on biopsy, to non-alcoholic liver disease and its more severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular cancer. HIV can infect multiple cells in the liver, leading to enhanced intrahepatic apoptosis, activation and fibrosis. HIV can also alter gastro-intestinal tract permeability, leading to increased levels of circulating lipopolysaccharide that may have an impact on liver function. This review focuses on recent changes in the epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of liver disease in HIV-infected patients, in the absence of co-infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus, with a specific focus on issues relevant to low and middle income countries. PMID:22489261

  20. Genetic variability in human immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Alizon, M; Montagnier, L

    1987-01-01

    The genetic polymorphism of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been established. In addition to the nucleic acid variations responsible for the restriction map polymorphism, isolates of HIV differ significantly at the protein level, especially in the envelope, in terms of amino acid substitutions and reciprocal insertions-deletions. In this investigation, molecular cloning and nucleotide sequencing of the genomes of 2 HIV isolates obtained from patients in Zaire were carried out. The 1st isolate was recovered in 1983 from a 24-year-old woman with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); the 2nd was isolated in 1985 from a 7-year-old boy with AIDS-related complex (ARC). The genetic organization of these isolates was identical to that found in other HIV isolates from the US and Europe, particularly in terms of the conservation of the central region located between the pol and env genes composed of a series of overlapping open reading frames. There were, however, substantial differences in the primary structure of the viral proteins, with env being more variable than the gag and pol genes. Alignment of the envelopes revealed hypervariable domains with a great number of mutations and reciprocal insertions and deletions. Overall, this analysis suggests that the African and American HIV infections have a common origin given their identical genetic organization. The sequence variability reflects a divergent evolutionary process, and the fact that the 2 Zairian isolates were more divergent than American isolates studied by others indicates a longer evolution of HIV in Africa. An essential research goal is to identify the HIV envelope domains responsible for the virus-cellular surface antigen interaction since an immune response against these epitopes could elicit neutralizing antibodies for use in a vaccine. PMID:3439717

  1. Bioengineering human microvascular networks in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2011-01-01

    The future of tissue engineering and cell-based therapies for tissue regeneration will likely rely on our ability to generate functional vascular networks in vivo. In this regard, the search for experimental models to build blood vessel networks in vivo is of utmost importance. The feasibility of bioengineering microvascular networks in vivo was first shown using human tissue-derived mature endothelial cells (ECs); however, such autologous endothelial cells present problems for wide clinical use, because they are difficult to obtain in sufficient quantities and require harvesting from existing vasculature. These limitations have instigated the search for other sources of ECs. The identification of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) in blood presented an opportunity to non-invasively obtain ECs (5-7). We and other authors have shown that adult and cord blood-derived ECFCs have the capacity to form functional vascular networks in vivo. Importantly, these studies have also shown that to obtain stable and durable vascular networks, ECFCs require co-implantation with perivascular cells. The assay we describe here illustrates this concept: we show how human cord blood-derived ECFCs can be combined with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a single cell suspension in a collagen/fibronectin/fibrinogen gel to form a functional human vascular network within 7 days after implantation into an immunodeficient mouse. The presence of human ECFC-lined lumens containing host erythrocytes can be seen throughout the implants indicating not only the formation (de novo) of a vascular network, but also the development of functional anastomoses with the host circulatory system. This murine model of bioengineered human vascular network is ideally suited for studies on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of human vascular network formation and for the development of strategies to vascularize engineered tissues. PMID:21775960

  2. Antiviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E

    1995-01-01

    Depending on the stage of their intervention with the viral replicative cycle, human immunodeficiency virus inhibitors could be divided into the following groups: (i) adsorption inhibitors (i.e., CD4 constructs, polysulfates, polysulfonates, polycarboxylates, and polyoxometalates), (ii) fusion inhibitors (i.e., plant lectins, succinylated or aconitylated albumins, and betulinic acid derivatives), (iii) uncoating inhibitors (i.e., bicyclams), (iv) reverse transcription inhibitors acting either competitively with the substrate binding site (i.e., dideoxynucleoside analogs and acyclic nucleoside phosphonates) or allosterically with a nonsubstrate binding site (i.e., non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), (v) integration inhibitors, (vi) DNA replication inhibitors, (vii) transcription inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and Tat antagonists), (viii) translation inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and ribozymes), (ix) maturation inhibitors (i.e., protease inhibitors, myristoylation inhibitors, and glycosylation inhibitors), and finally, (x) budding (assembly/release) inhibitors. Current knowledge, including the therapeutic potential, of these various inhibitors is discussed. In view of their potential clinical the utility, the problem of virus-drug resistance and possible strategies to circumvent this problem are also addressed. PMID:7542558

  3. Bacterial Respiratory Infections Complicating Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Opportunistic bacterial and fungal infections of the lower respiratory tract, most commonly those caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Pneumocystis jirovecii, remain the major causes of mortality in those infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Bacterial respiratory pathogens most prevalent in those infected with HIV, other than M. tuberculosis, represent the primary focus of the current review with particular emphasis on the pneumococcus, the leading cause of mortality due to HIV infection in the developed world. Additional themes include (1) risk factors; (2) the predisposing effects of HIV-mediated suppression on pulmonary host defenses, possibly intensified by smoking; (3) clinical and laboratory diagnosis, encompassing assessment of disease severity and outcome; and (4) antibiotic therapy. The final section addresses current recommendations with respect to pneumococcal immunization in the context of HIV infection, including an overview of the rationale underpinning the current "prime-boost" immunization strategy based on sequential administration of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine 23. PMID:26974299

  4. Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Marc; Masur, Henry; Kovacs, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    The presentation of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in previously healthy men having sex with men (MSM) in San Francisco and New York City in 1981 heralded the beginning of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic. Despite a decreasing incidence of PCP among patients with HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) since the advent of combination antiretroviral therapy in the mid-1990s, PCP remains one of the most common AIDS-defining opportunistic infections in the United States and Western Europe. Newer molecular diagnostic tests in conjunction with standard immunofluorescent or colorimetric tests have allowed for more rapid and accurate diagnosis. Although several effective oral and intravenous therapies exist to treat PCP, mortality rates in HIV-infected individuals remain unacceptably high, especially in those with advanced AIDS. The identification of specific mutations in Pneumocystis genes targeted by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has raised concerns about the development of resistance to the drug of choice and may ultimately lead to greater utilization of alternative therapies to treat PCP in the future. PMID:26974301

  5. Successful Orthotopic Heart Transplantation and Immunosuppressive Management in 2 Human Immunodeficiency Virus–Seropositive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kittleson, Michelle M.; Dilibero, Deanna; Hardy, W. David; Kobashigawa, Jon A.; Esmailian, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Few orthotopic heart transplantations have been performed in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus since the first such case was reported in 2001. Since that time, advances in highly active antiretroviral therapy have resulted in potent and durable suppression of the causative human immunodeficiency virus—accompanied by robust immune reconstitution, reversal of previous immunodeficiency, a marked decrease in opportunistic and other infections, and near-normal long-term survival. Although human immunodeficiency virus infection is not an absolute contraindication, few centers in the United States and Canada have performed heart transplantations in this patient population; these patients have been de facto excluded from this procedure in North America. Re-evaluation of the reasons for excluding these patients from cardiac transplantation is warranted in light of such significant advances in antiretroviral therapy. This case report documents successful orthotopic heart transplantation in 2 patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, and we describe their antiretroviral therapy and immunosuppressive management challenges. Both patients were doing well without sequelae 43 and 38 months after transplantation. PMID:27047290

  6. Eosinophilia in Patients Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Andrew; Serpa, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilia is not uncommonly encountered in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); particularly at initiation of care or among those with advanced disease. The clinical manifestation most commonly associated with eosinophilia in this patient population is skin rash. Management of these patients is challenging due to a paucity of data evaluating diagnostic testing and therapeutic strategies. Patients born in or with significant travel to parasite-endemic countries are more likely to have tissue-invasive helminthes, such as Strongyloides or Schistosoma. Patients without such risk factors are unlikely to have parasitic infections and frequently will have self-resolution of eosinophilia. When a detailed history, physical exam and diagnostic work-up is unrevealing, we sometimes consider empirical therapy with ivermectin. Praziquantel may also be considered for those at risk for schistosomiasis. PMID:26126686

  7. Pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J A

    1993-01-01

    The lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes AIDS by interacting with a large number of different cells in the body and escaping the host immune response against it. HIV is transmitted primarily through blood and genital fluids and to newborn infants from infected mothers. The steps occurring in infection involve an interaction of HIV not only with the CD4 molecule on cells but also with other cellular receptors recently identified. Virus-cell fusion and HIV entry subsequently take place. Following virus infection, a variety of intracellular mechanisms determine the relative expression of viral regulatory and accessory genes leading to productive or latent infection. With CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV replication can cause syncytium formation and cell death; with other cells, such as macrophages, persistent infection can occur, creating reservoirs for the virus in many cells and tissues. HIV strains are highly heterogeneous, and certain biologic and serologic properties determined by specific genetic sequences can be linked to pathogenic pathways and resistance to the immune response. The host reaction against HIV, through neutralizing antibodies and particularly through strong cellular immune responses, can keep the virus suppressed for many years. Long-term survival appears to involve infection with a relatively low-virulence strain that remains sensitive to the immune response, particularly to control by CD8+ cell antiviral activity. Several therapeutic approaches have been attempted, and others are under investigation. Vaccine development has provided some encouraging results, but the observations indicate the major challenge of preventing infection by HIV. Ongoing research is necessary to find a solution to this devastating worldwide epidemic. Images PMID:8464405

  8. Neuromuscular complications of human immunodeficiency virus infection and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R G

    1994-01-01

    At least 4 distinct peripheral neuropathy syndromes occur in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. The most common, painful sensory neuropathy, may be related to the viral infection or may be medication induced and is treated symptomatically. The other 3, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex (some patients), and the progressive polyradiculopathies related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may all respond to appropriate therapy. Both inflammatory myopathy and zidovudine myopathy also abate with early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:8048229

  9. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression. PMID:26962942

  10. Neurosyphilis in a Man with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghani, Khosro; Kallini, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe a 33-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus who developed erythematous macules on the palms and soles with subsequent headaches, papilledema, and iritis. They review the salient characteristics of neurosyphilis with a focus on human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals. The incidence of syphilis has increased since the year 2000 in African Americans, Hispanics, and men who have sex with men. Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of this disease—a fastidious, slowly growing, microaerophilic spirochete. Sexual contact is the most common mode of transmission. The rapid plasma reagin, Venereal Disease Research Laboratory assay, and fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption assay are commonly used to diagnose syphilis. The mainstay treatment is penicillin. Special considerations exist in the natural history and management of syphilis in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:25161759

  11. Health Administrator Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Prevention and Services at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Jones, Sandra; Sutton, Madeline Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Due to the disproportionate impact of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) among African American young adults, the authors explored (1) number of historically black college and university (HBCU) campuses with existing HIV prevention policies and services and (2) perceived barriers for implementing…

  12. The Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic, Washington, DC.

    This document presents findings of the Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic. The executive summary lists 20 major findings and recommendations which together comprise a comprehensive national strategy for managing the HIV epidemic. The commission recommends: (1) replacement of the obsolete term "AIDS"…

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Sporadic Nonfamilial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda.

    PubMed

    Guha, Sibashish Kamal; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Lal, Niharika Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), a relatively uncommon metabolic disease, is the most common cutaneous porphyria. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with sporadic, nonfamilial PCT that presented with classical cutaneous findings and multiple risk factors, including alcohol abuse, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS, that have been strongly associated with the sporadic form of PCT. PMID:27293254

  14. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Damani A.; Carroll, Karen C.; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  15. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future. PMID:25577549

  16. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Damani A; Carroll, Karen C; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  17. Symptoms of Autonomic Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Chow, Dominic; Nakamoto, Beau K; Sullivan, Katherine; Sletten, David M; Fujii, Satomi; Umekawa, Sari; Kocher, Morgan; Kallianpur, Kalpana J; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Low, Phillip

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the frequencies of symptoms associated with autonomic dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on stable combined antiretroviral therapy. Patients infected with HIV reported higher frequencies of dysautonomia symptoms compared with HIV-negative patients, particularly in the autonomic domains related to urinary, sleep, gastroparesis, secretomotor, pupillomotor, and male sexual dysfunction. PMID:26269797

  18. Aquagenic urticaria and human immunodeficiency virus infection: treatment with stanozolol.

    PubMed

    Fearfield, L A; Gazzard, B; Bunker, C B

    1997-10-01

    We report the first case of aquagenic urticaria in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This is a rare physical urticaria not previously described in this context. The disorder proved unamenable to conventional treatment with antihistamines, but did respond dramatically to stanozolol, suggesting a novel indication for this anabolic steroid. PMID:9390343

  19. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how the infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus, as well as neuropsychiatric abnormalities in the brain. (TW)

  20. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Sporadic Nonfamilial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Sibashish Kamal; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Lal, Niharika Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), a relatively uncommon metabolic disease, is the most common cutaneous porphyria. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with sporadic, nonfamilial PCT that presented with classical cutaneous findings and multiple risk factors, including alcohol abuse, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS, that have been strongly associated with the sporadic form of PCT. PMID:27293254

  1. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  2. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  3. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  4. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  5. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  6. Economic consequences for Medicaid of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Baily, Mary Ann; Bilheimer, Linda; Wooldridge, Judith; well, Kathryn Lang; Greenberg, Warren

    1990-01-01

    Medicaid is currently a major source of financing for health care for those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and to a lesser extent, for those with other manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It is likely to become even more important in the future. This article focuses on the structure of Medicaid in the context of the HIV epidemic, covering epidemiological issues, eligibility, service coverage and use, and reimbursement. A simple methodology for estimating HI\\'-related Medicaid costs under alternative assumptions about the future is also explained. PMID:10113503

  7. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Secondary to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Anthony A; Rosenthal, David G; Bender Ignacio, Rachel; Chu, Helen Y

    2015-12-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in immunocompromised hosts is a fulminant syndrome of immune activation with high rates of mortality that may be triggered by infections or immunodeficiency. Rapid diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder is necessary to prevent progression to multiorgan failure and death. We report a case of HLH in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus, disseminated histoplasmosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Escherichia coli bacteremia. We discuss management of acutely ill patients with HLH and treatment of the underlying infection versus initiation of HLH-specific chemotherapy. PMID:26566535

  8. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Secondary to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Anthony A.; Rosenthal, David G.; Bender Ignacio, Rachel; Chu, Helen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in immunocompromised hosts is a fulminant syndrome of immune activation with high rates of mortality that may be triggered by infections or immunodeficiency. Rapid diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder is necessary to prevent progression to multiorgan failure and death. We report a case of HLH in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus, disseminated histoplasmosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Escherichia coli bacteremia. We discuss management of acutely ill patients with HLH and treatment of the underlying infection versus initiation of HLH-specific chemotherapy. PMID:26566535

  9. Autoimmunity and dysmetabolism of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Xu, Jia-Hua; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Mo, Han-You; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remains ill-defined by lists of symptoms, infections, tumors, and disorders in metabolism and immunity. Low CD4 cell count, severe loss of body weight, pneumocystis pneumonia, and Kaposi's sarcoma are the major disease indicators. Lines of evidence indicate that patients living with AIDS have both immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. Immunodeficiency is attributed to deficits in the skin- and mucosa-defined innate immunity, CD4 T cells and regulatory T cells, presumably relating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The autoimmunity in AIDS is evident by: (1) overproduction of autoantibodies, (2) impaired response of CD4 cells and CD8 cells, (3) failure of clinical trials of HIV vaccines, and (4) therapeutic benefits of immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation and bone marrow transplantation in patients at risk of AIDS. Autoantibodies are generated in response to antigens such as debris and molecules de novo released from dead cells, infectious agents, and catabolic events. Disturbances in metabolic homeostasis occur at the interface of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity in the development of AIDS. Optimal treatments favor therapeutics targeting on the regulation of metabolism to restore immune homeostasis. PMID:26676359

  10. Perinatally infected adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (perinatally human immunodeficiency virus)

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Leticia S; Cardoso, Claudete A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of highly potent antiretroviral treatment during the last decades has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic disease. Children that were diagnosed during the first months or years of life and received treatment, are living longer and better and are presently reaching adolescence and adulthood. Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHIV) and young adults may present specific clinical, behavior and social characteristics and demands. We have performed a literature review about different aspects that have to be considered in the care and follow-up of PHIV. The search included papers in the MEDLINE database via PubMed, located using the keywords “perinatally HIV-infected” AND “adolescents”. Only articles published in English or Portuguese from 2003 to 2014 were selected. The types of articles included original research, systematic reviews, and quantitative or qualitative studies; case reports and case series were excluded. Results are presented in the following topics: “Puberal development and sexual maturation”, “Growth in weight and height”, “Bone metabolism during adolescence”, “Metabolic complications”, “Brain development, cognition and mental health”, “Reproductive health”, “Viral drug resistance” and “Transition to adult outpatient care”. We hope that this review will support the work of pediatricians, clinicians and infectious diseases specialists that are receiving these subjects to continue treatment. PMID:26279988

  11. Advances in human genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, H.; Hirschhorn, K.

    1993-01-01

    This book has five chapters covering peroxisomal diseases, X-linked immunodeficiencies, genetic mutations affecting human lipoproteins and their receptors and enzymes, genetic aspects of cancer, and Gaucher disease. The chapter on peroxisomes covers their discovery, structure, functions, disorders, etc. The chapter on X-linked immunodeficiencies discusses such diseases as agammaglobulinemia, severe combined immunodeficiency, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, animal models, linkage analysis, etc. Apolipoprotein formation, synthesis, gene regulation, proteins, etc. are the main focus of chapter 3. The chapter on cancer covers such topics as oncogene mapping and the molecular characterization of some recessive oncogenes. Gaucher disease is covered from its diagnosis, classification, and prevention, to its organ system involvement and molecular biology.

  12. Soluble Levels of Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) and Progression of Atherosclerosis in Individuals Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: ACTG NWCS 332.

    PubMed

    Danoff, Ann; Kendall, Michelle A; Currier, Judith S; Kelesidis, Theodoros; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Aberg, Judith A

    2016-08-01

    Identification of biomarkers and/or mediators of cardiovascular disease (CVD) associated with HIV infection would be of diagnostic and therapeutic value. As soluble receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (sRAGE) and endogenous secretory (esRAGE) have been implicated in vascular complications in other settings, we investigated whether either soluble form of RAGE was associated with changes in carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in HIV-infected patients and HIV-uninfected controls. We found no differences in sRAGE, esRAGE, or CIMT among groups at study entry, or in yearly rates of change in sRAGE, esRAGE, or CIMT by HIV-serostatus (all p > 0.10). However, yearly rates of change in sRAGE (p = 0.07) and esRAGE (p < 0.001) were higher in those taking protease inhibitors, and lower baseline esRAGE levels (p = 0.06) were associated with increased odds of CIMT progression in HIV-infected individuals. Although esRAGE was not altered by HIV-serostatus (p = 0.17), its inverse relationship with CIMT progression in HIV-infected patients suggests a possible role as a mediator of CVD in HIV-infected persons. PMID:27216802

  13. Total knee arthroplasty in human immunodeficiency virus-infected hemophiliacs.

    PubMed

    Unger, A S; Kessler, C M; Lewis, R J

    1995-08-01

    Twenty-six knee arthroplasties were performed in 15 patients with hemophilia A and human immunodeficiency virus infection from 1984 to 1991. Patient age range was 27 to 48 years. After an average follow-up period of 6.4 years (range, 1-9 years) all patients were alive and none of the implants had become infected. T4 lymphocyte counts showed some deterioration, which was not clinically significant. All of the patients were improved following surgery. Nineteen implants were rated excellent, four good, and three fair. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus did not adversely affect the clinical outcome of knee arthroplasty at follow-up periods up to 9 years. PMID:8523002

  14. Functional role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vpu.

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, E F; Cohen, E A; Lu, Y C; Sodroski, J G; Haseltine, W A

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the role of vpu in the replication and cytopathicity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), infectious proviruses were constructed that were isogenic except for the ability to produce the protein product of vpu. The vpu-encoded protein is shown to decrease the rate of syncytium formation and cell killing in infected CD4+ human T cells, to increase greatly the export of virus particles from infected cells, and to reduce the rate of accumulation of cell-associated viral proteins. The vpu protein complements in trans the defect in a vpu- HIV-1 provirus but does not affect the simian immunodeficiency virus, which lacks vpu. These observations suggest that vpu may contribute to the AIDS epidemic by increasing the transmission efficiency of the virus. Images PMID:2472639

  15. From Immunodeficiency to Humanization: The Contribution of Mouse Models to Explore HTLV-1 Leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pérès, Eléonore; Bagdassarian, Eugénie; This, Sébastien; Villaudy, Julien; Rigal, Dominique; Gazzolo, Louis; Duc Dodon, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    The first discovered human retrovirus, Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1), is responsible for an aggressive form of T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Mouse models recapitulating the leukemogenesis process have been helpful for understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this retroviral-induced disease. This review will focus on the recent advances in the generation of immunodeficient and human hemato-lymphoid system mice with a particular emphasis on the development of mouse models for HTLV-1-mediated pathogenesis, their present limitations and the challenges yet to be addressed. PMID:26690200

  16. From Immunodeficiency to Humanization: The Contribution of Mouse Models to Explore HTLV-1 Leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pérès, Eléonore; Bagdassarian, Eugénie; This, Sébastien; Villaudy, Julien; Rigal, Dominique; Gazzolo, Louis; Duc Dodon, Madeleine

    2015-12-01

    The first discovered human retrovirus, Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1), is responsible for an aggressive form of T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Mouse models recapitulating the leukemogenesis process have been helpful for understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this retroviral-induced disease. This review will focus on the recent advances in the generation of immunodeficient and human hemato-lymphoid system mice with a particular emphasis on the development of mouse models for HTLV-1-mediated pathogenesis, their present limitations and the challenges yet to be addressed. PMID:26690200

  17. Neurocysticercosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chianura, Leonardo; Sberna, Maurizio; Moioli, Cristina; Villa, Maria Riccarda; Orcese, Carloandrea; Causarano, Renzo

    2006-01-01

    Ecuador is considered a holoendemic high-risk area for the transmission of cysticercosis. Moreover, the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) occurs worldwide. We present a case of simultaneous diagnosis of cysticercosis and HIV infection in a 22-year-old Ecuadorian immigrant. We would postulate that with the increasing HIV incidence in endemic areas of cysticercosis, the simultaneous diagnosis of both diseases is an event to be expected. PMID:17107432

  18. Simplified testing for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Pagcharoenpol, P; Burgess-Cassler, A; Schramm, W

    1996-04-01

    Test strips for the detection of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 were investigated using specimens from risk groups in Thailand (141 reactive; 445 nonreactive) in a local Thai laboratory. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were both 100%. Using a set of seroconversion panels, the sensitivity of the test strips was within the range of sensitivities obtained with enzyme immunoassays. The test was developed for performance at decentralized settings under nonlaboratory conditions. PMID:8815120

  19. [Lopinavir/ritonavir in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women].

    PubMed

    Téllez, María Jesús

    2014-11-01

    There are clear sex-related biological differences between men and women. Diseases that affect the two sexes differently are studied separately. However, some diseases affect both men and women, but their incidence or outcome are clearly different. In human immunodeficiency virus infection, the potential differences in the effects of antiretroviral therapy are poorly characterized and few studies have been designed to elucidate these differences. Moreover, women are usually poorly represented in clinical trials of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:25542872

  20. Prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Daniel R.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2005-01-01

    Strategies for confronting the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have included a range of different approaches that focus on prevention and treatment. However, debate persists over what levels of emphasis are appropriate for the different components of the global response. This paper presents an overview of this debate and briefly summarizes the evidence on a range of interventions designed to prevent the spread of HIV infection, paying particular attention to voluntary counselling and testing, treatment for sexually transmitted infections and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We also review the experience with antiretroviral therapy to date in terms of response rates and survival rates, adherence, drug resistance, behavioural change and epidemiological impact. Although various studies have identified strategies with proven effectiveness in reducing the risks of HIV infection and AIDS mortality, considerable uncertainties remain. Successful integration of treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS will require a balanced approach and rigorous monitoring of the impact of programmes in terms of both individual and population outcomes. PMID:15744406

  1. Inflammatory joint disease and human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Forster, S M; Seifert, M H; Keat, A C; Rowe, I F; Thomas, B J; Taylor-Robinson, D; Pinching, A J; Harris, J R W

    1988-01-01

    Nine men positive for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who developed peripheral, non-erosive arthritis were followed up. The clinical features were compatible with reactive arthritis but were atypical in several respects: the joint symptoms were generally severe, persistent, and unresponsive to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The onset of arthritis was associated with various infections, none of which are known to be associated with the development of reactive arthritis. HLA typing was performed for three patients, all of whom were positive for HLA-B27. HIV was isolated from the synovial fluid of one patient. No patient had AIDS before developing arthritis, but four progressed to having AIDS after a mean of 7·5 months, and two died. Arthritis resolved in only one patient. The possibility of HIV infection should be considered in all patients with conditions suggesting reactive arthritis. Synovitis in patients with severe immunodeficiency has important pathogenetic implications. PMID:3135044

  2. [Pulmonary complications in children with human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Brockmann V, Pablo; Viviani S, Támara; Peña D, Anamaría

    2007-08-01

    Pulmonary complications in children infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are common and may be the first manifestation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The aim of our study was to review pulmonary diseases and complications in pediatric patients with HIV infection in a large tertiary hospital in Santiago, Chile. We performed a retrospective, descriptive analysis of 17 patients with HIV infection controlled at the Hospital Dr. Sótero del Rio. Respiratory complications/diseases were: overall pneumonia (n: 14), recurrent pneumonia (n: 10), citomegalovirus associated pneumonia (n: 4), Pneumocystis jiroveci associated pneumonia (n: 1) pulmonary tuberculosis (n: 1), lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (n: 3) and chronic pulmonary disease (n: 7). Microorganisms isolated were mostly atypical and frequently associated with severe and chronic pulmonary damage. A high degree of suspicion is required to detect atypical microorganisms promptly, in order to rapidly implement pathogen targeted therapy that could potentially decrease the possibility of sequelae. PMID:17728918

  3. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  4. Thirty years of the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Younai, Fariba S

    2013-01-01

    After more than 30 years of battling a global epidemic, the prospect of eliminating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the most challenging infectious disease of the modern era is within our reach. Major scientific discoveries about the virus responsible for this immunodeficiency disease state, including its pathogenesis, transmission patterns and clinical course, have led to the development of potent antiretroviral drugs that offer great hopes in HIV treatment and prevention. Although these agents and many others still in development and testing are capable of effectively suppressing viral replication and survival, the medical management of HIV infection at the individual and the population levels remains challenging. Timely initiation of antiretroviral drugs, adherence to the appropriate therapeutic regimens, effective use of these agents in the pre and post-exposure prophylaxis contexts, treatment of comorbid conditions and addressing social and psychological factors involved in the care of individuals continue to be important considerations. PMID:24136672

  5. Recent advances in treatment of severe primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Gennery, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare, inborn errors that result in impaired, disordered or uncontrolled immune responses. Whilst symptomatic and prophylactic treatment is available, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an option for many diseases, leading to cure of the immunodeficiency and establishing normal physical and psychological health. Newborn screening for some diseases, whilst improving outcomes, is focusing research on safer and less toxic treatment strategies, which result in durable and sustainable immune function without adverse effects. New conditioning regimens have reduced the risk of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and new methods of manipulating stem cell sources should guarantee a donor for almost all patients. Whilst incremental enhancements in transplantation technique have gradually improved survival outcomes over time, some of these new applications are likely to radically alter our approach to treating primary immunodeficiencies. PMID:26918153

  6. Plasmoblastic lymphoma associated with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Emoke; Krenács, L; Bagdi, Eniko; Pávai, Z; Macarie, I; Nagy, Elod-Erno; Demian, Smaranda

    2008-01-01

    Plasmoblastic lymphoma (PBL) is a subtype of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, typically present as extranodal disease associated with human immune deficiency virus (HIV) infection. PBLs are often the initial manifestation of AIDS. Here we present a case of PBL concerning the oral cavity. A 34-year-old woman presented a tumor in the oral cavity that involved the maxilla and gingiva (confirmed by CT-scan). The gingival biopsy showed a massive infiltration by large lymphoid cells with round, vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli, fine chromatin and an significant amount of basophilic cytoplasm which express CD79a, CD138, cytoplasmic lambda light chain and LCA, without staining for CD20, CD38, CD3 and CTK. Serological analysis confirmed HIV positivity. PBLs lack most B-lineage markers, but many express CD79a in at least some of the cells, therefore generate difficulties in differential diagnosis. Overall assessment and correlation of the histopathological and immunohistochemical features with the clinical findings and serology investigation are the most helpful diagnostic tools and can lead to the final diagnosis. PMID:18758634

  7. Review of testing for human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Bylund, D J; Ziegner, U H; Hooper, D G

    1992-06-01

    The performance of HIV testing requires meticulous attention to preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic variables, especially matters of patient confidentiality. Laboratory directors must pay strict attention to quality control and quality assurance practices. Careful attention to these considerations can produce a screening program in low-prevalence populations that has an extremely low false-positive rate, with a positive predictive value of greater than 99%. Issuing a clear and concise laboratory report to the clinician is important. The Fifth Consensus Conference on Testing for Human Retroviruses of the Association of State and Territorial Public Health Laboratory Directors, March 1990, has recommended that ELISA be reported as reactive or nonreactive; IFA as reactive, nonreactive, or nonspecific, and WB as reactive, nonreactive, or indeterminate. It is recommended that the terms positive and negative be reserved for the summary interpretation given at the conclusion of the HIV-1 antibody testing algorithm. The testing algorithm used for HIV antibody screening at Scripps Clinic is shown in Figure 3. Other algorithms for complete testing on a single sample only or on two separate samples are reported. We agree with others that the patient should not be counseled for infection with HIV until a reactive confirmatory test(s) establishes a positive diagnosis. Certain special situations in diagnostic testing deserve comment. Establishing the diagnosis of HIV infection can be difficult in seronegative persons with acute infection. Polymerase chain reaction, viral culture or antigen detection may be useful tests in this situation. However, careful interpretation of test results and close correlation with patient risk factors are important to establish the proper diagnosis. Reports of seronegative persons, some remaining seronegative over a protracted time, have raised concerns over the transfusional risk of HIV infection. Blood donor screening programs are using

  8. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-02-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus (the CD4 molecule). HIV also has tropism for the brain leading to neuropsychiatric abnormalities. Besides inducing cell death, HIV can interfere with T4 cell function by various mechanisms. The monocyte serves as a reservoir for HIV and is relatively refractory to its cytopathic effects. HIV can exist in a latent or chronic form which can be converted to a productive infection by a variety of inductive signals.

  9. Oral lesions associated with human immunodeficiency virus disease.

    PubMed

    Patton, Lauren L

    2013-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated oral disease among people living with HIV infection includes oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, oral warts, herpes simplex virus ulcers, major aphthous ulcers or ulcers not otherwise specified, HIV salivary gland disease, and atypical gingival and periodontal diseases. Diagnosis of some oral lesions is based on clinical appearance and behavior, whereas others require biopsy, culture, or imaging for definitive diagnosis. Management strategies including pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches are discussed in this article. Dentists also need to be cognizant of the potential oral side effects of HIV antiretroviral medications. PMID:24034072

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: The Spectrum Beyond AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Brain C.

    1987-01-01

    Since 1981, the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has emerged as the major infectious epidemic of our time. It is the most profound manifestation of infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Since 1984, serologic methods have existed to detect antibody to HIV. Several other clinical entities have been detected and are attributable to HIV infection. Appropriate counsel must accompany antibody testing. The author discusses the acute seroconversion event, as well as asymptomatic carrier status, including generalized lymphadenopathy. He also reviews the symptomatic states that do not meet the surveillance definition of AIDS, including treatments where available. PMID:21263801

  11. Early diagnosis and testing for human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Hesman, Amanda

    2016-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is now considered a long-term condition. However, HIV can only become a long-term condition if it is diagnosed early and antiretroviral therapy is commenced immediately. Individuals with HIV who are diagnosed late have an increased risk of death in the year after diagnosis compared to those diagnosed promptly. This article outlines HIV testing policy in the UK, the importance of the early diagnosis of HIV, the barriers to HIV testing, and how to offer testing in a range of settings. PMID:27286626

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Liver Disease Forum 2010: Conference Proceedings

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Thomas, David L.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    Liver disease continues to represent a critical mediator of morbidity and mortality in those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The frequent presence and overlap of concomitant injurious processes, including hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus infections, hepatoxicity associated with antiretroviral therapeutic agents, alcohol, and other toxins, in the setting of immunosuppression lead to rapid fibrotic progression and early development of end-stage liver disease. This conference summary describes the proceedings of a state-of-the-art gathering of international experts designed to highlight the status of current research in epidemiology, natural history, pathogenesis, and treatment of HIV and liver disease. PMID:21898501

  13. Antiretroviral Therapy for Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Kalapila, Aley G; Marrazzo, Jeanne

    2016-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is considered a chronic medical condition. Several new drugs are available, including fixed-dose combination tablets, that have greatly simplified combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens to treat HIV, while increasing the life-expectancy of infected individuals. In the last decade, multiple well-regarded studies have established the benefits of using ART in high-risk, HIV-negative persons to prevent HIV acquisition. The primary care provider must not only understand commonly encountered issues pertaining to ART, such as toxicities and drug interactions, but also needs to be aware of using ART for HIV prevention. PMID:27235622

  14. Care of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Menopausal Woman

    PubMed Central

    Cejtin, Helen E.

    2012-01-01

    More women than ever before are both Human Immunodeficiency Virus-infected and menopausal, because of increased survival and more frequent diagnosis in older women. Such a woman has the combined burden of her infection, its treatment, comorbid conditions, and aging. Thus she is at risk for a variety of problems such as disorders of bone mineral density and deficiencies in cognitive functioning. In addition to this, she experiences menopause in a unique fashion, with more symptoms and perhaps at an earlier age. The clinician caring for her must take a proactive approach to this multitude of factors that may affect her health and well-being. PMID:22284959

  15. Towards detecting the human immunodeficiency virus using microcantilever sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alodhayb, Abdullah; Brown, Nicole; Saydur Rahman, S. M.; Harrigan, Richard; Beaulieu, L. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Detecting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is difficult because the virus is prone to mutations and is in low concentrations in the body. Inside the HIV virion are two well characterized single stranded (ss) RNA molecules (viral genome) that feature both variable regions and regions that are conserved under virus mutation. In this work, microcantilever sensors have been employed as potential HIV detectors by targeting a conserved sequence of the viral genome by attempting to detect target ssDNA and ssRNA molecules that are significantly longer than the ssDNA molecules functionalized on the cantilever.

  16. Seroprevalence of human herpesvirus 8 in human immunodeficiency virus 1-positive and human immunodeficiency virus 1-negative populations in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Taguchi, H; Katano, H; Mori, S; Nakamura, T; Nojiri, N; Nakajima, K; Tadokoro, K; Juji, T; Iwamoto, A

    1999-02-01

    To determine the seroprevalence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) among human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-positive (HIV-1+) and HIV-1-negative (HIV-1-) populations in Japan, 276 HIV-1+ patients and 1,000 HIV-1- blood donors were enrolled in this study. Antibodies against HHV8 latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) were examined through indirect immunofluorescent assay by using a B-cell line that was infected latently with HHV8 (body cavity-based lymphoma 1). An HHV8- and Epstein-Barr virus-negative B-cell line (Ramos) was used as a control. Thirty-two seropositive cases against LANA (anti-LANA+) were identified among the 276 HIV-1+ patients who were studied. Five cases were foreigners living in Japan. The risk factor of all 27 Japanese cases was unprotected sexual intercourse, and the great majority of these cases (23 in 27; 85%) reported homosexual/bisexual behavior. Anti-LANA+ status correlated with the presence of sexually transmitted diseases, such as amoeba and HBV infection, further suggesting male homosexual behavior as the main route of HHV8 transmission in Japan. Only two LANA+ cases were identified among 1,000 HIV- blood donors in Japan; thus, seroprevalence of HHV8 identified by LANA was estimated to be 0.2% among HIV-1- populations in this country. PMID:9892401

  17. The Effects of a Kansas Education Class on Students' Knowledge and Attitudes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sager, R. Warren, Jr.

    This study was undertaken to investigate the knowledge and attitudes of 8th, 9th, and 10th grade Kansas students pertaining to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Attitudes and knowledge of 9th and 10th grade students who had participated in a Sex Respect Class offered in the 9th grade were compared…

  18. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Neural Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovich, Therese A.; Lazar, Eliot; Blumberg, Benjamin M.; Saito, Yoshihiro; Eskin, Thomas A.; Reichman, Richard; Baram, David A.; del Cerro, Coca; Gendelman, Howard E.; del Cerro, Manuel; Epstein, Leon G.

    1992-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly specific for its human host. To study HIV-1 infection of the human nervous system, we have established a small animal model in which second-trimester (11 to 17.5 weeks) human fetal brain or neural retina is transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye of immunosuppressed adult rats. The human xenografts vascularized, formed a blood-brain barrier, and differentiated, forming neurons and glia. The xenografts were infected with cell-free HIV-1 or with HIV-1-infected human monocytes. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction revealed HIV-1 sequences in DNA from xenograft tissue exposed to HIV-1 virions, and in situ hybridization demonstrated HIV-1 mRNA localized in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Pathological damage was observed only in neural xenografts containing HIV-1-infected human monocytes, supporting the hypothesis that these cells mediate neurotoxicity. This small animal model allows the study of direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 infection on developing human fetal neural tissues, and it should prove useful in evaluating antiviral therapies, which must ultimately target HIV-1 infection of the brain.

  19. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  20. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  1. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  2. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  3. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  4. 76 FR 58517 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) through Solid Organ Transplantation (Draft Guideline). The Draft Guideline can...

  5. Pathogenesis and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus lipodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Suyog Subhash; Ramteke, Karuna Balwant; Raparti, Girish Tulsidas; Kalra, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced understanding about the way human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infects and causes infection in humans has led to invention and use of newer more effective antiretroviral drugs. As treatment for HIV is long term, side effects of the antiretrovirals become an important area of research focus. Antiretrovirals can cause severe metabolic abnormalities, collectively known as HIV lipodystrophy syndrome. If untreated, these metabolic abnormalities have the potential to increase stroke and cardiac ischemia. Management includes choice of nonoffending drugs, switch over to less toxic drugs, hypolipidemics, oral antidiabetics including thiazolidinediones, metformin and growth hormone analogs and finally facial surgeries. Updated knowledge about HIV lipodystrophy, and the hormone-related drugs used to treat it, is essential for physicians and endocrinologists to be able to diagnose the patients and effectively treat them. PMID:22701839

  6. Delayed diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus infection in a patient with non-specific neurological symptoms and pancytopenia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Both non-specific presentation and asymptomatic course of human immunodeficiency virus infection lead to undiagnosed long-term persistence of the virus in a patient's organism. Case presentation Here, we present a case of a 31-year-old Caucasian man with non-specific neurological symptoms and pancytopenia, who was referred to an internal medicine ward for further diagnosis. Upon admission to our hospital, he denied any past risky behaviors and refused to have his blood collected for human immunodeficiency virus testing. Later, he eventually provided consent to conduct the human immunodeficiency virus test which turned out to have a positive result. The overall clinical pattern indicated an advanced-stage of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which contrasted with the history he had provided. Conclusions This case report indicates the need to consider human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosis in patients with non-specific neurological and hematological disorders. Our report also demonstrates difficulties that can be experienced by the physician while trying to obtain both a clear history and consent to perform human immunodeficiency virus testing. PMID:24666756

  7. Macrophages in Progressive Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    DiNapoli, Sarah R; Hirsch, Vanessa M; Brenchley, Jason M

    2016-09-01

    The cells that are targeted by primate lentiviruses (HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus [SIV]) are of intense interest given the renewed effort to identify potential cures for HIV. These viruses have been reported to infect multiple cell lineages of hematopoietic origin, including all phenotypic and functional CD4 T cell subsets. The two most commonly reported cell types that become infected in vivo are memory CD4 T cells and tissue-resident macrophages. Though viral infection of CD4 T cells is routinely detected in both HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected Asian macaques, significant viral infection of macrophages is only routinely observed in animal models wherein CD4 T cells are almost entirely depleted. Here we review the roles of macrophages in lentiviral disease progression, the evidence that macrophages support viral replication in vivo, the animal models where macrophage-mediated replication of SIV is thought to occur, how the virus can interact with macrophages in vivo, pathologies thought to be attributed to viral replication within macrophages, how viral replication in macrophages might contribute to the asymptomatic phase of HIV/SIV infection, and whether macrophages represent a long-lived reservoir for the virus. PMID:27307568

  8. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Maeve M.; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  9. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pakfetrat, Atessa; Falaki, Farnaz; Delavarian, Zahra; Dalirsani, Zohreh; Sanatkhani, Majid; Zabihi Marani, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center. Materials and Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration. Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%). The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+. Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia. PMID:25745611

  10. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Coogan, Maeve M; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection. PMID:8067276

  12. Overview of Microbicides for the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Baxter, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention tools that women can use and control are urgently needed. Microbicides are chemical products applied to the vagina or rectum to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV. Four classes of candidate microbicides have been tested to date: those that (1) enhance the natural defences in the vagina to inactivate HIV; (2) inactivate HIV in the vagina; (3) prevent HIV from attaching to, and fusing with, the host cells; and (4) prevent HIV from replicating in genital tract host cells. Despite numerous disappointing efficacy trial results over the past 20 years, substantial progress is now being made in microbicide development after the release of the CAPRISA 004 trial, which provided proof-of-concept that topical antiretroviral microbicides can prevent sexual transmission of HIV and herpes simplex type-2 infection. Microbicides, which fill an important gap for women-controlled prevention methods, have the potential to alter the course of the HIV pandemic. PMID:22386823

  13. Fungal, Viral, and Parasitic Pneumonias Associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Skalski, Joseph H; Limper, Andrew H

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory illness is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The spectrum of pulmonary disease that can affect patients with HIV is wide and includes opportunistic infection with many fungal, viral, and parasitic organisms. This article reviews the clinical presentation; approach to diagnosis; and management of fungal, viral, and parasitic pneumonias that can develop in patients with HIV including respiratory disease caused by Aspergillus, Cryptococcus, Histoplasma, Coccidioides, Cytomegalovirus, Toxoplasma, and Strongyloides. Because clinical symptoms and radiographic patterns are often insensitive at distinguishing these pulmonary infections, this review particularly focuses on specific host risk factors and diagnostic testing to consider when approaching HIV patients with respiratory illness. PMID:26974302

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus and migrant labor in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jochelson, K; Mothibeli, M; Leger, J P

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigate the impact of the migrant labor system on heterosexual relationships on South African mines and assess the implications for the future transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The migrant labor system has created a market for prostitution in mining towns and geographic networks of relationships within and between urban and rural communities. A section of the migrant workforce and a group of women dependent on prostitution for economic support appear especially vulnerable to contracting HIV infection since they are involved in multiple sexual encounters with different, changing partners, usually without condom protection. Furthermore, sexually transmitted disease morbidity is extensive in the general and mineworker populations. Historically, migration facilitated the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases and may act similarly for HIV. Problems of combating the HIV epidemic in South Africa are discussed. PMID:2004869

  15. Coronary Artery Disease in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seropositive Population.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Michael G; Arora, Rohit R

    2016-01-01

    The development of efficient combined antiretroviral therapies has lengthened the mean life span of the population affected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transforming this terminal infection to a chronic yet manageable disease. Nonetheless, patients with HIV--treatment naive or not--exhibit larger risks for coronary artery disease than the noninfected population. Moreover, coronary atherosclerosis/arteriosclerosis may be the most prevalent condition in the HIV-infected population that is being accentuated by the effects of viral agents and the antiretroviral drugs, especially protease inhibitors. Nonetheless, generalized metabolic dysfunctions and premature senescence are often attributed to the viremia caused by the HIV infection directly and primarily. Therefore, a multifactorial approach is to be considered when attempting to explain the strong correlation between HIV and coronary artery disease, including co-opportunistic viremias and vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency. PMID:23797758

  16. Human Immunodeficiency Syndromes Affecting Human Natural Killer Cell Cytolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Hyoungjun; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor-dependent fusion, promotes the release of the lytic granule contents into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process. PMID:24478771

  17. Epstein-Barr and human immunodeficiency viruses in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Morgello, S.

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma was examined. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from 12 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors was used as substrate for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Targets for amplification were the EBNA-1 region of EBV, the gag region of HIV, and a single copy cellular sequence as a control. The cases studied were autopsy and surgical specimens collected between the years 1985 and 1989. By the working formulation for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, five had large cell, four had mixed large and small cleaved cell, two had small cleaved cell, and one had an unclassified histology. Epstein-Barr virus was detected in 6 of 12 tumors studied. Human immunodeficiency virus was not detected in any of the tumors. The presence of EBV was not correlated with any particular histologic tumor type. It is concluded that EBV, not HIV, can be detected in a large percentage (50%) of AIDS-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas. This viral association may be significant in light of the demonstrated ability of EBV to induce lymphoid tumors in experimental mammalian systems. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1323221

  18. Intracellular Immunization of Human Fetal Cord Blood Stem/Progenitor Cells with a Ribozyme Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mang; Leavitt, Mark C.; Maruyama, Midori; Yamada, Osamu; Young, Dennis; Ho, Anthony D.; Wong-Staal, Flossie

    1995-01-01

    Successful treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection may ultimately require targeting of hematopoietic stem cells. Here we used retroviral vectors carrying the ribozyme gene to transduce CD34^+ cells from human fetal cord blood. Transduction and ribozyme expression had no apparent adverse effect on cell differentiation and/or proliferation. The macrophage-like cells, differentiated from the stem/progenitor cells in vitro, expressed the ribozyme gene and resisted infection by a macrophage tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1. These results suggest the feasibility of stem cell gene therapy for human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Group B

    PubMed Central

    Cella, Eleonora; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Giovanetti, Marta; Veo, Carla; Lai, Alessia; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Angeletti, Silvia; Ciotti, Marco; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Context: Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infections are mainly restricted to West Africa; however, in the recent years, the prevalence of HIV-2 is a growing concern in some European countries and the Southwestern region of India. Despite the presence of different HIV-2 groups, only A and B Groups have established human-to-human transmission chains. Aims: This work aimed to evaluate the phylogeographic inference of HIV-2 Group B worldwide to estimate their data of origin and the population dynamics. Materials and Methods: The evolutionary rates, the demographic history for HIV-2 Group B dataset, and the phylogeographic analysis were estimated using a Bayesian approach. The viral gene flow analysis was used to count viral gene out/in flow among different locations. Results: The root of the Bayesian maximum clade credibility tree of HIV-2 Group B dated back to 1957. The demographic history of HIV-2 Group B showed that the epidemic remained constant up to 1970 when started an exponential growth. From 1985 to early 2000s, the epidemic reached a plateau, and then it was characterized by two bottlenecks and a new plateau at the end of 2000s. Phylogeographic reconstruction showed that the most probable location for the root of the tree was Ghana. Regarding the viral gene flow of HIV-2 Group B, the only observed viral gene flow was from Africa to France, Belgium, and Luxembourg. Conclusions: The study gives insights into the origin, history, and phylogeography of HIV-2 Group B epidemic. The growing number of infections of HIV-2 worldwide indicates the need for strengthening surveillance. PMID:27621561

  20. Kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus budding and assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2009-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) belongs to a large family of RNA viruses, retroviruses. Unlike budding of regular enveloped viruses, retroviruses bud concurrently with the assembly of retroviral capsids on the cell membrane. The kinetics of HIV (and other retroviruses) budding and assembly is therefore strongly affected by the elastic energy of the membrane and fundamentally different from regular viruses. The main result of this work shows that the kinetics is tunable from a fast budding process to a slow and effectively trapped partial budding process, by varying the attractive energy of retroviral proteins (call Gags), relative to the membrane elastic energy. When the Gag-Gag attraction is relatively high, the membrane elastic energy provides a kinetic barrier for the two pieces of the partial capsids to merge. This energy barrier determines the slowest step in the kinetics and the budding time. In the opposite limit, the membrane elastic energy provides not only a kinetic energy barrier, but a free energy barrier. The budding and assembly is effectively trapped at local free energy minimum, corresponding to a partially budded state. The time scale to escape from this metastable state is exponentially large. In both cases, our result fit with experimental measurements pretty well.

  1. Markers predicting progression of human immunodeficiency virus-related disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukas, C M; Bernard, N F

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) interacts with the immune system throughout the course of infection. For most of the disease process, HIV activates the immune system, and the degree of activation can be assessed by measuring serum levels of molecules such as beta 2-microglobulin and neopterin, as well as other serum and cell surface phenotype markers. The levels of some of these markers correlate with clinical progression of HIV disease, and these markers may be useful as surrogate markers for development of clinical AIDS. Because the likelihood and timing of development of clinical AIDS following seroconversion, for any particular individual, are not readily predictable, the use of nonclinical disease markers has become critically important to patient management. Surrogate markers of HIV infection are, by definition, measurable traits that correlate with disease progression. An ideal marker should identify patients at highest risk of disease progression, provide information on how long an individual has been infected, help in staging HIV disease, predict development of opportunistic infections associated with AIDS, monitor the therapeutic efficacy of immunomodulating or antiviral treatments, and the easily quantifiable, reliable, clinically available, and affordable. This review examines the current state of knowledge and the role of surrogate markers in the natural history and treatment of HIV infection. The clinical usefulness of each marker is assessed with respect to the criteria outlined for the ideal surrogate marker for HIV disease progression. PMID:8118788

  2. Mucosal immunity in human and simian immunodeficiency lentivirus infections

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, JM

    2014-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence indicates that distinct pathological phenomenon occurs within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of progressively simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected Asian macaques and HIV-infected humans compared with other anatomical sites. Massive loss of GI tract lamina propria CD4 T cells, alteration in the profile of lymphocytic cytokine production, changes in the landscape of GI tract antigen-presenting cells, and variations to the structural barrier of the GI tract are hallmarks of progressive HIV/SIV infections. The pathology within the GI tract results in translocation of microbial products from the lumen of the intestine into peripheral circulation. These translocated microbial products directly stimulate the immune system and exacerbate immune activation and, thus, disease progression. Initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) does not restore completely the immunological abnormalities within the GI tract. This incomplete restoration within the GI tract may contribute to the increased mortality observed within HIV-infected individuals treated for decades with cART. Novel therapeutic interventions aimed at enhancing GI tract anatomy and physiology may improve the prognosis of HIV-infected individuals. PMID:23549448

  3. Global Impact of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Gayle, Helene D.; Hill, Gena L.

    2001-01-01

    This review provides information on the epidemiology, economic impact, and intervention strategies for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS pandemic in developing countries. According to the World Health Organization and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) at the end of 1999, an estimated 34.3 million people were living with HIV/AIDS. Most of the people living with HIV, 95% of the global total, live in developing countries. Examples of the impact of HIV/AIDS in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Newly Independent States provide insight into the demographics, modes of exposure, treatment and prevention options, and the economic effect of the epidemic on the global community. The epidemic in each region of the world is influenced by the specific risk factors that are associated with the spread of HIV/AIDS and the responses that have evolved to address it. These influences are important in developing HIV/AIDS policies and programs to effectively address the global pandemic. PMID:11292641

  4. Selective Destruction Of Cells Infected With The Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2006-03-28

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a varient of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  5. Selective destruction of cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a variant of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  6. Syphilis, leprosy, and human immunodeficiency virus coinfection: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Claudia Fd; Bornhausen-Demarch, Eduardo; Prata, Aline G; de Andrade, Felipe C; Fernandes, Mariana P; Lopes, Marcia Ra; Nery, José Ac

    2013-08-01

    The association between syphilis, leprosy, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not well documented, and the emergence of isolated cases raises the interest and indicates that this triple coinfection can occur. We report the case of a 42-year-old man from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, who presented with erythematous papules on the trunk, back, and upper and lower extremities; an erythematous plaque on the upper abdomen; and an erythematous violaceous plaque on the right thigh with altered sensitivity. Laboratory investigation showed a reagent VDRL test (1:512) and positive test results for Treponema pallidum hemagglutination. Treatment with benzathine penicillin (2,400,000 U intramuscularly) was started (2 doses 1 week apart). On follow-up 40 days later, the lesions showed partial improvement with persistence of the plaques on the right thigh and upper abdomen as well as a new similar plaque on the back. Further laboratory examinations showed negative bacilloscopy, positive HIV test, and histologic findings consistent with tuberculoid leprosy. The patient was started on multidrug therapy for paucibacillary leprosy with clinical improvement; the patient also was monitored by the HIV/AIDS department. We emphasize the importance of clinical suspicion for a coinfection case despite the polymorphism of these diseases as well as the precise interpretation of laboratory and histopathology examinations to correctly manage atypical cases. PMID:24087779

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus gag and protease: partners in resistance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) maturation plays an essential role in the viral life cycle by enabling the generation of mature infectious virus particles through proteolytic processing of the viral Gag and GagPol precursor proteins. An impaired polyprotein processing results in the production of non-infectious virus particles. Consequently, particle maturation is an excellent drug target as exemplified by inhibitors specifically targeting the viral protease (protease inhibitors; PIs) and the experimental class of maturation inhibitors that target the precursor Gag and GagPol polyproteins. Considering the different target sites of the two drug classes, direct cross-resistance may seem unlikely. However, coevolution of protease and its substrate Gag during PI exposure has been observed both in vivo and in vitro. This review addresses in detail all mutations in Gag that are selected under PI pressure. We evaluate how polymorphisms and mutations in Gag affect PI therapy, an aspect of PI resistance that is currently not included in standard genotypic PI resistance testing. In addition, we consider the consequences of Gag mutations for the development and positioning of future maturation inhibitors. PMID:22867298

  8. Genotypic Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    There are 16 approved human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drugs belonging to three mechanistic classes: protease inhibitors, nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors, and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors. HIV-1 resistance to these drugs is caused by mutations in the protease and RT enzymes, the molecular targets of these drugs. Drug resistance mutations arise most often in treated individuals, resulting from selective drug pressure in the presence of incompletely suppressed virus replication. HIV-1 isolates with drug resistance mutations, however, may also be transmitted to newly infected individuals. Three expert panels have recommended that HIV-1 protease and RT susceptibility testing should be used to help select HIV drug therapy. Although genotypic testing is more complex than typical antimicrobial susceptibility tests, there is a rich literature supporting the prognostic value of HIV-1 protease and RT mutations. This review describes the genetic mechanisms of HIV-1 drug resistance and summarizes published data linking individual RT and protease mutations to in vitro and in vivo resistance to the currently available HIV drugs. PMID:11932232

  9. Screening for Cognitive Impairment in Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Robert; Chiao, Stephanie; Wendelken, Lauren A.; Miller, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Recent publications estimate the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) exceeds 50%, and this rate is likely higher among older patients. Cognitive impairment may impact medication adherence, and symptomatic impairment has been linked to all-cause mortality providing some impetus for early detection. There are currently insufficient data to inform solid recommendations on screening methods. Most HIV-specific tools have poor performance characteristics for all but the most severe form of impairment, which accounts for <5% of cases. Reliance on symptoms is likely to miss a substantial proportion of individuals with HAND due to poor insight, confounding mood disturbances, and lack of well-informed proxies. In the aging HIV-positive population, broader screening tools may be required to allow sensitivity for both HIV and neurodegenerative disorders. We describe the clinical presentation of HAND, review existing data related to screening tools, and provide preliminary and practical recommendations in the absence of more definitive studies. PMID:21921226

  10. Update on kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients.

    PubMed

    Nashar, Khaled; Sureshkumar, Kalathil K

    2016-07-01

    Improved survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with chronic kidney disease following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy resulted in the need to revisit the topic of kidney transplantation in these patients. Large cohort studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes and proved that transplantation is a viable therapeutic option. However, HIV-infected recipients had higher rates of rejection. Immunosuppressive therapy did not negatively impact the course of HIV infection. Some of the immunosuppressive drugs used following transplantation exhibit antiretroviral effects. A close collaboration between infectious disease specialists and transplant professionals is mandatory in order to optimize transplantation outcomes in these patients. Transplantation from HIV(+) donors to HIV(+) recipients has been a subject of intense debate. The HIV Organ Policy Equity act provided a platform to research this area further and to develop guidelines. The first HIV(+) to HIV(+) kidney transplant in the United States and the first HIV(+) to HIV(+) liver transplant in the world were recently performed at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. PMID:27458559

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Host Defense in the Lungs.

