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Sample records for advanced imaging communication

  1. Advanced imaging communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.; Rice, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    Key elements of system are imaging and nonimaging sensors, data compressor/decompressor, interleaved Reed-Solomon block coder, convolutional-encoded/Viterbi-decoded telemetry channel, and Reed-Solomon decoding. Data compression provides efficient representation of sensor data, and channel coding improves reliability of data transmission.

  2. Advanced communications technologies for image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likens, W. C.; Jones, H. W.; Shameson, L.

    1984-01-01

    It is essential for image analysts to have the capability to link to remote facilities as a means of accessing both data bases and high-speed processors. This can increase productivity through enhanced data access and minimization of delays. New technology is emerging to provide the high communication data rates needed in image processing. These developments include multi-user sharing of high bandwidth (60 megabits per second) Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) satellite links, low-cost satellite ground stations, and high speed adaptive quadrature modems that allow 9600 bit per second communications over voice-grade telephone lines.

  3. Advanced Sensors Boost Optical Communication, Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Brooklyn, New York-based Amplification Technologies Inc. (ATI), employed Phase I and II SBIR funding from NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory to forward the company's solid-state photomultiplier technology. Under the SBIR, ATI developed a small, energy-efficient, extremely high-gain sensor capable of detecting light down to single photons in the near infrared wavelength range. The company has commercialized this technology in the form of its NIRDAPD photomultiplier, ideal for use in free space optical communications, lidar and ladar, night vision goggles, and other light sensing applications.

  4. Mission science value-cost savings from the Advanced Imaging Communication System (AICS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    An Advanced Imaging Communication System (AICS) was proposed in the mid-1970s as an alternative to the Voyager data/communication system architecture. The AICS achieved virtually error free communication with little loss in the downlink data rate by concatenating a powerful Reed-Solomon block code with the Voyager convolutionally coded, Viterbi decoded downlink channel. The clean channel allowed AICS sophisticated adaptive data compression techniques. Both Voyager and the Galileo mission have implemented AICS components, and the concatenated channel itself is heading for international standardization. An analysis that assigns a dollar value/cost savings to AICS mission performance gains is presented. A conservative value or savings of $3 million for Voyager, $4.5 million for Galileo, and as much as $7 to 9.5 million per mission for future projects such as the proposed Mariner Mar 2 series is shown.

  5. Tunable and reconfigurable THz devices for advanced imaging and adaptive wireless communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Shams, M. I. B.; Jiang, Z.; Rahman, S.; Hesler, J. L.; Cheng, L.-J.; Fay, P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report on two different approaches that have been explored to realize tunable and reconfigurable THz devices for advanced imaging and adaptive wireless communication. The first approach makes use of electronically tunable varactor diodes. Frequency tunable THz antennas based on this approach have been successfully demonstrated for the first time in G-band, enabling the development of spectroscopic THz detectors and focal-plane imaging arrays. The second approach takes advantages of optical THz spatial modulation based on photo-induced free carriers in semiconductors. Using this approach, high-performance tunable THz modulators/attenuators, reconfigurable masks for THz coded aperture imaging, and photo-induced Fresnel-zone-plate antennas for dynamic THz beam steering and forming have been successfully demonstrated. Our recent study also shows that by employing the so-called mesa array technique, sub-wavelength spatial resolution and higher than 100 dB modulation depth can be achieved, making it possible to develop tunable THz devices (e.g., tunable filters) with performance and versatility far beyond those realized by conventional approaches. On the basis of the above investigation, the prospects of high-speed near-field THz imaging, real-time ultra-sensitive heterodyne imaging and prototype adaptive THz wireless communication links will be discussed.

  6. High-speed image transmission via the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzill, Todd M.; Huang, H. K.; Thoma, George R.; Long, L. Rodney; Gill, Michael J.

    1996-05-01

    We are developing a wide area test bed network using the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) from NASA for high speed medical image transmission. The two test sites are the University of California, San Francisco, and the National Library of Medicine. The first phase of the test bed runs over a T1 link (1.544 Mbits/sec) using a Very Small Aperture Terminal. The second phase involves the High Data Rate Terminal via an ATM OC 3C (155 Mbits/sec) connection. This paper describes the experimental set up and some preliminary results from phase 1.

  7. Advanced Optical Fiber Communication Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Optical Network with Physical Star Topology," Advanced Fiber Communications Technologies , Leonid G. Kazovsky... advances in the performance and capabilities of optical fiber communication systems. While some of these technologies are interrelated (for example...multi gigabit per second hybrid circuit/packet switched lightwave network ," Proc. SPIE Advanced Fiber Communications Technologies , Boston 󈨟, Sept.

  8. Advanced satellite communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, Edward J.; Lie, Sen

    1992-05-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop an innovative advanced satellite receiver/demodulator utilizing surface acoustic wave (SAW) chirp transform processor and coherent BPSK demodulation. The algorithm of this SAW chirp Fourier transformer is of the Convolve - Multiply - Convolve (CMC) type, utilizing off-the-shelf reflective array compressor (RAC) chirp filters. This satellite receiver, if fully developed, was intended to be used as an on-board multichannel communications repeater. The Advanced Communications Receiver consists of four units: (1) CMC processor, (2) single sideband modulator, (3) demodulator, and (4) chirp waveform generator and individual channel processors. The input signal is composed of multiple user transmission frequencies operating independently from remotely located ground terminals. This signal is Fourier transformed by the CMC Processor into a unique time slot for each user frequency. The CMC processor is driven by a waveform generator through a single sideband (SSB) modulator. The output of the coherent demodulator is composed of positive and negative pulses, which are the envelopes of the chirp transform processor output. These pulses correspond to the data symbols. Following the demodulator, a logic circuit reconstructs the pulses into data, which are subsequently differentially decoded to form the transmitted data. The coherent demodulation and detection of BPSK signals derived from a CMC chirp transform processor were experimentally demonstrated and bit error rate (BER) testing was performed. To assess the feasibility of such advanced receiver, the results were compared with the theoretical analysis and plotted for an average BER as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. Another goal of this SBIR program was the development of a commercial product. The commercial product developed was an arbitrary waveform generator. The successful sales have begun with the delivery of the first arbitrary waveform generator.

  9. Advanced satellite communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staples, Edward J.; Lie, Sen

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop an innovative advanced satellite receiver/demodulator utilizing surface acoustic wave (SAW) chirp transform processor and coherent BPSK demodulation. The algorithm of this SAW chirp Fourier transformer is of the Convolve - Multiply - Convolve (CMC) type, utilizing off-the-shelf reflective array compressor (RAC) chirp filters. This satellite receiver, if fully developed, was intended to be used as an on-board multichannel communications repeater. The Advanced Communications Receiver consists of four units: (1) CMC processor, (2) single sideband modulator, (3) demodulator, and (4) chirp waveform generator and individual channel processors. The input signal is composed of multiple user transmission frequencies operating independently from remotely located ground terminals. This signal is Fourier transformed by the CMC Processor into a unique time slot for each user frequency. The CMC processor is driven by a waveform generator through a single sideband (SSB) modulator. The output of the coherent demodulator is composed of positive and negative pulses, which are the envelopes of the chirp transform processor output. These pulses correspond to the data symbols. Following the demodulator, a logic circuit reconstructs the pulses into data, which are subsequently differentially decoded to form the transmitted data. The coherent demodulation and detection of BPSK signals derived from a CMC chirp transform processor were experimentally demonstrated and bit error rate (BER) testing was performed. To assess the feasibility of such advanced receiver, the results were compared with the theoretical analysis and plotted for an average BER as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. Another goal of this SBIR program was the development of a commercial product. The commercial product developed was an arbitrary waveform generator. The successful sales have begun with the delivery of the first arbitrary waveform generator.

  10. Advanced quantum communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Evan Robert

    Quantum communication provides several examples of communication protocols which cannot be implemented securely using only classical communication. Currently, the most widely known of these is quantum cryptography, which allows secure key exchange between parties sharing a quantum channel subject to an eavesdropper. This thesis explores and extends the realm of quantum communication. Two new quantum communication protocols are described. The first is a new form of quantum cryptography---relativistic quantum cryptography---which increases communication efficiency by exploiting a relativistic bound on the power of an eavesdropper, in addition to the usual quantum mechanical restrictions intrinsic to quantum cryptography. By doing so, we have observed over 170% improvement in communication efficiency over a similar protocol not utilizing relativity. A second protocol, Quantum Orienteering, allows two cooperating parties to communicate a specific direction in space. This application shows the possibility of using joint measurements, or projections onto an entangled state, in order to extract the maximum useful information from quantum bits. For two-qubit communication, the maximal fidelity of communication using only separable operations is 73.6%, while joint measurements can improve the efficiency to 78.9%. In addition to implementing these protocols, we have improved several resources for quantum communication and quantum computing. Specifically, we have developed improved sources of polarization-entangled photons, a low-loss quantum memory for polarization qubits, and a quantum random number generator. These tools may be applied to a wide variety of future quantum and classical information systems.

  11. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, Richard T.; Schertler, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was conceived to help maintain U.S. leadership in the world's communications-satellite market. This experimental satellite is expected to be launched by NASA in 1992 and to furnish the technology necessary for establishing very small aperture terminal digital networks which provide on-demand full-mesh connectivity, and 1.544-MBPS services with only a single hop. Utilizing on-board switching and processing, each individual voice or data circuit can be separately routed to any location in the network. This paper provides an overview of the ACTS and discusses the value of the technology for future communications systems.

  12. Advanced Management Communication: An Elective Course in Corporate Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argenti, Paul A.

    1986-01-01

    Proposes a college-level elective course in advanced management communication that would teach future managers how to communicate with shareholders, the media, financial analysts, and the labor force. (SRT)

  13. Advanced Imaging Tracker

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    document requires that it 1e returncd: ADVANCED IMACINGC TRACKER Dr . L. E. Schmutz Contractor: Adaptive Optics Associates, Inc. Contt-ict Number: F30602-80...Code Number: IE20 Period of Worl: Covered: jun 80 - D’:c 81 Principal Investigator: Dr . Larry Schmut~z Phone: 617 547-2786 Project Engineer: Captaia...yaJPODCVR~ ADVANCED IMAGING TRACKER 10Jun 80 - ’,’ Dec 81 𔄃 PiRFORMiNO7 01G. REPORT NUMBER 7 ATII~(. ONTPA OR GRANTY NUMDERf.) Dr . 1L. E. Schiiut

  14. Advanced imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the Advanced Imaging System CCD based camera. The AIS1 camera system was developed at Photometric Ltd. in Tucson, Arizona as part of a Phase 2 SBIR contract No. NAS5-30171 from the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The camera project was undertaken as a part of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) project. This document is intended to serve as a complete manual for the use and maintenance of the camera system. All the different parts of the camera hardware and software are discussed and complete schematics and source code listings are provided.

  15. Advanced Communications Technology: Mobile Communications Requirements Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-05-01

    The Coast Guard's mobile communications requirements will outstrip existing system capabilities, available capacity, and affordability by the late 1990s. This will require changes in the mix of mobile communications equipment and services used by operational units. New commercial mobile satellite services are available now, with many others arriving on the market between 1998 and 2003. These new services present unique opportunities to satisfy mission requirements, reduce investment in communications infrastructure, and realize more costeffective communications services. The Coast Guard Research and Development Center (R&DC) has undertaken an effort to identify and evaluate current and emerging satellite services that may be used to satisfy Coast Guard mobile communications requirements. As part of this effort, Anteon Corporation has been tasked by R&DC to collect the mobile communications functional requirements that have been identified by program managers. Anteon analysts have reviewed the Government Furnished Information (GFI) and researched other related documentation to identify and collect the requirements that may be used to describe the needed operating environment. Anteon analysts assessed the functional requirements to develop system requirements that describe the features that a communications system must provide to support the functional requirements. This report presents the current and projected Coast Guard mobile communications system requirements.

  16. Communication services for advanced network applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Bresnahan, J.; Foster, I.; Insley, J.; Toonen, B.; Tuecke, S.

    1999-06-10

    Advanced network applications such as remote instrument control, collaborative environments, and remote I/O are distinguished by traditional applications such as videoconferencing by their need to create multiple, heterogeneous flows with different characteristics. For example, a single application may require remote I/O for raw datasets, shared controls for a collaborative analysis system, streaming video for image rendering data, and audio for collaboration. Furthermore, each flow can have different requirements in terms of reliability, network quality of service, security, etc. They argue that new approaches to communication services, protocols, and network architecture are required both to provide high-level abstractions for common flow types and to support user-level management of flow creation and quality. They describe experiences with the development of such applications and communication services.

  17. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onken, Michael; Eichelberg, Marco; Riesmeier, Jörg; Jensch, Peter

    Over the past 15 years Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) has established itself as the international standard for medical image communication. Most medical imaging equipment uses DICOM network and media services to export image data, thus making this standard highly relevant for medical image processing. The first section of this chapter provides a basic introduction into DICOM with its more than 3,600 pages of technical documentation, followed by a section covering selected advanced topics of special interest for medical image processing. The introductory text familiarizes the reader with the standard's main concepts such as information objects and DICOM media and network services. The rendering pipeline for image display and the concept of DICOM conformance are also discussed. Specialized DICOM services such as advanced image display services that provide means for storing how an image was viewed ("Softcopy Presentation States") and how multiple images should be aligned on an output device ("Structured Display" and "Hanging Protocols") are described. We further describe DICOM's sophisticated approach ("Structured Reporting") for storing structured documents such as CAD information, which is then covered in more detail. Finally, the last section provides an insight into a newly developed DICOM service called "Application Hosting", which introduces a standardized plug-in architecture for image processing, thus permitting users to utilize cross-vendor image processing plug-ins in DICOM applications.

  18. Imaging of Communicating Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Bathla, Girish; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocephalus basically means an increase in the volume of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the ventricles. As simple as it may sound, the definition and classification of hydrocephalus have been a matter of debate over many decades. Many international neurosurgical and radiological workgroups have tried to develop a consensus and over the last 5-10 years have been able to put forth a more well-defined and standardized approach. Though, the debate and controversy surrounding this topic is expected to continue, we have tried to review the most recent and consensually accepted definition and classification. Although conventionally classified as either "obstructive and nonobstructive" or "communicating and noncommunicating," none of the classification schemes were without confusion and errors. A more precise nomenclature is to divide hydrocephalus as either "communicating": with or without obstruction of CSF absorption, or as "noncommunicating": with definite obstruction to CSF absorption. We discuss communicating hydrocephalus in the current article, and the subsequent article deals with noncommunicating hydrocephalus.

  19. NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    NASA recently restructured its Space Communications Program to emphasize the development of high risk communication technology useable in multiple frequency bands and to support a wide range of future communication needs. As part of this restructuring, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project will develop and experimentally verify the technology associated with multiple fixed and scanning beam systems which will enable growth in communication satellite capacities and more effective utilization of the radio frequency spectrum. The ACTS requirements and operations as well as the technology significance for future systems are described.

  20. Advances in alimentary tract imaging.

    PubMed

    Maglinte, Dean-Dt; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Tann, Mark

    2006-05-28

    Advances in imaging techniques are changing the way radiologists undertake imaging of the gastrointestinal tract and their ability to answer questions posed by surgeons. In this paper we discuss the technological improvements of imaging studies that have occurred in the last few years and how these help to better diagnosing alimentary tract disease.

  1. Advancing biomedical imaging.

    PubMed

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2015-11-24

    Imaging reveals complex structures and dynamic interactive processes, located deep inside the body, that are otherwise difficult to decipher. Numerous imaging modalities harness every last inch of the energy spectrum. Clinical modalities include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and light-based methods [endoscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT)]. Research modalities include various light microscopy techniques (confocal, multiphoton, total internal reflection, superresolution fluorescence microscopy), electron microscopy, mass spectrometry imaging, fluorescence tomography, bioluminescence, variations of OCT, and optoacoustic imaging, among a few others. Although clinical imaging and research microscopy are often isolated from one another, we argue that their combination and integration is not only informative but also essential to discovering new biology and interpreting clinical datasets in which signals invariably originate from hundreds to thousands of cells per voxel.

  2. Advancing biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Imaging reveals complex structures and dynamic interactive processes, located deep inside the body, that are otherwise difficult to decipher. Numerous imaging modalities harness every last inch of the energy spectrum. Clinical modalities include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and light-based methods [endoscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT)]. Research modalities include various light microscopy techniques (confocal, multiphoton, total internal reflection, superresolution fluorescence microscopy), electron microscopy, mass spectrometry imaging, fluorescence tomography, bioluminescence, variations of OCT, and optoacoustic imaging, among a few others. Although clinical imaging and research microscopy are often isolated from one another, we argue that their combination and integration is not only informative but also essential to discovering new biology and interpreting clinical datasets in which signals invariably originate from hundreds to thousands of cells per voxel. PMID:26598657

  3. Recent advances on integrated quantum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orieux, Adeline; Diamanti, Eleni

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the use of integrated technologies for applications in the field of quantum information processing and communications has made great progress. The resulting devices feature valuable characteristics such as scalability, reproducibility, low cost and interconnectivity, and have the potential to revolutionize our computation and communication practices in the future, much in the way that electronic integrated circuits have drastically transformed our information processing capacities since the last century. Among the multiple applications of integrated quantum technologies, this review will focus on typical components of quantum communication systems and on overall integrated system operation characteristics. We are interested in particular in the use of photonic integration platforms for developing devices necessary in quantum communications, including sources, detectors and both passive and active optical elements. We also illustrate the challenges associated with performing quantum communications on chip, by using the case study of quantum key distribution—the most advanced application of quantum information science. We conclude with promising perspectives in this field.

  4. Modern Imaging Technology: Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Michael J.; Eckelman, William C.

    2004-06-18

    This 2-day conference is designed to bring scientist working in nuclear medicine, as well as nuclear medicine practitioners together to discuss the advances in four selected areas of imaging: Biochemical Parameters using Small Animal Imaging, Developments in Small Animal PET Imaging, Cell Labeling, and Imaging Angiogenesis Using Multiple Modality. The presentations will be on molecular imaging applications at the forefront of research, up to date on the status of molecular imaging in nuclear medicine as well as in related imaging areas. Experts will discuss the basic science of imaging techniques, and scheduled participants will engage in an exciting program that emphasizes the current status of molecular imaging as well as the role of DOE funded research in this area.

  5. Coherent Communications, Imaging and Targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Stappaerts, E; Baker, K; Gavel, D; Wilks, S; Olivier, S; Brase, J; Olivier, S; Brase, J

    2003-10-03

    Laboratory and field demonstration results obtained as part of the DARPA-sponsored Coherent Communications, Imaging and Targeting (CCIT) program are reviewed. The CCIT concept uses a Phase Conjugation Engine based on a quadrature receiver array, a hologram processor and a spatial light modulator (SLM) for high-speed, digital beam control. Progress on the enabling MEMS SLM, being developed by a consortium consisting of LLNL, academic institutions and small businesses, is presented.

  6. Advanced Image Understanding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Applications to Computer Technology (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1967). . 3. B. Kruse, "System Architecture for Image Analysis," Chapter 7 of Structured ... Computer Vision, edited by S. Tanimoto and A. Klinger (Academic Press, 1980). 107

  7. Distress detection, location, and communications using advanced space technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces a concept for low-cost, global, day-night, all-weather disaster warning and assistance. Evolving, advanced space technology with passive radio frequency reflectors in conjunction with an imaging synthetic aperture radar is employed to detect, identify, locate, and provide passive communication with earth users in distress. This concept evolved from a broad NASA research on new global search and rescue techniques. Appropriate airborne radar test results from this research are reviewed and related to potential disaster applications. The analysis indicates the approach has promise for disaster communications relative to floods, droughts, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and severe storms.

  8. Advanced Land Imager Assessment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chander, Gyanesh; Choate, Mike; Christopherson, Jon; Hollaren, Doug; Morfitt, Ron; Nelson, Jim; Nelson, Shar; Storey, James; Helder, Dennis; Ruggles, Tim; Kaita, Ed; Levy, Raviv; Ong, Lawrence; Markham, Brian; Schweiss, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager Assessment System (ALIAS) supports radiometric and geometric image processing for the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) instrument onboard NASA s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. ALIAS consists of two processing subsystems for radiometric and geometric processing of the ALI s multispectral imagery. The radiometric processing subsystem characterizes and corrects, where possible, radiometric qualities including: coherent, impulse; and random noise; signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs); detector operability; gain; bias; saturation levels; striping and banding; and the stability of detector performance. The geometric processing subsystem and analysis capabilities support sensor alignment calibrations, sensor chip assembly (SCA)-to-SCA alignments and band-to-band alignment; and perform geodetic accuracy assessments, modulation transfer function (MTF) characterizations, and image-to-image characterizations. ALIAS also characterizes and corrects band-toband registration, and performs systematic precision and terrain correction of ALI images. This system can geometrically correct, and automatically mosaic, the SCA image strips into a seamless, map-projected image. This system provides a large database, which enables bulk trending for all ALI image data and significant instrument telemetry. Bulk trending consists of two functions: Housekeeping Processing and Bulk Radiometric Processing. The Housekeeping function pulls telemetry and temperature information from the instrument housekeeping files and writes this information to a database for trending. The Bulk Radiometric Processing function writes statistical information from the dark data acquired before and after the Earth imagery and the lamp data to the database for trending. This allows for multi-scene statistical analyses.

  9. Advanced Approach of Multiagent Based Buoy Communication

    PubMed Central

    Gricius, Gediminas; Drungilas, Darius; Andziulis, Arunas; Dzemydiene, Dale; Voznak, Miroslav; Kurmis, Mindaugas; Jakovlev, Sergej

    2015-01-01

    Usually, a hydrometeorological information system is faced with great data flows, but the data levels are often excessive, depending on the observed region of the water. The paper presents advanced buoy communication technologies based on multiagent interaction and data exchange between several monitoring system nodes. The proposed management of buoy communication is based on a clustering algorithm, which enables the performance of the hydrometeorological information system to be enhanced. The experiment is based on the design and analysis of the inexpensive but reliable Baltic Sea autonomous monitoring network (buoys), which would be able to continuously monitor and collect temperature, waviness, and other required data. The proposed approach of multiagent based buoy communication enables all the data from the costal-based station to be monitored with limited transition speed by setting different tasks for the agent-based buoy system according to the clustering information. PMID:26345197

  10. Advances in abdominal MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, J T

    1998-01-01

    Major technical advances in MR imaging have led to its wider use in the evaluation of abdominal disease. The principle new pulse sequence is the RARE sequence for T2-weighted imaging. Multishot and breath-hold single-shot RARE techniques are now widely used, and both have performed as well as conventional spin-echo imaging with far shorter acquisition times. The most notable improvements have been in the detection and characterization of hepatic lesions. Two liver-specific contrast agents received FDA approval during 1997: SPIO particles or ferumoxide and mangafodipir trisodium, a hepatocyte-specific agent. Both of these agents provide considerable benefit in the detection and characterization of hepatic lesions. Manganese enhancement has also proved useful in MR imaging of the pancreas, although fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging with dynamic gadolinium enhancement has also yielded results comparable with those of contrast-enhanced CT. MR hydrography, a generic term for static fluid imaging, is another derivative of RARE fast T2-weighted imaging. MRCP, the best known example of MR hydrography, has been rapidly and widely employed as a primary method for imaging the biliary and pancreatic ducts and has become competitive with ERCP. MR vascular imaging, especially portal venography, has been used for noninvasive imaging of portal venous disease in Budd Chiari disease, before placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts, and for pancreatic cancer staging. Finally, the development of conventional phased-array body coils and endorectal coils has enabled high-quality MR imaging of perirectal disease (including Crohn disease, fistula in ano, and postpartum sphincter dysfunction). Future abdominal applications of MR imaging will involve second-generation MR interventional techniques, including use of open systems, functional or diffusion-weighted imaging exploiting the molecular activity of tissues, and virtual MR endoscopy. Although CT continues to evolve

  11. Advanced Communications Architecture Demonstration Made Significant Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carek, David Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Simulation for a ground station located at 44.5 deg latitude. The Advanced Communications Architecture Demonstration (ACAD) is a concept architecture to provide high-rate Ka-band (27-GHz) direct-to-ground delivery of payload data from the International Space Station. This new concept in delivering data from the space station targets scientific experiments that buffer data onboard. The concept design provides a method to augment the current downlink capability through the Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Ku-band (15-GHz) communications system. The ACAD concept pushes the limits of technology in high-rate data communications for space-qualified systems. Research activities are ongoing in examining the various aspects of high-rate communications systems including: (1) link budget parametric analyses, (2) antenna configuration trade studies, (3) orbital simulations (see the preceding figure), (4) optimization of ground station contact time (see the following graph), (5) processor and storage architecture definition, and (6) protocol evaluations and dependencies.

  12. Recent imaging advances in neurology.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Lorenzo; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2015-09-01

    Over the recent years, the application of neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) has considerably advanced the understanding of complex neurological disorders. PET is a powerful molecular imaging tool, which investigates the distribution and binding of radiochemicals attached to biologically relevant molecules; as such, this technique is able to give information on biochemistry and metabolism of the brain in health and disease. MRI uses high intensity magnetic fields and radiofrequency pulses to provide structural and functional information on tissues and organs in intact or diseased individuals, including the evaluation of white matter integrity, grey matter thickness and brain perfusion. The aim of this article is to review the most recent advances in neuroimaging research in common neurological disorders such as movement disorders, dementia, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury and multiple sclerosis, and to evaluate their contribution in the diagnosis and management of patients.

  13. Advances in multimodality molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Habib; Prasad, Rameshwar

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality molecular imaging using high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) combined with other modalities is now playing a pivotal role in basic and clinical research. The introduction of combined PET/CT systems in clinical setting has revolutionized the practice of diagnostic imaging. The complementarity between the intrinsically aligned anatomic (CT) and functional or metabolic (PET) information provided in a “one-stop shop” and the possibility to use CT images for attenuation correction of the PET data has been the driving force behind the success of this technology. On the other hand, combining PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in a single gantry is technically more challenging owing to the strong magnetic fields. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made resulting in the design of few preclinical PET systems and one human prototype dedicated for simultaneous PET/MR brain imaging. This paper discusses recent advances in PET instrumentation and the advantages and challenges of multimodality imaging systems. Future opportunities and the challenges facing the adoption of multimodality imaging instrumentation will also be addressed. PMID:20098557

  14. Advances in multimodal molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Auletta, Luigi; Gramanzini, Matteo; Gargiulo, Sara; Albanese, Sandra; Salvatore, Marco; Greco, Adelaide

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical molecular imaging is an emerging field. Improving the ability of scientists to study the molecular basis of human pathology in animals is of the utmost importance for future advances in all fields of human medicine. Moreover, the possibility of developing new imaging techniques or of implementing old ones adapted to the clinic is a significant area. Cardiology, neurology, immunology and oncology have all been studied with preclinical molecular imaging. The functional techniques of photoacoustic imaging (PAI), fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in association with each other or with the anatomic reference provided by computed tomography (CT) as well as with anatomic and functional information provided by magnetic resonance (MR) have all been proficiently applied to animal models of human disease. All the above-mentioned imaging techniques have shown their ability to explore the molecular mechanisms involved in animal models of disease. The clinical translatability of most of the techniques motivates the ongoing study of their possible fields of application. The ability to combine two or more techniques allows obtaining as much information as possible on the molecular processes involved in pathologies, reducing the number of animals necessary in each experiment. Merging molecular probes compatible with various imaging technique will further expand the capability to achieve the best results.

  15. Advanced communications payload for mobile applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, S. A.; Kwan, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced satellite payload is proposed for single hop linking of mobile terminals of all classes as well as Very Small Aperture Terminal's (VSAT's). It relies on an intensive use of communications on-board processing and beam hopping for efficient link design to maximize capacity and a large satellite antenna aperture and high satellite transmitter power to minimize the cost of the ground terminals. Intersatellite links are used to improve the link quality and for high capacity relay. Power budgets are presented for links between the satellite and mobile, VSAT, and hub terminals. Defeating the effects of shadowing and fading requires the use of differentially coherent demodulation, concatenated forward error correction coding, and interleaving, all on a single link basis.

  16. An advanced domestic satellite communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An updated traffic projection for U.S. domestic satellite communications service covering a period of 15 years; mid-1980 to mid-1995 was prepared. This model takes into account expected technology advances and reductions in transmission costs, legislative and regulatory changes permitting increased competition, and rising energy costs which will encourage more extensive substitution of telecommunications for travel. The historical development and current status of satellite systems are discussed as well as the characteristics of follow-on systems. Orbital arc utilization, spacecraft configuration for single shuttle launch, Earth station configuration, and system costs are examined. Areas which require technology development include multiple beam frequency reuse antennas, on-board switching, intersatellite links, and ka-band operation. Packing and deployment schemes for enclosing the satellite within the shuttle orbiter bay must also be devised.

  17. RF Technologies for Advancing Space Communication Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.; Bibyk, Irene K.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will address key technologies under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center designed to provide architecture-level impacts. Specifically, we will describe deployable antennas, a new type of phased array antenna and novel power amplifiers. The evaluation of architectural influence can be conducted from two perspectives where said architecture can be analyzed from either the top-down to determine the areas where technology improvements will be most beneficial or from the bottom-up where each technology s performance advancement can affect the overall architecture s performance. This paper will take the latter approach with focus on some technology improvement challenges and address architecture impacts. For example, using data rate as a performance metric, future exploration scenarios are expected to demand data rates possibly exceeding 1 Gbps. To support these advancements in a Mars scenario, as an example, Ka-band and antenna aperture sizes on the order of 10 meters will be required from Mars areostationary platforms. Key technical challenges for a large deployable antenna include maximizing the ratio of deployed-to-packaged volume, minimizing aerial density, maintaining RMS surface accuracy to within 1/20 of a wavelength or better, and developing reflector rigidization techniques. Moreover, the high frequencies and large apertures manifest a new problem for microwave engineers that are familiar to optical communications specialists: pointing. The fine beam widths and long ranges dictate the need for electronic or mechanical feed articulation to compensate for spacecraft attitude control limitations.

  18. Center for Advanced Signal and Imaging Sciences Workshop 2004

    SciTech Connect

    McClellan, J H; Carrano, C; Poyneer, L; Palmer, D; Baker, K; Chen, D; London, R; Weinert, G; Brase, J; Paglieroni, D; Lopez, A; Grant, C W; Wright, W; Burke, M; Miller, W O; DeTeresa, S; White, D; Toeppen, J; Haugen, P; Kamath, C; Nguyen, T; Manay, S; Newsam, S; Cantu-Paz, E; Pao, H; Chang, J; Chambers, D; Leach, R; Paulson, C; Romero, C E; Spiridon, A; Vigars, M; Welsh, P; Zumstein, J; Romero, K; Oppenheim, A; Harris, D B; Dowla, F; Brown, C G; Clark, G A; Ong, M M; Clance, T J; Kegelmeyer, l M; Benzuijen, M; Bliss, E; Burkhart, S; Conder, A; Daveler, S; Ferguson, W; Glenn, S; Liebman, J; Norton, M; Prasad, R; Salmon, T; Kegelmeyer, L M; Hafiz, O; Cheung, S; Fodor, I; Aufderheide, M B; Bary, A; Martz, Jr., H E; Burke, M W; Benson, S; Fisher, K A; Quarry, M J

    2004-11-15

    Welcome to the Eleventh Annual C.A.S.I.S. Workshop, a yearly event at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, presented by the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences, or CASIS, and sponsored by the LLNL Engineering Directorate. Every November for the last 10 years we have convened a diverse set of engineering and scientific talent to share their work in signal processing, imaging, communications, controls, along with associated fields of mathematics, statistics, and computing sciences. This year is no exception, with sessions in Adaptive Optics, Applied Imaging, Scientific Data Mining, Electromagnetic Image and Signal Processing, Applied Signal Processing, National Ignition Facility (NIF) Imaging, and Nondestructive Characterization.

  19. Advances in computer imaging/applications in facial plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Papel, I D; Jiannetto, D F

    1999-01-01

    Rapidly progressing computer technology, ever-increasing expectations of patients, and a confusing medicolegal environment requires a clarification of the role of computer imaging/applications. Advances in computer technology and its applications are reviewed. A brief historical discussion is included for perspective. Improvements in both hardware and software with the advent of digital imaging have allowed great increases in speed and accuracy in patient imaging. This facilitates doctor-patient communication and possibly realistic patient expectations. Patients seeking cosmetic surgery now often expect preoperative imaging. Although society in general has become more litigious, a literature search up to 1998 reveals no lawsuits directly involving computer imaging. It appears that conservative utilization of computer imaging by the facial plastic surgeon may actually reduce liability and promote communication. Recent advances have significantly enhanced the value of computer imaging in the practice of facial plastic surgery. These technological advances in computer imaging appear to contribute a useful technique for the practice of facial plastic surgery. Inclusion of computer imaging should be given serious consideration as an adjunct to clinical practice.

  20. Outer planet Pioneer imaging communications system study. [data compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The effects of different types of imaging data compression on the elements of the Pioneer end-to-end data system were studied for three imaging transmission methods. These were: no data compression, moderate data compression, and the advanced imaging communications system. It is concluded that: (1) the value of data compression is inversely related to the downlink telemetry bit rate; (2) the rolling characteristics of the spacecraft limit the selection of data compression ratios; and (3) data compression might be used to perform acceptable outer planet mission at reduced downlink telemetry bit rates.

  1. The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite and ISDN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Peter A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper depicts the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) system as a global central office switch. The ground portion of the system is the collection of earth stations or T1-VSAT's (T1 very small aperture terminals). The control software for the T1-VSAT's resides in a single CPU. The software consists of two modules, the modem manager and the call manager. The modem manager (MM) controls the RF modem portion of the T1-VSAT. It processes the orderwires from the satellite or from signaling generated by the call manager (CM). The CM controls the Recom Laboratories MSPs by receiving signaling messages from the stacked MSP shelves ro units and sending appropriate setup commands to them. There are two methods used to setup and process calls in the CM; first by dialing up a circuit using a standard telephone handset or, secondly by using an external processor connected to the CPU's second COM port, by sending and receiving signaling orderwires. It is the use of the external processor which permits the ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) Signaling Processor to implement ISDN calls. In August 1993, the initial testing of the ISDN Signaling Processor was carried out at ACTS System Test at Lockheed Marietta, Princeton, NJ using the spacecraft in its test configuration on the ground.

  2. Image-Enabled Discourse: Investigating the Creation of Visual Information as Communicative Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Anyone who has clarified a thought or prompted a response during a conversation by drawing a picture has exploited the potential of image making as an interactive tool for conveying information. Images are increasingly ubiquitous in daily communication, in large part due to advances in visually enabled information and communication technologies…

  3. Visual communication - Information and fidelity. [of images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Freidrich O.; Fales, Carl L.; Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1993-01-01

    This assessment of visual communication deals with image gathering, coding, and restoration as a whole rather than as separate and independent tasks. The approach focuses on two mathematical criteria, information and fidelity, and on their relationships to the entropy of the encoded data and to the visual quality of the restored image. Past applications of these criteria to the assessment of image coding and restoration have been limited to the link that connects the output of the image-gathering device to the input of the image-display device. By contrast, the approach presented in this paper explicitly includes the critical limiting factors that constrain image gathering and display. This extension leads to an end-to-end assessment theory of visual communication that combines optical design with digital processing.

  4. Advancing Instructional Communication: Integrating a Biosocial Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horan, Sean M.; Afifi, Tamara D.

    2014-01-01

    Celebrating 100 years of the National Communication Association necessitates that, as we commemorate our past, we also look toward our future. As part of a larger conversation about the future of instructional communication, this essay reinvestigates the importance of integrating biosocial approaches into instructional communication research. In…

  5. Recent advances in imaging technologies in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Naseem; Bansal, Nikhil; Logani, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Dentistry has witnessed tremendous advances in all its branches over the past three decades. With these advances, the need for more precise diagnostic tools, specially imaging methods, have become mandatory. From the simple intra-oral periapical X-rays, advanced imaging techniques like computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have also found place in modern dentistry. Changing from analogue to digital radiography has not only made the process simpler and faster but also made image storage, manipulation (brightness/contrast, image cropping, etc.) and retrieval easier. The three-dimensional imaging has made the complex cranio-facial structures more accessible for examination and early and accurate diagnosis of deep seated lesions. This paper is to review current advances in imaging technology and their uses in different disciplines of dentistry. PMID:25349663

  6. Advanced Shipboard Communications Demonstrations with ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axford, Roy A.; Jedrey, Thomas C.; Rupar, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    For ships at sea. satellites provide the only option for high data rate (HDR), long haul communications. Furthermore the demand for HDR satellite communications (SATCOM) for military and commercial ships. and other offshore platforms is increasing. Presently the bulk of this maritime HDR SATCOM connectivity is provided via C-band and X-band. However, the shipboard antenna sizes required to achieve a data rate of, say T 1 (1.544 Mbps) with present C-/X-band SATCOM systems range from seven to ten feet in diameter. This limits the classes of ships to which HDR services can be provided to those which are large enough to accommodate the massive antennas. With its high powered K/Ka-band spot beams, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was able to provide T I and higher rate services to ships at sea using much smaller shipboard antennas. This paper discusses three shipboard HDR SATCOM demonstrations that were conducted with ACTS between 1996 and 1998. The first demonstration involved a 2 Mbps link provided to the seismic survey ship MN Geco Diamond equipped with a 16-inch wide, 4.5-inch tall, mechanically steered slotted waveguide array antenna developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In this February 1996 demonstration ACTS allowed supercomputers ashore to process Geco Diamond's voluminous oceanographic seismic data in near real time. This capability allowed the ship to adjust its search parameters on a daily basis based on feedback from the processed data, thereby greatly increasing survey efficiency. The second demonstration was conducted on the US Navy cruiser USS Princeton (CG 59) with the same antenna used on Geco Diamond. Princeton conducted a six-month (January-July 1997) Western Hemisphere solo deployment during which time T1 connectivity via ACTS provided the ship with a range of valuable tools for operational, administrative and quality-of-life tasks. In one instance, video

  7. Advanced imaging in equine dental disease.

    PubMed

    Selberg, Kurt; Easley, Jeremiah T

    2013-08-01

    Dental and sinus disorders are relatively common and of major clinical importance in equine medicine. Advanced diagnostic imaging has become an integral part of equine veterinary medicine. Advanced imaging has progressed the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of dental- and sinus-related diseases. As a clinician, it is important to realize the value of advanced diagnostic imaging. Although computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are both significantly more expensive compared with other diagnostic tools, the financial cost of inaccurate diagnosis and treatment can often result in higher overall costs.

  8. Image analysis in medical imaging: recent advances in selected examples.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, G

    2010-01-01

    Medical imaging has developed into one of the most important fields within scientific imaging due to the rapid and continuing progress in computerised medical image visualisation and advances in analysis methods and computer-aided diagnosis. Several research applications are selected to illustrate the advances in image analysis algorithms and visualisation. Recent results, including previously unpublished data, are presented to illustrate the challenges and ongoing developments.

  9. A Course and Curriculum in Advanced Technical Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, David

    A course in advanced technical communication was developed at West Virginia University for upper-division students in engineering and the sciences and those planning careers in technical communication. The first four weeks of the semester are spent copy editing, with the students learning to use standard editing marks and keeping an editor's style…

  10. Advanced Pointing Imaging Camera (APIC) Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, R. S.; Bills, B. G.; Jorgensen, J.; Jun, I.; Maki, J. N.; McEwen, A. S.; Riedel, E.; Walch, M.; Watkins, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    The Advanced Pointing Imaging Camera (APIC) concept is envisioned as an integrated system, with optical bench and flight-proven components, designed for deep-space planetary missions with 2-DOF control capability.

  11. Recent Advancements in Microwave Imaging Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    H. Park; C.C. Chang; B.H. Deng; C.W. Domier; A.J.H. Donni; K. Kawahata; C. Liang; X.P. Liang; H.J. Lu; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; A. Mase; H. Matsuura; E. Mazzucato; A. Miura; K. Mizuno; T. Munsat; K. and Y. Nagayama; M.J. van de Pol; J. Wang; Z.G. Xia; W-K. Zhang

    2002-03-26

    Significant advances in microwave and millimeter wave technology over the past decade have enabled the development of a new generation of imaging diagnostics for current and envisioned magnetic fusion devices. Prominent among these are revolutionary microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI), microwave phase imaging interferometers, imaging microwave scattering and microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) systems for imaging electron temperature and electron density fluctuations (both turbulent and coherent) and profiles (including transport barriers) on toroidal devices such as tokamaks, spherical tori, and stellarators. The diagnostic technology is reviewed, and typical diagnostic systems are analyzed. Representative experimental results obtained with these novel diagnostic systems are also presented.

  12. Plan of advanced satellite communications experiment using ETS-VI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiomi, Tadashi

    1988-01-01

    Communications Research Laboratory (CRL, Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications, Japan) has been engaged in development of three advanced satellite communication payloads aiming at experiments by Japan's 2-ton class Engineering Test Satellite VI (ETS-VI) which is to be launched in H-II rocket by NASDA in August 1992. CRL's three experimental systems are: (1) S-band inter-satellite communications; (2) millimeter-wave inter-satellite and personal-satellite communications; and (3) optical inter-satellite communications. CRL develops experimental optical communication system with telescope of 75 mm diameter which has gimbal mirror beam pointing/tracking mechanism. The onboard system has fundamental optical communication functions with laser diode transmitter of wavelength 0.83 micron, laser beam point-ahead mechanism, receiver of wavelength 0.51 micron, modulation/demodulation subsystem, and so on.

  13. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Advances in diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haoran; Song, Tianqiang

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the growing knowledge on biological behaviors of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), as well as continuous improvement in imaging techniques and experienced interpretation of imaging features of the nodules in cirrhotic liver, the detection and characterization of HCC has improved in the past decade. A number of practice guidelines for imaging diagnosis have been developed to reduce interpretation variability and standardize management of HCC, and they are constantly updated with advances in imaging techniques and evidence based data from clinical series. In this article, we strive to review the imaging techniques and the characteristic features of hepatocellular carcinoma associated with cirrhotic liver, with emphasis on the diagnostic value of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and utilization of hepatocyte-specific MRI contrast agents. We also briefly describe the concept of liver imaging reporting and data systems and discuss the consensus and controversy of major practice guidelines.

  14. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) multibeam antenna technology verification experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; Lagin, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) is a key to reaching NASA's goal of developing high-risk, advanced communications technology using multiple frequency bands to support the nation's future communication needs. Using the multiple, dynamic hopping spot beams, and advanced on board switching and processing systems, ACTS will open a new era in communications satellite technology. One of the key technologies to be validated as part of the ACTS program is the multibeam antenna with rapidly reconfigurable hopping and fixed spot beam to serve users equipped with small-aperature terminals within the coverage areas. The proposed antenna technology experiments are designed to evaluate in-orbit ACTS multibeam antenna performance (radiation pattern, gain, cross pol levels, etc.).

  15. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2016-10-25

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  16. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2016-11-22

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  17. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  18. In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Paul W.; Shrout, J. D.; Sweedler, J. V.; Farrand, S.

    2016-01-25

    This document constitutes the final technical report for DE-SC0006642, In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities, a project carried out collaboratively by investigators at Notre Dame and UIUC. The work carried out under DOE support in this project produced advances in two areas: development of new highly sophisticated correlated imaging approaches and the application of these new tools to the growth and differentiation of microbial communities under a variety of environmental conditions. A significant effort involved the creation of technical enhancements and sampling approaches to allow us to advance heterocorrelated mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and correlated Raman microscopy (CRM) from bacterial cultures and biofilms. We then exploited these measurement advances in heterocorrelated MS/CRM imaging to determine relationship of signaling molecules and excreted signaling molecules produced by P. aeruginosa to conditions relevant to the rhizosphere. In particular, we: (1) developed a laboratory testbed mimic for the rhizosphere to enable microbial growth on slides under controlled conditions; (2) integrated specific measurements of (a) rhamnolipids, (b) quinolone/quinolones, and (c) phenazines specific to P. aeruginosa; and (3) utilized the imaging tools to probe how messenger secretion, quorum sensing and swarming behavior are correlated with behavior.

  19. Advances and prospects in visible light communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongda, Chen; Chunhui, Wu; Honglei, Li; Xiongbin, Chen; Zongyu, Gao; Shigang, Cui; Qin, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Visible light communication (VLC) is an emerging technology in optical wireless communication (OWC) that has attracted worldwide research in recent years. VLC can combine communication and illumination together, which could be applied in many application scenarios such as visible light communication local area networks (VLANs), indoor localization, and intelligent lighting. In recent years, pioneering and significant work have been made in the field of VLC. In this paper, an overview of the recent progress in VLC is presented. We also demonstrate our recent experiment results including bidirectional 100 Mbit/s VLAN or Li-Fi system based on OOK modulation without blue filter. The VLC systems that we proposed are good solutions for high-speed VLC application systems with low-cost and low-complexity. VLC technology shows a bright future due to its inherent advantages, shortage of RF spectra and ever increasing popularity of white LEDs. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Nos. 2015AA033303, 2013AA013602, 2013AA013603, 2013AA03A104), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61178051, 61321063, 61335010, 61178048, 61275169), and the National Basic Research Program of China (Nos. 2013CB329205, 2011CBA00608).

  20. MMIC technology for advanced space communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, A. N.; Connolly, D. J.; Anzic, G.

    1984-01-01

    The current NASA program for 20 and 30 GHz monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technology is reviewed. The advantages of MMIC are discussed. Millimeter wavelength MMIC applications and technology for communications systems are discussed. Passive and active MMIC compatible components for millimeter wavelength applications are investigated. The cost of a millimeter wavelength MMIC's is projected.

  1. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) capabilities for serving science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Thomas R.

    1990-01-01

    Results of research on potential science applications of the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) are presented. Discussed here are: (1) general research on communications related issues; (2) a survey of science-related activities and programs in the local area; (3) interviews of selected scientists and associated telecommunications support personnel whose projects have communications requirements; (4) analysis of linkages between ACTS functionality and science user communications activities and modes of operation; and (5) an analysis of survey results and the projection of conclusions to a national scale.

  2. Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer (AASIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Design information for the Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer is reported, which was developed to determine the configuration of a sensor for IR and visible imaging. The areas of technology reported include: systems design, optics, mechanics, electronics, detectors, radiative cooler, and radiometric calibration.

  3. Advanced Imaging Algorithms for Radiation Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The intent of the proposed work, in collaboration with University of Michigan, is to develop the algorithms that will bring the analysis from qualitative images to quantitative attributes of objects containing SNM. The first step to achieving this is to develop an indepth understanding of the intrinsic errors associated with the deconvolution and MLEM algorithms. A significant new effort will be undertaken to relate the image data to a posited three-dimensional model of geometric primitives that can be adjusted to get the best fit. In this way, parameters of the model such as sizes, shapes, and masses can be extracted for both radioactive and non-radioactive materials. This model-based algorithm will need the integrated response of a hypothesized configuration of material to be calculated many times. As such, both the MLEM and the model-based algorithm require significant increases in calculation speed in order to converge to solutions in practical amounts of time.

  4. Imaging of the pancreas: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of anomalies of pancreas and the pancreatic duct system are commonly encountered at radiological evaluation. Diagnosing pancreatic lesions generally requires a multimodality approach. This review highlights the new advances in pancreatic imaging and their applications in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic pathologies. The mainstay techniques include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), radionuclide imaging (RNI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). PMID:21847450

  5. Underground communications and tracking technology advances

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2007-03-15

    As the June 2009 deadline set by the MINER Act grows near, several technologies have emerged as possible options for communicating and tracking underground coal miners in the event of an emergency or disaster. NIOSH is currently deciding how best to invest $10 million assigned by Congress under an Emergency Supplementary Appropriations Act (ESA) to research and develop mine safety technology. Medium and ultra high frequency (UHF) systems seem to be leading the pack with radio frequency identification (RFID) tags serving as the tracking system. Wireless mesh systems can serve as a communications infrastructure and they can do much more. Even more technologies continue to emerge, such as inertial navigation tracking systems. Mines are discovering the wonders of modern voice and data communications underground. Still no one know if it is economically practical to design a system that will function after a coal mine explosion. From the nineteen systems submitted to MSHA's request for information (RFI), six systems were selected that represented most of the technologies that had been proposed: the Rajant Breadcrumb, Innovative Wireless, Concurrent Technologies/Time Domain, Transtek, Gamma Services, and the Kutta Consulting systems. They were tested at CONSOL Energy's McElroy mine in April 2006. MSHA felt that all of those systems needed a significant amount of work before they were ready for use in a underground coal mining environment. The agency continues to work with these, and other manufacturers, to assist in arranging for field demonstration and then to gain MSHA approval.

  6. The Army's Use of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilse, Kenneth

    1996-01-01

    Tactical operations require military commanders to be mobile and have a high level of independence in their actions. Communications capabilities providing intelligence and command orders in these tactical situations have been limited to simple voice communications or low-rate narrow bandwidth communications because of the need for immediate reliable connectivity. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) has brought an improved communications tool to the tactical commander giving the ability to gain access to a global communications system using high data rates and wide bandwidths. The Army has successfully tested this new capability of bandwidth-on-demand and high data rates for commanders in real-world conditions during Operation UPHOLD DEMOCRACY in Haiti during the fall and winter of 1994. This paper examines ACTS use by field commanders and details the success of the ACTS system in support of a wide variety of field condition command functions.

  7. Advanced Imaging for Space Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Future NASA interferometric missions will realize high-resolution with less mass and volume compared to filled-apertures thus saving in cost over comparable filled-aperture systems. However, interferometeric aperture systems give reduced sensitivity requiring longer integration times to achieve a desired signal-to-noise ratio but is likely the only cost effective path forward for high-resolution space imaging.

  8. Advanced heterostructure transistor technologies for wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, N.-L. Larry; Lin, Barry; Chau, Frank H.-F.; Jackson, Gordon; Chen, Zhengming; Lee, C. P.

    1999-08-01

    Wireless communication has enjoyed tremendous growth in the last five years. Most of the market is below the 3 GHz. Recently, millimeter wave frequency band was also opened up to commercial applications, such as the Local Multipoint Distribution System. The rapid growth of the market demands cost effective RF circuitry with ever better performance. Thus, the heterostructure transistors are pursued to meeting the market needs. This article will first analyze the technical demand on RF transistor circuitry for wireless application. Existing and emerging transistor technologies will be discussed for its strength. A general comparison will be made.

  9. Advanced Technology Direction and Control Communications Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-16

    WORK UN4IT NUMBERS The MITRE Corporation ’ 1820 flolley Madison Blvd. Work Unit 2214G McLean, VJ rginia 22102 Ii. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS...Satellite communications using low power technique. A spread spectrum system being developed by The MITRE Corporation for the Maritime Commission. vI I,: I...300-3000 MHz; SHF (super high frequency), 3-30 GHz; EHF (extra high frequency), 30-300 GHz. 3-3 The MITRE Corporation prepared a survey of

  10. An advanced laboratory course that emphasizes communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Georg

    2012-10-01

    I will introduce a fourth-year laboratory course that has a strong focus on communication skills. The course is meant to give students a preview of how experimental physics is performed in an academic or industrial research lab. The design is such that the course approximates the experience of a graduate student in a research group, which I regard as an ideal learning environment. I will contrast this with the learning experience in a typical first- or second-year lab. Results from a small survey are also presented.

  11. Antenna technology for advanced mobile communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rammos, Emmanuel; Roederer, Antoine; Rogard, Roger

    1988-01-01

    The onboard antenna front end is the key subsystem conditioning configuration and performance of mobile communication satellites. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate this key role and to review L-band satellite antenna technology for earth coverage and regional applications. Multibeam arrays are first discussed, then unfurlable and inflatable reflector antennas are described. These technologies are now qualified in Europe for future mobile systems, for which the optimum choice of antenna technology has been found to be the key to efficient use of spectrum and power resources.

  12. Active Metamaterials for Terahertz Communication and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Saroj

    In recent years there has been significant interest in terahertz (THz) systems mostly due to their unique applications in communication and imaging. One of the primary reason for this resurgence is the use of metamaterials to design THz devices due to lack of natural materials that can respond to this electromagnetic spectrum, the so-called ''THz gap''. Even after years of intense research, THz systems are complex and expensive, unsuitable for mainstream applications. This work focuses on bridging this gap by building all solid-state THz devices for imaging and communication applications in a commercial integrated circuit (IC) technology. One such canonical device is a THz wave modulator that can be used in THz wireless communication devices and as spatial light modulator (SLM) for THz imaging systems. The key contribution of this thesis is a metamaterial based THz wave modulator fabricated in a commercial gallium arsenide (GaAs) process resonant at 0.46 THz using a novel approach of embedding pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (pHEMTs) in metamaterial and demonstrate modulation values over 30%, and THz modulation at frequencies up to 10 MHz. Using the THz wave modulator, we fabricated and experimentally demonstrated an all solid-state metamaterial based THz spatial light modulator (SLM) as a 2x2 pixel array operating around 0.46 THz, by raster scanning an occluded metal object in polystyrene using a single-pixel imaging setup. This was an important step towards building an low-voltage (1V), low power, on-chip integrable THz imaging device. Using the characterization result from the THz SLM, we computationally demonstrated a multi-level amplitude shift keying (ASK) terahertz wireless communication system using spatial light modulation instead of traditional voltage mode modulation, achieving higher spectral efficiency for high speed communication. We show two orders of magnitude improvement in symbol error rate (SER) for a degradation of 20 dB in

  13. Potential markets for advanced satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, Steven; Roberts, David; Schubert, Leroy; Smith, Brian; Sogegian, Robert; Walters, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    This report identifies trends in the volume and type of traffic offered to the U.S. domestic communications infrastructure and extrapolates these trends through the year 2011. To describe how telecommunications service providers are adapting to the identified trends, this report assesses the status, plans, and capacity of the domestic communications infrastructure. Cable, satellite, and radio components of the infrastructure are examined separately. The report also assesses the following major applications making use of the infrastructure: (1) Broadband services, including Broadband Integrated Services Digital Network (BISDN), Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS), and frame relay; (2) mobile services, including voice, location, and paging; (3) Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSAT), including mesh VSAT; and (4) Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS) for audio and video. The report associates satellite implementation of specific applications with market segments appropriate to their features and capabilities. The volume and dollar value of these market segments are estimated. For the satellite applications able to address the needs of significant market segments, the report also examines the potential of each satellite-based application to capture business from alternative technologies.

  14. A Communication Architecture for an Advanced Extravehicular Mobile Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Sands, Obed S.; Bakula, Casey J.; Oldham, Daniel R.; Wright, Ted; Bradish, Martin A.; Klebau, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the communication architecture for the Power, Avionics and Software (PAS) 1.0 subsystem for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU). The following systems are described in detail: Caution Warning and Control System, Informatics, Storage, Video, Audio, Communication, and Monitoring Test and Validation. This document also provides some background as well as the purpose and goals of the PAS subsystem being developed at Glenn Research Center (GRC).

  15. Advances in noninvasive functional imaging of bone.

    PubMed

    Lan, Sheng-Min; Wu, Ya-Na; Wu, Ping-Ching; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Lin, Ruey-Mo

    2014-02-01

    The demand for functional imaging in clinical medicine is comprehensive. Although the gold standard for the functional imaging of human bones in clinical settings is still radionuclide-based imaging modalities, nonionizing noninvasive imaging technology in small animals has greatly advanced in recent decades, especially the diffuse optical imaging to which Britton Chance made tremendous contributions. The evolution of imaging probes, instruments, and computation has facilitated exploration in the complicated biomedical research field by allowing longitudinal observation of molecular events in live cells and animals. These research-imaging tools are being used for clinical applications in various specialties, such as oncology, neuroscience, and dermatology. The Bone, a deeply located mineralized tissue, presents a challenge for noninvasive functional imaging in humans. Using nanoparticles (NP) with multiple favorable properties as bioimaging probes has provided orthopedics an opportunity to benefit from these noninvasive bone-imaging techniques. This review highlights the historical evolution of radionuclide-based imaging, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, diffuse optics-enabled in vivo technologies, vibrational spectroscopic imaging, and a greater potential for using NPs for biomedical imaging.

  16. Advanced MR Imaging in Neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Radbruch, A; Bendszus, M

    2015-10-01

    The value of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the clinical management of brain tumour patients has greatly increased in recent years through the introduction of functional MR sequences. Previously, MR imaging for brain tumours relied for the most part on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR sequences but today with the help of advanced functional MR sequences, the pathophysiological aspects of tumour growth can be directly visualised and investigated. This article will present the pathophysiological background of the MR sequences relevant to neuro-oncological imaging as well as potential clinical applications. Ultimately, we take a look at possible future developments for ultra-high-field MR imaging.

  17. Advanced Microwave/Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zuowei; Yang, Lu; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Domier, C. W.; Ito, N.; Kogi, Y.; Liang, Y.; Mase, A.; Park, H.; Sakata, E.; Tsai, W.; Xia, Z. G.; Zhang, P.

    Millimeter wave technology advances have made possible active and passive millimeter wave imaging for a variety of applications including advanced plasma diagnostics, radio astronomy, atmospheric radiometry, concealed weapon detection, all-weather aircraft landing, contraband goods detection, harbor navigation/surveillance in fog, highway traffic monitoring in fog, helicopter and automotive collision avoidance in fog, and environmental remote sensing data associated with weather, pollution, soil moisture, oil spill detection, and monitoring of forest fires, to name but a few. The primary focus of this paper is on technology advances which have made possible advanced imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations and microturbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis include frequency selective surfaces, planar Schottky diode mixer arrays, electronically controlled beam shaping/steering arrays, and high power millimeter wave local oscillator and probe sources.

  18. Advanced integrated WDM system for POF communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, M.; Fischer, U. H. P.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer Optical Fibres (POFs) show clear advantages compared to copper and glass fibres. In essence, POFs are inexpensive, space-saving and not susceptible to electromagnetic interference. Thus, the usage of POFs have become a reasonable alternative in short distance data communication. Today, POFs are applied in a wide number of applications due to these specific advantages. These applications include automotive communication systems and in-house-networks. State-of-the-art is to transmit data with only one channel over POF, this limits the bandwidth. To solve this problem, an integrated MUX/DEMUX-element for WDM over POF is designed and developed to use multiple channels. This integration leads to low costs, therefore this component is suitable for mass market applications. The fundamental idea is to separate the chromatic parts of the light in its monochromatic components by means of a grating based on an aspheric mirror. Due to the high NA of the POF the setup has to be designed in a 3D-approach. Therefore this setup cannot be compared with the planar solutions available on market, they would result high losses in the 3rd dimension. To achieve a fast and optimized design an optical simulation program is used. Particular attention has to be paid to the design of the POF as a light source in the simulation program and the optimisation of the grating. The following realization of the demultiplexer is planed to be done with injection molding. This technology offers easy and very economical processing. These advantages make this technology first choice for optical components in the low-cost array.

  19. Advanced Electrical, Optical and Data Communication Infrastructure Development

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Cobb

    2011-04-30

    The implementation of electrical and IT infrastructure systems at the North Carolina Center for Automotive Research , Inc. (NCCAR) has achieved several key objectives in terms of system functionality, operational safety and potential for ongoing research and development. Key conclusions include: (1) The proven ability to operate a high speed wireless data network over a large 155 acre area; (2) Node to node wireless transfers from access points are possible at speeds of more than 50 mph while maintaining high volume bandwidth; (3) Triangulation of electronic devices/users is possible in areas with overlapping multiple access points, outdoor areas with reduced overlap of access point coverage considerably reduces triangulation accuracy; (4) Wireless networks can be adversely affected by tree foliage, pine needles are a particular challenge due to the needle length relative to the transmission frequency/wavelength; and (5) Future research will use the project video surveillance and wireless systems to further develop automated image tracking functionality for the benefit of advanced vehicle safety monitoring and autonomous vehicle control through 'vehicle-to-vehicle' and 'vehicle-to-infrastructure' communications. A specific advantage realized from this IT implementation at NCCAR is that NC State University is implementing a similar wireless network across Centennial Campus, Raleigh, NC in 2011 and has benefited from lessons learned during this project. Consequently, students, researchers and members of the public will be able to benefit from a large scale IT implementation with features and improvements derived from this NCCAR project.

  20. Technology and application advancements of uncooled imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Peter W.; Kohin, Margaret

    2005-05-01

    Having delivered over 30,000 uncooled microbolometer based thermal imaging engines, BAE Systems is the world's leading producer. Advancements in technology include the demonstration of broadband microbolometers on a 46 μm pixel pitch which have excellent sensitivity in the MWIR (NETD ~180 mK, 3-5 μm) and LWIR (NETD ~ 15 mK, 8-12 μm) wavebands. Application advancements include the development of a family of thermal weapons sights for the military which will replace current cooled systems with lighter, lower power systems and the introduction of a new generation of handheld and pole mounted thermal imagers for commercial markets.

  1. Advances in Molecular Imaging with Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Ryan; Dayton, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has long demonstrated utility in the study and measurement of anatomic features and noninvasive observation of blood flow. Within the last decade, advances in molecular biology and contrast agents have allowed researchers to use ultrasound to detect changes in the expression of molecular markers on the vascular endothelium and other intravascular targets. This new technology, referred to as ultrasonic molecular imaging, is still in its infancy. However, in preclinical studies, ultrasonic molecular imaging has shown promise in assessing angiogenesis, inflammation, and thrombus. In this review, we discuss recent advances in microbubble-type contrast agent development, ultrasound technology, and signal processing strategies that have the potential to substantially improve the capabilities and utility of ultrasonic molecular imaging. PMID:20487678

  2. Personnel screening with advanced multistatic imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sherif S.

    2013-05-01

    Personnel screening is demanded nowadays for securing air traffic as well as critical infrastructures. The millimeter-waves are able to penetrate clothes and detect concealed objects, making them an attractive choice for security screening. Imaging methods based on multistatic architecture can ensure high quality imagery in terms of resolution and dynamic range. Following the advances in semiconductor technology, fully electronic solutions delivering real-time imaging are becoming feasible. Furthermore, the continuously increasing capabilities of digital signal processing units allow for the utilization of digital-beamforming techniques for image reconstruction, thus offering new opportunities for imaging systems to use sophisticated operation modes. Based on these modern technologies, an advanced realization addressing personnel screening in E-band with planar multistatic sparse array design is demonstrated.

  3. New Opportunities with the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) ACTS program review; 2) Spot beam locations; 3) Key ACTS technologies; 4) ACTS accomplishments; 5) Experiments operations; 6) Inclined orbit opportunity, mission and impact; 7) Modifications summary; 8) Experiment opportunity, categories, processes; and 9) Recent and ongoing activity.

  4. Epidermal electronics with advanced capabilities in near-field communication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeonghyun; Banks, Anthony; Cheng, Huanyu; Xie, Zhaoqian; Xu, Sheng; Jang, Kyung-In; Lee, Jung Woo; Liu, Zhuangjian; Gutruf, Philipp; Huang, Xian; Wei, Pinghung; Liu, Fei; Li, Kan; Dalal, Mitul; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Feng, Xue; Huang, Yonggang; Gupta, Sanjay; Paik, Ungyu; Rogers, John A

    2015-02-25

    Epidermal electronics with advanced capabilities in near field communications (NFC) are presented. The systems include stretchable coils and thinned NFC chips on thin, low modulus stretchable adhesives, to allow seamless, conformal contact with the skin and simultaneous capabilities for wireless interfaces to any standard, NFC-enabled smartphone, even under extreme deformation and after/during normal daily activities.

  5. Advanced seismic imaging for geothermal development

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, John; Pullammanappallil, Satish; Honjas, Bill

    2016-08-01

    J. N. Louie, Pullammanappallil, S., and Honjas, W., 2011, Advanced seismic imaging for geothermal development: Proceedings of the New Zealand Geothermal Workshop 2011, Nov. 21-23, Auckland, paper 32, 7 pp. Preprint available at http://crack.seismo.unr.edu/geothermal/Louie-NZGW11.pdf

  6. Developing a framework for worldwide image communication.

    PubMed

    Rowberg, A H; York, W B

    1999-05-01

    The increasing mobility of the population and frequent changes in healthcare coverage, in both the government and private sectors, require integration of medical records not only longitudinally, but also across a variety of healthcare providers. Early in 1998, the federal government decided to solve this problem by constructing a framework for access to medical records by all of the government's health care facilities, called the Government Computer-Based Patient Record (GCPR). The government consortium chose a proposal by Litton PRC, a partnership of 11 companies with complementary areas of expertise. The framework is based on open systems, which use publicly available standards, and includes a Master Patient Information Locator that allows access to medical information from remote facilities, based on creating a unique identifier for each and every individual patient. PRC will use the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) imaging standard for radiology, supplemented by Health Level Seven (HL7).

  7. Uncooled thermal imaging sensor and application advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Peter W.; Cox, Stephen; Murphy, Bob; Grealish, Kevin; Joswick, Mike; Denley, Brian; Feda, Frank; Elmali, Loriann; Kohin, Margaret

    2006-05-01

    BAE Systems continues to advance the technology and performance of microbolometer-based thermal imaging modules and systems. 640x480 digital uncooled infrared focal plane arrays are in full production, illustrated by recent production line test data for two thousand focal plane arrays. This paper presents a snapshot of microbolometer technology at BAE Systems and an overview of two of the most important thermal imaging sensor programs currently in production: a family of thermal weapons sights for the United States Army and a thermal imager for the remote weapons station on the Stryker vehicle.

  8. A new imaging technique for detecting interstellar communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John; Welsh, Barry; Kotze, Marissa; Siegmund, Oswald

    2017-01-01

    We report on a unique detection methodology using the Berkeley Visible Image Tube (BVIT) mounted on the 10m Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) to search for laser pulses originating in communications from advanced extraterrestrial (ET) civilizations residing on nearby Earth-like planets located within their habitability zones. The detection technique assumes that ET communicates through high powered pulsed lasers with pulse durations on the order of 5 nanoseconds, the signals thereby being brighter than that of the host star within this very short period of time. Our technique turns down the gain of the optically sensitive photon counting microchannel plate detector such that ~30 photons are required in a 5ns window to generate an imaged event. Picking a priori targets with planets in the habitable zone substantially reduces the false alarm rate. Interplanetary communication by optical masers was first postulated by Schwartz and Townes in 1961. Under the assumption that ET has access to a 10 m class telescope operated as a transmitter then we could detect lasers with a similar power to that of the Livermore Laboratory laser (~1.8Mj per pulse), to a distance of ~ 1000 pc. In this talk we present the results of 2400 seconds of BVIT observations on the SALT of the star Wolf 1061, which is known to harbor an Earth-sized exoplanet located in the habitability zone. At this distance (4.3 pc), BVIT on SALT could detect a 48 joule per pulse laser, now commercially available as tabletop devices.

  9. Advanced endoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Helmut; Nägel, Andreas; Buda, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Advanced endoscopic imaging is revolutionizing our way on how to diagnose and treat colorectal lesions. Within recent years a variety of modern endoscopic imaging techniques was introduced to improve adenoma detection rates. Those include high-definition imaging, dye-less chromoendoscopy techniques and novel, highly flexible endoscopes, some of them equipped with balloons or multiple lenses in order to improve adenoma detection rates. In this review we will focus on the newest developments in the field of colonoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection rates. Described techniques include high-definition imaging, optical chromoendoscopy techniques, virtual chromoendoscopy techniques, the Third Eye Retroscope and other retroviewing devices, the G-EYE endoscope and the Full Spectrum Endoscopy-system. PMID:25789092

  10. Advanced technologies for remote sensing imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.L.

    1993-06-07

    Generating and returning imagery from great distances has been generally associated with national security activities, with emphasis on reliability of system operation. (While the introduction of such capabilities was usually characterized by high levels of innovation, the evolution of such systems has followed the classical track of proliferation of ``standardized items`` expressing ever more incremental technological advances.) Recent focusing of interest on the use of remote imaging systems for commercial and scientific purposes can be expected to induce comparatively rapid advances along the axes of efficiency and technological sophistication, respectively. This paper reviews the most basic reasons for expecting the next decade of advances to dwarf the impressive accomplishments of the past ten years. The impact of these advances clearly will be felt in all major areas of large-scale human endeavor, commercial, military and scientific.

  11. Advanced Communication and Networking Technologies for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul; Hayden, Jeff; Agre, Jonathan R.; Clare, Loren P.; Yan, Tsun-Yee

    2001-01-01

    Next-generation Mars communications networks will provide communications and navigation services to a wide variety of Mars science vehicles including: spacecraft that are arriving at Mars, spacecraft that are entering and descending in the Mars atmosphere, scientific orbiter spacecraft, spacecraft that return Mars samples to Earth, landers, rovers, aerobots, airplanes, and sensing pods. In the current architecture plans, the communication services will be provided using capabilities deployed on the science vehicles as well as dedicated communication satellites that will together make up the Mars network. This network will evolve as additional vehicles arrive, depart or end their useful missions. Cost savings and increased reliability will result from the ability to share communication services between missions. This paper discusses the basic architecture that is needed to support the Mars Communications Network part of NASA's Space Science Enterprise (SSE) communications architecture. The network may use various networking technologies such as those employed in the terrestrial Internet, as well as special purpose deep-space protocols to move data and commands autonomously between vehicles, at disparate Mars vicinity sites (on the surface or in near-Mars space) and between Mars vehicles and earthbound users. The architecture of the spacecraft on-board local communications is being reconsidered in light of these new networking requirements. The trend towards increasingly autonomous operation of the spacecraft is aimed at reducing the dependence on resource scheduling provided by Earth-based operators and increasing system fault tolerance. However, these benefits will result in increased communication and software development requirements. As a result, the envisioned Mars communications infrastructure requires both hardware and protocol technology advancements. This paper will describe a number of the critical technology needs and some of the ongoing research

  12. Vision communications based on LED array and imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jong-Ho; Jung, Sung-Yoon

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a brand new communication concept, called as "vision communication" based on LED array and image sensor. This system consists of LED array as a transmitter and digital device which include image sensor such as CCD and CMOS as receiver. In order to transmit data, the proposed communication scheme simultaneously uses the digital image processing and optical wireless communication scheme. Therefore, the cognitive communication scheme is possible with the help of recognition techniques used in vision system. By increasing data rate, our scheme can use LED array consisting of several multi-spectral LEDs. Because arranged each LED can emit multi-spectral optical signal such as visible, infrared and ultraviolet light, the increase of data rate is possible similar to WDM and MIMO skills used in traditional optical and wireless communications. In addition, this multi-spectral capability also makes it possible to avoid the optical noises in communication environment. In our vision communication scheme, the data packet is composed of Sync. data and information data. Sync. data is used to detect the transmitter area and calibrate the distorted image snapshots obtained by image sensor. By making the optical rate of LED array be same with the frame rate (frames per second) of image sensor, we can decode the information data included in each image snapshot based on image processing and optical wireless communication techniques. Through experiment based on practical test bed system, we confirm the feasibility of the proposed vision communications based on LED array and image sensor.

  13. Advances in retinal ganglion cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Balendra, S I; Normando, E M; Bloom, P A; Cordeiro, M F

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide and will affect 79.6 million people worldwide by 2020. It is caused by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), predominantly via apoptosis, within the retinal nerve fibre layer and the corresponding loss of axons of the optic nerve head. One of its most devastating features is its late diagnosis and the resulting irreversible visual loss that is often predictable. Current diagnostic tools require significant RGC or functional visual field loss before the threshold for detection of glaucoma may be reached. To propel the efficacy of therapeutics in glaucoma, an earlier diagnostic tool is required. Recent advances in retinal imaging, including optical coherence tomography, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and adaptive optics, have propelled both glaucoma research and clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. However, an ideal imaging technique to diagnose and monitor glaucoma would image RGCs non-invasively with high specificity and sensitivity in vivo. It may confirm the presence of healthy RGCs, such as in transgenic models or retrograde labelling, or detect subtle changes in the number of unhealthy or apoptotic RGCs, such as detection of apoptosing retinal cells (DARC). Although many of these advances have not yet been introduced to the clinical arena, their successes in animal studies are enthralling. This review will illustrate the challenges of imaging RGCs, the main retinal imaging modalities, the in vivo techniques to augment these as specific RGC-imaging tools and their potential for translation to the glaucoma clinic. PMID:26293138

  14. Distress detection, location, and communications using advanced space technology. [satellite-borne synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces a concept for low-cost, global, day-night, all-weather disaster warning and assistance. Evolving, advanced space technology with passive radio frequency reflectors in conjunction with an imaging synthetic aperture radar is employed to detect, identify, locate, and provide passive communication with earth users in distress. This concept evolved from a broad NASA research on new global search and rescue techniques. Appropriate airborne radar test results from this research are reviewed and related to potential disaster applications. The analysis indicates the approach has promise for disaster communications relative to floods, droughts, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and severe storms.

  15. Earth-lunar communications using the advanced TDRSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandel, Daniel L.; Jordan, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) is an operational geostationary satellite system used by the NASA to communicate with low earth orbiting missions such as the NASA Space Transportation System and the Hubble Space Telescope. The Advanced TDRSS (ATDRSS) is a continuation to TDRSS and will develop new spacecraft to replenish and maintain the TDRSS space network into the second decade of the 21st century. This paper describes an approach which could permit the future ATDRSS space network to meet the future communications required for lunar missions as well as those projected for low earth missions in this time frame.

  16. VICAR - VIDEO IMAGE COMMUNICATION AND RETRIEVAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    VICAR (Video Image Communication and Retrieval) is a general purpose image processing software system that has been under continuous development since the late 1960's. Originally intended for data from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory's unmanned planetary spacecraft, VICAR is now used for a variety of other applications including biomedical image processing, cartography, earth resources, and geological exploration. The development of this newest version of VICAR emphasized a standardized, easily-understood user interface, a shield between the user and the host operating system, and a comprehensive array of image processing capabilities. Structurally, VICAR can be divided into roughly two parts; a suite of applications programs and an executive which serves as the interfaces between the applications, the operating system, and the user. There are several hundred applications programs ranging in function from interactive image editing, data compression/decompression, and map projection, to blemish, noise, and artifact removal, mosaic generation, and pattern recognition and location. An information management system designed specifically for handling image related data can merge image data with other types of data files. The user accesses these programs through the VICAR executive, which consists of a supervisor and a run-time library. From the viewpoint of the user and the applications programs, the executive is an environment that is independent of the operating system. VICAR does not replace the host computer's operating system; instead, it overlays the host resources. The core of the executive is the VICAR Supervisor, which is based on NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Transportable Applications Executive (TAE). Various modifications and extensions have been made to optimize TAE for image processing applications, resulting in a user friendly environment. The rest of the executive consists of the VICAR Run-Time Library, which provides a set of subroutines (image

  17. Computational and design methods for advanced imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Gabriel C.

    This dissertation merges the optical design and computational aspects of imaging systems to create novel devices that solve engineering problems in optical science and attempts to expand the solution space available to the optical designer. This dissertation is divided into two parts: the first discusses a new active illumination depth sensing modality, while the second part discusses a passive illumination system called plenoptic, or lightfield, imaging. The new depth sensing modality introduced in part one is called depth through controlled aberration. This technique illuminates a target with a known, aberrated projected pattern and takes an image using a traditional, unmodified imaging system. Knowing how the added aberration in the projected pattern changes as a function of depth, we are able to quantitatively determine depth of a series of points from the camera. A major advantage this method permits is the ability for illumination and imaging axes to be coincident. Plenoptic cameras capture both spatial and angular data simultaneously. This dissertation present a new set of parameters that permit the design and comparison of plenoptic devices outside the traditionally published plenoptic 1.0 and plenoptic 2.0 configurations. Additionally, a series of engineering advancements are presented, including full system raytraces of raw plenoptic images, Zernike compression techniques of raw image files, and non-uniform lenslet arrays to compensate for plenoptic system aberrations. Finally, a new snapshot imaging spectrometer is proposed based off the plenoptic configuration.

  18. Display-based communications for advanced transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Alfred T.

    1989-01-01

    The next generation of civil transport aircraft will depend increasingly upon ground-air-ground and satellite data link for information critical to safe and efficient air transportation. Previous studies which examined the concept of display-based communications in addition to, or in lieu of, conventional voice transmissions are reviewed. A full-mission flight simulation comparing voice and display-based communication modes in an advanced transport aircraft is also described. The results indicate that a display-based mode of information transfer does not result in significantly increased aircrew workload, but does result in substantially increased message acknowledgment times when compared to conventional voice transmissions. User acceptance of the display-based communication system was generally high, replicating the findings of previous studies. However, most pilots tested expressed concern over the potential loss of information available from frequency monitoring which might result from the introduction of discrete address communications. Concern was expressed by some pilots for the reduced time available to search for conflicting traffic when using the communications display system. The implications of the findings for the design of display-based communications are discussed.