    PubMed

    Charles, Tysheena P; Shellito, Judd E

    2016-04-01

    Immunosuppression associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection impacts all components of host defense against pulmonary infection. Cells within the lung have altered immune function and are important reservoirs for HIV infection. The host immune response to infected lung cells further compromises responses to a secondary pathogenic insult. In the upper respiratory tract, mucociliary function is impaired and there are decreased levels of salivary immunoglobulin A. Host defenses in the lower respiratory tract are controlled by alveolar macrophages, lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. As HIV infection progresses, lung CD4 T cells are reduced in number causing a lack of activation signals from CD4 T cells and impaired defense by macrophages. CD8 T cells, on the other hand, are increased in number and cause lymphocytic alveolitis. Specific antibody responses by B-lymphocytes are decreased and opsonization of microorganisms is impaired. These observed defects in host defense of the respiratory tract explain the susceptibility of HIV-infected persons for oropharyngeal candidiasis, bacterial pneumonia, Pneumocystis pneumonia, and other opportunistic infections. PMID:26974294

  12. Noninfectious Pulmonary Complications of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Staitieh, Bashar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the retrovirus responsible for the development of AIDS. Its profound impact on the immune system leaves the host vulnerable to a wide range of opportunistic infections not seen in individuals with a competent immune system. Pulmonary infections dominated the presentations in the early years of the epidemic, and infectious and noninfectious lung diseases remain the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in persons living with HIV despite the development of effective antiretroviral therapy. In addition to the long known immunosuppression and infection risks, it is becoming increasingly recognized that HIV promotes the risk of noninfectious pulmonary diseases through a number of different mechanisms, including direct tissue toxicity by HIV-related viral proteins and the secondary effects of coinfections. Diseases of the airways, lung parenchyma and the pulmonary vasculature, as well as pulmonary malignancies, are either more frequent in persons living with HIV or have atypical presentations. As the pulmonary infectious complications of HIV are generally well known and have been reviewed extensively, this review will focus on the breadth of noninfectious pulmonary diseases that occur in HIV-infected individuals as these may be more difficult to recognize by general medical physicians and subspecialists caring for this large and uniquely vulnerable population. PMID:24992395

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Liver Disease Forum 2012

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Thomas, David; Chung, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    In the U.S. more than 1.1 million individuals are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These patients exhibit a high frequency of coinfections with other hepatotropic viruses and ongoing fibrosis leading to cirrhosis and liver-related mortality. The etiologies of liver disease include viral hepatitis coinfections, drug-related hepatotoxicity, fatty liver disease, and direct and indirect effects from HIV infection including increased bacterial translocation, immune activation, and presence of soluble proteins that modulate the hepatic cytokine environment. New treatments for HCV using direct acting agents appear viable, though issues related to intrinsic toxicities and drug:drug interactions remain. Recent research suggests that acute HCV infection, unrecognized hepatitis D infection, and hepatitis E may all represent emergent areas of concern. Antiretroviral agents, including those used in past years may represent risk factors for hepatic injury and portal hypertension. Key issues in the future include systematic implementation of liver disease management and new treatment in HIV-infected populations with concomitant injection drug use, alcohol use, and low socioeconomic status. PMID:23904401

  14. Role of liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Agarwal, Kosh

    2015-01-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality amongst human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, drug-induced hepatotoxicity related to combined anti-retro-viral therapy, alcohol related liver disease and non-alcohol related fatty liver disease appear to be the leading causes. It is therefore, anticipated that more HIV-positive patients with ESLD will present as potential transplant candidates. HIV infection is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation. Key transplantation outcomes such as rejection and infection rates as well as medium term graft and patient survival match those seen in the non-HIV infected patients in the absence of co-existing HCV infection. HIV disease does not seem to be negatively impacted by transplantation. However, HIV-HCV co-infection transplant outcomes remain suboptimal due to recurrence. In this article, we review the key challenges faced by this patient cohort in the pre- and post-transplant period. PMID:26604639

  15. Novel inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 infectivity.

    PubMed

    Beach, Lauren B; Rawson, Jonathan M; Kim, Baek; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2014-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infects about two million people worldwide. HIV-2 has fewer treatment options than HIV-1, yet may evolve drug resistance more quickly. We have analysed several novel drugs for anti-HIV-2 activity. It was observed that 5-azacytidine, clofarabine, gemcitabine and resveratrol have potent anti-HIV-2 activity. The EC50 values for 5-azacytidine, clofarabine and resveratrol were found to be significantly lower with HIV-2 than with HIV-1. A time-of-addition assay was used to analyse the ability of these drugs to interfere with HIV-2 replication. Reverse transcription was the likely target for antiretroviral activity. Taken together, several novel drugs have been discovered to have activity against HIV-2. Based upon their known activities, these drugs may elicit enhanced HIV-2 mutagenesis and therefore be useful for inducing HIV-2 lethal mutagenesis. In addition, the data are consistent with HIV-2 reverse transcriptase being more sensitive than HIV-1 reverse transcriptase to dNTP pool alterations. PMID:25103850

  16. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 by cdk inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Guendel, Irene; Agbottah, Emmanuel T; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2010-01-01

    Current therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection relies primarily on the administration of anti-retroviral nucleoside analogues, either alone or in combination with HIV-protease inhibitors. Although these drugs have a clinical benefit, continuous therapy with the drugs leads to drug-resistant strains of the virus. Recently, significant progress has been made towards the development of natural and synthetic agents that can directly inhibit HIV-1 replication or its essential enzymes. We previously reported on the pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (PCI) r-roscovitine as a potential inhibitor of HIV-1 replication. PCIs are among the most promising novel antiviral agents to emerge over the past few years. Potent activity on viral replication combined with proliferation inhibition without the emergence of resistant viruses, which are normally observed in HAART patients; make PCIs ideal candidates for HIV-1 inhibition. To this end we evaluated twenty four cdk inhibitors for their effect on HIV-1 replication in vitro. Screening of these compounds identified alsterpaullone as the most potent inhibitor of HIV-1 with activity at 150 nM. We found that alsterpaullone effectively inhibits cdk2 activity in HIV-1 infected cells with a low IC50 compared to control uninfected cells. The effects of alsterpaullone were associated with suppression of cdk2 and cyclin expression. Combining both alsterpaullone and r-roscovitine (cyc202) in treatment exhibited even stronger inhibitory activities in HIV-1 infected PBMCs. PMID:20334651

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of the brain.

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, W J; Berger, J R; Kaderman, R; Tornatore, C S; Major, E O

    1993-01-01

    Direct infection of the central nervous system by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the causative agent of AIDS, was not appreciated in the early years of the AIDS epidemic. Neurological complications associated with AIDS were largely attributed to opportunistic infections that arose as a result of the immunocompromised state of the patient and to depression. In 1985, several groups succeeded in isolating HIV-1 directly from brain tissue. Also that year, the viral genome was completely sequenced, and HIV-1 was found to belong to a neurotropic subfamily of retrovirus known as the Lentivirinae. These findings clearly indicated that direct HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system played a role in the development of AIDS-related neurological disease. This review summarizes the clinical manifestations of HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system and the related neuropathology, the tropism of HIV-1 for specific cell types both within and outside of the nervous system, the possible mechanisms by which HIV-1 damages the nervous system, and the current strategies for diagnosis and treatment of HIV-1-associated neuropathology. Images PMID:8269391

  18. Analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 RNA packageome.

    PubMed

    Eckwahl, Matthew J; Arnion, Helene; Kharytonchyk, Siarhei; Zang, Trinity; Bieniasz, Paul D; Telesnitsky, Alice; Wolin, Sandra L

    2016-08-01

    All retroviruses package cellular RNAs into virions. Studies of murine leukemia virus (MLV) revealed that the major host cell RNAs encapsidated by this simple retrovirus were LTR retrotransposons and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Several classes of ncRNAs appeared to be packaged by MLV shortly after synthesis, as precursors to tRNAs, small nuclear RNAs, and small nucleolar RNAs were all enriched in virions. To determine the extent to which the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) packages similar RNAs, we used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the RNAs within infectious HIV-1 virions produced in CEM-SS T lymphoblastoid cells. We report that the most abundant cellular RNAs in HIV-1 virions are 7SL RNA and transcripts from numerous divergent and truncated members of the long interspersed element (LINE) and short interspersed element (SINE) families of retrotransposons. We also detected precursors to several tRNAs and small nuclear RNAs as well as transcripts derived from the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacers. We show that packaging of a pre-tRNA requires the nuclear export receptor Exportin 5, indicating that HIV-1 recruits at least some newly made ncRNAs in the cytoplasm. Together, our work identifies the set of RNAs packaged by HIV-1 and reveals that early steps in HIV-1 assembly intersect with host cell ncRNA biogenesis pathways. PMID:27247436

  19. Exercise dysfunction in patients seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.E.; Anders, G.T.; Blanton, H.M.; Hawkes, C.E.; Bush, B.A.; McAllister, C.K.; Matthews, J.I. )

    1990-03-01

    To confirm the presence of exercise dysfunction in patients seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 32 such patients without AIDS were evaluated with cardiopulmonary exercise testing, pulmonary function testing, bronchoalveolar lavage, chest roentgenography, and gallium scanning. No evidence of pulmonary opportunistic infection was found. When compared to an otherwise similar group of HIV-seronegative controls, the patients exercised to a significantly lower workload (195 +/- 30 versus 227 +/- 31 W, p less than 0.001). The ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) values were also significantly lower for the patients (49.2 +/- 13.0 versus 61.9 +/- 9.1% of maximum predicted VO2, p less than 0.001). Nine of the patients had VAT values less than the 95% confidence interval for the controls. This subgroup exercised to a significantly lower maximum VO2 (69.9 +/- 11.2 versus 95.9 +/- 17.5% of maximum predicted VO2, p less than 0.001) and workload (165 +/- 21 versus 227 +/- 31 W) when compared to the control group. These patients demonstrated a mild tachypnea throughout exercise relative to the controls and had a significant increase in the slope of the heart rate to VO2 relationship. These findings are most consistent with a limitation of oxygen delivery to exercising muscles, which may represent occult cardiac disease in this group.

  20. The epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, B G; Gouws, E

    2001-01-01

    We review the epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in South Africa where the prevalence of HIV infection is among the highest in the world. The epidemic reached South Africa relatively recently but the prevalence of infection has increased rapidly and there are significant differences among provinces. Although few 15-year-old people are infected the prevalence increases rapidly with age thereafter, especially among women. The prevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 exceeds that of HIV and curable sexually transmitted infections are common. 'Circular migration' may help to explain the high rates and rapid spread of HIV in the region. The incidence of tuberculosis has increased dramatically as a result of the HIV epidemic. Antiretroviral therapy for the prevention of vertical transmission has been shown to be effective in local conditions but transmission through breast-feeding remains problematical. While some epidemiological models have been developed, much more needs to be done in this regard in order to plan, coordinate and evaluate an effective response to the epidemic. We conclude by discussing some of the research that is needed and steps that could be taken to reduce the continued spread of the infection. PMID:11516385

  1. Update on kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nashar, Khaled; Sureshkumar, Kalathil K

    2016-01-01

    Improved survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with chronic kidney disease following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy resulted in the need to revisit the topic of kidney transplantation in these patients. Large cohort studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes and proved that transplantation is a viable therapeutic option. However, HIV-infected recipients had higher rates of rejection. Immunosuppressive therapy did not negatively impact the course of HIV infection. Some of the immunosuppressive drugs used following transplantation exhibit antiretroviral effects. A close collaboration between infectious disease specialists and transplant professionals is mandatory in order to optimize transplantation outcomes in these patients. Transplantation from HIV+ donors to HIV+ recipients has been a subject of intense debate. The HIV Organ Policy Equity act provided a platform to research this area further and to develop guidelines. The first HIV+ to HIV+ kidney transplant in the United States and the first HIV+ to HIV+ liver transplant in the world were recently performed at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. PMID:27458559

  2. Water, electrolytes, and acid-base alterations in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Musso, Carlos G; Belloso, Waldo H; Glassock, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated disease has changed significantly over the past decade, mainly due to the wide availability and improvement of combination antiretroviral therapy regiments. Serious complications associated with profound immunodeficiency are nowadays fortunately rare in patients with adequate access to care and treatment. However, HIV infected patients, and particularly those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, are predisposed to a host of different water, electrolyte, and acid-base disorders (sometimes with opposite characteristics), since they have a modified renal physiology (reduced free water clearance, and relatively increased fractional excretion of calcium and magnesium) and they are also exposed to infectious, inflammatory, endocrinological, oncological variables which promote clinical conditions (such as fever, tachypnea, vomiting, diarrhea, polyuria, and delirium), and may require a variety of medical interventions (antiviral medication, antibiotics, antineoplastic agents), whose combination predispose them to undermine their homeostatic capability. As many of these disturbances may remain clinically silent until reaching an advanced condition, high awareness is advisable, particularly in patients with late diagnosis, concomitant inflammatory conditions and opportunistic diseases. These disorders contribute to both morbidity and mortality in HIV infected patients. PMID:26788462

  3. Water, electrolytes, and acid-base alterations in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Belloso, Waldo H; Glassock, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated disease has changed significantly over the past decade, mainly due to the wide availability and improvement of combination antiretroviral therapy regiments. Serious complications associated with profound immunodeficiency are nowadays fortunately rare in patients with adequate access to care and treatment. However, HIV infected patients, and particularly those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, are predisposed to a host of different water, electrolyte, and acid-base disorders (sometimes with opposite characteristics), since they have a modified renal physiology (reduced free water clearance, and relatively increased fractional excretion of calcium and magnesium) and they are also exposed to infectious, inflammatory, endocrinological, oncological variables which promote clinical conditions (such as fever, tachypnea, vomiting, diarrhea, polyuria, and delirium), and may require a variety of medical interventions (antiviral medication, antibiotics, antineoplastic agents), whose combination predispose them to undermine their homeostatic capability. As many of these disturbances may remain clinically silent until reaching an advanced condition, high awareness is advisable, particularly in patients with late diagnosis, concomitant inflammatory conditions and opportunistic diseases. These disorders contribute to both morbidity and mortality in HIV infected patients. PMID:26788462

  4. Exercise and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, DeSales; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The human immune system is highly efficient and remarkably protective when functioning properly. Similar to other physiological systems, it functions best when the body is maintained with a balanced diet, sufficient rest and a moderately stress-free lifestyle. It can be disrupted by inappropriate drug use and extreme emotion or exertion. The functioning of normal or compromised immune systems can be enhanced by properly prescribed moderate exercise conditioning regimens in healthy people, and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients but not in others who unable to complete an interval training program. Regular exercise conditioning in healthy people reduces cardiovascular risk factors, increases stamina, facilitates bodyweight control, and reduces stress by engendering positive feelings of well-being. Certain types of cancer may also be suppressed by appropriate exercise conditioning. Various exercise regimens are being evaluated as adjunct treatments for medicated patients with the HIV-1 syndrome. Limited anecdotal evidence from patients suggests that moderate exercise conditioning is per se responsible for their survival well beyond expectancy. HIV-1-infected patients respond positively, both physiologically and psychologically, to moderate exercise conditioning. However, the effectiveness of any exercise treatment programme depends on its mode, frequency, intensity and duration when prescribed o complement the pathological condition of the patient. The effectiveness of exercise conditioning regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection is reviewed in this article. In addition, we discuss mechanisms and pathways, involving the interplay of psychological and physiological factors, through which the suppressed immune system can be enhanced. The immune modulators discussed are endogenous opioids, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other hormones. Exercise conditioning treatment appears to be more effective when combined with other stress management

  5. Mycobacterium avium Complex Osteomyelitis in Persons With Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Brian R.; Buitrago, Martha O.; Patel, Sugat; Hachey, David H.; Haneuse, Sebastien; Harrington, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    In persons with advanced immunosuppression, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) typically causes disseminated disease with systemic symptoms. We report 2 cases in which MAC caused localized osteomyelitis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy with rising CD4 counts. We summarize 17 additional cases of HIV-associated MAC osteomyelitis from the literature and compare CD4 count at presentation for vertebral cases versus nonvertebral cases, which reveals a significantly higher CD4 at presentation for vertebral cases (median 251 cells/µL vs 50 cells/µL; P = .043; Mann–Whitney U test). The literature review demonstrates that the majority of cases of MAC osteomyelitis, especially vertebral, occurs in individuals with CD4 counts that have increased to above 100 cells/µL on antiretroviral therapy. Among HIV-infected individuals with osteomyelitis, MAC should be considered a possible etiology, particularly in the setting of immune reconstitution. PMID:26180837

  6. CD4+ T Cell Depletion in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection: Role of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Février, Michèle; Dorgham, Karim; Rebollo, Angelita

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is principally a mucosal disease and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the major site of HIV replication. Loss of CD4+ T cells and systemic immune hyperactivation are the hallmarks of HIV infection. The end of acute infection is associated with the emergence of specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses and the establishment of a chronic phase of infection. Abnormal levels of immune activation and inflammation persist despite a low steady state level of viremia. Although the causes of persistent immune hyperactivation remain incompletely characterized, physiological alterations of gastrointestinal tract probably play a major role. Failure to restore Th17 cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) might impair the recovery of the gut mucosal barrier. This review discusses recent advances on understanding the contribution of CD4+ T cell depletion to HIV pathogenesis. PMID:21994747

  7. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Santos, Lucianna Helene; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl

    2015-11-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RT) is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted. PMID:26560977

  8. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Lucianna Helene; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RT) is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted. PMID:26560977

  9. The regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-09-15

    Despite 15 years of intensive research we still do not have an effective treatment for AIDS, the disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Recent research is, however, revealing some of the secrets of the replication cycle of this complex retrovirus, and this may lead to the development of novel antiviral compounds. In particular the virus uses strategies for gene expression that seem to be unique in the eukaryotic world. These involve the use of virally encoded regulatory proteins that mediate their effects through interactions with specific viral target sequences present in the messenger RNA rather than in the proviral DNA. If there are no cellular counterparts of these RNA-dependent gene-regulation pathways then they offer excellent targets for the development of antiviral compounds. The viral promoter is also subject to complex regulation by combinations of cellular factors that may be functional in different cell types and at different cell states. Selective interference of specific cellular factors may also provide a route to inhibiting viral replication without disrupting normal cellular functions. The aim of this review is to discuss the regulation of HIV-1 gene expression and, as far as it is possible, to relate the observations to viral pathogenesis. Some areas of research into the regulation of HIV-1 replication have generated controversy and rather than rehearsing this controversy we have imposed our own bias on the field. To redress the balance and to give a broader view of HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis we refer you to a number of excellent reviews [Cullen, B. R. (1992) Microbiol. Rev. 56, 375-394; Levy, J. A. (1993) Microbiol. Rev. 57, 183-394; Antoni, B. A., Stein, S. & Rabson, A. B. (1994) Adv. Virus Res. 43, 53-145; Rosen, C. A. & Fenyoe, E. M. (1995) AIDS (Phila.) 9, S1-S3]. PMID:8856047

  10. Human Immunodeficiencies Related to Defective APC/T Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kallikourdis, Marinos; Viola, Antonella; Benvenuti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    The primary event for initiating adaptive immune responses is the encounter between T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the T cell area of secondary lymphoid organs and the formation of highly organized intercellular junctions referred to as immune synapses (IS). In vivo live-cell imaging of APC–T cell interactions combined to functional studies unveiled that T cell fate is dictated, in large part, by the stability of the initial contact. Immune cell interaction is equally important during delivery of T cell help to B cells and for the killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. The critical role of contact dynamics and synapse stability on the immune response is well illustrated by human immune deficiencies in which disease pathogenesis is linked to altered adhesion or defective cross-talk between the synaptic partners. The Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a severe primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp), a scaffold that promotes actin polymerization and links TCR stimulation to T cell activation. Absence or mutations in WASp affects intercellular APC–T cell communications by interfering with multiple mechanisms on both sides of the IS. The warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, and myelokathexis (WHIM) syndrome is caused by mutations in CXCR4, a chemokine receptor that in mutant form leads to impairment of APC–T cell interactions. Present evidences suggest that other recently characterized primary immune deficiencies caused by mutation in genes linked to actin cytoskeletal reorganization, such as WIP and DOCK8, may also depend on altered synapse stability. Here, we will discuss in details the mechanisms of disturbed APC–T cell interactions in WAS and WHIM. Moreover, we will summarize the evidence pointing to a compromised conjugate formation in WIP, DOCK8, and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. PMID:26379669

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtypes Prevalence in Central China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Li, Wen-jie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To study the epidemic characteristics, transmission sources and routes of various subtypes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and sequence variations in Henan, central China. To provide theoretical foundation for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) prevention strategy in this region where the primary HIV transmission route was through former paid blood donation. Materials and Methods HIV-1 gene env and gag were amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from 1,287 HIV-1 confirmed samples in Henan. Results Among 1,287 samples, 5 HIV-1 strains were found including subtypes B' (95.9%), C (0.47%) and recombinant subtypes CRF 07_BC (1.09%), CRF 08_BC (1.79%) and CRF 01_AE (0.78%). Phylogenetic tree analysis found that 1,234 Henan subtype B' were closely related to those commonly found in Thailand, and were distantly related to other international subtypes. The dominant strain in former blood plasma donors (FPDs) was subtype B', and the dominant strains in sexual transmission were subtype B' and BC. Among HIV patients who were most likely infected through routes other than paid blood donation, the percentage of non-B' subtypes was much higher than those of FPD. Conclusion These findings suggest that the prevailing strain of HIV-1 in Henan is subtype B', similar to the B' subtype found in Thailand. In addition, for the first time we found subtypes C and recombinant subtypes CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC and CRF01_AE in this region. Indicating that the subtype feature of HIV-1 became more complicated than before in central China. PMID:19881967

  12. Leishmania and human immunodeficiency virus coinfection: the first 10 years.

    PubMed Central

    Alvar, J; Cañavate, C; Gutiérrez-Solar, B; Jiménez, M; Laguna, F; López-Vélez, R; Molina, R; Moreno, J

    1997-01-01

    Over 850 Leishmania-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection cases have been recorded, the majority in Europe, where 7 to 17% of HIV-positive individuals with fever have amastigotes, suggesting that Leishmania-infected individuals without symptoms will express symptoms of leishmaniasis if they become immunosuppressed. However, there are indirect reasons and statistical data demonstrating that intravenous drug addiction plays a specific role in Leishmania infantum transmission: an anthroponotic cycle complementary to the zoonotic one has been suggested. Due to anergy in patients with coinfection, L. infantum dermotropic zymodemes are isolated from patient viscera and a higher L. infantum phenotypic variability is seen. Moreover, insect trypanosomatids that are currently considered nonpathogenic have been isolated from coinfected patients. HIV infection and Leishmania infection each induce important analogous immunological changes whose effects are multiplied if they occur concomitantly, such as a Th1-to-Th2 response switch; however, the consequences of the viral infection predominate. In fact, a large proportion of coinfected patients have no detectable anti-Leishmania antibodies. The microorganisms share target cells, and it has been demonstrated in vitro how L. infantum induces the expression of latent HIV-1. Bone marrow culture is the most useful diagnostic technique, but it is invasive. Blood smears and culture are good alternatives. PCR, xenodiagnosis, and circulating-antigen detection are available only in specialized laboratories. The relationship with low levels of CD4+ cells conditions the clinical presentation and evolution of disease. Most patients have visceral leishmaniasis, but asymptomatic, cutaneous, mucocutaneous, diffuse cutaneous, and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis can be produced by L. infantum. The digestive and respiratory tracts are frequently parasitized. The course of coinfection is marked by a high relapse rate. There is a lack

  13. REVIEW OF CONTROL OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION IN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Dami, N; Shehu, N Y; Dami, S; Iroezindu, M O

    2015-01-01

    The global scourge of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is inundating, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and in particular Nigeria which is home to 10% of the world's HIV-infected persons. The target of the millennium development goal 6 is to halt and reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS by 2015. HIV control in Nigeria was initially shrouded in denial and apathy. Subsequently, a more pragmatic approach was launched during the tenure of President Olusegun Obasanjo. Several policies were formulated. The national prevalence of HIV witnessed some progressive decline and is currently 4.1%. There is now improvement in both HIV awareness and counselling and testing. Greater access to antiretroviral therapy and other support services have also been witnessed with over 300,000 persons currently on drugs. Notable achievements have been recorded in prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTC). However, with increased access to antiretroviral therapy, antiretroviral drug resistance has become inevitable. Acquired drug resistance is high-82% and transmitted drug resistance ranges between 0.7 and 4.5%. The achievements were largely facilitated by international partnerships which have become more streamlined in recent years. A sustained shift to indigenously sourced financial and manpower resource has become imperative. It is also important to integrate HIV facilities with other existing health care facilities for sustainability and cost-effectiveness. In an attempt to strengthen the national response, President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan launched the President's Comprehensive Response Plan for HIV/AIDS in Nigeria. It is hoped that this well-articulated policy would be well implemented to significantly reverse the epidemic. PMID:27487603

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related pulmonary complications in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Saade, G R

    1997-08-01

    With changes in the demographics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, women and children are becoming the fastest growing group of newly infected patients. With longer survival after HIV infection, more women infected with HIV are becoming pregnant. Pulmonary disease is one of the most common presenting conditions in an AIDS-defining illness. Pneumocystis carini pneumonia and tuberculosis are the most common disorders that herald the onset of AIDS. They are also the most frequently encountered HIV-related pulmonary complications during pregnancy. Others have been rarely reported during pregnancy and include fungal infections (Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Coccidioides immitus), bacterial infections (Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae along with Pseudomona aeruginosa), viral infections (CMV), opportunistic neoplasms (Kaposi's sarcoma, lymphoma) and miscellaneous conditions peculiar to HIV-infected individuals (nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis, isolated pulmonary hypertension, and pulmonary edema secondary to cardiac disease or drug abuse). Most of the data regarding the pulmonary complications of HIV infection come from studies in nonpregnant patients. The extent to which pregnancy affects the course of respiratory disease in HIV infection and vice versa is not well documented. Clinical presentation is usually not altered by pregnancy. Except for minor modifications mainly related to potential fetal effects, the diagnostic work-up and management are similar to those in the nonpregnant patient. The most important effect of pregnancy on these conditions remains the delay in diagnosis and treatment. A high index of suspicion should, therefore, be maintained. In addition, most prophylactic measures recommended in nonpregnant HIV-infected individuals also apply to pregnant women. PMID:9298723

  15. Antiretroviral treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection: Swedish recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sandström, Eric; Uhnoo, Ingrid; Ahlqvist-Rastad, Jane; Bratt, Göran; Berglund, Torsten; Gisslén, Magnus; Lindbäck, Stefan; Morfeldt, Linda; Ståhle, Lars; Sönnerborg, Anders

    2003-01-01

    The Swedish guidelines (SwG) for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have several important roles. A major task involves the promotion of a uniformly high standard of care in all HIV treatment clinics in Sweden and the identification of strengths, weaknesses and relevance of recent research findings. CD4+ T-cell counts < 200 cells/microl are clear indications for the initiation of treatment, whereas high viral loads serve as an indication for increased vigilance rather than a criterion for therapy. It is recommended that the first regimen consists of 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in combination with 1 protease inhibitor or 1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor. The definition of treatment failure is rigorous. Treatment change should be considered if the viral load has not fallen by at least 1.5 log in 4 weeks or is undetectable within 3-4 months. Resistance testing is endorsed at primary infection, in the event of treatment failure and in pregnant women. Interaction with experts in HIV resistance testing is emphasized. Therapeutic drug monitoring is advocated. Patients with treatment failure should be handled individually and the decision on therapeutic strategy should be based on treatment history, resistance testing and other clinical facts. The SwG do not give recommendations for some important issues such as prolonged drug holidays and preferences in initial treatment regimens. More scientific data are likely to be available soon and the SwG will be refined accordingly. The present guidelines are translated from Swedish; they are published on the Medical Products Agency (MPA) and Swedish Reference Group for Antiviral Therapy (RAV) websites (www.mpa.se and www.rav.nu.se), including 7 separate papers based on a thorough literature search. A complete reference list is available on request from the MPA. PMID:12751710

  16. Ocular findings in human immunodeficiency virus patients in Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Kaleem, Mona A; Ramsahai, Shweta; Del Fierro, Katrina; Rasul, Samad; Onumah, Chavon; Lerebours, Valerie; Gajjala, Jhansi; Copeland, Robert A; Jones, Leslie S

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of ocular diseases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients in Washington, DC in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This was a cross-sectional study of patients with HIV who were seen by the ophthalmology consultation service between September 2003 and May 2011 at a single academic institution in Washington, DC. Medical history and ophthalmic findings were reviewed. Patients with complete laboratory data dated within 3 months of their presenting eye examination were included. Descriptive statistics were performed. The records of 151 patients were included in the final analysis. All patients had complete laboratory data dated within 3 months of their presenting eye examination. Sixty-eight (45 %) patients and fifty-eight (50 %) of those with a diagnosis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were diagnosed with an HIV-related ophthalmic disease. The leading anterior segment disease was herpes zoster ophthalmicus and the leading posterior segment disease was HIV retinopathy. Of the 151 included patients, 78 (52 %) were receiving HAART at the time of the examination. Thirty-one (42 %) of those not receiving HAART were diagnosed with an HIV-related ophthalmic disease. In this study, we find that the overall prevalence of ocular disease has decreased since the introduction of HAART. However, HIV patients continue to be predisposed to developing ophthalmic disease at higher rates than the general population. Visual dysfunction remains an important source of morbidity in HIV patients, particularly in those with AIDS. Measures for improvement include increased communication between infectious disease specialists and ophthalmologists to ensure adherence to HAART and routine eye examinations. PMID:22450559

  17. Inducible human immunodeficiency virus type 1 packaging cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, H; Rabson, A B; Kaul, M; Ron, Y; Dougherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    Packaging cell lines are important tools for transferring genes into eukaryotic cells. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based packaging cell lines are difficult to obtain, in part owing to the problem that some HIV-1 proteins are cytotoxic in a variety of cells. To overcome this, we have developed an HIV-1-based packaging cell line which has an inducible expression system. The tetracycline-inducible expression system was utilized to control the expression of the Rev regulatory protein, which in turn controls the expression of the late proteins including Gag, Pol, and Env. Western blotting (immunoblotting) demonstrated that the expression of p24gag and gp120env from the packaging cells peaked on days 6 and 7 postinduction. Reverse transcriptase activity could be detected by day 4 after induction and also peaked on days 6 and 7. Defective vector virus could be propagated, yielding titers as high as 7 x 10(3) CFU/ml, while replication-competent virus was not detectable at any time. Thus, the cell line should enable the transfer of specific genes into CD4+ cells and should be a useful tool for studying the biology of HIV-1. We have also established an inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line which could be used to propagate HIV-1 vectors that require only Env in trans. The env-minus vector virus titer produced from the Env-expressing cells reached 2 x 10(4) CFU/ml. The inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line should be a useful tool for the study of HIV-1 Env as well. PMID:8676479

  18. Perioperative concerns in neurosurgical patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Jyotsna; Ganjoo, Pragati; Hansda, Upendra; Sharma, Megha U.; Tandon, Monica S.; Singh, Daljit

    2016-01-01

    Background: The perioperative management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients undergoing neurosurgery is challenging due to the presence of HIV-related multi-system derangements, opportunistic infections and malignancies, history of substance abuse, and adverse effects of anti-retroviral therapy (ART), together with the inherent risks of neurosurgery. The possible adverse impact of HIV disease on the anesthetic outcome due to the associated co-morbidities, and conversely, the role of surgery and anesthesia in HIV disease progression due to their immunosuppressive effects, and also, the fear of HIV transmission among the attending medical personnel are the important perioperative concerns in such surgeries. Aim: To present our experience in the perioperative management of HIV-infected patients who underwent neurosurgery at our institute in the past 5 years and highlight the relevant perioperative issues. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of the records of HIV-infected neurosurgical patients was undertaken to determine their HIV status and ART, anesthesia and surgery details, perioperative complications, and instances of postoperative worsening of HIV disease or its transmission, if any. Results: Seven HIV infected patients with variable severity of HIV infection and systemic disease underwent neurosurgery for different indications. Their perioperative management was modified in accordance with the co-morbidities and the type of neurosurgery. There was no obvious adverse impact of the HIV disease on the anesthetic outcome, no obvious clinical evidence of post-surgery worsening of the HIV disease, and no instance of HIV transmission in our patients. Conclusion: A goodunderstanding of the HIV disease and its perioperative implications during neurosurgery helps in better patient management and enables a safe outcome. PMID:27057214

  19. Advances in Human B Cell Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Denise A.; Wei, Chungwen; Qian, Yu; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (“Big Biology”), necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort. PMID:23087687

  20. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis in a human immunodeficiency negative-virus patient.

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, Lamine; Kilani, Houda; Bouassida, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Moufida; Chalbi, Emna; Siai, Karima; Ezzine, Heykel; Touinsi, Hassen; Azzouz, Mohamed M'saddak; Sassi, Sadok

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of immunomodulator therapy in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative heterosexual man. PMID:24396560

  1. Optimization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Treatment During Incarceration

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Jaimie P.; Cepeda, Javier; Wu, Johnny; Trestman, Robert L.; Altice, Frederick L.; Springer, Sandra A.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) management in correctional settings is logistically feasible, but HIV-related outcomes before release have not been recently systematically examined. OBJECTIVE To evaluate HIV treatment outcomes throughout incarceration, including jail and prison. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study of longitudinally linked demographic, pharmacy, and laboratory data on 882 prisoners within the Connecticut Department of Correction (2005–2012) with confirmed HIV infection, who were continually incarcerated 90 days or more, had at least 2 HIV-1 RNA and CD4 lymphocyte measurements, and were prescribed antiretroviral therapy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Three electronic databases (correctional, laboratory, and pharmacy) were integrated to assess HIV viral suppression (HIV-1 RNA levels, <400 copies/mL) on intake and release. Secondary outcomes were mean change in log-transformed HIV-1 RNA levels and mean change in CD4 lymphocyte count during incarceration. Demographic characteristics, prescribed pharmacotherapies, receipt of directly observed therapy, and duration of incarceration were analyzed as possible explanatory variables for HIV viral suppression in logistic regression models. RESULTS Among 882 HIV-infected prisoners with 1185 incarceration periods, mean HIV-1 RNA level decreased by 1.1 log10 and CD4 lymphocyte count increased by 98 cells/μL over time, with a higher proportion achieving viral suppression by release compared with entry (70.0% vs 29.8%; P < .001); 36.9% of antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens were changed during incarceration. After adjusting for baseline HIV-1 RNA level, prerelease viral suppression correlated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.26–2.59) and psychiatric disorder severity below the sample median (adjusted odds ratio, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.12–1.99), but not race/ethnicity, incarceration duration, ART regimen or dosing strategy, or directly observed therapy

  2. Chronic kidney disease in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fabian, J; Katz, I; Gerntholtz, T; Goetsch, S; Naicker, S

    2007-06-01

    The number of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) worldwide was estimated to be 39.5 million in 2006, 2.6 million more than in 2004. The manifestations of HIV infection in the kidney are multiple and varied, highlighting the complexity of the disease process. There is a wide spectrum of renal disease that occurs in the course of HIV infection. Biopsy studies reveal varying frequencies of histological patterns. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is most common. A biopsy study at Chris Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto, South Africa showed that HIVAN was present in 27% and immune complex disease in 21%. Han et al. studied HIV-positive patients in Durban, South Africa and screened for proteinuria, including microalbuminuria. They found persistent proteinuria in 6%; HIVAN in 21/30 (72.4%) and the prevalence of HIVAN in patients with persistent microalbuminuria was 85.7%. Studies in black patients have shown a higher prevalence of both severe glomerular lesions (focal glomerulosclerosis) and nephrotic range proteinuria with renal dysfunction in the presence of normo-hypotension. There have been no prospective randomised controlled studies with any form of therapy for HIVAN to date. Therapy of HIVAN has included corticosteroids, cyclosporine and antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART appears to be a logical choice in the management of HIV-associated renal disease. Regimens containing protease inhibitors have been shown to be associated with significant slowing of the decline in creatinine clearance. Both peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis are appropriate treatment modalities for HIV-infected patients with end stage renal disease. The choice of dialysis modality between haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis is not a factor in predicting survival, if patients are stable on ART. Preliminary short-term data in case reports and small cohorts of liver, kidney, and heart transplant recipients suggest that patient survival rates may be similar to those in HIV

  3. The human immunodeficiency virus preventive vaccine research at the French National Agency for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome research.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elizabeth; Rieux, Véronique; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Kazatchkine, Michel

    2005-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic is of unprecedented gravity and is spreading rapidly, notably in the most disadvantaged regions of the world. The search for a preventive vaccine is thus an absolute priority. For over 10 years the French National Agency for AIDS research (ANRS) has been committed to an original program combining basic science and clinical research. The HIV preventive vaccine research program run by the ANRS covers upstream research for the definition of immunogens, animal models, and clinical research to evaluate candidate vaccines. Most researchers in 2004 believe that it should be possible to obtain partial vaccine protection through the induction of a strong and multiepitopic cellular response. Since 1992, the ANRS has set up 15 phases I and II clinical trials in order to evaluate the safety and the capacity of the candidate vaccines for inducing cellular immune responses. The tested candidate vaccines were increasingly complex recombinant canarypox viruses (Alvac) containing sequences coding for certain viral proteins, utilized alone or combined with other immunogens (whole or truncated envelope proteins). ANRS has also been developing an original strategy based on the utilization of lipopeptides. These comprise synthetic fragments of viral proteins associated with lipids that facilitate the induction of a cellular immune response. These approaches promptly allowed the assessment of a prime-boost strategy combining a viral vector and lipopeptides. PMID:15867969

  4. South Asian Consensus Guidelines for the rational management of diabetes in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Raza, Syed Abbas; Bantwal, Ganpathy; Baruah, Manash P.; Latt, Tint Swe; Shrestha, Dina; John, Mathew; Katulanda, Prasad; Somasundaram, Noel; Sahay, Rakesh; Pathan, Faruque

    2011-01-01

    As newer methods of management are made available, and accessible, survival rates with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are increasing. This means that chronic, metabolic complications of HIV are becoming more frequent in clinical practice, as acute morbidity is controlled. Management of HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is gradually expanding to include these chronic and metabolic complications of the disease, and the adverse effects associated with its treatments, including diabetes. Unfortunately, no guidelines are available to help the medical practitioners choose appropriate therapy for patients with these conditions. The aim of the South Asian Consensus Guidelines is to provide evidence-based recommendations to assist healthcare providers in the rational management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with HIV. The development of these guidelines used systematic reviews of available evidence to form its key recommendations. These guidelines and associated review of literature represent a compilation of available knowledge regarding rational management of diabetes in HIV. Patients of diabetes with concomitant HIV infection are managed optimally with insulin therapy and judicious use of highly active antiretroviral therapy with suitable alternatives is also recommended. These guidelines should prove helpful to physicians, not only in South Asia, but also across the globe, while managing patients with coexistent HIV and diabetes. PMID:22028994

  5. Generation and Characterization of Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tat Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Emmanuel; Hoebeke, Johan; Zagury, Daniel; Muller, Sylviane; Desgranges, Claude

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus Tat regulatory protein is essential for virus replication and pathogenesis. From human peripheral blood mononuclear cells of three Tat toxoid-immunized volunteers, we isolated five Tat-specific human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs): two full-length immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies and three single-chain fragment-variable (scFv) antibodies. The two IgGs were mapped to distinct epitopes within the basic region of Tat, and the three scFvs were mapped to the N-terminal domain of Tat. The three scFvs were highly reactive with recombinant Tat in Western blotting or immunoprecipitation, but results were in contrast to those for the two IgGs, which are sensitive to a particular folding of the protein. In transactivation assays, scFvs were able to inhibit both active recombinant Tat and native Tat secreted by a transfected CEM cell line while IgGs neutralized only native Tat. These HMAbs were able to reduce viral p24 production in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strain IIIB chronically infected cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:15016898

  6. Profound CD4+ T lymphocytopenia in human immunodeficiency virus negative individuals, improved with anti-human herpes virus treatment

    PubMed Central

    Klínger Hernández, Julio César; Niño Castaño, Victoria Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Lymphocytopenia and CD4+ T lymphocytopenia can be associated with many bacterial, fungal, parasite and viral infections. They can also be found in autoimmune and neoplastic diseases, common variable immunodeficiency syndrome, physical, psychological and traumatic stress, malnutrition and immunosuppressive therapy. Besides, they can also be brought into relation, without a known cause, with idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia. Among viral infections, the Retrovirus, specially the human immunodeficiency virus, is the most frequently cause. However, many acute viral infections, including cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr virus can be associated with transient lymphocytopenia and CD4+ T lymphocytopenia. As is well known, transient lymphocytopenia and CD4+ T lymphocytopenia are temporary and overcome when the disease improves. Nonetheless, severe CD4+ T Lymphocytopenia associated with chronic infections by human herpes virus has not been reported. We describe 6 cases of human immunodeficiency virus negative patients, with chronic cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr virus infections and profound lymphocytopenia with clinical symptoms of cellular immunodeficiency. These patients improved rapidly with ganciclovir or valganciclovir treatment. We claim here that it is important to consider the chronic human herpes virus infection in the differential diagnosis of profoundly CD4+ T lymphocytopenia etiology, when human immunodeficiency virus is absent, in order to start effective treatment and to determine, in future studies, the impact of chronic human herpes virus infection in human beings' health. PMID:24893304

  7. C5A Protects Macaques from Vaginal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Chatterji, Udayan; Bobardt, Michael; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Li, Jian; Wang, Xiaolei

    2015-01-01

    A safe and effective vaginal microbicide could decrease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in women. Here, we evaluated the safety and microbicidal efficacy of a short amphipathic peptide, C5A, in a rhesus macaque model. We found that a vaginal application of C5A protects 89% of the macaques from a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-162P3) challenge. We observed no signs of lesions or inflammation in animals vaginally treated with repeated C5A applications. With its noncellular cytotoxic activity and rare mechanism of action, C5A represents an attractive microbicidal candidate. PMID:26552985

  8. C5A Protects Macaques from Vaginal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Chatterji, Udayan; Bobardt, Michael; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E; Li, Jian; Wang, Xiaolei; Gallay, Philippe A

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective vaginal microbicide could decrease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in women. Here, we evaluated the safety and microbicidal efficacy of a short amphipathic peptide, C5A, in a rhesus macaque model. We found that a vaginal application of C5A protects 89% of the macaques from a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-162P3) challenge. We observed no signs of lesions or inflammation in animals vaginally treated with repeated C5A applications. With its noncellular cytotoxic activity and rare mechanism of action, C5A represents an attractive microbicidal candidate. PMID:26552985

  9. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of...

  10. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of...

  11. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of...

  12. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of...

  13. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of...

  14. Hydroxychloroquine treatment of patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Sperber, K; Louie, M; Kraus, T; Proner, J; Sapira, E; Lin, S; Stecher, V; Mayer, L

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an antimalarial agent used to treat patients with autoimmune diseases, has been shown to suppress human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in vitro in T cells and monocytes by inhibiting posttranscriptional modification of the virus. These in vitro observations have been expanded into an in vivo study of HCQ as a potential anti-HIV-1 agent in HIV-1-infected patients. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 40 asymptomatic HIV-1-infected patients who had CD4+ counts between 200 and 500 cells/mm3. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either HCQ 800 mg/d or placebo for 8 weeks. Virologic and immunologic parameters, including HIV-1 ribonucleic acid (RNA) via use of polymerase chain reaction, viral culture, antigen and mitogen responses, and proinflammatory cytokine levels were measured at the beginning and end of the study. The amount of recoverable HIV-1 RNA in plasma declined significantly in the HCQ group over the 8-week period (P = 0.022), while it increased in the placebo group. The percentage of CD4+ T cells remained stable in the HCQ-treated group (18.1 +/- 9.2% before treatment vs 18.6 +/- 10.5% after treatment) and fell significantly in the placebo group (21 +/- 7% before treatment vs 19.3 +/- 6.3% after treatment; P = 0.032). However, this was not reflected as a change in absolute CD4+ counts for either group (HCQ, 262.8 +/- 166 cells/mm3 vs 251 +/- 163 cells/mm3; placebo, 312 +/- 121 cells/mm3 vs 321 +/- 124 cells/mm3). Mitogen- and antigen-specific responses remained constant in the HCQ group while T cell proliferative responses to Candida decreased in the placebo group (4.8 +/- 3.6 x 10(3) SI [stimulation index] vs 3.0 +/- 3.0 x 10(3) SI; P = 0.032). Lastly, serum interleukin 6 levels declined in the HCQ group (14.3 +/- 13.5 U/mL vs 12.0 +/- 16.7 U/mL; P = 0.023) but not in the placebo group (11.3 +/- 8.8 U/mL vs 7.0 +/- 11.7 U/mL); this was coincident with a decrease in

  15. CD4-independent infection of human neural cells by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Harouse, J M; Kunsch, C; Hartle, H T; Laughlin, M A; Hoxie, J A; Wigdahl, B; Gonzalez-Scarano, F

    1989-01-01

    A number of studies have indicated that central nervous system-derived cells can be infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To determine whether CD4, the receptor for HIV-1 in lymphoid cells, was responsible for infection of neural cells, we characterized infectable human central nervous system tumor lines and primary fetal neural cells and did not detect either CD4 protein or mRNA. We then attempted to block infection with anti-CD4 antibodies known to block infection of lymphoid cells; we noted no effect on any of these cultured cells. The results indicate that CD4 is not the receptor for HIV-1 infection of the glioblastoma line U373-MG, medulloblastoma line MED 217, or primary human fetal neural cells. Images PMID:2786088

  16. Epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus-visceral leishmaniasis-co-infection.

    PubMed

    Naufal Spir, Patrícia Rodrigues; Zampieri D'Andrea, Lourdes Aparecida; Fonseca, Elivelton Silva; Prestes-Carneiro, Luiz Euribel

    2016-04-01

    In Brazil, the rates of mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) decreased from 20% to 1-2% in some regions. However, the country contains 90% of individuals infected with visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Latin America, and the west region of São Paulo state faces an alarming expansion of the disease. We describe the epidemiological aspects of the expanding infection of VL and a case report of an HIV-VL-co-infected child from the west region of São Paulo state. The patient was an AIDS-C3 with low levels of CD4, high viral load, severe diarrhea, oral and perineal candidiasis, severe thrombocytopenia, and protein-caloric malnourishment. She evolved with sepsis, renal and cardiac failure. An rK rapid diagnosis test, indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), and bone marrow aspirate were performed for VL. Her symptoms improved significantly after liposomal amphotericin B administration. From the 45 municipalities that compose the Regional Health Department of Presidente Prudente, Lutzomyia longipalpis vectors were found in 58% of them. VL infected dogs were found in 33% of those municipalities, infected dogs and humans were found in 29%, 20% are starting and 33% of the municipalities are preparing VL investigation. It is likely, in this patient, that VL advanced the clinical progression of the HIV disease and the development of AIDS severity. Supported by favorable conditions, the region becomes a new frontier of VL in Brazil. PMID:23834783

  17. The Interaction between Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Human Papillomaviruses in Heterosexuals in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer in the world, which is further aggravated by the burden of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) disease with invasive cervical cancer being an AIDS-defining cancer. The prevalence of HPV infection and associated disease is very high in HIV-infected people and continues to be a problem even after anti-retroviral therapy. In the genital tract, the interaction between HPV and HIV is complex, with infection with multiple HPV types reported to make both women and men more susceptible to HIV infection. Besides the national programmes to vaccinate girls against HPV and screen women for cervical cancer, there should be targeted cervical cancer screening, treatment and prevention programmes introduced into HIV treatment centres. There is evidence that in high HIV prevalence areas, HIV-positive women could cause increases in the prevalence of genital HPV infection in HIV-negative men and so increase the HPV circulating in the community. Condom use and circumcision reduce the acquisition of HIV-1, and also to some extent of HPV. This review will highlight what is known about the interaction of HIV and HPV, with an emphasis on research in Africa. PMID:26239348

  18. Molecular Evolution Analysis of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope in Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques: Implications for Challenge Dose Selection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Mariana; Landskron, Lisa; Lai, Rachel P. J.; McKinley, Trevelyan J.; Bogers, Willy M.; Verschoor, Ernst J.; Dubbes, Rob; Barnett, Susan W.; Frost, Simon D. W.; Heeney, Jonathan L.

    2011-01-01

    Since the demonstration that almost 80% of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections result from the transmission of a single variant from the donor, biological features similar to those of HIV mucosal transmission have been reported for macaques inoculated with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Here we describe the early diversification events and the impact of challenge doses on viral kinetics and on the number of variants transmitted in macaques infected with the chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus SHIVsf162p4. We show that there is a correlation between the dose administered and the number of variants transmitted and that certain inoculum variants are preferentially transmitted. This could provide insight into the viral determinants of transmission and could aid in vaccine development. Challenge through the mucosal route with high doses results in the transmission of multiple variants in all the animals. Such an unrealistic scenario could underestimate potential intervention measures. We thus propose the use of molecular evolution analysis to aid in the determination of challenge doses that better mimic the transmission dynamics seen in natural HIV-1 infection. PMID:21795341

  19. Limited Protection from a Pathogenic Chimeric Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge following Immunization with Attenuated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mark G.; Yalley-Ogunro, Jake; Greenhouse, Jack J.; Brennan, Terry P.; Jiang, Jennifer Bo; VanCott, Thomas C.; Lu, Yichen; Eddy, Gerald A.; Birx, Deborah L.

    1999-01-01

    Two live attenuated single-deletion mutant simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) constructs, SIV239Δnef and SIVPBj6.6Δnef, were tested for their abilities to stimulate protective immunity in macaques. During the immunization period the animals were examined for specific immune responses and virus growth. Each construct generated high levels of specific immunity in all of the immunized animals. The SIV239Δnef construct was found to grow to high levels in all immunized animals, with some animals remaining positive for virus isolation and plasma RNA throughout the immunization period. The SIVPBj6.6Δnef was effectively controlled by all of the immunized animals, with virus mostly isolated only during the first few months following immunization and plasma RNA never detected. Following an extended period of immunization of over 80 weeks, the animals were challenged with a pathogenic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) isolate, SIV89.6PD, by intravenous injection. All of the SIV239Δnef-immunized animals became infected with the SHIV isolate; two of five animals eventually controlled the challenge and three of five animals, which failed to check the immunizing virus, progressed to disease state before the unvaccinated controls. One of five animals immunized with SIVPBj6.6Δnef totally resisted infection by the challenge virus, while three others limited its growth and the remaining animal became persistently infected and eventually died of a pulmonary thrombus. These data indicate that vaccination with attenuated SIV can protect macaques from disease and in some cases from infection by a divergent SHIV. However, if animals are unable to control the immunizing virus, potential damage that can accelerate the disease course of a pathogenic challenge virus may occur. PMID:9882330

  20. Absence of Active Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Clinics in Zambia and Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Wandeler, Gilles; Mulenga, Lloyd; Hobbins, Michael; Joao, Candido; Sinkala, Edford; Hector, Jonas; Aly, Musa; Chi, Benjamin H.; Egger, Matthias; Vinikoor, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the prevalence of replicating hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in sub-Saharan Africa. Among 1812 individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus, no patient in rural Mozambique and 4 patients in urban Zambia were positive for anti-HCV antibodies. Of these, none had confirmed HCV replication. PMID:27047986

  1. Statin Effects to Reduce Hepatosteatosis as Measured by Computed Tomography in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Janet; Lu, Michael T.; Kim, Elli A.; Nou, Eric; Hallett, Travis R.; Park, Jakob; Hoffmann, Udo; Grinspoon, Steven K.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatosteatosis is highly prevalent among patients living with human immunodeficiency virus. In a 1-year, randomized, double-blind trial of atorvastatin or placebo, atorvastatin increased liver/spleen ratio among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, indicating a reduction in hepatosteatosis. This reduction in hepatosteatosis is associated with reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statin therapy. PMID:27419149

  2. Prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing and Associated Risk Factors in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Olivia; Wu, Qishan; Ickes, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study documents the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing in a sample of college students and examines associated demographic and behavioral characteristics. Participants: College students aged 18 or older were randomly selected to participate in a health behavior survey at a southeastern university in September…

  3. Evaluation of Serum Creatinine Changes With Integrase Inhibitor Use in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Tara A.; Duggan, Joan M.; Sahloff, Eric G.