  19. Performance evaluation of cognitive radio in advanced metering infrastructure communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiew, Yik-Kuan; Mohd Aripin, Norazizah; Din, Norashidah Md

    2016-03-01

    Smart grid is an intelligent electricity grid system. A reliable two-way communication system is required to transmit both critical and non-critical smart grid data. However, it is difficult to locate a huge chunk of dedicated spectrum for smart grid communications. Hence, cognitive radio based communication is applied. Cognitive radio allows smart grid users to access licensed spectrums opportunistically with the constraint of not causing harmful interference to licensed users. In this paper, a cognitive radio based smart grid communication framework is proposed. Smart grid framework consists of Home Area Network (HAN) and Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), while AMI is made up of Neighborhood Area Network (NAN) and Wide Area Network (WAN). In this paper, the authors only report the findings for AMI communication. AMI is smart grid domain that comprises smart meters, data aggregator unit, and billing center. Meter data are collected by smart meters and transmitted to data aggregator unit by using cognitive 802.11 technique; data aggregator unit then relays the data to billing center using cognitive WiMAX and TV white space. The performance of cognitive radio in AMI communication is investigated using Network Simulator 2. Simulation results show that cognitive radio improves the latency and throughput performances of AMI. Besides, cognitive radio also improves spectrum utilization efficiency of WiMAX band from 5.92% to 9.24% and duty cycle of TV band from 6.6% to 10.77%.

  20. Terahertz Tools Advance Imaging for Security, Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Picometrix, a wholly owned subsidiary of Advanced Photonix Inc. (API), of Ann Arbor, Michigan, invented the world s first commercial terahertz system. The company improved the portability and capabilities of their systems through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements with Langley Research Center to provide terahertz imaging capabilities for inspecting the space shuttle external tanks and orbiters. Now API s systems make use of the unique imaging capacity of terahertz radiation on manufacturing floors, for thickness measurements of coatings, pharmaceutical tablet production, and even art conservation.

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Revisited - Advanced Imaging Review.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Surabhi; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Uma; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a multisystem disorder, which causes significant morbidity. An early diagnosis of RA is essential to prevent the development of irreversible bone and joint changes. The disease has characteristic clinical features, but an early evaluation of the quantum of disease may be difficult with plain radiography alone. Recent developments in the imaging of RA have contributed significantly to an early diagnosis of the disease. In this article, we review the role and current status of various imaging modalities including recent advances in the evaluation and follow-up of early RA.

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Revisited – Advanced Imaging Review

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Surabhi; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Uma; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a multisystem disorder, which causes significant morbidity. An early diagnosis of RA is essential to prevent the development of irreversible bone and joint changes. The disease has characteristic clinical features, but an early evaluation of the quantum of disease may be difficult with plain radiography alone. Recent developments in the imaging of RA have contributed significantly to an early diagnosis of the disease. In this article, we review the role and current status of various imaging modalities including recent advances in the evaluation and follow-up of early RA. PMID:28105245

  3. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Agosta, Federica; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is playing an increasingly important role in the study of neurodegenerative diseases, delineating the structural and functional alterations determined by these conditions. Advanced MRI techniques are of special interest for their potential to characterize the signature of each neurodegenerative condition and aid both the diagnostic process and the monitoring of disease progression. This aspect will become crucial when disease-modifying (personalized) therapies will be established. MRI techniques are very diverse and go from the visual inspection of MRI scans to more complex approaches, such as manual and automatic volume measurements, diffusion tensor MRI, and functional MRI. All these techniques allow us to investigate the different features of neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances concerning the use of MRI in some of the most important neurodegenerative conditions, putting an emphasis on the advanced techniques.

  4. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit technology for advanced space communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1988-01-01

    Future Space Communications subsystems will utilize GaAs Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMIC's) to reduce volume, weight, and cost and to enhance system reliability. Recent advances in GaAs MMIC technology have led to high-performance devices which show promise for insertion into these next generation systems. The status and development of a number of these devices operating from Ku through Ka band will be discussed along with anticipated potential applications.

  5. Attitude Control Subsystem for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewston, Alan W.; Mitchell, Kent A.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the on-orbit operation of the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The three ACTS control axes are defined, including the means for sensing attitude and determining the pointing errors. The desired pointing requirements for various modes of control as well as the disturbance torques that oppose the control are identified. Finally, the hardware actuators and control loops utilized to reduce the attitude error are described.

  6. Advanced technology for space communications and tracking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    1988-10-01

    Technological advances in the communications and tracking areas being developed by NASA and applicable to future missions and associated space operations are discussed. The applications scenarios considered include the Space Shuttle, Space Station, lunar base, and Mars missions. Performance goals and conceptual designs are discussed, and the relevance of optical, laser, and millimeter wave-based implementations to the various applications are examined. Recommendations for future systems developments are addressed.

  7. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS): Four-Year System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Bauer, Robert; Krawczyk, Richard J.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Zernic, Michael J.; Gargione, Frank

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was conceived at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the late 1970's as a follow-on program to ATS and CTS to continue NASA's long history of satellite communications projects. The ACTS project set the stage for the C-band satellites that started the industry, and later the ACTS project established the use of Ku-band for video distribution and direct-to-home broadcasting. ACTS, launched in September 1993 from the space shuttle, created a revolution in satellite system architecture by using digital communications techniques employing key technologies such as a fast hopping multibeam antenna, an on-board baseband processor, a wide-band microwave switch matrix, adaptive rain fade compensation, and the use of 900 MHz transponders operating at Ka-band frequencies. This paper describes the lessons learned in each of the key ACTS technology areas, as well as in the propagation investigations.

  8. Imaging Tumor Hypoxia to Advance Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Boss, Mary-Keara

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Most solid tumors contain regions of low oxygenation or hypoxia. Tumor hypoxia has been associated with a poor clinical outcome and plays a critical role in tumor radioresistance. Recent Advances: Two main types of hypoxia exist in the tumor microenvironment: chronic and cycling hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia results from the limited diffusion distance of oxygen, and cycling hypoxia primarily results from the variation in microvessel red blood cell flux and temporary disturbances in perfusion. Chronic hypoxia may cause either tumor progression or regressive effects depending on the tumor model. However, there is a general trend toward the development of a more aggressive phenotype after cycling hypoxia. With advanced hypoxia imaging techniques, spatiotemporal characteristics of tumor hypoxia and the changes to the tumor microenvironment can be analyzed. Critical Issues: In this review, we focus on the biological and clinical consequences of chronic and cycling hypoxia on radiation treatment. We also discuss the advanced non-invasive imaging techniques that have been developed to detect and monitor tumor hypoxia in preclinical and clinical studies. Future Directions: A better understanding of the mechanisms of tumor hypoxia with non-invasive imaging will provide a basis for improved radiation therapeutic practices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 313–337. PMID:24329000

  9. Advanced technology for space communications and tracking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    The communications needs for the Growth Space Station (GSS) are envisioned to drive NASA to seek unique concepts and capability to establish this permanent presence in space. Furthermore, it will provide a facility to assemble, test, and deploy rather large and unique communications systems/subsystems. GSS is envisioned to need or desire the capability to communicate with many more satellites and spacecraft than the initial operating capability (IOC). The increased interconnectivity will include links with numerous NASA and other U.S. Government satellites, commercial satellites, foreign spacecraft, and deep space missions. In parallel, the payloads/experiments on Space Station are expected to increase in numbers and in terms of data gathering capabilities. The use of automation and robotics will require high data rate and extremely reliable links. The GSS will need to accommodate continually evolving and largely unknown future requirements for coverage, data rates, number of users, etc. This requirement for flexibility over a long term will provide a unique challenge to develop systems which are user transparent and which are quickly reconfigurable. Deep space communications are driven by the relatively near-term envisioned missions to the Moon and Mars. In addition to these, projected NASA missions include Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and comet/asteroid probes. These future deep space missions will require highly reliable, long life, and very efficient communications and tracking systems to ensure success. Additionally, for space proximity operations, systems capable of supporting rendezvous, station keeping, and soft docking between various vehicles, Shuttle, satellites, unknown objects, and Space Stations are needed. In this paper, technology advancements in the communications and tracking areas being pursued within NASA, as applicable to future missions and associated space operations, are presented. The relevance of optical-, laser-, and millimeter-wave based

  10. Advanced imaging in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria

    2017-04-01

    Although echocardiography remains the mainstay imaging technique for the evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), innovations in noninvasive imaging in the past few years have provided new insights into the pathophysiology and quantification of VHD, early detection of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, and advanced prognostic assessment. The severity grading of valve dysfunction has been refined with the use of Doppler echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and CT imaging. LV ejection fraction remains an important criterion when deciding whether patients should be referred for surgery. However, echocardiographic strain imaging can now detect impaired LV systolic function before LV ejection fraction reduces, thus provoking the debate on whether patients with severe VHD should be referred for surgery at an earlier stage (before symptom onset). Impaired LV strain correlates with the amount of myocardial fibrosis detected with CMR techniques. Furthermore, accumulating data show that the extent of fibrosis associated with severe VHD has important prognostic implications. The present Review focuses on using these novel imaging modalities to assess pathophysiology, early LV dysfunction, and prognosis of major VHDs, including aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation, and aortic regurgitation.

  11. A Mobile Communications Space Link Between the Space Shuttle Orbiter and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick; Arndt, G. D.; Bondyopadhyay, P.; Shaw, Roland

    1994-01-01

    A communications experiment is described as a link between the Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Breadboarding for this experiment has led to two items with potential for commercial application: a 1-Watt Ka-band amplifier and a Ka-band, circularly polarized microstrip antenna. Results of the hybrid Ka-band amplifier show gain at 30 dB and a saturated output power of 28.5 dBm. A second version comprised of MMIC amplifiers is discussed. Test results of the microstrip antenna subarray show a gain of approximately 13 dB and excellent circular polarization.

  12. Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Advanced Communications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling

    2015-01-01

    Novel approach enables high-speed special-purpose processors Advanced reconfigurable and reprogrammable communication systems will require sub-130-nanometer electronics. Legacy single event upset (SEU) radiation-tolerant circuits are ineffective at speeds greater than 125 megahertz. In Phase I of this project, ICs, LLC, demonstrated new base-level logic circuits that provide SEU immunity for sub-130-nanometer high-speed circuits. In Phase II, the company developed an innovative self-restoring logic (SRL) circuit and a system approach that provides high-speed, SEU-tolerant solutions that are effective for sub-130-nanometer electronics scalable to at least 22-nanometer processes. The SRL system can be used in the design of NASA's next-generation special-purpose processors, especially reconfigurable communication processors.

  13. Recent advances in imaging preterm brain injury.

    PubMed

    Boardman, J P; Dyet, L E

    2007-08-01

    Survivors of preterm birth are at high risk of neurocognitive impairment in childhood, but the disturbances to brain growth and function that underlie impairment are not completely understood. Improvements in perinatal care have led to a reduction in the major destructive parenchymal brain lesions that are associated with motor impairment, such as cystic periventricular leucomalacia and haemorrhagic parenchymal infarction. However, with the application of advanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and processing techniques in the neonatal period, subtle alterations in brain development have become apparent. These changes occur with similar frequency to long-term neurocognitive impairment, and may therefore represent candidate neural substrates for this group of disorders. Here we review the range of lesions and associated outcomes that are seen in the current era of perinatal care, and discuss how state of the art MR imaging techniques have helped to define the neural systems affected by preterm birth, and have provided insights into understanding mechanisms of injury.

  14. Advanced methods in synthetic aperture radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    For over 50 years our world has been mapped and measured with synthetic aperture radar (SAR). A SAR system operates by transmitting a series of wideband radio-frequency pulses towards the ground and recording the resulting backscattered electromagnetic waves as the system travels along some one-dimensional trajectory. By coherently processing the recorded backscatter over this extended aperture, one can form a high-resolution 2D intensity map of the ground reflectivity, which we call a SAR image. The trajectory, or synthetic aperture, is achieved by mounting the radar on an aircraft, spacecraft, or even on the roof of a car traveling down the road, and allows for a diverse set of applications and measurement techniques for remote sensing applications. It is quite remarkable that the sub-centimeter positioning precision and sub-nanosecond timing precision required to make this work properly can in fact be achieved under such real-world, often turbulent, vibrationally intensive conditions. Although the basic principles behind SAR imaging and interferometry have been known for decades, in recent years an explosion of data exploitation techniques enabled by ever-faster computational horsepower have enabled some remarkable advances. Although SAR images are often viewed as simple intensity maps of ground reflectivity, SAR is also an exquisitely sensitive coherent imaging modality with a wealth of information buried within the phase information in the image. Some of the examples featured in this presentation will include: (1) Interferometric SAR, where by comparing the difference in phase between two SAR images one can measure subtle changes in ground topography at the wavelength scale. (2) Change detection, in which carefully geolocated images formed from two different passes are compared. (3) Multi-pass 3D SAR tomography, where multiple trajectories can be used to form 3D images. (4) Moving Target Indication (MTI), in which Doppler effects allow one to detect and

  15. Advances in high-speed low-latency communications for nanopositioning in advanced microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Scott C.

    2012-06-01

    We present a comparison of classical and recently developed communications interfacing technologies relevant to scanned imaging. We adopt an applications perspective, with a focus on interfacing techniques as enablers for enhanced resolution, speed, stability, information density or similar benefits. A wealth of such applications have emerged, ranging from nanoscale-stabilized force microscopy yielding 100X resolution improvement thanks to leveraging the latest in interfacing capabilities, to novel approaches in analog interfacing which improve data density and DAC resolution by several orders of magnitude. Our intent is to provide tools to understand, select and implement advanced interfacing to take applications to the next level. We have entered an era in which new interfacing techniques are enablers, in their own right, for novel imaging techniques. For example, clever leveraging of new interfacing technologies has yielded nanoscale stabilization and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) resolution enhancement. To assist in choosing and implementing interfacing strategies that maximize performance and enable new capabilities, we review available interfaces such as USB2, GPIB and Ethernet against the specific needs of positioning for the scanned-imaging community. We spotlight recent developments such as LabVIEW FPGA, which allows non-specialists to quickly devise custom logic and interfaces of unprecedentedly high performance and parallelism. Notable applications are reviewed, including a clever amalgamation of AFM and optical tweezers and a picometer-scaleaccuracy interferometer devised for ultrafine positioning validation. We note the Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI), emerging as a high-speed/low-latency instrumentation interface. The utility of instrument-specific parallel (PIO) and TTL sync/trigger (DIO) interfaces is also discussed. Requirements of tracking and autofocus are reviewed against the time-critical needs of typical applications (to avoid, for example

  16. Advanced imaging of the scapholunate ligamentous complex.

    PubMed

    Shahabpour, Maryam; Staelens, Barbara; Van Overstraeten, Luc; De Maeseneer, Michel; Boulet, Cedric; De Mey, Johan; Scheerlinck, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    The scapholunate joint is one of the most involved in wrist injuries. Its stability depends on primary and secondary stabilisers forming together the scapholunate complex. This ligamentous complex is often evaluated by wrist arthroscopy. To avoid surgery as diagnostic procedure, optimization of MR imaging parameters as use of three-dimensional (3D) sequences with very thin slices and high spatial resolution, is needed to detect lesions of the intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the scapholunate complex. The paper reviews the literature on imaging of radial-sided carpal ligaments with advanced computed tomographic arthrography (CTA) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) to evaluate the scapholunate complex. Anatomy and pathology of the ligamentous complex are described and illustrated with CTA, MRA and corresponding arthroscopy. Sprains, mid-substance tears, avulsions and fibrous infiltrations of carpal ligaments could be identified on CTA and MRA images using 3D fat-saturated PD and 3D DESS (dual echo with steady-state precession) sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices. Imaging signs of scapholunate complex pathology include: discontinuity, nonvisualization, changes in signal intensity, contrast extravasation (MRA), contour irregularity and waviness and periligamentous infiltration by edema, granulation tissue or fibrosis. Based on this preliminary experience, we believe that 3 T MRA using 3D sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices and multiplanar reconstructions is capable to evaluate the scapholunate complex and could help to reduce the number of diagnostic arthroscopies.

  17. Advancing digital methods in the fight against communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Couture, Guillaume; Seaman, Vincent Y; Wenger, Jay; Moonen, Bruno; Magill, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Important advances are being made in the fight against communicable diseases by using new digital tools. While they can be a challenge to deploy at-scale, GPS-enabled smartphones, electronic dashboards and computer models have multiple benefits. They can facilitate program operations, lead to new insights about the disease transmission and support strategic planning. Today, tools such as these are used to vaccinate more children against polio in Nigeria, reduce the malaria burden in Zambia and help predict the spread of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

  18. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite Now Operating in an Inclined Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) system has been modified to support operation in an inclined orbit that is virtually transparent to users, and plans are to continue this final phase of its operation through September 2000. The next 2 years of ACTS will provide a new opportunity for using the technologies that this system brought online over 5 years ago and that are still being used to resolve the technical issues that face NASA and the satellite industry in the area of seamless networking and interoperability with terrestrial systems. New goals for ACTS have been defined that align the program with recent changes in NASA and industry. ACTS will be used as a testbed to: Show how NASA and other Government agencies can use commercial systems for 1. future support of their operations Test, characterize, and resolve technical issues in using advanced communications 2. protocols such as asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) and transmission control protocol/Internet protocol (TCP/IP) over long latency links as found when interoperating satellites with terrestrial systems Evaluate narrow-spot-beam Ka-band satellite operation in an inclined orbit 3. Verify Ka-band satellite technologies since no other Ka-band system is yet 4. available in the United States

  19. Advanced Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging System (AAHIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, Miles Q.; Pfeiffer, Joel E.; Sparks, Andrew W.; Jim, Kevin T. C.; Yoon, Dugan

    2002-11-01

    The design, operation, and performance of the fourth generation of Science and Technology International's Advanced Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging Sensors (AAHIS) are described. These imaging spectrometers have a variable bandwidth ranging from 390-840 nm. A three-axis image stabilization provides spatially and spectrally coherent imagery by damping most of the airborne platform's random motion. A wide 40-degree field of view coupled with sub-pixel detection allows for a large area coverage rate. A software controlled variable aperture, spectral shaping filters, and high quantum efficiency, back-illuminated CCD's contribute to the excellent sensitivity of the sensors. AAHIS sensors have been operated on a variety of fixed and rotary wing platforms, achieving ground-sampling distances ranging from 6.5 cm to 2 m. While these sensors have been primarily designed for use over littoral zones, they are able to operate over both land and water. AAHIS has been used for detecting and locating submarines, mines, tanks, divers, camouflage and disturbed earth. Civilian applications include search and rescue on land and at sea, agricultural analysis, environmental time-series, coral reef assessment, effluent plume detection, coastal mapping, damage assessment, and seasonal whale population monitoring

  20. Use of Advanced Solar Cells for Commercial Communication Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    The current generation of communications satellites are located primarily in geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Over the next decade, however, a new generation of communications satellites will be built and launched, designed to provide a world-wide interconnection of portable telephones. For this mission, the satellites must be positioned in lower polar and near-polar orbits. To provide complete coverage, large numbers of satellites will be required. Because the required number of satellites decreases as the orbital altitude is increased, fewer satellites would be required if the orbit chosen were raised from low to intermediate orbit. However, in intermediate orbits, satellites encounter significant radiation due to trapped electrons and protons. Radiation tolerant solar cells may be necessary to make such satellites feasible. We analyze the amount of radiation encountered in low and intermediate polar orbits at altitudes of interest to next-generation communication satellites, calculate the expected degradation for silicon, GaAs, and InP solar cells, and show that the lifetimes can be significantly increased by use of advanced solar cells.

  1. Use of advanced solar cells for commercial communication satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1995-03-01

    The current generation of communications satellites are located primarily in geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Over the next decade, however, a new generation of communications satellites will be built and launched, designed to provide a world-wide interconnection of portable telephones. For this mission, the satellites must be positioned in lower polar and near-polar orbits. To provide complete coverage, large numbers of satellites will be required. Because the required number of satellites decreases as the orbital altitude is increased, fewer satellites would be required if the orbit chosen were raised from low to intermediate orbit. However, in intermediate orbits, satellites encounter significant radiation due to trapped electrons and protons. Radiation tolerant solar cells may be necessary to make such satellites feasible. We analyze the amount of radiation encountered in low and intermediate polar orbits at altitudes of interest to next-generation communication satellites, calculate the expected degradation for silicon, GaAs, and InP solar cells, and show that the lifetimes can be significantly increased by use of advanced solar cells.

  2. Use of advanced solar cells for commerical communication satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.

    1995-01-01

    The current generation of communications satellites are located primarily in geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Over the next decade, however, a new generation of communications satellites will be built and launched, designed to provide a world-wide interconnection of portable telephones. For this mission, the satellites must be positioned in lower polar- and near-polar orbits. To provide complete coverage, large numbers of satellites will be required. Because of the required number of satellites decreases as the orbital altitude is increased, fewer satellites would be required if the orbit chosen were raised from Low to intermediate orbit. However, in intermediate orbits, satellites encounter significant radiation due to trapped electrons and protons. Radiation tolerant solar cells may be necessary to make such satellites feasible. We analyze the amount of radiation encountered in low and intermediate polar orbits at altitudes of interest to next-generation communication satellites, calculate the expected degradation for silicon, GaAs, and InP solar cells, and show that the lifetimes can be significantly increased by use of advanced solar cells.

  3. Advanced MR Imaging in Pediatric Brain Tumors, Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lequin, Maarten; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2017-02-01

    Advanced MR imaging techniques, such as spectroscopy, perfusion, diffusion, and functional imaging, have improved the diagnosis of brain tumors in children and also play an important role in defining surgical as well as therapeutic responses in these patients. In addition to the anatomic or structural information gained with conventional MR imaging sequences, advanced MR imaging techniques also provide physiologic information about tumor morphology, metabolism, and hemodynamics. This article reviews the physiology, techniques, and clinical applications of diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging, MR spectroscopy, perfusion MR imaging, susceptibility-weighted imaging, and functional MR imaging in the setting of neuro-oncology.

  4. Recent advances in imaging subcellular processes.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kenneth A; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology came about with the ability to first visualize cells. As microscopy techniques advanced, the early microscopists became the first cell biologists to observe the inner workings and subcellular structures that control life. This ability to see organelles within a cell provided scientists with the first understanding of how cells function. The visualization of the dynamic architecture of subcellular structures now often drives questions as researchers seek to understand the intricacies of the cell. With the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques, better and new optical techniques, and more sensitive and faster cameras, a whole array of questions can now be asked. There has been an explosion of new light microscopic techniques, and the race is on to build better and more powerful imaging systems so that we can further our understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms controlling molecular cell biology.

  5. Recent Advances in Morphological Cell Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shengyong; Zhao, Mingzhu; Wu, Guang; Yao, Chunyan; Zhang, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent advances in image processing methods for morphological cell analysis. The topic of morphological analysis has received much attention with the increasing demands in both bioinformatics and biomedical applications. Among many factors that affect the diagnosis of a disease, morphological cell analysis and statistics have made great contributions to results and effects for a doctor. Morphological cell analysis finds the cellar shape, cellar regularity, classification, statistics, diagnosis, and so forth. In the last 20 years, about 1000 publications have reported the use of morphological cell analysis in biomedical research. Relevant solutions encompass a rather wide application area, such as cell clumps segmentation, morphological characteristics extraction, 3D reconstruction, abnormal cells identification, and statistical analysis. These reports are summarized in this paper to enable easy referral to suitable methods for practical solutions. Representative contributions and future research trends are also addressed. PMID:22272215

  6. Recent advances in imaging subcellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kenneth A.; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology came about with the ability to first visualize cells. As microscopy techniques advanced, the early microscopists became the first cell biologists to observe the inner workings and subcellular structures that control life. This ability to see organelles within a cell provided scientists with the first understanding of how cells function. The visualization of the dynamic architecture of subcellular structures now often drives questions as researchers seek to understand the intricacies of the cell. With the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques, better and new optical techniques, and more sensitive and faster cameras, a whole array of questions can now be asked. There has been an explosion of new light microscopic techniques, and the race is on to build better and more powerful imaging systems so that we can further our understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms controlling molecular cell biology. PMID:27408708

  7. Can pictorial images communicate the quality of pain successfully?

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Peter; Morley, Stephen; Stones, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is common and difficult for patients to communicate to health professionals. It may include neuropathic elements which require specialised treatment. A little used approach to communicating the quality of pain is through the use of images. This study aimed to test the ability of a set of 12 images depicting different sensory pain qualities to successfully communicate those qualities. Images were presented to 25 student nurses and 38 design students. Students were asked to write down words or phrases describing the quality of pain they felt was being communicated by each image. They were asked to provide as many or as few as occurred to them. The images were extremely heterogeneous in their ability to convey qualities of pain accurately. Only 2 of the 12 images were correctly interpreted by more than 70% of the sample. There was a significant difference between the two student groups, with nurses being significantly better at interpreting the images than the design students. Clearly, attention needs to be given not only to the content of images designed to depict the sensory qualities of pain but also to the differing audiences who may use them. Education, verbal ability, ethnicity and a multiplicity of other factors may influence the understanding and use of such images. Considerable work is needed to develop a set of images which is sufficiently culturally appropriate and effective for general use. PMID:26516574

  8. Can pictorial images communicate the quality of pain successfully?

    PubMed

    Closs, S José; Knapp, Peter; Morley, Stephen; Stones, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Chronic pain is common and difficult for patients to communicate to health professionals. It may include neuropathic elements which require specialised treatment. A little used approach to communicating the quality of pain is through the use of images. This study aimed to test the ability of a set of 12 images depicting different sensory pain qualities to successfully communicate those qualities. Images were presented to 25 student nurses and 38 design students. Students were asked to write down words or phrases describing the quality of pain they felt was being communicated by each image. They were asked to provide as many or as few as occurred to them. The images were extremely heterogeneous in their ability to convey qualities of pain accurately. Only 2 of the 12 images were correctly interpreted by more than 70% of the sample. There was a significant difference between the two student groups, with nurses being significantly better at interpreting the images than the design students. Clearly, attention needs to be given not only to the content of images designed to depict the sensory qualities of pain but also to the differing audiences who may use them. Education, verbal ability, ethnicity and a multiplicity of other factors may influence the understanding and use of such images. Considerable work is needed to develop a set of images which is sufficiently culturally appropriate and effective for general use.

  9. Human Images: Teaching the Communication of Ethnography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalfen, Richard

    1977-01-01

    Reports how a communications perspective and visual materials have been utilized to revitalize introductory area anthropology courses. Discusses what might be done to incorporate a contextual understanding of mass media into classroom instruction. (Author/JM)

  10. Recent advances in human viruses imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Florian, Paula Ecaterina; Rouillé, Yves; Ruta, Simona; Nichita, Norica; Roseanu, Anca

    2016-06-01

    Microscopy techniques are often exploited by virologists to investigate molecular details of critical steps in viruses' life cycles such as host cell recognition and entry, genome replication, intracellular trafficking, and release of mature virions. Fluorescence microscopy is the most attractive tool employed to detect intracellular localizations of various stages of the viral infection and monitor the pathogen-host interactions associated with them. Super-resolution microscopy techniques have overcome the technical limitations of conventional microscopy and offered new exciting insights into the formation and trafficking of human viruses. In addition, the development of state-of-the art electron microscopy techniques has become particularly important in studying virus morphogenesis by revealing ground-braking ultrastructural details of this process. This review provides recent advances in human viruses imaging in both, in vitro cell culture systems and in vivo, in the animal models recently developed. The newly available imaging technologies bring a major contribution to our understanding of virus pathogenesis and will become an important tool in early diagnosis of viral infection and the development of novel therapeutics to combat the disease.

  11. NASA ACTS Multibeam Antenna (MBA) System. [Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choung, Youn H.; Stiles, W. Herschel; Wu, Joseph; Wong, William C.; Chen, C. Harry

    1986-01-01

    The design of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite MBA system, which provides both spot beam and scanning beam coverage to both high and low burst rates data-users is examined. The MBA consists of receive and transmit antennas installed on a common precision mounting platform that is integrated to the bus through three flexures; a lightweight system with low thermal distortion is obtained by using composite materials for the MBA structures. The RF design, which is a Cassegrain reflector with a large equivalent focal length/aperture size, is described. Consideration is given to the position of the feed in order to minimize scan loss and sidelobe levels, the size of the subreflector in order to minimize feed spillover, and antenna performance degradation caused by reflector surface distortion. Breadbroad model test result reveal that the maximum sidelobe level outside the 2.5 HPBW region is -30 dB or lower relative to the power.

  12. Study of repeater technology for advanced multifunctional communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Investigations are presented concerning design concepts and implementation approaches for the satellite communication repeater subsystems of advanced multifunctional satellites. In such systems the important concepts are the use of multiple antenna beams, repeater switching (routing), and efficient spectrum utilization through frequency reuse. An information base on these techniques was developed and tradeoff analyses were made of repeater design concepts, with the work design taken in a broad sense to include modulation beam coverage patterns. There were five major areas of study: requirements analysis and processing; study of interbeam interference in multibeam systems; characterization of multiple-beam switching repeaters; estimation of repeater weight and power for a number of alternatives; and tradeoff analyses based on these weight and power data.

  13. Advanced information processing system: Inter-computer communication services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, Laura; Masotto, Tom; Sims, J. Terry; Whittredge, Roy; Alger, Linda S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to document the functional requirements and detailed specifications for the Inter-Computer Communications Services (ICCS) of the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS). An introductory section is provided to outline the overall architecture and functional requirements of the AIPS and to present an overview of the ICCS. An overview of the AIPS architecture as well as a brief description of the AIPS software is given. The guarantees of the ICCS are provided, and the ICCS is described as a seven-layered International Standards Organization (ISO) Model. The ICCS functional requirements, functional design, and detailed specifications as well as each layer of the ICCS are also described. A summary of results and suggestions for future work are presented.

  14. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite - Performance, Reliability and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krawczyk, Richard J.; Ignaczak, Louis R.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Satellite (ACTS) was conceived and developed in the mid- 1980s as an experimental satellite to demonstrate unproven Ka-band technology, and potential new commercial applications and services. Since launch into geostationary orbit in September 1993. ACTS has accumulated almost seven years of essentially trouble-free operation and met all program objectives. The unique technology, service experiments. and system level demonstrations accomplished by ACTS have been reported in many forums over the past several years. As ACTS completes its final experiments activity, this paper will relate the top-level program goals that have been achieved in the design, operation, and performance of the particular satellite subsystems. Pre-launch decisions to ensure satellite reliability and the subsequent operational experiences contribute to lessons learned that may be applicable to other comsat programs.

  15. Advanced technologies for lightweight EHF tactical communications satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, David R.; Kolba, Dean P.; Greenberg, William L.; Semprucci, Marilyn

    1993-02-01

    The communications capabilities provided by EHF satellites can range from low data rate services (75 to 2400 bps per channel) to medium data rate links (4.8 kbps to 1.544 Mbps per link) depending on the payload configuration. Through the use of EHF waveform standards, the EHF payloads will be compatible with existing and planned EHF terminals. Advanced technologies permit the development of highly capable, lightweight payloads which can be utilized in a variety of roles. The key payload technologies include adaptive uplink antennas; high speed, low power digital signal processing subsystems; lightweight frequency hopping synthesizers; and efficient solid-state transmitters. The focus in this paper is on the signal processing and frequency generation technologies and their application in a lightweight EHF payload for tactical applications.

  16. Experiments applications guide: Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This applications guide first surveys the capabilities of the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) system (both the flight and ground segments). This overview is followed by a description of the baseband processor (BBP) and microwave switch matrix (MSM) operating modes. Terminals operating with the baseband processor are referred to as low burst rate (LBR); and those operating with the microwave switch matrix, as high burst rate (HBR). Three very small-aperture terminals (VSATs), LBR-1, LBR-2, and HBR, are described for various ACTS operating modes. Also described is the NASA Lewis link evaluation terminal. A section on ACTS experiment opportunities introduces a wide spectrum of network control, telecommunications, system, and scientific experiments. The performance of the VSATs is discussed in detail. This guide is intended as a catalyst to encourage participation by the telecommunications, business, and science communities in a broad spectrum of experiments.

  17. Advancing Information and Communication Technology Knowledge for Undergraduate Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Paula M

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic profession; for registered nurses their role is increasingly requiring greater information process understanding and the effective management of information to ensure high quality safe patient care. This paper outlines the design and implementation of Systems of eCare. This is a course which advances information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students within a Faculty of Health and Wellbeing appropriately preparing nurses for their professional careers. Systems of eCare entwines throughout the three year programme mapping to the curriculum giving meaning to learning for the student. In conclusion comments from students convey their appreciation of the provision of this element of the undergraduate programme. PMID:24199114

  18. Innovative Networking Concepts Tested on the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Daniel; Gupta, Sonjai; Zhang, Chuanguo; Ephremides, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a program of experiments conducted over the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) and the associated TI-VSAT (very small aperture terminal). The experiments were motivated by the commercial potential of low-cost receive only satellite terminals that can operate in a hybrid network environment, and by the desire to demonstrate frame relay technology over satellite networks. The first experiment tested highly adaptive methods of satellite bandwidth allocation in an integrated voice-data service environment. The second involved comparison of forward error correction (FEC) and automatic repeat request (ARQ) methods of error control for satellite communication with emphasis on the advantage that a hybrid architecture provides, especially in the case of multicasts. Finally, the third experiment demonstrated hybrid access to databases and compared the performance of internetworking protocols for interconnecting local area networks (LANs) via satellite. A custom unit termed frame relay access switch (FRACS) was developed by COMSAT Laboratories for these experiments; the preparation and conduct of these experiments involved a total of 20 people from the University of Maryland, the University of Colorado and COMSAT Laboratories, from late 1992 until 1995.

  19. Proceedings of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Conference 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert (Editor); Derwae, Robert (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The ACTS experiments program, which began in December 1993 and consisted of 103 different experiments, has made significant contributions to minimizing the risk of advanced satellite communications technology. The ACTS Conference 2000 (AC2000) was held to report the results of the program since the last ACTS conference was held in 1995 and to celebrate the end of a very successful satellite program. The conference was held on May 31, 2000, as part of the 6th Ka-band Utilization Conference in Cleveland, Ohio. Approximately 280 representatives of industry, academia, and government attended. The conference was organized into two parts: a technical session during the day and an evening reception. During the day, a series of five technical sessions included presentations of 17 papers covering the results of the experiment activity and technical performance of the satellite. In the evening, a reception was held to celebrate the end of the ACTS Experiments Program on one of NASA's most successful experimental communications satellite. These proceedings were developed to capture the entire event, including the evening reception.

  20. Radio Synthesis Imaging - A High Performance Computing and Communications Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutcher, Richard M.

    The National Science Foundation has funded a five-year High Performance Computing and Communications project at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) for the direct implementation of several of the computing recommendations of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee (the "Bahcall report"). This paper is a summary of the project goals and a progress report. The project will implement a prototype of the next generation of astronomical telescope systems - remotely located telescopes connected by high-speed networks to very high performance, scalable architecture computers and on-line data archives, which are accessed by astronomers over Gbit/sec networks. Specifically, a data link has been installed between the BIMA millimeter-wave synthesis array at Hat Creek, California and NCSA at Urbana, Illinois for real-time transmission of data to NCSA. Data are automatically archived, and may be browsed and retrieved by astronomers using the NCSA Mosaic software. In addition, an on-line digital library of processed images will be established. BIMA data will be processed on a very high performance distributed computing system, with I/O, user interface, and most of the software system running on the NCSA Convex C3880 supercomputer or Silicon Graphics Onyx workstations connected by HiPPI to the high performance, massively parallel Thinking Machines Corporation CM-5. The very computationally intensive algorithms for calibration and imaging of radio synthesis array observations will be optimized for the CM-5 and new algorithms which utilize the massively parallel architecture will be developed. Code running simultaneously on the distributed computers will communicate using the Data Transport Mechanism developed by NCSA. The project will also use the BLANCA Gbit/s testbed network between Urbana and Madison, Wisconsin to connect an Onyx workstation in the University of Wisconsin Astronomy Department to the NCSA CM-5, for development of long

  1. Advances in diagnostic imaging for pathologic conditions of the jaws.

    PubMed

    Benson, Byron W; Flint, Diane J; Liang, Hui; Opatowsky, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in dental and maxillofacial imaging are delineated along with the advantages and disadvantages of each imaging modality. The imaging modalities that are included are intraoral radiography, panoramic radiography, cone-beam computed tomography, multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine, and ultrasound.

  2. Camouflaging in Digital Image for Secure Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, B.; Singh, A. P.

    2013-06-01

    The present paper reports on a new type of camouflaging in digital image for hiding crypto-data using moderate bit alteration in the pixel. In the proposed method, cryptography is combined with steganography to provide a two layer security to the hidden data. The novelty of the algorithm proposed in the present work lies in the fact that the information about hidden bit is reflected by parity condition in one part of the image pixel. The remaining part of the image pixel is used to perform local pixel adjustment to improve the visual perception of the cover image. In order to examine the effectiveness of the proposed method, image quality measuring parameters are computed. In addition to this, security analysis is also carried by comparing the histograms of cover and stego images. This scheme provides a higher security as well as robustness to intentional as well as unintentional attacks.

  3. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020 Section 892.2020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image...

  4. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020 Section 892.2020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image...

  5. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020 Section 892.2020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image...

  6. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020 Section 892.2020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image...

  7. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020 Section 892.2020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image...

  8. End-to-end imaging information rate advantages of various alternative communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of various deep space communication systems which are required to transmit both imaging and a typically error sensitive class of data called general science and engineering (gse) are compared. The approach jointly treats the imaging and gse transmission problems, allowing comparisons of systems which include various channel coding and data compression alternatives. Actual system comparisons include an advanced imaging communication system (AICS) which exhibits the rather significant advantages of sophisticated data compression coupled with powerful yet practical channel coding. For example, under certain conditions the improved AICS efficiency could provide as much as two orders of magnitude increase in imaging information rate compared to a single channel uncoded, uncompressed system while maintaining the same gse data rate in both systems. Additional details describing AICS compression and coding concepts as well as efforts to apply them are provided in support of the system analysis.