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective chart review evaluated changes in serum creatinine and creatinine clearance (CrCl) after initiation of an integrase inhibitor (INSTI)-based regimen as initial treatment in human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults. Serum creatinine and CrCl changes were similar to those seen in clinical trials for INSTIs. No renal-related serious adverse events or discontinuations occurred. PMID:27092314

  4. The Connections between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Implications for Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Fox, Ashley; Ferro, Carol; Khawaja, Shazia; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2005-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted with 28 women who are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and have experienced childhood sexual abuse (CSA) in order to examine (1) the challenges generated by the experience of sexual abuse and related coping strategies, (2) the impact of the HIV diagnosis on their coping strategies, and (3) the links…

  5. 76 FR 72417 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) through Solid Organ Transplantation'' (76 FR 58517). Written and electronic comments were to be received on or before November 21, 2011... Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus...

  6. Case Study: Delirium in an Adolescent Girl with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharko, Alexander M.; Baker, Eva H.; Kothari, Priti; Khattak, Hina; Lancaster, Duniya

    2006-01-01

    Delirium and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated dementia are well recognized neuropsychiatric consequences of HIV infection in adults. Almost nothing is known regarding the management of delirium in HIV-infected children and adolescents. HIV-related progressive encephalopathy is thought to represent the pediatric form of HIV-associated…

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing and False Disclosures in Heterosexual College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marelich, William D.; Clark, Tonya

    2004-01-01

    The authors assessed factors that motivate individuals to report negative human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test results, although they had never been tested. In particular, they investigated sexual intimacy motives associated with the needs for affiliation, sex, and dominance as contributing factors for faulty disclosures. Participants…

  8. Statin Effects to Reduce Hepatosteatosis as Measured by Computed Tomography in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Lo, Janet; Lu, Michael T; Kim, Elli A; Nou, Eric; Hallett, Travis R; Park, Jakob; Hoffmann, Udo; Grinspoon, Steven K

    2016-04-01

    Hepatosteatosis is highly prevalent among patients living with human immunodeficiency virus. In a 1-year, randomized, double-blind trial of atorvastatin or placebo, atorvastatin increased liver/spleen ratio among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, indicating a reduction in hepatosteatosis. This reduction in hepatosteatosis is associated with reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statin therapy. PMID:27419149

  9. Syphilis? An Unusual Cause of Surgical Emergency in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Man

    PubMed Central

    Bender Ignacio, Rachel A.; Koch, Lisa L.; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Charmie Godornes, B.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a human immunodeficiency virus-infected man undergoing urgent anorectal surgery, with multi-centimeter fungating masses discovered inside the anus. Initial pathology was inconclusive. After the patient developed a disseminated rash postoperatively determined to be secondary syphilis, the anorectal pathology was reviewed and Treponema pallidum DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from the mass. PMID:26213693

  10. Interaction of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Vpx and Invariant Chain

    PubMed Central

    Pancio, Heather A.; Vander Heyden, Nancy; Kosuri, Kavitha; Cresswell, Peter; Ratner, Lee

    2000-01-01

    Vpx is a virion-associated protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and simian immunodeficiency viruses. The yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify invariant chain (Ii) as a cellular protein that interacts with HIV-2 Vpx. Vpx-Ii interaction was confirmed in cell-free reactions using bacterially expressed glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins and by coimmunoprecipitation in transfected and infected cells. In chronically infected cells expressing Vpx, Ii levels were markedly decreased, presumably due to enhanced degradation. These findings suggest that Vpx may disrupt major histocompatibility complex class II antigen presentation. PMID:10846101

  11. Reciprocal modulations between p53 and Tat of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C J; Wang, C; Friedman, D J; Pardee, A B

    1995-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) after a long clinical latency. This disease is associated with a spectrum of cancers. Here we report that wild-type p53 is a potent suppressor of Tat, a major transactivator of HIV-1. Reciprocally, Tat inhibits the transcription of p53. Downregulation of p53 by upregulated tat may be important for the establishment of productive viral infection in a cell and also may be involved in the development of AIDS-related malignancies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777531

  12. Purinergic signaling and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: From viral entry to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Passos, Daniela F; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Leal, Daniela BR

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a serious condition associated to severe immune dysfunction and immunodeficiency. Mechanisms involved in HIV-associated immune activation, inflammation and loss of CD4+ T cells have been extensively studied, including those concerning purinergic signaling pathways. Purinergic signaling components are involved in viral entry and replication and disease progression. Research involving the participation of purinergic signaling in HIV infection has been not only important to elucidate disease mechanisms but also to introduce new approaches to therapy. The involvement of purinergic signaling in the pathogenesis of HIV infection and its implications in the control of the HIV infection are reviewed in this paper. PMID:26279989

  13. Human colon epithelial cells productively infected with human immunodeficiency virus show impaired differentiation and altered secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, J; Yahi, N; Baghdiguian, S; Chermann, J C

    1992-01-01

    Selected strains of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 are able to infect human colon epithelial cells in vitro, suggesting a mechanism for the anal route of HIV transmission. In some cases, HIV is not produced by infected colon cells but can be rescued after coculture with T-lymphoid cells. One of the HIV strains (HIV1-NDK) replicated well in colonic cells. A transmission electron microscope study demonstrated two major structural perturbations in producer colon cells: an unusual number of secretion bodies and the appearance of intracellular lumina with disorganized microvilli, indicating a defect in brush border assembly and differentiation. Either abnormality could account for HIV-induced enteropathy consisting of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption in the absence of enteric pathogens. Moreover, HT29 cells infected with HIV provide a unique model for selection of enterotropic HIV strains. Images PMID:1727501

  14. Species-specific metastasis of human tumor cells in the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse engrafted with human tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, E; Namikawa, R

    1995-01-01

    We have attempted to model human metastatic disease by implanting human target organs into the immunodeficient C.B-17 scid/scid (severe combined immunodeficiency; SCID) mouse, creating SCID-hu mice. Preferential metastasis to implants of human fetal lung and human fetal bone marrow occurred after i.v. injection of human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells into SCID-hu mice; the homologous mouse organs were spared. Clinically more aggressive variant SCLC cells metastasized more efficiently to human fetal lung implants than did cells from classic SCLC. Metastasis of variant SCLC to human fetal bone marrow was enhanced in SCID-hu mice exposed to gamma-irradiation or to interleukin 1 alpha. These data indicate that the SCID-hu mice may provide a model in which to study species- and tissue-specific steps of the human metastatic process. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7753860

  15. Species-Specific Metastasis of Human Tumor Cells in the Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mouse Engrafted with Human Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtivelman, Emma; Namikawa, Reiko

    1995-05-01

    We have attempted to model human metastatic disease by implanting human target organs into the immunodeficient C.B-17 scid/scid (severe combined immunodeficiency; SCID) mouse, creating SCID-hu mice. Preferential metastasis to implants of human fetal lung and human fetal bone marrow occurred after i.v. injection of human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells into SCID-hu mice; the homologous mouse organs were spared. Clinically more aggressive variant SCLC cells metastasized more efficiently to human fetal lung implants than did cells from classic SCLC. Metastasis of variant SCLC to human fetal bone marrow was enhanced in SCID-hu mice exposed to γ-irradiation or to interleukin 1α. These data indicate that the SCID-hu mice may provide a model in which to study species- and tissue-specific steps of the human metastatic process.

  16. Pattern of mucocutaneous manifestations in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients in North India

    PubMed Central

    Kore, Sachin D.; Kanwar, Amrinder J.; Vinay, Keshavamurthy; Wanchu, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mucocutaneous diseases are among the first-recognized clinical manifestations of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. They function as visual markers in assessing the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Given the relative ease of examination of skin, its evaluation remains an important tool in the diagnosis of HIV infection. Objective: To determine the pattern of mucocutaneous manifestations in HIV-positive patients and to correlate their presence with CD4 counts. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 352 HIV-infected patients seen at PGIMER, Chandigarh, India, over a period of 1 year. The patients were screened for mucocutaneous disorders by an experienced dermatologist. The patients were classified into different stages according to the World Health Organization clinical and immunological staging system. Results: The most prevalent infection was candidiasis, seen in 57 patients (16.2%). Prevalence of candidiasis, dermatophytosis, herpes simplex, herpes zoster, molluscum contagiosum (MC), seborrheic dermatitis, adverse drug reaction, nail pigmentation, xerosis and diffuse hair loss differed statistically according to the clinical stages of HIV infection. There was a statistically significant association between immunological stages of HIV infection and dermatophytosis. Conclusion: Results of our study suggest that mucocutaneous findings occur throughout the course of HIV infection. Dermatoses like MC and dermatophytosis show an inverse relation with CD4 cell count, and these dermatoses can be used as a proxy indicator of advanced immunosuppression to start highly active anti-retroviral therapy in the absence of facilities to carry out CD4 cell count. PMID:23919050

  17. Molecular Characterization of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Women and Their Vertically Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Sara Nunes; Giovanetti, Marta; Rego, Filipe Ferreira de Almeida; Oliveira, Tulio de; Danaviah, Siva; Gonçalves, Maria Luiza Freire; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos Junior; Brites, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    Approximately 35 million people worldwide are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) around 3.2 million of whom are children under 15 years. Mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1 accounts for 90% of all infections in children. Despite great advances in the prevention of MTCT in Brazil, children are still becoming infected. Samples from 19 HIV-1-infected families were collected. DNA was extracted and fragments from gag, pol, and env were amplified and sequenced directly. Phylogenetic reconstruction was performed. Drug resistance analyses were performed in pol and env sequences. We found 82.1% of subtype B and 17.9% of BF recombinants. A prevalence of 43.9% drug resistance-associated mutations in pol sequences was identified. Of the drug-naive children 33.3% presented at least one mutation related to protease inhibitor/nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor/nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (PI/NRTI/NNRTI) resistance. The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance mutations was 4.9%. On env we found a low prevalence of HR1 (4.9%) and HR2 (14.6%) mutations. PMID:26200738

  18. Infectious and Non-infectious Etiologies of Cardiovascular Disease in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Daniel B.; King, Travis S.; Stover, Kayla R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasing rates of HIV have been observed in women, African Americans, and Hispanics, particularly those residing in rural areas of the United States. Although cardiovascular (CV) complications in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have significantly decreased following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy on a global scale, in many rural areas, residents face geographic, social, and cultural barriers that result in decreased access to care. Despite the advancements to combat the disease, many patients in these medically underserved areas are not linked to care, and fewer than half achieve viral suppression. Methods: Databases were systematically searched for peer-reviewed publications reporting infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. Relevant articles cited in the retrieved publications were also reviewed for inclusion. Results: A variety of outcomes studies and literature reviews were included in the analysis. Relevant literature discussed the manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. Conclusion: In these medically underserved areas, it is vital that clinicians are knowledgeable in the manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of CV complications in patients with untreated HIV. This review summarizes the epidemiology and causes of CV complications associated with untreated HIV and provide recommendations for management of these complications. PMID:27583063

  19. Hepatitis B virus coinfection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hsin-Yun; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Tsai, Mao-Song; Lee, Kuan-Yeh; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Due to the shared modes of transmission, coinfection with HBV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not uncommon. It is estimated that 10% of HIV-infected patients worldwide are coinfected with HBV. In areas where an HBV vaccination program is implemented, the HBV seroprevalence has declined significantly. In HIV/HBV-coinfected patients, HBV coinfection accelerates immunologic and clinical progression of HIV infection and increases the risk of hepatotoxicity when combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is initiated, while HIV infection increases the risk of hepatitis events, cirrhosis, and end-stage liver disease related to chronic HBV infection. With the advances in antiviral therapy, concurrent, successful long-term suppression of HIV and HBV replication can be achieved in the cART era. To reduce the disease burden of HBV infection among HIV-infected patients, adoption of safe sex practices, avoidance of sharing needles and diluent, HBV vaccination and use of cART containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate plus emtricitabine or lamivudine are the most effective approaches. However, due to HIV-related immunosuppression, using increased doses of HBV vaccine and novel approaches to HBV vaccination are needed to improve the immunogenicity of HBV vaccine among HIV-infected patients. PMID:25356024

  20. Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in primary dendritic cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Langhoff, E; Terwilliger, E F; Bos, H J; Kalland, K H; Poznansky, M C; Bacon, O M; Haseltine, W A

    1991-01-01

    The ability of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to replicate in primary blood dendritic cells was investigated. Dendritic cells compose less than 1% of the circulating leukocytes and are nondividing cells. Highly purified preparations of dendritic cells were obtained using recent advances in cell fractionation. The results of these experiments show that dendritic cells, in contrast to monocytes and T cells, support the active replication of all strains of HIV-1 tested, including T-cell tropic and monocyte/macrophage tropic isolates. The dendritic cell cultures supported much more virus production than did cultures of primary unseparated T cells, CD4+ T cells, and adherent as well as nonadherent monocytes. Replication of HIV-1 in dendritic cells produces no noticeable cytopathic effect nor does it decrease total cell number. The ability of the nonreplicating dendritic cells to support high levels of replication of HIV-1 suggests that this antigen-presenting cell population, which is also capable of supporting clonal T-cell growth, may play a central role in HIV pathogenesis, serving as a source of continued infection of CD4+ T cells and as a reservoir of virus infection. Images PMID:1910172

  1. Slower evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 quasispecies during progression to AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Delwart, E L; Pan, H; Sheppard, H W; Wolpert, D; Neumann, A U; Korber, B; Mullins, J I

    1997-01-01

    The evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) quasispecies at the envelope gene was studied from the time of infection in 11 men who experienced different rates of CD4+ cell count decline and 6 men with unknown dates of infection by using DNA heteroduplex mobility assays. Quasispecies were genetically homogeneous near the time of seroconversion. Subsequently, slower proviral genetic diversification and higher plasma viremia correlated with rapid CD4+ cell count decline. Except for the fastest progressors to AIDS, highly diverse quasispecies developed in all subjects within 3 to 4 years. High quasispecies diversity was then maintained for years until again becoming more homogeneous in a subset of late-stage AIDS patients. Individuals who maintained high CD4+ cell counts showed continuous genetic turnover of their complex proviral quasispecies, while more closely related sets of variants were found in longitudinal samples of severely immunocompromised patients. The limited number of variants that grew out in short-term PBMC cocultures were rare in the uncultured proviral quasispecies of healthy, long-term infected individuals but more common in vivo in patients with low CD4+ cell counts. The slower evolution of HIV-1 observed during rapid progression to AIDS and in advanced patients may reflect ineffective host-mediated selection pressures on replicating quasispecies. PMID:9311829

  2. Cost and safety of assisted reproductive technologies for human immunodeficiency virus-1 discordant couples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Yih; Ho, Hong-Nerng

    2015-05-12

    Due to significant advances in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), HIV-1 infection gradually has become a treatable chronic disease. Successfully treated HIV-positive individuals can have a normal life expectancy. Hence, more and more HIV-1 discordant couples in Taiwan and the rest of the world are seeking fertility assistance. Pre-treatment of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) combined with sperm washing and RT-polymerase chain reaction examination for HIV-1 viral load has become the standard procedure to assist them to conceive. However, in order to reduce the transmission risk to the lowest level for the couple and to diminish the cost of health care for the insurance institutes or government, in vitro fertilization (IVF)-intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) therapy provides the ideal solution for HIV-1 discordant couples with infected men. Intrauterine insemination (IUI) theoretically introduces more than 10(7) times of sperm counts or semen volume to uninfected women vs IVF-ICSI. However, since some regimens of HAART may significantly decrease the sperm motility, compared to IVF-ICSI, IUI only produces 1/5 to 1/2 pregnancy rates per cycle. Given the risk of seroconversion of HIV infection which actually happens after successful treatment, IVF-ICSI for these HIV-1 seropositive men is more cost-effective and should be the first line treatment for these cases. PMID:25964879

  3. [Socioeconomic aspects of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in developing countries].

    PubMed

    Gentilini, M; Chieze, F

    1990-11-01

    The assessment of the socio-economical aspects of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is difficult because of the relative scarcity of information. This study addresses mainly the socio-economic aspects of the AIDS pandemic in the inter-tropical zone of Africa, which, at the moment, constitutes the epicenter of the disease. In the absence of a possible radical treatment, the HIV infection prevalence should range between 25 and 30 million individuals by the year 2000 in the world, and the number of cases of AIDS, between 5 and 6 million, among which 4 to 5 million in the developing world alone. At the current rate, the overmortality rate related to AIDS in Africa is estimated at 0.1%, which should result in a drop by 30% of the Gross National Products advance (GNP). Each case of AIDS in Africa leads to a loss of productivity of 8.8 years. Already, losses caused by AIDS screening and its medical treatment in five countries of Central Africa should exceed the total amount of the foreign assistance received by each country. The estimated economic weight of the AIDS attendance is 15 to 20 times more heavy for a developing country than for an industralized one. Overcoming economically the cost of AIDS is an objective impossible to reach for deprived countries. PMID:2094555

  4. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained...

  5. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained...

  6. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained...

  7. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained...

  8. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained...

  9. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... (70 FR 43439), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance of the same title. FDA received...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV): Testing, Product Disposition, and Donor...

  10. Immune reconstitution syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected child due to giardiasis leading to shock.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Sneha; Shah, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been reported in association with tuberculosis, herpes zoster (shingles), Cryptococcus neoformans, Kaposi's sarcoma, Pneumocystis pneumonia, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, human papillomavirus, and Cytomegalovirus. However, it has never been documented with giardiasis. We present a 7-year-old HIV infected girl who developed diarrhea and shock following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and her stool showed the presence of giardiasis. PMID:26985424

  11. Immune reconstitution syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected child due to giardiasis leading to shock

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Sneha; Shah, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been reported in association with tuberculosis, herpes zoster (shingles), Cryptococcus neoformans, Kaposi's sarcoma, Pneumocystis pneumonia, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, human papillomavirus, and Cytomegalovirus. However, it has never been documented with giardiasis. We present a 7-year-old HIV infected girl who developed diarrhea and shock following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and her stool showed the presence of giardiasis. PMID:26985424

  12. Generation of Immunodeficient Mice Bearing Human Immune Systems by the Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hasgur, Suheyla; Aryee, Ken Edwin; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Brehm, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice are being used as recipients of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for in vivo analyses of human immune system development and function. The development of several stocks of immunodeficient Prkdc (scid) (scid), or recombination activating 1 or 2 gene (Rag1 or Rag2) knockout mice bearing a targeted mutation in the gene encoding the IL2 receptor gamma chain (IL2rγ), has greatly facilitated the engraftment of human HSC and enhanced the development of functional human immune systems. These "humanized" mice are being used to study human hematopoiesis, human-specific immune therapies, human-specific pathogens, and human immune system homeostasis and function. The establishment of these model systems is technically challenging, and levels of human immune system development reported in the literature are variable between laboratories. The use of standard protocols for optimal engraftment of HSC and for monitoring the development of the human immune systems would enable more direct comparisons between humanized mice generated in different laboratories. Here we describe a standard protocol for the engraftment of human HSC into 21-day-old NOD-scid IL2rγ (NSG) mice using an intravenous injection approach. The multiparameter flow cytometry used to monitor human immune system development and the kinetics of development are described. PMID:27150084

  13. Molecular biology of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Haseltine, W.A. )

    1991-07-01

    The immunodeficiency virus type 1 ia a complex retrovirus. In addition to genes that specify the proteins of the virus particle and the replicative enzymes common to all retroviruses, HIV-1 specifies at least six additional proteins that regulate the virus cycle. Two of these regulatory genes, tat and rev, specify proteins essential for replication. These proteins bind to specific sequences of newly synthesized virus RNA and profoundly affect virus protein expression. Tat and rev appear to be prototypes of novel eukaryotic regulatory proteins. These two genes may play a central role in regulating the rate of virus replication. Three other viral genes, vif, vpu, and vpr, affect the assembly and replication capacity of newly made virus particles. These genes may play a critical role in spread of the virus from tissue to tissue and from person to person. Our understanding of the contribution of each of the virus structural proteins and regulatory genes to the complex life cycle of the virus in natural infections is incomplete. However, enough insight has been gained into the structure and function of each of these components to provide a firm basis for rational antiviral drug development.

  14. Effects of long terminal repeat mutations on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y; Stenzel, M; Sodroski, J G; Haseltine, W A

    1989-01-01

    The effects of deletions within three functional regions of the long terminal repeat of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 upon the ability of the long terminal repeat to direct production of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene product and upon the ability of viruses that carry the mutations to replicate in human cell lines was investigated. The results show that the enhancer and TATAA sequences were required for efficient virus replication. Deletion of the negative regulatory element (NRE) yielded a virus that replicated more rapidly than did an otherwise isogeneic NRE-positive virus. The suppressive effect of the NRE did not depend upon the negative regulatory gene (nef), as both NRE-positive and NRE-negative viruses were defective for nef. We conclude that factors specified by the cell interact with the NRE sequences to retard human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication. PMID:2760991

  15. Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Disruption through Altered Mucosal MicroRNA Expression in Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gaulke, Christopher A.; Porter, Matthew; Han, Yan-Hong; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Grishina, Irina; George, Michael D.; Dang, Angeline T.; Ding, Shou-Wei; Jiang, Guochun; Korf, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial barrier dysfunction during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has largely been attributed to the rapid and severe depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although it is known that changes in mucosal gene expression contribute to intestinal enteropathy, the role of small noncoding RNAs, specifically microRNA (miRNA), has not been investigated. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected nonhuman primate model of HIV pathogenesis, we investigated the effect of viral infection on miRNA expression in intestinal mucosa. SIV infection led to a striking decrease in the expression of mucosal miRNA compared to that in uninfected controls. This decrease coincided with an increase in 5′-3′-exoribonuclease 2 protein and alterations in DICER1 and Argonaute 2 expression. Targets of depleted miRNA belonged to molecular pathways involved in epithelial proliferation, differentiation, and immune response. Decreased expression of several miRNA involved in maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the gut was localized to the proliferative crypt region of the intestinal epithelium. Our findings suggest that SIV-induced decreased expression of miRNA involved in epithelial homeostasis, disrupted expression of miRNA biogenesis machinery, and increased expression of XRN2 are involved in the development of epithelial barrier dysfunction and gastroenteropathy. IMPORTANCE MicroRNA (miRNA) regulate the development and function of intestinal epithelial cells, and many viruses disrupt normal host miRNA expression. In this study, we demonstrate that SIV and HIV disrupt expression of miRNA in the small intestine during infection. The depletion of several key miRNA is localized to the proliferative crypt region of the gut epithelium. These miRNA are known to control expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell death, and epithelial maturation. Our data indicate that this disruption might be caused by altered expression of mi

  16. Infectious Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype C from an African Isolate: Rhesus Macaque Model

    PubMed Central

    Ndung'u, Thumbi; Lu, Yichen; Renjifo, Boris; Touzjian, Neal; Kushner, Nicholas; Pena-Cruz, Victor; Novitsky, Vladimir A.; Lee, Tun-Hou; Essex, Max

    2001-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C is responsible for more than 56% of all infections in the HIV and AIDS pandemic. It is the predominant subtype in the rapidly expanding epidemic in southern Africa. To develop a relevant model that would facilitate studies of transmission, pathogenesis, and vaccine development for this subtype, we generated SHIVMJ4, a simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) chimera based on HIV-1 subtype C. SHIVMJ4 contains the majority of env, the entire second exon of tat, and a partial sequence of the second exon of rev, all derived from a CCR5-tropic, primary isolate envelope clone from southern Africa. SHIVMJ4 replicated efficiently in human, rhesus, and pig-tailed macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro but not in CEMx174 cells. To assess in vivo infectivity, SHIVMJ4 was intravenously inoculated into four rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). All four animals became infected as determined through virus isolation, PCR analysis, and viral loads of 107 to 108 copies of viral RNA per ml of plasma during the primary infection phase. We have established a CCR5-tropic SHIVMJ4/rhesus macaque model that may be useful in the studies of HIV-1 subtype C immunology and biology and may also facilitate the evaluation of vaccines to control the spread of HIV-1 subtype C in southern Africa and elsewhere. PMID:11689623

  17. The genetic immunodeficiency disease, leukocyte adhesion deficiency, in humans, dogs, cattle, and mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu-Chen; Bauer, Thomas R; Ackermann, Mark R; Smith, C Wayne; Kehrli, Marcus E; Starost, Matthew F; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2004-08-01

    This review highlights the genotype-phenotype relationship of the genetic immunodeficiency disease leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) in humans, dogs, cattle, and mice, and provides assessment of the opportunities that each animal species provides in the understanding of leukocyte biology and in developing new therapeutic approaches to LAD in humans. This comparison is important since animal models of genetic diseases in humans provide the opportunity to test new therapeutic approaches in an appropriate, disease-specific model. The success of this approach is dependent on the relationship of the phenotype in the animal to the phenotype of the disease in humans. PMID:15357315

  18. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors that potently and specifically block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, D L; Busso, M; Tan, C K; Reusser, F; Palmer, J R; Poppe, S M; Aristoff, P A; Downey, K M; So, A G; Resnick, L

    1991-01-01

    Certain bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs) are potent inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) at concentrations lower by 2-4 orders of magnitude than that which inhibits normal cellular DNA polymerase activity. Combination of a BHAP with nucleoside analog HIV-1 RT inhibitors suggested that together these compounds inhibited RT synergistically. In three human lymphocytic cell systems using several laboratory and clinical HIV-1 isolates, the BHAPs blocked HIV-1 replication with potencies nearly identical to those of 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine or 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine; in primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, concentrations of these antiviral agents were lower by at least 3-4 orders of magnitude than cytotoxic levels. The BHAPs do not inhibit replication of HIV-2, the simian or feline immunodeficiency virus, or Rauscher murine leukemia virus in culture. Evaluation of a BHAP in HIV-1-infected SCID-hu mice (severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with human fetal lymph node) showed that the compound could block HIV-1 replication in vivo. The BHAPs are readily obtained synthetically and have been extensively characterized in preclinical evaluations. These compounds hold promise for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Images PMID:1717988

  19. kappa opioid receptors in human microglia downregulate human immunodeficiency virus 1 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, C C; Gekker, G; Hu, S; Sheng, W S; Shark, K B; Bu, D F; Archer, S; Bidlack, J M; Peterson, P K

    1996-01-01

    Microglial cells, the resident macrophages of the brain, play an important role in the neuropathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and recent studies suggest that opioid peptides regulate the function of macrophages from somatic tissues. We report herein the presence of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) in human fetal microglia and inhibition of HIV-1 expression in acutely infected microglial cell cultures treated with KOR ligands. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing analyses, we found that mRNA for the KOR was constitutively expressed in microglia and determined that the nucleotide sequence of the open reading frame was identical to that of the human brain KOR gene. The expression of KOR in microglial cells was confirmed by membrane binding of [3H]U69,593, a kappa-selective ligand, and by indirect immunofluorescence. Treatment of microglial cell cultures with U50,488 or U69,593 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of expression of the monocytotropic HIV-1 SF162 strain. This antiviral effect of the kappa ligands was blocked by the specific KOR antagonist, nor-binaltrophimine. These findings suggest that kappa opioid agonists have immunomodulatory activity in the brain, and that these compounds could have potential in the treatment of HIV-1-associated encephalopathy. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8755601

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human macrophages modulates the cytokine response to Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed Central

    Kandil, O; Fishman, J A; Koziel, H; Pinkston, P; Rose, R M; Remold, H G

    1994-01-01

    The present studies examined production of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and IL-6 by human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to Pneumocystis carinii in vitro and the impact of concurrent macrophage infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on these cytokine responses. Macrophages were infected with the HIV-1 BaL monocytotropic strain for 10 to 14 days and then exposed to P. carinii. At various times following P. carinii treatment, culture supernatants were harvested to assess the cytokine profile. Addition of P. carinii to HIV-uninfected macrophages resulted in augmented production of IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IL-1 beta protein. By contrast, in HIV-infected macrophages exposed to P. carinii, only the release of IL-6 was increased compared with that for HIV-uninfected macrophages, while the levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta decreased. This altered response was confirmed at the molecular level for TNF-alpha mRNA. Preventing physical contact between P. carinii and macrophages by a membrane filter inhibited all cytokine release. Substituting P. carinii with a preparation of P. carinii 95- to 115-kDa major membrane glycoprotein A yielded a response similar to that obtained by addition of intact P. carinii. These results suggest that HIV-1 infection of human macrophages modulates cytokine responses to P. carinii. Images PMID:8300221

  1. Trans-activation of human immunodeficiency virus gene expression is mediated by nuclear events

    SciTech Connect

    Hauber, J.; Perkins, A.; Heimer, E.P.; Cullen, B.R.

    1987-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus encodes a gene product termed tat that is able to activate viral gene expression when present in trans. The mechanism of action of the tat gene product appears to be bimodal, resulting in both an increase in the steady-state level of viral mRNA and the enhanced translation of that RNA. In this report, the authors have examined the mechanism by which tat elevates viral mRNA levels. Data are presented demonstrating that tat acts by increasing the rate of viral transcription, rather than by modulating the stability of viral mRNA. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to show that tat is predominantly localized in the nucleus of expressing cells, a location consistent with a role in the regulation of viral transcription. These results suggest that tat could play a role in human immunodeficiency virus replication essentially similar to that proposed for the trans-acting nuclear gene products described for several other virus species.

  2. Antiviral drugs other than zidovudine and immunomodulating therapies in human immunodeficiency virus infection. An overview.

    PubMed

    Clumeck, N; Hermans, P

    1988-08-29

    Although the management of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infections has focused on the treatment of opportunistic infections, or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related cancers in end stages of the disease, therapies now aim at preventing the natural progression of the underlying disease. In addition to zidovudine many investigational drugs are proposed to treat AIDS-related complex patients. Most of these therapies can be divided into two major groups: (1) The first group includes agents with antiretroviral properties: nucleoside analogues, such as 2'-3'-dideoxycytidine and ribavirin, suramin, antimoniotungstate (heteropolyanion-23), foscarnet (phosphonoformate), interferons, peptide T, castanospermine, dextran sulfate, AL721, or ampligen. (2) The second group aims to restore the defective immune system; it includes thymosin (thymopentin), interleukin-2, cyclosporine, plasmapheresis, bone marrow transplantation, inosine, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, methionine-enkephalin and carrisyn. At present, no drug other than zidovudine has proved as monotherapy to lengthen survival of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. PMID:2457313

  3. Biology of anemia, differential diagnosis, and treatment options in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Claster, Susan

    2002-05-15

    Anemia is the most common hematologic manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The causes of HIV-related anemia are multifactorial and include direct and indirect effects of HIV infection. HIV-related anemia generally is due to reduced red blood cell (RBC) production, secondary to a variety of causes, but it may also involve nutritional deficiencies, increased RBC destruction, or a combination of these problems. Evaluation of hemoglobin level, reticulocyte count, bilirubin, and mean corpuscular volume value and review of the peripheral blood smear are necessary for diagnosis. Treatment of HIV-related anemia should address the correctable underlying causes of this disorder, such as modifications of offending medications, nutritional deficiencies, and parvovirus infection. Patients with HIV infection have a blunted erythropoietin response to anemia. Therapeutic modalities for anemia that is not amenable to correction include blood transfusion and recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin alfa). PMID:12001030

  4. Primary Neuritic Hansen's Disease presenting as Ulnar Nerve Abscess in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Patient.

    PubMed

    Karjigi, S; Herakal, K; Murthy, S C; Bathina, A; Kusuma, M R; Nikhil, K R Y

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy has been increasingly known to have an enigmatic relationship with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Co-infection may result in atypical manifestations of leprosy. A 45-year old human immunodeficiency virus-positive male; agricultural laborer presented with a swelling over right elbow, right hand deformity, generalized itching and recurrent vesicles overthe perinasal area. Clinical and investigational findings were consistent with mononeuritic type of Hansen's disease with right sided silent ulnar nerve abscess, partial claw hand. CD4+ count of the patientwas 430 cells/cmm. This patient also hadherpes simplex labialis, with HIV-associated pruritus. To the best of our knowledge such an atypical presentation has not been reported earlier. PMID:26999990

  5. Genetic Diversity of Pneumocystis carinii Isolated from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients in Turin, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, Gisella; Sbaiz, Luca; Avanzini, Claudio; Caramello, Pietro; Savoia, Dianella

    2001-01-01

    By DNA sequence analysis we identified two new strain types and five novel sporadic variations among 25 isolates of Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis obtained from 19 human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients. Of these, 13 were infected with a single strain and 6 were coinfected. Fifteen different combination types were identified among the 18 strains for which complete molecular typing was accomplished. PMID:11474032

  6. Minimal Requirement for a Lentivirus Vector Based on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, V. Narry; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos; Kingsman, Susan M.; Kingsman, Alan J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of human immunodeficiency virus vectors for gene therapy is hampered by concern over their safety. This concern might be ameliorated, in part, if the viral accessory genes and proteins could be eliminated from the vector genomes and particles. Here we describe a minimal vector system that is capable of transducing nondividing cells and which does not contain tat, vif, vpr, vpu, and nef. PMID:9420292

  7. Minimal requirement for a lentivirus vector based on human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Kim, V N; Mitrophanous, K; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1998-01-01

    The use of human immunodeficiency virus vectors for gene therapy is hampered by concern over their safety. This concern might be ameliorated, in part, if the viral accessory genes and proteins could be eliminated from the vector genomes and particles. Here we describe a minimal vector system that is capable of transducing nondividing cells and which does not contain tat, vif, vpr, vpu, and nef. PMID:9420292

  8. Crusted Scabies: Presenting as erythroderma in a human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patient

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Shruti; Shah, Hiral; Patel, Bharti; Bhuptani, Neela

    2016-01-01

    Crusted scabies is a rare manifestation of scabies characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of mites in the skin. It is common in patients with sensory neuropathy, mentally retarded persons and in patients who are immunosuppressed. Further, crusted scabies can rarely present as erythroderma (<0.5% cases) necessitating a high index of suspicion for its diagnosis. Because of its rare occurrence, we are reporting a case of crusted scabies presenting as erythroderma, in a human immunodeficiency virus seropositive patient. PMID:27190417

  9. Twenty years of human immunodeficiency virus care at the Mayo Clinic: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Nathan W; Badley, Andrew D; Kasten, Mary J; Sampath, Rahul; Temesgen, Zelalem; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Wilson, John W; Yao, Joseph D; Zeuli, John; Rizza, Stacey A

    2016-05-12

    The Mayo human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Clinic has been providing patient centered care for persons living with HIV in Minnesota and beyond for the past 20 years. Through multidisciplinary engagement, vital clinical outcomes such as retention in care, initiation of antiretroviral therapy and virologic suppression are maximized. In this commentary, we describe the history of the Mayo HIV Clinic and its best practices, providing a "Mayo Model" of HIV care that exceeds national outcomes and may be applicable in other settings. PMID:27175350

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coat Protein Neurotoxicity Mediated by Nitric Oxide in Primary Cortical Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Uhl, George R.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1993-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 coat protein, gp120, kills neurons in primary cortical cultures at low picomolar concentrations. The toxicity requires external glutamate and calcium and is blocked by glutamate receptor antagonists. Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to gp120 toxicity, since nitroarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, prevents toxicity as does deletion of arginine from the incubation medium and hemoglobin, which binds NO. Superoxide dismutase also attenuates toxicity, implying a role for superoxide anions.

  11. Crusted Scabies: Presenting as erythroderma in a human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patient.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Shruti; Shah, Hiral; Patel, Bharti; Bhuptani, Neela

    2016-01-01

    Crusted scabies is a rare manifestation of scabies characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of mites in the skin. It is common in patients with sensory neuropathy, mentally retarded persons and in patients who are immunosuppressed. Further, crusted scabies can rarely present as erythroderma (<0.5% cases) necessitating a high index of suspicion for its diagnosis. Because of its rare occurrence, we are reporting a case of crusted scabies presenting as erythroderma, in a human immunodeficiency virus seropositive patient. PMID:27190417

  12. Sweat gland carcinoma in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Toi, M; Kauffman, L; Peterson, L; Golitz, L; Myers, A

    1995-02-01

    Eccrine (sweat gland) carcinoma is a rare form of skin cancer that may be locally destructive. It is known to recur after resection and can metastasize to regional or distant lymph nodes. There have been two reported cases in association with patients immunocompromised as the result of organ transplantation (I. Penn: Prog Allergy. 37: 259, 1986). We report here the first case of sweat gland carcinoma in a patient infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:7539911

  13. Spectrum of false positivity for the fourth generation human immunodeficiency virus diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peter; Jackson, Patrick; Shaw, Nathan; Heysell, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Novel fourth generation screening and confirmatory human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) assays are now commercially available and incorporated into new diagnostic algorithms. We report two cases involving a total of three patients which highlight the spectrum of false positivity for both the Abbott Architect p24 antigen/antibody assay and the confirmatory Multispot antibody differentiation test. We then discuss the mechanisms for false positivity and the associated clinical conditions or laboratory scenarios that may predispose to inaccurate interpretation. PMID:26734067

  14. Bifunctional Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Small Molecules with Two Novel Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li; Yuan, Xiong; Aiken, Christopher; Chen, Chin Ho

    2004-01-01

    A class of betulinic acid derivatives was synthesized to target two critical steps in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication cycle, entry and maturation. Each mechanism of HIV-1 inhibition is distinct from clinically available anti-HIV therapeutics. The viral determinants of the antientry and antimaturation activities are the bridging sheet of HIV-1 gp120 and the P24/p2 cleavage site, respectively. PMID:14742233

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus testing for patient-based and population-based diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Albritton, W L; Vittinghoff, E; Padian, N S

    1996-10-01

    Laboratory testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been introduced for individual patient-based diagnosis as well as high-risk and low-risk population-based screening. The choice of test, confirmatory algorithm, and interpretative criteria used depend on the clinical setting. In the context of general population-based testing, factors affecting test performance will have to be considered carefully in the development of testing policy. PMID:8843247

  16. A human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor is a novel functional inhibitor of human pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Healan-Greenberg, Christine; Waring, Jeffrey F; Kempf, Dale J; Blomme, Eric A G; Tirona, Rommel G; Kim, Richard B

    2008-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions involving induction of cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s) can lead to loss of drug efficacy. Certain drugs, particularly those used to treat mycobacterial and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, are especially prone to induce P450s. During studies to examine drug-interaction potential of compounds in cultured human hepatocytes, exposure with (S)-1-[(1S,3S,4S)-4-[(S)-2-(3-benzyl-2-oxo-imidazolidin-1-yl)-3,3-dimethyl-butyrylamino]-3-hydroxy-5-phenyl-1-(4-pyridin-2-yl-benzyl)-pentylcarbamoyl]-2,2-dimethyl-propyl-carbamic acid methyl ester (A-792611), a novel HIV protease inhibitor (PI) previously under investigation for the treatment of HIV infection, resulted in significant down-regulation of constitutive CYP3A4 expression. Furthermore, coadministration of A-792611 was found to attenuate CYP3A4 induction mediated by known inducers rifampin and efavirenz. A-792611 also attenuated the rifampin and ritonavir-mediated activation of the human pregnane X receptor (PXR) in luciferase reporter assays. Microarray analysis on cultured human hepatocytes revealed that A-792611 treatment down-regulated the expression of PXR target genes CYP3A4, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, and CYP2C9, whereas there was a lack of inductive effect observed in treated rat hepatocytes. A-792611 did not interact with other ligand-activated nuclear receptors that regulate P450 expression such as constitutive androstane receptor, farnesoid X receptor, vitamin D receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha. These data suggest that A-792611 is a functional and effective human PXR inhibitor. Among the class of HIV-PIs, which are typically PXR activators, A-792611 seems to have a unique property for PXR antagonism and could be a useful tool for studying nuclear receptor pathway regulation. PMID:18096673

  17. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Selective inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus with subpicosecond near-infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsen, K. T.; Tsen, Shaw-Wei D.; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.; Kiang, Juliann G.

    2008-06-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be inactivated by irradiation with subpicosecond near-infrared laser pulses at a moderate laser power density. By comparing the threshold laser power density for the inactivation of HIV with those of human red blood cells and mouse dendritic cells, we conclude that it is plausible to use the ultrashort pulsed laser to selectively inactivate blood-borne pathogens such as HIV while leaving sensitive materials like human red blood cells unharmed. This finding has important implications in the development of a new laser technology for disinfection of viral pathogens in blood products and in the clinic.

  18. Immunogenic compositions comprising human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mosaic Nef proteins

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T.; Perkins, Simon; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Fischer, William M.; Theiler, James; Letvin, Norman; Haynes, Barton F.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Yusim, Karina; Kuiken, Carla

    2012-02-21

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Nef polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  19. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, X. M.; Ruker, F.; Casale, E.; Carter, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 degrees. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  20. Human Discs Large Is a New Negative Regulator of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Perugi, Fabien; Muriaux, Delphine; Ramirez, Bertha Cecilia; Chabani, Sabah; Decroly, Etienne; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Blot, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 replication is positively or negatively regulated through multiple interactions with host cell proteins. We report here that human Discs Large (Dlg1), a scaffold protein recruited beneath the plasma membrane and involved in the assembly of multiprotein complexes, restricts HIV-1 infectivity. The endogenous Dlg1 and HIV-1 Gag polyprotein spontaneously interact in HIV-1-chronically infected T cells. Depleting endogenous Dlg1 in either adherent cells or T cells does not affect Gag maturation, production, or release, but it enhances the infectivity of progeny viruses five- to sixfold. Conversely, overexpression of Dlg1 reduces virus infectivity by ∼80%. Higher virus infectivity upon Dlg1 depletion correlates with increased Env content in cells and virions, whereas the amount of virus-associated Gag or genomic RNA remains identical. Dlg1 knockdown is also associated with the redistribution and colocalization of Gag and Env toward CD63 and CD82 positive vesicle-like structures, including structures that seem to still be connected to the plasma membrane. This study identifies both a new negative regulator that targets the very late steps of the HIV-1 life cycle, and an assembly pathway that optimizes HIV-1 infectivity. PMID:18946087

  1. Human herpesvirus 8-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Fardet, L; Blum, L; Kerob, D; Agbalika, F; Galicier, L; Dupuy, A; Lafaurie, M; Meignin, V; Morel, P; Lebbé, C

    2003-07-15

    We retrospectively reviewed 5 cases of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HL) associated with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) reactivation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. All patients had clinical and biological features characteristic of HL. Pulmonary symptoms were present in all patients and were frequently life threatening. The mean number of HL episodes was 6. Four patients had HL-associated Kaposi sarcoma, and 3 had multicentric Castleman disease. The mean CD4 cell count was 200 cells/mm(3). HIV loads were stable in all patients. All patients had high levels of HHV-8 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells during attacks, and a significant increase in this parameter before the attacks was seen in 3 patients. Although 2 patients died of HL, 3 are still alive and receiving etoposide therapy (mean follow-up, 3 years). HHV-8-related HL is associated with life-threatening symptoms and biological HHV-8 reactivation, and it may be controlled in the long term by etoposide therapy combined with highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:12856221

  2. Identification of three feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) env gene subtypes and comparison of the FIV and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolutionary patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Sodora, D L; Shpaer, E G; Kitchell, B E; Dow, S W; Hoover, E A; Mullins, J I

    1994-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus associated with AIDS-like illnesses in cats. As such, FIV appears to be a feline analog of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A hallmark of HIV infection is the large degree of viral genetic diversity that can develop within an infected individual and the even greater and continually increasing level of diversity among virus isolates from different individuals. Our goal in this study was to determine patterns of FIV genetic diversity by focusing on a 684-nucleotide region encompassing variable regions V3, V4, and V5 of the FIV env gene in order to establish parallels and distinctions between FIV and HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Our data demonstrate that, like HIV-1, FIV can be separated into distinct envelope sequence subtypes (three are described here). Similar to that found for HIV-1, the pairwise sequence divergence within an FIV subtype ranged from 2.5 to 15.0%, whereas that between subtypes ranged from 17.8 to 26.2%. However, the high number of synonymous nucleotide changes among FIV V3 to V5 env sequences may also include a significant number of back mutations and suggests that the evolutionary distances among FIV subtypes are underestimated. Although only a few subtype B viruses were available for examination, the pattern of diversity between the FIV A and B subtypes was found to be significantly distinct; subtype B sequences had proportionally fewer mutations that changed amino acids, compared with silent changes, suggesting a more advanced state of adaptation to the host. No similar distinction was evident for HIV-1 subtypes. The diversity of FIV genomes within individual infected cats was found to be as high as 3.7% yet twofold lower than that within HIV-1-infected people over a comparable region of the env gene. Despite these differences, significant parallels between patterns of FIV evolution and HIV-1 evolution exist, indicating that a wide array of potentially divergent virus challenges need to be considered

  3. Broadly Neutralizing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Antibody Gene Transfer Protects Nonhuman Primates from Mucosal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Kevin O.; Wang, Lingshu; Joyce, M. Gordon; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Balazs, Alejandro B.; Cheng, Cheng; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Duan, Lijie; Foulds, Kathryn E.; Donaldson, Mitzi; Xu, Ling; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Todd, John-Paul; Baltimore, David; Roederer, Mario; Haase, Ashley T.; Kwong, Peter D.; Rao, Srinivas S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) can prevent lentiviral infection in nonhuman primates and may slow the spread of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Although protection by passive transfer of human bnAbs has been demonstrated in monkeys, durable expression is essential for its broader use in humans. Gene-based expression of bnAbs provides a potential solution to this problem, although immune responses to the viral vector or to the antibody may limit its durability and efficacy. Here, we delivered an adeno-associated viral vector encoding a simianized form of a CD4bs bnAb, VRC07, and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective efficacy. The expressed antibody circulated in macaques for 16 weeks at levels up to 66 μg/ml, although immune suppression with cyclosporine (CsA) was needed to sustain expression. Gene-delivered simian VRC07 protected against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection in monkeys 5.5 weeks after treatment. Gene transfer of an anti-HIV antibody can therefore protect against infection by viruses that cause AIDS in primates when the host immune responses are controlled. IMPORTANCE Sustained interventions that can prevent HIV-1 infection are needed to halt the spread of the HIV-1 pandemic. The protective capacity of anti-HIV antibody gene therapy has been established in mouse models of HIV-1 infection but has not been established for primates. We show here a proof-of-concept that gene transfer of anti-HIV antibody genes can protect against infection by viruses that cause AIDS in primates when host immune responses are controlled. PMID:26041300

  4. Malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients in India: Initial experience in the HAART era

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Soneja, Manish; Ranjan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Limited data are available on malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients from India. We undertook this study to assess the frequency and spectrum of malignancies in HIV-infected adult patients during the first eight years of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) rollout under the National ART Programme at a tertiary care centre in New Delhi, India. Methods: Retrospective analysis of records of patients registered at the ART clinic between May 2005 and December 2013 was done. Results: The study included 2598 HIV-infected adult patients with 8315 person-years of follow up. Malignancies were diagnosed in 26 patients with a rate of 3.1 (IQR 2.1-4.5) cases per 1000 person-years. The median age for those diagnosed with malignancy was 45 (IQR 36-54) yr, which was significantly (P<0.01) higher compared with those not developing malignancies 35 (IQR 30-40) yr. The median baseline CD4+ T-cell count in patients with malignancy was 135 (IQR 68-269) cells/µl compared to 164 (IQR 86-243) cells/µl in those without malignancies. AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs) were seen in 19 (73%) patients, while non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs) were observed in seven (27%) patients. Malignancies diagnosed included non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (16), carcinoma cervix (3), Hodgkin's lymphoma (2), carcinoma lung (2), hepatocellular carcinoma (1), and urinary bladder carcinoma (1). One patient had primary central nervous system lymphoma. There was no case of Kaposi's sarcoma. Interpretation & conclusions: Malignancies in HIV-infected adult patients were infrequent in patients attending the clinic. Majority of the patients presented with advanced immunosuppression and the ADCs, NHL in particular, were the commonest malignancies. PMID:26658591

  5. Design and baseline participant characteristics of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemiology Research (HER) Study: a prospective cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus infection in US women.

    PubMed

    Smith, D K; Warren, D L; Vlahov, D; Schuman, P; Stein, M D; Greenberg, B L; Holmberg, S D

    1997-09-15

    The prospective, multisite human immunodeficiency (HIV) Epidemiology Research Study was established to define the biologic, psychologic, and social effects of HIV infection on the health of US women. From 1993 to 1995, a total of 871 HIV-infected women and 439 demographically matched, uninfected women aged 16-55 years, half of whom reported injection drug use and half of whom reported only sexual risk behaviors, were recruited in four US cities. Two sites recruited primarily from medical/drug therapy care settings, and two recruited from community sources. Women consented to biannual interviews; physical examination; blood, urine, and cervicovaginal specimen collection and repository; laboratory assays; and abstraction of outpatient and inpatient medical records to document HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related diagnoses. Retention was greater than 88% at the third 6-month follow-up. Lower retention was associated with currently injecting drugs, not having dependent children, and not being infected with HIV at enrollment. In addition to the core study, a variety of nested studies are under way, some in collaboration with other HIV cohorts and various Public Health Service agencies. This cohort is distinct from other HIV longitudinal cohorts in the diversity of its participants and the comprehensive range of measures to study prospectively the biomedical, social, and emotional effects of the HIV epidemic on infected women and those whose behavior puts them at high risk of infection. PMID:9290506

  6. Recursion-based depletion of human immunodeficiency virus-specific naive CD4(+) T cells may facilitate persistent viral replication and chronic viraemia leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okada, Seiji; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy has made human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection a controllable disease, it is still unclear how viral replication persists in untreated patients and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in several years. Theorists tried to explain it with the diversity threshold theory in which accumulated mutations in the HIV genome make the virus so diverse that the immune system will no longer be able to recognize all the variants and fail to control the viraemia. Although the theory could apply to a number of cases, macaque AIDS models using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have shown that failed viral control at the set point is not always associated with T-cell escape mutations. Moreover, even monkeys without a protective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) allele can contain replication of a super infected SIV following immunization with a live-attenuated SIV vaccine, while those animals are not capable of fighting primary SIV infection. Here we propose a recursion-based virus-specific naive CD4(+) T-cell depletion hypothesis through thinking on what may happen in individuals experiencing primary immunodeficiency virus infection. This could explain the mechanism for impairment of virus-specific immune response in the course of HIV infection. PMID:27515208

  7. Comparative analysis of genetically engineered immunodeficient mouse strains as recipients for human myoblast transplantation.

    PubMed

    Silva-Barbosa, Suse D; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Di Santo, James P; Mouly, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    The development of an optimized animal model for the in vivo analysis of human muscle cells remains an important goal in the search of therapy for muscular dystrophy. Here we examined the efficiency of human myoblast xenografts in three distinct immunodeficient mouse models. We found that different conditioning regimes used to provoke host muscle regeneration (i.e., cardiotoxin versus cryodamage) had a marked impact on xenograft success. Tibialis anterior muscle of Rag2-, Rag-/gammac-, and Rag-/gammac-/C5- mice was treated by cardiotoxin or cryodamage, submitted to enzymatic digestion, and analyzed by cytofluorometry to quantitate inflammatory cells. Human myoblasts were injected into pretreated muscles from immunodeficient recipients and the cell engraftment evaluated by immunocytochemistry, 4-8 weeks after transplantation. Donor cell differentiation and dispersion within the host muscles was also investigated. Host regeneration in cardiotoxin-treated mice was accompanied by a higher inflammatory cell infiltration when compared to that induced by cryodamage. Accordingly, when compared to the cardiotoxin group, more human myogenic cells were found after cryodamage. When the distinct immunodeficient mice were compared, we found that the alymphoid strain lacking the complement component C5 (Rag-/gammac-/C5- mice) was the most efficient host for human muscle xenografts, when compared with C5(+)Rag-/gammac- mice or Rag- mice. Our results demonstrate that cryolesion-conditioned muscles of Rag-/gammac-/C5- mice provide the best environment for long-term in vivo human myoblast differentiation, opening the way for a novel approach to study the pathophysiology of human muscle disorders. PMID:16285254

  8. [Gastric uptake of gallium67 in the human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Escalera Temprado, T; Banzo Marraco, J; Abós Olivares, M D; Olave Rubio, M T; Prats Rivera, E; García López, F; Razola Alba, P

    2004-02-01

    Nowadays, the human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) is a chronic disease. In the frequent clinical situations with fever, lymph nodes and loss weight it is necessary to determine their etiology, for establishing a specific treatment. Gastrointestinal opportunistic infections or gastric lymphomatous or sarcomatous process, which can accumulate Ga67, may be present in the patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We report 2 cases with gastric uptake in which endoscopy and biopsy was obtained. In the first one, with previous treatment with omeprazol and almalgate for gastroesophagic reflux, endoscopy and biopsy were normal and in the second patient an Helicobacter pylori infection was diagnosed. We think that gastric uptake of Ga67 in HIV patients, must indicate to the clinician to rule out associated pathologies. PMID:14974895

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection despite prior immunization with a recombinant envelope vaccine regimen.

    PubMed Central

    McElrath, M J; Corey, L; Greenberg, P D; Matthews, T J; Montefiori, D C; Rowen, L; Hood, L; Mullins, J I

    1996-01-01

    With efforts underway to develop a preventive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine, it remains unclear which immune responses are sufficient to protect against infection and whether prior HIV-1 immunity can alter the subsequent course of HIV-1 infection. We investigated these issues in the context of a volunteer who received six HIV-1LAI envelope immunizations and 10 weeks thereafter acquired HIV-1 infection through a high-risk sexual exposure. In contrast to nonvaccinated acutely infected individuals, anamnestic HIV-1-specific B- and T-cell responses appeared within 3 weeks in this individual, and neutralizing antibody preceded CD8+ cytotoxic responses. Despite an asymptomatic course and an initial low level of detectable infectious virus, a progressive CD4+ cell decline and dysfunction occurred within 2 years. Although vaccination elicited immunity to HIV-1 envelope, which was recalled upon HIV-1 exposure, it was insufficient to prevent infection and subsequent immunodeficiency. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8633000

  10. Inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by ionizing radiation in body fluids and serological evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Bigbee, P.D.; Sarin, P.S.; Humphreys, J.C.; Eubanks, W.G.; Sun, D.; Hocken, D.G.; Thornton, A.; Adams, D.E.; Simic, M.G. )

    1989-11-01

    A method to use ionizing radiation to inactivate HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) in human body fluids was studied in an effort to reduce the risk of accidental infection to forensic science laboratory workers. Experiments conducted indicate that an X-ray absorbed dose of 25 krad was required to completely inactivate HIV. This does not alter forensically important constituents such as enzymes and proteins in body fluids. This method of inactivation of HIV cannot be used on body fluids which will be subjected to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) typing.