  9. Methodological advances in imaging intravital axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Sleigh, James N.; Vagnoni, Alessio; Twelvetrees, Alison E.; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2017-01-01

    Axonal transport is the active process whereby neurons transport cargoes such as organelles and proteins anterogradely from the cell body to the axon terminal and retrogradely in the opposite direction. Bi-directional transport in axons is absolutely essential for the functioning and survival of neurons and appears to be negatively impacted by both aging and diseases of the nervous system, such as Alzheimer’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The movement of individual cargoes along axons has been studied in vitro in live neurons and tissue explants for a number of years; however, it is currently unclear as to whether these systems faithfully and consistently replicate the in vivo situation. A number of intravital techniques originally developed for studying diverse biological events have recently been adapted to monitor axonal transport in real-time in a range of live organisms and are providing novel insight into this dynamic process. Here, we highlight these methodological advances in intravital imaging of axonal transport, outlining key strengths and limitations while discussing findings, possible improvements, and outstanding questions. PMID:28344778

  10. Methodological advances in imaging intravital axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Sleigh, James N; Vagnoni, Alessio; Twelvetrees, Alison E; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2017-01-01

    Axonal transport is the active process whereby neurons transport cargoes such as organelles and proteins anterogradely from the cell body to the axon terminal and retrogradely in the opposite direction. Bi-directional transport in axons is absolutely essential for the functioning and survival of neurons and appears to be negatively impacted by both aging and diseases of the nervous system, such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The movement of individual cargoes along axons has been studied in vitro in live neurons and tissue explants for a number of years; however, it is currently unclear as to whether these systems faithfully and consistently replicate the in vivo situation. A number of intravital techniques originally developed for studying diverse biological events have recently been adapted to monitor axonal transport in real-time in a range of live organisms and are providing novel insight into this dynamic process. Here, we highlight these methodological advances in intravital imaging of axonal transport, outlining key strengths and limitations while discussing findings, possible improvements, and outstanding questions.

  11. General consumer communication tools for improved image management and communication in medicine.

    PubMed

    Rosset, Chantal; Rosset, Antoine; Ratib, Osman

    2005-12-01

    We elected to explore new technologies emerging on the general consumer market that can improve and facilitate image and data communication in medical and clinical environment. These new technologies developed for communication and storage of data can improve the user convenience and facilitate the communication and transport of images and related data beyond the usual limits and restrictions of a traditional picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) network. We specifically tested and implemented three new technologies provided on Apple computer platforms. (1) We adopted the iPod, a MP3 portable player with a hard disk storage, to easily and quickly move large number of DICOM images. (2) We adopted iChat, a videoconference and instant-messaging software, to transmit DICOM images in real time to a distant computer for conferencing teleradiology. (3) Finally, we developed a direct secure interface to use the iDisk service, a file-sharing service based on the WebDAV technology, to send and share DICOM files between distant computers. These three technologies were integrated in a new open-source image navigation and display software called OsiriX allowing for manipulation and communication of multimodality and multidimensional DICOM image data sets. This software is freely available as an open-source project at http://homepage.mac.com/rossetantoine/OsiriX. Our experience showed that the implementation of these technologies allowed us to significantly enhance the existing PACS with valuable new features without any additional investment or the need for complex extensions of our infrastructure. The added features such as teleradiology, secure and convenient image and data communication, and the use of external data storage services open the gate to a much broader extension of our imaging infrastructure to the outside world.

  12. Advances in superresolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI)

    PubMed Central

    Dertinger, Thomas; Pallaoro, Alessia; Braun, Gary; Ly, Sonny; Laurence, Ted A.; Weiss, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    We review the concept of superresolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI), discuss its attributes and trade-offs (in comparison with other superresolution methods), and present superresolved images taken on samples stained with quantum dots, organic dyes, and plasmonic metal nanoparticles. We also discuss the prospects of SOFI for live cell superresolution imaging and for imaging with other (non-fluorescent) contrasts. PMID:23672771

  13. Advanced x-ray imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, John L. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An x-ray spectrometer that also provides images of an x-ray source. Coded aperture imaging techniques are used to provide high resolution images. Imaging position-sensitive x-ray sensors with good energy resolution are utilized to provide excellent spectroscopic performance. The system produces high resolution spectral images of the x-ray source which can be viewed in any one of a number of specific energy bands.

  14. Integration of a Communicating Science Module into an Advanced Chemistry Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renaud, Jessica; Squier, Christopher; Larsen, Sarah C.

    2006-01-01

    A communicating science module was introduced into an advanced undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. The module was integrated into the course such that students received formal instruction in communicating science interwoven with the chemistry laboratory curriculum. The content of the communicating science module included three…

  15. Advanced mobile satellite communications using COMETS satellite in MM-wave and Ka-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo; Isobe, Shunkichi; Takeuchi, Makoto; Naito, Hideyuki

    1993-01-01

    Early in the 21st century, the demand for personal communications using mobile, hand-held, and VSAT terminals will rapidly increase. In a future system, many different types of services should be provided with one-hop connection. The Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) has studied a future advanced mobile satellite communications system using millimeter wave and Ka band. In 1990, CRL started the Communications and Broadcasting Engineering Test Satellite (COMETS) project. The satellite has been developed in conjunction with NASDA and will be launched in 1997. This paper describes the COMETS payload configuration and the experimental system for the advanced mobile communications mission.

  16. A Cooperative Communication System for the Advancement of Safe, Effective, and Efficient Patient Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-C-0126 TITLE: A Cooperative Communication System for the Advancement of Safe, Effective, and Efficient Patient Care...DATES COVERED 15Aug2014 – 14Aug2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Cooperative Communication System for the Advancement of Safe, Effective, and Efficient ...J. (2015, January). Developing a Cooperative Communication System for Safe, Effective, and Efficient Patient Care. Society of Critical Care Medicine

  17. Gigabit Satellite Network for NASA's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoder, Douglas; Bergamo, Marcos

    1996-01-01

    The advanced communication technology satellite (ACTS) gigabit satellite network provides long-haul point-to-point and point-to-multipoint full-duplex SONET services over NASA's ACTS. at rates up to 622 Mbit/s (SONET OC-12), with signal quality comparable to that obtained with terrestrial fiber networks. Data multiplexing over the satellite is accomplished using time-division multiple access (TDMA) techniques coordinated with the switching and beam hopping facilities provided by ACTS. Transmissions through the satellite are protected with Reed-Solomon encoding. providing virtually error-free transmission under most weather conditions. Unique to the system are a TDMA frame structure and satellite synchronization mechanism that allow: (a) very efficient utilization of the satellite capacity: (b) over-the-satellite dosed-loop synchronization of the network in configurations with up to 64 ground stations: and (c) ground station initial acquisition without collisions with existing signalling or data traffic. The user interfaces are compatible with SONET standards, performing the function of conventional SONET multiplexers and. as such. can be: readily integrated with standard SONET fiber-based terrestrial networks. Management of the network is based upon the simple network management protocol (SNMP). and includes an over-the-satellite signalling network and backup terrestrial internet (IP-based) connectivity. A description of the ground stations is also included.

  18. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Liao, Yang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy. PMID:24689058

  19. Optics for Advanced Neutron Imaging and Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Moncton, David E.; Khaykovich, Boris

    2016-03-30

    During the report period, we continued the work as outlined in the original proposal. We have analyzed potential optical designs of Wolter mirrors for the neutron-imaging instrument VENUS, which is under construction at SNS. In parallel, we have conducted the initial polarized imaging experiment at Helmholtz Zentrum, Berlin, one of very few of currently available polarized-imaging facilities worldwide.

  20. Beyond Linear Syntax: An Image-Oriented Communication Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Rupal; Pilato, Sam; Roy, Deb

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a novel AAC communication aid based on semantic rather than syntactic schema, leading to more natural message construction. Users interact with a two-dimensional spatially organized image schema, which depicts the semantic structure and contents of the message. An overview of the interface design is presented followed by…

  1. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Used for Inclined Orbit Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) is operated by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. ACTS, which was launched in September 1993, is in its 7th year of operations, far exceeding the system s planned 2 years of operations and 4 years of designed mission life. After 5 successful years of operating as a geostationary satellite, the spacecraft s North-South stationkeeping was discontinued in August 1998. The system is now operating in an inclined orbit that increases at a rate of 0.8 /yr. With only scarce fuel remaining, operating in this mode extends the usage of the still totally functional payload. Although tracking systems are now needed on the experimenter Earth stations, experiment operations have continued with very little disruption. This is the only known geosynchronous Ka-band (30/20 GHz) spot-beam satellite operating in an inclined orbit. The project began its transition from geostationary operations to inclined operations in August 1998. This did not interrupt operations and was transparent to the experimenters on the system. For the space segment, new daily procedures were implemented to maintain the pointing of the system s narrow 0.3 spot beams while the spacecraft drifts in the North-South direction. For the ground segment, modifications were designed, developed, and fielded for the three classes of experimenter Earth stations. With the next generation of commercial satellite systems still being developed, ACTS remains the only operational testbed for Ka-band geosynchronous satellite communications over the Western hemisphere. Since inclined orbit operations began, the ACTS experiments program has supported 43 investigations by industry, Government, and academic organizations, as well as four demonstrations. The project s goals for inclined-orbit operations now reflect a narrower focus in the types of experiments that will be done. In these days of "faster, better, cheaper," NASA is seeking

  2. Advance directive communications practices:social worker's contributions to the interdisciplinary health care team.

    PubMed

    Black, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a comparative study about social workers' interdisciplinary advance directive communication practices with patients at several hospitals located in upstate New York. The sample consisted of physicians (n=32), nurses (n=74), and social workers (n=29). The research surveyed advance directive communication practices by discipline utilizing a self-administered questionnaire. Advance directive communication was operationalized as a cumulative process incorporating the following phases that were measured as scales: initiation of the topic, disclosure of information, identification of a surrogate decision-maker, discussion of treatment options, elicitation of patient values, interaction with family members, and collaboration with other health care professionals. Results suggest that social workers offer distinct skills in their advance directive communication practices and discuss advance directives more frequently than either physicians or nurses.

  3. [Image guided and robotic treatment--the advance of cybernetics in clinical medicine].

    PubMed

    Fosse, E; Elle, O J; Samset, E; Johansen, M; Røtnes, J S; Tønnessen, T I; Edwin, B

    2000-01-10

    The introduction of advanced technology in hospitals has changed the treatment practice towards more image guided and minimal invasive procedures. Modern computer and communication technology opens up for robot aided and pre-programmed intervention. Several robotic systems are in clinical use today both in microsurgery and in major cardiac and orthopedic operations. As this trend develops, professions which are new in this context such as physicists, mathematicians and cybernetic engineers will be increasingly important in the treatment of patients.

  4. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  5. A new image representation for compact and secure communication

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Skourikhine, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    In many areas of nuclear materials management there is a need for communication, archival, and retrieval of annotated image data between heterogeneous platforms and devices to effectively implement safety, security, and safeguards of nuclear materials. Current image formats such as JPEG are not ideally suited in such scenarios as they are not scalable to different viewing formats, and do not provide a high-level representation of images that facilitate automatic object/change detection or annotation. The new Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) open standard for representing graphical information, recommended by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is designed to address issues of image scalability, portability, and annotation. However, until now there has been no viable technology to efficiently field images of high visual quality under this standard. Recently, LANL has developed a vectorized image representation that is compatible with the SVG standard and preserves visual quality. This is based on a new geometric framework for characterizing complex features in real-world imagery that incorporates perceptual principles of processing visual information known from cognitive psychology and vision science, to obtain a polygonal image representation of high fidelity. This representation can take advantage of all textual compression and encryption routines unavailable to other image formats. Moreover, this vectorized image representation can be exploited to facilitate automated object recognition that can reduce time required for data review. The objects/features of interest in these vectorized images can be annotated via animated graphics to facilitate quick and easy display and comprehension of processed image content.

  6. Preclinical imaging in oncology: advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Iommelli, Francesca; DE Rosa, Viviana; Terlizzi, Cristina; Del Vecchio, Silvana

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical imaging with radiolabeled probes became an integral part of the complex translational process that moves a newly developed compound from laboratory to clinical application. Imaging studies in animal tumor models may be undertaken to test a newly synthesized tracer, a newly developed drug or to interrogate, in the living organism, specific molecular and biological processes underlying tumor growth and progression. The aim of the present review is to outline the current knowledge and future perspectives of preclinical imaging in oncology by providing examples from recent literature. Among the biological processes and molecular targets that can be visualized with radiolabeled probes in animal tumor models, we focused on proliferation, expression of targets suitable for therapy, glycolytic phenotype, metastatic dissemination, tumor angiogenesis and survival. The major contribution of preclinical imaging emerging from these studies is the development and validation of imaging biomarkers that can be translated into the clinical context for patient selection and evaluation of tumor response to molecularly targeted agents.

  7. Advanced Imaging Optics Utilizing Wavefront Coding.

    SciTech Connect

    Scrymgeour, David; Boye, Robert; Adelsberger, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Image processing offers a potential to simplify an optical system by shifting some of the imaging burden from lenses to the more cost effective electronics. Wavefront coding using a cubic phase plate combined with image processing can extend the system's depth of focus, reducing many of the focus-related aberrations as well as material related chromatic aberrations. However, the optimal design process and physical limitations of wavefront coding systems with respect to first-order optical parameters and noise are not well documented. We examined image quality of simulated and experimental wavefront coded images before and after reconstruction in the presence of noise. Challenges in the implementation of cubic phase in an optical system are discussed. In particular, we found that limitations must be placed on system noise, aperture, field of view and bandwidth to develop a robust wavefront coded system.

  8. Bilingual toddlers have advanced abilities to repair communication failure.

    PubMed

    Wermelinger, Stephanie; Gampe, Anja; Daum, Moritz M

    2017-03-01

    Recent research has demonstrated enhanced communicative abilities in bilingual children compared with monolingual children throughout childhood and in a variety of domains. The processes underlying these advantages are, however, not well understood. It has been suggested that one aspect that particularly stimulates bilinguals' communication skills is their daily experience with challenging communication. In the current study, we investigated whether children's assumed experience with communication failures would increase their skills when it came to repairing communication failure. Non-German bilingual, German bilingual, and monolingual 2.5-year-old toddlers participated in a communication task in which a misunderstanding occurred. We hypothesized that monolingual and German bilingual children would have fewer daily communication failures-and, therefore, less well-trained repair skills-compared with non-German bilinguals. The results showed that non-German bilinguals were more likely to repair the misunderstanding compared with both monolingual children and German bilingual children. The current findings support the view that the communicative advantages of bilingual individuals develop based on their unique experience with interpersonal communication and its difficulties.

  9. General consumer communication tools for improved image management and communication in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Rosset, Antoine; McCoy, J. Michael

    2005-04-01

    We elected to explore emerging consumer technologies that can be adopted to improve and facilitate image and data communication in medical and clinical environment. The wide adoption of new communication paradigm such as instant messaging, chatting and direct emailing can be integrated in specific applications. The increasing capacity of portable and hand held devices such as iPod music players offer an attractive alternative for data storage that exceeds the capabilities of traditional offline storage media such as CD or even DVD. We adapted medical image display and manipulation software called OSIRIX to integrate different innovative technologies facilitating the communication and data transfer between remote users. We integrated email and instant messaging features to the program allowing users to instantaneously email an image or a set of images that are displayed on the screen. Using iChat instant messaging application from Apple a user can share the content of his screen with a remote correspondent and communicate in real time using voice and video. To provide convenient mechanism for exchange of large data sets the program can store the data in DICOM format on CD or DVD, but was also extended to use the large storage capacity of iPod hard disks as well as Apple"s online storage service "dot Mac" that users can subscribe to benefit from scalable secure storage that accessible from anywhere on the internet. The adoption of these innovative technologies is likely to change the architecture of traditional picture archiving and communication systems and provide more flexible and efficient means of communication.

  10. Flight Test Results of the Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager Advanced Land Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendenhall, Jeffrey A.; Lencioni, Donald E.; Hearn, David R.; Digenis, Constantine J.

    2002-09-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) is the primary instrument on the Earth Observing-1 spacecraft (EO-1) and was developed under NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP). The NMP mission objective is to flight-validate advanced technologies that will enable dramatic improvements in performance, cost, mass, and schedule for future, Landsat-like, Earth Science Enterprise instruments. ALI contains a number of innovative features designed to achieve this objective. These include the basic instrument architecture, which employs a push-broom data collection mode, a wide field-of-view optical design, compact multi-spectral detector arrays, non-cryogenic HgCdTe for the short wave infrared bands, silicon carbide optics, and a multi-level solar calibration technique. The sensor includes detector arrays that operate in ten bands, one panchromatic, six VNIR and three SWIR, spanning the range from 0.433 to 2.35 μm. Launched on November 21, 2000, ALI instrument performance was monitored during its first year on orbit using data collected during solar, lunar, stellar, and earth observations. This paper will provide an overview of EO-1 mission activities during this period. Additionally, the on-orbit spatial and radiometric performance of the instrument will be compared to pre-flight measurements and the temporal stability of ALI will be presented.

  11. Advanced ultrasound probes for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildes, Douglas G.; Smith, L. Scott

    2012-05-01

    New medical ultrasound probe architectures and materials build upon established 1D phased array technology and provide improved imaging performance and clinical value. Technologies reviewed include 1.25D and 1.5D arrays for elevation slice thickness control; electro-mechanical and 2D array probes for real-time 3D imaging; catheter probes for imaging during minimally-invasive procedures; single-crystal piezoelectric materials for greater frequency bandwidth; and cMUT arrays using silicon MEMS in place of piezo materials.

  12. Combining advanced imaging processing and low cost remote imaging capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrer, Matthew J.; McQuiddy, Brian

    2008-04-01

    Target images are very important for evaluating the situation when Unattended Ground Sensors (UGS) are deployed. These images add a significant amount of information to determine the difference between hostile and non-hostile activities, the number of targets in an area, the difference between animals and people, the movement dynamics of targets, and when specific activities of interest are taking place. The imaging capabilities of UGS systems need to provide only target activity and not images without targets in the field of view. The current UGS remote imaging systems are not optimized for target processing and are not low cost. McQ describes in this paper an architectural and technologic approach for significantly improving the processing of images to provide target information while reducing the cost of the intelligent remote imaging capability.

  13. The Female Professional: Communication Proficiencies as Predictors of Organizational Advancement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shockley-Zalabak, Pamela; Staley, Constance Courtney

    Based on the assumption that communication skills are a critical component of organizational effectiveness and "promotability," a study was conducted to investigate the perceptions supervisors have of their female employees' communication proficiency. In particular, comparisons were made between evaluations of supervisors on a variety of…

  14. Plan of advanced satellite communication experiments using ETS-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikegami, Tetsushi

    1989-01-01

    In 1992, an Engineering Test Satellite 6 is scheduled to be launched by an H-2 rocket. The missions of ETS-6 are to establish basic technologies of inter-satellite communications using S-band, millimeter waves and optical beams and of fixed and mobile satellite communications using multibeam antenna on board the satellite. A plan of the experiments is introduced.

  15. Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research and Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0198 TITLE: Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging... Brain Imaging Research Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0198 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Catherine...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Brain injury is a leading cause of

  16. Advanced Image Search: A Strategy for Creating Presentation Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Diane K.; Hines, Jean D.; Swinker, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    Finding relevant digital images to create presentation boards requires advanced search skills. This article describes a course assignment involving a technique designed to develop students' literacy skills with respect to locating images of desired quality and content from Internet databases. The assignment was applied in a collegiate apparel…

  17. Advances in Small Animal Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudos, George K.

    2007-11-01

    The rapid growth in genetics and molecular biology combined with the development of techniques for genetically engineering small animals has led to an increased interest in in vivo laboratory animal imaging during the past few years. For this purpose, new instrumentation, data acquisition strategies, and image processing and reconstruction techniques are being developed, researched and evaluated. The aim of this article is to give a short overview of the state of the art technologies for high resolution and high sensitivity molecular imaging techniques, primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The basic needs of small animal imaging will be described. The evolution in instrumentation in the past two decades, as well as the commercially available systems will be overviewed. Finally, the new trends in detector technology and preliminary results from challenging applications will be presented. For more details a number of references are provided.

  18. Advances in scintillators for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loef, Edgar V.; Shah, Kanai S.

    2014-09-01

    A review is presented of some recent work in the field of inorganic scintillator research for medical imaging applications, in particular scintillation detectors for Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET).

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Recent advances in diffuse optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, A. P.; Hebden, J. C.; Arridge, S. R.

    2005-02-01

    We review the current state-of-the-art of diffuse optical imaging, which is an emerging technique for functional imaging of biological tissue. It involves generating images using measurements of visible or near-infrared light scattered across large (greater than several centimetres) thicknesses of tissue. We discuss recent advances in experimental methods and instrumentation, and examine new theoretical techniques applied to modelling and image reconstruction. We review recent work on in vivo applications including imaging the breast and brain, and examine future challenges.

  20. Advanced endoscopic imaging in gastric neoplasia and preneoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jonathan W J; Lim, Lee Guan; Yeoh, Khay Guan

    2017-01-01

    Conventional white light endoscopy remains the current standard in routine clinical practice for early detection of gastric cancer. However, it may not accurately diagnose preneoplastic gastric lesions. The technological advancements in the field of endoscopic imaging for gastric lesions are fast growing. This article reviews currently available advanced endoscopic imaging modalities, in particular chromoendoscopy, narrow band imaging and confocal laser endomicroscopy, and their corresponding evidence shown to improve diagnosis of preneoplastic gastric lesions. Raman spectrometry and polarimetry are also introduced as promising emerging technologies. PMID:28176895

  1. Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2006-01-03

    A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

  2. Advanced Multiple In-Multiple Out (MIMO) Antenna Communications for Airborne Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    ADVANCED MULTIPLE IN-MULTIPLE OUT (MIMO) ANTENNA COMMUNICATIONS FOR AIRBORNE NETWORKS SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY MARCH 2015 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT...TECHNICAL REPORT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) OCT 2011 – SEP 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ADVANCED MULTIPLE IN-MULTIPLE OUT (MIMO) ANTENNA ...MIMO system with over the air transmission. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Multiple In-Multiple Out (MIMO Antenna Communications, Airborne Networks, D-BLAST

  3. Advanced information processing system: Authentication protocols for network communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Richard E.; Adams, Stuart J.; Babikyan, Carol A.; Butler, Bryan P.; Clark, Anne L.; Lala, Jaynarayan H.

    1994-01-01

    In safety critical I/O and intercomputer communication networks, reliable message transmission is an important concern. Difficulties of communication and fault identification in networks arise primarily because the sender of a transmission cannot be identified with certainty, an intermediate node can corrupt a message without certainty of detection, and a babbling node cannot be identified and silenced without lengthy diagnosis and reconfiguration . Authentication protocols use digital signature techniques to verify the authenticity of messages with high probability. Such protocols appear to provide an efficient solution to many of these problems. The objective of this program is to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate intercomputer communication architectures which employ authentication. As a context for the evaluation, the authentication protocol-based communication concept was demonstrated under this program by hosting a real-time flight critical guidance, navigation and control algorithm on a distributed, heterogeneous, mixed redundancy system of workstations and embedded fault-tolerant computers.

  4. The geostationary operational environmental satellite /GOES/ imaging communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. L.; Savides, J.

    1975-01-01

    The SMS/GOES Satellite obtains day and night weather information from synchronous geostationary orbit by means of (1) earth imaging, (2) collection of environmental data from ground based sensors, platforms, and (3) monitoring of the space environment. SMS-1 and SMS-2 have been in orbit for 17 months and 8 months, respectively, and are presently taking full earth disk images in the visible and infrared every 30 minutes. SMS-1 is positioned to cover the eastern portion of the U.S. while SMS-2 is positioned to cover the western portion. This paper provides a general overview of the imaging communication portions of the SMS/GOES, related to the image data encoding and transmission as well as the method of the data time multiplexing and the manner in which the scan line to line synchronization is achieved.

  5. Advances in Lymphatic Imaging and Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Gunda, Padmaja; Majeti, Bharat K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Laird, Forrest M.

    2011-09-10

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death after heart disease in the US. While metastasized cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon are incurable, before their distant spread, these diseases will have invaded the lymphatic system as a first step in their progression. Hence, proper evaluation of the disease state of the lymphatics which drain a tumor site is crucial to staging and the formation of a treatment plan. Current lymphatic imaging modalities with visible dyes and radionucleotide tracers offer limited sensitivity and poor resolution; however, newer tools using nanocarriers, quantum dots, and magnetic resonance imaging promise to vastly improve the staging of lymphatic spread without needless biopsies. Concurrent with the improvement of lymphatic imaging agents, has been the development of drug carriers that can localize chemotherapy to the lymphatic system, thus improving the treatment of localized disease while minimizing the exposure of healthy organs to cytotoxic drugs. This review will focus on polymeric systems that have been developed for imaging and drug delivery to the lymph system, how these new devices improve upon current technologies, and where further improvement is needed.

  6. Integrating Images, Applications, and Communications Networks. Volume 5.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    man has been in search of knowledge. Whether by curiosity or by circumstance, he has gained experience providing him with a range of information, a...number systems were generated, and alphabets were created to assist in saving and communicating ideas and experiences . Consequently, the knowledge was...in the experimental -. stage, such processes are beginning to show promising results 119, 16). V. ** V 13. 2.2.4 Geographic Imaging Computer mapping

  7. Application of the advanced communications technology satellite for teleradiology and telemedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brent K.; Carter, Stephen J.; Rowberg, Alan H.

    1995-05-01

    The authors have an in-kind grant from NASA to investigate the application of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to teleradiology and telemedicine using the JPL developed ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) uplink. This experiment involves the transmission of medical imagery (CT, MR, CR, US and digitized radiographs including mammograms), between the ACTS/AMT and the University of Washington. This is accomplished by locating the AMT experiment van in various locations throughout Washington state, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Hawaii. The medical images are transmitted from the ACTS to the downlink at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, consisting of AMT equipment and the high burst rate-link evaluation terminal (HBR-LET). These images are then routed from LeRC to the University of Washington School of Medicine (UWSoM) through the Internet and public switched Integrated Serviced Digital Network (ISDN). Once images arrive in the UW Radiology Department, they are reviewed using both video monitor softcopy and laser-printed hardcopy. Compressed video teleconferencing and transmission of real-time ultrasound video between the AMT van and the UWSoM are also tested. Image quality comparisons are made using both subjective diagnostic criteria and quantitative engineering analysis. Evaluation is performed during various weather conditions (including rain to assess rain fade compensation algorithms). Compression techniques also are tested to evaluate their effects on image quality, allowing further evaluation of portable teleradiology/telemedicine at lower data rates and providing useful information for additional applications (e.g., smaller remote units, shipboard, emergency disaster, etc.). The medical images received at the UWSoM over the ACTS are directly evaluated against the original digital images. The project demonstrates that a portable satellite-land connection can provide subspecialty consultation and education for rural and remote

  8. Advanced communications technology satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal communication protocol software user's guide, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    The Communication Protocol Software was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (ACTS HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenters terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various experiments by government, university, and industry agencies. The Communication Protocol Software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitor (C&PM) Software system of the HBR-LET. The Communication Protocol Software allows users to control and configure the Intermediate Frequency Switch Matrix (IFSM) on board the ACTS to yield a desired path through the spacecraft payload. Besides IFSM control, the C&PM Software System is also responsible for instrument control during HBR-LET experiments, uplink power control of the HBR-LET to demonstrate power augmentation during signal fade events, and data display. The Communication Protocol Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 (NASA CR-189162) outlines the commands and procedures to install and operate the Communication Protocol Software. Configuration files used to control the IFSM, operator commands, and error recovery procedures are discussed. The Communication Protocol Software Maintenance Manual, Version 1.0 (NASA CR-189163, to be published) is a programmer's guide to the Communication Protocol Software. This manual details the current implementation of the software from a technical perspective. Included is an overview of the Communication Protocol Software, computer algorithms, format representations, and computer hardware configuration. The Communication Protocol Software Test Plan (NASA CR-189164, to be published) provides a step-by-step procedure to verify the operation of the software. Included in the Test Plan is command transmission, telemetry reception, error detection, and error recovery procedures.

  9. Advanced Research into Imaging of Moving Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    antenna. The antenna currents are measured and the radar receiver collects a time-varying voltage srec(t) [1]. Signal processing of the measured...produce images from the collected radar systems. 2. Radar Measurables Radar systems determine information about the target by various means ...elimination), or none when drawing a standard see-through wireframe. The current colormap determines the edge color [9]. The surf function is similar to

  10. Conventional and advanced imaging in neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Y; Sutton, I J; Ghadiri, M; Masters, L; Zivadinov, R; Barnett, M H

    2014-08-01

    Myelitis and optic neuritis are prototypic clinical presentations of both multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Once considered a subtype of multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica, is now known to have a discrete pathogenesis in which antibodies to the water channel, aquaporin 4, play a critical role. Timely differentiation of neuromyelitis optica from MS is imperative, determining both prognosis and treatment strategy. Early, aggressive immunosuppression is required to prevent the accrual of severe disability in neuromyelitis optica; conversely, MS-specific therapies may exacerbate the disease. The diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica requires the integration of clinical, MR imaging, and laboratory data, but current criteria are insensitive and exclude patients with limited clinical syndromes. Failure to recognize the expanding spectrum of cerebral MR imaging patterns associated with aquaporin 4 antibody seropositivity adds to diagnostic uncertainty in some patients. We present the state of the art in conventional and nonconventional MR imaging in neuromyelitis optica and review the place of neuroimaging in the diagnosis, management, and research of the condition.

  11. Recent advances in radiology and medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, R.E.; Sherwood, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first chapter, on the radiology of arthritis, is an overview. The second and seventh chapters are on the chest the former, on adult respiratory distress syndrome, is a brief summary, and the latter, on digital radiography of the chest with the prototype slit-scanning technique. The third chapter reviews computed tomography of the lumbar spine. The following two chapters are on MR imaging, one on the central nervous system (covering demyelinating diseases, cardiovascular disease, infections, and tumors), with excellent illustrations; and one on MR imaging of the body. The illustrations are good. The following chapter is on extracardiac digital subtraction angiography (DSA), with an interesting table comparing and contrasting conventional angiography with both intraveneous and intraarterial DSA. The eighth chapter on pediatric imaging fits a world of experience. Chapter 9 is an update on contrast media, while the next chapter is on barium infusion examination of the small intestine. The final three chapters are concerned with the present state of angioplasty, interventional radiology in the urinary tract.

  12. Recent advances in echocardiography: strain and strain rate imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mirea, Oana; Duchenne, Jurgen; Voigt, Jens-Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Deformation imaging by echocardiography is a well-established research tool which has been gaining interest from clinical cardiologists since the introduction of speckle tracking. Post-processing of echo images to analyze deformation has become readily available at the fingertips of the user. New parameters such as global longitudinal strain have been shown to provide added diagnostic value, and ongoing efforts of the imaging societies and industry aimed at harmonizing methods will improve the technique further. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of echocardiographic strain and strain rate imaging, and provides an overview on its current and potential future clinical applications. PMID:27158476

  13. Identifying Successful Advancement Approaches in Four Catholic Universities: The Effectiveness of the Four Advancement Models of Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonglia, Jean-Pierre K.

    2010-01-01

    The current longitudinal study of the most successful Catholic universities in the United States identifies the prevalence of four advancement models of communication that have contributed to make those institutions successful in their philanthropic efforts. While research by Grunig and Kelly maintained that the two-way symmetrical model of…

  14. Advanced and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Bargalló, Núria; Cervera, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus is a major diagnostic challenge, and a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is, by far, the main tool for assessing the brain in this disease. Conventional and advanced MRI techniques are used to help establishing the diagnosis, to rule out alternative diagnoses, and recently, to monitor the evolution of the disease. This review explores the neuroimaging findings in SLE, including the recent advances in new MRI methods. PMID:26236469

  15. High-fidelity video and still-image communication based on spectral information: natural vision system and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Haneishi, Hideaki; Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Kishimoto, Junko; Kanazawa, Hiroshi; Tsuchida, Masaru; Iwama, Ryo; Ohyama, Nagaaki

    2006-01-01

    In addition to the great advancement of high-resolution and large-screen imaging technology, the issue of color is now receiving considerable attention as another aspect than the image resolution. It is difficult to reproduce the original color of subject in conventional imaging systems, and that obstructs the applications of visual communication systems in telemedicine, electronic commerce, and digital museum. To breakthrough the limitation of conventional RGB 3-primary systems, "Natural Vision" project aims at an innovative video and still-image communication technology with high-fidelity color reproduction capability, based on spectral information. This paper summarizes the results of NV project including the development of multispectral and multiprimary imaging technologies and the experimental investigations on the applications to medicine, digital archives, electronic commerce, and computer graphics.

  16. Classroom Communication and Instructional Processes: Advances through Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayle, Barbara Mae, Ed.; Preiss, Raymond W., Ed.; Burrell, Nancy, Ed.; Allen, Mike, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This volume offers a systematic review of the literature on communication education and instruction. Making meta-analysis findings accessible and relevant, the editors of this volume approach the topic from the perspective that meta-analysis serves as a useful tool for summarizing experiments and for determining how and why specific teaching and…

  17. Recent advances in molecular, multimodal and theranostic ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Fabian; Fokong, Stanley; Bzyl, Jessica; Lederle, Wiltrud; Palmowski, Moritz; Lammers, Twan

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is an exquisite tool for the non-invasive and real-time diagnosis of many different diseases. In this context, US contrast agents can improve lesion delineation, characterization and therapy response evaluation. US contrast agents are usually micrometer-sized gas bubbles, stabilized with soft or hard shells. By conjugating antibodies to the microbubble (MB) surface, and by incorporating diagnostic agents, drugs or nucleic acids into or onto the MB shell, molecular, multimodal and theranostic MBs can be generated. We here summarize recent advances in molecular, multimodal and theranostic US imaging, and introduce concepts how such advanced MB can be generated, applied and imaged. Examples are given for their use to image and treat oncological, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Furthermore, we discuss for which therapeutic entities incorporation into (or conjugation to) MB is meaningful, and how US-mediated MB destruction can increase their extravasation, penetration, internalization and efficacy.

  18. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  19. Advanced imaging assessment of bone quality.

    PubMed

    Genant, Harry K; Jiang, Yebin

    2006-04-01

    Noninvasive and/or nondestructive techniques can provide structural information about bone, beyond simple bone densitometry. While the latter provides important information about osteoporotic fracture risk, many studies indicate that bone mineral density (BMD) only partly explains bone strength. Quantitative assessment of macrostructural characteristics, such as geometry, and microstructural features, such as relative trabecular volume, trabecular spacing, and connectivity, may improve our ability to estimate bone strength. Methods for quantitatively assessing macrostructure include (besides conventional radiographs) dual X ray absorptiometry (DXA) and computed tomography (CT), particularly volumetric quantitative computed tomography (vQCT). Methods for assessing microstructure of trabecular bone noninvasively and/or nondestructively include high-resolution computed tomography (hrCT), microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), high-resolution magnetic resonance (hrMR), and micromagnetic resonance (micro-MR). vQCT, hrCT, and hrMR are generally applicable in vivo; micro-CT and micro-MR are principally applicable in vitro. Despite progress, problems remain. The important balances between spatial resolution and sampling size, or between signal-to-noise and radiation dose or acquisition time, need further consideration, as do the complexity and expense of the methods versus their availability and accessibility. Clinically, the challenges for bone imaging include balancing the advantages of simple bone densitometry versus the more complex architectural features of bone, or the deeper research requirements versus the broader clinical needs. The biological differences between the peripheral appendicular skeleton and the central axial skeleton must be further addressed. Finally, the relative merits of these sophisticated imaging techniques must be weighed with respect to their applications as diagnostic procedures, requiring high accuracy or reliability, versus their monitoring

  20. More than a Picture: Helping Undergraduates Learn to Communicate through Scientific Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Fiona L.; Lom, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Images are powerful means of communicating scientific results; a strong image can underscore an experimental result more effectively than any words, whereas a poor image can readily undermine a result or conclusion. Developmental biologists rely extensively on images to compare normal versus abnormal development and communicate their results. Most…

  1. Advanced digital image archival system using MPEG technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wo

    2009-08-01

    Digital information and records are vital to the human race regardless of the nationalities and eras in which they were produced. Digital image contents are produced at a rapid pace from cultural heritages via digitalization, scientific and experimental data via high speed imaging sensors, national defense satellite images from governments, medical and healthcare imaging records from hospitals, personal collection of photos from digital cameras. With these mass amounts of precious and irreplaceable data and knowledge, what standards technologies can be applied to preserve and yet provide an interoperable framework for accessing the data across varieties of systems and devices? This paper presents an advanced digital image archival system by applying the international standard of MPEG technologies to preserve digital image content.

  2. LTE-advanced random access mechanism for M2M communication: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Rashid; Sarowa, Sandeep; Jaglan, Reena Rathee; Khan, Mohammad Junaid; Agrawal, Sunil

    2016-03-01

    Machine Type Communications (MTC) enables one or more self-sufficient machines to communicate directly with one another without human interference. MTC applications include smart grid, security, e-Health and intelligent automation system. To support huge numbers of MTC devices, one of the challenging issues is to provide a competent way for numerous access in the network and to minimize network overload. In this article, the different control mechanisms for overload random access are reviewed to avoid congestion caused by random access channel (RACH) of MTC devices. However, past and present wireless technologies have been engineered for Human-to-Human (H2H) communications, in particular, for transmission of voice. Consequently the Long Term Evolution (LTE) -Advanced is expected to play a central role in communicating Machine to Machine (M2M) and are very optimistic about H2H communications. Distinct and unique characteristics of M2M communications create new challenges from those in H2H communications. In this article, we investigate the impact of massive M2M terminals attempting random access to LTE-Advanced all at once. We discuss and review the solutions to alleviate the overload problem by Third Generation Partnership Project (3GPP). As a result, we evaluate and compare these solutions that can effectively eliminate the congestion on the random access channel for M2M communications without affecting H2H communications.

  3. Communication, interventions, and scientific advances in autism: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Llaneza, Danielle C; DeLuke, Susan V; Batista, Myra; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Christodulu, Kristin V; Frye, Cheryl A

    2010-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) affect approximately 1 in 150 children across the U.S., and are characterized by abnormal social actions, language difficulties, repetitive or restrictive behaviors, and special interests. ASD include autism (autistic disorder), Asperger Syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS or atypical autism). High-functioning individuals may communicate with moderate-to-high language skills, although difficulties in social skills may result in communication deficits. Low-functioning individuals may have severe deficiencies in language, resulting in poor communication between the individual and others. Behavioral intervention programs have been developed for ASD, and are frequently adjusted to accommodate specific individual needs. Many of these programs are school-based and aim to support the child in the development of their skills, for use outside the classroom with family and friends. Strides are being made in understanding the factors contributing to the development of ASD, particularly the genetic contributions that may underlie these disorders. Mutant mouse models provide powerful research tools to investigate the genetic factors associated with ASD and its co-morbid disorders. In support, the BTBR T+tf/J mouse strain incorporates ASD-like social and communication deficits and high levels of repetitive behaviors. This commentary briefly reviews the reciprocal relationship between observations made during evidence-based behavioral interventions of high- versus low-functioning children with ASD and the accumulating body of research in autism, including animal studies and basic research models. This reciprocity is one of the hallmarks of the scientific method, such that research may inform behavioral treatments, and observations made during treatment may inform subsequent research.