  11. A rare case of verrucous carcinoma of penis in an human immunodeficiency virus- infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Tonita Mariola; Girisha, Banavasi S.; Bhat, Shubha P.; Christy, Carol M.; Handattu, Sripathi; Fernandes, Michelle S.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects. Verrucous carcinoma is a peculiarly slow evolving, but relentlessly expanding variant of epidermoid carcinoma that is extremely reluctant to metastasize. A 60-year-old unmarried male patient presented with urethral discharge of 3 weeks duration. Dorsal slit of the prepuce revealed an ulceroproliferative growth measuring 3 cm × 3 cm arising from prepuce and involving glans. Biopsy from the growth in the prepuce showed histopathological features of verrucous carcinoma. Partial amputation of the penis was done. Human papillomavirus DNA by polymerase chain reaction was negative. The patient was started on antiretroviral therapy. PMID:26692616

  12. Restoration of Viral Immunity in Immunodeficient Humans by the Adoptive Transfer of T Cell Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddell, Stanley R.; Watanabe, Kathe S.; Goodrich, James M.; Li, Cheng R.; Agha, Mounzer E.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1992-07-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells to establish immunity is an effective therapy for viral infections and tumors in animal models. The application of this approach to human disease would require the isolation and in vitro expansion of human antigen-specific T cells and evidence that such T cells persist and function in vivo after transfer. Cytomegalovirus-specific CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell (CTL) clones could be isolated from bone marrow donors, propagated in vitro, and adoptively transferred to immunodeficient bone marrow transplant recipients. No toxicity developed and the clones provided persistent reconstitution of CD8^+ cytomegalovirus-specific CTL responses.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection. PMID:12709027

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection. PMID:12709027

  15. Viricidal effect of stimulated human mononuclear phagocytes on human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Chase, M J; Klebanoff, S J

    1992-01-01

    Human monocytes stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or opsonized zymosan in vitro were viricidal to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as measured by the inability of the virus to replicate in CEM cells. Monocytes, when stimulated, release myeloperoxidase (MPO) and produce H2O2; MPO reacts with H2O2 and chloride to form hypochlorous acid, a known microbicidal agent. The viricidal activity of stimulated monocytes was inhibited by the peroxidase inhibitor azide, implicating MPO, and by catalase but not heated catalase or superoxide dismutase, implicating H2O2. Stimulated monocytes from patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) or hereditary MPO deficiency were not viricidal to HIV-1 unless they were supplemented with the H2O2-generating enzyme glucose oxidase or MPO, respectively. The viricidal activity of stimulated, glucose oxidase-supplemented CGD monocytes and MPO-supplemented MPO-deficient monocytes, like that of normal stimulated monocytes, was inhibited by azide and catalase. Monocytesmaintained in culture differentiate into macrophages with loss of MPO and decreased H2O2 production. The viricidal activity of 3- to 9-day monocyte-derived macrophages was decreased unless MPO was added, whereas the loss of viricidal activity by 12-day-old monocyte-derived macrophages was not reversed by MPO unless the cells were pretreated with gamma-interferon. These findings suggest that stimulated monocytes can be viricidal to HIV-1 through the release of the MPO/H2O2/chloride system and that the decreased viricidal activity on differentiation to macrophages results initially from the loss of MPO and, with more prolonged culture, also from a decreased respiratory burst that can be overcome by gamma-interferon. PMID:1319066

  16. Increased alpha-9 human papillomavirus species viral load in human immunodeficiency virus positive women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Persistent high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and increased HR-HPV viral load are associated with the development of cancer. This study investigated the effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection, HIV viral load and CD4 count on the HR-HPV viral load; and also investigated the predictors of cervical abnormalities. Methods Participants were 292 HIV-negative and 258 HIV-positive women. HR-HPV viral loads in cervical cells were determined by the real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results HIV-positive women had a significantly higher viral load for combined alpha-9 HPV species compared to HIV-negative women (median 3.9 copies per cell compared to 0.63 copies per cell, P = 0.022). This was not observed for individual HPV types. HIV-positive women with CD4 counts >350/μl had significantly lower viral loads for alpha-7 HPV species (median 0.12 copies per cell) than HIV-positive women with CD4 ≤350/μl (median 1.52 copies per cell, P = 0.008), but low CD4 count was not significantly associated with increased viral load for other HPV species. High viral loads for alpha-6, alpha-7 and alpha-9 HPV species were significant predictors of abnormal cytology in women. Conclusion HIV co-infection significantly increased the combined alpha-9 HPV viral load in women but not viral loads for individual HPV types. High HR-HPV viral load was associated with cervical abnormal cytology. PMID:24484380

  17. The gut microbiome in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Zmora, Niv; Itav, Shlomik; Bashiardes, Stavros; Elinav, Hila; Elinav, Eran

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS causes severe dysfunction of the immune system through CD4+ T cell depletion, leading to dysregulation of both the adaptive and innate immune arms. A primary target for viral infection is the gastrointestinal tract, which is a reservoir of CD4+ T cells. In addition to being a major immune hub, the human gastrointestinal tract harbors trillions of commensal microorganisms, the microbiota, which have recently been shown to play critical roles in health. Alterations in the composition and function of microbiota have been implicated in a variety of 'multi-factorial' disorders, including infectious, autoimmune, metabolic, and neoplastic disorders. It is widely accepted that, in addition to its direct role in altering the gastrointestinal CD4+ T cell compartment, HIV infection is characterized by gut microbiota compositional and functional changes. Herein, we review such alterations and discuss their potential local and systemic effects on the HIV-positive host, as well as potential roles of novel microbiota-targeting treatments in modulating HIV progression and associated adverse systemic manifestations. PMID:27256449

  18. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activities of U-90152 and U-75875 in human brain cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, P K; Gekker, G; Hu, S; Chao, C C

    1994-01-01

    Antiviral activities of the reverse transcriptase inhibitors U-90152 and 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine and the protease inhibitor U-75875 were compared in two culture models of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 brain infection. In a model involving acutely infected microglial cells, U-90152 was the most active, whereas in a model using chronically infected promonocytes, U-75875 was the most active. PMID:7530933

  19. Severe combined immunodeficiency mouse and human psoriatic skin chimeras. Validation of a new animal model.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, B. J.; Kunkel, S. L.; Burdick, M.; Strieter, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    Research into the cause and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying expression of psoriatric skin lesions has been hampered by lack of an appropriate animal model for this common and enigmatic cutaneous disease. These studies characterize normal skin, pre-psoriatic skin, and psoriatic plaque skin samples transplanted onto severe combined immunodeficiency mice. In this report we document that 1), normal, prepsoriatic, and psoriatic plaque keratome skin samples can be transplanted onto severe combined immunodeficiency mice reliably with high rates of graft survival (> 85%) and with reproducible changes consistently observed over prolonged periods of engraftment; 2), after transplantation, by clinical assessment and routine light microscopy, normal skin remained essentially normal whereas pre-psoriatic skin became thicker, and psoriatic plaque skin retained its characteristic plaque-type elevation and scale; 3), by using a panel of antibodies and immunohistochemical analysis, the overall phenotype of human cell types (including immunocytes) that persisted in the transplanted skin was remarkably similar to the immunophenotype of pretransplanted skin samples; 4), clearly recognized interface zones between human and murine skin within the epidermal and dermal compartments could be identified by routine microscopy and immunostaining, with focal areas of chimerism; and 5), elevated interleukin 8 cytokine levels were present in transplanted pre-psoriatic and psoriatic plaque skin samples. We conclude that there are many similarities between pre- and post-transplanted human samples of normal and psoriatic skin that are grafted onto severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Thus, we propose that this new animal model is appropriate for additional mechanistic-type studies designed to reveal the underlying genetic/etiological abnormality, as well as better illuminate the pathophysiological basis, for this important skin disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7887440

  20. Temporal patterns of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcripts in human fetal astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Tornatore, C; Meyers, K; Atwood, W; Conant, K; Major, E

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of the developing central nervous system results in a dementing process in children, termed HIV-1-associated encephalopathy. Infection of astroglial elements of the pediatric nervous system has been demonstrated and suggests that direct infection of some astrocytes may contribute to the neurologic deficit. In this model, HIV-1 establishes a persistent state of infection in astrocytes, which can be reactivated by the cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta). To better understand the natural history of viral persistence in astroglial cells, we characterized infection at the transcriptional level. The most abundant viral transcript during the establishment of persistence was the subgenomic multiply spliced 2-kb message, similar to mononuclear cell models of HIV-1 latency. Following reactivation with TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta the multiply spliced 2-kb message remained the most abundant viral transcript, in contrast to infected mononuclear cells in which reactivation leads to the reemergence of the 9- and 4-kb transcripts. Further characterization of the persistent 2-kb transcript by PCR amplification of in vitro-synthesized viral cDNA showed that, in the absence of cytokine stimulation, the most abundant multiply spliced transcripts were the Nef- and Rev-specific messages. However, following cytokine stimulation, double- and triple-spliced Tat-, Rev-, and Nef-specific messages could be identified. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that, during viral persistence, astrocytes expressed Nef protein but few or no viral structural proteins. These results demonstrate that viral persistence in astrocytes at the transcriptional level is fundamentally different from that seen in mononuclear cells and could account for the virtual absence of astroglial expression of viral structural antigens in vivo. Images PMID:8254781

  1. Influence of immune activation and inflammatory response on cardiovascular risk associated with the human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Luis M; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Amaro-Villalobos, Juan Manuel; Egido, Jesús; García-Puig, Juan; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have an increased cardiovascular risk. Although initially this increased risk was attributed to metabolic alterations associated with antiretroviral treatment, in recent years, the attention has been focused on the HIV disease itself. Inflammation, immune system activation, and endothelial dysfunction facilitated by HIV infection have been identified as key factors in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. In this review, we describe the epidemiology and pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in patients with HIV infection and summarize the latest knowledge on the relationship between traditional and novel inflammatory, immune activation, and endothelial dysfunction biomarkers on the cardiovascular risk associated with HIV infection. PMID:25609975

  2. [Antiviral activity of aqueous extracts of the birch fungus Inonotus obliquus on the human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Shibnev, V A; Garaev, T M; Finogenova, M P; Kalnina, L B; Nosik, D N

    2015-01-01

    Fractions of aqueous and water-alcohol extracts of the birch fungus Inonotus obliquus have antiviral effect against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Antiviral properties of low toxic extracts were manifested in the concentration of 5.0 μg/ml upon simultaneous application with the virus in the lymphoblastoid cells culture MT-4. The extract of the birch fungus can be used for development of new antiviral drugs, inhibitors of HIV-replication when used both in the form of individual drugs and as a part of complex therapy. PMID:26182655

  3. Cardiovascular disease in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients: A true or perceived risk?

    PubMed Central

    Shahbaz, Shima; Manicardi, Marcella; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Raggi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    After the successful introduction of highly active antiretroviral agents the survival of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in developed countries has increased substantially. This has allowed the surfacing of several chronic diseases among which cardiovascular disease (CVD) is prominent. The pathogenesis of CVD in HIV is complex and involves a combination of traditional and HIV related factors. An accurate assessment of risk of CVD in these patients is still elusive and as a consequence the most appropriate preventive and therapeutic interventions remain controversial. PMID:26516417

  4. Neurobehavioral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Singer, Elyse J; Thames, April D

    2016-02-01

    Behavioral disorders are common in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The differential includes preexisting psychiatric diseases, substance abuse, direct effects of HIV infection, opportunistic infection, and the adverse effects of medical therapies. Many patients have more than one contributing or comorbid problem to explain these behavioral changes. The differential should always include consideration of psychosocial, genetic, and medical causes of disease. Treatment strategies must take into account the coadministration of antiretroviral therapy and the specific neurologic problems common in patients infected with HIV. PMID:26613994

  5. Bilateral Peripheral Facial Palsy in a Patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Su; Yoon, Hee Jung; Kim, Hai Jin; Nam, Ji Sun; Choi, Sung Ho; Kim, June Myung

    2006-01-01

    Neurological complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. They can occur at any stage of the disease and can affect any level of the central or peripheral nervous systems. In the literature, several cases of HIV-associated facial paralysis have been reported; however, bilateral facial palsy is rarely reported. In this paper, we present the first case in Korea, of a bilateral facial palsy occurring as the first clinical manifestation of HIV infection. PMID:17066521

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and diffuse polyneuropathy. Implications for rehabilitation medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Mukand, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Patients at various stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection require rehabilitation services. These patients present problems for each of the disciplines in a rehabilitation team, and all team members must confront the psychosocial and ethical issues involved with the disease. Patients with HIV infection may have polyneuropathy with multisystem involvement, including dysphagia, autonomic dysfunction, respiratory failure, bowel and bladder dysfunction, generalized weakness, a painful sensory neuropathy, and depression. Guidelines are presented for determining if inpatient rehabilitation or other settings are appropriate. Case management is a valuable strategy for the rehabilitation of patients with this complicated disorder. PMID:1866948

  7. [Non-dermatophytic moulds: onychomycosis in four patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    de Magalhães Lima, Kedma; Machado Barbosa de Castro, Célia Maria; Fonsêca Nogueira Cambuim, Idalina Inês; Carvalhaes de Oliveira, Jeferson; Delgado, Marília; Sette de Melo Rego, Rossana

    2008-03-01

    Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are a risk group for onychomycosis, fungal infections caused mainly by dermatophytes and yeast. However, non-dermatohytic moulds are becoming common agents for nail infections in this population of patients. We report four cases of onychomycosis caused by non-dermatophytic moulds (Aspergillus niger, Scytalidium hyalinum, Scytalidium dimidiatum and Fusarium solani) in patients infected with HIV from Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. Onychomicosis by non-dermatophytic species in HIV-positive patients requires special attention in the clinical and the laboratory. A proper diagnosis is necessary to establish the specific and adequate treatment, preventing fungal invasion. PMID:18338928

  8. [Oral plasmablastic lymphoma in a human immunodeficiency virus positive child: a case report].

    PubMed

    Astolfo, María Florencia; D'Antonio, Federico; Dartiguelongue, Juan B; Arabolaza, María N; Cheistwer, Ariel; De Matteo, Elena; Torrado, Lidia; Martínez Iriart, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare and aggressive subtype of diffuse large B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, originally described in the oral cavity of male adults with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. It is composed of neoplastic ceils which resemble immunoblasts but present immunophenotype distinctive of plasma cell and Epstein-Barr virus latent infection. In children, it is an even rarer disease. We present a case of oral plasmablastic lymphoma in a vertically transmitted human immunodeficiency virus-positive five-year-old child. PMID:27079412

  9. Visceral leishmaniasis with cutaneous lesions in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Ara, M; Maillo, C; Peón, G; Clavel, A; Cuesta, J; Grasa, M P; Carapeto, F J

    1998-07-01

    We report a case of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) with cutaneous lesions in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The cutaneous lesions consisted of erythematous papules on the legs. Biopsy of one lesion showed abundant Leishmania amastigotes within epithelial cells of an eccrine sweat gland in the dermis. Leishmania organisms were also found in a blood smear. Rapid and complete clearance of the cutaneous lesions was achieved after antimony therapy. Cutaneous lesions in VL are being reported increasingly frequently in patients with HIV infection and their significance remains in discussion. PMID:9764161

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus among people who inject drugs: is risk increasing in Europe?

    PubMed

    Hedrich, D; Kalamara, E; Sfetcu, O; Pharris, A; Noor, A; Wiessing, L; Hope, V; Van de Laar, M

    2013-01-01

    In most European Union (EU)/European Economic Area (EEA) countries, between 2010 and 2012, reports of new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnoses among people who inject drugs have been stable or declining. HIV outbreaks in Greece and Romania, first reported in 2011, continue and economic conditions hinder provision of effective response coverage. When measured against some established thresholds, prevention coverage remains inadequate in at least one-third of EU/EEA countries. Urgent consideration to scale up prevention efforts is merited. PMID:24308980

  11. Twenty years of human immunodeficiency virus care at the Mayo Clinic: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Nathan W; Badley, Andrew D; Kasten, Mary J; Sampath, Rahul; Temesgen, Zelalem; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Wilson, John W; Yao, Joseph D; Zeuli, John; Rizza, Stacey A

    2016-01-01

    The Mayo human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Clinic has been providing patient centered care for persons living with HIV in Minnesota and beyond for the past 20 years. Through multidisciplinary engagement, vital clinical outcomes such as retention in care, initiation of antiretroviral therapy and virologic suppression are maximized. In this commentary, we describe the history of the Mayo HIV Clinic and its best practices, providing a “Mayo Model” of HIV care that exceeds national outcomes and may be applicable in other settings. PMID:27175350

  12. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Jorge N; Ledesma, Bibiana A; Nigro, Monica G; Vittar, Natalia; Rueda, Nestor; De Carolis, Luis; Figueiras, Olga; Carnevale, Silvana; Corti, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a severe opportunistic infection in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The lung is a major site of infection after the central nervous system. In this report we described two cases of pneumonia due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV patients with antiretroviral therapy. Clinical and radiological abnormalities are not specific. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with late stage of HIV, CD4 count less than 100 cells/µl and a poor adherence to HAART. PMID:26933317

  13. Orphans and Vulnerable Children Affected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Malcolm; Beard, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, 15.1 million children have been orphaned because of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). They face significant vulnerabilities, including stigma and discrimination, trauma and stress, illness, food insecurity, poverty, and difficulty accessing education. Millions of additional children who have living parents are vulnerable because their parents or other relatives are infected. This article reviews the current situation of orphans and vulnerable children, explores the underlying determinants of vulnerability and resilience, describes the response by the global community, and highlights the challenges as the HIV pandemic progresses through its fourth decade. PMID:26613693

  14. Action of uracil analogs on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and its reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Piras, G; Dutschman, G E; Im, G J; Pan, B C; Chu, S H; Cheng, Y C

    1995-01-01

    Three structural analogs of 5-ethyl-1-benzyloxymethyl-6-(phenylthio)uracil (E-BPU) inhibited human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication without cytotoxicity in vitro and were more potent than azidothymidine and were as potent as E-BPU. The target of these compounds is HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Reverse transcriptases resistant to nevirapine (tyrosine at position 181 to cysteine) and TIBO R82150 (leucine at position 100 to isoleucine) are cross resistant to E-BPU analogs. Nevirapine- or TIBO R82150-resistant HIV-1 were cross resistant to E-BPU analogs but were inhibited at concentrations 11- to 135-fold lower than the cytotoxic doses. PMID:7537030

  15. Mechanism of selective inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus by ingenol triacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, M; Ijichi, K; Tokuhisa, K; Katsuura, K; Shigeta, S; Konno, K; Wang, G Y; Uemura, D; Yokota, T; Baba, M

    1996-01-01

    Ingenol 3,5,20-triacetate (ITA), one of the ingenol derivatives, is a selective inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication in vitro. ITA inhibited the replication of HIV strains in MT-4 cells at concentrations of 0.051 to 0.65 microM. This concentration was approximately 10(3)-fold lower than its cytotoxic threshold. The mechanism of action of ITA is primarily attributed to the inhibition of viral adsorption to the host cells, but it is distinct from the mechanism of inhibition by other adsorption inhibitors. PMID:8787923

  16. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, Jorge N; Ledesma, Bibiana A; Nigro, Monica G; Vittar, Natalia; Rueda, Nestor; De Carolis, Luis; Figueiras, Olga; Carnevale, Silvana; Corti, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a severe opportunistic infection in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The lung is a major site of infection after the central nervous system. In this report we described two cases of pneumonia due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV patients with antiretroviral therapy. Clinical and radiological abnormalities are not specific. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with late stage of HIV, CD4 count less than 100 cells/µl and a poor adherence to HAART. PMID:26933317

  17. Triterpene derivatives that block entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 into cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mayaux, J F; Bousseau, A; Pauwels, R; Huet, T; Hénin, Y; Dereu, N; Evers, M; Soler, F; Poujade, C; De Clercq, E

    1994-01-01

    A series of triterpene compounds characterized by a stringent structure-activity relationship were identified as potent and selective inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Currently studied botulinic derivatives have 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) against HIV-1 strain IIIB/LAI in the 10 nM range in several cellular infection assays but are inactive against HIV-2. These compounds did not significantly inhibit the in vitro activities of several purified HIV-1 enzymes. Rather, they appeared to block virus infection at a postbinding, envelope-dependent step involved in the fusion of the virus to the cell membrane. PMID:8170948

  18. Toxic epidermal necrolysis caused by fluconazole in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    George, Jacob; Sharma, Arun; Dixit, Ramakant; Chhabra, Naveen; Sharma, Smita

    2012-07-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are rare but serious dermatologic disorders. These grave conditions present as medical emergency, requiring prompt diagnosis and management. These are often drug induced and various groups of drugs, such as sulfa drugs, NSAIDS, etc., have been implicated as to cause TEN. Fluconazole is a commonly used drug with mild side effects. TEN caused by fluconazole is rare, and till now only few cases have been reported in the literature. We present a case of TEN in a human immunodeficiency virus infected man following fluconazole therapy in view of its rare occurrence. PMID:23129968

  19. Bubble continuous positive airway pressure in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected infant

    PubMed Central

    McCollum, E. D.; Smith, A.; Golitko, C. L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY World Health Organization-classified very severe pneumonia due to Pneumocystis jirovecii infection is recognized as a life-threatening condition in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected infants. We recount the use of nasal bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) in an HIV-infected African infant with very severe pneumonia and treatment failure due to suspected infection with P. jirovecii. We also examine the potential implications of BCPAP use in resource-poor settings with a high case index of acute respiratory failure due to HIV-related pneumonia, but limited access to mechanical ventilation. PMID:21396221

  20. Efficient human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection of cells lacking PDZD8.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shijian; Sodroski, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    PDZD8 can bind the capsid proteins of different retroviruses, and transient knockdown of PDZD8 results in a decrease in the efficiency of an early, post-entry event in the retrovirus life cycle. Here we used the CRISPR-CAS9 system to create cell lines in which PDZD8 expression is stably eliminated. The PDZD8-knockout cell lines were infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and murine leukemia virus as efficiently as the parental PDZD8-expressing cells. These results indicate that PDZD8 is not absolutely necessary for HIV-1 infection and diminishes its attractiveness as a potential target for intervention. PMID:25771112

  1. De Novo Belatacept in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Kidney Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Cohen, E A; Mulligan, D; Kulkarni, S; Tichy, E M

    2016-09-01

    Benefits of belatacept-based immunosuppressive regimens in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive renal transplant recipients include avoidance of drug interactions between calcineurin inhibitors and highly active antiretroviral agents and decreased likelihood or severity of nonimmune toxicities such as new-onset diabetes after transplant, hyperlipidemia and hypertension. We report a successful case of de novo belatacept at >18 mo from transplant in an HIV-positive black man aged 50 years who received his first transplant from a living related kidney donor. To our knowledge, this case is the first reported of belatacept use in an HIV-positive renal transplant recipient. PMID:27137752

  2. Protein structure-based design of potent orally bioavailable, nonpeptide inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus protease.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, S H; Melnick, M; Davies, J F; Appelt, K; Lewis, K K; Fuhry, M A; Pino, M; Trippe, A J; Nguyen, D; Dawson, H

    1995-01-01

    A class of potent nonpeptidic inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus protease has been designed by using the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme as a guide. By employing iterative protein cocrystal structure analysis, design, and synthesis the binding affinity of the lead compound was incrementally improved by over four orders of magnitude. An inversion in inhibitor binding mode was observed crystallographically, providing information critical for subsequent design and highlighting the utility of structural feedback in inhibitor optimization. These inhibitors are selective for the viral protease enzyme, possess good antiviral activity, and are orally available in three species. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7724556

  3. Immediate-early gene region of human cytomegalovirus trans-activates the promoter of human immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; Kenney, S.C.; Kamine, J.; Pagano, J.S.; Huang, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    Almost all homosexual patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are also actively infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The authors have hypothesized that an interaction between HCMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may exist at a molecular level and contribute to the manifestations of HIV infection. In this report, they demonstrate that the immediate-early gene region of HCMV, in particular immediate-early region 2, trans-activates the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase that is fused to the HIV long terminal repeat and carried by plasmid pHIV-CAT. The HCMV immediate-early trans-activator increases the level of mRNA from the plamid pHIV-CAT. The sequences of HIV that are responsive to trans-activation by the HDMV immediate-early region are distinct from HIV sequences that are required for response to the HIV tat. The stimulation of HIV gene expression by HDMV gene functions could enhance the consequences of HIV infection in persons with previous or concurrent HCMV infection.

  4. Inhibition of growth of human immunodeficiency virus in vitro by crude extracts of Chinese medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Chang, R S; Yeung, H W

    1988-04-01

    Twenty-seven medicinal herbs reputed in ancient Chinese folklore to have anti-infective properties were extracted by boiling under reflux. The extracts were tested for inhibitory activity against the human immunodeficiency virus in the H9 cell line at concentrations nontoxic to growth of the H9 cells. Using a significant reduction (greater than 3 S. D. below the mean) in the percentage of cells positive for specific viral antigens in three successive assays as indicative of activity against the virus, 11 of the 27 extracts were found to be active. One of the extracts (Viola yedoensis) was studied in greater depth. At a subtoxic concentration, this extract shut off completely the growth of HIV in virtually all experiments. It did not inactivate HIV extracellularly, did not induce interferon and did not inhibit the growth of herpes simplex, polio or vesicular stomatitis viruses in human fibroblast culture. Chinese medicinal herbs appeared to be a rich source of potentially useful materials for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection. PMID:2840849

  5. A Patient Presenting with Tuberculous Encephalopathy and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jason; Afroz, Suraiya; French, Eric; Mehta, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 33 Final Diagnosis: Tuberculous meningitis, human immunodeficiency virus infection Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Lumbar puncture Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: In the USA, Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is more likely to be found in foreign-born individuals, and those co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are more likely to have tuberculous meningitis. The literature is lacking in details about the clinical workup of patients presenting with tuberculous meningitis with encephalopathic features who are co-infected with HIV. This report demonstrates a clinical approach to diagnosis and management of tuberculous meningitis. Case Report: A 33-year-old Ecuadorean man presented with altered consciousness and constitutional symptoms. During the workup he was found to have tuberculous meningitis with encephalopathic features and concurrent HIV infection. Early evidence for tuberculosis meningitis included lymphocytic pleocytosis and a positive interferon gamma release assay. A confirmatory diagnosis of systemic infection was made based on lymph node biopsy. Imaging studies of the neck showed scrofula and adenopathy, and brain imaging showed infarctions, exudates, and communicating hydrocephalus. Treatment was started for tuberculous meningitis, while antiretroviral therapy for HIV was started 5 days later in combination with prednisone, given the risk of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Conclusions: A clinical picture consistent with tuberculous meningitis includes constitutional symptoms, foreign birth, lymphocytic pleocytosis, specific radiographic findings, and immunodeficiency. Workup for tuberculous meningitis should include MRI, HIV screening, and cerebral spinal fluid analysis. It is essential to treat co-infection with HIV and to assess for IRIS. PMID:27302013

  6. Cliniconeuropathologic correlates of human immunodeficiency virus in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Everall, I; Vaida, F; Khanlou, N; Lazzaretto, D; Achim, C; Letendre, S; Moore, D; Ellis, R; Cherner, M; Gelman, B; Morgello, S; Singer, E; Grant, I; Masliah, E

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) brain pathology and its clinical correlates in the antiretroviral era. We carried out a cross-sectional survey, analyzing prospective clinical and neuropathological data collected by the National NeuroAIDS Tissue Consortium (NNTC), comprising 589 brain samples from individuals with advanced HIV disease collected from 1999 onwards. We assessed gender, ethnicity/race, mode of transmission, age, year of death, nadir CD4, plasma viral load, last antiretroviral regimen, presence of parenchymal HIV brain pathology, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, and major depressive disorder. We compared cohort demographic variables with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention US HIV/AIDS statistics and examined associations of parenchymal HIV brain pathology with demographic, clinical, and HIV disease factors. With regard to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention US data, the NNTC was similar in age distribution, but had fewer females and African Americans and more Hispanics and men who have sex with men. Only 22% of the brains examined were neuropathologically normal. Opportunistic infections occurred in 1% to 5% of the cohort. Parenchymal HIV brain pathology was observed in 17.5% of the cohort and was associated with nadir CD4 and plasma viral load. Brains without parenchymal HIV brain pathology often had other noninfectious findings or minimal nondiagnostic abnormalities that were associated with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. Clinically, 60% of the cohort reported a lifetime episode of major depressive disorder and 88% had a HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. No pathological finding correlated with major depressive disorder. Both antiretroviral treatment regimen and elevated plasma HIV viral load were associated with presence of parenchymal HIV brain pathology; however, multivariate analyses suggest a stronger association with plasma viral load. The frequency

  7. Active and Selective Transcytosis of Cell-Free Human Immunodeficiency Virus through a Tight Polarized Monolayer of Human Endometrial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hocini, Hakim; Becquart, Pierre; Bouhlal, Hicham; Chomont, Nicolas; Ancuta, Petronela; Kazatchkine, Michel D.; Bélec, Laurent

    2001-01-01

    We report that both primary and laboratory-adapted infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates in a cell-free form are capable of transcytosis through a tight and polarized monolayer of human endometrial cells. Trancytosis of cell-free HIV occurs in a strain-selective fashion and appears to be dependent on interactions between HIV envelope glycoproteins and lectins on the apical membrane of the epithelial cells. These findings provide new insights into the initial events occurring during heterosexual transmission of the virus. PMID:11333919

  8. Human papillomavirus genotypes in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with anal pathology in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We studied anal specimens to determine the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and co-infection occurrence. This information will contribute to the knowledge of HPV genotype distributions and provide an estimate of the prevalence of different oncogenic HPV genotypes found in patients in Madrid (Spain). Methods We studied a total of 82 anal biopsies from the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón of Madrid. These included 4 specimens with benign lesions, 52 specimens with low-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesion, 24 specimens with high-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesions and 2 specimens with invasive anal carcinoma. HPV genotyping was performed with PCR amplification and reverse dot blot hybridization. Results We detected 33 different HPV genotypes, including 16 HPVs associated with a high risk of carcinogenesis, 3 HPVs associated with a highly likely risk of carcinogenesis and 14 HPVs associated with a low-risk of carcinogenesis. In two specimens, an uncharacterized HPV genotype was detected. The most frequent HPV genotypes found were HPV-16 (10.3%; 95% CI: 6.6%-15.1%), HPV-52 (8.5%; 95% CI: 5.2%-13%) and HPV-43/44 (7.6%; 95% CI: 4.5%-11.9%). HPV-18 was only detected in 0.9% (95% CI: 0.1%-3.2%) of the total viruses detected in all lesions. HPV co-infections were found in 83.9% of all types of lesions. The majority of cases (90.2%) were concomitantly infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Conclusion The prevalence of high-risk carcinogenic genotypes in anal pathological samples was remarkable. Therefore, further studies that include a greater number of samples, particularly invasive carcinoma cases are needed to evaluate the potential influence of these HPV genotypes in the appearance of anal carcinomas. Also, the influence of other accompanying infections should be evaluated clarify the appearance of this type of carcinoma. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  9. Selective inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus with an ultrashort pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsen, K. T.; Tsen, Shaw-Wei D.; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.; Kibler, Karen; Jacobs, Bert; Kiang, Juliann G.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, femtosecond laser technology has been shown to be effective in the inactivation of non-pathogenic viruses. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time that infectious numbers of pathogenic viruses such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) can be reduced by irradiation with subpicosecond near infrared laser pulses at a moderate laser power density. By comparing the threshold laser power density for the inactivation of HIV with those of human red blood cells and mouse dendritic cells, we conclude that it is plausible to use the ultrashort pulsed laser to selectively inactivate blood-borne pathogens such as HIV while leaving the sensitive materials like human red blood cells unharmed. This finding has important implications in the development of a new laser technology for disinfection of viral pathogens in blood products and in the clinic.

  10. Characterization to species level of Mycobacterium avium complex strains from human immunodeficiency virus-positive and -negative patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakopoulos, A M; Tassios, P T; Matsiota-Bernard, P; Marinis, E; Tsaousidou, S; Legakis, N J

    1997-01-01

    Forty human clinical Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex strains isolated in Greece were characterized to the species level by PCR with three sets of primers specific for one or both species. M. avium predominated in both human immunodeficiency virus-positive and -negative patients, but the frequency of M. intracellulare isolation appeared to be higher in the latter. PMID:9350780

  11. Computational Methods for De novo Protein Design and its Applications to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1, Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase, Ubiquitin Specific Protease 7, and Histone Demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Bellows, M.L.; Floudas, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of computational de novo protein design methods, highlighting recent advances and successes. Four protein systems are described that are important targets for drug design: human immunodeficiency virus 1, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, ubiquitin specific protease 7, and histone demethylases. Target areas for drug design for each protein are described, along with known inhibitors, focusing on peptidic inhibitors, but also describing some small-molecule inhibitors. Computational design methods that have been employed in elucidating these inhibitors for each protein are outlined, along with steps that can be taken in order to apply computational protein design to a system that has mainly used experimental methods to date. PMID:20210752

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Monoclonal Antibodies Suppress Acute Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Viremia and Limit Seeding of Cell-Associated Viral Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Pegu, Amarendra; Wang, Keyun; McGinnis, Kathleen; Nason, Martha; Foulds, Kathryn; Letukas, Valerie; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Chen, Xuejun; Todd, John Paul; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Rao, Srinivas; Michael, Nelson L.; Robb, Merlin L.; Mascola, John R.; Koup, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) administered shortly after human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can suppress viremia and limit seeding of the viral reservoir, but lifelong treatment is required for the majority of patients. Highly potent broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can reduce plasma viremia when administered during chronic HIV-1 infection, but the therapeutic potential of these antibodies during acute infection is unknown. We tested the ability of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-specific broadly neutralizing MAbs to suppress acute simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) replication in rhesus macaques. Four groups of macaques were infected with SHIV-SF162P3 and received (i) the CD4-binding-site MAb VRC01; (ii) a combination of a more potent clonal relative of VRC01 (VRC07-523) and a V3 glycan-dependent MAb (PGT121); (iii) daily cART, all on day 10, just prior to expected peak plasma viremia; or (iv) no treatment. Daily cART was initiated 11 days after MAb administration and was continued for 13 weeks in all treated animals. Over a period of 11 days after a single administration, MAb treatment significantly reduced peak viremia, accelerated the decay slope, and reduced total viral replication compared to untreated controls. Proviral DNA in lymph node CD4 T cells was also diminished after treatment with the dual MAb. These data demonstrate the virological effect of potent MAbs and support future clinical trials that investigate HIV-1-neutralizing MAbs as adjunctive therapy with cART during acute HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE Treatment of chronic HIV-1 infection with potent broadly neutralizing HIV-1 MAbs has been shown to significantly reduce plasma viremia. However, the antiviral effect of MAb treatment during acute HIV-1 infection is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that MAbs targeting the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein both suppress acute SHIV plasma viremia and limit CD4 T cell-associated viral DNA. These

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase: effect on viral replication of mutations at highly conserved residues.

    PubMed

    Cannon, P M; Wilson, W; Byles, E; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1994-08-01

    Sequence comparisons of the integrase (IN) proteins from different retroviruses have identified several highly conserved residues. We have introduced mutations at 16 of these sites into the integrase gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and analyzed the phenotypes of the resulting viruses. The viruses were all normal for p24 content and reverse transcriptase activity. In addition, all of the mutants could infect T-cell lines and undergo reverse transcription, as assessed by PCR analysis. Most of the mutant viruses also had normal Western blot (immunoblot) profiles, although three of the mutations resulted in reduced signals for IN relative to the wild type on the immunoblots and mutation of residue W235 completely abolished recognition of the protein by pooled sera from human immunodeficiency virus type 1-positive patients. Mutations that have previously been shown to abolish activity in in vitro studies produced noninfectious viruses. The substitution of W235 was notable in producing a noninfectious virus, despite previous reports of this residue being nonessential for IN activity in vitro (A.D. Leavitt, L. Shiue, and H.E. Varmus, J. Biol. Chem. 268:2113-2119, 1993). In addition, we have identified four highly conserved residues that can be mutated without any affect on viral replication in T-cell lines. PMID:8035478

  14. 5-azacytidine and 5-azadeoxycytidine inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, J; Walker, M C; Leclerc, J M; Lapointe, N; Beaulieu, R; Thibodeau, L

    1990-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents which affect the integration, stability, or inducibility of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) provirus would have considerable value in treating acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Two nucleoside analogs of cytosine, 5-azacytidine and 5-azadeoxycytidine, which seem to have such value because of their capabilities to affect both the stability and the methylation patterns of the nucleic acids into which they are incorporated, were tested for their ability to inhibit the replication of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) in human CEM T cells in vitro. 5-Azadeoxycytidine (1 microM) completely inhibited HIV replication in CEM cells, by the criteria of reduced viral antigen expression and decreased supernatant reverse transcriptase activity, with little toxicity for the treated cells. 5-azacytidine (1 microM) also inhibited HIV replication, but less effectively. When added 2 or more h after CEM cells were infected with HIV-1, both 5-azacytosine derivatives were less effective than they were when added at the time of infection. Even 2 h of exposure to 5-azadeoxycytidine was sufficient for inhibition of HIV replication. Although long exposure to either analog at concentrations of 1 microM would result in pronounced cellular cytotoxicity, the the fact that short exposures to the same dose of drug inhibit HIV replication but are not toxic for the cells implies that cellular toxicity itself is not an important mechanism of the antiviral action of the analogs. PMID:1691617

  15. Prediction of optimal peptide mixtures to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Holley, L H; Goudsmit, J; Karplus, M

    1991-01-01

    Sequences of the principal neutralizing determinant (PND) of the external envelope protein, gp120, from 245 isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 are analyzed. The minimal set of peptides that would elicit antibodies to neutralize a majority of U.S. and European isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is determined with the assumption that peptides of a given length including the central Gly-Pro-Gly triad are required. In spite of the hypervariability of the PND, 90% of these 245 sequences include peptides from a set of 7 pentapeptides, 13 hexapeptides, or 17 heptapeptides. Tests of these peptide sets on 78 additional PND sequences show that 95% are covered by the 7 pentapeptides, 94% by the 13 hexapeptides, and 86% by the 17 heptapeptides. To anticipate variants not yet observed, single amino acid mutation frequencies from the 245 isolates are used to calculate an expanded set of the 10,000 most probable PND sequences. These sequences cover 86% of the total distribution expected for the central portion of the PND. Peptide lists derived from this expanded set when tested on the 78 additional sequences show that 7 pentapeptides cover 95%, 13 hexapeptides cover 94%, and 17 heptapeptides cover 94%. These results suggest that peptide cocktails of limited size with the potential to cover a large fraction of PND sequence variation may be feasible vaccine candidates. PMID:1862103

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolution in vivo tracked by DNA heteroduplex mobility assays.

    PubMed Central

    Delwart, E L; Sheppard, H W; Walker, B D; Goudsmit, J; Mullins, J I

    1994-01-01

    High mutation rates and strong selective pressures imposed on human immunodeficiency viruses in vivo result in the formation of pools of genetic variants known as quasispecies. DNA heteroduplex mobility and tracking analyses were used to monitor the generation of HIV sequence diversity, to estimate quasispecies complexity, and to assess the turnover of genetic variants to approach an understanding of the relationship between viral quasispecies evolution in vivo and disease progression. Proviral DNA pools were nearly homogeneous soon after sexual transmission. The emergence and clearance of individual variants then occurred at different rates in different individuals. High quasispecies complexity was found in long-term-infected, asymptomatic individuals, while rapid CD4+ cell decline and AIDS were often, but not always, associated with lower quasispecies complexity. Proviral genetic variation was often low following in vitro culture, because of the outgrowth of one or a few variants that often became more abundant only later as proviruses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These studies provide insight into the dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus sequence changes in vivo and illustrate the utility of heteroduplex analysis for the study of phenomena associated with rapid genetic changes. Images PMID:8084001

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Tat Induces Nitric-oxide Synthase in Human Astroglia*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Jana, Malabendu; Dasgupta, Subhajit; Koka, Sreenivas; He, Jun; Wood, Charles; Pahan, Kalipada

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is known to cause neuronal injury and dementia in a significant proportion of patients. However, the mechanism by which HIV-1 mediates its deleterious effects in the brain is poorly defined. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of the HIV-1 tat gene on the expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) in human U373MG astroglial cells and primary astroglia. Expression of the tat gene as RSV-tat but not that of the CAT gene as RSV-CAT in U373MG astroglial cells led to the induction of NO production and the expression of iNOS protein and mRNA. Induction of NO production by recombinant HIV-1 Tat protein and inhibition of RSV-tat-induced NO production by anti-Tat antibodies suggest that RSV-tat-induced production of NO is dependent on Tat and that Tat is secreted from RSV-tat-transfected astroglia. Similar to U373MG astroglial cells, RSV-tat also induced the production of NO in human primary astroglia. The induction of human iNOS promoter-derived luciferase activity by the expression of RSV-tat suggests that RSV-tat induces the transcription of iNOS. To understand the mechanism of induction of iNOS, we investigated the role of NF-κB and C/EBPβ, transcription factors responsible for the induction of iNOS. Activation of NF-κB as well as C/EBPβ by RSV-tat, stimulation of RSV-tat-induced production of NO by the wild type of p65 and C/EBPβ, and inhibition of RSV-tat-induced production of NO by Δp65, a dominant-negative mutant of p65, and ΔC/EBPβ, a dominant-negative mutant of C/EBPβ, suggest that RSV-tat induces iNOS through the activation of NF-κB and C/EBPβ. In addition, we show that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) but not that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is involved in RSV-tat induced production of NO. Interestingly, PD98059, an inhibitor of the ERK pathway, and ΔERK2, a dominant-negative mutant of ERK2, inhibited RSV-tat-induced production of NO

  18. Intra-Blood-Brain Barrier Synthesis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antigen and Antibody in Humans and Chimpanzees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudsmit, Jaap; Epstein, Leon G.; Paul, Deborah A.; van der Helm, Hayo J.; Dawson, George J.; Asher, David M.; Yanagihara, Richard; Wolff, Axel V.; Gibbs, Clarence J.; Carleton Gajdusek, D.

    1987-06-01

    The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was associated with progressive encephalopathy in adult and pediatric patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV antigen was detected in CSF from 6 of 7 AIDS patients with progressive encephalopathy. By contrast, HIV antigen, whether free or complexed, was detected in CSF from only 1 of 18 HIV antibody seropositive patients without progressive encephalopathy and from 0 of 8 experimentally infected chimpanzees without clinical signs. Intra-blood-brain barrier synthesis of HIV-specific antibody was demonstrated in the majority of patients with AIDS (9/12) or at risk for AIDS (8/13) as well as in the experimentally infected chimpanzees, indicating HIV-specific B-cell reactivity in the brain without apparent neurological signs. In 6 of 11 patients with HIV infection, antibodies synthesized in the central nervous system were directed against HIV envelope proteins. Active viral expression appears to be necessary for both the immunodeficiency and progressive encephalopathy associated with HIV infection.

  19. Exogenous Interleukin-2 Administration Corrects the Cell Cycle Perturbation of Lymphocytes from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Paiardini, Mirko; Galati, Domenico; Cervasi, Barbara; Cannavo, Giuseppe; Galluzzi, Luca; Montroni, Maria; Guetard, Denise; Magnani, Mauro; Piedimonte, Giuseppe; Silvestri, Guido

    2001-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced immunodeficiency is characterized by progressive loss of CD4+ T cells associated with functional abnormalities of the surviving lymphocytes. Increased susceptibility to apoptosis and loss of proper cell cycle control can be observed in lymphocytes from HIV-infected individuals and may contribute to the lymphocyte dysfunction of AIDS patients. To better understand the relation between T-cell activation, apoptosis, and cell cycle perturbation, we studied the effect of exogenous interleukin-2 (IL-2) administration on the intracellular turnover of phase-dependent proteins. Circulating T cells from HIV-infected patients display a marked discrepancy between a metabolic profile typical of G0 and a pattern of expression of phase-dependent proteins that indicates a more-advanced position within the cell cycle. This discrepancy is enhanced by in vitro activation with ConA and ultimately results in a marked increase of apoptotic events. Conversely, treatment of lymphocytes with IL-2 alone restores the phase-specific pattern of expression of cell cycle-dependent proteins and is associated with low levels of apoptosis. Interestingly, exogenous IL-2 administration normalizes the overall intracellular protein turnover, as measured by protein synthesis, half-life of newly synthesised proteins, and total protein ubiquitination, thus providing a possible explanation for the effect of IL-2 on the intracellular kinetics of cell cycle-dependent proteins. The beneficial effect of IL-2 administration is consistent with the possibility of defective IL-2 function in vivo, which is confirmed by the observation that lymphocytes from HIV-infected patients show abnormal endogenous IL-2 paracrine/autocrine function upon in vitro mitogen stimulation. Overall these results confirm that perturbation of cell cycle control contributes to HIV-related lymphocyte dysfunction and, by showing that IL-2 administration can revert this perturbation, suggest a new

  20. Identification of cis-acting repressive sequences within the negative regulatory element of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y C; Touzjian, N; Stenzel, M; Dorfman, T; Sodroski, J G; Haseltine, W A

    1990-01-01

    The negative regulatory element of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is a 260-nucleotide-long sequence that decreases the rate of RNA transcription initiation specified by the long terminal repeat. This region has the potential to bind several cellular transcription factors. Here it is shown that sequences which recognize the NFAT-1 and USF cellular transcription factors contribute to this negative regulatory effect. The sequences within the negative regulatory element which resemble the AP-1 site and the URS do not negatively regulate human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat transcription initiation. PMID:2398545

  1. Alternating versus continuous drug regimens in combination chemotherapy of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Mazzulli, T; Rusconi, S; Merrill, D P; D'Aquila, R T; Moonis, M; Chou, T C; Hirsch, M S

    1994-01-01

    We compared the in vitro efficacies of two-, three-, and four-drug combinations given continuously or in alternating regimens against a clinical isolate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. In H9 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, at the drug concentrations used in this study, there was greater suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection as the number of drugs in the regimen was increased from one to four simultaneously administered agents. Although alternating drug regimens were effective, they were not better than continuous administration of either single drugs or combinations of agents and were less effective than giving all drugs of an alternating regimen simultaneously. PMID:8031028

  2. [An epidemiological and immunological study of human immunodeficiency virus infection in the southern area of Madrid].

    PubMed

    Cervero, M; Medina Asensio, J; Rubio, R; Costa, J R

    1991-01-01

    The clinical characteristics and immunological parameters are characterized in different groups of infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in patients infected by HIV, and the prognostic markers of survival in patients diagnosed of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study was carried out in 312 patients from June 1984 to March 1989. The most common risk group was intravenous drug addicts (IVDA) 80.9%. We observed that during the last years there was an increase in the number of cases of heterosexual transmission. Through follow up, 17.6% of patients developed acquired immunodeficiency (AIDS). The incidence rate for AIDS was higher amongst homosexuals than IVDA (35.4/14.6). Esophageal candidiasis and extrapulmonary tuberculosis were the AIDS indicators most frequently encountered. Once the study period was over, with a follow up of 19.3 +/- 3.4 months, the probability of survival after 12 months was 70 +/- 0.07% and after 24 months was 42% +/- 0.09%. The risk group (homosexuals), the appearance of a neoplasia as the first diagnosis of AIDS, and the immunological parameters (CD3 less than 500, CD4 less than 400, CD4/CD8 ratio less than 0.5 and total lymphocyte count of less than 1700 were the markers with worst prognosis which correlated with survival rates (p less than 0.01). We confirmed that when comparing immunologic parameters amongst HIV infection groups, IgA levels were higher (p less than 0.05); the total number of lymphocytes, the number of helper lymphocytes and the CD4/CD8 ratio were lower (p less than 0.01) in IV and AIDS group with respect to group II and III, in patients with AIDS with respect to group IV-non-AIDS and in those who died with relation to AIDS. PMID:2063023

  3. Decreases in human immunodeficiency virus infection rates in Kombolcha, Ethiopia: a 10-year data review

    PubMed Central

    Shiferaw, Melashu Balew; Gebregergs, Gebremedhin Berhe; Sinishaw, Mulusew Alemneh; Yesuf, Yohannes Amede

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is one of the most serious public health and development challenges in sub-Saharan Africa, including Ethiopia. A particular challenge for prevention strategies has been the emergence of hotspot areas. Therefore, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome programs should not be based on national level statistics, but need to be more focused geographically. Kombolcha is one of the high spot areas with different projects and development corridors. Hence, the aim of this study is to assess the trend of HIV infection rates among patients who visited Africa Service Committee clinic from 2005 to 2014. Methods An institutional-based cross-sectional study was conducted from January 1 to January 30, 2016. All records of new patients enrolled from February 8, 2005 to December 31, 2014 were reviewed. Data on sociodemographic information, risky sexual behavior, and HIV test result were collected from each study participant using data collection format. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify risk factors of HIV infection. Results The overall HIV infection was 10.8% (2,233/20,674). The rate of infection varied from 13.3% in 2005 to 4.5% in 2014, and its trend had significantly declined from 2008 to 2014. Urban residence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.53; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22–5.25), patients who ever had intercourse with penetration (AOR: 5.62; 95% CI: 1.11–28.57), and those who had marriage experience (AOR: 11.65; 95% CI: 4.2–32.3) were more infected with HIV. Conclusion The trend of HIV infection significantly reduced in the last 10 years in Kombolcha area. However, the HIV infection still remains high (4.5%) that needs intervention of those who had marriage experience, risky sexual behavior, and urban dwellers. PMID:27462177

  4. Human papillomavirus detection in women with and without human immunodeficiency virus infection in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV infection leads to a decreasing immune response, thereby facilitating the appearance of other infections, one of the most important ones being HPV. However, studies are needed for determining associations between immunodeficiency caused by HIV and/or the presence of HPV during the course of cervical lesions and their degree of malignancy. This study describes the cytological findings revealed by the Papanicolaou test, laboratory characteristics and HPV molecular profile in women with and without HIV infection. Methods A total of 216 HIV-positive and 1,159 HIV-negative women were invited to participate in the study; PCR was used for the molecular detection of HPV in cervical samples. Statistical analysis (such as percentages, Chi-square test and Fisher’s exact test when applicable) determined human papillomavirus (HPV) infection frequency (single and multiple) and the distribution of six types of high-risk-HPV in women with and without HIV infection. Likewise, a logistic regression model was run to evaluate the relationship between HIV-HPV infection and different risk factors. Results An association was found between the frequency of HPV infection and infection involving 2 or more HPV types (also known as multiple HPV infection) in HIV-positive women (69.0% and 54.2%, respectively); such frequency was greater than that found in HIV-negative women (44.3% and 22.7%, respectively). Statistically significant differences were observed between both groups (p = 0.001) regarding HPV presence (both in infection and multiple HPV infection). HPV-16 was the most prevalent type in the population being studied (p = 0.001); other viral types had variable distribution in both groups (HIV-positive and HIV-negative). HPV detection was associated with <500 cell/mm3 CD4-count (p = 0.004) and higher HIV-viral-load (p = 0.001). HPV-DNA detection, <200 cell/mm3 CD4-count (p = 0.001), and higher HIV-viral-load (p = 0.001) were associated with

  5. Productive Infection of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: Implications for Vector Development

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, James; Power, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus causing immune suppression and neurological disease in cats. Like primate lentiviruses, FIV utilizes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for infection. In addition, FIV gene expression has been demonstrated in immortalized human cell lines. To investigate the extent and mechanism by which FIV infected primary and immortalized human cell lines, we compared the infectivity of two FIV strains, V1CSF and Petaluma, after cell-free infection. FIV genome was detected in infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages at 21 and 14 days postinfection, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis of FIV-infected human PBMC indicated that antibodies to FIV p24 recognized 12% of the cells. Antibodies binding the CCR3 chemokine receptor maximally inhibited infection of human PBMC by both FIV strains compared to antibodies to CXCR4 or CCR5. Reverse transcriptase levels increased in FIV-infected human PBMC, with detection of viral titers of 101.3 to 102.1 50% tissue culture infective doses/106 cells depending on the FIV strain examined. Cell death in human PBMC infected with either FIV strain was significantly elevated relative to uninfected control cultures. These findings indicate that FIV can productively infect primary human cell lines and that viral strain specificity should be considered in the development of an FIV vector for gene therapy. PMID:9971834

  6. Allergen-induced migration of human cells in allergic severe combined immunodeficiency mice.

    PubMed

    Duez, C; Akoum, H; Marquillies, P; Cesbron, J Y; Tonnel, A B; Pestel, J

    1998-02-01

    Recently, we have shown that severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, intraperitoneally reconstituted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt)-sensitive patients, produced human IgE and developed a pulmonary inflammatory-type reaction after exposure to allergen aerosol. In order to understand the potential mechanisms involved in the human cell migration in SCID mice, we analysed their phenotypic profile in the lungs, spleen and thymus, 2 months after Dpt inhalation. The human cell recruitment in these organs was found to be allergen-dependent as CD45+ human cells were only detected in hu-SCID mice after Dpt exposure. The composition of the pulmonary human T-cell infiltrate, preferentially memory (CD45RO), activated (human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR) and CD4+ cells, was similar to that described in asthmatic patients. However, CD20+ B cells were predominately recruited in the spleen and thymus and may be IgE-producing cells in the spleen. In the lungs, the percentage of human leucocytes expressing the alpha-chain of the lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) (CD11a) was higher than those of CD49d+ or CD54+ cells, in contrast to the spleen and thymus, suggesting a potential role of LFA-1 in the human cell migration towards SCID mice lung. In conclusion, this model could be useful in the study of factors implicated in the cellular migration towards the lymphoid organs during an allergic reaction. PMID:9496684

  7. Visceral Leishmaniasis Treated with Antimonials/Paromomycin followed by Itraconazole/Miltefosine after Standard Therapy Failures in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus–Infected Patient

    PubMed Central

    Barragán, Patricia; López-Velez, Rogelio; Olmo, Montserrat; Podzamczer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is an opportunistic infection that affects human immunodeficiency virus–infected persons in leishmaniasis-endemic areas. The standard treatment may not be effective and relapses are common. We report the case of a human immunodeficiency virus-1–infected patient who had several relapses of visceral leishmaniasis after treatment with standard therapies and responded to a combined therapy. PMID:20595469

  8. Quality of life among human immunodeficiency virus-1 infected and human immunodeficiency virus-1/hepatitis C virus co-infected individuals in Iranian patients

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri, Sarah; Delavar, Ali; Jabbari, Hossain

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the quality of life (QOL) of people infected with both hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The study design was a cross sectional descriptive survey, using self administered questionnaires. Materials and Methods: A convenience sample of 242 patients (131 of them HIV/HCV), Iranian adults (aged 18–57) living with HIV/AIDS, was recruited from outpatient referring to Imam Khomeini Hospital behavioral counseling center in Tehran city, Iran. The instruments included the Multidimensional QOL HIV (MQoL HIV) and a demographic section. Results: The majority of the samples were male and single. The mean age was 36.52 years (standard deviation = 8.5). HIV mono infected patients reported higher scores in social support and physical functioning, but lower scores in physical health compared with HIV/HCV co infected individuals. There was no significant difference in overall MQOL HIV score between HIV and HIV/HCV patients. Conclusion: Future studies will need to explore the impact of HCV on HIV infected individuals' QOL.