  4. Communication, Interventions, and Scientific Advances in Autism: A Commentary

    PubMed Central

    Llaneza, Danielle C.; DeLuke, Susan V.; Batista, Myra; Crawley, Jacqueline N.; Christodulu, Kristin V.; Frye, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) affect approximately 1 in 150 children across the U.S., and are characterized by abnormal social actions, language difficulties, repetitive or restrictive behaviors, and special interests. ASD include autism (autistic disorder), Asperger syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS or atypical autism). High-functioning individuals may communicate with moderate-to-high language skills, although difficulties in social skills may result in communication deficits. Low-functioning individuals may have severe deficiencies in language, resulting in poor communication between the individual and others. Behavioral intervention programs have been developed for ASD, and are frequently adjusted to accommodate specific individual needs. Many of these programs are school-based and aim to support the child in the development of their skills, for use outside the classroom with family and friends. Strides are being made in understanding the factors contributing to the development of ASD, particularly the genetic contributions that may underlie these disorders. Mutant mouse models provide powerful research tools to investigate the genetic factors associated with ASD and its co-morbid disorders. In support, the BTBR T+tf/J mouse strain incorporates ASD-like social and communication deficits and high levels of repetitive behaviors. This commentary briefly reviews the reciprocal relationship between observations made during evidence-based behavioral interventions of high- versus low-functioning children with ASD and the accumulating body of research in autism, including animal studies and basic research models. This reciprocity is one of the hallmarks of the scientific method, such that research may inform behavioral treatments, and observations made during treatment may inform subsequent research. PMID:20093134

  5. Technical advances of interventional fluoroscopy and flat panel image receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul

    2008-11-01

    In the past decade, various radiation reducing devices and control circuits have been implemented on fluoroscopic imaging equipment. Because of the potential for lengthy fluoroscopic procedures in interventional cardiovascular angiography, these devices and control circuits have been developed for the cardiac catheterization laboratories and interventional angiography suites. Additionally, fluoroscopic systems equipped with image intensifiers have benefited from technological advances in x-ray tube, x-ray generator, and spectral shaping filter technologies. The high heat capacity x-ray tube, the medium frequency inverter generator with high performance switching capability, and the patient dose reduction spectral shaping filter had already been implemented on the image intensified fluoroscopy systems. These three underlying technologies together with the automatic dose rate and image quality (ADRIQ) control logic allow patients undergoing cardiovascular angiography procedures to benefit from "lower patient dose" with "high image quality." While photoconductor (or phosphor plate) x-ray detectors and signal capture thin film transistor (TFT) and charge coupled device (CCD) arrays are analog in nature, the advent of the flat panel image receptor allowed for fluoroscopy procedures to become more streamlined. With the analog-to-digital converter built into the data lines, the flat panel image receptor appears to become a digital device. While the transition from image intensified fluoroscopy systems to flat panel image receptor fluoroscopy systems is part of the on-going "digitization of imaging," the value of a flat panel image receptor may have to be evaluated with respect to patient dose, image quality, and clinical application capabilities. The advantage of flat panel image receptors has yet to be fully explored. For instance, the flat panel image receptor has its disadvantages as compared to the image intensifiers; the cost of the equipment is probably the most

  6. Scalable fault tolerant image communication and storage grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slik, David; Seiler, Oliver; Altman, Tym; Montour, Mike; Kermani, Mohammad; Proseilo, Walter; Terry, David; Kawahara, Midori; Leckie, Chris; Muir, Dale

    2003-05-01

    Increasing production and use of digital medical imagery are driving new approaches to information storage and management. Traditional, centralized approaches to image communication, storage and archiving are becoming increasingly expensive to scale and operate with high levels of reliability. Multi-site, geographically-distributed deployments connected by limited-bandwidth networks present further scalability, reliability, and availability challenges. A grid storage architecture built from a distributed network of low cost, off-the-shelf servers (nodes) provides scalable data and metadata storage, processing, and communication without single points of failure. Imaging studies are stored, replicated, cached, managed, and retrieved based on defined rules, and nodes within the grid can acquire studies and respond to queries. Grid nodes transparently load-balance queries, storage/retrieval requests, and replicate data for automated backup and disaster recovery. This approach reduces latency, increases availability, provides near-linear scalability and allows the creation of a geographically distributed medical imaging network infrastructure. This paper presents some key concepts in grid storage and discusses the results of a clinical deployment of a multi-site storage grid for cancer care in the province of British Columbia.

  7. MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion imaging: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Hatabu, H

    1997-10-01

    Recent advances in MR pulmonary angiography and MR perfusion imaging are reviewed, focusing on two principal areas of technical development: (1) the availability of MR scanners equipped with enhanced gradient systems; and (2) new trends in MR angiography using gadolinium contrast agents or labeling of blood with an inversion recovery radiofrequency pulse in place of the more traditional methods using naturally flowing spins as the source of intravascular signal. These recent developments in MR have significant potential for clinical imaging of the pulmonary vasculature, particularly for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, and are now opening windows to functional MR imaging of the lung.

  8. Recent Advances of Radionuclide-based Molecular Imaging of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kazuma, Soraya M.; Sultan, Deborah; Zhao, Yongfeng; Detering, Lisa; You, Meng; Luehmann, Hannah P.; Abdalla, Dulcineia S.P.; Liu, Yongjian

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease characterized by the development of multifocal plaque lesions within vessel walls and extending into the vascular lumen. The disease takes decades to develop symptomatic lesions, affording opportunities for accurate detection of plaque progression, analysis of risk factors responsible for clinical events, and planning personalized treatment. Of the available molecular imaging modalities, radionuclide-based imaging strategies have been favored due to their sensitivity, quantitative detection and pathways for translational research. This review summarizes recent advances of radiolabeled small molecules, peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles for atherosclerotic plaque imaging during disease progression. PMID:26369676

  9. Recent Advances in Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sollip

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease that occurs most often in female cancer patients. Early detection can significantly reduce the mortality rate. Microwave breast imaging, which is noninvasive and harmless to human, offers a promising alternative method to mammography. This paper presents a review of recent advances in microwave imaging for breast cancer detection. We conclude by introducing new research on a microwave imaging system with time-domain measurement that achieves short measurement time and low system cost. In the time-domain measurement system, scan time would take less than 1 sec, and it does not require very expensive equipment such as VNA. PMID:28096808

  10. AXIOM: Advanced X-Ray Imaging Of the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Rayrnont, G.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S.; Owen, C. J.; Read, A. M.; Peacocke, L.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    AXIOM (Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere) is a concept mission which aims to explain how the Earth's magnetosphere responds to the changing impact of the solar wind using a unique method never attempted before; performing wide-field soft X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the magnetosheath. magnetopause and bow shock at high spatial and temporal resolution. Global imaging of these regions is possible because of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) process which produces elevated soft X-ray emission from the interaction of high charge-state solar wind ions with primarily neutral hydrogen in the Earth's exosphere and near-interplanetary space.

  11. Advances in molecular preclinical therapy mediated by imaging.

    PubMed

    Greco, Adelaide; Albanese, Sandra; Auletta, Luigi; DE Carlo, Flavia; Salvatore, Marco; Howard, Candace M; Claudio, Pier P

    2017-03-01

    Several advances have been made toward understanding the biology of cancer and most of them are due to robust genetic studies that led to the scientific recognition that although many patients have the same type of cancer their tumors may have harbored different molecular alterations. Personalized therapy and the development of advanced techniques of preclinical imaging and new murine models of disease are emerging concepts that are allowing mapping of disease markers in vivo and in some cases also receptor targeted therapy. Aim of this review is to illustrate some emerging models of disease that allow patient tumor implantation in mice for subsequent drug testing and advanced approaches for therapy mediated by preclinical imaging. In particular we discuss targeted therapy mediated by high frequency ultrasound and magnetic resonance, two emerging techniques in molecular preclinical therapy.

  12. Enterprise-class Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image infrastructure.

    PubMed

    York, G; Wortmann, J; Atanasiu, R

    2001-06-01

    Most current picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) are designed for a single department or a single modality. Few PACS installations have been deployed that support the needs of the hospital or the entire Integrated Delivery Network (IDN). The authors propose a new image management architecture that can support a large, distributed enterprise.

  13. Optoacoustic tomography and its recent advances in biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yixiong; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2005-01-01

    Optoacoustic tomography, which maps the distribution of the optical absorption within biological tissues by use of time-resolved laser-induced ultrasonic signals, is attracting increasing interests in biomedical imaging. As a hybrid imaging technique, it takes the advantages of both optical and ultrasonic techniques in that the tomography image has the optical contrast similar to the optical techniques while enjoying the high spatial resolution comparable to the ultrasound. In theories, this technique can image the objects embedded several centimeters deep within targets with a resolution of several tens of microns. In this paper, the current-state-of-the-art time-resolved optoacoustic tomography in biomedical imaging is reviewed. This paper consists of four sections: principles of optoacoustic tomography, signal acquisition and process, recent progress and advance, and problems and outlooks for the technique.

  14. Insights into dendritic cell function using advanced imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Jatin M

    2012-11-15

    The application of advanced imaging techniques to fundamental questions in immunology has provided insight into dendritic cell function and has challenged dogma created using static imaging of lymphoid tissue. The history of dendritic cell biology has a storied past and is tightly linked to imaging. The development of imaging techniques that emphasize live cell imaging in situ has provided not only breath-taking movies, but also novel insights into the importance of spatiotemporal relationships between antigen presenting cells and T cells. This review serves to provide a primer on two-photon microscopy, TIRF microscopy, spinning disk confocal microscopy and optical trapping and provides selective examples of insights gained from these tools on dendritic cell biology.

  15. Advanced technology development for image gathering, coding, and processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.

    1990-01-01

    Three overlapping areas of research activities are presented: (1) Information theory and optimal filtering are extended to visual information acquisition and processing. The goal is to provide a comprehensive methodology for quantitatively assessing the end-to-end performance of image gathering, coding, and processing. (2) Focal-plane processing techniques and technology are developed to combine effectively image gathering with coding. The emphasis is on low-level vision processing akin to the retinal processing in human vision. (3) A breadboard adaptive image-coding system is being assembled. This system will be used to develop and evaluate a number of advanced image-coding technologies and techniques as well as research the concept of adaptive image coding.

  16. Technology Advances in Support of Fusion Plasma Imaging Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qi; Lai, Jiali; Hu, Fengqi; Li, Maijou; Chang, Yu-Ting; Domier, Calvin; Luhmann, Neville, Jr.

    2012-10-01

    Innovative technologies are under investigation in key areas to enhance the performance of microwave and millimeter-wave fusion plasma imaging diagnostics. Novel antenna and mixer configurations are being developed at increasingly higher frequencies, to facilitate the use of electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on high field (> 2.6 T) plasma devices. Low noise preamplifier-based imaging antenna arrays are being developed to increase the sensitivity and dynamic range of microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) diagnostics for the localized measurement of turbulent density fluctuations. High power multi-frequency sources, fabricated using advanced CMOS technology, offer the promise of allowing MIR-based diagnostic instruments to image these density fluctuations in 2-D over an extended plasma volume in high performance tokamak plasmas. Details regarding each of these diagnostic development areas will be presented.

  17. Quantifying Atmospheric Impacts on Space Optical Imaging and Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.

    2011-09-01

    Clouds and optical turbulence are key drivers in the performance of optical imaging and communication systems. Clouds are composed of liquid water and/or ice crystals and depending on the physical thickness can produce atmospheric fades easily exceeding 10 dB. In these more common cases, impacts on optical imaging and communication systems may be severe. On the other hand, there are times when cloud fades may be as low as 1 or 2 dB as a result of thin, ice crystal based cirrus clouds. In these cases, the impacts on imaging and communication collectors may be limited. Atmospheric optical turbulence acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from telescopes. The quality of service of a free space optical communications link may also be impacted. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon distributions of turbulence at the location of interest. Large variations in the Fried Coherence Length (ro) are common as a function of time of day and by location and can range from just a few centimeters to tens of centimeters. The ability to characterize the distribution and frequency of clouds and optical turbulence are critical in order to understand and predict atmospheric impacts. A state-of-the-art cloud detection system has been developed, validated and applied to produce high resolution climatologies in order to investigate these impacts. The cloud detection system uses global in coverage, geostationary, multi-spectral satellite imagery at horizontal resolutions up to one kilometer and temporal resolutions up to fifteen minutes. Multi-spectral imagery from the visible wavelengths (0.6 μm) through the longwave infrared (15 μm) are used to produce individual cloud tests which are combined to produce a composite cloud analysis. The basis for the detection algorithm relies on accurate modeling of the clear sky

  18. Advancing Unmanned Aircraft Sensor Collection and Communication Capabilities with Optical Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukaczyk, T.

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are now being used for monitoring climate change over both land and seas. Their uses include monitoring of cloud conditions and atmospheric composition of chemicals and aerosols due to pollution, dust storms, fires, volcanic activity and air-sea fluxes. Additional studies of carbon flux are important for various ecosystem studies of both marine and terrestrial environments specifically, and can be related to climate change dynamics. Many measurements are becoming more complex as additional sensors become small enough to operate on more widely available small UAS. These include interferometric radars as well as scanning and fan-beam lidar systems which produce data streams even greater than those of high resolution video. These can be used to precisely map surfaces of the earth, ocean or ice features that are important for a variety of earth system studies. As these additional sensor capabilities are added to UAS the ability to transmit data back to ground or ship monitoring sites is limited by traditional wireless communication protocols. We describe results of tests of optical communication systems that provide significantly greater communication bandwidths for UAS, and discuss both the bandwidth and effective range of these systems, as well as their power and weight requirements both for systems on UAS, as well as those of ground-based receiver stations. We justify our additional use of Delay and Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) communication protocols with optical communication methods to ensure security and continuity of command and control operations. Finally, we discuss the implications for receiving, geo-referencing, archiving and displaying data streams from sensors communicated via optical communication to better enable real-time anomaly detection and adaptive sampling capabilities using multiple UAS or other unmanned or manned systems.

  19. R and D limited partnerships (possible applications in advanced communications satellite technology experiment program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Typical R&D limited partnership arrangements, advantages and disadvantages of R&D limited partnership (RDLPs) and antitrust and tax implications are described. A number of typical forms of RDLPs are described that may be applicable for use in stimulating R&D and experimental programs using the advanced communications technology satellite. The ultimate goal is to increase the rate of market penetration of goods and/or services based upon advanced satellite communications technology. The conditions necessary for these RDLP forms to be advantageous are outlined.

  20. Advanced Inverter Functions and Communication Protocols for Distribution Management

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarajan, Adarsh; Palmintier, Bryan; Baggu, Murali

    2016-05-05

    This paper aims at identifying the advanced features required by distribution management systems (DMS) service providers to bring inverter-connected distributed energy resources into use as an intelligent grid resource. This work explores the standard functions needed in the future DMS for enterprise integration of distributed energy resources (DER). The important DMS functionalities such as DER management in aggregate groups, including the discovery of capabilities, status monitoring, and dispatch of real and reactive power are addressed in this paper. It is intended to provide the industry with a point of reference for DER integration with other utility applications and to provide guidance to research and standards development organizations.

  1. What advances in microscopy are required for combined MRI and optical functional brain imaging? (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinfeld, David

    2016-03-01

    This overview talk will focus on forward-looking scientific needs and physical limits to images of neuronal processes. The challenge in nervous systems is that the basic unit for "switching" events in the nervous system occurs on the one micrometer scale of synaptic spines, while computations involve communication between individual neurons across the full expanse of cortex, which is ten millimeters for mouse cortex. I will address hoped-for advances in optical microscopy, within the context of existing and proposed contrast mechanisms of neuronal function, that span the four orders of magnitude of length scales for neuronal processing

  2. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Yielder, Jill; Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). Methods: The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. Results: Findings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. Conclusions: The authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ.

  3. DICOM image communication in globus-based medical grids.

    PubMed

    Vossberg, Michal; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Krefting, Dagmar

    2008-03-01

    Grid computing, the collaboration of distributed resources across institutional borders, is an emerging technology to meet the rising demand on computing power and storage capacity in fields such as high-energy physics, climate modeling, or more recently, life sciences. A secure, reliable, and highly efficient data transport plays an integral role in such grid environments and even more so in medical grids. Unfortunately, many grid middleware distributions, such as the well-known Globus Toolkit, lack the integration of the world-wide medical image communication standard Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM). Currently, the DICOM protocol first needs to be converted to the file transfer protocol (FTP) that is offered by the grid middleware. This effectively reduces most of the advantages and security an integrated network of DICOM devices offers. In this paper, a solution is proposed that adapts the DICOM protocol to the Globus grid security infrastructure and utilizes routers to transparently route traffic to and from DICOM systems. Thus, all legacy DICOM devices can be seamlessly integrated into the grid without modifications. A prototype of the grid routers with the most important DICOM functionality has been developed and successfully tested in the MediGRID test bed, the German grid project for life sciences.

  4. Baseband processor development for the Advanced Communications Satellite Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moat, D.; Sabourin, D.; Stilwell, J.; Mccallister, R.; Borota, M.

    1982-01-01

    An onboard-baseband-processor concept for a satellite-switched time-division-multiple-access (SS-TDMA) communication system was developed for NASA Lewis Research Center. The baseband processor routes and controls traffic on an individual message basis while providing significant advantages in improved link margins and system flexibility. Key technology developments required to prove the flight readiness of the baseband-processor design are being verified in a baseband-processor proof-of-concept model. These technology developments include serial MSK modems, Clos-type baseband routing switch, a single-chip CMOS maximum-likelihood convolutional decoder, and custom LSL implementation of high-speed, low-power ECL building blocks.

  5. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS): Design and on-orbit performance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gargione, F.; Acosta, R.; Coney, T.; Krawczyk, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), developed and built by Lockheed Martin Astro space for the NASA Lewis Research Center, was launched in September 1993 on the shuttle STS 51 mission. ACTS is a digital experimental communications test bed that incorporates gigahertz bandwidth transponders operating at Ka band, hopping spot beams, on-board storage and switching, and dynamic rain fade compensation. This paper describes the ACTS enabling technologies, the design of the communications payload, the constraints imposed on the spacecraft bus, and the measurements conducted to verify the performance of the system in orbit.

  6. Coherent Terahertz Wireless Signal Transmission Using Advanced Optical Fiber Communication Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Kuri, Toshiaki; Morohashi, Isao; Hosako, Iwao; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Yuki; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2015-02-01

    Coherent terahertz signal transmission with multilevel modulation and demodulation is demonstrated using an optical sub-harmonic IQ mixer (SHIQM), which consists of optical components in advanced optical fiber communication technologies. An optical-frequency-comb-employed signal generator is capable of vector modulation as well as frequency tunability. Digital signal processing (DSP) adopted from the recently developed optical digital coherent communication can easily demodulate multi-level modulated terahertz signals by using electrical heterodyning for intermediate-frequency (IF) down conversion. This technique is applicable for mobile backhauling in the next-generation mobile communication technology directly connected to an optical fiber network as a high-speed wireless transmission link.

  7. Presentations of the Ninth Advanced Communications Technology Satellite Propagation Studies Workshop (APSW IX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite Propagation Studies Workshop (APSW) is convened each year to present the results of the ACTS Propagation Campaign. Representatives from the satellite communications (satcom) industry, academia, and government are invited to APSW for discussions and exchange of information. The ACTS Propagation campaign is completing three years of Ka-Band data collection at seven sites in North America. Through this effort, NASA is making a major contribution to growth of satcom services by providing timely propagation data and models for predicting the performance of Ka-Band satellite communications systems.

  8. Challenges and recent advances in mass spectrometric imaging of neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Gemperline, Erin; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that grants the ability to investigate a broad mass range of molecules, from small molecules to large proteins, by creating detailed distribution maps of selected compounds. To date, MSI has demonstrated its versatility in the study of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides of different classes toward investigation of neurobiological functions and diseases. These studies have provided significant insight in neurobiology over the years and current technical advances are facilitating further improvements in this field. neurotransmitters, focusing specifically on the challenges and recent Herein, we advances of MSI of neurotransmitters. PMID:24568355

  9. A comparison of image communication protocols in e-science platform for biomedical imaging research and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tusheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Haibo; Zhang, Jianguo

    2012-02-01

    In designing of e-Science platform for biomedical imaging research and application cross multiple academic institutions and hospitals, it needs to find out the best communication protocol to transmit various kinds of biomedical images acquired from Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Source (SSRS), micro-PET, Micro-CT which includes both types of DICOM and non-DICOM images. In this presentation, we presented several image communication scenarios required in e-Science platform and several possible image communication protocols, and then tested and evaluated the performance of these image communication protocols in e-Science data flows to find out which protocol is the best candidate to be used in e-Science platform for the purpose for security, communication performance, easy implementation and management.

  10. Advances in imaging explosive blast mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hetherington, H; Bandak, A; Ling, G; Bandak, F A

    2015-01-01

    In the past, direct physical evidence of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) from explosive blast has been difficult to obtain through conventional imaging modalities such as T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Here, we review current progress in detecting evidence of brain injury from explosive blast using advanced imaging, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and the metabolic imaging methods such as positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), where each targets different aspects of the pathology involved in mTBI. DTI provides a highly sensitive measure to detect primary changes in the microstructure of white matter tracts. fMRI enables the measurement of changes in brain activity in response to different stimuli or tasks. Remarkably, all three of these paradigms have found significant success in conventional mTBI where conventional clinical imaging frequently fails to provide definitive differences. Additionally, although used less frequently for conventional mTBI, PET has the potential to characterize a variety of neurotransmitter systems using target agents and will undoubtedly play a larger role, once the basic mechanisms of injury are better understood and techniques to identify the injury are more common. Finally, our MRSI imaging studies, although acquired at much lower spatial resolution, have demonstrated selectivity to different metabolic and physiologic processes, uncovering some of the most profound differences on an individual by individual basis, suggesting the potential for utility in the management of individual patients.

  11. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  12. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  13. Advanced space communications architecture study. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstein, Michael; Hadinger, Peter J.

    1987-01-01

    The technical feasibility and economic viability of satellite system architectures that are suitable for customer premise service (CPS) communications are investigated. System evaluation is performed at 30/20 GHz (Ka-band); however, the system architectures examined are equally applicable to 14/11 GHz (Ku-band). Emphasis is placed on systems that permit low-cost user terminals. Frequency division multiple access (FDMA) is used on the uplink, with typically 10,000 simultaneous accesses per satellite, each of 64 kbps. Bulk demodulators onboard the satellite, in combination with a baseband multiplexer, convert the many narrowband uplink signals into a small number of wideband data streams for downlink transmission. Single-hop network interconnectivity is accomplished via downlink scanning beams. Each satellite is estimated to weigh 5600 lb and consume 6850W of power; the corresponding payload totals are 1000 lb and 5000 W. Nonrecurring satellite cost is estimated at $110 million, with the first-unit cost at $113 million. In large quantities, the user terminal cost estimate is $25,000. For an assumed traffic profile, the required system revenue has been computed as a function of the internal rate of return (IRR) on invested capital. The equivalent user charge per-minute of 64-kbps channel service has also been determined.

  14. Advanced space communications architecture study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstein, Michael; Hadinger, Peter J.

    1987-01-01

    The technical feasibility and economic viability of satellite system architectures that are suitable for Customer Premise Service (CPS) communications is investigated. System evaluation is performed at 30/20 GHz (Ka-band); however, the system architectures examined are equally applicable to 14/11 GHz (Ku-band). Emphasis is placed on system that permit low cost user terminals. Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) is used on the uplink, with typically 10,000 simultaneous accesses per satellite, each of 64 kbps. Bulk demodulators onboard the satellite, in combination with a baseband multiplexer, convert the many narrowband uplink signals into a small number of wideband data streams for downlink transmission. Single hop network interconnectivity is accomplished through use of downlink scanning beams. Each satellite is estimated to weigh 5600 lb and consume 6850W of power; the corresponding payload totals are 1000 lb and 5000W. Nonrecurring satellite cost is estimated at $110 million, with the first unit cost at $113 million. In large quantities, the user terminal cost estimate is $25,000.

  15. Satellite switched FDMA advanced communication technology satellite program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, S.; Higton, G. H.; Wood, K.; Kline, A.; Furiga, A.; Rausch, M.; Jan, Y.

    1982-01-01

    The satellite switched frequency division multiple access system provided a detailed system architecture that supports a point to point communication system for long haul voice, video and data traffic between small Earth terminals at Ka band frequencies at 30/20 GHz. A detailed system design is presented for the space segment, small terminal/trunking segment at network control segment for domestic traffic model A or B, each totaling 3.8 Gb/s of small terminal traffic and 6.2 Gb/s trunk traffic. The small terminal traffic (3.8 Gb/s) is emphasized, for the satellite router portion of the system design, which is a composite of thousands of Earth stations with digital traffic ranging from a single 32 Kb/s CVSD voice channel to thousands of channels containing voice, video and data with a data rate as high as 33 Mb/s. The system design concept presented, effectively optimizes a unique frequency and channelization plan for both traffic models A and B with minimum reorganization of the satellite payload transponder subsystem hardware design. The unique zoning concept allows multiple beam antennas while maximizing multiple carrier frequency reuse. Detailed hardware design estimates for an FDMA router (part of the satellite transponder subsystem) indicate a weight and dc power budget of 353 lbs, 195 watts for traffic model A and 498 lbs, 244 watts for traffic model B.

  16. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) multibeam antenna analysis and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Lagin, Alan R.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; Narvaez, Adabelle

    1992-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of a satellite communication system design is the accurate estimation of antenna performance degradation. Pointing error, end coverage gain, peak gain degradation, etc. are the main concerns. The thermal or dynamic distortions of a reflector antenna structural system can affect the far-field antenna power distribution in a least four ways. (1) The antenna gain is reduced; (2) the main lobe of the antenna can be mispointed thus shifting the destination of the delivered power away from the desired locations; (3) the main lobe of the antenna pattern can be broadened, thus spreading the RF power over a larger area than desired; and (4) the antenna pattern sidelobes can increase, thus increasing the chances of interference among adjacent beams of multiple beam antenna system or with antenna beams of other satellites. The in-house developed NASA Lewis Research Center thermal/structural/RF analysis program was designed to accurately simulate the ACTS in-orbit thermal environment and predict the RF antenna performance. The program combines well establish computer programs (TRASYS, SINDA and NASTAN) with a dual reflector-physical optics RF analysis program. The ACTS multibeam antenna configuration is analyzed and several thermal cases are presented and compared with measurements (pre-flight).

  17. Advanced Imaging Modalities in the Detection of Cerebral Vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jena N.; Mehta, Vivek; Russin, Jonathan; Amar, Arun P.; Rajamohan, Anandh; Mack, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is complex and is not entirely understood. Mechanistic insights have been gained through advances in the capabilities of diagnostic imaging. Core techniques have focused on the assessment of vessel caliber, tissue metabolism, and/or regional perfusion parameters. Advances in imaging have provided clinicians with a multifaceted approach to assist in the detection of cerebral vasospasm and the diagnosis of delayed ischemic neurologic deficits (DIND). However, a single test or algorithm with broad efficacy remains elusive. This paper examines both anatomical and physiological imaging modalities applicable to post-SAH vasospasm and offers a historical background. We consider cerebral blood flow velocities measured by Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TCD). Structural imaging techniques, including catheter-based Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), CT Angiography (CTA), and MR Angiography (MRA), are reviewed. We examine physiologic assessment by PET, HMPAO SPECT, 133Xe Clearance, Xenon-Enhanced CT (Xe/CT), Perfusion CT (PCT), and Diffusion-Weighted/MR Perfusion Imaging. Comparative advantages and limitations are discussed. PMID:23476766

  18. Recent Advances in Computed Tomographic Technology: Cardiopulmonary Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Tabari, Azadeh; Lo Gullo, Roberto; Murugan, Venkatesh; Otrakji, Alexi; Digumarthy, Subba; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2017-03-01

    Cardiothoracic diseases result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Chest computed tomography (CT) has been an imaging modality of choice for assessing a host of chest diseases, and technologic advances have enabled the emergence of coronary CT angiography as a robust noninvasive test for cardiac imaging. Technologic developments in CT have also enabled the application of dual-energy CT scanning for assessing pulmonary vascular and neoplastic processes. Concerns over increasing radiation dose from CT scanning are being addressed with introduction of more dose-efficient wide-area detector arrays and iterative reconstruction techniques. This review article discusses the technologic innovations in CT and their effect on cardiothoracic applications.

  19. Digital image communication scheme based on the breakup of spiral waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidelys, Martynas; Lu, Chen; Cheng, Yujie; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2017-02-01

    A digital image communication scheme based on the breakup of spiral waves is presented in this paper. This communication system does not require spatially homogeneous random initial conditions. Moreover, the secret image is not embedded into the initial conditions of the evolving self-organizing patterns. Such features increase the security of the communication, but still enable an effective transmission of the secret image. Computational experiments are used to demonstrate the properties and efficiency of the proposed scheme.

  20. Advances in molecular imaging for breast cancer detection and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Advances in our ability to assay molecular processes, including gene expression, protein expression, and molecular and cellular biochemistry, have fueled advances in our understanding of breast cancer biology and have led to the identification of new treatments for patients with breast cancer. The ability to measure biologic processes without perturbing them in vivo allows the opportunity to better characterize tumor biology and to assess how biologic and cytotoxic therapies alter critical pathways of tumor response and resistance. By accurately characterizing tumor properties and biologic processes, molecular imaging plays an increasing role in breast cancer science, clinical care in diagnosis and staging, assessment of therapeutic targets, and evaluation of responses to therapies. This review describes the current role and potential of molecular imaging modalities for detection and characterization of breast cancer and focuses primarily on radionuclide-based methods. PMID:22423895

  1. Advanced ground-penetrating, imaging radar for bridge inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Warhus, J.P.; Mast, J.E.; Johansson, E.M.; Nelson, S.E.; Lee, Hua

    1993-08-01

    Inspecting high-value structures, like bridges and buildings using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is an application of the technology that is growing in importance. In a typical inspection application, inspectors use GPR to locate structural components, like reinforcing bars embedded in concrete, to avoid weakening the structure while collecting core samples for detailed inspection. Advanced GPR, integrated with imaging technologies for use as an NDE tool, can provide the capability to locate and characterize construction flaws and wear- or age-induced damage in these structures without the need for destructive techniques like coring. In the following sections, we discuss an important inspection application, namely, concrete bridge deck inspection. We describe an advanced bridge deck inspection system concept and provide an overview of a program aimed at developing such a system. Examples of modeling, image reconstruction, and experimental results are presented.

  2. Advanced Communication and Control Solutions of Distributed Energy Resources (DER)

    SciTech Connect

    Asgeirsson, Haukur; Seguin, Richard; Sherding, Cameron; de Bruet, Andre, G.; Broadwater, Robert; Dilek, Murat

    2007-01-10

    This report covers work performed in Phase II of a two phase project whose objective was to demonstrate the aggregation of multiple Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and to offer them into the energy market. The Phase I work (DE-FC36-03CH11161) created an integrated, but distributed, system and procedures to monitor and control multiple DERs from numerous manufacturers connected to the electric distribution system. Procedures were created which protect the distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. Using the web as the communication medium for control and monitoring of the DERs, the integration of information and security was accomplished through the use of industry standard protocols such as secure SSL,VPN and ICCP. The primary objective of Phase II was to develop the procedures for marketing the power of the Phase I aggregated DERs in the energy market, increase the number of DER units, and implement the marketing procedures (interface with ISOs) for the DER generated power. The team partnered with the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO), the local ISO, to address the energy market and demonstrate the economic dispatch of DERs in response to market signals. The selection of standards-based communication technologies offers the ability of the system to be deployed and integrated with other utilities’ resources. With the use of a data historian technology to facilitate the aggregation, the developed algorithms and procedures can be verified, audited, and modified. The team has demonstrated monitoring and control of multiple DERs as outlined in phase I report including procedures to perform these operations in a secure and safe manner. In Phase II, additional DER units were added. We also expanded on our phase I work to enhance communication security and to develop the market model of having DERs, both customer and utility owned, participate in the energy market. We are proposing a two-part DER energy market model--a utility

  3. Advanced indium antimonide monolithic charge coupled infrared imaging arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, T. L.; Merilainen, C. A.; Thom, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    The continued process development of SiO2 insulators for use in advanced InSb monolithic charge coupled infrared imaging arrays is described. Specific investigations into the use of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) SiO2 as a gate insulator for InSb charge coupled devices is discussed, as are investigations of other chemical vapor deposited SiO2 materials.

  4. Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research and Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    injury in children. Dr. Dobson’s project was an investigation of the mechanisms of brain injury in premature infants , and potential neuroprotective...study hypoxic ischemic brain injury in newborns treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Dr. Massaro has a long standing interest in identifying early...TE.Understanding brain injury and neurodevelopmental disabilities in the preterm infant : the evolving role of advanced magnetic resonance imaging.Semin

  5. Application of advanced on-board processing concepts to future satellite communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.; Hoffman, M.; Kota, S. L.; Ruddy, J. M.; White, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    An initial definition of on-board processing requirements for an advanced satellite communications system to service domestic markets in the 1990's is presented. An exemplar system architecture with both RF on-board switching and demodulation/remodulation baseband processing was used to identify important issues related to system implementation, cost, and technology development.

  6. Prospects for Significant Theoretical Advances in Communication: The Role of the Interesting Question.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouran, Dennis S.

    This paper discusses ways in which the field of speech communication can be advanced. The first half of the paper characterizes the objectivist and subjectivist views of how knowledge is acquired and the forms of inquiry to which these views have led. The remainder of the paper demonstrates the role that the "interesting question" (one for which…

  7. Health Care Professionals' Death Attitudes, Experiences, and Advance Directive Communication Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    The study surveyed 135 health care professionals (74 nurses, 32 physicians, and 29 social workers) to examine their personal death attitudes and experiences in relation to their reported advance directive communication practice behavior. Negative correlations were found between collaborating with other health care professionals regarding the…

  8. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Claudia F.E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Over the past 20 years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has advanced due to new techniques involving increased magnetic field strength and developments in coils and pulse sequences. These advances allow increased opportunity to delineate the complex skull base anatomy and may guide the diagnosis and treatment of the myriad of pathologies that can affect the skull base. Objectives The objective of this article is to provide a brief background of the development of MRI and illustrate advances in skull base imaging, including techniques that allow improved conspicuity, characterization, and correlative physiologic assessment of skull base pathologies. Data Synthesis Specific radiographic illustrations of increased skull base conspicuity including the lower cranial nerves, vessels, foramina, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, and effacement of endolymph are provided. In addition, MRIs demonstrating characterization of skull base lesions, such as recurrent cholesteatoma versus granulation tissue or abscess versus tumor, are also provided as well as correlative clinical findings in CSF flow studies in a patient pre- and post-suboccipital decompression for a Chiari I malformation. Conclusions This article illustrates MRI radiographic advances over the past 20 years, which have improved clinicians' ability to diagnose, define, and hopefully improve the treatment and outcomes of patients with underlying skull base pathologies. PMID:25992137

  9. Imaging of skull base pathologies: Role of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Ankit; Kesavadas, C; Thomas, Bejoy; Kapilamoorthy, TR

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays a vital role in evaluation of skull base pathologies as this region is not directly accessible for clinical evaluation. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have played complementary roles in the diagnosis of the various neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions of the skull base. However, CT and conventional MRI may at times be insufficient to correctly pinpoint the accurate diagnosis. Advanced MRI techniques, though difficult to apply in the skull base region, in conjunction with CT and conventional MRI can however help in improving the diagnostic accuracy. This article aims to highlight the importance of advanced MRI techniques like diffusion-weighted imaging, susceptibility-weighted imaging, perfusion-weighted imaging, and MR spectroscopy in differentiation of various lesions involving the skull base. PMID:26427895

  10. Advanced Echocardiographic Imaging of the Congenitally Malformed Heart

    PubMed Central

    Black, D; Vettukattil, J

    2013-01-01

    There have been significant advancements in the ability of echocardiography to provide both morphological and functional information in children with congenitally malformed hearts. This progress has come through the development of improved technology such as matrix array probes and software which allows for the off line analysis of images to a high standard. This article focuses on these developments and discusses some newer concepts in advanced echocardiography such is multi-planar reformatting [MPR] and tissue motion annular displacement [TMAD]. Our aim is to discuss important aspects related to the quality and reproducibility of data, to review the most recent published data regarding advanced echocardiography in the malformed heart and to guide the reader to appropriate text for overcoming the technical challenges of using these methods. Many of the technical aspects of image acquisition and post processing have been discussed in recent reviews by the authors and we would urge readers to study these texts to gain a greater understanding [1]. The quality of the two dimensional image is paramount in both strain analysis and three dimensional echocardiography. An awareness of how to improve image quality is vital to acquiring accurate and usable data. Three dimensional echocardiography (3DE) is an attempt to visualise the dynamic morphology of the heart. Although published media is the basis for theoretical knowledge of how to practically acquire images, electronic media [eg.www.3dechocardiography.com] is the only way of visualising the advantages of this technology in real time. It is important to be aware of the limitations of this technology and that much of the data gleaned from using these methods is at a research stage and not yet in regular clinical practice. PMID:23228075

  11. EIR: enterprise imaging repository, an alternative imaging archiving and communication system.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jiang; Topaloglu, Umit; Lane, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    The enormous number of studies performed at the Nuclear Medicine Department of University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) generates a huge amount PET/CT images daily. A DICOM workstation had been used as "mini-PACS" to route all studies, which is historically proven to be slow due to various reasons. However, replacing the workstation with a commercial PACS server is not only cost inefficient; and more often, the PACS vendors are reluctant to take responsibility for the final integration of these components. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an alternative imaging archiving and communication system called Enterprise Imaging Repository (EIR). EIR consists of two distinguished components: an image processing daemon and a user friendly web interface. EIR not only reduces the overall waiting time of transferring a study from the modalities to radiologists' workstations, but also provides a more preferable presentation.

  12. Advanced gastrointestinal endoscopic imaging for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Rath, Timo; Neumann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy is of paramount importance for diagnosis, monitoring and dysplasia surveillance in patients with both, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, with the recent recognition that mucosal healing is directly linked to the clinical outcome of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, a growing demand exists for the precise, timely and detailed endoscopic assessment of superficial mucosal layer. Further, the novel field of molecular imaging has tremendously expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern endoscopy, now encompassing not only diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment but also the prediction of individual therapeutic responses. Within this review, we describe how novel endoscopic approaches and advanced endoscopic imaging methods such as high definition and high magnification endoscopy, dye-based and dye-less chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endocytoscopy and molecular imaging now allow for the precise and ultrastructural assessment of mucosal inflammation and describe the potential of these techniques for dysplasia detection. PMID:26811662

  13. Imaging spectroscopic analysis at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, A. A.; Warwick, T.; Anders, S.; Lamble, G.M.; Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Padmore, H.A.

    1999-05-12

    One of the major advances at the high brightness third generation synchrotrons is the dramatic improvement of imaging capability. There is a large multi-disciplinary effort underway at the ALS to develop imaging X-ray, UV and Infra-red spectroscopic analysis on a spatial scale from. a few microns to 10nm. These developments make use of light that varies in energy from 6meV to 15KeV. Imaging and spectroscopy are finding applications in surface science, bulk materials analysis, semiconductor structures, particulate contaminants, magnetic thin films, biology and environmental science. This article is an overview and status report from the developers of some of these techniques at the ALS. The following table lists all the currently available microscopes at the. ALS. This article will describe some of the microscopes and some of the early applications.

  14. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    DOE PAGES

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this hasmore » been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.« less

  15. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this has been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.

  16. Brain Imaging Using T-Rays Instrumentation Advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño-Palacios, C. G.; Celis-López, M. A.; Lárraga-Gutiérrez, J. M.; García-Garduño, A.; Zapata-Nava, O. J.; Díaz, A. Orduña; Torres-Jácome, A.; de-la-Hidalga-Wade, J.; Iturbe-Castillo, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    We present the advances on a brain imaging setup using submillimeter detectors and terahertz laser source. Terahertz radiation, known as T-rays, falls in the far infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum close to the microwaves and fraction of millimeter wavelengths. These T-rays are ideal candidates for medical imaging because the wavelength is long enough to be dispersed by molecular structures and sufficient small to produce images with a reasonable resolution, in a non-ionizing way. The millimeter detectors used in this proposal are being developed in parallel to the detectors used in the large Millimeter Telescope (LMT/GTM). Using the non-ionizing water absorption to terahertz radiation by different tissues we study the absorption difference between healthy and tumors in spite of the large absorption by water present in the body.

  17. Recent Advances in Higher-Order, Multimodal, Biomedical Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Rieffel, James; Chitgupi, Upendra; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2015-09-16

    Advances in biomedical imaging have spurred the development of integrated multimodal scanners, usually capable of two simultaneous imaging modes. The long-term vision of higher-order multimodality is to improve diagnostics or guidance through the analysis of complementary, data-rich, co-registered images. Synergies achieved through combined modalities could enable researchers to better track diverse physiological and structural events, analyze biodistribution and treatment efficacy, and compare established and emerging modalities. Higher-order multimodal approaches stand to benefit from molecular imaging probes and, in recent years, contrast agents that have hypermodal characteristics have increasingly been reported in preclinical studies. Given the chemical requirements for contrast agents representing various modalities to be integrated into a single entity, the higher-order multimodal agents reported so far tend to be of nanoparticulate form. To date, the majority of reported nanoparticles have included components that are active for magnetic resonance. Herein, recent progress in higher-order multimodal imaging agents is reviewed, spanning a range of material and structural classes, and demonstrating utility in three (or more) imaging modalities.

  18. Advanced Imaging and Robotics Technologies for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masamune, Ken; Hong, Jaesung

    2011-10-01

    Due to the importance of surgery in the medical field, a large amount of research has been conducted in this area. Imaging and robotics technologies provide surgeons with the advanced eye and hand to perform their surgeries in a safer and more accurate manner. Recently medical images have been utilized in the operating room as well as in the diagnostic stage. If the image to patient registration is done with sufficient accuracy, medical images can be used as "a map" for guidance to the target lesion. However, the accuracy and reliability of the surgical navigation system should be sufficiently verified before applying it to the patient. Along with the development of medical imaging, various medical robots have also been developed. In particular, surgical robots have been researched in order to reach the goal of minimal invasiveness. The most important factors to consider are determining the demand, the strategy for their use in operating procedures, and how it aids patients. In addition to the above considerations, medical doctors and researchers should always think from the patient's point of view. In this article, the latest medical imaging and robotic technologies focusing on surgical applications are reviewed based upon the factors described in the above.

  19. Advances in Spectral-Spatial Classification of Hyperspectral Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fauvel, Mathieu; Tarabalka, Yuliya; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Tilton, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images are presented in this paper. Several techniques are investigated for combining both spatial and spectral information. Spatial information is extracted at the object (set of pixels) level rather than at the conventional pixel level. Mathematical morphology is first used to derive the morphological profile of the image, which includes characteristics about the size, orientation and contrast of the spatial structures present in the image. Then the morphological neighborhood is defined and used to derive additional features for classification. Classification is performed with support vector machines using the available spectral information and the extracted spatial information. Spatial post-processing is next investigated to build more homogeneous and spatially consistent thematic maps. To that end, three presegmentation techniques are applied to define regions that are used to regularize the preliminary pixel-wise thematic map. Finally, a multiple classifier system is defined to produce relevant markers that are exploited to segment the hyperspectral image with the minimum spanning forest algorithm. Experimental results conducted on three real hyperspectral images with different spatial and spectral resolutions and corresponding to various contexts are presented. They highlight the importance of spectral-spatial strategies for the accurate classification of hyperspectral images and validate the proposed methods.

  20. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD.

  1. Advancing the art of satellite communications - Foreign competition spurs NASA Satcom research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulloch, C.

    1985-01-01

    Major advances in satellite communications technology in the US and Japan are detailed. Japan's Ka-band services aboard CS-2a and CS-2b, launched in 1973, are discussed, as well as plans for the ECS-2 and ACTS-E (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) experimental projects. The ACTS-E would carry both a broadcasting payload operating at 27/22 GHz and a communication payload using the 50/40 GHz band. Japan's fourth generation CS-4, for start-up in the first half of the 1990's, is described as a 2-ton craft carrying 60-70 transponders, and providing capacity for up to 100,000 equivalent two-way voice channels via 10 or 20 scanning spotbeams. NASA's new programs are described as well, including the ACTS program, with a communications payload embodying signal-processing, message-routing, and traffic-management techniques, and the MSAT program, concentrating on narrow-band transmissions. Included are the technical description, operational parameters, and schematic layout of NASA's ACTS, and block diagrams of baseband processor for low burst rate communications switching on the ACTS.

  2. Recent advances in medical imaging: anatomical and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Grignon, Bruno; Mainard, Laurence; Delion, Matthieu; Hodez, Claude; Oldrini, Guillaume

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to present an overview of the most important recent advances in medical imaging and their potential clinical and anatomical applications. Dramatic changes have been particularly observed in the field of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Computed tomography (CT) has been completely overturned by the successive development of helical acquisition, multidetector and large area-detector acquisition. Visualising brain function has become a new challenge for MRI, which is called functional MRI, currently based principally on blood oxygenation level-dependent sequences, which could be completed or replaced by other techniques such as diffusion MRI (DWI). Based on molecular diffusion due to the thermal energy of free water, DWI offers a spectrum of anatomical and clinical applications, ranging from brain ischemia to visualisation of large fibrous structures of the human body such as the anatomical bundles of white matter with diffusion tensor imaging and tractography. In the field of X-ray projection imaging, a new low-dose device called EOS has been developed through new highly sensitive detectors of X-rays, allowing for acquiring frontal and lateral images simultaneously. Other improvements have been briefly mentioned. Technical principles have been considered in order to understand what is most useful in clinical practice as well as in the field of anatomical applications. Nuclear medicine has not been included.

  3. MDCT imaging of the stomach: advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Prashant; Prakash, Anjali; Pradhan, Gaurav; Vidholia, Aditi; Nagpal, Nishant; Saboo, Sachin S; Kuehn, David M; Khandelwal, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    The stomach may be involved by a myriad of pathologies ranging from benign aetiologies like inflammation to malignant aetiologies like carcinoma or lymphoma. Multidetector CT (MDCT) of the stomach is the first-line imaging for patients with suspected gastric pathologies. Conventionally, CT imaging had the advantage of simultaneous detection of the mural and extramural disease extent, but advances in MDCT have allowed mucosal assessment by virtual endoscopy (VE). Also, better three-dimensional (3D) post-processing techniques have enabled more robust and accurate pre-operative planning in patients undergoing gastrectomy and even predict the response to surgery for patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for weight loss. The ability of CT to obtain stomach volume (for bariatric surgery patients) and 3D VE images depends on various patient and protocol factors that are important for a radiologist to understand. We review the appropriate CT imaging protocol in the patients with suspected gastric pathologies and highlight the imaging pearls of various gastric pathologies on CT and VE.

  4. Quantitative Computed Tomography and Image Analysis for Advanced Muscle Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnus K.; Arnadottir, Iris D.; Marcante, Andrea; Piccione, Francesco; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging is of particular interest in the field of translational myology, as extant literature describes the utilization of a wide variety of techniques to non-invasively recapitulate and quantity various internal and external tissue morphologies. In the clinical context, medical imaging remains a vital tool for diagnostics and investigative assessment. This review outlines the results from several investigations on the use of computed tomography (CT) and image analysis techniques to assess muscle conditions and degenerative process due to aging or pathological conditions. Herein, we detail the acquisition of spiral CT images and the use of advanced image analysis tools to characterize muscles in 2D and 3D. Results from these studies recapitulate changes in tissue composition within muscles, as visualized by the association of tissue types to specified Hounsfield Unit (HU) values for fat, loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, and normal muscle, including fascia and tendon. We show how results from these analyses can be presented as both average HU values and compositions with respect to total muscle volumes, demonstrating the reliability of these tools to monitor, assess and characterize muscle degeneration. PMID:27478562

  5. Advancing the Message: Tips and Suggestions for Communications People in Child Welfare Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layton, Mary J.

    Nonprofit agencies involved in child welfare are increasingly interested in generating publicity for their work and improving their organization's public image. This booklet compiles information, tips, and resources helpful to public relations and communications professionals and agency personnel responsible for handling media relations for child…

  6. [Advances in sensor node and wireless communication technology of body sensor network].

    PubMed

    Lin, Weibing; Lei, Sheng; Wei, Caihong; Li, Chunxiang; Wang, Cang

    2012-06-01

    With the development of the wireless communication technology, implantable biosensor technology, and embedded system technology, Body Sensor Network (BSN) as one branch of wireless sensor networks and important part of the Internet of things has caught more attention of researchers and enterprises. This paper offers the basic concept of the BSN and analyses the related research. We focus on sensor node and wireless communication technology from perspectives of technology challenges, research advance and development trend in the paper. Besides, we also present a relative overview of domestic and overseas projects for the BSN.

  7. M-health medical video communication systems: an overview of design approaches and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Panayides, A S; Pattichis, M S; Constantinides, A G; Pattichis, C S

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of the new, High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard, combined with wide deployment of 4G wireless networks, will provide significant support toward the adoption of mobile-health (m-health) medical video communication systems in standard clinical practice. For the first time since the emergence of m-health systems and services, medical video communication systems can be deployed that can rival the standards of in-hospital examinations. In this paper, we provide a thorough overview of today's advancements in the field, discuss existing approaches, and highlight the future trends and objectives.

  8. TU-EF-207-00: Advances in Breast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis

  9. Technology in radiology: advances in diagnostic imaging & therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Stern, S M

    1993-01-01

    Nearly 100 years from its birth, radiology continues to grow as though still in adolescence. Although some radiologic technologies have matured more than others, new applications and techniques appear regularly in the literature. Radiology has evolved from purely diagnostic devices to interventional technologies. New contrast agents in MRI, X ray and ultrasound enable physicians to make diagnoses and plan therapies with greater precision than ever before. Techniques are less and less invasive. Advances in computer technology have given supercomputer-like power to high-end nuclear medicine and MRI systems. Imaging systems in most modalities are now designed with upgrades in mind instead of "planned obsolescence." Companies routinely upgrade software and other facets of their products, sometimes at no additional charge to existing customers. Hospitals, radiology groups and imaging centers will face increasing demands to justify what they do according to patient outcomes and management criteria. Did images make the diagnosis or confirm it? Did the images determine optimal treatment strategies or confirm which strategies might be appropriate? Third-party payers, especially the government, will view radiology in those terms. The diagnostic imaging and therapy systems of today require increasingly sophisticated technical support for maintenance and repair. Hospitals, radiology groups and imaging centers will have to determine the most economic and effective ways to guarantee equipment up-time. Borrowing from the automotive industry, some radiology manufacturers have devised transtelephonic software systems to facilitate remote troubleshooting. To ensure their fiscal viability, hospitals continue to acquire new imaging and therapy technologies for competitive and access-to-services reasons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology Advancements for Plasma Diagnostics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangyu

    To realize fusion plant, the very first step is to understand the fundamental physics of materials under fusion conditions, i.e. to understand fusion plasmas. Our research group, Plasma Diagnostics Group, focuses on developing advanced tools for physicists to extract as much information as possible from fusion plasmas at millions degrees. The Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostics is a very useful tool invented in this group to study fusion plasma electron temperature and it fluctuations. This dissertation presents millimeter wave imaging technology advances recently developed in this group to improve the ECEI system. New technologies made it more powerful to image and visualize magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) activities and micro-turbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis start from development of miniaturized elliptical substrate lens array. This novel substrate lens array replaces the previous generation substrate lens, hyper-hemispherical substrate lens, in terms of geometry. From the optical performance perspective, this substitution not only significantly simplifies the optical system with improved optical coupling, but also enhances the RF/LO coupling efficiency. By the benefit of the mini lens focusing properties, a wideband dual-dipole antenna array is carefully designed and developed. The new antenna array is optimized simultaneously for receiving both RF and LO, with sharp radiation patterns, low side-lobe levels, and less crosstalk between adjacent antennas. In addition, a high frequency antenna is also developed, which extends the frequency limit from 145 GHz to 220 GHz. This type of antenna will be used on high field operation tokamaks with toroidal fields in excess of 3 Tesla. Another important technology advance is so-called extended bandwidth double down-conversion electronics. This new electronics extends the instantaneous IF coverage from 2 to 9.2 GHz to 2 to 16.4 GHz. From the plasma point of view, it means that the

  11. Netscape Communicator 4.5. Volume II: Beyond the Basics. Advanced Searches, Multimedia, and Composing a Web Page.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Gail; Wichowski, Chester P.

    This second of two guides on Netscape Communicator 4.5 contains six lessons on advanced searches, multimedia, and composing a World Wide Web page. Lesson 1 is a review of the Navigator window, toolbars, and menus. Lesson 2 covers AltaVista's advanced search tips, searching for information excluding certain text, and advanced and nested Boolean…

  12. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Simulation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, G.; Buckley, J.; Bugaev, V.; Fegan, S.; Funk, S.; Konopelko, A.; Vassiliev, V.V.; /UCLA

    2011-06-14

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory being planned in the U.S. The anticipated sensitivity of AGIS is about one order of magnitude better than the sensitivity of current observatories, allowing it to measure gamma-ray emission from a large number of Galactic and extra-galactic sources. We present here results of simulation studies of various possible designs for AGIS. The primary characteristics of the array performance - collecting area, angular resolution, background rejection, and sensitivity - are discussed.

  13. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) - Simulation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, G.; Buckley, J.; Bugaev, V.; Fegan, S.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Funk, S.; Konopelko, A.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a US-led concept for a next-generation instrument in ground-based very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The most important design requirement for AGIS is a sensitivity of about 10 times greater than current observatories like Veritas, H.E.S.S or MAGIC. We present results of simulation studies of various possible designs for AGIS. The primary characteristics of the array performance, collecting area, angular resolution, background rejection, and sensitivity are discussed.

  14. Advanced Imaging of Athletes: Added Value of Coronary Computed Tomography and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Matthew W

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomographic angiography have become important parts of the armamentarium for noninvasive diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Emerging technologies have produced faster imaging, lower radiation dose, improved spatial and temporal resolution, as well as a wealth of prognostic data to support usage. Investigating true pathologic disease as well as distinguishing normal from potentially dangerous is now increasingly more routine for the cardiologist in practice. This article investigates how advanced imaging technologies can assist the clinician when evaluating all athletes for pathologic disease that may put them at risk.

  15. Proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Network and Technology Concepts for Mobile, Micro, and Personal Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Lori (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The Workshop on Advanced Network and Technology Concepts for Mobile, Micro, and Personal Communications was held at NASA's JPL Laboratory on 30-31 May 1991. It provided a forum for reviewing the development of advanced network and technology concepts for turn-of-the-century telecommunications. The workshop was organized into three main categories: (1) Satellite-Based Networks (L-band, C-band, Ku-band, and Ka-band); (2) Terrestrial-Based Networks (cellular, CT2, PCN, GSM, and other networks); and (3) Hybrid Satellite/Terrestrial Networks. The proceedings contain presentation papers from each of the above categories.

  16. Recent Advances in the Imaging of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging has played an important role in the characterization of the frontotemporal dementia (FTD) syndromes, demonstrating neurodegenerative signatures that can aid in the differentiation of FTD from other neurodegenerative disorders. Recent advances have been driven largely by the refinement of the clinical syndromes that underlie FTD, and by the discovery of new genetic and pathological features associated with FTD. Many new imaging techniques and modalities are also now available that allow the assessment of other aspects of brain structure and function, such as diffusion tensor imaging and resting state functional MRI. Studies have utilized these recent techniques, as well as traditional volumetric MRI, to provide further insight into disease progression across the many clinical, genetic and pathological variants of FTD. Importantly, neuroimaging signatures have been identified that will improve the clinician’s ability to predict underlying genetic and pathological features, and hence ultimately improve patient diagnosis. PMID:23015371

  17. Advances in imaging ultrastructure yield new insights into presynaptic biology

    PubMed Central

    Bruckner, Joseph J.; Zhan, Hong; O’Connor-Giles, Kate M.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses are the fundamental functional units of neural circuits, and their dysregulation has been implicated in diverse neurological disorders. At presynaptic terminals, neurotransmitter-filled synaptic vesicles are released in response to calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels activated by the arrival of an action potential. Decades of electrophysiological, biochemical, and genetic studies have contributed to a growing understanding of presynaptic biology. Imaging studies are yielding new insights into how synapses are organized to carry out their critical functions. The development of techniques for rapid immobilization and preservation of neuronal tissues for electron microscopy (EM) has led to a new renaissance in ultrastructural imaging that is rapidly advancing our understanding of synapse structure and function. PMID:26052269

  18. Advanced DTM Generation from Very High Resolution Satellite Stereo Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perko, R.; Raggam, H.; Gutjahr, K. H.; Schardt, M.

    2015-03-01

    This work proposes a simple filtering approach that can be applied to digital surface models in order to extract digital terrain models. The method focusses on robustness and computational efficiency and is in particular tailored to filter DSMs that are extracted from satellite stereo images. It represents an evolution of an existing DTM generation method and includes distinct advancement through the integration of multi-directional processing as well as slope dependent filtering, thus denoted "MSD filtering". The DTM generation workflow is fully automatic and requires no user interaction. Exemplary results are presented for a DSM generated from a Pléiades tri-stereo image data set. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations with respect to highly accurate reference LiDAR data confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  19. Advances and challenges in deformable image registration: From image fusion to complex motion modelling.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Julia A; Heinrich, Mattias P; Papież, Bartłomiej W; Brady, Sir J Michael

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 20 years, the field of medical image registration has significantly advanced from multi-modal image fusion to highly non-linear, deformable image registration for a wide range of medical applications and imaging modalities, involving the compensation and analysis of physiological organ motion or of tissue changes due to growth or disease patterns. While the original focus of image registration has predominantly been on correcting for rigid-body motion of brain image volumes acquired at different scanning sessions, often with different modalities, the advent of dedicated longitudinal and cross-sectional brain studies soon necessitated the development of more sophisticated methods that are able to detect and measure local structural or functional changes, or group differences. Moving outside of the brain, cine imaging and dynamic imaging required the development of deformable image registration to directly measure or compensate for local tissue motion. Since then, deformable image registration has become a general enabling technology. In this work we will present our own contributions to the state-of-the-art in deformable multi-modal fusion and complex motion modelling, and then discuss remaining challenges and provide future perspectives to the field.

  20. Proceedings of the Eleventh Advanced Communications Technology Satellite Propagation Studies Workshop (APSW 11)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor); Ho, Christian (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite Propagation Studies Workshop (APSW) is convened each year to present the results of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Ka-band propagation campaign. Representatives from the space community including industry, academia, and government who are interested in radiowave propagation at Ka-band are invited to APSW for discussions and exchange of information. The ACTS Propagation campaign will complete five years of Ka-Band data collection at seven sites in North America by December 31, 1998. Through this effort, NASA is making a major contribution to the effective utilization of this band by providing timely propagation data and models for predicting the performance of Ka-band links between space and ground.

  1. Diagnosis by Endoscopy and Advanced Imaging of Barrett's Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Swager, Anne-Fré; Curvers, Wouter L; Bergman, Jacques J

    Evaluation of patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) using dye-based chromoendoscopy, optical chromoendoscopy, autofluorescence imaging, or confocal laser endomicroscopy does not significantly increase the number of patients with a diagnosis of early neoplasia compared with high-definition white light endoscopy (HD-WLE) with random biopsy analysis. These newer imaging techniques are not more effective in standard surveillance of patients with BE because the prevalence of early neoplasia is low and HD-WLE with random biopsy analysis detects most cases of neoplasia. The evaluation and treatment of patients with BE and early stage neoplasia should be centralized in tertiary referral centers, where procedures are performed under optimal conditions, by expert endoscopists. Lesions that require resection are almost always detected by HD-WLE, although advanced imaging techniques can detect additional flat lesions. However, these are of limited clinical significance because they are effectively eradicated by ablation therapy. No endoscopic imaging technique can reliably assess submucosal or lymphangio invasion. Endoscopic resection of early stage neoplasia in patients with BE is important for staging and management. Optical chromoendoscopy can also be used to evaluate lesions before endoscopic resection and in follow-up after successful ablation therapy.

  2. Recent Advances in Techniques for Hyperspectral Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza, Antonio; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Boardman, Joseph W.; Brazile, Jason; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Fauvel, Mathieu; Gamba, Paolo; Gualtieri, Anthony; Marconcini, Mattia; Tilton, James C.; Trianni, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than 30 years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspectral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal view on recent advances in techniques for hyperspectral image processing. Our main focus is on the design of techniques able to deal with the highdimensional nature of the data, and to integrate the spatial and spectral information. Performance of the discussed techniques is evaluated in different analysis scenarios. To satisfy time-critical constraints in specific applications, we also develop efficient parallel implementations of some of the discussed algorithms. Combined, these parts provide an excellent snapshot of the state-of-the-art in those areas, and offer a thoughtful perspective on future potentials and emerging challenges in the design of robust hyperspectral imaging algorithms

  3. Microwave imaging for breast cancer detection: advances in three--dimensional image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Golnabi, Amir H; Meaney, Paul M; Epstein, Neil R; Paulsen, Keith D

    2011-01-01

    Microwave imaging is based on the electrical property (permittivity and conductivity) differences in materials. Microwave imaging for biomedical applications is particularly interesting, mainly due to the fact that available range of dielectric properties for different tissues can provide important functional information about their health. Under the assumption that a 3D scattering problem can be reasonably represented as a simplified 2D model, one can take advantage of the simplicity and lower computational cost of 2D models to characterize such 3D phenomenon. Nonetheless, by eliminating excessive model simplifications, 3D microwave imaging provides potentially more valuable information over 2D techniques, and as a result, more accurate dielectric property maps may be obtained. In this paper, we present some advances we have made in three-dimensional image reconstruction, and show the results from a 3D breast phantom experiment using our clinical microwave imaging system at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC), NH.

  4. Towards Advancing Knowledge Translation of AAC Outcomes Research for Children and Youth with Complex Communication Needs.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Stephen E; Shepherd, Tracy; Renzoni, Anne Marie; Anderson, Colleen; Barber, Mary; Kingsnorth, Shauna; Ward, Karen

    2015-06-01

    The production of new knowledge in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) requires effective processes to leverage the different perspectives of researchers and knowledge users and improve prospects for utilization in clinical settings. This article describes the motivation, planning, process, and outcomes for a novel knowledge translation workshop designed to influence future directions for AAC outcomes research for children with complex communication needs. Invited knowledge users from 20 pediatric AAC clinics and researchers engaged in the collaborative development of research questions using a framework designed for the AAC field. The event yielded recommendations for research and development priorities that extend from the early development of language, communication, and literacy skills in very young children, to novel but unproven strategies that may advance outcomes in transitioning to adulthood.

  5. A Java viewer to publish Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) radiologic images on the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Setti, E; Musumeci, R

    2001-06-01

    The world wide web is an exciting service that allows one to publish electronic documents made of text and images on the internet. Client software called a web browser can access these documents, and display and print them. The most popular browsers are currently Microsoft Internet Explorer (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) and Netscape Communicator (Netscape Communications, Mountain View, CA). These browsers can display text in hypertext markup language (HTML) format and images in Joint Photographic Expert Group (JPEG) and Graphic Interchange Format (GIF). Currently, neither browser can display radiologic images in native Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) format. With the aim to publish radiologic images on the internet, we wrote a dedicated Java applet. Our software can display radiologic and histologic images in DICOM, JPEG, and GIF formats, and provides a a number of functions like windowing and magnification lens. The applet is compatible with some web browsers, even the older versions. The software is free and available from the author.

  6. Advances in automated 3-D image analyses of cell populations imaged by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ancin, H; Roysam, B; Dufresne, T E; Chestnut, M M; Ridder, G M; Szarowski, D H; Turner, J N

    1996-11-01

    Automated three-dimensional (3-D) image analysis methods are presented for rapid and effective analysis of populations of fluorescently labeled cells or nuclei in thick tissue sections that have been imaged three dimensionally using a confocal microscope. The methods presented here greatly improve upon our earlier work (Roysam et al.:J Microsc 173: 115-126, 1994). The principal advances reported are: algorithms for efficient data pre-processing and adaptive segmentation, effective handling of image anisotrophy, and fast 3-D morphological algorithms for separating overlapping or connected clusters utilizing image gradient information whenever available. A particular feature of this method is its ability to separate densely packed and connected clusters of cell nuclei. Some of the challenges overcome in this work include the efficient and effective handling of imaging noise, anisotrophy, and large variations in image parameters such as intensity, object size, and shape. The method is able to handle significant inter-cell, intra-cell, inter-image, and intra-image variations. Studies indicate that this method is rapid, robust, and adaptable. Examples were presented to illustrate the applicability of this approach to analyzing images of nuclei from densely packed regions in thick sections of rat liver, and brain that were labeled with a fluorescent Schiff reagent.

  7. The Effectiveness of Advance Organizers on the Signification of Poetic Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayat, Nihat

    2007-01-01

    Advance organizers activate the most suitable schema to learn new material. Poetic images are signified in schemata and the elements which are not expressed may be called by advance organizers. The purpose of this investigation is to discern the effectiveness of advance organizers on the signification of poetic images. Pretest-posttest…

  8. The network and its role in digital imaging and communications in medicine imaging.

    PubMed

    Ballance, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    The elements of a digital imaging system are bound together by the network, so careful attention must be paid to this essential component. Networking hardware and cable choice will affect the speed of image transmission between devices within a network. Wireless networking offers convenience at the expense of speed and potentially, security. If a facility allows its network to connect to the Internet, security precautions are essential. Firewalls prevent unauthorized and destructive access to the network; virtual private networks allow encrypted communication with the network; and email and web browser encryption allow data transmitted from the network to other users on the Internet safely. This article presents an overview of this broad array of technologies. Readers are encouraged to seek additional depth as needed to address individual networking needs.

  9. Communicator image and Myers-Briggs Type Indicator extraversion-introversion.

    PubMed

    Opt, Susan K; Loffredo, Donald A

    2003-11-01

    This study is an examination of the relationship between communicator image and Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) dimensions of extraversion-introversion. The authors found that individuals who prefer extraversion tend to have a more positive communicator image than those who prefer introversion. The results of this study support other research results showing that personality preferences differ in communication behaviors and traits, which could have implications for the individual's comfort and success in society. Results of this research also support the contention that communication behavior has biological aspects.

  10. Advanced Imaging in Femoroacetabular Impingement: Current State and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S; Hesper, Tobias; Tiderius, Carl Johan; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is now a known precursor of early osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. In terms of clinical intervention, the decision between joint preservation and joint replacement hinges on the severity of articular cartilage degeneration. The exact threshold during the course of disease progression when the cartilage damage is irreparable remains elusive. The intention behind radiographic imaging is to accurately identify the morphology of osseous structural abnormalities and to accurately characterize the chondrolabral damage as much as possible. However, both plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are insensitive for articular cartilage anatomy and pathology. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques include magnetic resonance arthrography and biochemically sensitive techniques of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), T1rho (T1ρ), T2/T2* mapping, and several others. The diagnostic performance of these techniques to evaluate cartilage degeneration could improve the ability to predict an individual patient-specific outcome with non-surgical and surgical care. This review discusses the facts and current applications of biochemical MRI for hip joint cartilage assessment covering the roles of dGEMRIC, T2/T2*, and T1ρ mapping. The basics of each technique and their specific role in FAI assessment are outlined. Current limitations and potential pitfalls as well as future directions of biochemical imaging are also outlined.

  11. Advanced Imaging in Femoroacetabular Impingement: Current State and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S.; Hesper, Tobias; Tiderius, Carl Johan; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is now a known precursor of early osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. In terms of clinical intervention, the decision between joint preservation and joint replacement hinges on the severity of articular cartilage degeneration. The exact threshold during the course of disease progression when the cartilage damage is irreparable remains elusive. The intention behind radiographic imaging is to accurately identify the morphology of osseous structural abnormalities and to accurately characterize the chondrolabral damage as much as possible. However, both plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are insensitive for articular cartilage anatomy and pathology. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques include magnetic resonance arthrography and biochemically sensitive techniques of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), T1rho (T1ρ), T2/T2* mapping, and several others. The diagnostic performance of these techniques to evaluate cartilage degeneration could improve the ability to predict an individual patient-specific outcome with non-surgical and surgical care. This review discusses the facts and current applications of biochemical MRI for hip joint cartilage assessment covering the roles of dGEMRIC, T2/T2*, and T1ρ mapping. The basics of each technique and their specific role in FAI assessment are outlined. Current limitations and potential pitfalls as well as future directions of biochemical imaging are also outlined. PMID:26258129

  12. An advanced CCD emulator with 32MB image memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, P.; Fried, J.; Kotov, I.

    2012-07-01

    As part of the LSST sensor development program we have developed an advanced CCD emulator for testing new multichannel readout electronics. The emulator, based on an Altera Stratix II FPGA for timing and control, produces 4 channels of simulated video waveforms in response to an appropriate sequence of horizontal and vertical clocks. It features 40MHz, 16-bit DACs for reset and video generation, 32MB of image memory for storage of arbitrary grayscale bitmaps, and provision to simulate reset and clock feedthrough ("glitches") on the video channels. Clock inputs are qualified for proper sequences and levels before video output is generated. Binning, region of interest, and reverse clock sequences are correctly recognized and appropriate video output will be produced. Clock transitions are timestamped and can be played back to a control PC. A simplified user interface is provided via a daughter card having an ARM M3 Cortex microprocessor and miniature color LCD display and joystick. The user can select video modes from stored bitmap images, or flat, gradient, bar, chirp, or checkerboard test patterns; set clock thresholds and video output levels; and set row/column formats for image outputs. Multiple emulators can be operated in parallel to simulate complex CCDs or CCD arrays.

  13. End-of-life communication in Korean older adults: With focus on advance care planning and advance directives.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ji Eun; Cho, BeLong; Yoo, Sang Ho; Kim, SangYun; Yoo, Jun-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    The present article aimed to provide a comprehensive review of current status of end-of-life (EOL) care and sociocultural considerations in Korea, with focus on the EOL communication and use of advance directives (AD) in elderly Koreans. Through literature review, we discuss the current status of EOL care and sociocultural considerations in Korea, and provide a look-ahead. In Korea, patients often receive life-sustaining treatment until the very end of life. Advance care planning is rare, and most do-not-resuscitate decisions are made between the family and physician at the very end of patient's life. Koreans, influenced mainly by Confucian tradition, prefer a natural death and discontinuation of life-sustaining treatment. Although Koreans generally believe that death is natural and unavoidable, they tend not to think about or discuss death, and regard preparation for death as unnecessary. As a result, AD are completed by just 4.7% of the general adult population. This situation can be explained by several sociocultural characteristics including opting for natural death, wish not to burden others, preference for family involvement and trust in doctor, avoidance of talking about death, and filial piety. Patients often receive life-sustaining treatment until the very EOL, advance care planning and the use of AD is not common in Korea. This was related to unique sociocultural characteristics of Korea. A more active role of physicians, development of a more deliberate EOL discussion process, development of culturally appropriate AD and promotion of advance care planning might be required to provide good EOL care in Korea.

  14. AXIOM: Advanced X-Ray Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sembay, S. F.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C.; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S. E.; Owen, C. J.; Peacocke, L.; Read, A. M.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G. W.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2011-01-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in two complementary ways by in situ measurements, or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Some parts of the Earth's magnetosphere have been remotely sensed, but the majority remains unexplored by this type of measurements. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques, which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this article we describe how an appropriately designed and located X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock, with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Global images of the dayside magnetospheric boundaries require vantage points well outside the magnetosphere. Our studies have led us to propose AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere, a concept mission using a Vega launcher with a LISA Pathfinder-type Propulsion Module to place the spacecraft in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth Moon L1 point. The model payload consists of an X-ray Wide Field Imager, capable of both imaging and spectroscopy, and an in situ plasma and magnetic field measurement package. This package comprises a Proton-Alpha Sensor, designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an Ion Composition Analyser, to characterize the minor ion populations in the solar wind that cause charge exchange emission, and a Magnetometer, designed to measure the strength and direction

  15. AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sembay, S. F.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C.; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S. E.; Owen, C. J.; Peacocke, L.; Read, A. M.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G. W.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in two complementary ways - by in situ measurements, or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Some parts of the Earth's magnetosphere have been remotely sensed, but the majority remains unexplored by this type of measurements. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques. which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this article we describe how an appropriately designed and located. X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock. with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Global images of the dayside magnetospheric boundaries require vantage points well outside the magnetosphere. Our studies have led us to propose 'AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere', a concept mission using a Vega launcher with a LISA Pathfinder-type Propulsion Module to place the spacecraft in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth - Moon Ll point. The model payload consists of an X-ray Wide Field Imager, capable of both imaging and spectroscopy, and an in situ plasma and magnetic field measurement package. This package comprises a Proton-Alpha Sensor, designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an Ion Composition Analyser, to characterize the minor ion populations in the solar wind that cause charge exchange emission, and a Magnetometer, designed to measure the strength and

  16. Communication and Reception in Teaching: The Age of Image "versus" the "Weight" of Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradea, Adela

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary culture is mainly a culture of image. We get our information seeing. Examination of images is free, while reading is impelled by the necessity of browsing the whole text. The image seems more appropriate than the text when trying to communicate easy and quickly. The speech calls for articulated language, expressed through a symbolic…

  17. Advanced mobile satellite communications system using Ka and MM-wave bands in Japan's R and D satellite project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isobe, Shunkichi; Ohmori, Shingo; Hamamoto, Naokazu; Yamamoto, Minoru

    1991-01-01

    Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) studied an advanced mobile satellite communications system using Ka and millimeter-wave bands in the R&D Satellite project. The project started in 1990 and the satellite will be launched in 1997. On-board multi-beam interconnecting is one of basic functions to realize one-hop connection among Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSATs), mobile, and hand-held terminals in future mobile satellite communications system. An Intermediate Frequency (IF) filter bank and regenerative transponder are suitable for this function. The transponder configuration of an advanced mobile communications mission of the R&D Satellite for experiment is shown. High power transmitters of Ka and millimeter-wave bands, a 3x3 IF filter band and Single Channel Per Carrier/Time Division Multiplexing (SCPC/TDM) regenerative MODEMS, which will be boarded on the R&D Satellite, are being developed for the purpose of studying the feasibility of advanced mobile communications system.

  18. Advances in high-throughput speed, low-latency communication for embedded instrumentation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Jordan, Scott [Physik Instrumente

    2016-07-12

    Scott Jordan on "Advances in high-throughput speed, low-latency communication for embedded instrumentation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  19. A highly reliable, autonomous data communication subsystem for an advanced information processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagle, Gail; Masotto, Thomas; Alger, Linda

    1990-01-01

    The need to meet the stringent performance and reliability requirements of advanced avionics systems has frequently led to implementations which are tailored to a specific application and are therefore difficult to modify or extend. Furthermore, many integrated flight critical systems are input/output intensive. By using a design methodology which customizes the input/output mechanism for each new application, the cost of implementing new systems becomes prohibitively expensive. One solution to this dilemma is to design computer systems and input/output subsystems which are general purpose, but which can be easily configured to support the needs of a specific application. The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS), currently under development has these characteristics. The design and implementation of the prototype I/O communication system for AIPS is described. AIPS addresses reliability issues related to data communications by the use of reconfigurable I/O networks. When a fault or damage event occurs, communication is restored to functioning parts of the network and the failed or damage components are isolated. Performance issues are addressed by using a parallelized computer architecture which decouples Input/Output (I/O) redundancy management and I/O processing from the computational stream of an application. The autonomous nature of the system derives from the highly automated and independent manner in which I/O transactions are conducted for the application as well as from the fact that the hardware redundancy management is entirely transparent to the application.

  20. Advanced imaging in acute and chronic deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Karande, Gita Yashwantrao; Sanchez, Yadiel; Baliyan, Vinit; Mishra, Vishala; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) affecting the extremities is a common clinical problem. Prompt imaging aids in rapid diagnosis and adequate treatment. While ultrasound (US) remains the workhorse of detection of extremity venous thrombosis, CT and MRI are commonly used as the problem-solving tools either to visualize the thrombosis in central veins like superior or inferior vena cava (IVC) or to test for the presence of complications like pulmonary embolism (PE). The cross-sectional modalities also offer improved visualization of venous collaterals. The purpose of this article is to review the established modalities used for characterization and diagnosis of DVT, and further explore promising innovations and recent advances in this field. PMID:28123971

  1. Recent advances in tissue (pro)renin imaging.

    PubMed

    Prokai, Agnes; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2010-06-01

    Due to its pivotal role in blood pressure control and renal pathologies there is renewed interest in renin and its precursor prorenin. Also, the newly discovered (pro)renin receptor is a new element of the ever broadening renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The complexity of RAS including the recently recognized collecting duct site of (pro)renin (a term denoting both renin and prorenin) synthesis requires the use of advanced research techniques such as multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. With the help of this technology we have pioneered an imaging approach to directly visualize (pro)renin content, release and tissue activity in the living kidney. The use of this technology is reviewed here and exemplified by the direct visualization of (pro)renin activity in the collecting duct. New pharmacological tools, the renin inhibitor aliskiren and the handle region peptide (decoy peptide) was used to further characterize the intra-renal, collecting duct RAS.