  9. Sophorolipids, Microbial Glycolipids with Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Sperm-Immobilizing Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vishal; Doncel, Gustavo F.; Seyoum, Theodoros; Eaton, Kristin M.; Zalenskaya, Irina; Hagver, Rena; Azim, Abul; Gross, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The increased incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS disease in women aged 15 to 49 years has identified the urgent need for a female-controlled, efficacious, and safe vaginal topical microbicide. To meet this challenge, sophorolipid (SL) produced by Candida bombicola and its structural analogs have been studied in this report for their spermicidal, anti-HIV, and cytotoxic activities. The sophorolipid diacetate ethyl ester derivative is the most potent spermicidal and virucidal agent of the series of SLs studied. Its virucidal activity against HIV and sperm-immobilizing activity against human semen are similar to those of nonoxynol-9. However, it also induced enough vaginal cell toxicity to raise concerns about its applicability for long-term microbicidal contraception. Its structure-activity relationship has been established for creating new analogs with less cytotoxicity and higher activity. PMID:16189085

  10. Thrombotic microangiopathy and human immunodeficiency virus in the era of eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Anna; Boroujerdi-Rad, Laleh; Shah, Gaurang; Chen, Joline L.T.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) include thrombotic thromobocytopenic purpura and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Among these conditions, atypical HUS is now recognized to be a disease of alternative complement pathway dysregulation. Eculizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the complement protein C5 and prevents the cleavage of C5 to C5a and C5b. Eculizumab has been used as a novel treatment for complement-mediated TMA. We present a case of a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection who developed TMA and was successfully treated with eculizumab. The effect of long-term treatment with this new medication is unknown, and further studies are needed to establish guidelines in the management of this condition. PMID:27478600

  11. Thrombotic microangiopathy and human immunodeficiency virus in the era of eculizumab.

    PubMed

    Jin, Anna; Boroujerdi-Rad, Laleh; Shah, Gaurang; Chen, Joline L T

    2016-08-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) include thrombotic thromobocytopenic purpura and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Among these conditions, atypical HUS is now recognized to be a disease of alternative complement pathway dysregulation. Eculizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the complement protein C5 and prevents the cleavage of C5 to C5a and C5b. Eculizumab has been used as a novel treatment for complement-mediated TMA. We present a case of a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection who developed TMA and was successfully treated with eculizumab. The effect of long-term treatment with this new medication is unknown, and further studies are needed to establish guidelines in the management of this condition. PMID:27478600

  12. Selective induction of toxicity to human cells expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat by a conditionally cytotoxic adenovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, L K; Arens, M Q; Subramanian, T; Chinnadurai, G

    1990-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) primarily infect CD4+ T lymphocytes, leading eventually to the development of a systemic immune dysfunction termed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). An attractive strategy to combat HIV-mediated pathogenesis would be to eliminate the initial pool of infected cells and thus prevent disease progression. We have engineered a replication-defective, conditionally cytotoxic adenovirus vector, Ad-tk, whose action is dependent on the targeted expression of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene (tk), cloned downstream of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, in human cells expressing the HIV-1 transcriptional activator Tat. Infection of Tat-expressing human HeLa or Jurkat cells with Ad-tk resulted in high-level tk expression, which was not deleterious to the viability of these cells. However, in the presence of the antiherpetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir, Ad-tk infection resulted in a massive reduction in the viability of these Tat-expressing cell lines. As adenoviruses are natural passengers of the human lymphoid system, our results suggest adenovirus vector-based strategies for the targeted expression, under the control of cis-responsive HIV regulatory elements, of cytotoxic agents in HIV-infected cells for the therapy of HIV-mediated pathogenesis. Images PMID:2247444

  13. In Vitro Characterization of a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Chimera Expressing HIV Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase To Study Antiviral Resistance in Pigtail Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Zandrea; Boltz, Valerie; Palmer, Sarah; Coffin, John M.; Hughes, Stephen H.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.

    2004-01-01

    Antiviral resistance is a significant obstacle in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. Because nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) specifically target HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and do not effectively inhibit simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RT, the development of animal models to study the evolution of antiviral resistance has been problematic. To facilitate in vivo studies of NNRTI resistance, we examined whether a SIV that causes immunopathogenesis in pigtail macaques could be made sensitive to NNRTIs. Two simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) were derived from the genetic background of SIVmne: SIV-RT-YY contains RT substitutions intended to confer NNRTI susceptibility (V181Y and L188Y), and RT-SHIVmne contains the entire HIV-1 RT coding region. Both mutant viruses grew to high titers in vitro but had reduced fitness relative to wild-type SIVmne. Although the HIV-1 RT was properly processed into p66 and p51 subunits in RT-SHIVmne particles, the RT-SHIVmne virions had lower levels of RT per viral genomic RNA than HIV-1. Correspondingly, there was decreased RT activity in RT-SHIVmne and SIV-RT-YY particles. HIV-1 and RT-SHIVmne were similarly susceptible to the NNRTIs efavirenz, nevirapine, and UC781. However, SIV-RT-YY was less sensitive to NNRTIs than HIV-1 or RT-SHIVmne. Classical NNRTI resis tance mutations were selected in RT-SHIVmne after in vitro drug treatment and were monitored in a sensitive allele-specific real-time RT-PCR assay. Collectively, these results indicate that RT-SHIVmne may be a useful model in macaques for the preclinical evaluation of NNRTIs and for studies of the development of drug resistance in vivo. PMID:15564466

  14. In Vivo Replication Capacity Rather Than In Vitro Macrophage Tropism Predicts Efficiency of Vaginal Transmission of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus or Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christopher J.; Marthas, Marta; Greenier, Jennifer; Lu, Ding; Dailey, Peter J.; Lu, Yichen

    1998-01-01

    We used the rhesus macaque model of heterosexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission to test the hypothesis that in vitro measures of macrophage tropism predict the ability of a primate lentivirus to initiate a systemic infection after intravaginal inoculation. A single atraumatic intravaginal inoculation with a T-cell-tropic molecular clone of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), SIVmac239, or a dualtropic recombinant molecular clone of SIV, SIVmac239/1A11/239, or uncloned dualtropic SIVmac251 or uncloned dualtropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) 89.6-PD produced systemic infection in all rhesus macaques tested. However, vaginal inoculation with a dualtropic molecular clone of SIV, SIVmac1A11, resulted in transient viremia in one of two rhesus macaques. It has previously been shown that 12 intravaginal inoculations with SIVmac1A11 resulted in infection of one of five rhesus macaques (M. L. Marthas, C. J. Miller, S. Sutjipto, J. Higgins, J. Torten, B. L. Lohman, R. E. Unger, H. Kiyono, J. R. McGhee, P. A. Marx, and N. C. Pedersen, J. Med. Primatol. 21:99–107, 1992). In addition, SHIV HXBc2, which replicates in monkey macrophages, does not infect rhesus macaques following multiple vaginal inoculations, while T-cell-tropic SHIV 89.6 does (Y. Lu, P. B. Brosio, M. Lafaile, J. Li, R. G. Collman, J. Sodroski, and C. J. Miller, J. Virol. 70:3045–3050, 1996). These results demonstrate that in vitro measures of macrophage tropism do not predict if a SIV or SHIV will produce systemic infection after intravaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques. However, we did find that the level to which these viruses replicate in vivo after intravenous inoculation predicts the outcome of intravaginal inoculation with each virus. PMID:9525652

  15. Mouse strain and conditioning regimen determine survival and function of human leucocytes in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Tournoy, K G; Depraetere, S; Pauwels, R A; Leroux-Roels, G G

    2000-01-01

    The innate immune system of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice represents an important barrier to the successful engraftment of human cells. Different genetic and pharmacological strategies improve the graft survival. Non-obese diabetic (NOD)-SCID mice are better hosts for reconstitution with human peripheral blood leucocytes (Hu-PBL) because of their reduced natural killer cell and macrophage activity next to defective T and B cell functions. We investigated effects of TM-β1, a rat monoclonal antibody recognizing the mouse IL-2 receptor β-chain, on Hu-PBL survival and function in NOD-SCID and SCID mice. Relative to untreated littermates, TM-β1 improved Hu-PBL survival in SCID and NOD-SCID mice. Moreover, TM-β1-pretreated NOD-SCID mice displayed significantly better Hu-PBL survival and tissue distribution than TM-β1-pretreated SCID mice. Irradiation of NOD-SCID mice further enhanced the effects of TM-β1. However, these animals died within 3 weeks post-grafting due to graft-versus-host disease. Secondary immune responses were evaluated with Hu-PBL from a donor immune to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). In TM-β1-pretreated NOD-SCID mice, human HBsAg-specific memory B cells produced high titres of anti-HBsAg immunoglobulin irrespective of the administration of a secondary antigen booster dose. This contrasts with secondary immune responses in TM-β1-pretreated SCID mice where high titred antigen-specific immunoglobulins were produced when the appropriate antigen booster was given. In conclusion, reducing the function of the innate immune system in immunodeficient mice improves survival of the human graft and can result in an activation of the memory B cells without the need for recall antigen exposure. PMID:10606988

  16. A Patient Presenting with Tuberculous Encephalopathy and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Jason; Afroz, Suraiya; French, Eric; Mehta, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In the USA, Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is more likely to be found in foreign-born individuals, and those co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are more likely to have tuberculous meningitis. The literature is lacking in details about the clinical workup of patients presenting with tuberculous meningitis with encephalopathic features who are co-infected with HIV. This report demonstrates a clinical approach to diagnosis and management of tuberculous meningitis. CASE REPORT A 33-year-old Ecuadorean man presented with altered consciousness and constitutional symptoms. During the workup he was found to have tuberculous meningitis with encephalopathic features and concurrent HIV infection. Early evidence for tuberculosis meningitis included lymphocytic pleocytosis and a positive interferon gamma release assay. A confirmatory diagnosis of systemic infection was made based on lymph node biopsy. Imaging studies of the neck showed scrofula and adenopathy, and brain imaging showed infarctions, exudates, and communicating hydrocephalus. Treatment was started for tuberculous meningitis, while anti-retroviral therapy for HIV was started 5 days later in combination with prednisone, given the risk of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). CONCLUSIONS A clinical picture consistent with tuberculous meningitis includes constitutional symptoms, foreign birth, lymphocytic pleocytosis, specific radiographic findings, and immunodeficiency. Workup for tuberculous meningitis should include MRI, HIV screening, and cerebral spinal fluid analysis. It is essential to treat co-infection with HIV and to assess for IRIS. PMID:27302013

  17. Projection of human immunodeficiency virus among high-risk groups in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Md Nazrul Islam; Shitan, Mahendran

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) presents a serious healthcare threat to young individuals in Malaysia and worldwide. This study aimed to identify trends in HIV-related risk behaviors among recognized high-risk groups and to estimate HIV transmission up to the year 2015. Data and necessary information were obtained from the Ministry of Health Malaysia, published reports from the World Health Organization and United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS, and other articles. The Estimation and Projection Package was used to estimate HIV transmission. The results of the present study revealed that within the high-risk groups, intravenous drug users (IDUs) had the highest prevalence rate of HIV transmission, followed by patients with sexually transmitted infections (STIs), female sex workers (SWs), and men who have sex with men (MSM). Within these at-risk populations, patients with STIs have the highest prevalence of HIV, followed by IDUs, MSM, and SWs. If the transmission rate continues to increase, the situation will worsen; therefore, there is an urgent need for a comprehensive prevention program to control HIV transmission in Malaysia. PMID:24047742

  18. Analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nef gene sequences present in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Shugars, D C; Smith, M S; Glueck, D H; Nantermet, P V; Seillier-Moiseiwitsch, F; Swanstrom, R

    1993-01-01

    The nef genes of the human immunodeficiency viruses type 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) and the related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) encode a protein (Nef) whose role in virus replication and cytopathicity remains uncertain. As an attempt to elucidate the function of nef, we characterized the nucleotide and corresponding protein sequences of naturally occurring nef genes obtained from several HIV-1-infected individuals. A consensus Nef sequence was derived and used to identify several features that were highly conserved among the Nef sequences. These features included a nearly invariant myristylation signal, regions of sequence polymorphism and variable duplication, a region with an acidic charge, a (Pxx)4 repeat sequence, and a potential protein kinase C phosphorylation site. Clustering of premature stop codons at position 124 was noted in 6 of the 54 Nef sequences. Further analysis revealed four stretches of residues that were highly conserved not only among the patient-derived HIV-1 Nef sequences, but also among the Nef sequences of HIV-2 and the SIVs, suggesting that Nef proteins expressed by these retroviruses are functionally equivalent. The "Nef-defining" sequences were used to evaluate the sequence alignments of known proteins reported to share sequence similarity with Nef sequences and to conduct additional computer-based searches for similar protein sequences. A gene encoding the consensus Nef sequence was also generated. This gene encodes a full-length Nef protein that should be a valuable tool in further studies of Nef function. Images PMID:8043040

  19. Antiviral properties of palinavir, a potent inhibitor of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Lamarre, D; Croteau, G; Wardrop, E; Bourgon, L; Thibeault, D; Clouette, C; Vaillancourt, M; Cohen, E; Pargellis, C; Yoakim, C; Anderson, P C

    1997-01-01

    Palinavir is a potent inhibitor of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2) proteases. Replication of laboratory strains (HIV-1, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus) and HIV-1 clinical isolates is inhibited by palinavir with 50% effective concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 30 nM. The average cytotoxic concentration of palinavir (35 microM) in the various target cells indicates a favorable therapeutic index. Potent antiviral activity is retained with increased doses of virus and with clinical isolates resistant to zidovudine (AZT), didanosine (ddI), or nevirapine. Combinations of palinavir with either AZT, ddI, or nevirapine demonstrate synergy or additivity in the inhibition of HIV-1 replication. Palinavir retains anti-HIV-1 activity when administered postinfection until times subsequent to the reverse transcription step. In chronically infected CR-10 cells, palinavir blocks Gag precursor polyprotein processing completely, reducing greater than 99% of infectious particle production. The results indicate that the antiviral activity of palinavir is specific to inhibition of the viral protease and occurs at a late stage in the replicative cycle of HIV-1. On the basis of the potent in vitro activity, low-level cytotoxicity, and other data, palinavir was selected for in-depth preclinical evaluation. PMID:9145853

  20. Effect of sexual behavior change on long-term human immunodeficiency virus prevalence among homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Morris, M; Dean, L

    1994-08-01

    Substantial changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related sexual behavior have been reported by virtually every survey of homosexual/bisexual men in the last decade. This paper uses a behavior-based simulation to examine how such changes are likely to affect the long-term future of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic among homosexual men. Data from the Longitudinal AIDS Impact Project in New York City are used to estimate age-specific patterns of unprotected anogenital contact and behavioral change from 1980 to 1991. Model projections are validated using New York City surveillance data on AIDS incidence from 1981 to 1991. The current levels of unsafe sex reported in the Longitudinal AIDS Impact Project are shown to be almost exactly on the epidemic threshold. If this behavior were maintained, HIV prevalence would slowly decline in the population, but with just one additional unsafe sexual partner per year HIV would instead become endemic, with seroprevalence of about 65% in the oldest group and about 25% in the youngest. Transmission dynamics in the youngest group are analyzed in detail. For this group, the assortative age-matching bias in partner selection patterns raises the unsafe behavior threshold slightly in the long run. PMID:8030625

  1. Current laboratory diagnosis of opportunistic enteric parasites in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    De, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Opportunistic enteric parasitic infections are encountered in 30-60% of HIV seropositive patients in developed countries and in 90% of patients in developing countries. Once the CD4+ cell count drops below 200 cells/μl, patients are considered to have developed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), with the risk of an AIDS-defining illness or opportunistic infection significantly increasing. Opportunistic enteric parasites encountered in these patients are Cryptosporidium, Isospora, Cyclospora, and microsporidia; as well as those more commonly associated with gastrointestinal disease, for example, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, and also rarely Balantidium coli. In view of AIDS explosion in India, opportunistic enteric parasites are becoming increasingly important and it has to be identified properly. Apart from wet mounts, concentration methods for stool samples and special staining techniques for identification of these parasites, commercially available fecal immunoassays are widely available for the majority of enteric protozoa. Molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, flow cytometry, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), have also come in the pipeline for early diagnosis of these infections. Proper disposal of the feces to prevent contamination of the soil and water, boiling/filtering drinking water along with improved personal hygiene might go a long way in preventing these enteric parasitic infections. PMID:23961436

  2. School placement for human immunodeficiency virus-infected children: the Baltimore City experience.

    PubMed

    Santelli, J S; Birn, A E; Linde, J

    1992-05-01

    Over the past 6 years, the city of Baltimore has successfully implemented a school placement policy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Both policy and specific procedures are based on nationally promulgated guidelines. School placement policy is part of an overall AIDS policy that includes education of students and staff and adoption of universal precautions to prevent transmission of communicable diseases in school. Implementation has been marked by excellent collaboration between the departments of health and education. Important policy components include expedited clinical investigation of each case, an interagency review panel, strict protection of confidentiality, a restricted setting for certain children, a school site visit for each placement, and continued monitoring of the school placement by school nurses. Many HIV-infected students need special educational services and/or school health services. The Baltimore City school placement process has avoided the exaggerated publicity endured by some communities, where media reporting has aggravated community fears and invaded the lives of families with HIV-infected children. Baltimore City has succeeded in ensuring access to education, protecting families' confidentiality, and providing special care for HIV-infected students. Local communities should emphasize national guidelines in designing school placement policies for HIV-infected children. School placement policies work best in the context of a comprehensive policy incorporating AIDS education and care. PMID:1579392

  3. Diagnostic implications of Ga-67 chest-scan patterns in human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.H.; Garay, S.M.; Grossman, R.J.; Tiu, S.; Banner, H.

    1989-03-01

    Consecutive gallium-67 scans (n = 237) of 180 human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients with suspected pulmonary infections were evaluated for intensity and pattern of gallium distribution. Scan findings were correlated with the history, chest radiographic findings, and clinicopathologic diagnoses. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) occurred significantly more often with heterogeneous diffuse uptake than with homogeneous diffuse uptake. Heterogeneous diffuse uptake had an 87% positive predictive value for PCP, which was higher than that of other patterns. Localized pulmonary uptake was most commonly due to bacterial pneumonia or PCP; ill-defined, perihilar uptake, to cytomegalovirus or PCP; and focal (lymph node) uptake, to tuberculosis or lymphoma. The positive predictive value of any pulmonary uptake for lung pathology was 93%, and the negative predictive value of a negative scan was 96%. These findings confirm the utility of gallium scanning in the detection of lung pathology related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, particularly PCP. Furthermore, identification of a diffuse pattern may permit the use of a less invasive test more specifically directed at the confirmation of a diagnosis of PCP.

  4. Gap Junctions Mediate Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Bystander Killing in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry into the CNS is an early event after infection, resulting in neurological dysfunction in a significant number of individuals. As people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) live longer, the prevalence of cognitive impairment is increasing, despite antiretroviral therapy. The mechanisms that mediate CNS dysfunction are still not completely understood, and include inflammation, viral presence, and/or replication. In this report, we characterize a novel role of gap junctions in transmitting and thereby amplifying toxic signals originating from HIV-infected astrocytes that trigger cell death in uninfected astrocytes. HIV-infected astrocytes were resistant to apoptosis; however, uninfected astrocytes forming gap junctions with infected astrocytes were apoptotic. Gap junction blockers abolished apoptosis in uninfected astrocytes, supporting the role of these channels in amplifying cell death. Our findings describe a novel mechanism of toxicity within the brain, triggered by low numbers of HIV-infected astrocytes and amplified by gap junctions, contributing to the pathogenesis of NeuroAIDS. PMID:18032656

  5. Comparison of Talaromyces marneffei Infection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive and Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative Patients from Fujian, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Ru; Cai, Shao-Xi; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Yu, Mei-E; Xu, Neng-Luan; Xie, Bao-Song; Lin, Ming; Hu, Xin-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei (TM) is an emerging dimorphic human pathogenic fungus that is endemic to Southeast Asia. TM mostly occurs as an opportunistic infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The objective of this study was to compare the clinical and laboratory parameters of patients with TM infections who were HIV-positive and HIV-negative and to assess therapies and outcomes. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of 26 patients diagnosed with disseminated TM infection from September 2005 to April 2014 at Fujian Provincial Hospital, China. Results: Patients with TM infection tend to present with fever, weight loss, and anemia. The time from symptom onset to confirmed diagnosis was greater for HIV-negative patients (n = 7; median: 60 days, range: 14–365 days) than for HIV-positive patients (n = 19; median: 30 days, range: 3–90 days, Mann–Whitney U = 31.50, P = 0.041). HIV-negative patients were more likely to have dyspnea (57.1% vs. 5.3%, χ2 = 8.86, P = 0.010), low neutrophil count (Mann–Whitney U = 27.00, P = 0.029), high CD4 count (Mann–Whitney U = 0.00, P = 0.009), and high lymphocyte count (Mann–Whitney U = 21.00, P = 0.009). There were no significant differences in other demographic, clinical, or biochemical characteristics. Among all the patients, 12 HIV-positive patient and 1 HIV-negative patient received amphotericin and fluconazole treatment, 9 of whom improved, 1 died, 2 had kidney damage, 1 had hypokalemia due to exceeded doses. Conclusions: HIV-negative patients with TM infections tend to have a longer diagnostic interval, a higher percentage of dyspnea, higher levels of CD4 and lymphocytes, and lower neutrophil counts than TM infection in HIV-positive patients. Treatment programs with amphotericin and fluconazole are mostly effective. PMID:27098791

  6. Viral protein R of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 induces retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Viral protein R (Vpr), a protein of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) with various biological functions, was shown to be present in the blood of HIV-1-positive patients. However, it remained unclear whether circulating Vpr in patients’ blood is biologically active. Here, we examined the activity of blood Vpr using an assay system by which retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1 (L1-RTP) was detected. We also investigated the in vivo effects of recombinant Vpr (rVpr) by administrating it to transgenic mice harboring human L1 as a transgene (hL1-Tg mice). Based on our data, we discuss the involvement of blood Vpr in the clinical symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Results We first discovered that rVpr was active in induction of L1-RTP. Biochemical analyses revealed that rVpr-induced L1-RTP depended on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β. By using a sensitive L1-RTP assay system, we showed that 6 of the 15 blood samples from HIV-1 patients examined were positive for induction of L1-RTP. Of note, the L1-RTP-inducing activity was blocked by a monoclonal antibody specific for Vpr. Moreover, L1-RTP was reproducibly induced in various organs, including the kidney, when rVpr was administered to hL1-Tg mice. Conclusions Blood Vpr is biologically active, suggesting that its monitoring is worthwhile for clarification of the roles of Vpr in the pathogenesis of AIDS. This is the first report to demonstrate a soluble factor in patients’ blood active for L1-RTP activity, and implies the involvement of L1-RTP in the development of human diseases. PMID:23915234

  7. Use of Murine CXCR-4 as a Second Receptor by Some T-Cell-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Parolin, Cristina; Borsetti, Alessandra; Choe, Hyeryun; Farzan, Michael; Kolchinsky, Peter; Heesen, Michael; Ma, Qing; Gerard, Craig; Palú, Giorgio; Dorf, Martin E.; Springer, Timothy; Sodroski, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    The human CXCR-4 molecule serves as a second receptor for primary, T-cell-tropic, and laboratory-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. Here we show that murine CXCR-4 can support the entry of some of these HIV-1 isolates. Differences between mouse and human CXCR-4 in the ability to function as an HIV-1 receptor are determined by sequences in the second extracellular loop of the CXCR-4 protein. PMID:9445072

  8. Identification of Light-independent Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection through Bioguided Fractionation of Hypericum perforatum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Light-dependent activities against enveloped viruses in St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum) extracts have been extensively studied. In contrast, light-independent antiviral activity from this species has not. Here, we identify the light-independent inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (...

  9. Trends in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Risk Behaviors among High School Students--United States, 1991-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brener, Nancy; Kann, Laura; Lowry, Richard; Wechsler, Howell; Romero, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    This paper examined changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related risk behaviors among high school students in the United States during 1991-2005. Data from 8 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys conducted during that period were analyzed. During 1991-2005, the percentage of US high school students engaging in HIV-related sexual risk…

  10. Construction and Use of a Replication-Competent Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) that Expresses the Chloramphenicol Acetyltransferase Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terwilliger, E. F.; Godin, B.; Sodroski, J. G.; Haseltine, W. A.

    1989-05-01

    The construction and properties of an infectious human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that expresses the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase are described. This virus can be used in vitro to screen for drugs that inhibit HIV infection. The marked virus may also be used to trace the routes of infection from the site of inoculation in animal experiments.

  11. A Glimpse of the Early Years of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic: A Fellow's Experience in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Colasanti, Jonathan; Armstrong, Wendy S.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a manageable chronic disease in the United States, yet the first author's experience on a general infectious diseases (ID) consult service illustrates that certain areas of the United States still experience high rates of acquired immune deficiency syndrome-related complications. PMID:25734112

  12. A One-Session Human Immunodeficiency Virus Risk-Reduction Intervention in Adolescents with Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurstone, Christian; Riggs, Paula D.; Klein, Constance; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore change in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk among teens in outpatient treatment for substance use disorders (SUDs). Method: From December 2002 to August 2004, 50 adolescents (13-19 years) with major depressive disorder, conduct disorder, and one or more non-nicotine SUD completed the Teen Health Survey (THS) at the…

  13. Human immunoglobulin production in immunodeficient mice: enhancement by immunosuppression of host and in vitro activation of human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cavacini, L A; Kennel, M; Lally, E V; Posner, M R; Quinn, A

    1992-01-01

    The affect of host and donor related factors on successful engraftment of human cells into mice was examined to minimize the variability that has been observed in successful development of human-mouse chimera for the study of human disease and immune physiology and regulation. Human immunoglobulin production in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was augmented by immunosuppressing recipient mice and activating donor PBMC. Immunosuppression of recipient mice with 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation induced a 10-fold increase in human IgG in the sera of engrafted SCID mice. Variation in production of human IgG in recipient mice correlated with preinjection phenotype and activation status of injected PBMC. Mice injected with PBMC with a low CD4/CD8 ratio (less than 0.5) produced no detectable circulating human immunoglobulin. When the CD4/CD8 ratio was greater than 1.5, human IgG was detected in sera of PBMC-recipient SCID mice. Serum IgG increased 10-fold following in vitro activation of donor PBMC with anti-CD3, IL-2 and Staphylococcus aureus. Successful engraftment and serum IgG production was evidenced by an increase in the recovery of activated human IgG+ cells in the spleens of mice with maximal IgG production. Optimization of functional engraftment required modification of both the host (SCID mice) and the donor cells. PMID:1395094

  14. Cofactor requirement for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry into a CD4-expressing human cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, R D; Geballe, A P

    1993-01-01

    Expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) receptor CD4 on many nonhuman and some human cell lines is not sufficient to permit HIV-1 infection. We describe a human glioblastoma cell line (U373-MG) which remains resistant to HIV-1 despite the added expression of an authentic CD4 molecule. The block to HIV-1 infection of these cells is strain independent and appears to be at viral entry. Heterokaryons of CD4-expressing U373-MG (U373-CD4) cells fused to HeLa cells allow HIV-1 entry. A U373-CD4/HeLa hybrid clone allows efficient HIV-1 replication. These results suggest that HeLa cells express a factor(s) that can complement the viral entry defect of U373-CD4 cells and is necessary for efficient CD4-mediated HIV-1 infection. Images PMID:7690415

  15. Involvement of human leukocyte antigen class I molecules in human immunodeficiency virus infection of CD4-positive cells.

    PubMed Central

    Benkirane, M; Blanc-Zouaoui, D; Hirn, M; Devaux, C

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the putative roles of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated and cell surface-expressed major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules in the course of the HIV life cycle by the combined use of MHC-I molecule-positive and MHC-I molecule-negative virus particles and MHC-I molecule-positive and MHC-I molecule-negative CD4+ human cells. We found (i) that several anti-MHC-I monoclonal antibodies neutralize cell infection by direct interaction with HIV-associated MHC-I antigens, (ii) that these HIV-associated MHC-I antigens are however dispensable for cell infection, and (iii) that the cell surface-expressed MHC-I molecules are unnecessary for productive infection of CD4+ human cells. These results clarify further the functions of MHC-I molecules during the HIV life cycle. PMID:7916059

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C co-infection in sub-Saharan West Africa.

    PubMed

    Mboto, C I; Davies, A; Fielder, M; Jewell, A P

    2006-01-01

    Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is becoming a major global problem, leading to increased morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Co-existence in sub-Saharan West Africa of a high prevalence of HIV and HCV, which share similar behavioural risk factors and modes of transmission, must be seen in the broader context of an emerging third epidemic of HIV and HCV co-infection, as many factors that may affect the spread of HIV and HCV co-infection are endemic in the continent, including host factors such as sexual behaviour, presence of other sexually transmitted diseases, female and male circumcision status, percutaneous and perinatal exposure, and poverty. This review examines the epidemiology, risk factors and transmission of HIV and HCV co-infection and draws attention to the possible emergence of an epidemic of HIV and HCV co-infection in the region. PMID:16613141

  17. Bispecific Antibodies that Mediate Killing of Cells Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus of Any Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Jorg; Lotscher, Erika; Steimer, Kathelyn S.; Capon, Daniel J.; Baenziger, Jurg; Jack, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    1991-06-01

    Although AIDS patients lose human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T cells, their remaining CD8-positive T lymphocytes maintain cytotoxic function. To exploit this fact we have constructed bispecific antibodies that direct cytotoxic T lymphocytes of any specificity to cells that express gp120 of HIV. These bispecific antibodies comprise one heavy/light chain pair from an antibody to CD3, linked to a heavy chain whose variable region has been replaced with sequences from CD4 plus a second light chain. CD3 is part of the antigen receptor on T cells and is responsible for signal transduction. In the presence of these bispecific antibodies, T cells of irrelevant specificity effectively lyse HIV-infected cells in vitro.

  18. Iron supplementation during human immunodeficiency virus infection: a double-edged sword?

    PubMed

    Clark, T D; Semba, R D

    2001-10-01

    Although iron supplementation is considered beneficial for groups at risk for anemia, concern has been raised that it could be harmful during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Studies suggest: (1) faster HIV disease progression in thalassemia major patients receiving inadequate doses of iron-chelating drug; (2) higher mortality among patients receiving iron supplementation with dapsone compared with aerosolized pentamidine for prophylaxis against Pneumocytis carinii pneumonia; (3) higher iron stores and mortality among patients with haptoglobin Hp 2-2 phenotype; and (4) shorter survival among patients with high bone marrow iron deposition. These studies largely involved men in developed countries. Among HIV-infected pregnant women in Africa with a high prevalence of iron deficiency, no relationship was found between indicators of iron status and HIV disease severity. The available data do not contraindicate the current practice of iron supplementation in developing countries where there is a high prevalence of both HIV infection and iron deficiency. PMID:11601873

  19. A Hairpin Ribozyme Inhibits Expression of Diverse Strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mang; Ojwang, Joshua; Yamada, Osamu; Hampel, Arnold; Rapapport, Jay; Looney, David; Wong-Staal, Flossie

    1993-07-01

    Ribozymes have enormous potential as antiviral agents. We have previously reported that a hairpin ribozyme expressed under the control of the β-actin promoter that cleaves human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in the leader sequence can inhibit HIV-1 (pHXB2gpt) expression. For such a ribozyme in a retroviral vector delivery system to be useful in gene therapy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, it must be able to inhibit the expression of multiple HIV-1 strains. We have now cloned this ribozyme into various regular expression vectors (including retroviral vectors) by using various gene expression control strategies. Here we show by transient transfection that inhibition of expression of diverse strains of HIV-1 can be achieved by this ribozyme expressed in the proper vectors. These data further support the potential of this hairpin ribozyme as a therapeutic agent for HIV-1.

  20. Single-photon emission computed tomography in human immunodeficiency virus encephalopathy: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Masdeu, J.C.; Yudd, A.; Van Heertum, R.L.; Grundman, M.; Hriso, E.; O'Connell, R.A.; Luck, D.; Camli, U.; King, L.N. )

    1991-08-01

    Depression or psychosis in a previously asymptomatic individual infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be psychogenic, related to brain involvement by the HIV or both. Although prognosis and treatment differ depending on etiology, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are usually unrevealing in early HIV encephalopathy and therefore cannot differentiate it from psychogenic conditions. Thirty of 32 patients (94%) with HIV encephalopathy had single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings that differed from the findings in 15 patients with non-HIV psychoses and 6 controls. SPECT showed multifocal cortical and subcortical areas of hypoperfusion. In 4 cases, cognitive improvement after 6-8 weeks of zidovudine (AZT) therapy was reflected in amelioration of SPECT findings. CT remained unchanged. SPECT may be a useful technique for the evaluation of HIV encephalopathy.

  1. Innate and Adaptive Factors Regulating Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Genomic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sonia; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Pirrone, Vanessa; Wigdahl, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, antiretroviral therapy targeting the viral entry process, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and protease, has prolonged the lives of people infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). However, despite the development of more effective therapeutic strategies, reservoirs of viral infection remain. This review discusses molecular mechanisms surrounding the development of latency from the site of integration to pre- and post-integration maintenance of latency, including epigenetic factors. In addition, an overview of innate and adaptive cells important to HIV-1 infection are examined from the viewpoint of cytokines released and cytokines that act on these cells to explore an overall understanding of HIV-1 proviral genome activation. Finally, this review is discussed from the viewpoint of how an understanding of the interplay of all of these factors will help guide the next generation of therapies. PMID:20387125

  2. Rifampin Reduces Concentrations of Trimethoprim and Sulfamethoxazole in Serum in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, Esteban; Pou, Leonor; Fernandez-Sola, Antoni; Campos, Francisco; Lopez, Rosa M.; Ocaña, Imma; Ruiz, Isabel; Pahissa, Albert

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether rifampin reduces concentrations of trimethoprim (TMP) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) in serum of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons, levels of these agents were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography before and after more than 12 days of standard antituberculosis treatment for 10 patients who had been taking one double-strength tablet of co-trimoxazole once daily for more than 1 month. Statistically significant, 47 and 23% decreases in TMP and SMX mean areas under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24), respectively, were observed after administration of rifampin. N-Acetyl-SMX profiles without and with rifampin were similar. The steady-state AUC0–24 metabolite/parent drug ratio increased by 32% with rifampin administration. Our study shows that rifampin reduces profiles of TMP and SMX in serum of HIV-infected patients. PMID:11600390

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Galiatsatos, Panagis; Melia, Michael T.; Silhan, Leann L.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) results from a hypersensitivity response to airways colonization with Aspergillus fumigatus, and it occurs most often in individuals with asthma or cystic fibrosis. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is an indolent, but potentially progressive, disease in patients. In patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), ABPA is rare, and its description in the literature is limited to case reports. We describe the occurrence of ABPA in a 37-year-old woman with well controlled HIV infection. This represents the first documented case of ABPA in an HIV-infected patient whose only pulmonary comorbidity included the ramifications of prior acute respiratory distress syndrome due to Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. We also review prior case reports of ABPA in HIV-infected patients and consider risk factors for its development. PMID:27419184

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a child presenting as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Tullu, Milind S; Patil, Dhananjay P; Muranjan, Mamta N; Kher, Archana S; Lahiri, Keya R

    2011-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an extremely rare occurrence in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We describe an 8-year-old male child who presented with weakness of both lower limbs for 10 days and focal convulsions for 2 days. The child had left, upper motor neuron facial palsy, lower limb hypotonia, and exaggerated deep tendon reflexes. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibodies for HIV tested positive and the CD4 count was 109 cells/µL. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, brain) revealed extensive confluent hyperintensities (on T2-weighted images) in left parietal, right temporal, and right occipital regions of the white matter, and similar signals were seen in right lentiform nucleus and right posterior thalami, suggesting acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. There was transient improvement with intravenous methyl prednisolone. The patient succumbed to the illness. Perinatally transmitted pediatric HIV infection presenting with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis has not yet been reported in the medical literature. PMID:20656677

  5. Antiretroviral regimen and suboptimal medication adherence are associated with low-level human immunodeficiency virus viremia.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulos, Christina; Ribaudo, Heather; Ragland, Kathleen; Bangsberg, David R; Li, Jonathan Z

    2015-01-01

    Episodes of human immunodeficiency virus low-level viremia (LLV) are common in the clinical setting, but its association with antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen and adherence remains unclear. Antiretroviral therapy adherence was evaluated in participants of the Research on Access to Care in the Homeless cohort by unannounced pill counts. Factors associated with increased risk of LLV include treatment with a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen (ritonavir-boosted PI vs nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor: adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 3.1; P = .01) and lower ART adherence over the past 3 months (HR, 1.1 per 5% decreased adherence, adjusted; P = .050). Patients with LLV may benefit from ART adherence counseling and potentially regimen modification. PMID:25884007

  6. Associations among depression, suicidal behavior, and quality of life in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, Gianluca; Montebovi, Franco; Lamis, Dorian A; Erbuto, Denise; Girardi, Paolo; Amore, Mario; Pompili, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential associations among major depression, quality of life, and suicidal behavior in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. METHODS: A detailed MEDLINE search was carried out to identify all articles and book chapters in English published from January 1995 to January 2015. RESULTS: Based on the main findings, the prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) ranged from 14.0% to 27.2%. Furthermore, the prevalence of suicidal ideation varied from 13.6% to 31.0% whereas, attempted suicides were reported to range from 3.9% to 32.7%. Interestingly, various associated risk factors for both depression and suicide were identified in HIV patients. Finally, consistent associations were reported among MDD, suicidal ideation, and poor quality of life in individuals living with HIV. CONCLUSION: Although additional studies are needed to elucidate this complex association, our results suggest the importance of early detection of both MDD and suicidality in patients living with HIV. PMID:26279991

  7. Alternative nucleophilic substrates for the endonuclease activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Ealy, Julie B.; Sudol, Malgorzata; Krzeminski, Jacek; Amin, Shantu; Katzman, Michael

    2012-11-10

    Retroviral integrase can use water or some small alcohols as the attacking nucleophile to nick DNA. To characterize the range of compounds that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase can accommodate for its endonuclease activities, we tested 45 potential electron donors (having varied size and number or spacing of nucleophilic groups) as substrates during site-specific nicking at viral DNA ends and during nonspecific nicking reactions. We found that integrase used 22 of the 45 compounds to nick DNA, but not all active compounds were used for both activities. In particular, 13 compounds were used for site-specific and nonspecific nicking, 5 only for site-specific nicking, and 4 only for nonspecific nicking; 23 other compounds were not used for either activity. Thus, integrase can accommodate a large number of nucleophilic substrates but has selective requirements for its different activities, underscoring its dynamic properties and providing new information for modeling and understanding integrase.

  8. Absence of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in "natural" eccrine sweat.

    PubMed

    Wormser, G P; Bittker, S; Forseter, G; Hewlett, I K; Argani, I; Joshi, B; Epstein, J S; Bucher, D

    1992-01-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been found in numerous body fluids, there are no reports of attempts to demonstrate this virus in eccrine sweat, a fluid frequently encountered during person-to-person interactions. "Natural" eccrine sweat samples and blood from 50 HIV-1-seropositive patients and 2 HIV-1-seronegative controls were cultured for HIV-1 by a cocultivation method. Polymerase chain reaction for HIV-1 RNA and proviral DNA was done on 40 sweat samples (39 patients, 1 control). HIV-1 was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 39 (78%) of 50 patients but from none of 52 sweat samples. No HIV-1 viral DNA or RNA was detected in the 40 sweat samples tested. With present methodology, infectious HIV-1 cannot be demonstrated in "natural" eccrine sweat samples from HIV-infected patients. PMID:1345794

  9. Properties of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase recombination upon infection.

    PubMed

    Sakuragi, Sayuri; Shioda, Tatsuo; Sakuragi, Jun-ichi

    2015-11-01

    Reverse transcription (RT) is one of the hallmark features of retroviruses. During RT, virus encoded reverse transcriptase (RTase) must transfer from one end to the other end of the viral genome on two separate occasions to complete RT and move on to the production of proviral DNA. In addition, multiple strand-transfer events between homologous regions of the dimerized viral genome by RTase are also observed, and such recombination events serve as one of the driving forces behind human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome sequence diversity. Although retroviral recombination is widely considered to be important, several features of its mechanism are still unclear. We constructed an HIV-1 vector system to examine the target sequences required for virus recombination, and elucidated other necessary prerequisites to harbor recombination, such as the length, homology and the stability of neighbouring structures around the target sequences. PMID:26282329

  10. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Patient

    PubMed Central

    Regeti, Kalyani; Khan, Rafay; Jehangir, Waqas; Zafar, Shoaib; Yousif, Abdalla; Sen, Shuvendu

    2016-01-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a relatively common disease of adulthood characterized by a typical combination of clinical and radiological findings. In this report, we discuss a 54-year-old female presenting with symptoms suggestive of NPH and found to have a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1. She was not treated as she was in denial state and developed NPH as a possible complication. In the literature, there has only been one reported case of HIV type 2 causing NPH; however, no relationship has been properly documented with HIV type 1. These findings bring about a question on whether NPH is associated or a complication of HIV with awareness of this association. Earlier screening of HIV can be done in patients presenting with such symptoms, thus to prevent further progression of its complications. PMID:27222676

  11. Retinal blood flow indices in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Yung, C W; Harris, A; Massicotte, S; Chioran, G; Krombach, G; Danis, R; Wolf, S

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: Abnormal blood flow dynamics are believed to contribute to the development of retinal microvascular disease in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In this study, the scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) was used, combined with fluorescein angiography, to measure retinal blood flow indices in HIV seropositive patients. METHODS: Arteriovenous passage time (AVP) and perifoveal capillary blood flow velocity (CFV) were measured in 23 HIV infected patients and 23 control subjects with SLO fluorescein angiography. RESULTS: No significant difference in AVP was found between the two groups. However, CFV was significantly reduced in HIV infected patients (p = 0.013). CONCLUSION: Patients infected with HIV show abnormal haemodynamics at the level of the perifoveal capillaries. PMID:8949717

  12. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Patient.

    PubMed

    Regeti, Kalyani; Khan, Rafay; Jehangir, Waqas; Zafar, Shoaib; Yousif, Abdalla; Sen, Shuvendu

    2016-06-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a relatively common disease of adulthood characterized by a typical combination of clinical and radiological findings. In this report, we discuss a 54-year-old female presenting with symptoms suggestive of NPH and found to have a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1. She was not treated as she was in denial state and developed NPH as a possible complication. In the literature, there has only been one reported case of HIV type 2 causing NPH; however, no relationship has been properly documented with HIV type 1. These findings bring about a question on whether NPH is associated or a complication of HIV with awareness of this association. Earlier screening of HIV can be done in patients presenting with such symptoms, thus to prevent further progression of its complications. PMID:27222676

  13. Antibodies to CD4 in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, M; Ardman, B; Basiripour, L; Lu, Y C; Blohm, D; Haseltine, W; Sodroski, J

    1989-01-01

    The attachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to target cells is mediated by a specific interaction between the viral envelope glycoprotein (gp120) and the CD4 receptor. Here we report that approximately 10% of HIV-1-infected individuals produce antibodies that recognize the extracellular portion of the CD4 molecule. Carboxyl-terminal deletions of CD4 that do not affect HIV-1 gp120 binding eliminate recognition of CD4 by patient antisera. In contrast, mutations in the amino-terminal domain of CD4 that attenuate HIV-1 gp120 binding do not diminish CD4 recognition by patient antisera. These results suggest that HIV-1 infection can generate antibodies directed against a region of the viral receptor distinct from the virus-binding domain. Images PMID:2541442

  14. Vaginal transmission of chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency viruses in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y; Brosio, P; Lafaile, M; Li, J; Collman, R G; Sodroski, J; Miller, C J

    1996-01-01

    Chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that express the env genes derived from distinct HIV type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for the ability to infect rhesus macaques following intravaginal inoculation. SHIVs containing either the HIV-1 HXBc2 or the HIV-1 89.6 envelope glycoproteins were capable of replicating in intravenously inoculated rhesus macaques. However, intravaginal inoculation of animals with these two SHIVs resulted in infection only with the SHIV containing the HIV-1 89.6 glycoprotein. Thus, properties conferred by the envelope glycoproteins in the chimeric virus affect the ability of particular SHIVs to initiate a systemic infection following vaginal inoculation. These results provide indirect support for the hypothesis that the selection of specific viral variants occurs in the genital tracts of individuals exposed to HIV by sexual contact. PMID:8627782

  15. Isolated and bilateral simultaneous facial palsy disclosing early human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sathirapanya, Pornchai

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral lower motor neuron type facial palsy is an unusual neurological disorder. There are few reports that associate it with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on initial presentation. A 51-year-old married woman, who was previously healthy and had no risk of HIV infection, presented solely with bilateral simultaneous facial palsy. A positive HIV serology test was confirmed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. Following a short course of oral prednisolone, the patient recovered completely from facial palsy in three months, even though an antiretroviral treatment was suspended. Exclusion of HIV infection in patients with bilateral facial palsy is essential for early diagnosis and management of HIV. PMID:26106247

  16. ADAR2 editing enzyme is a novel human immunodeficiency virus-1 proviral factor.

    PubMed

    Doria, Margherita; Tomaselli, Sara; Neri, Francesca; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Michienzi, Alessandro; Gallo, Angela

    2011-05-01

    The adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes catalyse conversion of adenosine to inosine in dsRNA. A positive effect of ADAR1 on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication has recently been reported. Here, we show that another ADAR enzyme, ADAR2, positively affects the replication process of HIV-1. We found that, analogously to ADAR1, ADAR2 enhances the release of progeny virions by an editing-dependent mechanism. However, differently from the ADAR1 enzyme, ADAR2 does not increase the infectious potential of the virus. Importantly, downregulation of ADAR2 in Jurkat cells significantly impairs viral replication. Therefore, ADAR2 shares some but not all proviral functions of ADAR1. These results suggest a novel role of ADAR2 as a viral regulator. PMID:21289159

  17. Evaluation of the disinfectant effect of Solprogel against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Hernández, A; Belda, F J; Domínguez, J; Matas, L; Gimenez, M; Caraballo, M; Ramil, C; Ausina, V

    1996-11-01

    The antiviral activities of sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) and a commercial product (Solprogel 2%) against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) were investigated using a quantitative suspension test method. Solprogel is a compound that contains NaDCC and a biodegradable polymer of acrylic acid. Viral suspensions were prepared containing 3.2 x 10(6) tissue culture infective dose 50 (TCID50) in culture media. Syncytium formation in the MT-2 line and HIV antigen p24 on the supernatant of the cultures were used to determine viral titre. Results indicate that satisfactory disinfection (1000-fold reduction in 5 min) can be achieved using NaDCC and Solprogel at concentrations of 100 and 120 ppm available chlorine, respectively. PMID:8923278

  18. Epidemic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among intravenous drug users (IVDU).

    PubMed Central

    D'Aquila, R. T.; Williams, A. B.

    1987-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is epidemic among intravenous drug users (IVDU), particularly in the northeastern United States. IVDU are playing a critical role in the spread of HIV by infecting their heterosexual partners and children, as well as their needle-sharing partners. The epidemiology of HIV infection among IVDU is reviewed here, including a compilation of seroprevalence data. Relevant determinants of the future spread of HIV among IVDU are discussed, including the major risk factors for HIV seropositivity, the modes of HIV transmission, and aspects of the natural history of HIV infection in IVDU. The public health policy implications of these issues include the need for education of adolescents and the general public about the risks of drug injection and heterosexual intercourse with IVDU, as well as motivation of IVDU to stop injecting, never share injection paraphernalia, or, at least, clean needles effectively. PMID:3324506

  19. Current Issues and Considerations Regarding Trichomoniasis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus in African-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Shafir, Shira C.; Sorvillo, Frank J.; Smith, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis has long been recognized as one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections. However, it is only in recent years that it has been appreciated that Trichomonas may play a critical role in amplifying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. Given the evidence that T. vaginalis likely promotes HIV infection, the apparent high level of Trichomonas infection in the African-American community is cause for concern. Even if T. vaginalis increases the risk of HIV transmission by a small or modest amount, it translates into a sizable population effect since Trichomonas is so common in this community. Therefore, control of trichomoniasis may represent an important avenue of control for the prevention of HIV transmission, particularly among African-Americans. PMID:19136432

  20. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Galiatsatos, Panagis; Melia, Michael T; Silhan, Leann L

    2016-04-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) results from a hypersensitivity response to airways colonization with Aspergillus fumigatus, and it occurs most often in individuals with asthma or cystic fibrosis. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is an indolent, but potentially progressive, disease in patients. In patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), ABPA is rare, and its description in the literature is limited to case reports. We describe the occurrence of ABPA in a 37-year-old woman with well controlled HIV infection. This represents the first documented case of ABPA in an HIV-infected patient whose only pulmonary comorbidity included the ramifications of prior acute respiratory distress syndrome due to Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. We also review prior case reports of ABPA in HIV-infected patients and consider risk factors for its development. PMID:27419184

  1. Role of the cytoskeleton in cell-to-cell transmission of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce-Pratt, R; Malamud, D; Phillips, D M

    1994-01-01

    We previously observed that when human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected T lymphocytes are added to epithelial cells, they adhere, polarize, and secrete virions unidirectionally onto the epithelium. Epithelial cells subsequently take up virus and become productively infected. We report here that colchicine treatment of T-lymphocyte suspensions induced lymphocyte polarization, redistribution of F-actin into a pseudopod, and secretion of HIV from the pseudopod. Immobilization of T lymphocytes on negatively charged plastic also caused redistribution of F-actin and unidirectional secretion of HIV onto the plastic. As neither colchicine nor adhesion caused an increase in HIV secretion, they apparently act by focusing secretion to the tip of the pseudopod. We speculate that adhesion-induced polar secretion of HIV, from activated mononuclear cells onto epithelia, is a cytoskeleton-mediated process which may be involved in HIV transmission in vivo. Images PMID:8151760

  2. Nef Does Not Affect the Efficiency of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Fusion with Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tobiume, Minoru; Lineberger, Janet E.; Lundquist, Christopher A.; Miller, Michael D.; Aiken, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) accessory protein Nef stimulates viral infectivity by an unknown mechanism. Recent studies have suggested that Nef may act by regulating the efficiency of virus entry into cells. Here we provide evidence to the contrary. Using a quantitative assay of HIV-1 virus-cell fusion, we observed equivalent rates and extents of fusion of wild-type and Nef-defective HIV-1 particles with MT-4 cells and CD4-expressing HeLa cells. In studies using soluble CD4 (sCD4) to inhibit infection, wild-type and Nef-defective HIV-1 escaped the sCD4 block with similar kinetics. We conclude that Nef acts at a postentry step in infection, probably by facilitating intracellular transport of the HIV-1 ribonucleoprotein complex. PMID:12970449

  3. Safety, tolerance, and efficacy of atevirdine in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Been-Tiktak, A M; Williams, I; Vrehen, H M; Richens, J; Aldam, D; van Loon, A M; Loveday, C; Boucher, C A; Ward, P; Weller, I V; Borleffs, J C

    1996-01-01

    Atevirdine is a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this study we investigated the effect of atevirdine in asymptomatic antiretroviral naive HIV-infected patients with CD4+ cell counts of between 200 and 750 cells per mm3. Patients were randomized to receive 600 mg of atevirdine (n = 15) or a placebo (n = 15) three times a day for 12 weeks. There was no statistically significant effect of atevirdine on viral loads (HIV p24 antigen and HIV-1 RNA levels by PCR) or CD4+ cell counts. The data do not support the use of atevirdine as a monotherapy in the treatment of HIV-infected patients. PMID:8913487

  4. Long-term survivor of human immunodeficiency virus-associated plasmablastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Atul; Tilak, T V S V G K; Lodha, Rakesh; Sharma, M C; Dabkara, Deepak

    2013-04-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma (PL) is a type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) having a strong association with immunosuppression, especially, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It generally has a poor prognosis with most patients dying within 2 years from initial presentation, and long-term survivors are very few. We report the case of a 10-years-old child, presenting in 2003 with swelling on the right side of the face and fever of 2 months. Evaluation revealed a mass in the right palatal and upper alveolar region with extensive spread and bone destruction, regional adenopathy, mass lesion in the liver and hepatosplenomegaly without bone marrow involvement. Histopathology was suggestive of the PL and patient tested positive for HIV. He was started on high grade NHL chemotherapy protocol along with highly-active anti-retroviral therapy HAART. He responded well and is in complete remission since 8 years of completion of treatment and is on HAART. PMID:24049295

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 envelope glycoproteins oligomerize through conserved sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Center, R J; Kemp, B E; Poumbourios, P

    1997-01-01

    Hetero-oligomerization between human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) envelope glycoprotein (Env) truncation mutants and epitope-tagged gp160 is dependent on the presence of gp41 transmembrane protein (TM) amino acids 552 to 589, a putative amphipathic alpha-helical sequence. HIV-2 Env truncation mutants containing this sequence were also able to form cross-type hetero-oligomers with HIV-1 Env. HIV-2/HIV-1 hetero-oligomerization was, however, more sensitive to disruption by mutagenesis or increased temperature. The conservation of the Env oligomerization function of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 alpha-helical sequences suggests that retroviral TM alpha-helical motifs may have a universal role in oligomerization. PMID:9188654

  6. [Practical considerations for high resolution anoscopy in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Iribarren-Díaz, Mauricio; Ocampo Hermida, Antonio; González-Carreró Fojón, Joaquín; Alonso-Parada, María; Rodríguez-Girondo, Mar

    2014-12-01

    Anal cancer is uncommon in the general population, however its incidence is increasing significantly in certain risk groups, mainly in men who have sex with men, and particularly those infected with human immunodeficiency virus. High resolution anoscopy technique is currently considered the standard in the diagnosis of anal intraepithelial neoplasia, but at present there is no agreed standard method between health areas. High resolution anoscopy is an affordable technique that can be critical in the screening of anal carcinoma and its precursor lesions, but is not without difficulties. We are currently studying the most effective strategy for managing premalignant anal lesions, and with this article we attempt to encourage other groups interested in reducing the incidence of an increasing neoplasia. PMID:24182418

  7. Transcription factor AP-2 regulates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, N D; Agranoff, A B; Duckett, C S; Nabel, G J

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gene expression is regulated by an enhancer region composed of multiple potential cis-acting regulatory sites. Here, we describe binding sites for the transcription factor AP-2 in the HIV-1 long terminal repeat which modulate HIV enhancer function. One site is embedded within the two previously described kappa B elements, and a second site is detected further downstream. DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments demonstrated that AP-2 binds to the site between the kappa B elements. Interestingly, AP-2 and NF-kappa B bind to this region in a mutually exclusive manner. Mutations which disrupt this AP-2-binding site lower basal levels of transcription but do not affect NF-kappa B-mediated induction by tumor necrosis factor alpha in Jurkat T leukemia cells. Images PMID:8084021

  8. Widespread geographic distribution of oral Candida dubliniensis strains in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, D; Haynes, K; Bille, J; Boerlin, P; Rodero, L; Lloyd, S; Henman, M; Coleman, D

    1997-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a recently identified chlamydospore-positive yeast species associated with oral candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (HIV+) patients and is closely related to Candida albicans. Several recent reports have described atypical oral Candida isolates with phenotypic and genetic properties similar to those of C. dubliniensis. In this study 10 atypical chlamydospore-positive oral isolates from HIV+ patients in Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and Argentina and 1 isolate from an HIV-negative Irish subject were compared to reference strains of C. albicans and Candida stellatoidea and reference strains of C. dubliniensis recovered from Irish and Australian HIV+ individuals. All 11 isolates were phenotypically and genetically similar to and phylogenetically identical to C. dubliniensis. These findings demonstrate that the geographical distribution of C. dubliniensis is widespread, and it is likely that it is a significant constituent of the normal oral flora with the potential to cause oral candidiasis, particularly in immunocompromised patients. PMID:9157162

  9. Modeling the human 8p11-myeloproliferative syndrome in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Agerstam, Helena; Järås, Marcus; Andersson, Anna; Johnels, Petra; Hansen, Nils; Lassen, Carin; Rissler, Marianne; Gisselsson, David; Olofsson, Tor; Richter, Johan; Fan, Xiaolong; Ehinger, Mats; Fioretos, Thoas

    2010-09-23

    The 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome (EMS), also referred to as stem cell leukemia/lymphoma, is a chronic myeloproliferative disorder that rapidly progresses into acute leukemia. Molecularly, EMS is characterized by fusion of various partner genes to the FGFR1 gene, resulting in constitutive activation of the tyrosine kinases in FGFR1. To date, no previous study has addressed the functional consequences of ectopic FGFR1 expression in the potentially most relevant cellular context, that of normal primary human hematopoietic cells. Herein, we report that expression of ZMYM2/FGFR1 (previously known as ZNF198/FGFR1) or BCR/FGFR1 in normal human CD34(+) cells from umbilical-cord blood leads to increased cellular proliferation and differentiation toward the erythroid lineage in vitro. In immunodeficient mice, expression of ZMYM2/FGFR1 or BCR/FGFR1 in human cells induces several features of human EMS, including expansion of several myeloid cell lineages and accumulation of blasts in bone marrow. Moreover, bone marrow fibrosis together with increased extramedullary hematopoiesis is observed. This study suggests that FGFR1 fusion oncogenes, by themselves, are capable of initiating an EMS-like disorder, and provides the first humanized model of a myeloproliferative disorder transforming into acute leukemia in mice. The established in vivo EMS model should provide a valuable tool for future studies of this disorder. PMID:20554971

  10. High Prevalence of Liver Fibrosis in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Monoinfection and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Hepatitis-B Co-infection as Assessed by Shear Wave Elastography: Study at a Teaching Hospital in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Gitau, Samuel Nguku; Vinayak, Sudhir; Silaba, Micah; Adam, Rodney; Shah, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of liver fibrosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) monoinfection versus those with HIV hepatitis-B virus (HBV) co-infection as assessed with shear wave elastography (SWE) in a tertiary sub-Saharan Africa hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 105 consecutive patients, 70 with HIV monoinfection and 35 with HIV-HBV co-infection, had liver elastography obtained using SWE to assess for the presence of liver fibrosis the cutoff of which was 5.6 kPa. Assessment of aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) score (a noninvasive serum biomarker of liver fibrosis) in these patients was also done. Results: The prevalence of liver fibrosis was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in patients with HIV-HBV co-infection, 25.7%, compared to those with HIV monoinfection, 7.1%. APRI score was greater in patients with HIV-HBV co-infection than those with HIV monoinfection. HIV co-infection with HBV accelerates progression to liver fibrosis. Association of a low cluster of differentiation 4 (CD-4) count with advanced fibrosis supports earlier starting of antiretroviral therapy to prevent rapid progression of liver disease in HIV-positive patients. Conclusion: In view of the high prevalence of liver fibrosis in patients with HIV-HBV co-infection, regular monitoring of the disease progression is recommended. PMID:27403400

  11. Relationships over 1 year between lymphocyte subsets and psychosocial variables among adults with infection by human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Perry, S; Fishman, B; Jacobsberg, L; Frances, A

    1992-05-01

    To examine relationships between immune and psychosocial variables among adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1, 221 subjects without acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were assessed for degree of depression, anxiety, psychiatric symptoms, social support, stressful life events, hardiness, hopelessness, bereavement, and intrusive and avoidant thoughts about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. At entry, none of 22 psychosocial variables significantly correlated with lymphocyte subsets. Among subjects seen 6 and 12 months later, severity of physical symptoms was associated with greater emotional distress, but the CD4 cell count was predicted by neither clinical ratings of psychopathology and global functioning nor by standardized self-report measures of constructs used in psychoimmune research. We conclude that among our sample, physical symptoms contributed to emotional distress, but emotional distress did not contribute to the CD4 cell count, a marker of disease progression. PMID:1586275

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 expression in the central nervous system correlates directly with extent of disease

    SciTech Connect

    Weiser, B.; La Neve, D.; Eilbott, D.J.; Burger, H.; Seidman, R. ); Peress, N. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Northport, NY )

    1990-05-01

    To investigate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis in infected individuals and examine the correlation of HIV-1 expression with extent of clinical and pathologic disease, the authors studied spinal cords from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with a wide range of spinal cord pathology. By performing in situ hybridization with HIV-1-specific riboprobes, they detected HIV-1 RNA in all 10 cords from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with a common, characteristic pathologic entity called vacuolar myelopathy but not in 10 control cords from HIV-1-infected and uninfected patients. In the cords from individuals with vacuolar myelopathy, the level of HIV-1 RNA expression correlated directly with extent of spinal cord pathology and clinical findings. These data support a role for HIV-1 int he pathogenesis of tissue damage and related clinical disease in infected individuals.