  2. Recent advances in tissue (pro)renin imaging

    PubMed Central

    Prokai, Agnes; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2010-01-01

    1. ABSTRACT Due to its pivotal role in blood pressure control and renal pathologies there is renewed interest in renin and its precursor prorenin. Also, the newly discovered (pro)renin receptor is a new element of the ever broadening renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The complexity of RAS including the recently recognized collecting duct site of (pro)renin (a term denoting both renin and prorenin) synthesis requires the use of advanced research techniques such as multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. With the help of this technology we have pioneered an imaging approach to directly visualize (pro)renin content, release and tissue activity in the living kidney. The use of this technology is reviewed here and exemplified by the direct visualization of (pro)renin activity in the collecting duct. New pharmacological tools, the renin inhibitor aliskiren and the handle region peptide (decoy peptide) was used to further characterize the intra-renal, collecting duct RAS. PMID:20515794

  3. Recent advances in hydrogen peroxide imaging for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hengchang; Aleyasin, Hossein; Dickinson, Bryan C; Haskew-Layton, Renée E; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in physiological signaling as well as pathological conditions. However, the subtleties of peroxide-mediated signaling are not well understood, in part because the generation, degradation, and diffusion of H2O2 are highly volatile within different cellular compartments. Therefore, the direct measurement of H2O2 in living specimens is critically important. Fluorescent probes that can detect small changes in H2O2 levels within relevant cellular compartments are important tools to study the spatial dynamics of H2O2. To achieve temporal resolution, the probes must also be photostable enough to allow multiple readings over time without loss of signal. Traditional fluorescent redox sensitive probes that have been commonly used for the detection of H2O2 tend to react with a wide variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and often suffer from photostablilty issues. Recently, new classes of H2O2 probes have been designed to detect H2O2 with high selectivity. Advances in H2O2 measurement have enabled biomedical scientists to study H2O2 biology at a level of precision previously unachievable. In addition, new imaging techniques such as two-photon microscopy (TPM) have been employed for H2O2 detection, which permit real-time measurements of H2O2 in vivo. This review focuses on recent advances in H2O2 probe development and optical imaging technologies that have been developed for biomedical applications.

  4. The Impact of the Advancing Social-Communication and Play (ASAP) Intervention on Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Jessica R.; Boyd, Brian A.; Watson, Linda R.; Crais, Elizabeth R.; Baranek, Grace T.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates an intervention targeting social-communication and play skills (Advancing Social-communication And Play; ASAP) implemented by school staff in a public preschool setting. With increases in enrollment of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in school systems, establishing the effectiveness and feasibility of…

  5. The Impact of the Advancing Social-Communication and Play (ASAP) Intervention on Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Jessica R.; Boyd, Brian A.; Watson, Linda R.; Crais, Elizabeth R.; Baranek, Grace T.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates an intervention targeting social-communication and play skills (Advancing Social-communication and Play; ASAP) implemented by school staff in a public preschool setting. With increases in enrollment of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in school systems, establishing the effectiveness and feasibility of…

  6. Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Its Application to Traumatic Brain Injury: Basic Principles and Recent Advances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Its Application to Traumatic Brain Injury: Basic Principles and Recent Advances Ping-Hong Yeh1*, Terrence R. Oakes2,3...00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Its Application to Traumatic Brain Injury: Basic Principles and Recent Advances 5a...Gerard Riedy1,2,3,4 1Traumatic Brain Injury Image Analysis Lab, Henry Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Rockville, USA

  7. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles in advanced imaging and nanotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rajh, Tijana; Dimitrijevic, Nada M; Rozhkova, Elena A

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor photocatalysis using nanoparticulate TiO(2) has proven to be a promising technology for use in catalytic reactions, in the cleanup of water contaminated with hazardous industrial by-products, and in nanocrystalline solar cells as a photoactive material. Metal oxide semiconductor colloids are of considerable interest because of their photocatalytic properties. The coordination sphere of the surface metal atoms is incomplete and thus traps light-induced charges, but also exhibits high affinity for oxygen-containing ligands and gives the opportunity for chemical modification. We use enediol linkers, such as dopamine and its analogs, to bridge the semiconductors to biomolecules such as DNA or proteins. Nanobio hybrids that combine the physical robustness and chemical reactivity of nanoscale metal oxides with the molecular recognition and selectivity of biomolecules were developed. Control of chemical processes within living cells was achieved using TiO(2) nanocomposites in order to develop new tools for advanced nanotherapeutics. Here, we describe general experimental approaches for synthesis and characterization of high crystallinity, water soluble 5 nm TiO(2) particles and their nanobio composites, methods of cellular sample preparation for advanced Synchrotron-based imaging of nanoparticles in single cell X-ray fluorescence, and a detailed experimental setup for application of the high-performance TiO(2)-based nanobio photocatalyst for targeted lysis of cancerous or other disordered cells.

  8. Bio-image warehouse system: concept and implementation of a diagnosis-based data warehouse for advanced imaging modalities in neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Minati, L; Ghielmetti, F; Ciobanu, V; D'Incerti, L; Maccagnano, C; Bizzi, A; Bruzzone, M G

    2007-03-01

    Advanced neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), chemical shift spectroscopy imaging (CSI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) create novel challenges in terms of data storage and management: huge amounts of raw data are generated, the results of analysis may depend on the software and settings that have been used, and most often intermediate files are inherently not compliant with the current DICOM (digital imaging and communication in medicine) standard, as they contain multidimensional complex and tensor arrays and various other types of data structures. A software architecture, referred to as Bio-Image Warehouse System (BIWS), which can be used alongside a radiology information system/picture archiving and communication system (RIS/PACS) system to store neuroimaging data for research purposes, is presented. The system architecture is conceived with the purpose of enabling to query by diagnosis according to a predefined two-layered classification taxonomy. The operational impact of the system and the time needed to get acquainted with the web-based interface and with the taxonomy are found to be limited. The development of modules enabling automated creation of statistical templates is proposed.

  9. Advanced driver assistance system for AHS over communication links with random packet dropouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Seshadhri; Ayyagari, Ramakalyan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we propose an advanced driver assist system (ADAS) for platoon based automated highway system (AHS) with packet loss in inter-vehicle communication. Using the concept of rigidity, we first show that vehicles in a platoon tend to fall apart in the event of a packet loss among vehicles. To overcome this, we propose an estimation based dynamic platooning algorithm which employs the state estimate to maintain the platoon. Communication among the vehicle is reduced by using minimum spanning tree (MST) in state estimation algorithm. Effectiveness of the proposed ADAS scheme is illustrated by simulation wherein, dynamic platoons of holonomic vehicles with integrator dynamics are considered. Simulation studies indicate that the proposed algorithm maintains the platoon up to a packet loss rate of 48%. State transmission scheme proposed in our algorithm has three significant advantages, they are: (1) it handles packet loss in inter-vehicle communication, (2) reduces the effect of error in measured output, and (3) reduces the inter-vehicle communication. These advantages significantly increase the reliability and safety of the AHS.

  10. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) Network Control Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coney, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the performance of the network control function for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) very small aperture terminal (VSAT) full mesh network. This includes control of all operational activities such as acquisition, synchronization, timing and rain fade compensation as well as control of all communications activities such as on-demand integrated services (voice, video, and date) connects and disconnects Operations control is provided by an in-band orderwire carried in the baseboard processor (BBP) control burst, the orderwire burst, the reference burst, and the uplink traffic burst. Communication services are provided by demand assigned multiple access (DAMA) protocols. The ACTS implementation of DAMA protocols ensures both on-demand and integrated voice, video and data services. Communications services control is also provided by the in-band orderwire but uses only the reference burst and the uplink traffic burst. The performance of the ACTS network control functions have been successfully tested during on-orbit checkout and in various VSAT networks in day to day operations. This paper discusses the network operations and services control performance.

  11. Communication and decision support for children with advanced cancer and their families.

    PubMed

    Mack, Jennifer W; Feudtner, Chris; Hinds, Pamela S

    2012-01-01

    Clinician communication related to treatment decision making is a fundamentally important health care intervention and is often reported by parents of seriously ill children to be the most valued of clinician skills. Since different children and families have different communication styles and expectations, and since these may change over the course of the illness experience, one of the early and recurring tasks is to clarify and work with these diverse styles and expectations. Adopting a stance of compassionate desire to know more about patients and families, in addition to imparting information, is vital, and can be facilitated by following a general strategy of "ask, tell, ask." In addition to the exchange of information, communication between clinician and patient and family also involves the signaling and exchange of emotions, in which the pace, verbal inflection, and body language of the conversation are fundamental. Discussions about prognosis and goals of care, while needing to be handled in a gentle manner, should start early in the illness experience and be revised whenever there is a relapse or major complication. Children often want to participate in these conversations to a degree of their own choosing, which they themselves can clarify. Effective and empathetic clinician communication can greatly facilitate decision making and care for children with advanced cancer and their families, and provide a substantial source of comfort.

  12. Cine-magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of communication between middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts and cisterns.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, T; Taoka, T; Nikaido, Y; Shiomi, K; Fujimoto, T; Otsuka, H; Takeuchi, H

    1996-06-01

    Cine-magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations were performed in 10 patients with middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts to evaluate communication between the cysts and the normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space. Eight of 10 patients were evaluated by time of flight cine-MR imaging, and two by phase contrast cine-MR imaging. Two patients underwent membranectomy of the cysts, and were evaluated both pre- and postoperatively. Computed tomography cisternography was used to confirm communication between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns. Pulsatile fluid motion within the cysts was present in all patients. However, marked fluid motion and jet flow between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns were only observed in communicating cysts. In the two patients who underwent membranectomy, postoperative examination found greater fluid motion and jet flow not previously present. Cine-MR imaging demonstration of marked pulsatile fluid motion accompanied by jet flow suggests that a cyst communicates with the normal CSF space.

  13. Advanced communication satellites worldwide - Satellites of opportunity for the ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girardey, Catherine C.

    1993-01-01

    Space agencies worldwide are involved in advanced satellite communication systems. This paper presents an overview of these satellites and related technologies in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. They are geostationary satellites using high frequency bands such as K/Ka (20/30 GHz) and O-band (millimeter wave), as well as optical frequencies. The similarity of these programs demonstrate a common interest to develop large capacity satellite communication systems, and shows that closer international cooperation could be set up. The ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) project discussed here is such an example. The AMT's compatibility with satellites other than ACTS has been studied, and a proposed common experiment is presented here. The Japanese Engineering Test Satellite ETS-VI has been identified as the best initial 'satellite of opportunity' for AMT in this preliminary assessment.

  14. Advances in Ka-Band Communication System for CubeSats and SmallSats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegege, Obadiah; Wong, Yen F.; Altunc, Serhat

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed that evaluated the feasibility of Ka-band communication system to provide CubeSat/SmallSat high rate science data downlink with ground antennas ranging from the small portable 1.2m/2.4m to apertures 5.4M, 7.3M, 11M, and 18M, for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Lunar CubeSat missions. This study included link analysis to determine the data rate requirement, based on the current TRL of Ka-band flight hardware and ground support infrastructure. Recent advances in Ka-band transceivers and antennas, options of portable ground stations, and various coverage distances were included in the analysis. The link/coverage analysis results show that Cubesat/Smallsat missions communication requirements including frequencies and data rates can be met by utilizing Near Earth Network (NEN) Ka-band support with 2 W and high gain (>6 dBi) antennas.

  15. CCSDS Advanced Orbiting Systems - International data communications standards for the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Adrian J.

    1990-01-01

    Established in 1982, the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) is an international organization that is staffed by data-handling experts from nearly all of the world's major space agencies. Its goal is to develop standard data-communications techniques so that several agencies may cross-support each other's data flow and thus allow complex, international missions to be flown. Under the general umbrella of Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS), an international CCSDS task force was formed in 1985 to develop standard data-communications concepts for manned missions, such as the Space Station Freedom and the Hermes space plane, and large unmanned vehicles, such as polar orbiting platforms. The history of the CCSDS and the development of the AOS recommendation are reviewed, and the user services and protocols embodied in its systems architecture are introduced.

  16. Dissecting cell adhesion architecture using advanced imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Penny E

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins or to other cells is essential for the control of embryonic development, tissue integrity, immune function and wound healing. Adhesions are tightly spatially regulated structures containing over one hundred different proteins that coordinate both dynamics and signaling events at these sites. Extensive biochemical and morphological analysis of adhesion types over the past three decades has greatly improved understanding of individual protein contributions to adhesion signaling and, in some cases, dynamics. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that these diverse macromolecular complexes contain a variety of protein sub-networks, as well as distinct sub-domains that likely play important roles in regulating adhesion behavior. Until recently, resolving these structures, which are often less than a micron in size, was hampered by the limitations of conventional light microscopy. However, recent advances in optical techniques and imaging methods have revealed exciting insight into the intricate control of adhesion structure and assembly. Here we provide an overview of the recent data arising from such studies of cell:matrix and cell:cell contact and an overview of the imaging strategies that have been applied to study the intricacies and hierarchy of proteins within adhesions. PMID:21785274

  17. Advances in submicron infrared vibrational band chemical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragnea, Bogdan; Leone, Stephen R.

    The technique of infrared near-field microscopy with submicron resolution is an important addition to the chemical sciences arsenal in the last few years. Although related to highly successful scanning optical probe microscopies in the visible, infrared near-field microscopy had to overcome several obstacles, which slowed its development. This review illustrates the history as well as the state of the art of this new field, its limitations and perspectives. At present, two main experimental approaches have been successful: the apertureless metal tip approach and the fibre tip aperture approach. The two variants are compared from the point of view of resolution, ease of implementation in the laboratory and image formation mechanisms. The techniques using chemically specific vibrational absorption contrast are emphasized here, in the general context of chemical microscopy, which includes other methods such as chemical force, Raman and fluorescence microscopies. The phenomenon of surface-enhanced infrared absorption is also mentioned in relation to near-field infrared microscopy, with regard to important aspects of image formation and possible improvements. The main advantages of spatial resolution, chemical sensitivity, non-intrusiveness, minute amounts of specimen and the possibility of quantitative analytical measurements make infrared near-field microscopy a powerful tool. We also examine here possible future applications that go beyond the limits of classical vibrational microspectroscopy, as well as directions for additional advances.

  18. Advanced infrared detection and image processing for automated bat censusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Jeffery D.; Kunz, Tomas H.; Horn, Jason; Cleveland, Cutler; Petronio, Susan M.

    2003-09-01

    The Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis) forms some of the largest aggregations of mammals known to mankind. However, little is known about population sizes and nightly foraging activities. An advanced infrared (IR) thermal imaging system with a real time imaging and data acquisition system is described for censusing Brazilian free-tailed bats during nightly emergences at selected Texas caves. We developed a statistically-based algorithm suitable for counting emerging bats in columns with relative constant trajectories and velocities. Individual bats are not identified and tracked, but instead column density is calculated at intervals of 1/30th of a second and counts are accumulated based upon column velocity. Preliminary evaluation has shown this method to be far more accurate than those previously used to census large bat populations. This real-time automated censusing system allows us to make accurate and repeatable estimates of the number of bats present independent of colony size, ambient light, or weather conditions, and without causing disturbance to the colony.

  19. Sharpening advanced land imager multispectral data using a sensor model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemeshewsky, G.P.; ,

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) instrument on NASA's Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite provides for nine spectral bands at 30m ground sample distance (GSD) and a 10m GSD panchromatic band. This report describes an image sharpening technique where the higher spatial resolution information of the panchromatic band is used to increase the spatial resolution of ALI multispectral (MS) data. To preserve the spectral characteristics, this technique combines reported deconvolution deblurring methods for the MS data with highpass filter-based fusion methods for the Pan data. The deblurring process uses the point spread function (PSF) model of the ALI sensor. Information includes calculation of the PSF from pre-launch calibration data. Performance was evaluated using simulated ALI MS data generated by degrading the spatial resolution of high resolution IKONOS satellite MS data. A quantitative measure of performance was the error between sharpened MS data and high resolution reference. This report also compares performance with that of a reported method that includes PSF information. Preliminary results indicate improved sharpening with the method reported here.

  20. Advances in target imaging of deep Earth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Y.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Clouzet, P.

    2015-12-01

    A new generation of global tomographic models (Lekić and Romanowicz, 2011; French et al, 2013, 2014) has emerged with the development of accurate numerical wavefield computations in a 3D earth combined with access to enhanced HPC capabilities. These models have sharpened up mantle images and unveiled relatively small scale structures that were blurred out in previous generation models. Fingerlike structures have been found at the base of the oceanic asthenosphere, and vertically oriented broad low velocity plume conduits extend throughout the lower mantle beneath those major hotspots that are located within the perimeter of the deep mantle large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs). While providing new insights into our understanding of mantle dynamics, the detailed morphology of these features, requires further efforts to obtain higher resolution images. The focus of our ongoing effort is to develop advanced tomographic methods to image remote regions of the Earth at fine scales. We have developed an approach in which distant sources (located outside of the target region) are replaced by an equivalent set of local sources located at the border of the computational domain (Masson et al., 2014). A limited number of global simulations in a reference 3D earth model is then required. These simulations are computed prior to the regional inversion, while iterations of the model need to be performed only within the region of interest, potentially allowing us to include shorter periods at limited additional computational cost. Until now, the application was limited to a distribution of receivers inside the target region. This is particularly suitable for studies of upper mantle structure in regions with dense arrays (e.g. see our companion presentation Clouzet et al., this Fall AGU). Here we present our latest development that now can include teleseismic data recorded outside the imaged region. This allows us to perform regional waveform tomography in the situation where

  1. Advanced Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging System (AAHIS): an imaging spectrometer for maritime applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelker, Mark A.; Resmini, Ronald G.; Mooradian, Gregory C.; McCord, Thomas B.; Warren, Christopher P.; Fene, Michael W.; Coyle, Christopher C.; Anderson, Richard

    1995-06-01

    The Advanced Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging System (AAHIS) is a compact, lightweight visible and near IR pushbroom hyperspectral imaging spectrometer flown on a Piper Aztec aircraft. AAHIS is optimized for use in shallow water, littoral, and vegetation remote sensing. Data are collected at up to 55 frames/second and may be displayed and analyzed inflight or recorded for post-flight processing. Swath width is 200 meters at a flight altitude of 1 km. Each image pixel contains hyperspectral data simultaneously recorded in up to 288 contiguous spectral channels covering the 432 to 832 nm spectral region. Pixel binning typically yields pixels 1.0 meter square with a spectral channel width of 5.5 nm. Design and performance of the AAHIS is presented, including processed imagery demonstrating feature detection and materials discrimination on land and underwater at depths up to 27 meters.

  2. Radiological image transfer and communication within the BERKOM/RADKOM project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Matthias; Hunger, J.; Zendel, W.; Zwicker, C.; Felix, Roland; Pack, G.; Kuritke, D.

    1990-08-01

    In this radiologic communication project two PAC-systems were installed in two locations of one radiologic department of the Rudolf Virchow University Clinic lying about 10 km apart. The realisation of a well-operating PACS-to-PACS communication is related to a fast image- and video- data transfer and a command processing technic. The PACS-workstation has to enable the manipulation and post-processing technics known from CT-, MR- and DSA- imaging.

  3. Advanced digital modulation: Communication techniques and monolithic GaAs technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. G.; Oliver, J. D., Jr.; Kot, R. C.; Richards, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Communications theory and practice are merged with state-of-the-art technology in IC fabrication, especially monolithic GaAs technology, to examine the general feasibility of a number of advanced technology digital transmission systems. Satellite-channel models with (1) superior throughput, perhaps 2 Gbps; (2) attractive weight and cost; and (3) high RF power and spectrum efficiency are discussed. Transmission techniques possessing reasonably simple architectures capable of monolithic fabrication at high speeds were surveyed. This included a review of amplitude/phase shift keying (APSK) techniques and the continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) methods, of which MSK represents the simplest case.

  4. Imaging-Genetics in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Advances, Translational Impact, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Ameis, Stephanie H.; Szatmari, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) refers to a group of heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders that are unified by impairments in reciprocal social communication and a pattern of inflexible behaviors. Recent genetic advances have resolved some of the complexity of the genetic architecture underlying ASD by identifying several genetic variants that contribute to the disorder. Different etiological pathways associated with ASD may converge through effects on common molecular mechanisms, such as synaptogenesis, neuronal motility, and axonal guidance. Recently, with more sophisticated techniques, neuroimaging, and neuropathological studies have provided some consistency of evidence that altered structure, activity, and connectivity within complex neural networks is present in ASD, compared to typically developing children. The imaging-genetics approach promises to help bridge the gap between genetic variation, resultant biological effects on the brain, and production of complex neuropsychiatric symptoms. Here, we review recent findings from the developing field of imaging-genetics applied to ASD. Studies to date have indicated that relevant risk genes are associated with alterations in circuits that mediate socio-emotional, visuo-spatial, and language processing. Longitudinal studies ideally focused on early development, in conjunction with investigation for gene–gene, and gene–environment interactions may move the promise of imaging-genetics in ASD closer to the clinical domain. PMID:22615702

  5. [The CORBA solution of medical imaging and communication system].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Lü, Yangsheng; Yu, Hui

    2005-02-01

    Due to the difficulty of communication and information share between Medical information systems, the Object Management Group issued the software specification of CORBAMed, defining the interfaces of services, and specifying the software architecture of Medical Information System. This paper attempts to use CORBA in Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), provides a system model of CORBA solution of PACS, and analyzes the view layers structure of system, finally we discuss the related services of CORBAMed.

  6. The use of a picture archiving and communication system to catalogue visible-light photographic images.

    PubMed

    Silberzweig, James E; Khorsandi, Azita S; El-Shayal, Tarek; Abiri, Michael M

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that anatomic visible-light photographs can be catalogued using a system primarily intended for viewing radiographic images. One hundred four patients from April 2004 through November 2005 were evaluated for lower extremity venous insufficiency, lower extremity varicose veins, and/or telangiectasias. All consultation reports, duplex ultrasound reports with images, and lower extremity photographic images were archived in the radiology department's picture archiving and communication system. The picture archiving and communication system provides an electronic alternative to using a conventional, manual, or analog method of storing photographic images. Use of a picture archiving and communication system for the archiving of photographic images can be a valuable tool for an interventional radiologist's vein practice.

  7. Application of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Evaluation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Hillary J.; Dragoo, Jason L.; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Levenston, Marc E.; Gold, Garry E.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews current magnetic resonance imaging techniques for imaging the lower extremity, focusing on imaging of the knee, ankle, and hip joints. Recent advancements in MRI include imaging at 7 Tesla, using multiple receiver channels, T2* imaging, and metal suppression techniques, allowing more detailed visualization of complex anatomy, evaluation of morphological changes within articular cartilage, and imaging around orthopedic hardware. PMID:23622097

  8. Advances in multiscale theoretical analysis and imaging aspects of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shockro, Jennifer

    The work presented in this dissertation is focused on two aspects related to turbulent flow. The first of these is the one-dimensional theoretical analysis of the logarithmic spiral in terms of fractal dimension and spectrum. The second is on imaging methodologies and analysis of turbulent jet scalar interfaces in atmospheric conditions, with broad applicability to various studies where turbulence has a key role, such as urban contaminant dispersion or free space laser communications. The logarithmic spiral is of particular interest to studies of turbulence and natural phenomena as it appears frequently in nature with the "Golden Ratio" and is thought to play an important role in turbulent mixing. It is also an inherently anisotropic geometric structure and therefore provides information towards examining phenomena in which anisotropic properties might be expected to appear and is thought to be present as a structure within the fine scales of the turbulent hierarchy. In this work it is subjected to one-dimensional theoretical analysis, focusing on the development of a probability density function (pdf) for the spiral and the relation of the pdf to its fractal dimension. Results indicate that the logarithmic spiral does not have a constant fractal dimension and thus that it does not exhibit any form of self-similar statistical behavior, supporting previous theoretical suppositions about behavior at the fine scales within the turbulent hierarchy. A signal is developed from the pdf in order to evaluate its power spectrum. Results of this analysis provide information about the manner in which energy is carried at different scales of the spiral. To our knowledge, the logarithmic spiral in particular has not yet been examined in this fashion in literature. In order to further investigate this object, the multiscale minima meshless (M(3) ) method isextended and employed computationally to the two-dimensional logarithmic spiral as well as to experimental images of a

  9. Considerations when communicating with awake patients undergoing image-guided neuro-interventions

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Luigi; Di Paola, Francesco; Leonardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The authors empirically evaluated the context of intra-procedural physician-patient communication during imaging-guided procedures in a radiology/neuroradiology interventional clinical framework. Different intra-procedural communicative scenarios are reported. They conclude that the quality of intra-procedural physician-patient communication should be considered an important element of individual and team ethical and professional behaviour, able to strongly influence the therapeutic alliance. As for the whole medical communication strategy, an approach which takes into account the psychological and cultural background of the individual patient is preferred. PMID:26261155

  10. Advance Directives and Communication Skills of Prehospital Physicians Involved in the Care of Cardiovascular Patients.

    PubMed

    Gigon, Fabienne; Merlani, Paolo; Ricou, Bara

    2015-12-01

    Advance directives (AD) were developed to respect patient autonomy. However, very few patients have AD, even in cases when major cardiovascular surgery is to follow. To understand the reasons behind the low prevalence of AD and to help decision making when patients are incompetent, it is necessary to focus on the impact of prehospital practitioners, who may contribute to an increase in AD by discussing them with patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate self-rated communication skills and the attitudes of physicians potentially involved in the care of cardiovascular patients toward AD.Self-administered questionnaires were sent to general practitioners, cardiologists, internists, and intensivists, including the Quality of Communication Score, divided into a General Communication score (QOCgen 6 items) and an End-of-life Communication score (QOCeol 7 items), as well as questions regarding opinions and practices in terms of AD.One hundred sixty-four responses were received. QOCgen (mean (±SD)): 9.0/10 (1.0); QOCeol: 7.2/10 (1.7). General practitioners most frequently start discussions about AD (74/149 [47%]) and are more prone to designate their own specialty (30/49 [61%], P < 0.0001). Overall, only 57/159 (36%) physicians designated their own specialty; 130/158 (82%) physicians ask potential cardiovascular patients if they have AD and 61/118 (52%) physicians who care for cardiovascular patients talk about AD with some of them.The characteristics of physicians who do not talk about AD with patients were those who did not personally have AD and those who work in private practices.One hundred thirty-three (83%) physicians rated the systematic mention of patients' AD in the correspondence between physicians as good, while 114 (71%) at the patients' first registration in the private practice.Prehospital physicians rated their communication skills as good, whereas end-of-life communication was rated much lower. Only half of those surveyed speak about AD

  11. The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Bookbinder, Jay; Petre, Robert; Smith, Randall; Ptak, Andrew; Tananbaum, Harvey; Garcia, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Following recommendations from the 2010 "New Worlds, New Horizons" (NWNH) report, the Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) concept streamlines the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission to concentrate on the science objectives that are enabled by high-resolution spectroscopic capabilities. AXSIO will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin for tens of supermassive black holes (SMBH), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN during their peak activity, observe 5MBH out to redshift z=6, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, find the missing baryons in the cosmic web using background quasars, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes and supernovae inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. These measurements are enabled by a 0.9 sq m collecting area at 1.25 keV, a micro calorimeter array providing high-resolution spectroscopic imaging and a deployable high efficiency grating spectrometer. AXSIO delivers a 30-fold increase in effective area for high resolution spectroscopy. The key simplifications are guided by recommendations in the NWNH panel report include a reduction in focal length from 20m to 10m, eliminating the extendable optical bench, and a reduction in the instrument complement from six to two, avoiding a movable instrument platform. A focus on spectroscopic science allows the spatial resolution requirement to be relaxed to 10 arc sec (with a 5 arc sec goal). These simplifications decrease the total mission cost to under the $2B cost to NASA recommended by NWNH. AXSIO will be available to the entire astronomical community with observing allocations based on peer-review.

  12. Advances in automated deception detection in text-based computer-mediated communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Mark; Twitchell, Douglas P.; Burgoon, Judee K.; Nunamaker, Jay F., Jr.

    2004-08-01

    The Internet has provided criminals, terrorists, spies, and other threats to national security a means of communication. At the same time it also provides for the possibility of detecting and tracking their deceptive communication. Recent advances in natural language processing, machine learning and deception research have created an environment where automated and semi-automated deception detection of text-based computer-mediated communication (CMC, e.g. email, chat, instant messaging) is a reachable goal. This paper reviews two methods for discriminating between deceptive and non-deceptive messages in CMC. First, Document Feature Mining uses document features or cues in CMC messages combined with machine learning techniques to classify messages according to their deceptive potential. The method, which is most useful in asynchronous applications, also allows for the visualization of potential deception cues in CMC messages. Second, Speech Act Profiling, a method for quantifying and visualizing synchronous CMC, has shown promise in aiding deception detection. The methods may be combined and are intended to be a part of a suite of tools for automating deception detection.

  13. An advanced Ka band phased array communication system at commercial frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Lawrence; Kacpura, Thomas; Kershner, Dennis

    2000-01-01

    The Glenn Research Center (GRC) Direct Data Distribution (D3) project will demonstrate an advanced, high-performance communication system that transmits information from a technology payload carried by the Space Shuttle in low-Earth orbit (LEO) to a small receiving terminal on the Earth. The Shuttle-based communications package will utilize a solid-state, Ka-band phased array antenna that electronically steers the 19.05 Ghz RF signal toward a low-cost, tracking ground terminal, thereby providing agile, vibration-free, electronic steering at reduced size and weight with increased reliability. The project will also demonstrate new digital modulation and processing technology that will allow transmission of user/platform data at rates up to 1200 Mbits per second. This capability will enable the management of the substantially increased amounts of data to be collected from the International Space Station (ISS) or other LEO platforms directly to NASA field centers, principal investigators, or into the commercial terrestrial communications network. .

  14. Advanced imaging techniques for the study of plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Sozzani, Rosangela; Busch, Wolfgang; Spalding, Edgar P.; Benfey, Philip N.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of plant growth and development from living plants. Multi-level data, from macroscopic to molecular, and from weeks to seconds, can be acquired. Furthermore, advances in parallelized and automated image acquisition enable the throughput to capture images from large populations of plants under specific growth conditions. Image-processing capabilities allow for 3D or 4D reconstruction of image data and automated quantification of biological features. These advances facilitate the integration of imaging data with genome-wide molecular data to enable systems-level modeling. PMID:24434036

  15. Advanced imaging techniques for the study of plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Sozzani, Rosangela; Busch, Wolfgang; Spalding, Edgar P; Benfey, Philip N

    2014-05-01

    A variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of plant growth and development from living plants. Multi-level data, from macroscopic to molecular, and from weeks to seconds, can be acquired. Furthermore, advances in parallelized and automated image acquisition enable the throughput to capture images from large populations of plants under specific growth conditions. Image-processing capabilities allow for 3D or 4D reconstruction of image data and automated quantification of biological features. These advances facilitate the integration of imaging data with genome-wide molecular data to enable systems-level modeling.

  16. Design and performance of the EO-1 Advanced Land Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lencioni, Donald E.; Digenis, Constantine J.; Bicknell, William E.; Hearn, David R.; Mendenhall, Jeffrey A.

    1999-12-01

    An Advanced Land Imager (ALI) will be flown on the first Earth Observing mission (EO-1) under NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP). The ALI contains a number of key NMP technologies. These include a 15 degree wide field-of-view, push-broom instrument architecture with a 12.5 cm aperture diameter, compact multispectral detector arrays, non-cryogenic HgCdTe for the short wave infrared bands, silicon carbide optics, and a multi-level solar calibration technique. The focal plane contains multispectral and panchromatic (MS/Pan) detector arrays with a total of 10 spectral bands spanning the 0.4 to 2.5 micrometer wavelength region. Seven of these correspond to the heritage Landsat bands. The instantaneous fields of view of the detectors are 14.2 (mu) rad for the Pan band and 42.6 (mu) rad for the MS bands. The partially populated focal plane provides a 3 degree cross-track coverage corresponding to 37 km on the ground. The focal plane temperature is maintained at 220 K by means of a passive radiator. The instrument environmental and performance testing has been completed. Preliminary data analysis indicates excellent performance. This paper presents an overview of the instrument design, the calibration strategy, and results of the pre-flight performance measurements. It also discusses the potential impact of ALI technologies to future Landsat-like instruments.

  17. Recent Advances in Metabolic Profiling And Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Titus, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a metabolic disease. Cancer cells, being highly proliferative, show significant alterations in metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, respiration, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism. Metabolites like peptides, nucleotides, products of glycolysis, the TCA cycle, fatty acids, and steroids can be an important read out of disease when characterized in biological samples such as tissues and body fluids like urine, serum, etc. The cancer metabolome has been studied since the 1960s by analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Current research is focused on the identification and validation of biomarkers in the cancer metabolome that can stratify high-risk patients and distinguish between benign and advanced metastatic forms of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current state of prostate cancer metabolomics, the biomarkers that show promise in distinguishing indolent from aggressive forms of the disease, the strengths and limitations of the analytical techniques being employed, and future applications of metabolomics in diagnostic imaging and personalized medicine of prostate cancer. PMID:25632377

  18. Advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging: technology and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Bradford C

    2007-07-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a valuable method for use by clinical investigators to study task-related brain activation in patients with neurological or neuropsychiatric illness. Despite the relative infancy of the field, the rapid adoption of this functional neuroimaging technology has resulted from, among other factors, its ready availability, its relatively high spatial and temporal resolution, and its safety as a noninvasive imaging tool that enables multiple repeated scans over the course of a longitudinal study, and thus may lend itself well as a measure in clinical drug trials. Investigators have used fMRI to identify abnormal functional brain activity during task performance in a variety of patient populations, including those with neurodegenerative, demyelinating, cerebrovascular, and other neurological disorders that highlight the potential utility of fMRI in both basic and clinical spheres of research. In addition, fMRI studies reveal processes related to neuroplasticity, including compensatory hyperactivation, which may be a universally-occurring, adaptive neural response to insult. Functional MRI is being used to study the modulatory effects of genetic risk factors for neurological disease on brain activation; it is being applied to differential diagnosis, as a predictive biomarker of disease course, and as a means to identify neural correlates of neurotherapeutic interventions. Technological advances are rapidly occurring that should provide new applications for fMRI, including improved spatial resolution, which promises to reveal novel insights into the function of fine-scale neural circuitry of the human brain in health and disease.

  19. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager: Imaging Performance On-Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    This report analyzes the on-orbit imaging performance of the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on the Earth Observing-1 satellite. The pre-flight calibrations are first summarized. The methods used to reconstruct and geometrically correct the image data from this push-broom sensor are described. The method used here does not refer to the position and attitude telemetry from the spacecraft. Rather, it is assumed that the image of the scene moves across the focal plane with a constant velocity, which can be ascertained from the image data itself. Next, an assortment of the images so reconstructed is presented. Color images sharpened with the 10-m panchromatic band data are shown, and the algorithm for producing them from the 30-m multispectral data is described. The approach taken for assessing spatial resolution is to compare the sharpness of features in the on-orbit image data with profiles predicted on the basis of the pre-flight calibrations. A large assortment of bridge profiles is analyzed, and very good fits to the predicted shapes are obtained. Lunar calibration scans are analyzed to examine the sharpness of the edge-spread function at the limb of the moon. The darkness of the space beyond the limb is better for this purpose than anything that could be simulated on the ground. From these scans, we find clear evidence of scattering in the optical system, as well as some weak ghost images. Scans of planets and stars are also analyzed. Stars are useful point sources of light at all wavelengths, and delineate the point-spread functions of the system. From a quarter-speed scan over the Pleiades, we find that the ALI can detect 6th magnitude stars. The quality of the reconstructed images verifies the capability of the ALI to produce Landsat-type multi spectral data. The signal-to-noise and panchromatic spatial resolution are considerably superior to those of the existing Landsat sensors. The spatial resolution is confirmed to be as good as it was designed to be.