  13. Efficiency of Cell-Free and Cell-Associated Virus in Mucosal Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hulot, Sandrine L.; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Gombos, Randi B.; Zheng, Yi; Owuor, Joshua; Lifton, Michelle A.; Ayeni, Christian; Najarian, Robert M.; Yeh, Wendy W.; Asmal, Mohammed; Zamir, Gideon; Letvin, Norman L.

    2013-01-01

    Effective strategies are needed to block mucosal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we address a crucial question in HIV-1 pathogenesis: whether infected donor mononuclear cells or cell-free virus plays the more important role in initiating mucosal infection by HIV-1. This distinction is critical, as effective strategies for blocking cell-free and cell-associated virus transmission may be different. We describe a novel ex vivo model system that utilizes sealed human colonic mucosa explants and demonstrate in both the ex vivo model and in vivo using the rectal challenge model in rhesus monkeys that HIV-1-infected lymphocytes can transmit infection across the mucosa more efficiently than cell-free virus. These findings may have significant implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of mucosal transmission of HIV-1 and for the development of strategies to prevent HIV-1 transmission. PMID:24109227

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus-negative plasmablastic lymphoma: a comprehensive analysis of 114 cases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Liu, Bailong; Liu, Bin; Wang, Qiang; Ding, Lijuan; Xia, Chengcheng; Dong, Lihua

    2015-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-negative plasma-blastic lymphoma (PBL) is an extremely rare entity. Its clinicopathological features, optimal treatment strategy and prognostic factors remain obsure. An extensive search was performed in the English language literature within the Pubmed database using the key words: 'plasmablastic lymphoma and human immunodeficiency virus-negative or immunocompetent'. Data from 114 patients from 52 articles were analyzed. The mean patient age at diagnosis was 58.90 years (range, 2-86). HIV-negative PBL showed a predilection for elderly individuals (patients older than 60 years, 56.14%) and affected more males than females (M:F, 2.29:1). Ann Arbor stage IV patients accounted for 39.22% while bone marrow involvement was less frequent (12.79%). The Ki-67 index was high with a mean expression of 83%. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection was common being positive in 58.70% of the patients while herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) infection was rare being positive in only 7.55% of the patients. Immunosuppression was noted in 28.16% of patients. The median overall survival (OS) was 19 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 52.3 and 45.3%, respectively. Age, gender and primary site showed no strong relationship with OS while Immunosuppression, Ann Arbor stage IV and EBV negativity were able to predict a poorer OS. Either complete remission (CR) or partial remission (PR) was superior to the refractory group in OS (P<0.0001 and P=0.0066, respectively). For stage Ⅰ patients, the application of radiotherapy did not improve the OS. In conclusion, HIV-negative PBL is a distinct entity likely occurring in elderly and immunosuppressed individuals. Immunosuppression status, Ann Arbor stage IV, EBV negativity and refractory to treatment are poor prognostic factors of OS in HIV-negative PBL. PMID:25695332

  15. The Effect of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention and Reproductive Health Text Messages on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing Among Young Women in Rural Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Njuguna, Njambi; Ngure, Kenneth; Mugo, Nelly; Sambu, Carrole; Sianyo, Christopher; Gakuo, Stephen; Irungu, Elizabeth; Baeten, Jared; Heffron, Renee

    2016-01-01

    Background More than half of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individuals in Kenya are unaware of their status, and young women carry a disproportionate burden of incident HIV infections. We sought to determine the effect of an SMS intervention on uptake of HIV testing among female Kenyan college students. Methods We conducted a quasi-experimental study to increase HIV testing among women 18 to 24 years old. Four midlevel training colleges in Central Kenya were allocated to have their study participants receive either weekly SMS on HIV and reproductive health topics or no SMS. Monthly 9-question SMS surveys were sent to all participants for 6 months to collect data on HIV testing, sexual behavior, and HIV risk perception. We used multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression to detect differences in the time to the first HIV test reported by women during the study period. Results We enrolled 600 women between September 2013 and March 2014 of whom 300 received weekly SMS and monthly surveys and 300 received only monthly surveys. On average, women were 21 years of age (interquartile range, 20–22), 71.50% had ever had sex and 72.62% had never tested for HIV. A total of 356 women reported testing for HIV within the 6 months of follow-up: 67% from the intervention arm and 51% from the control arm (hazard ratio, 1.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.28–1.92). Conclusions Use of weekly text messages about HIV prevention and reproductive health significantly increased rates of HIV testing among young Kenyan women and would be feasible to implement widely among school populations. PMID:27200519

  16. Tightly bound zinc in human immunodeficiency virus type 1, human T-cell leukemia virus type I, and other retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Bess, J W; Powell, P J; Issaq, H J; Schumack, L J; Grimes, M K; Henderson, L E; Arthur, L O

    1992-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) were purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation in the presence of 1 mM EDTA. Pelleted gradient fractions were analyzed for total protein, total Gag capsid protein, and total zinc. Zinc was found to copurify and concentrate with the virus particles. Through successive cycles of resuspending in buffer containing EDTA and repelleting, the zinc content remained constant at about 1.7 mol of zinc per mol of Gag protein. Proteins from purified virus (HIV-1 and HTLV-I) were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, blotted to polyvinylidene fluoride paper, and probed with 65ZnCl2. Viral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins (HIV-1 p7NC and HTLV-I p15NC) bound 65Zn2+. Other retroviruses, including simian immunodeficiency virus, equine infectious anemia virus, bovine leukemia virus, Moloney murine leukemia virus, mouse mammary tumor virus, and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, were found to contain amounts of zinc per milligram of total protein similar to those found in HIV-1 and HTLV-I. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that retroviral NC proteins function as zinc finger proteins in mature viruses. Images PMID:1731111

  17. Key role of human leukocyte antigen in modulating human immunodeficiency virus progression: An overview of the possible applications.

    PubMed

    Grifoni, Alba; Montesano, Carla; Colizzi, Vittorio; Amicosante, Massimo

    2015-05-12

    Host and viral factors deeply influence the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression. Among them human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus plays a key role at different levels. In fact, genes of the HLA locus have shown the peculiar capability to modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses. In particular, HLA class I molecules are recognized by CD8(+) T-cells and natural killers (NK) cells towards the interaction with T cell receptor (TCR) and Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) 3DL1 respectively. Polymorphisms within the different HLA alleles generate structural changes in HLA class I peptide-binding pockets. Amino acid changes in the peptide-binding pocket lead to the presentation of a different set of peptides to T and NK cells. This review summarizes the role of HLA in HIV progression toward acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome and its receptors. Recently, many studies have been focused on determining the HLA binding-peptides. The novel use of immune-informatics tools, from the prediction of the HLA-bound peptides to the modification of the HLA-receptor complexes, is considered. A better knowledge of HLA peptide presentation and recognition are allowing new strategies for immune response manipulation to be applied against HIV virus. PMID:25964877

  18. A Simple Mouse Model for the Study of Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Chang; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Kyung-Chang; Park, Ki Hoon; Lee, Hee Jung; Cho, Young Keol; Kim, Sang Il; Kim, Sung Soon; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2016-02-01

    Humanized mouse models derived from immune-deficient mice have been the primary tool for studies of human infectious viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, the current protocol for constructing humanized mice requires elaborate procedures and complicated techniques, limiting the supply of such mice for viral studies. Here, we report a convenient method for constructing a simple HIV-1 mouse model. Without prior irradiation, NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ-null (NSG) mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1 × 10(7) adult human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hu-PBMCs). Four weeks after PBMC inoculation, human CD45(+) cells, and CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells were detected in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver, whereas human CD19(+) cells were observed in lymph nodes and spleen. To examine the usefulness of hu-PBMC-inoculated NSG (hu-PBMC-NSG) mice as an HIV-1 infection model, we intravenously injected these mice with dual-tropic HIV-1DH12 and X4-tropic HIV-1NL4-3 strains. HIV-1-infected hu-PBMC-NSG mice showed significantly lower human CD4(+) T cell counts and high HIV viral loads in the peripheral blood compared with noninfected hu-PBMC-NSG mice. Following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and neutralizing antibody treatment, HIV-1 replication was significantly suppressed in HIV-1-infected hu-PBMC-NSG mice without detectable viremia or CD4(+) T cell depletion. Moreover, the numbers of human T cells were maintained in hu-PBMC-NSG mice for at least 10 weeks. Taken together, our results suggest that hu-PBMC-NSG mice may serve as a relevant HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis model that could facilitate in vivo studies of HIV-1 infection and candidate HIV-1 protective drugs. PMID:26564392

  19. The development of a novel immunotherapy model of human ovarian cancer in human PBL-severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, W; Gallagher, G

    1995-01-01

    The reported ability of SCID mice to accept xenografts of both human tumors and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) provides the potential for the development of novel immunotherapy models in these animals. This study describes the development of a novel small animal model of human ovarian cancer. This was achieved by engrafting a human ovarian cancer cell line (Ovan-4) into the peritoneal cavity of immunodeficient SCID and immune reconstituted human PBL-SCID mice. When transplanted to SCID mice this cell line exhibited growth characteristics similar to the clinical disease observed in patients with implantation of metastatic nodules onto the interior surface of the peritoneal wall. Reconstituted human PBL-SCID mice challenged with identical numbers of Ovan-4 cells exhibited a significant increase in survival time, suggesting a role for cells of the human immune system in preventing the development of this type of malignancy in vivo. Furthermore, vaccination of human PBL-SCID mice against Ovan-4 produced tumour-specific human antibodies in the serum of these animals. Animals reconstituted with CD8-depleted PBL exhibited increased serum immunoglobulin levels and produced enhanced anti-Ovan-4 activity after vaccination. Subsequent challenge of these animals with Ovan-4 revealed a further increase in survival time. These results suggest that human antibodies may have a role in immunity against ovarian cancer and could be of therapeutic value in this type of disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7664496

  20. Modulation by Morphine of Viral Set Point in Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus and Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Torres, Cynthia; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Rodriguez, Idia; Martinez, Melween; Staprans, Silvija; Donahoe, Robert M.; Kraiselburd, Edmundo; Stephens, Edward B.; Kumar, Anil

    2004-01-01

    Six rhesus macaques were adapted to morphine dependence by injecting three doses of morphine (5 mg/kg of body weight) for a total of 20 weeks. These animals along with six control macaques were infected intravenously with mixture of simian-human immunodeficiency virus KU-1B (SHIVKU-1B), SHIV89.6P, and simian immunodeficiency virus 17E-Fr. Levels of circulating CD4+ T cells and viral loads in the plasma and the cerebrospinal fluid were monitored in these macaques for a period of 12 weeks. Both morphine and control groups showed precipitous loss of CD4+ T cells. However this loss was more prominent in the morphine group at week 2 (P = 0.04). Again both morphine and control groups showed comparable peak plasma viral load at week 2, but the viral set points were higher in the morphine group than that in the control group. Likewise, the extent of virus replication in the cerebral compartment was more pronounced in the morphine group. These results provide a definitive evidence for a positive correlation between morphine and levels of viral replication. PMID:15452267

  1. Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and Cancer: Proceedings of the 8th Annual Texas Conference on Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Rajendiran, Smrithi; Kashyap, Meghana V.; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2013-01-01

    The Texas Center for Health Disparities, a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Center of Excellence, presents an annual conference to discuss prevention, awareness education and ongoing research about health disparities both in Texas and among the national population. The 2013 Texas Conference on Health Disparities brought together experts, in research, patient care and community outreach, on the “Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and Cancer”. Smoking, HIV/AIDS and cancer are three individual areas of public health concern, each with its own set of disparities and risk factors based on race, ethnicity, gender, geography and socio-economic status. Disparities among patient populations, in which these issues are found to be comorbid, provide valuable information on goals for patient care. The conference consisted of three sessions addressing “Comorbidities and Treatment”, “Public Health Perspectives”, and “Best Practices”. This article summarizes the basic science, clinical correlates and public health data presented by the speakers. PMID:24227993

  2. Efavirenz Therapy in Rhesus Macaques Infected with a Chimera of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing Reverse Transcriptase from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hofman, Michael J.; Higgins, Joanne; Matthews, Timothy B.; Pedersen, Niels C.; Tan, Chalet; Schinazi, Raymond F.; North, Thomas W.

    2004-01-01

    The specificity of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) for the RT of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has prevented the use of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in the study of NNRTIs and NNRTI-based highly active antiretroviral therapy. However, a SIV-HIV-1 chimera (RT-SHIV), in which the RT from SIVmac239 was replaced with the RT-encoding region from HIV-1, is susceptible to NNRTIs and is infectious to rhesus macaques. We have evaluated the antiviral activity of efavirenz against RT-SHIV and the emergence of efavirenz-resistant mutants in vitro and in vivo. RT-SHIV was susceptible to efavirenz with a mean effective concentration of 5.9 ± 4.5 nM, and RT-SHIV variants selected with efavirenz in cell culture displayed 600-fold-reduced susceptibility. The efavirenz-resistant mutants of RT-SHIV had mutations in RT similar to those of HIV-1 variants that were selected under similar conditions. Efavirenz monotherapy of RT-SHIV-infected macaques produced a 1.82-log-unit decrease in plasma viral-RNA levels after 1 week. The virus load rebounded within 3 weeks in one treated animal and more slowly in a second animal. Virus isolated from these two animals contained the K103N and Y188C or Y188L mutations. The RT-SHIV-rhesus macaque model may prove useful for studies of antiretroviral drug combinations that include efavirenz. PMID:15328115

  3. Consensus on context-specific strategies for reducing the stigma of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Zambézia Province, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Mukolo, Abraham; Torres, Isabel; Bechtel, Ruth M.; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo E.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma has been implicated in poor outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) care. Reducing stigma is important for HIV prevention and long-term treatment success. Although stigma reduction interventions are conducted in Mozambique, little is known about the current nature of stigma and the efficacy and effectiveness of stigma reduction initiatives. We describe action research to generate consensus on critical characteristics of HIV stigma and anti-stigma interventions in Zambézia Province, Mozambique. Qualitative data gathering methods, including indepth key-informant interviews, community interviews and consensus group sessions, were utilized. Delphi methods and the strategic options development analysis technique were used to synthesize qualitative data. Key findings are that stigma enacted by the general public might be declining in tandem with the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Mozambique, but there is likely excessive residual fear of HIV disease and community attitudes that sustain high levels of perceived stigma. HIV-positive women accessing maternal and child health services appear to shoulder a disproportionate burden of stigma. Unintentional biases among healthcare providers are currently the critical frontier of stigmatization, but there are few interventions designed to address them. Culturally sensitive psychotherapies are needed to address psychological distress associated with internalized stigma and these interventions should complement current supports for voluntary counseling and testing. While advantageous for defining stakeholder priorities for stigma reduction efforts, confirmatory quantitative studies of these consensus positions are needed before the launch of specific interventions. PMID:24527744

  4. Behaviors Influencing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission in the Context of Positive Prevention among People Living with HIV/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Radfar, Seyed Ramin; Sedaghat, Abbas; Banihashemi, Arash Tehrani; Gouya, Mohammadmehdi; Rawson, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Identifying factors, which influence health behaviors is critical to designing appropriate and effective preventive programs. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission is highly related to people behaviors and understanding factors influencing healthy behaviors among Iranian people living with HIVs (PLHIVs)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is very important to tailor an effective response to HIV/AIDS epidemic. Methods: This study was conducted as a qualitative study by methods of focus group discussion and in-depth interview in six provinces of Iran with 64 PLHIVs to determine factors influence engagement in positive prevention. Results: Knowledge and education, feelings of responsibility and positive prevention practices were identified as the primary domains of engagement. These domains were found to be influenced by feelings of ostracism and frustration, poverty, barriers to disclosure of HIV status, access to and utilization of drug abuse treatment services and antiretroviral therapy, adherence to treatment, age, religiousness, sex work, singleness, and incarceration. Conclusions: Designing new interventions and updating current interventions directed toward the aforementioned factors should be addressed by responsible Iranian authorities in order to have a national effective response on the HIV/AIDS epidemic. PMID:25489445

  5. Growth characteristics and metastatic properties of human breast cancer xenografts in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Visonneau, S.; Cesano, A.; Torosian, M. H.; Miller, E. J.; Santoli, D.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the growth and metastatic potential of two human breast cancer cell lines and 16 patient-derived biopsy specimens, representing the most common histological types of breast carcinomas, upon subcutaneous implantation into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. The method of engraftment we used, based on implantation of intact tissue specimens and complete immunosuppression of the host, provided an easier system to grow human breast carcinoma specimens in mouse models and resulted in a 50% success rate of tumor take. No correlation was found between growth in SCID mice and pathological diagnosis, grading, or estrogen/progesterone receptor expression by the tumor biopsy specimen. Serial passage of the tumor fragments in SCID mice resulted in increased metastasis rates and more rapid emergence of a palpable tumor mass. A tumor from a patient with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, which grew aggressively and metastasized in 100% of the female SCID mice, was also successfully engrafted in 100% of nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID female mice, but systemic spread was minimal. Fragments of the same tumor grew in only 33% of male SCID mice with very limited metastases. A strong correlation (r = 0.997) was observed between tumor burden and the presence of soluble (serum) interleukin-2 receptor, a marker associated with a subset of human breast tumors. All together, these data indicate the usefulness of SCID/human breast tumor xenografts for measuring tumor progression and evaluating novel therapeutic approaches to breast cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:9588898

  6. Frequency of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Among Students of Tertiary and Secondary Institutions in An Endemic State

    PubMed Central

    Abubakar, Abdulazeez

    2012-01-01

    Background: Students are pivotal to manpower development and technological advancement of any nation. Nigerian nation was recently ranked third human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) most endemic nation in the world Aim: The study was designed to determine the frequency of HIV infection among Nigerian tertiary and secondary institution students. Materials and Methods: A HIV screening test was conducted on 1,978 apparently healthy students composed of 981 males and 997 females aged 11–35 years, randomly selected from some Nigerian tertiary and secondary institutions Results: Overall, the sero-prevalence rate of 13.7% was recorded consisting 9.9% in the tertiary and 3.8% in secondary institutions. The distribution of the infection showed no significant difference by age (χ2=1.07, P>0.05) and by gender (χ2=0.85, P>0.05). Also, the prevalence had no significant association with the settlement of students (χ2=0.96, P>0.05) and the status of educational institutions (χ2=1.42, P>0.05). Conclusion: The findings indicate a high HIV prevalence rate among students in this part of the globe. General behavioral changes about sex among the students are suggested. PMID:22536559

  7. Discordance at human leukocyte antigen-DRB3 and protection from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Hader, Shannon L; Hodge, Thomas W; Buchacz, Kate A; Bray, Robert A; Padian, Nancy S; Rausa, Alfio; Slaviniski, Sally A; Holmberg, Scott D

    2002-06-15

    Host human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) integrated into the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 envelope could theoretically determine, as in tissue transplants, whether HIV-1 is "rejected" by exposed susceptible persons, preventing transmission. HLA discordance (mismatch) was examined among 45 heterosexual partner pairs in which at least 1 partner was HIV-1 infected and exposure or transmission between partners had occurred. Immunologic discordance at class II HLA-DRB3 (present in the HIV donor partner but absent in the recipient partner) was associated with lack of transmission of HIV-1. Eight (35%) of 23 partner pairs in which HIV-1 transmission did not occur were immunologically discordant at HLA-DRB3, compared with 0 of 11 partner pairs in which HIV-1 transmission did occur (P=.027). Further investigation of the roles of class II HLAs in HIV-1 transmission and as possible components of HIV-1 vaccines should be pursued. PMID:12085318

  8. The relationship between personality traits and AIDS in patients with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Bahman; Zarinfar, Nader; Noori, Hasan

    2016-06-01

    This study carried out to survey the relationship between personality traits and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus. This case-control study was conducted on 79 AIDS patients of Triangle Clinic in Arak (case group) and 80 healthy people of Valiasr Hospital in Arak (control group). Demographic information checklist and Cloninger' Temperament and Character inventory (TCI) were two instruments applied in the study. SPSS software V.19 and tests independent t-tests, Chi squared and Spearman correlation coefficient were used for data analysis with significant level of <0.05. The average of innovativeness variables (M:74.12), harm avoidance (M: 65.17), reward dependence (M:50.030), and self-directedness (M:35.02) in case group in comparison with control group was significantly higher, and there was a significant difference between two groups variables (P-0.000). The novelty seeking had the highest average in the AIDS patients with a history of addiction (M:74.00), and there was statistically significant difference between perseverance variable (P-0.021) and cooperativeness variable (P-0.041) in the two groups of AIDS patients. There was a significant relationship between novelty seeking and age at the onset of AIDS (P-0.038), harm avoidance and age at the onset of addiction (P-0.046), persistence and age at the onset of AIDS (P-0.035) and the time infected with HIV (P-0.033). It is found that two groups are different due to the personalities, so it is essential to consider the personality traits in order to prevent AIDS and also successfully treat patients suffering from AIDS. PMID:27208456

  9. Factors associated with prevalent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chmiel, J S; Detels, R; Kaslow, R A; Van Raden, M; Kingsley, L A; Brookmeyer, R

    1987-10-01

    Interviews regarding medical history, life-style, specific drug taking and sexual activities, and physical examinations were administered to 4,955 homosexual men who volunteered for the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study in Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Pittsburgh. Overall, the prevalence of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in these men was 38.0%. The factor most strongly associated with prevalent HIV infection according to a multiple logistic regression model was rectal trauma, a composite variable which included receptive anal fisting, enemas before sex, reporting of blood around the rectum, and the observation of scarring, fissures or fistulas on rectal examination. Receptive anal intercourse also was strongly associated with HIV infection in the model. The multivariate relative odds for HIV antibody positivity was 7.72 for the highest level of rectal trauma and 3.04 for receptive anal intercourse. Symptoms reported to occur in some persons who subsequently develop acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were frequent among HIV seropositive men (12.9%) but were reported in 8.4% of seronegative men as well. Generalized lymphadenopathy was observed significantly more often in seropositive men (48.8%) compared with seronegative men (11.4%). The prevalence of HIV antibodies was inversely related to the number of T-helper cells and directly related (to a lesser extent) to the number of T-suppressor cells. The results suggest that disruption of the rectal mucosa provides access by HIV to the blood stream and to specific immunologic cells. Since symptoms and generalized lymphadenopathy were often reported among seronegative men, they probably also occur among some seropositive men not currently progressing to AIDS. PMID:3651095

  10. Antiviral properties of aminodiol inhibitors against human immunodeficiency virus and protease.

    PubMed Central

    Bechtold, C M; Patick, A K; Alam, M; Greytok, J; Tino, J A; Chen, P; Gordon, E; Ahmad, S; Barrish, J C; Zahler, R

    1995-01-01

    A series of aminodiol inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease were identified by using an in vitro peptide cleavage assay. BMS 182,193, BMS 186,318, and BMS 187,071 protected cells against HIV-1, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus infections, with 50% effective doses ranging from 0.05 to 0.33 microM, while having no inhibitory effect on cells infected with unrelated viruses. These compounds were also effective in inhibiting p24 production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with HIV-1 IIIB and against the zidovudine-resistant HIV-1 strain A018C. Time-of-addition studies indicated that BMS 182,193 could be added as late as 27 h after infection and still retain its antiviral activity. To directly show that the activity of these compounds in culture was due to inhibition of proteolytic cleavage, the levels of HIV-1 gag processing in chronically infected cells were monitored by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. All compounds blocked the processing of p55 in a dose-dependent manner, with 50% effective doses of 0.4 to 2.4 microM. To examine the reversibility of BMS 186,318, chronically infected CEM-SS cells were treated with drug and virions purified from the culture medium. Incubation of HIV-1 particles in drug-free medium indicated that inhibition of p55 proteolysis was slowly reversible. The potent inhibition of HIV-1 during both acute and chronic infections indicates that these aminodiol compounds are effective anti-HIV-1 compounds. PMID:7726501

  11. Human HOIP and LUBAC deficiency underlies autoinflammation, immunodeficiency, amylopectinosis, and lymphangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Dobbs, Kerry; Cobat, Aurélie; Tarantino, Nadine; Hazen, Melissa; Lidov, Hart G W; Hopkins, Gregory; Du, Likun; Belkadi, Aziz; Chrabieh, Maya; Itan, Yuval; Picard, Capucine; Fournet, Jean-Christophe; Eibel, Hermann; Tsitsikov, Erdyni; Pai, Sung-Yun; Abel, Laurent; Al-Herz, Waleed; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Israel, Alain; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2015-06-01

    Inherited, complete deficiency of human HOIL-1, a component of the linear ubiquitination chain assembly complex (LUBAC), underlies autoinflammation, infections, and amylopectinosis. We report the clinical description and molecular analysis of a novel inherited disorder of the human LUBAC complex. A patient with multiorgan autoinflammation, combined immunodeficiency, subclinical amylopectinosis, and systemic lymphangiectasia, is homozygous for a mutation in HOIP, the gene encoding the catalytic component of LUBAC. The missense allele (L72P, in the PUB domain) is at least severely hypomorphic, as it impairs HOIP expression and destabilizes the whole LUBAC complex. Linear ubiquitination and NF-κB activation are impaired in the patient's fibroblasts stimulated by IL-1β or TNF. In contrast, the patient's monocytes respond to IL-1β more vigorously than control monocytes. However, the activation and differentiation of the patient's B cells are impaired in response to CD40 engagement. These cellular and clinical phenotypes largely overlap those of HOIL-1-deficient patients. Clinical differences between HOIL-1- and HOIP-mutated patients may result from differences between the mutations, the loci, or other factors. Our findings show that human HOIP is essential for the assembly and function of LUBAC and for various processes governing inflammation and immunity in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26008899

  12. Human HOIP and LUBAC deficiency underlies autoinflammation, immunodeficiency, amylopectinosis, and lymphangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Dobbs, Kerry; Cobat, Aurélie; Tarantino, Nadine; Hazen, Melissa; Lidov, Hart G.W.; Hopkins, Gregory; Du, Likun; Belkadi, Aziz; Chrabieh, Maya; Itan, Yuval; Picard, Capucine; Fournet, Jean-Christophe; Eibel, Hermann; Tsitsikov, Erdyni; Pai, Sung-Yun; Abel, Laurent; Al-Herz, Waleed; Israel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Inherited, complete deficiency of human HOIL-1, a component of the linear ubiquitination chain assembly complex (LUBAC), underlies autoinflammation, infections, and amylopectinosis. We report the clinical description and molecular analysis of a novel inherited disorder of the human LUBAC complex. A patient with multiorgan autoinflammation, combined immunodeficiency, subclinical amylopectinosis, and systemic lymphangiectasia, is homozygous for a mutation in HOIP, the gene encoding the catalytic component of LUBAC. The missense allele (L72P, in the PUB domain) is at least severely hypomorphic, as it impairs HOIP expression and destabilizes the whole LUBAC complex. Linear ubiquitination and NF-κB activation are impaired in the patient’s fibroblasts stimulated by IL-1β or TNF. In contrast, the patient’s monocytes respond to IL-1β more vigorously than control monocytes. However, the activation and differentiation of the patient’s B cells are impaired in response to CD40 engagement. These cellular and clinical phenotypes largely overlap those of HOIL-1-deficient patients. Clinical differences between HOIL-1- and HOIP-mutated patients may result from differences between the mutations, the loci, or other factors. Our findings show that human HOIP is essential for the assembly and function of LUBAC and for various processes governing inflammation and immunity in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26008899

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein (gp120) induction of monocyte arachidonic acid metabolites and interleukin 1.

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, L M; Corcoran, M L; Pyle, S W; Arthur, L O; Harel-Bellan, A; Farrar, W L

    1989-01-01

    This study reports on the direct effect of the envelope glycoprotein (gp120) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on human monocyte function. Addition of preparations of purified gp120 from the HIV-1 to human monocytes resulted in the production of interleukin 1 (IL-1) and arachidonic acid metabolites from the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. Quantification of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and IL-1 revealed an increase in both mediators with 50 ng of gp120 per ml and an increase of 12- and 30- to 40-fold with 200-400 ng of gp120 per ml, respectively. Unlike native gp120, the recombinant nonglycosylated gp120 fragments PB1-RF and PB1-IIIB, as well as one of the core structural proteins of HIV-1, p24, did not increase arachidonic acid metabolism or IL-1 activity. Cytofluorometric analysis revealed that gp120 blocked the binding of OKT4A to the CD4 on monocytes, whereas OKT4 binding was unaffected. Involvement of the CD4 in signal transduction was further demonstrated by the ability of OKT4 and OKT4A monoclonal antibodies to increase monocyte PGE2, IL-1 activity, and nanogram amounts of IL-1 beta. PMID:2536171

  14. Pin1 liberates the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1): Must we stop it?

    PubMed

    Hou, Hai; Wang, Jing-Zhang; Liu, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Ting

    2015-07-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is mainly caused by the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). To our knowledge, this is the first review focusing on the vital role of Pin1 in the infection of HIV-1 and the development of AIDS. We and others have demonstrated that Pin1, the only known cis-to-trans isomerase recognizing the pThr/pSer-Pro motifs in proteins, plays striking roles in several human diseases. Interestingly, recent evidence gradually indicates that Pin1 regulates several key steps of the life cycle of HIV-1, including the uncoating of the HIV-1 core, the reverse transcription of the RNA genome of HIV-1, and the integration of the HIV-1 cDNA into human chromosomes. Whereas inhibiting Pin1 suppresses all of these key steps and attenuates the replication of HIV-1, at the same time different PIN1 gene variants are correlated with the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, Pin1 potentially promotes HIV-1 infection by activating multiple oncogenes and inactivating multiple tumor suppressors, extending the life span of HIV-infected cells. These descriptions suggest Pin1 as a promising therapeutic target for the prevention of HIV-1 and highlight the possibility of blocking the development of AIDS by Pin1 inhibitors. PMID:25913034

  15. Seroprevalence of the Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and Human Immunodeficiency Viruses and Treponema pallidum at the Beijing General Hospital from 2010 to 2014: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaoxia; Wang, Qiaofeng; Zhang, Weihong; Qiu, Zhifeng; Cui, Jingtao; Yan, Wenjuan; Ni, Anping

    2015-01-01

    Background The hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency viruses and Treponema pallidum are important causes of infectious diseases concern to public health. Methods Between 2010 and 2014, we used an automated chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay to detect the hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency viruses as well as Treponema pallidum (the rapid plasma regain test was used in 2010–2011). Positive human immunodeficiency virus tests were confirmed via western blotting. Results Among 416,130 subjects, the seroprevalences for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and Treponema pallidum were 5.72%, 1.23%, 0.196%, and 0.76%, respectively. Among 671 patients with positive human immunodeficiency virus results, 392 cases were confirmed via western blotting. Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent in men (7.78% and 0.26%, respectively) than in women (4.45% and 0.021%, respectively). The hepatitis B and C virus seroprevalences decreased from 6.21% and 1.58%, respectively, in 2010, to 5.37% and 0.988%, respectively, in 2014. The human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence increased from 0.04% in 2010 to 0.17% in 2014, and was elevated in the Infectious Disease (2.65%), Emergency (1.71%), and Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (1.12%) departments. The specificity of the human immunodeficiency virus screening was 71.4%. The false positive rates for the Treponema pallidum screening tests increased in patients who were 60–70 years old. The co-infection rates for the hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viruses were 0.47% in hepatitis C virus-positive patients and 7.33% in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients. Conclusions During 2010–2014, hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent among men at our institution. Although the seroprevalences of hepatitis B and C viruses decreased, the seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency

  16. Persistent infection of chimpanzees with human immunodeficiency virus: serological responses and properties of reisolated viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Nara, P L; Robey, W G; Arthur, L O; Asher, D M; Wolff, A V; Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C; Fischinger, P J

    1987-01-01

    Persistent infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in the chimpanzee may be valuable for immunopathologic and potential vaccine evaluation. Two HIV strains, the tissue culture-derived human T-cell lymphotropic virus type IIIB (HTLV-IIIB) and in vivo serially passaged lymphadenopathy-associated virus type 1 (LAV-1), were injected intravenously into chimpanzees. Two animals received HTLV-IIIB as either virus-infected H9 cells or cell-free virus. A third animal received chimpanzee-passaged LAV-1. Evaluation of their sera for virus-specific serologic changes, including neutralizations, was done during a 2-year period. During this period all animals had persistently high titers of antibodies to viral core and envelope antigens. All three animals developed a progressively increasing type-specific neutralizing LAV-1 versus HTLV-IIIB antibody titer during the 2-year observation period which broadened in specificity to include HTLV-HIRF, HTLV-IIIMN, and HTLV-IIICC after 6 to 12 months. The antibody titers against both viruses were still increasing by 2 years after experimental virus inoculation. Sera from all animals were capable of neutralizing both homologously and heterologously reisolated virus from chimpanzees. A slightly more rapid type-specific neutralizing response was noted for the animal receiving HTLV-IIIB-infected cells compared with that for cell-free HTLV-IIIB. Sera from all persistently infected chimpanzees were capable of mediating group-specific antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytolysis of HIV-infected cells derived from all isolates tested. Viruses reisolated from all three animals at 20 months after inoculation revealed very similar peptide maps of their respective envelope gp120s, as determined by two-dimensional chymotrypsin oligopeptide analysis. One peptide, however, from the original HTLV-IIIB-inoculated virus was deleted in viruses from all three animals, and in addition, we noted the appearance of a new or modified peptide which

  17. Persistent infection of chimpanzees with human immunodeficiency virus: serological responses and properties of reisolated viruses.

    PubMed

    Nara, P L; Robey, W G; Arthur, L O; Asher, D M; Wolff, A V; Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C; Fischinger, P J

    1987-10-01

    Persistent infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in the chimpanzee may be valuable for immunopathologic and potential vaccine evaluation. Two HIV strains, the tissue culture-derived human T-cell lymphotropic virus type IIIB (HTLV-IIIB) and in vivo serially passaged lymphadenopathy-associated virus type 1 (LAV-1), were injected intravenously into chimpanzees. Two animals received HTLV-IIIB as either virus-infected H9 cells or cell-free virus. A third animal received chimpanzee-passaged LAV-1. Evaluation of their sera for virus-specific serologic changes, including neutralizations, was done during a 2-year period. During this period all animals had persistently high titers of antibodies to viral core and envelope antigens. All three animals developed a progressively increasing type-specific neutralizing LAV-1 versus HTLV-IIIB antibody titer during the 2-year observation period which broadened in specificity to include HTLV-HIRF, HTLV-IIIMN, and HTLV-IIICC after 6 to 12 months. The antibody titers against both viruses were still increasing by 2 years after experimental virus inoculation. Sera from all animals were capable of neutralizing both homologously and heterologously reisolated virus from chimpanzees. A slightly more rapid type-specific neutralizing response was noted for the animal receiving HTLV-IIIB-infected cells compared with that for cell-free HTLV-IIIB. Sera from all persistently infected chimpanzees were capable of mediating group-specific antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytolysis of HIV-infected cells derived from all isolates tested. Viruses reisolated from all three animals at 20 months after inoculation revealed very similar peptide maps of their respective envelope gp120s, as determined by two-dimensional chymotrypsin oligopeptide analysis. One peptide, however, from the original HTLV-IIIB-inoculated virus was deleted in viruses from all three animals, and in addition, we noted the appearance of a new or modified peptide which

  18. Effects of human chromosome 12 on interactions between Tat and TAR of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, A; Cujec, T P; Peterlin, B M

    1994-01-01

    Rates of transcriptions of the human immunodeficiency virus are greatly increased by the viral trans activator Tat. In vitro, Tat binds to the 5' bulge of the trans-activation response (TAR) RNA stem-loop, which is present in all viral transcripts. In human cells, the central loop in TAR and its cellular RNA-binding proteins are also critical for the function of Tat. Previously, we demonstrated that in rodent cells (CHO cells), but not in those which contain the human chromosome 12 (CHO12 cells), Tat-TAR interactions are compromised. In this study, we examined the roles of the bulge and loop in TAR in Tat trans activation in these cells. Whereas low levels of trans activation depended solely on interactions between Tat and the bulge in CHO cells, high levels of trans activation depended also on interactions between Tat and the loop in CHO12 cells. Since the TAR loop binding proteins in these two cell lines were identical and different from their human counterpart, the human chromosome 12 does not encode TAR loop binding proteins. In vivo binding competition studies with TAR decoys confirmed that the binding of Tat to TAR is more efficient in CHO12 cells. Thus, the protein(s) encoded on human chromosome 12 helps to tether Tat to TAR via its loop, which results in high levels of trans activation. Images PMID:8083988

  19. Superior Efficacy of a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Combined with Antiretroviral Prevention in Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Challenged Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Le Grand, Roger; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Dispinseri, Stefania; Gosse, Leslie; Desjardins, Delphine; Shen, Xiaoying; Tolazzi, Monica; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Saidi, Hela; Tomaras, Georgia; Prague, Mélanie; Barnett, Susan W.; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although vaccines and antiretroviral (ARV) prevention have demonstrated partial success against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in clinical trials, their combined introduction could provide more potent protection. Furthermore, combination approaches could ameliorate the potential increased risk of infection following vaccination in the absence of protective immunity. We used a nonhuman primate model to determine potential interactions of combining a partially effective ARV microbicide with an envelope-based vaccine. The vaccine alone provided no protection from infection following 12 consecutive low-dose intravaginal challenges with simian-HIV strain SF162P3, with more animals infected compared to naive controls. The microbicide alone provided a 68% reduction in the risk of infection relative to that of the vaccine group and a 45% reduction relative to that of naive controls. The vaccine-microbicide combination provided an 88% reduction in the per-exposure risk of infection relative to the vaccine alone and a 79% reduction relative to that of the controls. Protected animals in the vaccine-microbicide group were challenged a further 12 times in the absence of microbicide and demonstrated a 98% reduction in the risk of infection. A total risk reduction of 91% was observed in this group over 24 exposures (P = 0.004). These important findings suggest that combined implementation of new biomedical prevention strategies may provide significant gains in HIV prevention. IMPORTANCE There is a pressing need to maximize the impact of new biomedical prevention tools in the face of the 2 million HIV infections that occur each year. Combined implementation of complementary biomedical approaches could create additive or synergistic effects that drive improved reduction of HIV incidence. Therefore, we assessed a combination of an untested vaccine with an ARV-based microbicide in a nonhuman primate vaginal challenge model. The vaccine alone provided no

  20. Susceptibility of Mink (Mustera vision)-Derived Cells to Replication by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Koito, Atsushi; Kameyama, Yuichi; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2003-01-01

    In vivo studies for understanding viral transmission and replication, host immune responses, and pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection would greatly benefit from the establishment of a small-animal model. In this study, we explored the potential of American mink (Mustera vison) as a susceptible host. We found that primary cells and cell lines derived from this species efficiently supported trans-activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat by Tat. Accordingly, the cysteine residue at position 261, which has been shown to be important for interaction of the human cyclin T1 with the HIV-1 regulatory protein Tat, is conserved in the mink homologue. No species-specific defect in Rev function could be detected in mink cells. In addition, primary splenocytes, fibroblasts, and the Mv.1.Lu cell line from American mink supported early as well as late HIV-1 gene expression following infection with vesicular stomatitis G protein-pseudotyped HIV-1 viruses, at levels comparable to those seen with permissive human cells. Furthermore, the mink Mv.1.Lu cell line stably expressing human CD4 and CCR5 receptors supported a spreading HIV-1 infection with few, if any, deficiencies compared to findings in human cell lines. This indicates the potential of HIV-1 to replicate in these cells once the blockade at the stage of virus entry has been removed. These results clearly show that cells from American mink generally pose no functional intracellular block to HIV-1 replication, and collectively they raise the possibility that this animal species could be engineered to support HIV-1 infection, providing a useful small-animal model for evaluating de novo infection by HIV-1. PMID:12692213

  1. Slow Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infectivity Correlated with Low HIV Coreceptor Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Cynthia L.

    2001-01-01

    The absolute number of CD4+ lymphocytes in blood is prognostic for disease progression, yet the cell surface density of CD4 receptors or chemokine receptors on a single cell has not previously been found to be predictive of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity outcome. It has recently been shown that human leukocyte elastase (HLE) and its ligand α1 proteinase inhibitor (α1PI; α1 antitrypsin) act as HIV fusion cofactors. The present study shows that decreased HIV infectivity is significantly correlated with decreased cell surface density of HLE but not with decreased CD4 nor chemokine receptors. In vitro HIV infectivity outcome in this study was predicted by the surface density of HLE on mononuclear phagocytes but not on lymphocytes. The set point HLE surface density was in part determined by α1PI. Decreased circulating α1PI was correlated with increased cell surface HLE and with increased HIV infectivity. The correlation of HIV infectivity outcome with surface HLE and circulating α1PI supports the utility of these HIV cofactors in diagnostic analysis and therapeutic intervention. PMID:11527806

  2. Two distinct CCR5 domains can mediate coreceptor usage by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Doranz, B J; Lu, Z H; Rucker, J; Zhang, T Y; Sharron, M; Cen, Y H; Wang, Z X; Guo, H H; Du, J G; Accavitti, M A; Doms, R W; Peiper, S C

    1997-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major fusion coreceptor for macrophage-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To define the structures of CCR5 that can support envelope (Env)-mediated membrane fusion, we analyzed the activity of homologs, chimeras, and mutants of human CCR5 in a sensitive gene reporter cell-cell fusion assay. Simian, but not murine, homologs of CCR5 were fully active as HIV-1 fusion coreceptors. Chimeras between CCR5 and divergent chemokine receptors demonstrated the existence of two distinct regions of CCR5 that could be utilized for Env-mediated fusion, the amino-terminal domain and the extracellular loops. Dual-tropic Env proteins were particularly sensitive to alterations in the CCR5 amino-terminal domain, suggesting that this domain may play a pivotal role in the evolution of coreceptor usage in vivo. We identified individual residues in both functional regions, Asp-11, Lys-197, and Asp-276, that contribute to coreceptor function. Deletion of a highly conserved cytoplasmic motif rendered CCR5 incapable of signaling but did not abrogate its ability to function as a coreceptor, implying the independence of fusion and G-protein-mediated chemokine receptor signaling. Finally, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody to CCR5 to assist in future studies of CCR5 expression. PMID:9261347

  3. Serological responses in chimpanzees inoculated with human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein (gp120) subunit vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, L.O.; Pyle, S.W.; Nara, P.L.; Bess, J.W. Jr.; Gonda, M.A.; Kelliher, J.C.; Gilden, R.V.; Robey, W.G.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Gallo, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The major envelope glycoprotein of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been purified and was utilized as a prototype vaccine in chimpanzees. The 120,000-dalton glycoprotein (gp120) was purified from membranes of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB-infected cells and the final preparation contained low levels to no detectable HTLV-IIIB core antigen (p24) and low levels of endotoxin. Chimpanzees inoculated with gp120 responded by developing antibodies that precipitated radiolabeled gp120 and neutralized in vitro infection of HTLV-IIIB. Antibodies to HTLV-IIIB p24 were not detected in the gp120-immunized chimpanzees. Peripheral blood leukocytes from the vaccinated animals were examined for T4/sup +/ and T8/sup +/ cells, and no decrease in the T4/T8 ratio was found, indicating that immunization with a ligand (gp120) that binds to T4 has not detectable adverse effect on the population of T4/sup +/ cells. The only current animal model that can be reproducibly infected with HIV is the chimpanzee. Immunization of chimpanzees with HIV proteins will provide an experimental system for testing the effectiveness of prototype vaccines for preventing HIV infection in vivo.

  4. Human immunodeficiency-causing mutation defines CD16 in spontaneous NK cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Grier, Jennifer T.; Forbes, Lisa R.; Monaco-Shawver, Linda; Oshinsky, Jennifer; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Moody, Curtis; Pandey, Rahul; Campbell, Kerry S.; Orange, Jordan S.

    2012-01-01

    The Fc receptor on NK cells, FcγRIIIA (CD16), has been extensively studied for its role in mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). A homozygous missense mutation in CD16 (encoding a L66H substitution) is associated with severe herpesvirus infections in rare patients. Here, we identified a new patient with this CD16 mutation and compared the patient’s NK cells to those of the originally reported patient. Patients with the L66H mutation had intact ADCC, but deficient spontaneous NK cell cytotoxicity and decreased surface expression of CD2, a coactivation receptor. Mechanistic studies in a human NK cell line, NK-92, demonstrated that CD16 expression correlated with CD2 surface levels and enabled killing of a melanoma cell line typically resistant to CD16-deficient NK-92 cells. An association between CD16 and CD2 was identified biochemically and at the immunological synapse, which elicited CD16 signaling after CD2 engagement. Stable expression of CD16 L66H in NK-92 cells recapitulated the patient phenotype, abrogating association of CD16 with CD2 as well as CD16 signaling after CD2 ligation. Thus, CD16 serves a role in NK cell–mediated spontaneous cytotoxicity through a specific association with CD2 and represents a potential mechanism underlying a human congenital immunodeficiency. PMID:23006327

  5. Can antiretroviral therapy be tailored to each human immunodeficiency virus-infected individual? Role of pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Asensi, Victor; Collazos, Julio; Valle-Garay, Eulalia

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics refers to the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within human genes on drug therapy outcome. Its study might help clinicians to increase the efficacy of antiretroviral drugs by improving their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and by decreasing their side effects. HLAB*5701 genotyping to avoid the abacavir-associated hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) is a cost-effective diagnostic tool, with a 100% of negative predictive value, and, therefore, it has been included in the guidelines for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HALDRB*0101 associates with nevirapine-induced HSR. CYP2B6 SNPs modify efavirenz plasma levels and their genotyping help decreasing its central nervous system, hepatic and HSR toxicities. Cytokines SNPs might influence the development of drug-associated lipodystrophy. APOA5, APOB, APOC3 and APOE SNPs modify lipids plasma levels and might influence the coronary artery disease risk of HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy. UGT1A1*28 and ABCB1 (MDR1) 3435C > T SNPs modify atazanavir plasma levels and enhance hyperbilirubinemia. Much more effort needs to be still devoted to complete large prospective studies with multiple SNPs genotyping in order to reveal more clues about the role played by host genetics in antiretroviral drug efficacy and toxicity. PMID:26279978

  6. The epidemiology of cancers in human immunodeficiency virus infection and after organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grulich, Andrew E; Vajdic, Claire M

    2015-04-01

    The authors provide an update on the association between immune deficiency and cancer risk in people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and in solid organ transplant recipients. Over the past decade, it has become clear that a wider range of about 20 mostly infection-related cancers occur at increased rates in people with immune deficiency. The human herpes virus 8 (HHV8) and Epstein Barr Virus (EBV)-related cancers of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) are most closely related to level of immune deficiency. Transplant recipients also have a greatly increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin, related to direct carcinogenic effects of the pharmaceuticals used for immune suppression. For those three cancer types, the increased cancer risk is largely reversed when immune deficiency is decreased by treatment of HIV or by reduction of iatrogenic immune suppression. Other infection-related cancers also occur at increased rates, but it is not clear whether reduction of immune deficiency reduces cancer risk. Prostate and breast cancer do not occur at increased rates, providing strong evidence that these cancers are unlikely to be related to infection. Epidemiological and clinical trends in these two populations have led to substantial recent changes in cancer occurrence. PMID:25843729

  7. Epitope specificity of human immunodeficiency virus-1 antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] responses.

    PubMed

    Pollara, Justin; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M Anthony; Pazgier, Marzena; Haynes, Barton F; Ferrari, Guido

    2013-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] has been suggested to play an important role in control of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 [HIV-1] viral load and protection from infection. ADCC antibody responses have been mapped to multiple linear and conformational epitopes within the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Many epitopes targeted by antibodies that mediate ADCC overlap with those recognized by antibodies capable of virus neutralization. In addition, recent studies conducted with human monoclonal antibodies derived from HIV-1 infected individuals and HIV-1 vaccine-candidate vaccinees have identified a number of antibodies that lack the ability to capture primary HIV-1 isolates or mediate neutralizing activity, but are able to bind to the surface of infected CD4+ T cells and mediate ADCC. Of note, the conformational changes in the gp120 that may not exclusively relate to binding of the CD4 molecule are important in exposing epitopes recognized by ADCC responses. Here we discuss the HIV-1 envelope epitopes targeted by ADCC antibodies in the context of the potential protective capacities of ADCC. PMID:24191939

  8. Crystallization of the Fab from a human monoclonal antibody against gp 41 of human immunodeficiency virus type I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casale, Elena; He, Xiao-Min; Snyder, Robert S.; Carter, Daniel C.; Wenisch, Elisabeth; Jungbauer, Alois; Tauer, Christa; Ruker, Florian; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal IgG antibody directed against gp 41 from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has been crystallized in both intact and Fab forms. Crystals of the intact antibody grow as tetragonal-like prisms too small for conventional X-ray analysis. However, the Fab portion of the antibody produces suitable platelike crystals which belong to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with unit cell constants of a = 66.5 A, b = 74.3 A, and c = 105.3 A. There is one molecule of Fab in the asymmetric unit. The Fab crystals show diffraction to d-spacings less than 3.0 A.

  9. Highly efficient inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase by aptamers functionalized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiang, Yen-Chun; Ou, Chung-Mao; Chen, Shih-Ju; Ou, Ting-Yu; Lin, Han-Jia; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-03-01

    We have developed aptamer (Apt)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Apt-Au NPs, 13 nm in diameter) as highly effective inhibitors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). Two Apts, RT1t49 (Aptpol) and ODN 93 (AptRH), which recognize the polymerase and RNase H regions of HIV-1 RT, are used to conjugate Au NPs to prepare Aptpol-Au NPs and AptRH-Au NPs, respectively. In addition to DNA sequence, the surface density of the aptamers on Au NPs (nApt-Au NPs; n is the number of aptamer molecules on each Au NP) and the linker length number (Tm; m is the base number of the deoxythymidine linker) between the aptamer and Au NPs play important roles in determining their inhibition activity. A HIV-lentiviral vector-based antiviral assay has been applied to determine the inhibitory effect of aptamers or Apt-Au NPs on the early stages of their replication cycle. The nuclease-stable G-quadruplex structure of 40AptRH-T45-Au NPs shows inhibitory efficiency in the retroviral replication cycle with a decreasing infectivity (40.2%).We have developed aptamer (Apt)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Apt-Au NPs, 13 nm in diameter) as highly effective inhibitors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). Two Apts, RT1t49 (Aptpol) and ODN 93 (AptRH), which recognize the polymerase and RNase H regions of HIV-1 RT, are used to conjugate Au NPs to prepare Aptpol-Au NPs and AptRH-Au NPs, respectively. In addition to DNA sequence, the surface density of the aptamers on Au NPs (nApt-Au NPs; n is the number of aptamer molecules on each Au NP) and the linker length number (Tm; m is the base number of the deoxythymidine linker) between the aptamer and Au NPs play important roles in determining their inhibition activity. A HIV-lentiviral vector-based antiviral assay has been applied to determine the inhibitory effect of aptamers or Apt-Au NPs on the early stages of their replication cycle. The nuclease-stable G-quadruplex structure of 40AptRH-T45

  10. Characterization of Primary Isolate-Like Variants of Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, John M.; Earl, Patricia L.; Moss, Bernard; Reimann, Keith A.; Wyand, Michael S.; Manson, Kelledy H.; Bilska, Miroslawa; Zhou, Jin Tao; Pauza, C. David; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Letvin, Norman L.; Montefiori, David C.

    1999-01-01

    Several different strains of simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) that contain the envelope glycoproteins of either T-cell-line-adapted (TCLA) strains or primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are now available. One of the advantages of these chimeric viruses is their application to studies of HIV-1-specific neutralizing antibodies in preclinical AIDS vaccine studies in nonhuman primates. In this regard, an important consideration is the spectrum of antigenic properties exhibited by the different envelope glycoproteins used for SHIV construction. The antigenic properties of six SHIV variants were characterized here in neutralization assays with recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4), monoclonal antibodies, and serum samples from SHIV-infected macaques and HIV-1-infected individuals. Neutralization of SHIV variants HXBc2, KU2, 89.6, and 89.6P by autologous and heterologous sera from SHIV-infected macaques was restricted to an extent that these viruses may be considered heterologous to one another in their major neutralization determinants. Little or no variation was seen in the neutralization determinants on SHIV variants 89.6P, 89.6PD, and SHIV-KB9. Neutralization of SHIV HXBc2 by sera from HXBc2-infected macaques could be blocked with autologous V3-loop peptide; this was less true in the case of SHIV 89.6 and sera from SHIV 89.6-infected macaques. The poorly immunogenic but highly conserved epitope for monoclonal antibody IgG1b12 was a target for neutralization on SHIV variants HXBc2, KU2, and 89.6 but not on 89.6P and KB9. The 2G12 epitope was a target for neutralization on all five SHIV variants. SHIV variants KU2, 89.6, 89.6P, 89.6PD, and KB9 exhibited antigenic properties characteristic of primary isolates by being relatively insensitive to neutralization in peripheral blood mononuclear cells with serum samples from HIV-1-infected individuals and 12-fold to 38-fold less sensitive to inhibition with recombinant soluble CD4 than TCLA

  11. Didanosine reduces atevirdine absorption in subjects with human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, G D; Fischl, M A; Shelton, M J; Borin, M T; Driver, M R; DeRemer, M; Lee, K; Wajszczuk, C P

    1996-01-01

    Atevirdine is a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with in vitro activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and is currently in phase II clinical trials. Atevirdine is most soluble at a pH of < 2, and therefore, normal gastric acidity is most likely necessary for optimal bioavailability. Because of the rapid development of resistance in vitro, atevirdine is being evaluated in combination with didanosine and/or zidovudine in both two- and three-drug combination regimens. To examine the influence of concurrent didanosine (buffered tablet formulation) on the disposition of atevirdine, 12 human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected subjects (mean CD4+ cell count, 199 cells per mm3; range, 13 to 447 cells/mm3) participated in a three-way, partially randomized, crossover, single-dose study to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of didanosine and atevirdine when each drug was given alone (treatments A and B, respectively) versus concurrently (treatment C). Concurrent administration of didanosine and atevirdine significantly reduced the maximum concentration of atevirdine in serum from 3.45 +/- 2.8 to 0.854 +/- 0.33 microM (P = 0.004). Likewise, the mean atevirdine area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h after administration of the combination was reduced to 6.47 +/- 2.2 microM.h (P = 0.004) relative to a value of 11.3 +/- 4.8 microM.h for atevirdine alone. Atevirdine had no statistically significant effect on the pharmacokinetic parameters of didanosine. Concurrent administration of single doses of atevirdine and didanosine resulted in a markedly lower maximum concentration of atevirdine in serum and area under the concentration-time curve, with a minimal effect on the disposition of didanosine. It is unknown whether an interaction of similar magnitude would occur under steady-state conditions; thus, combination regimens which include both atevirdine and didanosine should be designed so that their administration times are separated. Since

  12. Ring finger protein ZIN interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vif.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feng; Davis, Adam; Lake, Julie-Anne; Carr, Jill; Xia, Wei; Burrell, Christopher; Li, Peng

    2004-10-01

    Virion infectivity factor (Vif) protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is essential for the productive infection of primary human CD4 T lymphocytes and macrophages. Vif overcomes the HIV-inhibitory effects of cellular factor APOBEC3G, which has cytidine deaminase activity. We previously reported the isolation of a Vif-interacting ring finger protein, Triad 3, from a human leukocyte cDNA library, using the yeast two-hybrid system. The full-length cellular protein homologue of Triad 3 has been recently identified as the zinc finger protein inhibiting NF-kappaB (ZIN). Sequence analysis indicates that Triad 3 protein contains all four major ring-like motifs of ZIN. We report here that ZIN binds to purified Vif in vitro and that Triad 3/ZIN interacts with HIV-1 Vif in transfected human 293T cells, as demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation. To test the biological relevance of this interaction, we produced infectious HIV-1 NL4.3 in the presence or absence of cotransfected ZIN. HIV-1 NL4.3 virus stocks produced in the presence of exogenously expressed ZIN were twofold less infectious in a single-cycle infectivity assay than virus produced in the absence of exogenous ZIN. It was further shown that cells infected with HIV NL4.3 virus stocks produced in the presence of exogenously expressed ZIN were impaired in viral DNA synthesis by twofold. The impairment in viral reverse transcription and the reduction in single-cycle viral infectivity were both shown to be dependent on the presence of Vif in the virus producer cells. The possible mechanisms by which ZIN interferes with the early events of HIV-1 replication are discussed. PMID:15367624

  13. Food Security in Households of People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Study in a Subdivision of Darjeeling District, West Bengal

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) adversely impacts food security in households of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Little research has focused on food insecurity among PLWHA in India. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of and factors relating to food security in households of PLWHA in the Siliguri subdivision of Darjeeling, West Bengal, India. Methods: A cross-sectional community-based study was carried out among 173 PLWHA residing in Siliguri and registered at the Anti-retroviral Therapy Centre of North Bengal Medical College & Hospital. Data was collected at the household level with interviews of PLWHA using a food security survey instrument. We analyzed the associations using logistic regression. Results: The prevalence of household food security among the participants was 50.9% (88/173). Five years or more of schooling, higher socioeconomic class and males were found to be significantly associated with a higher likelihood of food security. A later stage of the disease and the presence of other family members with HIV/AIDS were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of food security. The major coping strategies to deal with food insecurity in the acute phase HIV infection included borrowing money (56.1%), followed by spousal support, loans from microfinance institutions, banks, or money lenders, borrowing food, or selling agricultural products. Conclusions: The present study revealed that only about half of households with PLWHA were food secure. Prior interventions relating to periods of food and economic crisis as well as strategies for sustaining food security and economic status are needed in this area. PMID:27499166

  14. A Combination DNA and Attenuated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Strategy Provides Enhanced Protection from Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Induced Disease†

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Rama Rao; Patel, Kalpana; Niedziela, Genevieve; Nigam, Pragati; Sharma, Sunita; Staprans, Silvija I.; Montefiori, David C.; Chenareddi, Lakshmi; Herndon, James G.; Robinson, Harriet L.; McClure, Harold M.; Novembre, Francis J.

    2005-01-01

    Among the most effective vaccine candidates tested in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque system, live attenuated viruses have been shown to provide the best protection from challenge. To investigate if preimmunization would increase the level of protection afforded by live attenuated SIVmac239Δnef (Δnef), macaques were given two priming immunizations of DNA encoding SIV Gag and Pol proteins, with control macaques receiving vector DNA immunizations. In macaques receiving the SIV DNA inoculation, SIV-specific cellular but not humoral responses were readily detectable 2 weeks after the second DNA inoculation. Following boosting with live attenuated virus, control of Δnef replication was superior in SIV-DNA-primed macaques versus vector-DNA-primed macaques and was correlated with higher levels of CD8+/gamma-interferon-positive and/or interleukin-2-positive cells. Challenge with an intravenous inoculation of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) strain SHIV89.6p resulted in infection of all animals. However, macaques receiving SIV DNA as the priming immunizations had statistically lower viral loads than control animals and did not develop signs of disease, whereas three of seven macaques receiving vector DNA showed severe CD4+ T-cell decline, with development of AIDS in one of these animals. No correlation of immune responses to protection from disease could be derived from our analyses. These results demonstrate that addition of a DNA prime to a live attenuated virus provided better protection from disease following challenge than live attenuated virus alone. PMID:16306607

  15. What High School Students Who Are Mildly Mentally Retarded Know about the Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Hazel B.; Horn, Charles J., Jr.

    Alabama high school students (N=309) with mild mental retardation completed a questionnaire concerning their knowledge, attitudes, and sources of information about human immune deficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Students demonstrated some basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS, and expressed some concern about getting AIDS. They…

  16. Frequency of hepatitis B, C and D and human immunodeficiency virus infections in multi-transfused thalassemics.

    PubMed

    Amarapurkar, D N; Kumar, A; Vaidya, S; Murti, P; Bichile, S K; Kalro, R H; Desai, H G

    1992-04-01

    Of forty multi-transfused thalassemia patients (26 males, 14 females; mean age 8.1 +/- 5.3 years, range 1-35) with no clinical or biochemical evidence of liver disease, HBsAg, anti-hepatitis C virus and anti-human immunodeficiency virus antibodies were present in 18 (45%), 7 (17.5%) and 1 (2.5%) cases respectively. Three of the 18 (16.7%) HBsAg positive patients were anti-delta antibody positive. Our results indicate that more than 50% of multi-transfused thalassemia patients show serological evidence of one or more of hepatitis B, C and D and human immunodeficiency virus infection. PMID:1428037

  17. Characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants with increased resistance to a C2-symmetric protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, D D; Toyoshima, T; Mo, H; Kempf, D J; Norbeck, D; Chen, C M; Wideburg, N E; Burt, S K; Erickson, J W; Singh, M K

    1994-01-01

    Inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease represent a promising class of antiviral drugs for the treatment of AIDS, and several are now in clinical trials. Here, we report the in vitro selection of viral variants with decreased sensitivity to a C2-symmetric protease inhibitor (A-77003). We show that a single amino acid substitution (Arg to Gln or Lys) at position 8 of the protease results in a substantial decrease in the inhibitory activity of the drug on the enzyme and a comparable increase in viral resistance. These findings, when analyzed by using the three-dimensional structure of the protease-drug complex, provide a strategic guide for the future development of inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease. Images PMID:8107264

  18. Human APOBEC3 Induced Mutation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Contributes to Adaptation and Evolution in Natural Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Young; Lorenzo-Redondo, Ramon; Little, Susan J.; Chung, Yoon-Seok; Phalora, Prabhjeet K.; Maljkovic Berry, Irina; Archer, John; Penugonda, Sudhir; Fischer, Will; Richman, Douglas D.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Malim, Michael H.; Wolinsky, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Human APOBEC3 proteins are cytidine deaminases that contribute broadly to innate immunity through the control of exogenous retrovirus replication and endogenous retroelement retrotransposition. As an intrinsic antiretroviral defense mechanism, APOBEC3 proteins induce extensive guanosine-to-adenosine (G-to-A) mutagenesis and inhibit synthesis of nascent human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) cDNA. Human APOBEC3 proteins have additionally been proposed to induce infrequent, potentially non-lethal G-to-A mutations that make subtle contributions to sequence diversification of the viral genome and adaptation though acquisition of beneficial mutations. Using single-cycle HIV-1 infections in culture and highly parallel DNA sequencing, we defined trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G, and APOBEC3H. We then compared these APOBEC3 editing contexts with the patterns of G-to-A mutations in HIV-1 DNA in cells obtained sequentially from ten patients with primary HIV-1 infection. Viral substitutions were highest in the preferred trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for the APOBEC3 deaminases. Consistent with the effects of immune selection, amino acid changes accumulated at the APOBEC3 editing contexts located within human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-appropriate epitopes that are known or predicted to enable peptide binding. Thus, APOBEC3 activity may induce mutations that influence the genetic diversity and adaptation of the HIV-1 population in natural infection. PMID:25080100

  19. Structural Insight into the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Vif SOCS Box and Its Role in Human E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley,B.; Ehrlich, E.; Short, L.; Yu, Y.; Xiao, Z.; Yu, X.; Xiong, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virion infectivity factor (Vif) causes the proteasome-mediated destruction of human antiviral protein APOBEC3G by tethering it to a cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase composed of ElonginB, ElonginC, Cullin5, and Rbx2. It has been proposed that HIV Vif hijacks the E3 ligase through two regions within its C-terminal domain: a BC box region that interacts with ElonginC and a novel zinc finger motif that interacts with Cullin5. We have determined the crystal structure of the HIV Vif BC box in complex with human ElonginB and ElonginC. This complex presents direct structural evidence of the recruitment of a human ubiquitin ligase by a viral BC box protein that mimics the conserved interactions of cellular ubiquitin ligases. We further mutated conserved hydrophobic residues in a region downstream of the Vif BC box. These mutations demonstrate that this region, the Vif Cullin box, composes a third E3-ligase recruiting site critical for interaction between Vif and Cullin5. Furthermore, our homology modeling reveals that the Vif Cullin box and zinc finger motif may be positioned adjacent to the N terminus of Cullin5 for interaction with loop regions in the first cullin repeat of Cullin5.

  20. Therapeutic Trial of Rifabutin After Rifampicin-Associated DRESS Syndrome in Tuberculosis-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coinfected Patients.

    PubMed

    Lehloenya, Rannakoe J; Dlamini, Sipho; Muloiwa, Rudzani; Kakande, Betty; Ngwanya, Mzudumile R; Todd, Gail; Dheda, Keertan

    2016-09-01

    Elimination of a rifamycin from the treatment regimen for tuberculosis negatively impacts outcomes. Cross-reactivity between the rifamycins after drug eruptions is unclear. We report 6 consecutive human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with rifampicin-associated drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome confirmed on diagnostic rechallenge. The patients subsequently tolerated rifabutin. These data inform clinical management of tuberculosis-associated drug reactions. PMID:27419190

  1. Therapeutic Trial of Rifabutin After Rifampicin-Associated DRESS Syndrome in Tuberculosis-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lehloenya, Rannakoe J.; Dlamini, Sipho; Muloiwa, Rudzani; Kakande, Betty; Ngwanya, Mzudumile R.; Todd, Gail; Dheda, Keertan

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of a rifamycin from the treatment regimen for tuberculosis negatively impacts outcomes. Cross-reactivity between the rifamycins after drug eruptions is unclear. We report 6 consecutive human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with rifampicin-associated drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome confirmed on diagnostic rechallenge. The patients subsequently tolerated rifabutin. These data inform clinical management of tuberculosis-associated drug reactions. PMID:27419190

  2. Potential of a Simplified p24 Assay for Early Diagnosis of Infant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection in Haiti▿

    PubMed Central

    George, Erik; Beauharnais, Carole Anne; Brignoli, Emilio; Noel, Francine; Bois, Gyrlande; De Matteis Rouzier, Patricia; Altenor, Martine; Lauture, Daniel; Hosty, Marlène; Mehta, Sapna; Wright, Peter F.; Pape, Jean W.

    2007-01-01

    With global efforts to scale up the prevention of mother-to-child transmission services and pediatric antiretroviral therapy, there is an urgent need to introduce a simple, low-cost infant human immunodeficiency virus test in the field. We postulated that the p24 antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay could be simplified by eliminating signal amplification without compromising diagnostic accuracy. PMID:17670933

  3. Salivary binding antibodies induced by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 recombinant gp120 vaccine. The NIAID AIDS Vaccine Evaluation Group.

    PubMed Central

    Gorse, G J; Yang, E Y; Belshe, R B; Berman, P W

    1996-01-01

    Salivary binding antibodies induced by candidate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines in healthy, HIV-1 uninfected volunteers were assessed in a clinical trial evaluating intramuscularly injected HIV-1MN recombinant gp120 (rgp120) vaccine alone or with HIV-1IIIB rgp120 vaccine. The two rgp120 vaccines induced envelope glycoprotein-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies in whole saliva and serum. PMID:8914773

  4. Living Related Donor Renal Transplant in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Patient: Case Reports from Tertiary Care Hospital in Western India

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Sonal; Patel, Atul K; Patel, Ketan K; Shukla, Ketan D; Darji, Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Renal transplantation (TX) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasingly performed in developed countries in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Management of HIV infected patients during and post-transplant is very complex and challenging due to drug interaction, infection risk and associated co-infections. We described our experience with living related donor renal TX in three HIV infected patients. PMID:25191053

  5. Living related donor renal transplant in human immunodeficiency virus infected patient: case reports from tertiary care hospital in Western India.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Sonal; Patel, Atul K; Patel, Ketan K; Shukla, Ketan D; Darji, Prakash

    2014-07-01

    Renal transplantation (TX) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasingly performed in developed countries in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Management of HIV infected patients during and post-transplant is very complex and challenging due to drug interaction, infection risk and associated co-infections. We described our experience with living related donor renal TX in three HIV infected patients. PMID:25191053

  6. beta-2 Microglobulin values among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative, HIV-positive asymptomatic, and HIV-positive symptomatic Ugandans.

    PubMed Central

    Piwowar, E M; Tugume, S B; Grant, R M; Lutalo, T; Pattishall, K; Katongole-Mbidde, E

    1995-01-01

    Mean serum beta-2 microglobulin levels among healthy human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative and asymptomatic and symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive Ugandans were found to be 2.35, 3.75, and 5.06 mg/liter, respectively (P < 0.001). The upper limit of the normal range (3.5 mg/liter) is higher in this African population than that reported elsewhere. PMID:7697536

  7. Effects of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 on herpes simplex virus and human immunodeficiency virus replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; McGrath, M. S.; Hanks, D.; Erickson, S.; Pulliam, L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the direct effect of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 (dmPGA1) on the replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). dmPGA1 significantly inhibited viral replication in both HSV and HIV infection systems at concentrations of dmPGA1 that did not adversely alter cellular DNA synthesis. The 50% inhibitory concentration (ID50) for several HSV type 1 (HSV-1) strains ranged from 3.8 to 5.6 micrograms/ml for Vero cells and from 4.6 to 7.3 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. The ID50s for two HSV-2 strains varied from 3.8 to 4.5 micrograms/ml for Vero cells; the ID50 was 5.7 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. We found that closely related prostaglandins did not have the same effect on the replication of HSV; dmPGE2 and dmPGA2 caused up to a 60% increase in HSV replication compared with that in untreated virus-infected cells. HIV-1 replication in acutely infected T cells (VB line) and chronically infected macrophages was assessed by quantitative decreases in p24 concentration. The effective ID50s were 2.5 micrograms/ml for VB cells acutely infected with HIV-1 and 5.2 micrograms/m for chronically infected macrophages. dmPGA1 has an unusual broad-spectrum antiviral activity against both HSV and HIV-1 in vitro and offers a new class of potential therapeutic agents for in vivo use.

  8. Generation of hybrid human immunodeficiency virus utilizing the cotransfection method and analysis of cellular tropism.

    PubMed Central

    Velpandi, A; Nagashunmugam, T; Murthy, S; Cartas, M; Monken, C; Srinivasan, A

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) isolated from infected individuals show tremendous genetic and biologic diversity. To delineate the genetic determinants underlying specific biologic characteristics, such as rate of replication, cytopathic effects, and ability to infect macrophages and T4 lymphoid cells, generation of hybrid HIV using viruses which exhibit distinct biologic features is essential. To develop methods for generating hybrid HIV, we constructed truncated HIV proviral DNA plasmids. Upon digestion with restriction enzymes, these plasmid DNAs were cotransfected into human rhabdomyosarcoma cells to generate hybrid HIV. The hybrid HIVs derived by this method were infectious upon transmission to both phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes and established human leukemic T-cell lines. The virus derived from molecular clone pHXB2 (HIVHTLV-III) productively infected CEMx174 cells. On the other hand, molecular clone pARV (HIVSF2)-derived virus did not show productive infection of CEMx174 cells when used as a cell-free virus. The hybrid HIV containing the 3' end of the genome from pARV and the 5' end of the genome from pHXB2 was effective in infecting CEMx174 cells, but the converse hybrid containing 5' pARV and 3' pHXB2 was not effective in infecting CEMx174 cells. These results suggest that differences in the genes outside of env and nef play a role in the ability of the virus to infect a certain cell type. The intracellular ligation method should be useful in the analysis of related and unrelated HIV-1 isolates with common restriction enzyme cleavage sites. Images PMID:1678438

  9. Sensitive, hydrosoluble, macromolecular fluorogenic substrates for human immunodeficiency virus 1 proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Anjuère, F; Monsigny, M; Lelièvre, Y; Mayer, R

    1993-01-01

    Hydrosoluble macromolecular fluorogenic substrates specific for the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) proteinase have been prepared. The fluoresceinyl peptide Ftc-epsilon-Ahx-Ser-Phe-Asn-Phe-Pro-Gln-Ile-Thr-(Gly)n, corresponding to the first cleavage site of HIV-1 gag-pol native precursor was linked to a water-soluble neutral (Lys)n derivative. The epsilon-aminohexanoyl residue (epsilon-Ahx) and the glycyl sequence were added in order to improve the stability of the substrate and the accessibility of the cleavage site to the HIV-1 proteinase respectively. This macro-molecular peptidic-substrate conjugate is significantly more water-soluble than the free peptide itself on a substrate molar concentration basis. The assay is based on the quantitative precipitation of the polymeric material by adding propan-2-ol whereas the fluorescent peptide moiety released upon proteolysis remains soluble in the supernatant. The proteinase activity is assessed by measuring the fluorescence of the supernatant. This assay allows the detection of a few fmol of HIV-1 proteinase, even in the presence of cell culture media, plasma or cell lysate and it gives accurate results within a large proteinase concentration range. The hydrosoluble macromolecular substrate is also suitable for determining the HIV-1 proteinase activity using 96-well microplates, allowing us to test accurately and rapidly numerous enzyme samples and/or the potency of new proteinase inhibitors. PMID:8489513

  10. Integrating women's perspectives on prenatal human immunodeficiency virus screening: toward a socially just policy.

    PubMed

    Mawn, B

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to include the voices of laywomen at risk for or living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the ongoing debate on prenatal and newborn HIV screening. A phenomenological approach based on Moustakas's heuristic model was used in order to explore women's lived experience. The investigator interviewed 33 women, half of whom were HIV-positive, using an open-ended, loosely structured interview guide. Two major domains were identified related to the women's views and experiences of HIV testing: the importance of a woman's awareness of her HIV status for both her own and her child's sake, and the need to maintain voluntary choice. Common themes emerging from the stories included paradoxical dimensions of living with the virus, such as fear of death, worry about health, concern over the pandemic itself, and loneliness, interspersed with faith and hope. Implications for health care providers include an enhanced understanding of the impact of the diagnosis, improvement in counseling techniques, and the importance of the establishment of trust. PMID:9839795

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immune Cell Receptors, Coreceptors, and Cofactors: Implications for Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Andrew W; Skeate, Joseph G; Sanna, Adriana M; Taylor, Julia R; Da Silva, Diane M; Cannon, Paula M; Kast, W Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the last three decades, extensive research on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has highlighted its capability to exploit a variety of strategies to enter and infect immune cells. Although CD4(+) T cells are well known as the major HIV target, with infection occurring through the canonical combination of the cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) receptor and either the C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) or C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) coreceptors, HIV has also been found to enter other important immune cell types such as macrophages, dendritic cells, Langerhans cells, B cells, and granulocytes. Interestingly, the expression of distinct cellular cofactors partially regulates the rate in which HIV infects each distinct cell type. Furthermore, HIV can benefit from the acquisition of new proteins incorporated into its envelope during budding events. While several publications have investigated details of how HIV manipulates particular cell types or subtypes, an up-to-date comprehensive review on HIV tropism for different immune cells is lacking. Therefore, this review is meant to focus on the different receptors, coreceptors, and cofactors that HIV exploits to enter particular immune cells. Additionally, prophylactic approaches that have targeted particular molecules associated with HIV entry and infection of different immune cells will be discussed. Unveiling the underlying cellular receptors and cofactors that lead to HIV preference for specific immune cell populations is crucial in identifying novel preventative/therapeutic targets for comprehensive strategies to eliminate viral infection. PMID:27410493

  12. Chromosomal radiosensitivity of human immunodeficiency virus positive/negative cervical cancer patients in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    HERD, OLIVIA; FRANCIES, FLAVIA; KOTZEN, JEFFREY; SMITH, TRUDY; NXUMALO, ZWIDE; MULLER, XANTHENE; SLABBERT, JACOBUS; VRAL, ANNE; BAEYENS, ANS

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer amongst South African women and is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in this region. Several international studies on radiation-induced DNA damage in lymphocytes of cervical cancer patients have remained inconclusive. Despite the high incidence of cervical cancer in South Africa, and the extensive use of radiotherapy to treat it, the chromosomal radiosensitivity of South African cervical cancer patients has not been studied to date. Since a high number of these patients are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, the effect of HIV infection on chromosomal radiosensitivity was also investigated. Blood samples from 35 cervical cancer patients (20 HIV-negative and 15 HIV-positive) and 20 healthy controls were exposed to X-rays at doses of 6 MV of 2 and 4 Gy in vitro. Chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed using the micronucleus (MN) assay. MN scores were obtained using the Metafer 4 platform, an automated microscopic system. Three scoring methods of the MNScore module of Metafer were applied and compared. Cervical cancer patients had higher MN values than healthy controls, with HIV-positive patients having the highest MN values. Differences between groups were significant when using a scoring method that corrects for false positive and false negative MN. The present study suggested increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in HIV-positive South African cervical cancer patients. PMID:26549042

  13. African origins and chronic kidney disease susceptibility in the human immunodeficiency virus era.

    PubMed

    Kasembeli, Alex N; Duarte, Raquel; Ramsay, Michèle; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem worldwide with the estimated incidence growing by approximately 6% annually. There are striking ethnic differences in the prevalence of CKD such that, in the United States, African Americans have the highest prevalence of CKD, four times the incidence of end stage renal disease when compared to Americans of European ancestry suggestive of genetic predisposition. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are the major causes of CKD. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is an irreversible form of CKD with considerable morbidity and mortality and is present predominantly in people of African ancestry. The APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles were more strongly associated with the risk for CKD than the previously examined MYH9 E1 risk haplotype in individuals of African ancestry. A strong association was reported in HIVAN, suggesting that 50% of African Americans with two APOL1 risk alleles, if untreated, would develop HIVAN. However these two variants are not enough to cause disease. The prevailing belief is that modifying factors or second hits (including genetic hits) underlie the pathogenesis of kidney disease. This work reviews the history of genetic susceptibility of CKD and outlines current theories regarding the role for APOL1 in CKD in the HIV era. PMID:25949944

  14. Lack of Detectable Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Superinfection during 1072 Person-Years of Observation

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Matthew J.; Delwart, Eric; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Tsui, Rose; Zolopa, Andrew R.; Taylor, Jonathan; Shafer, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    We examined consecutive protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1—infected individuals, to distinguish changes resulting from sequence evolution due to possible superinfection. Between July 1997 and December 2001, ⩾2 PR and RT samples from 718 persons were sequenced at Stanford University Hospital. Thirty-seven persons had highly divergent sequence pairs characterized by a nucleotide distance of >4.5% in PR or >3.0% in RT. In 16 of 37 sequence pairs, divergence resulted from the loss of mutations during a treatment interruption or from the gain of mutations with reinstitution of treatment. tat and/or gag sequencing of HIV-1 from cryopreserved plasma samples could be performed on 15 of the 21 divergent isolate pairs from persons without a treatment interruption. The sequences of these genes, unaffected by selective drug pressure, were monophyletic. Although HIV-1 PR and RT genes from treated persons may become highly divergent, these changes usually are the result of sequence evolution, rather than superinfection. PMID:12870121

  15. Structure-function studies of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix protein, p17.

    PubMed

    Cannon, P M; Matthews, S; Clark, N; Byles, E D; Iourin, O; Hockley, D J; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix protein, p17, plays important roles in both the early and late stages of the viral life cycle. Using our previously determined solution structure of p17, we have undertaken a rational mutagenesis program aimed at mapping structure-function relationships within the molecule. Amino acids hypothesized to be important for p17 function were mutated and examined for effect in an infectious proviral clone of HIV-1. In parallel, we analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy the structure of recombinant p17 protein containing such substitutions. These analyses identified three classes of mutants that were defective in viral replication: (i) proteins containing substitutions at internal residues that grossly distorted the structure of recombinant p17 and prevented viral particle formation, (ii) mutations at putative p17 trimer interfaces that allowed correct folding of recombinant protein but produced virus that was defective in particle assembly, and (iii) substitution of basic residues in helix A that caused some relocation of virus assembly to intracellular locations and produced normally budded virions that were completely noninfectious. PMID:9094619

  16. Opposite Effects of SDF-1 on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Valérie; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Heard, Jean-Michel; Schwartz, Olivier

    1999-01-01

    The α-chemokine SDF-1 binds CXCR4, a coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and inhibits viral entry mediated by this receptor. Since chemokines are potent chemoattractants and activators of leukocytes, we examined whether the stimulation of HIV target cells by SDF-1 affects the replication of virus with different tropisms. We observed that SDF-1 inhibited the entry of X4 strains and increased the infectivity of particles bearing either a CCR5-tropic HIV-1 envelope or a vesicular stomatitis virus G envelope. In contrast to the inhibitory effect of SDF-1 on X4 strains, which is at the level of entry, the stimulatory effect does not involve envelope-receptor interactions or proviral DNA synthesis. Rather, we observed an increased ability of Tat to transactivate the HIV-1 long terminal repeat in the presence of the chemokine. Therefore, the effects of SDF-1 on the HIV-1 life cycle can be multiple and opposite, including both an inhibition of viral entry and a stimulation of proviral gene expression. PMID:10196252

  17. Primary Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Setting of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Emily A.; Guiou, Michael; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Vaughan, Andrew; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Chen, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer among a cohort of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 12 patients with serologic evidence of HIV who subsequently underwent radiation therapy to a median dose of 68 Gy (range, 64-72 Gy) for newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were reviewed. Six patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in 6 cases (50%). All patients had a Karnofsky performance status of 80 or 90. Nine patients (75%) were receiving antiretroviral therapies at the time of treatment, and the median CD4 count was 460 (range, 266-800). Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: The 3-year estimates of overall survival and local-regional control were 78% and 92%, respectively. Acute Grade 3+ toxicity occurred in 7 patients (58%), the most common being confluent mucositis (5 patients) and moist skin desquamation (4 patients). Two patients experienced greater than 10% weight loss, and none experienced more than 15% weight loss from baseline. Five patients (42%) experienced treatment breaks in excess of 10 cumulative days, although none required hospitalization. There were no treatment-related fatalities. Conclusions: Radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer seems to be relatively well tolerated among appropriately selected patients with HIV. The observed rates of toxicity were comparable to historical controls without HIV.

  18. Determinants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Resistance to gp41-Derived Inhibitory Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rimsky, Laurence T.; Shugars, Diane C.; Matthews, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    A synthetic peptide, DP178, containing amino acids 127 to 162 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 Env glycoprotein, is a potent inhibitor of virus infection and virus mediated cell-to-cell fusion (C. Wild, T. Greenwell, and T. Matthews, AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 9:1051–1053, 1993). In an effort to understand the mechanism of action of this peptide, we derived resistant variants of HIV-1IIIB and NL4-3 by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of the peptide. Sequence analysis of the resistant isolates suggested that a contiguous 3-amino-acid sequence within the amino-terminal heptad repeat motif of gp41 was associated with resistance. Site-directed mutagenesis studies confirmed this observation and indicated that changes in two of these three residues were necessary for development of the resistant phenotype. Direct binding of DP178 to recombinant protein and synthetic peptide analogs containing the wild-type and mutant heptad repeat sequences revealed a strong correlation between DP178 binding and the biological sensitivity of the corresponding virus isolates to DP178. The results are discussed from the standpoints of the mechanism of action of DP178 and recent crystallographic information for a core structure of the gp41 ectodomain. PMID:9444991

  19. Integrating Preexposure Prophylaxis for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention Into Women's Health Care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Dominika; Weber, Shannon

    2016-07-01

    Women comprise one in five new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnoses in the United States. Trials and implementation projects demonstrate preexposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention is effective in women. Preexposure prophylaxis is a method of preventing HIV acquisition by having an HIV-negative individual take antiretroviral medication before exposure. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved daily oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate coformulated with emtricitabine as preexposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention in 2012. Preexposure prophylaxis is highly dependent on adherence for effectiveness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends offering preexposure prophylaxis to individuals at significant risk of infection and estimates 468,000 women in the United States are eligible for preexposure prophylaxis. Although variable individual and structural forces affect each woman's medication adherence, and therefore the effectiveness of preexposure prophylaxis, women's health care providers are uniquely positioned to screen, counsel about, and offer preexposure prophylaxis. Shared decision-making provides a framework for these clinical encounters, allowing patients and clinicians to make health care decisions together based on scientific evidence and patient experiences. By incorporating fertility desires and contraceptive needs, health care providers effectively integrate sexual and reproductive health care. Including preexposure prophylaxis in women's health services requires health care provider training and attention to lessons learned from family planning and HIV prevention. Nevertheless, obstetrician-gynecologists have an opportunity to play a critical role in reducing sexual transmission of HIV in the United States by integrating preexposure prophylaxis education and provision into their practices. PMID:27275793

  20. Species distribution in human immunodeficiency virus-related mycobacterial infections: implications for selection of initial treatment.

    PubMed

    Montessori, V; Phillips, P; Montaner, J; Haley, L; Craib, K; Bessuille, E; Black, W

    1996-06-01

    Management of mycobacterial infection is species specific; however, treatment is prompted by positive smears or cultures, often several weeks before species identification. The objective of this study was to determine the species distribution of mycobacterial isolates from various body sites in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). All mycobacterial isolates recovered at St. Paul's Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) from April 1989 to March 1993 were reviewed. Among 357 HIV-positive patients with mycobacterial infections, 64% (96) of the sputum isolates were Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), 18% were Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and 17% were Mycobacterium kansasii. Lymph node involvement (25 patients) was due to either MAC (72%) or M. tuberculosis (24%). Two hundred ninety-eight episodes of mycobacteremia were due to MAC (98%), M. tuberculosis (1%), and M. kansasii (1%). Similarly, cultures of 84 bone marrow biopsy specimens (99%), 19 intestinal biopsy specimens (100%), and 30 stool specimens (97%) yielded predominantly MAC. These results have implications for initial therapy, particularly in areas where rapid methods for species identification are not readily available. Because of considerable geographic variation, development of guidelines for selection of initial therapy depends on regional determination of species distribution in HIV-related mycobacterial infections. PMID:8783698

  1. African origins and chronic kidney disease susceptibility in the human immunodeficiency virus era

    PubMed Central

    Kasembeli, Alex N; Duarte, Raquel; Ramsay, Michèle; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem worldwide with the estimated incidence growing by approximately 6% annually. There are striking ethnic differences in the prevalence of CKD such that, in the United States, African Americans have the highest prevalence of CKD, four times the incidence of end stage renal disease when compared to Americans of European ancestry suggestive of genetic predisposition. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are the major causes of CKD. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is an irreversible form of CKD with considerable morbidity and mortality and is present predominantly in people of African ancestry. The APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles were more strongly associated with the risk for CKD than the previously examined MYH9 E1 risk haplotype in individuals of African ancestry. A strong association was reported in HIVAN, suggesting that 50% of African Americans with two APOL1 risk alleles, if untreated, would develop HIVAN. However these two variants are not enough to cause disease. The prevailing belief is that modifying factors or second hits (including genetic hits) underlie the pathogenesis of kidney disease. This work reviews the history of genetic susceptibility of CKD and outlines current theories regarding the role for APOL1 in CKD in the HIV era. PMID:25949944

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integration Protein Expressed in Escherichia Coli Possesses Selective DNA Cleaving Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Paula A.; Fyfe, James A.

    1990-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration protein, a potential target for selective antiviral therapy, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, free of detectable contaminating endonucleases, selectively cleaved double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that mimic the U3 and the U5 termini of linear HIV DNA. Two nucleotides were removed from the 3' ends of both the U5 plus strand and the U3 minus strand; in both cases, cleavage was adjacent to a conserved CA dinucleotide. The reaction was metal-ion dependent, with a preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+. Reaction selectivity was further demonstrated by the lack of cleavage of an HIV U5 substrate on the complementary (minus) strand, an analogous substrate that mimics the U3 terminus of an avian retrovirus, and an HIV U5 substrate in which the conserved CA dinucleotide was replaced with a TA dinucleotide. Such an integration protein-mediated cleavage reaction is expected to occur as part of the integration event in the retroviral life cycle, in which a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome is inserted into the host cell DNA.

  3. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Mason, Andrew; Luftig, Ronald B; Bautista, Abraham P

    2002-07-01

    Approximately 400,000 individuals in the United States are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and it is likely that almost one in two of these subjects consumes alcohol. The majority of these patients suffer an accelerated course of liver disease as manifested by the onset of cirrhosis within 5 to 10 years of developing HCV infection, as well as an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is thought that chronic alcohol abuse mediates liver damage as a result of increased production of free radicals and proinflammatory cytokines. In the setting of chronic HCV infection, alcohol ingestion has an additional effect of diminishing immune clearance and increasing viral burden to hasten the onset of cirrhosis and HCC. Likewise, chronic HCV and HIV-1 co-infection results in a net increase in HCV burden; higher prevalence rates of HCV transmission to sexual partners and offspring, as well as an accelerated progression to end stage liver disease as compared to individuals with HCV infection alone. Thus, the synergistic effects of alcohol abuse and HIV-1 greatly impact on the morbidity and mortality for patients with HCV coinfection. Ultimately, this cumulative disease process will require far more aggressive management with abstinence and counseling for alcohol abuse; highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection and combination anti-viral therapy for HCV infection to stem the rapid progression to end stage liver disease. PMID:12086918

  4. Discovery of novel ribonucleoside analogs with activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Dapp, Michael J; Bonnac, Laurent; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2014-01-01

    Reverse transcription is an important early step in retrovirus replication and is a key point targeted by evolutionarily conserved host restriction factors (e.g., APOBEC3G, SamHD1). Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) is a major target of antiretroviral drugs, and concerns regarding drug resistance and off-target effects have led to continued efforts for identifying novel approaches to targeting HIV-1 RT. Several observations, including those obtained from monocyte-derived macrophages, have argued that ribonucleotides and their analogs can, intriguingly, impact reverse transcription. For example, we have previously demonstrated that 5-azacytidine has its greatest antiviral potency during reverse transcription by enhancement of G-to-C transversion mutations. In the study described here, we investigated a panel of ribonucleoside analogs for their ability to affect HIV-1 replication during the reverse transcription process. We discovered five ribonucleosides-8-azaadenosine, formycin A, 3-deazauridine, 5-fluorocytidine, and 2'-C-methylcytidine-that possess anti-HIV-1 activity, and one of these (i.e., 3-deazauridine) has a primary antiviral mechanism that involves increased HIV-1 mutational loads, while quantitative PCR analysis determined that the others resulted in premature chain termination. Taken together, our findings provide the first demonstration of a series of ribonucleoside analogs that can target HIV-1 reverse transcription with primary antiretroviral mechanisms that include premature termination of viral DNA synthesis or enhanced viral mutagenesis. PMID:24155391

  5. Antiretroviral therapy and drug resistance in human immunodeficiency virus type 2 infection.

    PubMed

    Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alvarez, Mar

    2014-02-01

    One to two million people worldwide are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2), with highest prevalences in West African countries, but also present in Western Europe, Asia and North America. Compared to HIV-1, HIV-2 infection undergoes a longer asymptomatic phase and progresses to AIDS more slowly. In addition, HIV-2 shows lower transmission rates, probably due to its lower viremia in infected individuals. There is limited experience in the treatment of HIV-2 infection and several antiretroviral drugs used to fight HIV-1 are not effective against HIV-2. Effective drugs against HIV-2 include nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (e.g. zidovudine, tenofovir, lamivudine, emtricitabine, abacavir, stavudine and didanosine), protease inhibitors (saquinavir, lopinavir and darunavir), and integrase inhibitors (raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir). Maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist blocking coreceptor binding during HIV entry, is active in vitro against CCR5-tropic HIV-2 but more studies are needed to validate its use in therapeutic treatments against HIV-2 infection. HIV-2 strains are naturally resistant to a few antiretroviral drugs developed to suppress HIV-1 propagation such as nonnucleoside RT inhibitors, several protease inhibitors and the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide. Resistance selection in HIV-2 appears to be faster than in HIV-1. In this scenario, the development of novel drugs specific for HIV-2 is an important priority. In this review, we discuss current anti-HIV-2 therapies and mutational pathways leading to drug resistance. PMID:24345729

  6. Spatial analysis of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus among pregnant women1

    PubMed Central

    de Holanda, Eliane Rolim; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz; Pedrosa, Nathália Lima; Paiva, Simone de Sousa; de Almeida, Rosa Lívia Freitas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to analyze the spatial distribution of reported cases of pregnant women infected by the human immunodeficiency virus and to identify the urban areas with greater social vulnerability to the infection among pregnant women. METHOD: ecological study, developed by means of spatial analysis techniques of area data. Secondary data were used from the Brazilian National Disease Notification System for the city of Recife, Pernambuco. Birth data were obtained from the Brazilian Information System on Live Births and socioeconomic data from the 2010 Demographic Census. RESULTS: the presence of spatial self-correlation was verified. Moran's Index was significant for the distribution. Clusters were identified, considered as high-risk areas, located in grouped neighborhoods, with equally high infection rates among pregnant women. A neighborhood located in the Northwest of the city was distinguished, considered in an epidemiological transition phase. CONCLUSION: precarious living conditions, as evidenced by the indicators illiteracy, absence of prenatal care and poverty, were relevant for the risk of vertical HIV transmission, converging to the grouping of cases among disadvantaged regions. PMID:26155005

  7. Good governance and good health: The role of societal structures in the human immunodeficiency virus pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Menon-Johansson, Anatole S

    2005-01-01

    Background Only governments sensitive to the demands of their citizens appropriately respond to needs of their nation. Based on Professor Amartya Sen's analysis of the link between famine and democracy, the following null hypothesis was tested: "Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) prevalence is not associated with governance". Methods Governance has been divided by a recent World Bank paper into six dimensions. These include Voice and Accountability, Political Stability and Absence of Violence, Government Effectiveness, Regulatory Quality, Rule of Law and the Control of Corruption. The 2002 adult HIV prevalence estimates were obtained from UNAIDS. Additional health and economic variables were collected from multiple sources to illustrate the development needs of countries. Results The null hypothesis was rejected for each dimension of governance for all 149 countries with UNAIDS HIV prevalence estimates. When these nations were divided into three groups, the median (range) HIV prevalence estimates remained constant at 0.7% (0.05 – 33.7%) and 0.75% (0.05% – 33.4%) for the lower and middle mean governance groups respectively despite improvements in other health and economic indices. The median HIV prevalence estimates in the higher mean governance group was 0.2% (0.05 – 38.8%). Conclusion HIV prevalence is significantly associated with poor governance. International public health programs need to address societal structures in order to create strong foundations upon which effective healthcare interventions can be implemented. PMID:15850480

  8. Diarylsulfones, a novel class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Neamati, N; Mazumder, A; Zhao, H; Sunder, S; Burke, T R; Schultz, R J; Pommier, Y

    1997-01-01

    A majority of reported human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) inhibitors are polyhydroxylated aromatic compounds containing two phenyl rings separated by aliphatic or aromatic linkers. Most inhibitors possessing a catechol moiety exhibit considerable toxicity in cellular assays. In an effort to identify nonhydroxylated analogs, a series of aromatic sulfones were tested for their ability to inhibit the 3' processing and strand transfer steps that are necessary for HIV replication. Several aromatic sulfones have previously been shown to have moderate activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in cellular assays; however, their inhibitory potencies against IN have not been explored. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of a series of sulfones and sulfonamides against IN was determined. Among 52 diaryl sulfones tested, 4 were determined to be highly potent (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.8 to 10 micrograms/ml), 5 had good potencies (IC50, 11 to 50 micrograms/ml), 10 showed moderate potencies (IC50, 51 to 100 micrograms/ml), and 33 were inactive (IC50, > 100 micrograms/ml) against IN. All of the active compounds exhibited similar potencies against HIV-2 IN. Sulfa drugs, used extensively in treating Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in AIDs patients, were also examined. Among 19 sulfonamides tested, sulfasalazine (IC50, 50 micrograms/ml) was the most potent. We conclude that potent inhibitors of IN can be designed based on the results presented in this study. PMID:9021196

  9. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Harimurti, Kuntjoro; Saldi, Siti R F; Dewiasty, Esthika; Khoeri, Miftahuddin M; Yunihastuti, Evi; Putri, Tiara; Tafroji, Wisnu; Safari, Dodi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the distribution of serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae carried by adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Jakarta, Indonesia. Specimens of nasopharyngeal swab were collected from 200 HIV infected adults aged 21 to 63 years. Identification of S. pneumoniae was done by optochin susceptibility test and PCR for the presence of psaA and lytA genes. Serotyping was performed with sequential multiplex PCR and antibiotic susceptibility with the disk diffusion method. S. pneumoniae strains were carried by 10% adults with serotype 6A/B 20% was common serotype among cultured strains in 20 adults. Most of isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol (80%) followed by clindamycin (75%), erythromycin (75%), penicillin (55%), and tetracycline (50%). This study found resistance to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim was most common with only 15% of strains being susceptible. High non-susceptibility to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim was observed in S. pneumoniae strains carried by HIV infected adults in Jakarta, Indonesia. PMID:26896285

  10. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: Extremely rare presentation of pediatric human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Kailash Chandra; Shirolkar, Mukund S; Ghane, Vaishali R

    2014-01-01

    Acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a 10-year-old child, presenting with monoparesis, progressing to triplegia over 4 weeks is an extremely rare feature. The child had left upper motor neurone facial palsy with left hemiplegia, paralyzed right lower limb, grade zero power, exaggerated deep tendon reflexes and bilateral extensor plantars. Child tested positive for HIV by ELISA. CD3+ absolute count was 431. CD3+ CD4 count was 28, and CD45 absolute count was 478. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain and spine showed multiple ill-defined foci of hyperintensity in white matter suggestive of ADEM. Acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an extremely rare presenting feature of perinatally acquired HIV infection in paediatrics. Clinically child remained same even with methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, antituberculosis therapy, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis and supportive therapy. Child had sudden clinical deterioration and death before antiretroviral therapy could be initiated. This case emphasizes that pediatricians and neurophysicians should suspect HIV as an etiology of ADEM in cases with atypical clinical presentation and social risk factors, in spite of its very rare occurrence. PMID:25250073

  11. Survival Rates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Tuberculosis Co-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Roshanaei, Ghodratollah; Sabouri Ghannad, Masoud; Saatchi, Mohammad; Khazaei, Salman; Mirzaei, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: At present, limited clinical data is available regarding survival rates of patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/tuberculosis (TB) in developing countries. Objectives: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of HIV infection on the survival chances of active TB adults who disclosed their symptoms of TB in this part of Iran. Patients and Methods: The records and data of 807 patients only infected with TB and 21 co-infected patients with HIV/TB, who were admitted to primary health care units in Iran, were evaluated. Their survival time was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier Estimator, Log-rank test and SPSS version 16. Results: Cox regression analysis showed that co-infection with HIV significantly affects the survival rate of TB patients so that the rate of death was 20.7 (8.1-53) times more than TB infected patients alone. Also, married patients with tuberculosis were 2.7 times more at risk of death than single subjects. We also confirmed that in HIV/TB positive patients, married individuals were more prone to death than single subjects (P value < 0.001). Conclusions: Our results denote the need to progress diagnostic and preventive measures in this part of Iran. PMID:25371800

  12. Motor development of infants exposed to maternal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) but not infected

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To assess the motor development of infants exposed to maternal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods Thirty infants were assessed in the period from November 2009 to March 2010 at the AIDS Reference and Training Centre, in São Paulo, Brazil. The assessment instrument used in the research was the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS). All 30 infants used the antiretroviral drug properly for 42 consecutive days, in accordance with the protocol of the World Health Organization. Results Out of the total number of infants, 27 (90%) had proper motor performance and 3 (10%) presented motor delay, according to the AIMS. Discussion This study demonstrated that only 10% of the assessed group had developmental delay and no relation with environmental variables was detected, such as maternal level of education, social and economic issues, maternal practices, attendance at the day care center, and drug use during pregnancy. It is important to emphasize the necessity of studies with a larger number of participants. PMID:24171763

  13. Tropical Diseases Screening in Immigrant Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Fernando; Molina, Israel; Sulleiro, Elena; Burgos, Joaquín; Curran, Adrián; den Eynde, Eva Van; Villar del Saz, Sara; Navarro, Jordi; Crespo, Manuel; Ocaña, Inma; Ribera, Esteve; Falcó, Vicenç; Pahissa, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Latent parasitic infections can reactivate because of immunosuppression. We conducted a prospective observational study of all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected immigrants who visited the Infectious Diseases Department of the Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain, during June 2010–May 2011. Screening of the most prevalent tropical diseases (intestinal parasitosis, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, malaria, schistosomiasis, and strongyloidiasis) was performed according to geographic origin. A total of 190 patients were included: 141 (74.2%) from Latin America, 41 (21.6%) from sub-Saharan Africa, and 8 (4.2%) from northern Africa. Overall, 36.8% (70 of 190) of the patients had at least one positive result for any parasitic disease: 5 patients with positive Trypanosoma cruzi serology, 11 patients with positive Schistosoma mansoni serology, 35 patients with positive Strongyloides stercoralis serology, 7 patients with positive Leishmania infantum serology, intestinal parasitosis were detected in 37 patients, malaria was diagnosed in one symptomatic patient. We propose a screening and management strategy of latent parasitic infections in immigrant patients infected with HIV. PMID:23509119

  14. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus-1 on monocyte-derived dendritic cell maturation and function

    PubMed Central

    Fairman, P; Angel, J B

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are mediators of the adaptive immune response responsible for antigen presentation to naive T cells in secondary lymph organs. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has been reported to inhibit the maturation of DC, but a clear link between maturation and function has not been elucidated. To understand further the effects of HIV-1 on DC maturation and function, we expanded upon previous investigations and assessed the effects of HIV-1 infection on the expression of surface molecules, carbohydrate endocytosis, antigen presentation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responsiveness over the course of maturation. In vitro infection with HIV-1 resulted in an increase in the expression of DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) as well as decreases in maturation-induced CCR7 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-II expression. Retention of endocytosis that normally occurs with DC maturation as well as inhibition of antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells was also observed. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) responsiveness to LPS as measured by phosphorylation of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 was not affected by HIV-1 infection. In summary, in-vitro HIV-1 impairs DC maturation, as defined by cell surface protein expression, with selective alterations in mature DC function. Understanding the mechanisms of DC dysfunction in HIV infection will provide further insight into HIV immune pathogenesis. PMID:22943206

  15. Compounds from rose (Rosa rugosa) flowers with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Fu, M; Ng, T B; Jiang, Y; Pi, Z F; Liu, Z K; Li, L; Liu, F

    2006-09-01

    The aqueous extracts and ethanol precipitates of aqueous extracts of 18 medicinal herbs traditionally used in China were screened for their ability to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) in-vitro. Among the samples screened at a concentration of 500 microg mL-1, dried rose (Rosa rugosa) flowers showed the strongest inhibition. The ethanol precipitate of the aqueous extract of R. rugosa was processed and two components (P1 and P2) were obtained after ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Then, P1-a (Mr 150 kDa) and P1-b (Mr 8 kDa) were isolated from P1 by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. They inhibited the activity of HIV-1 RT with an IC50 of 158 nM and 148.16 microg mL-1 (18.5 microM), respectively. Further structural analyses revealed that P1-a was a polysaccharide-peptide complex, and P1-b was a polymer consisting of acteoside and acteoside derivatives identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, assays of carbohydrate and protein contents and high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. PMID:16945187

  16. Perception of reliability of human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS information sources.

    PubMed Central

    Essien, E. J.; Ross, M. W.; Linares, A. C.; Osemene, N. I.

    2000-01-01

    The sources of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS information as well as the perception of reliability of information from these sources may have a significant impact on the effectiveness of HIV risk reduction messages in reaching high risk populations. We examined the sources of HIV information and the perception of reliability of information from these sources among African Americans (n = 441), Hispanic Americans (n = 456), and whites (n = 297), in Houston, Texas. The data revealed that African Americans and Hispanics were most likely to receive their HIV/AIDS information from the "media" compared with whites who received most of their information from "government agencies and professionals." Information from "family, friends and schools" were regarded as the least reliable by respondents from all three ethnic groups. The data also showed that perceptions of reliability of information sources were influenced by level of educational attainment. Implications for designing target audience-specific intervention strategies for the prevention of the spread of HIV disease are discussed. PMID:10918761

  17. DC-SIGN and CLEC-2 Mediate Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Capture by Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Chaipan, Chawaree; Soilleux, Elizabeth J.; Simpson, Peter; Hofmann, Heike; Gramberg, Thomas; Marzi, Andrea; Geier, Martina; Stewart, Elizabeth A.; Eisemann, Jutta; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Fuller, Gemma L.; Pearce, Andrew C.; Watson, Steve P.; Hoxie, James A.; Baribaud, Frederic; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Platelets can engulf human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and a significant amount of HIV-1 in the blood of infected individuals is associated with these cells. However, it is unclear how platelets capture HIV-1 and whether platelet-associated virus remains infectious. DC-SIGN and other lectins contribute to capture of HIV-1 by dendritic cells (DCs) and facilitate HIV-1 spread in DC/T-cell cocultures. Here, we show that platelets express both the C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) and low levels of DC-SIGN. CLEC-2 bound to HIV-1, irrespective of the presence of the viral envelope protein, and facilitated HIV-1 capture by platelets. However, a substantial fraction of the HIV-1 binding activity of platelets was dependent on DC-SIGN. A combination of DC-SIGN and CLEC-2 inhibitors strongly reduced HIV-1 association with platelets, indicating that these lectins are required for efficient HIV-1 binding to platelets. Captured HIV-1 was maintained in an infectious state over several days, suggesting that HIV-1 can escape degradation by platelets and might use these cells to promote its spread. Our results identify CLEC-2 as a novel HIV-1 attachment factor and provide evidence that platelets capture and transfer infectious HIV-1 via DC-SIGN and CLEC-2, thereby possibly facilitating HIV-1 dissemination in infected patients. PMID:16940507

  18. Molecular Characterization of Clinical Isolates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Resistant to the Protease Inhibitor Darunavir

    SciTech Connect

    Sasková, Klára Grantz; Koíek, Milan; Rezácová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jirí; Yashina, Tatyana; Kagan, Ron M.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2010-03-04

    Darunavir is the most recently approved human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease (PR) inhibitor (PI) and is active against many HIV type 1 PR variants resistant to earlier-generation PIs. Darunavir shows a high genetic barrier to resistance development, and virus strains with lower sensitivity to darunavir have a higher number of PI resistance-associated mutations than viruses resistant to other PIs. In this work, we have enzymologically and structurally characterized a number of highly mutated clinically derived PRs with high levels of phenotypic resistance to darunavir. With 18 to 21 amino acid residue changes, the PR variants studied in this work are the most highly mutated HIV PR species ever studied by means of enzyme kinetics and X-ray crystallography. The recombinant proteins showed major defects in substrate binding, while the substrate turnover was less affected. Remarkably, the overall catalytic efficiency of the recombinant PRs (5% that of the wild-type enzyme) is still sufficient to support polyprotein processing and particle maturation in the corresponding viruses. The X-ray structures of drug-resistant PRs complexed with darunavir suggest that the impaired inhibitor binding could be explained by change in the PR-inhibitor hydrogen bond pattern in the P2 binding pocket due to a substantial shift of the aminophenyl moiety of the inhibitor. Recombinant virus phenotypic characterization, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray structural analysis thus help to explain darunavir resistance development in HIV-positive patients.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus postexposure prophylaxis for occupational exposure in a medical school hospital in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Hiransuthikul, N; Hiransuthikul, P; Kanasuk, Y

    2007-12-01

    This is a retrospective review of occupational exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and subsequent postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) among healthcare workers (HCWs) in King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital (KCMH), Bangkok, Thailand. From January 2002 to December 2004, data were collected from incident reports, the hospital's infectious diseases unit and the emergency department. There were 315 reported episodes of occupational exposure among 306 HCWs. Nurses (34.0%) were the HCWs most frequently exposed and percutaneous injury (91.4%) was the most common type of exposure. One-third of the source patients tested were infected with HIV. PEP was initiated following 200 (63.5%) of the 315 exposures and was started within 24h in >95% of cases. The most commonly prescribed PEP regimen was zidovudine, lamivudine and nelfinavir. Fifty-six percent of HCWs given PEP completed a four-week course but the remainder discontinued PEP prematurely due to side-effects, or after negative results from the source, or following informed risk reassessment or from their own accord. No exposed HCW acquired HIV during the study period. Appropriate counselling and careful risk assessment are important in achieving effective HIV PEP among HCWs. PMID:18023920

  20. "Frontal systems" behaviors in comorbid human immunodeficiency virus infection and methamphetamine dependency.

    PubMed

    Marquine, María J; Iudicello, Jennifer E; Morgan, Erin E; Brown, Gregory G; Letendre, Scott L; Ellis, Ronald J; Deutsch, Reena; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K

    2014-01-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and methamphetamine (MA) dependence are associated with neural injury preferentially involving frontostriatal circuits. Little is known, however, about how these commonly comorbid conditions impact behavioral presentations typically associated with frontal systems dysfunction. Our sample comprised 47 HIV-uninfected/MA-nondependent; 25 HIV-uninfected/MA-dependent; 36 HIV-infected/MA-nondependent; and 28 HIV-infected/MA-dependent subjects. Participants completed self-report measures of "frontal systems" behaviors, including impulsivity/disinhibition, sensation-seeking, and apathy. They also underwent comprehensive neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric assessments that allowed for detailed characterization of neurocognitive deficits and comorbid/premorbid conditions, including lifetime Mood and Substance Use Disorders, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, and Antisocial Personality Disorder. Multivariable regression models adjusting for potential confounds (i.e., demographics and comorbid/premorbid conditions) showed that MA dependence was independently associated with increased impulsivity/disinhibition, sensation-seeking and apathy, and HIV infection with greater apathy. However, we did not see synergistic/additive effects of HIV and MA on frontal systems behaviors. Global neurocognitive impairment was relatively independent of the frontal systems behaviors, which is consistent with the view that these constructs may have relatively separable biopsychosocial underpinnings. Future research should explore whether both neurocognitive impairment and frontal systems behaviors may independently contribute to everyday functioning outcomes relevant to HIV and MA. PMID:24290100

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Using drug from mathematical perceptive

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Amar Nath; Saha, Shubhankar; Roy, Priti Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Entry of acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus into the host immune cell involves the participation of various components of host and viral cell unit. These components may be categorized as attachment of the viral surface envelope protein subunit, gp120, to the CD4+ receptor and chemokine coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4, present on T cell surface. The viral fusion protein, gp41, the second cleaved subunit of Env undergoes reconfiguration and the membrane fusion reaction itself. Since the CD4+ T cell population is actively involved; the ultimate outcome of human immunodeficiency virus infection is total collapse of the host immune system. Mathematical modeling of the stages in viral membrane protein-host cell receptor-coreceptor interaction and the effect of antibody vaccine on the viral entry into the susceptible host cell has been carried out using as impulsive differential equations. We have studied the effect of antibody vaccination and determined analytically the threshold value of drug dosage and dosing interval for optimum levels of infection. We have also investigated the effect of perfect adherence of drug dose on the immune cell count in extreme cases and observed that systematic drug dosage of the immune cells leads to longer and improved lives. PMID:26568917

  2. Precancerous Cervix in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Women Thirty Years Old and above in Northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Adrawa, Norbert; Amongin, Dinah

    2016-01-01

    Background. Little is known about precancerous cervical lesion (PCCL), the precursor of cervical cancer among Human Immunodeficiency (HIV) infected women in a postconflict setting of Northern Uganda. Objective. To establish factors associated with PCCL among HIV infected women above thirty years of age in a postconflict setting of Northern Uganda. Method. This retrospective cohort study used electronic data from 995 HIV-positive women that attended cervical cancer screening during June 2014 and December 2015. Data on social, sexual, obstetric, and gynecological factors was analyzed at 95% confidence level. Multivariate analysis determined factors independently associated with positive PCCL. Probability value less than 5% was considered significant. Results. Prevalence of PCCL was 3.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.0–4.3). A positive PCCL was significantly associated with absence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) during clinic visits (adjusted odds ratio, aOR = 0.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.09–0.64; P = 0.004) and first pregnancy before the age of 20 years (aOR = 3.09; 95% CI: 1.21–7.89; P = 0.018). Conclusion. The prevalence of PCCL was low in the postconflict setting of Northern Uganda. HIV-positive women presenting with STDs and those with first pregnancy before the age of 20 years were at increased risk of PCCL. PMID:27478441

  3. Intrinsic activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease heterologous fusion proteins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, S J; Haines, J K; Huffman, K M

    1995-01-01

    We have generated various mammalian expression constructs that produce fusion proteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease (PR) with the HIV-1 Nef protein. The expression of these proteins is inducible by the HIV-1 Tat protein. High-level expression of proteolytically active PR was produced from PR imbedded into Nef coding sequences, flanked by PR cleavage sites. The fusion protein was cleaved nearly to completion and did not exhibit the regulated processing that is seen with the virally encoded PR. No cytotoxic effect of PR expression was detected. The self-cleavage of PR could be inhibited by a specific inhibitor of HIV-1 PR (U75875). Elimination of the aminoterminal PR cleavage site did not have a measurable effect on cleavage of the precursor fusion protein. The cleaved fusion proteins appeared to be extremely unstable in the transfected cells. These findings demonstrate the intrinsic activity of HIV-1 PR in mammalian cells, in the context of a heterologous fusion protein. PMID:7832989

  4. Occult hepatitis B virus infection among Mexican human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Muñoz, Ma Teresa; Maldonado-Rodriguez, Angelica; Rojas-Montes, Othon; Torres-Ibarra, Rocio; Gutierrez-Escolano, Fernanda; Vazquez-Rosales, Guillermo; Gomez, Alejandro; Muñoz, Onofre; Torres, Javier; Lira, Rosalia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of occult hepatitis B infection (OHBI) in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1+/ hepatitis B surface antigen negative (HBsAg)- patients from Mexico. METHODS: We investigated the presence of OHBI in 49 HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA was analyzed using nested PCR to amplify the Core (C) region and by real-time PCR to amplify a region of the S and X genes. The possible associations between the variables and OHBI were investigated using Pearson’s χ2 and/or Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS: We found that the frequency of OHBI was 49% among the group of 49 HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients studied. The presence of OHBI was significantly associated with the HIV-1 RNA viral load [odds ratio (OR) = 8.75; P = 0.001; 95%CI: 2.26-33.79] and with HIV-antiretroviral treatment with drugs that interfere with HBV replication (lamivudine, tenofovir or emtricitabine) (OR = 0.25; P = 0.05; 95%CI: 0.08-1.05). CONCLUSION: The OHBI frequency is high among 49 Mexican HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients and it was more frequent in patients with detectable HIV RNA, and less frequent in patients who are undergoing HIV-ARV treatment with drugs active against HBV. PMID:25309083

  5. Sociosexuality, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) susceptibility, and sexual behavior among African American women

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Naomi M.

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial correlation of risky sexual behavior is important for the design and implementation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related prevention and intervention studies. Sociosexuality (individual differences in endorsement of casual sexual behavior) and perceived susceptibility to HIV were examined for their relationship to each other, and in predicting risky sexual behavior among adult, heterosexual African American women using web-based and in-person surveys. This study included 275 geographically diverse women (mean age = 33.60 years), with 81% reported having at least a college degree, and over 50% reported incomes over $45,000. Results indicate that sociosexuality was significantly associated with perceived susceptibility, and both higher levels of sociosexuality and perceived susceptibility were significantly related to engagement in riskier sexual behavior. Age at first voluntary intercourse emerged as an important covariate in predicting risky sexual behavior among the participants. The need to include psychosocial variables associated with risky sexual behavior in sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV-related health promotion and intervention studies was discussed. PMID:25614851

  6. Evaluation of Coxsackievirus Infection in Children with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1–Associated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jenson, Hal B.; Gauntt, Charles J.; Easley, Kirk A.; Pitt, Jane; Lipshultz, Steven E.; McIntosh, Kenneth; Shearer, William T.

    2015-01-01

    In a matched case-control study of the association between coxsackieviruses and cardiac impairment, 24 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1–infected children with cardiac impairment were compared with 24 HIV-1–infected control subjects. Serologic evidence of coxsackievirus infection was present in all children, with no significant difference in geometric mean antibody titers between case patients and control subjects. Conditional logistic regression to test for an association between coxsackievirus antibody titer and the presence or absence of cardiac impairment, by any indicator, showed an odds ratio of 1.11 (95% confidence interval, 0.58–2.10; P = .75), indicating no association between coxsackievirus infection and cardiac impairment. Coxsackievirus antibody titers correlated positively with total IgG levels in nonrapid progressors but not in rapid progressors. Paired serum samples taken before and after diagnosis of cardiac impairment in 5 patients showed no evidence of intervening coxsackievirus infection. These results do not identify a causal role for coxsackieviruses for cardiomyopathy in HIV-1–infected children. PMID:12085328

  7. Increased suppressor T cells in probable transmitters of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Seage, G R; Horsburgh, C R; Hardy, A M; Mayer, K H; Barry, M A; Groopman, J E; Jaffe, H W; Lamb, G A

    1989-12-01

    To evaluate behavioral and immunologic factors related to transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by homosexual intercourse, we studied a population of 329 homosexual/bisexual men (155 partner-pairs) seen in a community health center and medical outpatient clinic. Logistic regression analysis showed that behavioral risk factors for infection in the 130 HIV-infected men included: receptive anal intercourse (OR 4.6, 95% CI-1.8, 12.1); receptive fisting (OR 2.5, CI-1.1, 7.0); nitrite use (OR 2.3, CI-1.2, 4.6); history of gonorrhea or syphilis (OR 2.3, CI-1.4, 3.9); and history of sexual contact with men from areas with many AIDS cases (OR 1.9, CI-1.0, 3.5). Comparing seven men who were probable transmitters of HIV and 11 men who had not transmitted HIV to their uninfected partners despite unprotected insertive anal intercourse, we found no differences in HIV isolation from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, circulating HIV antigen detection, or presence of neutralizing antibody to HIV. Helper T-cell numbers were not significantly different between the two groups, but transmitters had more suppressor T-cells than did nontransmitters. PMID:2530906

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus testing services at syringe exchange programs: availability and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Heinzerling, Keith G; Kral, Alex H; Flynn, Neil M; Anderson, Rachel L; Scott, Andrea; Gilbert, Mary L; Asch, Steven M; Bluthenthal, Ricky N

    2007-06-01

    We described the availability and outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing services at syringe exchange programs throughout California, using interviews with 24 syringe exchange program directors and 560 syringe exchange clients. Both HIV and HCV testing services were available in 62% of programs, 21% had HIV testing only, and 17% had neither. Programs administered by health care/social service providers were more likely than independent syringe exchange programs to have HIV and HCV testing services available. Among clients of programs with testing available, clients of illegal programs were significantly less likely than clients of legal programs to have used syringe exchange HIV and HCV testing services. The availability of HIV and HCV testing services at syringe exchange programs varies, and the use of existing testing services by clients is not universal. Efforts to increase both the availability of HIV and HCV testing services at syringe exchange programs and the use of existing testing services are needed. PMID:17481466

  9. Characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 binding to liposomes containing galactosylceramide.

    PubMed

    Long, D; Berson, J F; Cook, D G; Doms, R W

    1994-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infects some cell types which lack CD4, demonstrating that one or more alternative viral receptors exist. One such receptor is galactosylceramide (GalCer), a glycosphingolipid distributed widely in the nervous system and in colonic epithelial cells. Using a liposome flotation assay, we found that the HIV-1 surface glycoprotein, gp120, quantitatively bound to liposomes containing GalCer but not to liposomes containing phospholipids and cholesterol alone. Binding was saturable and was inhibited by preincubating liposomes with anti-GalCer antibodies. We observed less efficient binding of gp120 to liposomes containing lactosylceramide, glucosylceramide, and galactosylsulfate, whereas no binding to liposomes containing mixed gangliosides, psychosine, or sphingomyelin was detected. Binding to GalCer was rapid, largely independent of temperature and pH, and stable to conditions which remove most peripheral membrane proteins. By contrast, gp120 bound to lactosylceramide could be removed by 2 M potassium chloride or 3 M potassium thiocyanate, demonstrating a less stable interaction. Removal of N-linked oligosaccharides on gp120 did not affect binding efficiency. However, as previously observed for CD4 binding, heat denaturation of gp120 prevented binding to GalCer. Finally, binding was critically dependent on the concentration of GalCer in the target membrane, suggesting that binding to glycolipid-rich domains occurs and that GalCer conformation may be important for gp120 recognition. PMID:8057468

  10. Host-specific driving force in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolution in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Diaz, R S; Ho, D D; Mosley, J W; Busch, M P; Mayer, A

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the process of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolution in vivo, a total of 179 HIV-1 V3 sequences derived from cell-free plasma were determined from serial samples in three epidemiologically linked individuals (one infected blood donor and two transfusion recipients) over a maximum period of 8 years. A systematic analysis of pairwise comparisons of intrapatient sequences, both within and between each sample time point, revealed a preponderance and accumulation of nonsynonymous rather than synonymous substitutions in the V3 loop and flanking regions as they diverged over time. This strongly argues for the dominant role that positive selection for amino acid change plays in governing the pattern and process of HIV-1 env V3 evolution in vivo and nullifies hypotheses of purely neutral or mutation-driven evolution or completely chance events. In addition, different rates of evolution of HIV-1 were observed in these three different individuals infected with the same viral strain, suggesting that the degree of positive pressure for HIV-1 amino acid change is host dependent. Finally, the observed similar rate of accumulation in divergence within and between infected individuals suggests that the process of genetic divergence in the HIV epidemic proceeds regardless of host-to-host transmission events, i.e., that transmission does not reset the evolutionary clock. PMID:9032400

  11. Phylogenetic Mapping of Recombination Hotspots in Human Immunodeficiency Virus via Spatially Smoothed Change-Point Processes

    PubMed Central

    Minin, Vladimir N.; Dorman, Karin S.; Fang, Fang; Suchard, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a Bayesian framework for inferring spatial preferences of recombination from multiple putative recombinant nucleotide sequences. Phylogenetic recombination detection has been an active area of research for the last 15 years. However, only recently attempts to summarize information from several instances of recombination have been made. We propose a hierarchical model that allows for simultaneous inference of recombination breakpoint locations and spatial variation in recombination frequency. The dual multiple change-point model for phylogenetic recombination detection resides at the lowest level of our hierarchy under the umbrella of a common prior on breakpoint locations. The hierarchical prior allows for information about spatial preferences of recombination to be shared among individual data sets. To overcome the sparseness of breakpoint data, dictated by the modest number of available recombinant sequences, we a priori impose a biologically relevant correlation structure on recombination location log odds via a Gaussian Markov random field hyperprior. To examine the capabilities of our model to recover spatial variation in recombination frequency, we simulate recombination from a predefined distribution of breakpoint locations. We then proceed with the analysis of 42 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intersubtype gag recombinants and identify a putative recombination hotspot. PMID:17194781

  12. Cutaneous Co-infected Cytomegalovirus and Herpes Simplex Virus Perigenital Ulcers in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Jason; Cannon, Sarah; Cam, Kristin; Keller, Matthew

    2013-10-01

    There is uncertainty regarding the pathogenic nature of cytomegalovirus in cutaneous lesions co-infected with herpes simplex virus. It is widely believed that herpes simplex virus is the main pathogenic factor in such lesions and that cytomegalovirus plays little if any role. There are, however, isolated case reports that describe cytomegalovirus as an important driving pathogen in such lesions. The authors present two human immunodeficiency virus patients who have cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus co-infected perigenital ulcers, one of whom improved on valacyclovir, while the other, who was already on valacyclovir for chronic herpes simplex virus suppression, showed no improvement with a single dose of cidofovir. He only showed rapid improvement when treated with valganciclovir. The latter patient underscores the viewpoint that at least in some cases, cytomegalovirus may be an important driving force behind the formation of such lesions. The authors therefore recommend that clinicians be aware of the possible pathogenic role of cytomegalovirus in these ulcers, and, in nonhealing ulcers, use anti-cytomegalovirus agents to prevent the onset of systemic disease. These results warrant further study of the pathogenesis of cytomegalovirus in co-infected herpes simplex virus ulcers. PMID:24155993

  13. Measuring performance decrements in aviation personnel infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Mapou, R L; Kay, G G; Rundell, J R; Temoshok, L

    1993-02-01

    There is controversy over whether cognitive impairment occurs in early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. When impairment is reported, findings are typically subclinical, affect only a minority, and their relationship to occupational functioning has not been established. Despite such findings, it has been recommended that HIV-seropositive pilots be disqualified from flying. This paper reviews research relevant to measuring performance decrements in HIV-infected aviators. Based upon current data, we conclude that although subtle neurobehavioral dysfunction may occur in some asymptomatic HIV-seropositive individuals, there is no research which has demonstrated associated decrements in aviation-related skills. Thus, it may be premature to recommend medical disqualification of all HIV-seropositive aviators. We propose, instead, that sensitive neurocognitive measures, incorporated into a comprehensive neurodiagnostic evaluation, could be used to evaluate asymptomatic HIV-seropositive aviators. Only those who are impaired on evaluation would be disqualified from flying. Concurrently, research investigating the relationship between abnormalities and aviation abilities would be conducted. PMID:8431191

  14. Expression and characterization of glycophospholipid-anchored human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Salzwedel, K; Johnston, P B; Roberts, S J; Dubay, J W; Hunter, E

    1993-01-01

    Four chimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env genes were constructed which encoded the extracellular domain of either the wild-type or a cleavage-defective HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp160) fused at one of two different positions in env to a C-terminal glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) attachment signal from the mouse Thy-1.1 glycoprotein. All four of the constructs encoded glycoproteins that were efficiently expressed when Rev was supplied in trans, and the two cleavable forms were processed normally to gp120 and a chimeric "gp41." The chimeric glycoproteins, in contrast to the wild-type glycoprotein, could be cleaved from the surface of transfected cells by treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, indicating that they were anchored in the plasma membrane by a GPI moiety. These GPI-anchored glycoproteins were transported intracellularly at a rate only slightly lower than that of the full-length HIV-1 glycoprotein and were present on the cell surface in equivalent amounts. Nevertheless, all four glycoproteins were defective in mediating both cell-cell and virus-cell fusion as determined by syncytium formation in COS-1-HeLa-T4 cell mixtures and trans complementation of an env-defective HIV-1 genome. Images PMID:8102410

  15. Proteomic landscape of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Elizabeth V.; Crothers, Kristina; Chow, Yu-Hua; Park, David R.; Goodlett, David R.; Schnapp, Lynn M.

    2013-01-01

    The lung is an important reservoir of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Individuals infected with HIV are more prone to pulmonary infections and chronic lung disorders. We hypothesized that comprehensively profiling the proteomic landscape of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in patients with HIV would provide insights into how this virus alters the lung milieu and contributes to pathogenesis of HIV-related lung diseases. BALF was obtained from five HIV-negative (HIV−) and six asymptomatic HIV-positive (HIV+) subjects not on antiretroviral therapy. Each sample underwent shotgun proteomic analysis based on HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. Differentially expressed proteins between the groups were identified using statistical methods based on spectral counting. Mechanisms of disease were explored using functional annotation to identify overlapping and distinct pathways enriched between the BALF proteome of HIV+ and HIV− subjects. We identified a total of 318 unique proteins in BALF of HIV− and HIV+ subjects. Of these, 87 were differentially up- or downregulated between the two groups. Many of these differentially expressed proteins are known to interact with key HIV proteins. Functional analysis of differentially regulated proteins implicated downregulation of immune responses in lungs of HIV+ patients. Combining shotgun proteomic analysis with computational methods demonstrated that the BALF proteome is significantly altered during HIV infection. We found that immunity-related pathways are underrepresented in HIV+ patients. These findings implicate mechanisms whereby HIV invokes local immunosuppression in the lung and increases the susceptibility of HIV+ patients to develop a wide range of infectious and noninfectious pulmonary diseases. PMID:24213920

  16. Exosomes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I Pathogenesis: Threat or Opportunity?

    PubMed

    Teow, Sin-Yeang; Nordin, Alif Che; Ali, Syed A; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng

    2016-01-01

    Nanometre-sized vesicles, also known as exosomes, are derived from endosomes of diverse cell types and present in multiple biological fluids. Depending on their cellular origins, the membrane-bound exosomes packed a variety of functional proteins and RNA species. These microvesicles are secreted into the extracellular space to facilitate intercellular communication. Collective findings demonstrated that exosomes from HIV-infected subjects share many commonalities with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I (HIV-1) particles in terms of proteomics and lipid profiles. These observations postulated that HIV-resembled exosomes may contribute to HIV pathogenesis. Interestingly, recent reports illustrated that exosomes from body fluids could inhibit HIV infection, which then bring up a new paradigm for HIV/AIDS therapy. Accumulative findings suggested that the cellular origin of exosomes may define their effects towards HIV-1. This review summarizes the two distinctive roles of exosomes in regulating HIV pathogenesis. We also highlighted several additional factors that govern the exosomal functions. Deeper understanding on how exosomes promote or abate HIV infection can significantly contribute to the development of new and potent antiviral therapeutic strategy and vaccine designs. PMID:26981123

  17. Mutation analysis of IL2RG in human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Puck, J M; Pepper, A E; Henthorn, P S; Candotti, F; Isakov, J; Whitwam, T; Conley, M E; Fischer, R E; Rosenblatt, H M; Small, T N; Buckley, R H

    1997-03-15

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immunity. In humans, SCID is most commonly caused by mutations in the X-linked gene IL2RG, which encodes the common gamma chain, gamma c, of the leukocyte receptors for interleukin-2 and multiple other cytokines. To investigate the frequency and variety of IL2RG mutations that cause SCID, we analyzed DNA, RNA, and B-cell lines from a total of 103 unrelated SCID-affected males and their relatives using a combination of molecular and immunologic techniques. Sixty-two different mutations spanning all eight IL2RG exons were found in 87 cases, making possible correlations between mutation type and functional consequences. Although skewed maternal X chromosome inactivation, single-strand conformation polymorphism, mRNA expression, and cell surface staining with anti-gamma c antibodies were all helpful in establishing IL2RG defects as the cause of SCID, only dideoxy fingerprinting and DNA sequence determination each detected 100% of the IL2RG mutations in our series. Abnormal gamma c chains may be expressed in the lymphocytes of as many as two thirds of patients with X-linked SCID. Specific mutation diagnosis thus remains technically challenging, but it is important for genetic counseling and perhaps for helping to select appropriate subjects for retroviral gene therapy trials, This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use. PMID:9058718

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus has similar effects on brain volumetrics and cognition in males and females.

    PubMed

    Behrman-Lay, Ashley M; Paul, Robert H; Heaps-Woodruff, Jodi; Baker, Laurie M; Usher, Christina; Ances, Beau M

    2016-02-01

    Most studies that have examined neuropsychological impairments associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have focused on males, yet females represent one of the largest groups of newly infected patients. Further, few studies have examined neuropsychological performance and neuroimaging outcomes among females compared to males in the modern era of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). The present study investigated neuropsychological performance and brain volumetrics among HIV+ males (n = 93) and females (n = 44) on stable HAART compared to HIV seronegative (HIV-) males (n = 42) and females (n = 49). Results revealed a significant effect of HIV on neuropsychological performance and neuroimaging measures. An effect of gender, independent of HIV status, was also observed for neuroimaging measures but not neuropsychological performance. Additionally, no significant differences in neuropsychological performance or brain volumetrics were seen between HIV+ males and females. No significant interaction was observed between HIV and gender on either neuropsychological or neuroimaging indices. Our results suggest that both HIV+ males and females treated with HAART experience similar outcomes in terms of brain integrity. PMID:26306688

  19. Adherence to directly observed antiretroviral therapy among human immunodeficiency virus-infected prison inmates.

    PubMed

    Wohl, David A; Stephenson, Becky L; Golin, Carol E; Kiziah, C Nichole; Rosen, David; Ngo, Bich; Liu, Honghu; Kaplan, Andrew H

    2003-06-15

    Directly observed therapy (DOT) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is commonly used in correctional settings; however, the efficacy of DOT for treating HIV infection has not been determined. We prospectively assessed adherence to antiretroviral therapy regimens among 31 HIV-infected prison inmates who were receiving >or=1 antiretrovirals via DOT. Adherence was measured by self-report, pill count, electronic monitoring caps, and, for DOT only, medication administration records. Overall, median adherence was 90%, as measured by pill count; 86%, by electronic monitoring caps; and 100%, by self-report. Adherence, as measured by electronic monitoring caps, was >90% in 32% of the subjects. In 91% of cases, adherence, as measured by medication administration records, was greater than that recorded by electronic monitoring caps for the same medications administered by DOT. Objective methods of measurement revealed that adherence to antiretroviral regimens administered wholly or in part by DOT was

  20. Pros and cons of liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients

    PubMed Central

    Baccarani, Umberto; Righi, Elda; Adani, Gian Luigi; Lorenzin, Dario; Pasqualucci, Alberto; Bassetti, Matteo; Risaliti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Before the introduction of combined highly active antiretroviral therapy, a positive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serological status represented an absolute contraindication for solid organ transplant (SOT). The advent of highly effective combined antiretroviral therapy in 1996 largely contributed to the increased demand for SOT in HIV-positive individuals due to increased patients’ life expectancy associated with the increasing prevalence of end-stage liver disease (ESLD). Nowadays, liver failure represents a frequent cause of mortality in the HIV-infected population mainly due to coinfection with hepatitis viruses sharing the same way of transmission. Thus, liver transplantation (LT) represents a reasonable approach in HIV patients with stable infection and ESLD. Available data presently supports with good evidence the practice of LT in the HIV-positive population. Thus, the issue is no longer “whether it is correct to transplant HIV-infected patients”, but “who are the patients who can be safely transplanted” and “when is the best time to perform LT”. Indeed, the benefits of LT in HIV-infected patients, especially in terms of mid- and long-term patient and graft survivals, are strictly related to the patients’ selection and to the correct timing for transplantation, especially when hepatitis C virus coinfection is present. Aim of this article is to review the pros and cons of LT in the cohort of HIV infected recipients. PMID:24833865

  1. Insights into human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis B virus co-infection in India

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Runu; Pal, Ananya

    2015-01-01

    Shared routes of transmission lead to frequent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection in a host which results in about 10% of HIV positive individuals to have chronic hepatitis B infection worldwide. In post-antiretroviral therapy era, liver diseases have emerged as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals and HBV co-infection have become the major health issue among this population particularly from the regions with endemic HBV infection. In setting of HIV-HBV co-infection, HIV significantly impacts the natural history of HBV infection, its disease profile and the treatment outcome in negative manner. Moreover, the epidemiological pattern of HBV infection and the diversity in HBV genome (genotypic and phenotypic) are also varied in HIV co-infected subjects as compared to HBV mono-infected individuals. Several reports on the abovementioned issues are available from developed parts of the world as well as from sub-Saharan African countries. In contrast, most of these research areas remained unexplored in India despite having considerable burden of HIV and HBV infections. This review discusses present knowledge from the studies on HIV-HBV co-infection in India and relevant reports from different parts of the world. Issues needed for the future research relevant to HIV-HBV co-infection in India are also highlighted here, including a call for further investigations on this field of study. PMID:26279986

  2. Barriers to human immunodeficiency virus related risk reduction among male street prostitutes.

    PubMed

    Simon, P M; Morse, E V; Balson, P M; Osofsky, H J; Gaumer, H R

    1993-01-01

    Two hundred eleven male street prostitutes between the ages of 18 and 51 years were interviewed and tested for antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Economic, social, and emotional barriers to the reduction of HIV-related risk behavior were examined within the context of several concepts present in the Health Belief Model (HBM). Three lifestyle factors were found to function as barriers to engaging in risk reduction behavior. Subjects who were more economically dependent on prostitution, perceived less control over the hustling encounter, and reported increased pleasure from sexual activity with their customers were more likely to engage in risk-taking behavior. Prostitutes' perception of the severity of HIV infection was not significantly associated with their risk behavior. Unexpected findings indicated that increases in perceived susceptibility to HIV and perceived benefit of condom use for HIV prevention were significantly related to increased risk-taking behavior. Practical applications of findings in the design and implementation of future HIV-related preventive health education programs are discussed. PMID:8491637

  3. Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus during early infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M A; Kingsley, L A; Atchison, R W; Belle, S; Breinig, M C; Ho, M; Rinaldo, C R

    1991-01-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was investigated in 49 homosexual men who seroconverted to HIV (cases) as compared with 49 matched controls who remained seronegative to HIV during a longitudinal study. EBV infection was reactivated in cases 6 months, but not 12 months, prior to HIV seroconversion as compared with controls and remained reactivated during 18 months of follow-up after HIV seroconversion, as shown by increases in immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibody titers to EBV early antigen. Antibody titers to EBV viral capsid antigen did not differ between cases and controls prior to the time of seroconversion to HIV but were significantly increased among cases by the first seropositive study visit and remained elevated during the 18 months after HIV seroconversion. Total serum IgG levels were increased in cases at the visit of seroconversion, and during 18 months of follow-up, but did not correlate with enhanced IgG production specific for EBV antigens. Significant decreases in numbers of CD4+ cells and increases in numbers of CD8+ cells during this early phase of HIV infection were not associated with changes in patterns of EBV antibody responses. Reactivation of EBV beginning 6 months before HIV seroconversion may have implications regarding the role of this herpesvirus in the pathogenesis of HIV. PMID:1650790

  4. Liver fibrosis in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection: Diagnostic methods and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, Caterina; Martini, Salvatore; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Macera, Margherita; Zampino, Rosa; Coppola, Nicola; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-10-28

    Several non-invasive surrogate methods have recently challenged the main role of liver biopsy in assessing liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients, applied to avoid the well-known side effects of liver puncture. Serological tests involve the determination of biochemical markers of synthesis or degradation of fibrosis, tests not readily available in clinical practice, or combinations of routine tests used in chronic hepatitis and HIV/HCV coinfection. Several radiologic techniques have also been proposed, some of which commonly used in clinical practice. The studies performed to compare the prognostic value of non-invasive surrogate methods with that of the degree of liver fibrosis assessed on liver tissue have not as yet provided conclusive results. Each surrogate technique has shown some limitations, including the risk of over- or under-estimating the extent of liver fibrosis. The current knowledge on liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients will be summarized in this review article, which is addressed in particular to physicians involved in this setting in their clinical practice. PMID:26523204

  5. How human immunodeficiency virus voluntary testing can contribute to tuberculosis control.

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey-Faussett, Peter; Maher, Dermot; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Nunn, Paul; Perriëns, Joseph; Raviglione, Mario

    2002-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is fueling the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. However, despite their close epidemiological links, the public health responses have largely been separate. WHO has set out a strategy to decrease the burden of HIV-related TB, comprising interventions against both TB and HIV. Voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) for HIV can link TB and HIV programme activities. The benefits of VCT for HIV to TB patients include referral for appropriate clinical care and support for those testing HIV-positive. Likewise, people attending a centre for VCT can benefit from TB screening: those found to be both HIV-positive and with active TB need referral for TB treatment; those without active TB should be offered TB preventive treatment with isoniazid. To explore how VCT for HIV can contribute to a more coherent response to TB, WHO is coordinating the ProTEST Initiative. The name "ProTEST" is derived from the Promotion of voluntary testing as an entry point for access to the core interventions of intensified TB case-finding and isoniazid preventive treatment. Other interventions may be added to provide finally a comprehensive range of HIV and TB prevention and care interventions. Under the ProTEST Initiative, pilot districts are establishing links between centres for VCT for HIV and TB prevention and care. This will pave the way for large-scale operationalization of the comprehensive range of interventions needed to control TB in settings with high HIV prevalence. PMID:12571721

  6. Simultaneous Cell-to-Cell Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus to Multiple Targets through Polysynapses▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicka, Dominika; Feldmann, Jérôme; Porrot, Françoise; Wietgrefe, Steve; Guadagnini, Stéphanie; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Estaquier, Jérôme; Haase, Ashley T.; Sol-Foulon, Nathalie; Schwartz, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) efficiently propagates through cell-to-cell contacts, which include virological synapses (VS), filopodia, and nanotubes. Here, we quantified and characterized further these diverse modes of contact in lymphocytes. We report that viral transmission mainly occurs across VS and through “polysynapses,” a rosette-like structure formed between one infected cell and multiple adjacent recipients. Polysynapses are characterized by simultaneous HIV clustering and transfer at multiple membrane regions. HIV Gag proteins often adopt a ring-like supramolecular organization at sites of intercellular contacts and colocalize with CD63 tetraspanin and raft components GM1, Thy-1, and CD59. In donor cells engaged in polysynapses, there is no preferential accumulation of Gag proteins at contact sites facing the microtubule organizing center. The LFA-1 adhesion molecule, known to facilitate viral replication, enhances formation of polysynapses. Altogether, our results reveal an underestimated mode of viral transfer through polysynapses. In HIV-infected individuals, these structures, by promoting concomitant infection of multiple targets in the vicinity of infected cells, may facilitate exponential viral growth and escape from immune responses. PMID:19369333

  7. Evaluation of a dipstick method for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Beristain, C N; Rojkin, L F; Lorenzo, L E

    1995-01-01

    Serology has been a fundamental tool to prevent post-transfusional infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and for epidemiological surveys, the first step to attempt control of the pandemia. Enzyme immunoassay is in widespread use. Nevertheless, simpler methods are needed in many countries, where laboratory facilities and trained personnel are limited, and HIV prevalence is high. The evaluation of a simple and noninstrumented HIV antibody test is presented here. The test employs synthetic antigens of HIV-1 and HIV-2 attached to the teeth of a polystyrene comb, which fit into the wells of standard microtiter plates where samples are diluted. Captured antibodies are developed with colloidal gold-labeled Protein A. Three seroconversion panels plus 662 samples were tested, including HIV-1 and HIV-2-infected individuals, normal blood donors, and a noninfected baby born to a seroreactive mother. When compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot, the dipstick showed 100% sensitivity and 98.7% specificity. The simplicity of result evaluations and excellent reagent stability make the dipstick suitable for small blood banks and for epidemiological surveys. PMID:8587001

  8. Influence of membrane fluidity on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Shinji . E-mail: biodef@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Yusa, Keisuke; Monde, Kazuaki; Akaike, Takaaki; Maeda, Yosuke

    2005-04-08

    For penetration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), formation of fusion-pores might be required for accumulating critical numbers of fusion-activated gp41, followed by multiple-site binding of gp120 with receptors, with the help of fluidization of the plasma membrane and viral envelope. Correlation between HIV-1 infectivity and fluidity was observed by treatment of fluidity-modulators, indicating that infectivity was dependent on fluidity. A 5% decrease in fluidity suppressed the HIV-1 infectivity by 56%. Contrarily, a 5% increase in fluidity augmented the infectivity by 2.4-fold. An increased temperature of 40 deg C or treatment of 0.2% xylocaine after viral adsorption at room temperature enhanced the infectivity by 2.6- and 1.5-fold, respectively. These were inhibited by anti-CXCR4 peptide, implying that multiple-site binding was accelerated at 40 deg C or by xylocaine. Thus, fluidity of both the plasma membrane and viral envelope was required to form the fusion-pore and to complete the entry of HIV-1.

  9. Gestational surrogacy for a human immunodeficiency virus seropositive sperm donor: what are the ethics?

    PubMed

    Adams, Karen E

    2003-01-01

    Clinics that provide assisted reproductive technology (ART) are guided by general guidelines set forth by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and its Ethics Committee and are free to set their own policies within those guidelines. This article presents a case in which a university clinic was presented with a novel request. A same-sex male couple, both positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), asked to use one of the couple's sperm to establish a pregnancy in an unrelated gestational surrogate through in vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and embryo transfer. The couple's argument in favor of such a plan was that no documented case of HIV seroconversion had so far occurred in recipients of gametes from HIV-positive donors. Since gestational surrogates routinely accept the risks inherent in pregnancy and childbearing, an informed surrogate should be allowed to accept the risks of such an arrangement. They further argued that if no clinic were willing to provide such services, data regarding seroconversion would never be obtained. The university ethics committee examined the fertility clinic's policies and found the clinic's refusal to provide such services to be completely consistent with its policy that allows providing services to HIV-discordant couples, same-sex couples, and gestational surrogates, but that always acts to protect the surrogate from exposure to infectious risk. PMID:12948103

  10. Liver fibrosis in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection: Diagnostic methods and clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Sagnelli, Caterina; Martini, Salvatore; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Macera, Margherita; Zampino, Rosa; Coppola, Nicola; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Several non-invasive surrogate methods have recently challenged the main role of liver biopsy in assessing liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients, applied to avoid the well-known side effects of liver puncture. Serological tests involve the determination of biochemical markers of synthesis or degradation of fibrosis, tests not readily available in clinical practice, or combinations of routine tests used in chronic hepatitis and HIV/HCV coinfection. Several radiologic techniques have also been proposed, some of which commonly used in clinical practice. The studies performed to compare the prognostic value of non-invasive surrogate methods with that of the degree of liver fibrosis assessed on liver tissue have not as yet provided conclusive results. Each surrogate technique has shown some limitations, including the risk of over- or under-estimating the extent of liver fibrosis. The current knowledge on liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients will be summarized in this review article, which is addressed in particular to physicians involved in this setting in their clinical practice. PMID:26523204

  11. Identification of a binding site for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, K; Zambrano, N; Baldwin, E T; Shapiro, B A; Erickson, J W; Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M; Appella, E

    1993-06-01

    The nucleocapsid (NC) protein NCp7 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is important for encapsidation of the virus genome, RNA dimerization, and primer tRNA annealing in vitro. Here we present evidence from gel mobility-shift experiments indicating that NCp7 binds specifically to an RNA sequence. Two complexes were identified in native gels. The more slowly migrating complex contained two RNA molecules and one peptide, while the more rapidly migrating one is composed of one RNA and one peptide. Further, mutational analysis of the RNA shows that the predicted stem and loop structure of stem-loop 1 plays a critical role. Our results show that NCp7 binds to a unique RNA structure within the psi region; in addition, this structure is necessary for RNA dimerization. We propose that NCp7 binds to the RNA via a direct interaction of one zinc-binding motif to stem-loop 1 followed by binding of the other zinc-binding motif to stem-loop 1, stem-loop 2, or the linker region of the second RNA molecule, forming a bridge between the two RNAs. PMID:8506369

  12. TAR-independent replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bagasra, O; Khalili, K; Seshamma, T; Taylor, J P; Pomerantz, R J

    1992-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) may differ in various cell types and with various exogenous stimuli. Astrocytic glial cells, which can support HIV-1 replication in cell cultures and may be infected in vivo, are demonstrated to provide a cellular milieu in which TAR mutant HIV-1 viruses may replicate. Using transfections of various TAR mutant HIV-1 proviral constructs, we demonstrate TAR-independent replication in unstimulated astrocytic cells. We further demonstrate, using viral constructs with mutations in the tat gene and in the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B)-binding sites (enhancer) of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, that TAR-independent HIV-1 replication in astrocytic cells requires both intact NF-kappa B moiety-binding motifs in the HIV-1 long terminal repeat and Tat expression. We measured HIV-1 p24 antigen production, syncytium formation, and levels and patterns of viral RNA expression by Northern (RNA) blotting to characterize TAR-independent HIV-1 expression in astrocytic glial cells. This alternative regulatory pathway of TAR-independent, Tat-responsive viral production may be important in certain cell types for therapies which seek to perturb Tat-TAR binding as a strategy to interrupt the viral lytic cycle. Images PMID:1433528

  13. Topoisomerase I activity associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) particles and equine infectious anemia virus core.

    PubMed Central

    Priel, E; Showalter, S D; Roberts, M; Oroszlan, S; Segal, S; Aboud, M; Blair, D G

    1990-01-01

    In the present study, we found a topoisomerase I (topo I) activity in two strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) particles. The topo I activity was located in the EIAV cores and differed from the cellular topo I in its ionic requirements and response to ATP, indicating that these were two distinct forms of this enzyme. Topo I activity was removed from the viral lysates and viral cores by anti-topo I antiserum. The only protein recognized by this antiserum was an 11.5 kd protein in HIV lysate and 11 kd in EIAV lysate. We showed that the 11 kd protein recognized by the anti-topo I antiserum is the EIAV p11 nucleocapsid protein. Furthermore, purified topo I protein blocked the binding of the antibodies to the p11 protein and vice versa, purified p11 protein blocked the binding of these antibodies to the cellular topo I. These results suggest that the EIAV p11 nucleocapsid protein and the cellular topo I share similar epitopes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2174357

  14. Mutational analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Eli Nef function.

    PubMed Central

    Zazopoulos, E; Haseltine, W A

    1992-01-01

    The studies presented here define an internally consistent experimental system that permits systematic analysis of the effect of nef on the rate of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in a CD4+ tumor T-cell line and in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The parental full-length Nef protein, derived from the Eli strain of HIV-1, accelerates virus replication in both cell types. Mutations that destabilize or alter the intracellular location of the protein affect the ability of the Nef protein to accelerate virus replication. A set of mutants was made in amino acids proposed to be required for Nef function, including threonine and serine residues proposed to be targets for phosphorylation, and in sequences thought to resemble the G-1, G-3, and G-4 sites of the family of G proteins. In most cases alterations of the critical amino acids yield stable Nef proteins of parental phenotype. These results challenge the existing theories for the mechanism of Nef function. The results also identify two residues in the carboxyl half of the protein that are important for Nef function. Images PMID:1631166

  15. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Oligomeric Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp140

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Patricia L.; Sugiura, Wataru; Montefiori, David C.; Broder, Christopher C.; Lee, Susan A.; Wild, Carl; Lifson, Jeffrey; Moss, Bernard

    2001-01-01

    The biologically active form of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein is oligomeric. We previously described a soluble HIV-1 IIIB Env protein, gp140, with a stable oligomeric structure composed of uncleaved gp120 linked to the ectodomain of gp41 (P. L. Earl, C. C. Broder, D. Long, S. A. Lee, J. Peterson, S. Chakrabarti, R. W. Doms, and B. Moss, J. Virol. 68:3015–3026, 1994). Here we compared the antibody responses of rabbits to gp120 and gp140 that had been produced and purified in an identical manner. The gp140 antisera exhibited enhanced cross-reactivity with heterologous Env proteins as well as greater neutralization of HIV-1 compared to the gp120 antisera. To examine both immunogenicity and protective efficacy, we immunized rhesus macaques with oligomeric gp140. Strong neutralizing antibodies against a homologous virus and modest neutralization of heterologous laboratory-adapted isolates were elicited. No neutralization of primary isolates was observed. However, a substantial fraction of the neutralizing activity could not be blocked by a V3 loop peptide. After intravenous challenge with simian-HIV virus SHIV-HXB2, three of the four vaccinated macaques exhibited no evidence of virus replication. PMID:11134278

  16. Metabolic stress in infected cells may represent a therapeutic target for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Menéndez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2013-07-01

    Worldwide, there are thousands of new cases of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection per day. The effectiveness of current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is relative; to prioritize finding vaccines and/or cure-oriented initiatives should be reinforced because there is little room, if any, for procrastination. Basic and clinical findings on HIV-1 reservoirs suggest that disruption of virus latency is feasible. Because the goal is curing HIV-1 infection, we should be aware that the challenge is to eradicate the viruses of every single infected cell and consequently acting upon virus latency is necessary but not sufficient. The large majority of the virus reservoir, CD4(+) T lymphocytes, is readily accessible but other minor reservoirs, where ART does not diffuse, require innovative strategies. The situation closely resembles that currently faced in the treatment of cancer. Exploiting the fact that histone deacetylase inhibitors, mainly vorinostat, may disrupt the latency of HIV-1, we propose to supplement this effect with a programmed interference in the metabolic stress of infected cells. Metformin and chloroquine are cheap and accessible modulators of pro-survival mechanisms to which viruses are constantly confronted to generate alternative energy sources and maximize virus production. Metformin restrains the use of the usurped cellular biosynthetic machinery by viral genes and chloroquine contributes to death of infected cells. We suggest that the combination of vorinostat, chloroquine and metformin should be combined with ART to pursue viral eradication in infected cells. PMID:23639282

  17. Bilateral pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia in a human immunodeficiency viral-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Larbcharoensub, Noppadol; Wattanatranon, Duangkamon; Sanpaphant, Suda; Sri-Utenchai, Nithid; Wiratkapun, Cholatip; Kongdan, Youwanush

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is an uncommon mesenchymal neoplasm of the breast demonstrating stromal myofibroblastic proliferation and having the appearance of anastomosing slit-like pseudovascular spaces lined by spindle-shaped cells. A case of nodular PASH of the bilateral breasts in a 40-year-old woman with clinically presenting with a progressive enlarged breast lump is reported. Mammographic and ultrasonographic features of the right and left breasts showed a large solid lump with well-circumscribed border measuring 4 cm × 1.7 cm × 3.4 cm and 13.8 cm × 10.9 cm × 12.1 cm, respectively. Wide excision of the right breast and quadrantectomy of the left breast were performed. The histopathological examination of the lesion showed anastomosing slit-like pseudovascular spaces. The stromal cells were immunoreactive for muscle actin (HHF35), smooth muscle actin, and progesterone receptor. Clinical and pathological findings with briefly reviewed relevant literatures are discussed. This is the first clinicopathological and radiological report of bilateral mammary nodular PASH in a human immunodeficiency viral-infected patient. PMID:26275264

  18. Gender Reassignment Surgery in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji-An; Kim, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Min-Su; Lee, Keun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    It is believed that surgery on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients is dangerous and should be avoided due to the possibility of postoperative infection of the patients or HIV occupational transmission to the medical staff. We discuss here the preparations and measures needed to conduct surgery safely on HIV-positive patients, based on our experience. We performed sex reassignment surgery on two HIV-positive patients from January 2013 to January 2015. Both of them were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy and were asymptomatic, with a normal CD4 count (>500 cells/µL). The HIV-RNA was undetectable within the bloodstream. All the staff wore protective clothing, glasses, and three pairs of protective gloves in the operating room because of the possibility of transmission. Prophylactic antibiotics were administered to the patients, and antiviral therapy was performed during their perioperative course. Neither of the patients had postoperative complications, and none of the medical staff experienced accidental exposure. Both patients had satisfactory surgery outcomes without complications. HIV-positive patients can undergo surgery safely without increased risk of postoperative complications or HIV transmission to the staff through the proper use of antibiotics, active antiretroviral therapy, and supplemental protective measures with post-exposure prophylaxis for the staff in case of HIV exposure. PMID:26618127

  19. Gender Reassignment Surgery in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Kwun; Choi, Ji-An; Kim, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Min-Su; Lee, Keun-Cheol

    2015-11-01

    It is believed that surgery on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients is dangerous and should be avoided due to the possibility of postoperative infection of the patients or HIV occupational transmission to the medical staff. We discuss here the preparations and measures needed to conduct surgery safely on HIV-positive patients, based on our experience. We performed sex reassignment surgery on two HIV-positive patients from January 2013 to January 2015. Both of them were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy and were asymptomatic, with a normal CD4 count (>500 cells/µL). The HIV-RNA was undetectable within the bloodstream. All the staff wore protective clothing, glasses, and three pairs of protective gloves in the operating room because of the possibility of transmission. Prophylactic antibiotics were administered to the patients, and antiviral therapy was performed during their perioperative course. Neither of the patients had postoperative complications, and none of the medical staff experienced accidental exposure. Both patients had satisfactory surgery outcomes without complications. HIV-positive patients can undergo surgery safely without increased risk of postoperative complications or HIV transmission to the staff through the proper use of antibiotics, active antiretroviral therapy, and supplemental protective measures with post-exposure prophylaxis for the staff in case of HIV exposure. PMID:26618127

  20. Spread of distinct human immunodeficiency virus type 1 AG recombinant lineages in Africa.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, M; van Den Burg, R; Zorgdrager, F; Goudsmit, J

    2000-02-01

    To identify new subtype G human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains and AG recombinant forms, we collected 28 serum samples from immigrants to the Netherlands from 12 countries throughout Africa. Based on the gag sequences 22 isolates were identified as subtype A or G. Phylogenetic analysis of discontinuous regions of the gag (726 nt), pol (1176 nt) and env (276 nt) genes revealed 13 AG recombinants with the mosaic structure A(gag)/G(pol)/A(env), three with A(gag)/G(pol)/G(env) and one other with A(gag) /G(pol)/G(env), in addition to 'pure' subtypes A(gag)/A(pol)/A(env) (n=1) and G(gag)/G(pol)/G(env) (n=4). To analyse the crossover points in more detail, a new RT-PCR was developed resulting in a large contiguous sequence of 2600 nt from the gag region to half the pol region. All the 13 A(gag)/G(pol)/A(env) recombinants appeared to belong to the circulating recombinant form (CRF) AG (IbNG). The three A(gag)/G(pol) /G(env) recombinants differed from the CRF AG (IbNG) subtype, suggesting the identification of a new CRF subtype. The recovery of AG recombinants from African countries a thousand miles apart indicates the active spread of new recombinants. PMID:10644851