  20. Using Still Images for Written English Communication. Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, David John

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess student response to teaching English for written communication in a Japanese university context by using students' own photographs instead of textbooks. Thirty Japanese college freshmen English majors of similar ability studying writing receive monthly assignments to use their own photographs to write about…

  1. Imaging Multimodalities for Dissecting Alzheimer's Disease: Advanced Technologies of Positron Emission Tomography and Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shimojo, Masafumi; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya; Sahara, Naruhiko

    2015-01-01

    The rapid progress in advanced imaging technologies has expanded our toolbox for monitoring a variety of biological aspects in living subjects including human. In vivo radiological imaging using small chemical tracers, such as with positron emission tomography, represents an especially vital breakthrough in the efforts to improve our understanding of the complicated cascade of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), and it has provided the most reliable visible biomarkers for enabling clinical diagnosis. At the same time, in combination with genetically modified animal model systems, the most recent innovation of fluorescence imaging is helping establish diverse applications in basic neuroscience research, from single-molecule analysis to animal behavior manipulation, suggesting the potential utility of fluorescence technology for dissecting the detailed molecular-based consequence of AD pathophysiology. In this review, our primary focus is on a current update of PET radiotracers and fluorescence indicators beneficial for understanding the AD cascade, and discussion of the utility and pitfalls of those imaging modalities for future translational research applications. We will also highlight current cutting-edge genetic approaches and discuss how to integrate individual technologies for further potential innovations. PMID:26733795

  2. Antennas Designed for Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Project at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is to enable a communications infrastructure that provides the capacity, efficiency, and flexibility necessary to realize a mature free-flight environment. The technical thrust of the AC/ATM Project is targeted at the design, development, integration, test, and demonstration of enabling technologies for global broadband aeronautical communications. Since Ku-band facilities and equipment are readily available, one of the near-term demonstrations involves a link through a Kuband communications satellite. Two conformally mounted antennas will support the initial AC/ATM communications links. Both of these are steered electronically through monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifiers and phase shifters. This link will be asymmetrical with the downlink to the aircraft (mobile vehicle) at a throughput rate of greater than 1.5 megabits per second (Mbps), whereas the throughput rate of the uplink from the aircraft will be greater than 100 kilobits per second (kbps). The data on the downlink can be narrow-band, wide-band, or a combination of both, depending on the requirements of the experiment. The AC/ATM project is purchasing a phased-array Ku-band transmitting antenna for the uplink from the test vehicle. Many Ku-band receiving antennas have been built, and one will be borrowed for a short time to perform the initial experiments at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The Ku-band transmitting antenna is a 254-element MMIC phased-array antenna being built by Boeing Phantom Works. Each element can radiate 100 mW. The antenna is approximately 43-cm high by 24-cm wide by 3.3-cm thick. It can be steered beyond 60 from broadside. The beamwidth varies from 6 at broadside to 12 degrees at 60 degrees, which is typical of phased-array antennas. When the antenna is steered to 60 degrees, the beamwidth will illuminate

  3. HBOI Underwater Imaging and Communication Research - Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-19

    Matrix study Included in the Monte Carlo model ·were extra lines of code to track the number of scattering collisions that each simulated photon bundle...significant image quality improvement at high turbidity . At c=1.55m-1, there is factor of 10 improvement in CSNR for the SAl image. For clear water ...is noisier. Development and validation of one-way pulse stretching radiative transfer code The Metron Monte Carlo code was subjected to several sets

  4. HBOI Underwater Imaging and Communications Research - Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    together with validation results can be found in Dalgleish et al., (2010). 3 Forward scattering Mueller Matrix study Included in the Monte Carlo ...image quality improvement at high turbidity . At c=1.55m-1, there is factor of 10 improvement in CSNR for the SAI image. For clear water scenario (c...Development and validation of one-way pulse stretching radiative transfer code The Metron Monte Carlo code was subjected to several sets of

  5. HBOI Underwater Imaging and Communications Research - Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    techniques. The exact analytical solution and Monte Carlo simulations will be used to validate the multiple-scales approximation. Once the appropriate...electro-optical signals in turbid ocean environments. The models will be used to estimate pulse stretching and/or loss of modulation depth for user...8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 communications systems as a function of water Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs). The analytical nature of

  6. The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS): Science Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J.; Coppi, P.; Digel, S.; Funk, S.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Pohl, M.; Romani, R.; Vassiliev, V.; /UCLA

    2011-11-21

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS), a future gamma-ray telescope consisting of an array of {approx}50 atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes distributed over an area of {approx}1 km{sup 2}, will provide a powerful new tool for exploring the high-energy universe. The order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity and improved angular resolution could provide the first detailed images of {gamma}-ray emission from other nearby galaxies or galaxy clusters. The large effective area will provide unprecedented sensitivity to short transients (such as flares from AGNs and GRBs) probing both intrinsic spectral variability (revealing the details of the acceleration mechanism and geometry) as well as constraining the high-energy dispersion in the velocity of light (probing the structure of spacetime and Lorentz invariance). A wide field of view ({approx}4 times that of current instruments) and excellent angular resolution (several times better than current instruments) will allow for an unprecedented survey of the Galactic plane, providing a deep unobscured survey of SNRs, X-ray binaries, pulsar-wind nebulae, molecular cloud complexes and other sources. The differential flux sensitivity of {approx}10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} will rival the most sensitive X-ray instruments for these extended Galactic sources. The excellent capabilities of AGIS at energies below 100 GeV will provide sensitivity to AGN and GRBs out to cosmological redshifts, increasing the number of AGNs detected at high energies from about 20 to more than 100, permitting population studies that will provide valuable insights into both a unified model for AGN and a detailed measurement of the effects of intergalactic absorption from the diffuse extragalactic background light. A new instrument with fast-slewing wide-field telescopes could provide detections of a number of long-duration GRBs providing important physical constraints from this new spectral component. The new array will also have excellent

  7. [Dolichoectatic intracranial arteries. Advances in images and therapeutics].

    PubMed

    Casas Parera, I; Abruzzi, M; Lehkuniec, E; Schuster, G; Muchnik, S

    1995-01-01

    Dolichoectasia of intracranial arteries is an infrequent disease with an incidence less than 0.05% in general population. It represents 7% of all intracranial aneurysms. Commonly seen in middle age patients with severe atherosclerosis and hypertension, the affected arteries include the basilar artery, supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery, middle, anterior and posterior cerebral arteries; males are more frequently affected. The clinical features of these fusiform aneurysms are divided in three categories: ische-mic, cranial nerve compression and signs from mass effect. Hemorrhage may also occur. Nine patients with symptomatic cerebral blood vessel dolichoectasias are presented. Six of them were males with moderate or severe hypertension. Lesions were confined to the basilar artery in 3 cases, carotid arteries and the middle cerebral artery in 1 case, and both systems were affected in 4 patients. Middle cerebral arteries were affected in 5 cases and the anterior cerebral artery in one. An isolated fusiform aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery is also presented (case 8) (Table 3). Motor or sensory deficits, ataxia, dementia, hemifacial spasm and parkinsonism were observed. One patient died from cerebro-meningeal hemorrhage (Table 2). All patients were studied with computerized axial tomography of the brain, 5 cases with four vessel cerebral angiography, 4 cases with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and case 5 with MRI angiography. Clinical symptoms depend on the affected vascular territory, size of the aneurysm and compression of adjacent structures. The histopathologic findings are atheromatous lesions, disruption of the internal elastic membrane and fibrosis of the muscular wall. The resultant is a diffuse deficiency of the muscular wall and the internal elastic membrane. Recent advances in neuroimaging such as better resolution of CT scan, magnetic resonance images (MRI) and MRI angiography increased the diagnosis of this pathology showing

  8. MO-DE-202-02: Advances in Image Registration and Reconstruction for Image-Guided Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Siewerdsen, J

    2016-06-01

    At least three major trends in surgical intervention have emerged over the last decade: a move toward more minimally invasive (or non-invasive) approach to the surgical target; the development of high-precision treatment delivery techniques; and the increasing role of multi-modality intraoperative imaging in support of such procedures. This symposium includes invited presentations on recent advances in each of these areas and the emerging role for medical physics research in the development and translation of high-precision interventional techniques. The four speakers are: (1) Keyvan Farahani, "Image-guided focused ultrasound surgery and therapy" (2) Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, "Advances in image registration and reconstruction for image-guided neurosurgery" (3) Tina Kapur, "Image-guided surgery and interventions in the advanced multimodality image-guided operating (AMIGO) suite" (4) Raj Shekhar, "Multimodality image-guided interventions: Multimodality for the rest of us" Learning Objectives: 1. Understand the principles and applications of HIFU in surgical ablation. 2. Learn about recent advances in 3D-2D and 3D deformable image registration in support of surgical safety and precision. 3. Learn about recent advances in model-based 3D image reconstruction in application to intraoperative 3D imaging. 4. Understand the multi-modality imaging technologies and clinical applications investigated in the AMIGO suite. 5. Understand the emerging need and techniques to implement multi-modality image guidance in surgical applications such as neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology. Research supported by the NIH and Siemens Healthcare.; J. Siewerdsen; Grant Support - National Institutes of Health; Grant Support - Siemens Healthcare; Grant Support - Carestream Health; Advisory Board - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Elekta Oncology.; T. Kapur, P41EB015898; R. Shekhar, Funding: R42CA137886 and

  9. DICOM image secure communications with Internet protocols IPv6 and IPv4.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianguo; Yu, Fenghai; Sun, Jianyong; Yang, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chenwen

    2007-01-01

    Image-data transmission from one site to another through public network is usually characterized in term of privacy, authenticity, and integrity. In this paper, we first describe a general scenario about how image is delivered from one site to another through a wide-area network (WAN) with security features of data privacy, integrity, and authenticity. Second, we give the common implementation method of the digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) image communication software library with IPv6/IPv4 for high-speed broadband Internet by using open-source software. Third, we discuss two major security-transmission methods, the IP security (IPSec) and the secure-socket layer (SSL) or transport-layer security (TLS), being used currently in medical-image-data communication with privacy support. Fourth, we describe a test schema of multiple-modality DICOM-image communications through TCP/IPv4 and TCP/IPv6 with different security methods, different security algorithms, and operating systems, and evaluate the test results. We found that there are tradeoff factors between choosing the IPsec and the SSL/TLS-based security implementation of IPv6/IPv4 protocols. If the WAN networks only use IPv6 such as in high-speed broadband Internet, the choice is IPsec-based security. If the networks are IPv4 or the combination of IPv6 and IPv4, it is better to use SSL/TLS security. The Linux platform has more security algorithms implemented than the Windows (XP) platform, and can achieve better performance in most experiments of IPv6 and IPv4-based DICOM-image communications. In teleradiology or enterprise-PACS applications, the Linux operating system may be the better choice as peer security gateways for both the IPsec and the SSL/TLS-based secure DICOM communications cross public networks.

  10. Design and Development of a Baseband Processor for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kerry D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the operational baseband processor (BBP) subsystem on board the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The BBP supports the network consisting of the NASA ground station (NGS) low burst rate (LBR) terminals, and the T1 very small aperture terminals (VSAT's), to provide flexible, demand assigned satellite switched (SS), baseband processed frequency division modulated (FDM)/time division multiple access (TDMA) operations. This paper presents an overview of the baseband processor and includes a description of the data flow, functional block diagrams, and a discussion of the implementation of BBP. A discussion of the supporting technologies for the BBP is presented. A brief summary of BBP-level performance testing is also presented. Finally, a discussion of the implications of current technology on the BBP design, if it were to be developed today, is presented.

  11. An experiment in remote manufacturing using the advanced communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsatsoulis, Costas; Frost, Victor

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the completed project was to develop an experiment in remote manufacturing that would use the capabilities of the ACTS satellite. A set of possible experiments that could be performed using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), and which would perform remote manufacturing using a laser cutter and an integrated circuit testing machine are described in detail. The proposed design is shown to be a feasible solution to the offered problem and it takes into consideration the constraints that were placed on the experiment. In addition, we have developed two more experiments that are included in this report: backup of rural telecommunication networks, and remote use of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data analysis for on-site collection of glacier scattering data in the Antarctic.

  12. The Integrated Safety-Critical Advanced Avionics Communication and Control (ISAACC) System Concept: Infrastructure for ISHM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Briscoe, Jeri M.

    2005-01-01

    Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) architectures for spacecraft will include hard real-time, critical subsystems and soft real-time monitoring subsystems. Interaction between these subsystems will be necessary and an architecture supporting multiple criticality levels will be required. Demonstration hardware for the Integrated Safety-Critical Advanced Avionics Communication & Control (ISAACC) system has been developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. It is a modular system using a commercially available time-triggered protocol, ?Tp/C, that supports hard real-time distributed control systems independent of the data transmission medium. The protocol is implemented in hardware and provides guaranteed low-latency messaging with inherent fault-tolerance and fault-containment. Interoperability between modules and systems of modules using the TTP/C is guaranteed through definition of messages and the precise message schedule implemented by the master-less Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) communications protocol. "Plug-and-play" capability for sensors and actuators provides automatically configurable modules supporting sensor recalibration and control algorithm re-tuning without software modification. Modular components of controlled physical system(s) critical to control algorithm tuning, such as pumps or valve components in an engine, can be replaced or upgraded as "plug and play" components without modification to the ISAACC module hardware or software. ISAACC modules can communicate with other vehicle subsystems through time-triggered protocols or other communications protocols implemented over Ethernet, MIL-STD- 1553 and RS-485/422. Other communication bus physical layers and protocols can be included as required. In this way, the ISAACC modules can be part of a system-of-systems in a vehicle with multi-tier subsystems of varying criticality. The goal of the ISAACC architecture development is control and monitoring of safety critical systems of a

  13. The Link Evaluation Terminal for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite Experiments Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Brian D.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental NASA satellite, Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), introduces new technology for high throughput 30 to 20 GHz satellite services. Contained in a single communication payload is both a regenerative TDMA system and multiple 800 MHz 'bent pipe' channels routed to spot beams by a switch matrix. While only one mode of operation is typical during any experiment, both modes can operate simultaneously with reduced capability due to sharing of the transponder. NASA-Lewis instituted a ground terminal development program in anticipation of the satellite launch to verify the performance of the switch matrix mode of operations. Specific functions are built into the ground terminal to evaluate rain fade compensation with uplink power control and to monitor satellite transponder performance with bit error rate measurements. These functions were the genesis of the ground terminal's name, Link Evaluation Terminal, often referred to as LET. Connectors are included in LET that allow independent experimenters to run unique modulation or network experiments through ACTS using only the RF transmit and receive portions of LET. Test data indicate that LET will be able to verify important parts of ACTS technology and provide independent experimenters with a useful ground terminal. Lab measurements of major subsystems integrated into LET are presented. Bit error rate is measured with LET in an internal loopback mode.

  14. The link evaluation terminal for the advanced communications technology satellite experiments program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Brian D.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental NASA satellite, Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), introduces new technology for high throughput 30 to 20 GHz satellite services. Contained in a single communication payload is both a regenerative TDMA system and multiple 800 MHz 'bent pipe' channels routed to spot beams by a switch matrix. While only one mode of operation is typical during any experiment, both modes can operate simultaneously with reduced capability due to sharing of the transponder. NASA-Lewis instituted a ground terminal development program in anticipation of the satellite launch to verify the performance of the switch matrix mode of operations. Specific functions are built into the ground terminal to evaluate rain fade compensation with uplink power control and to monitor satellite transponder performance with bit error rate measurements. These functions were the genesis of the ground terminal's name, Link Evaluation Terminal, often referred to as LET. Connectors are included in LET that allow independent experimenters to run unique modulation or network experiments through ACTS using only the RF transmit and receive portions of LET. Test data indicate that LET will be able to verify important parts of ACTS technology and provide independent experimenters with a useful ground terminal. Lab measurements of major subsystems integrated into LET are presented. Bit error rate is measured with LET in an internal loopback mode.

  15. Globalization and advances in information and communication technologies: the impact on nursing and health.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Patricia A; Coenen, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Globalization and information and communication technology (ICT) continue to change us and the world we live in. Nursing stands at an opportunity intersection where challenging global health issues, an international workforce shortage, and massive growth of ICT combine to create a very unique space for nursing leadership and nursing intervention. Learning from prior successes in the field can assist nurse leaders in planning and advancing strategies for global health using ICT. Attention to lessons learned will assist in combating the technological apartheid that is already present in many areas of the globe and will highlight opportunities for innovative applications in health. ICT has opened new channels of communication, creating the beginnings of a global information society that will facilitate access to isolated areas where health needs are extreme and where nursing can contribute significantly to the achievement of "Health for All." The purpose of this article is to discuss the relationships between globalization, health, and ICT, and to illuminate opportunities for nursing in this flattening and increasingly interconnected world.

  16. High security chaotic multiple access scheme for visible light communication systems with advanced encryption standard interleaving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Junchao; Zhang, Lin; Li, Diyang; Liu, Xingcheng

    2016-06-01

    Chaotic sequences can be applied to realize multiple user access and improve the system security for a visible light communication (VLC) system. However, since the map patterns of chaotic sequences are usually well known, eavesdroppers can possibly derive the key parameters of chaotic sequences and subsequently retrieve the information. We design an advanced encryption standard (AES) interleaving aided multiple user access scheme to enhance the security of a chaotic code division multiple access-based visible light communication (C-CDMA-VLC) system. We propose to spread the information with chaotic sequences, and then the spread information is interleaved by an AES algorithm and transmitted over VLC channels. Since the computation complexity of performing inverse operations to deinterleave the information is high, the eavesdroppers in a high speed VLC system cannot retrieve the information in real time; thus, the system security will be enhanced. Moreover, we build a mathematical model for the AES-aided VLC system and derive the theoretical information leakage to analyze the system security. The simulations are performed over VLC channels, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness and high security of our presented AES interleaving aided chaotic CDMA-VLC system.

  17. Optical techniques for signal distribution and control in advanced radar and communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, J. R.

    1985-03-01

    It is concluded that optical techniques offer some advantages for signal distribution and control in advanced radar and communication systems. They are clearly ideal for transporting microwave signals over considerable distances, as in remote positioning of radar receivers, provided high dynamic range is not required and an enclosed transmission path is essential. They are an elegant means of distributing low level r.f. or i.f. signals around an active phased array where these signals are of relatively constant amplitude (as in mixer local oscillator applications). However, there is currently a rather restrictive limit on the size of distribution network possible. Optical techniques are obviously suitable for distributing digital control signals to phased array modules and confer considerable immunity to interference. They are less suitable for high dynamic range signals, such as the received radar returns, either at r.f. or when downcovered to i.f. Future developments in coherent optics or in fast optical A/D technology could, however, influence this conclusion. Currently, the optimum applications for optical techniques appear to be i.f. beamformers for multibeam communication satellite systems and in calibration/monitoring systems for phased arrays.

  18. Communication: Neutral atom imaging using a pulsed electromagnetic lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jamie R.; Anciaux, Erik M.; Raizen, Mark G.

    2017-02-01

    We report on progress towards a neutral atom imaging device that will be used for chemically sensitive surface microscopy and nanofabrication. Our novel technique for improving refractive power and correcting chromatic aberration in atom lenses is based on a fundamental paradigm shift from continuous-beam focusing to a pulsed, three-dimensional approach. Simulations of this system suggest that it will pave the way toward the long-sought goal of true atom imaging on the nanoscale. Using a prototype lens with a supersonic beam of metastable neon, we have imaged complex patterns with lower distortion and higher resolution than has been shown in any previous experiment. Comparison with simulations corroborates the underlying theory and encourages further refinement of the process.

  19. English 591, 592, and 593--Advance Program: Images of Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County Board of Education, Louisville, KY.

    For those students who qualify, the Advance Program offers an opportunity to follow a stimulating curriculum designed for the academically talented. The purposes of the course outlined in this guide for twelfth grade English are to bring the previous three years' studies in Advance Program English to a meaningful culmination; to provide a…

  20. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, Donald D.

    1990-01-01

    Communication in its many forms is a critical component for an effective Space Grant Program. Good communication is needed within individual Space Grant College/Consortia, for example between consortium affiliates and the consortium program office. Effective communication between the several programs, NASA Headquarters, and NASA field centers also is required. Further, communication among the above program elements, industry, local and state government, and the public also are necessary for meeting program objectives.

  1. Recent advances in CZT strip detectors and coded mask imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Gruber, D. E.; Heindl, W. A.; Pelling, M. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Rothschild, R. E.; Skelton, R. T.; Hink, P. L.; Slavis, K. R.; Binns, W. R.; Tumer, T.; Visser, G.

    1999-09-01

    The UCSD, WU, UCR and Nova collaboration has made significant progress on the necessary techniques for coded mask imaging of gamma-ray bursts: position sensitive CZT detectors with good energy resolution, ASIC readout, coded mask imaging, and background properties at balloon altitudes. Results on coded mask imaging techniques appropriate for wide field imaging and localization of gamma-ray bursts are presented, including a shadowgram and deconvolved image taken with a prototype detector/ASIC and MURA mask. This research was supported by NASA Grants NAG5-5111, NAG5-5114, and NGT5-50170.

  2. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Alan

    An informal introduction to the study of communication deals with the major topics in the field. It presents basic theories of communication and language, reviews how language takes on meaning, explains the stimulus-response and Piaget theories of learning, and presents major theories dealing with communications and society. These theories include…

  3. Imaging of CNS Tumors in Children: Advances and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Vézina, Louis-Gilbert

    2009-01-01

    MR technology is constantly improving. Functional imaging techniques such as MR spectroscopy, perfusion imaging, diffusion imaging and diffusion tensor imaging are increasingly utilized in the pediatric patient with a brain tumor. However estimate of tumor size remains the primary imaging endpoint in the evaluation of response to treatment; validation across institutions and vendor platforms of MRI functional parameters is necessary given the relative uncommon occurrence of brain tumors in children. Pediatric neuroimaging can be challenging, and the optimal way to image children with CNS tumors is not uniformly applied across all centers. Application of proper scanning techniques and validation of functional imaging techniques should lead to improved care of children with CNS tumors PMID:18952579

  4. Renewable Energy SCADA/Training Using NASA's Advanced Technology Communication Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalu, A.; Emrich, C.; Ventre, G.; Wilson, W.; Acosta, Roberto (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The lack of electrical energy in the rural communities of developing countries is well known, as is the economic unfeasibility of providing much needed energy to these regions via electric grids. Renewable energy (RE) can provide an economic advantage over conventional forms in meeting some of these energy needs. The use of a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) arrangement via satellite could enable experts at remote locations to provide technical assistance to local trainees while they acquire a measure of proficiency with a newly installed RE system through hands-on training programs using the same communications link. Upon full mastery of the technologies, indigenous personnel could also employ similar SCADA arrangements to remotely monitor and control their constellation of RE systems. Two separate ACTS technology verification experiments (TVEs) have demonstrated that the portability of the Ultra Small Aperture Terminal (USAT) and the versatility of NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), as well as the advantages of Ka band satellites, can be invaluable in providing energy training via distance education (DE), and for implementing renewable energy system SCADA. What has not been tested is the capabilities of these technologies for a simultaneous implementation of renewable energy DE and SCADA. Such concurrent implementations will be useful for preparing trainees in developing countries for their eventual SCADA operations. The project described in this correspondence is the first effort, to our knowledge, in this specific TVE. The setup for this experiment consists of a one-Watt USAT located at Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) connected to two satellite modems tuned to different frequencies to establish two duplex ACTS Ka-band communication channels. A short training program on operation and maintenance of the system will be delivered while simultaneously monitoring and controlling the hybrid using the same satellite

  5. Recent Advances in Compressed Sensing: Discrete Uncertainty Principles and Fast Hyperspectral Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    medical imaging , e.g., magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Since the early 1980s, MRI has granted doctors the ability to distinguish between healthy tissue...chemical composition of a star. Conventional hyperspectral cameras are slow. Different methods of hyperspectral imaging either require time to process ...Recent Advances in Compressed Sensing: Discrete Uncertainty Principles and Fast Hyperspectral Imaging THESIS MARCH 2015 Megan E. Lewis, Second

  6. SHORT COMMUNICATION: An image processing approach to calibration of hydrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorefice, S.; Malengo, A.

    2004-06-01

    The usual method adopted for multipoint calibration of glass hydrometers is based on the measurement of the buoyancy by hydrostatic weighing when the hydrometer is plunged in a reference liquid up to the scale mark to be calibrated. An image processing approach is proposed by the authors to align the relevant scale mark with the reference liquid surface level. The method uses image analysis with a data processing technique and takes into account the perspective error. For this purpose a CCD camera with a pixel matrix of 604H × 576V and a lens of 16 mm focal length were used. High accuracy in the hydrometer reading was obtained as the resulting reading uncertainty was lower than 0.02 mm, about a fifth of the usual figure with the visual reading made by an operator.

  7. Expanding uses of ambient noise for imaging, detection, and communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, John R.; Malod, Laurent

    2002-11-01

    The use of ambient noise to sense the marine environment has a human history of only two decades. Starting with incoherent processing inspired by optical analogies such as Acoustic Daylight (TM), the exploration of the potential for ambient noise to provide useful information about the environment has blossomed into many related areas and diverse algorithms with connections to multistatic active sonar, classic passive sonar, communications, matched field processing and others. This presentation will introduce some recent work in these areas and attempt to draw together how the use of ambient noise, both by mankind and marine animals, is beginning to form a more complete picture of the potential of this exciting area of research. [Work supported by the Defence Science and Technology Agency, Singapore.

  8. Acquisition, Tracking, and Pointing Using Earth Thermal Images for Deep Space Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Gerry G.; Lee, Shinhak

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of using long wavelength Earth thermal (infrared) images for telescope tracking/pointing application. for both Deep Space Free- pace Optical Communications has been investigated and is reported her. The advantage of this technology rests on using full Earth images in this band, which yield more accurate estimates of geometric centroids than that of Earth images in the visible band. Another major advantage is that these images are nearly independent of Earth phase angle. The results of the study show that at a Mars range, with currently available sensors, a noise equivalent angle of 10 to 150 nanoradians and a bias error of better than 80 nanoradians can be obtained. This enables precise pointing of the optical communications beam for high data rate links.

  9. Advanced endoscopic imaging: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Technology Review.

    PubMed

    East, James E; Vleugels, Jasper L; Roelandt, Philip; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bisschops, Raf; Dekker, Evelien; Hassan, Cesare; Horgan, Gareth; Kiesslich, Ralf; Longcroft-Wheaton, Gaius; Wilson, Ana; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-11-01

    Background and aim: This technical review is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the utilization of advanced endoscopic imaging in gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. Methods: This technical review is based on a systematic literature search to evaluate the evidence supporting the use of advanced endoscopic imaging throughout the GI tract. Technologies considered include narrowed-spectrum endoscopy (narrow band imaging [NBI]; flexible spectral imaging color enhancement [FICE]; i-Scan digital contrast [I-SCAN]), autofluorescence imaging (AFI), and confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendation and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations:1. We suggest advanced endoscopic imaging technologies improve mucosal visualization and enhance fine structural and microvascular detail. Expert endoscopic diagnosis may be improved by advanced imaging, but as yet in community-based practice no technology has been shown consistently to be diagnostically superior to current practice with high definition white light. (Low quality evidence.) 2. We recommend the use of validated classification systems to support the use of optical diagnosis with advanced endoscopic imaging in the upper and lower GI tracts (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3. We suggest that training improves performance in the use of advanced endoscopic imaging techniques and that it is a prerequisite for use in clinical practice. A learning curve exists and training alone does not guarantee sustained high performances in clinical practice. (Weak recommendation, low quality evidence.) Conclusion: Advanced endoscopic imaging can improve mucosal visualization and endoscopic diagnosis; however it requires training and the use of validated classification systems.

  10. Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    BPL Global

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at

  11. Recent Advances in Image Assisted Neurosurgical Procedures: Improved Navigational Accuracy and Patient Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Olivi, Alessandro, M.D.

    2010-08-28

    Neurosurgical procedures require precise planning and intraoperative support. Recent advances in image guided technology have provided neurosurgeons with improved navigational support for more effective and safer procedures. A number of exemplary cases will be presented.

  12. Recent Advances in Image Assisted Neurosurgical Procedures: Improved Navigational Accuracy and Patient Safety

    ScienceCinema

    Olivi, Alessandro, M.D.

    2016-07-12

    Neurosurgical procedures require precise planning and intraoperative support. Recent advances in image guided technology have provided neurosurgeons with improved navigational support for more effective and safer procedures. A number of exemplary cases will be presented.

  13. Advanced Concepts in Multi-Dimensional Radiation Detection and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Kai; Haefner, Andy; Barnowski, Ross; Pavlovsky, Ryan; Torii, Tatsuo; Sanada, Yukihisa; Shikaze, Yoshiaki

    Recent developments in the detector fabrication, signal readout, and data processing enable new concepts in radiation detection that are relevant for applications ranging from fundamental physics to medicine as well as nuclear security and safety. We present recent progress in multi-dimensional radiation detection and imaging in the Berkeley Applied Nuclear Physics program. It is based on the ability to reconstruct scenes in three dimensions and fuse it with gamma-ray image information. We are using the High-Efficiency Multimode Imager HEMI in its Compton imaging mode and combining it with contextual sensors such as the Microsoft Kinect or visual cameras. This new concept of volumetric imaging or scene data fusion provides unprecedented capabilities in radiation detection and imaging relevant for the detection and mapping of radiological and nuclear materials. This concept brings us one step closer to the seeing the world with gamma-ray eyes.

  14. MO-C-BRE-01: The WMIS-AAPM Joint Symposium: Advances in Molecular Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Contag, C; Pogue, B; Lewis, J

    2014-06-15

    This joint symposium of the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS) and the AAPM includes three luminary speakers discussing work in new paradigms of molecular imaging in cancer (Contag), applications of optical imaging technologies to radiation therapy (Pogue) and an update on PET imaging as a surrogate biomarker for cancer progression and response to therapy. Learning Objectives: Appreciate the current trends in molecular and systems imaging. Understand how optical imaging technologies, and particularly Cerenkov detectors, can be used in advancing radiation oncology. Stay current on new PET tracers - and targets - of interest in cancer treatment.

  15. Carbon nanotubes for biomedical imaging: the recent advances.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hua; Peng, Rui; Liu, Zhuang

    2013-12-01

    This article reviews the latest progresses regarding the applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), as multifunctional nano-probes for biomedical imaging. Utilizing the intrinsic band-gap fluorescence of semi-conducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), fluorescence imaging in the near infrared II (NIR-II) region with enhanced tissue penetration and spatial resolution has shown great promise in recent years. Raman imaging based on the resonance Raman scattering of SWNTs has also been explored by a number of groups for in vitro and in vivo imaging of biological samples. The strong absorbance of CNTs in the NIR region can be used for photoacoustic imaging, and their photoacoustic signals can be dramatically enhanced by adding organic dyes, or coating with gold shells. Taking advantages of metal nanoparticle impurities attached to nanotubes, CNTs can also serve as a T2-contrast agent in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In addition, when labeled with radioactive isotopes, many groups have developed nuclear imaging with functionalized CNTs. Therefore CNTs are unique imaging probes with great potential in biomedical multimodal imaging.

  16. IR camera system with an advanced image processing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Syuichi; Tamura, Tetsuo

    2016-05-01

    We have developed image processing technologies for resolving issues caused by the inherent UFPA (uncooled focal plane array) sensor characteristics to spread its applications. For example, large time constant of an uncooled IR (infra-red) sensor limits its application field, because motion blur is caused in monitoring the objective moving at high speed. The developed image processing technologies can eliminate the blur and retrieve almost the equivalent image observed in still motion. This image processing is based on the idea that output of the IR sensor is construed as the convolution of radiated IR energy from the objective and impulse response of the IR sensor. With knowledge of the impulse response and moving speed of the objective, the IR energy from the objective can be de-convolved from the observed images. We have successfully retrieved the image without blur using the IR sensor of 15 ms time constant under the conditions in which the objective is moving at the speed of about 10 pixels/60 Hz. The image processing for reducing FPN (fixed pattern noise) has also been developed. UFPA having the responsivity in the narrow wavelength region, e.g., around 8 μm is appropriate for measuring the surface of glass. However, it suffers from severe FPN due to lower sensitivity compared with 8-13 μm. The developed image processing exploits the images of the shutter itself, and can reduce FPN significantly.

  17. Sub-component modeling for face image reconstruction in video communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiell, Derek J.; Xiao, Jing; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K.

    2008-08-01

    Emerging communications trends point to streaming video as a new form of content delivery. These systems are implemented over wired systems, such as cable or ethernet, and wireless networks, cell phones, and portable game systems. These communications systems require sophisticated methods of compression and error-resilience encoding to enable communications across band-limited and noisy delivery channels. Additionally, the transmitted video data must be of high enough quality to ensure a satisfactory end-user experience. Traditionally, video compression makes use of temporal and spatial coherence to reduce the information required to represent an image. In many communications systems, the communications channel is characterized by a probabilistic model which describes the capacity or fidelity of the channel. The implication is that information is lost or distorted in the channel, and requires concealment on the receiving end. We demonstrate a generative model based transmission scheme to compress human face images in video, which has the advantages of a potentially higher compression ratio, while maintaining robustness to errors and data corruption. This is accomplished by training an offline face model and using the model to reconstruct face images on the receiving end. We propose a sub-component AAM modeling the appearance of sub-facial components individually, and show face reconstruction results under different types of video degradation using a weighted and non-weighted version of the sub-component AAM.

  18. Gynecologic tumors: how to communicate imaging results to the surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Calareso, Giuseppina; De Maria, Federica; Zanagnolo, Vanna; Lazzari, Roberta; Cecconi, Agnese; Bellomi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Gynecologic cancers are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for female patients, with an estimated 88,750 new cancer cases and 29,520 deaths in the United States in 2012. To offer the best treatment options to patients it is important that the radiologist, surgeon, radiation oncologist, and gynecologic oncologist work together with a multidisciplinary approach. Using the available diagnostic imaging modalities, the radiologist must give appropriate information to the surgeon in order to plan the best surgical approach and its timing. PMID:24434038

  19. Molecular Engineering of Vector-Based Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lily Wu, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...SUBTITLE Molecular Engineering of Vector-based Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Advanced Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT...reproductions will be in black and white. 14. ABSTRACT Hormone refractory and metastatic prostate cancer are not well understood. Better animal models

  20. Image-based interactive device for effective communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, F.; Nielsen, J.; Questa, Paolo; Sandini, Giulio

    1996-12-01

    The main objective of IBIDEM is to develop a video phone useful for speech reading by hearing-impaired people based on a new generation of the space-variant sensor and using standard telephone lines. The space variant nature of the sensor will allow it to have high resolution in the area of interest, lips or fingers, while still maintaining a wide field of view in order to perceive, for example, the facial expression of the interlocutor, but reducing drastically the amount of data to be sent on the line. A second objective if IBIDEM is the use of the same equipment for remote monitoring of health status. The system can be used for obtaining information about the status of a client in the form of images and could be extended to include various physiological parameters like heart rate, blood pressure, etc. The IBIDEM project is constructing a video phone using a camera with the retina-like sensor, a motorized system for moving the point of view of the camera as well as a display for the transmitted images. This video phone will be a high- quality, low-cost aid for the hearing impaired as well as being useful for remote monitoring.

  1. Integral small communication platforms fusing optical and military radar imaging for UGV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz P.; Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Sadovnik, Lev S.; Manasson, Vladimir A.

    2000-07-01

    In this paper, integration of two basic imaging sensor technology components: optical imaging and radar imaging, will be provided, within the small communication platform environment. This is possible due to a novel MMW imaging technique developed by Waveband Corporation, based on a small and compact MMW (millimeter wave) antenna which is diffraction- grating-based, rather than gimble (scanning), or phase-array-based,as in the prior art. The proposed integral imaging system can operate UGV in any weather and environmental conditions (daylight, low-vision, dark, night, fog, snow, dust, etc) by applying switching module which automatically provides any of the three regions: (a) only optical; (b) only radar; (c) both (i.e., hybrid imaging). In this paper, feasibility and figure the merit analysis is provided.

  2. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Multibeam Antenna On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) was launched in September 1993. ACTS introduced several new technologies, including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at extremely short wavelengths never before used in communications. This antenna, which has both fixed and rapidly reconfigurable high-energy spot beams (150 miles in diameter), serves users equipped with small antenna terminals. Extensive structural and thermal analyses have been performed for simulating the ACTS MBA on-orbit performance. The results show that the reflector surfaces (mainly the front subreflector), antenna support assembly, and metallic surfaces on the spacecraft body will be distorted because of the thermal effects of varying solar heating, which degrade the ACTS MBA performance. Since ACTS was launched, a number of evaluations have been performed to assess MBA performance in the space environment. For example, the on-orbit performance measurements found systematic environmental disturbances to the MBA beam pointing. These disturbances were found to be imposed by the attitude control system, antenna and spacecraft mechanical alignments, and on-orbit thermal effects. As a result, the MBA may not always exactly cover the intended service area. In addition, the on-orbit measurements showed that antenna pointing accuracy is the performance parameter most sensitive to thermal distortions on the front subreflector surface and antenna support assemblies. Several compensation approaches were tested and evaluated to restore on-orbit pointing stability. A combination of autotrack (75 percent of the time) and Earth sensor control (25 percent of the time) was found to be the best way to compensate for antenna pointing error during orbit. This approach greatly minimizes the effects of thermal distortions on antenna beam pointing.

  3. Communication between breast cancer patients and their physicians about breast-related body image issues.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mallory; Anderson, Rebecca C; Jensik, Kathleen; Xiang, Qun; Pruszynski, Jessica; Walker, Alonzo P

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer patients encounter body image changes throughout their diagnosis, treatment, and recovery from breast cancer. No prospective studies were identified investigating communication between physicians and breast cancer patients related to body image. This qualitative pilot study determines (1) how breast cancer patients prefer their physicians communicate regarding body image changes and (2) how comfortable physicians are in discussing body image issues with their patients. Data were collected from patients over 12 weeks through the breast evaluation questionnaire (BEQ), a valid and reliable instrument, and a qualitative questionnaire. Ten physicians completed a qualitative questionnaire. The data were analyzed using frequency analysis. Nearly 70% of the patients reported there was more the physician could do to improve patient comfort in discussing breast-related body image concerns. Honesty, openness, and directness were important to the patients. Thirty-three percent of the patients answered that their physicians should be honest, open, and direct while discussing these issues. On a five-point Likert scale (1 = very uncomfortable and 5 = very comfortable), the physicians most frequently answered a 4 when asked how comfortable they are speaking about breast-related body image issues; however, only four out of 10 always address the topic themselves during the patient's visit. These data suggest that patients want honesty, openness, and directness from their physicians during the discussion of breast-related body image issues. The physicians report they are comfortable speaking about breast-related body image issues; yet, they do not directly initiate the topic.

  4. Young Girls' Eating Attitudes and Body Image Dissatisfaction: Associations with Communication and Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kichler, Jessica C.; Crowther, Janis H.

    2009-01-01

    The relationships among communication, modeling, body image dissatisfaction, and maladaptive eating attitudes and behaviors in preadolescent girls were investigated in a cross-sectional study of 69 girls in fourth through sixth grade and their mothers. Participants completed questionnaires assessing familial and peer influences, body image…

  5. Advanced Technology Demonstrator for IR Imaging Missile Warning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-02-01

    13 Figure 9: Paraglider ...but also mountains, towers, other flying platform and e.g. paratroopers/ paragliders . Some of these objects have no plume, this excludes UV-devices for...Figure 9: Paraglider - The device also has to have the ability to recognize these a.m. objects, so it has to be an imaging device with intelligent image

  6. Advanced Image Processing Techniques for Maximum Information Recovery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    The program shown as A4 in the Appendix embeds the message “GOD BLESS AMERICA” in the 20th row of the clown image shown below. The encoded...is not 200 x 320, changed the values of i and j below. load(’ clown ’) % This will convert the matrix for the clown image. for i = 1:200

  7. [Advances in infrared spectrum zoom imaging system research].

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Xing, Ting-wen; Jiang, Ya-dong

    2014-12-01

    Compared with the infrared spectrum fixed focal length system and infrared spectrum dual-zoom system, infrared spectrum continuous zoom imaging system which has continuous variational field of view can track targets sequentially, so it is a research direction in infrared spectrum imaging technology. Some new technologies are presented overseas in order to improve the detection performance, reduce cost and have good athermalized performance in infrared spectrum continuous zoom imaging system. Infrared material, infrared detector and variable aperture, those new technologies are su mmarized and the idiographic application of those new technologies in infrared spectrum continuous zoom imaging system are presented in the paper, for example athermalization of an infrared spectrum zoom lens system with new infrared material for target detection, dual band infrared spectrum continuous zoom imaging system with mid-wave infrared and long-wave infrared, infrared spectrum continuous zoom imaging system with high ratio, nfrared spectrum continuous zoom imaging system with dual F/number. It is useful for the development of chinese infrared continuous zoom imaging system.

  8. Advanced Research into Moving Target Imaging Using Multistatic Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    From [2])...........................................................................................................5 Figure 6. SAR and ISAR schemes...SAR and ISAR schemes for imaging targets (From [2]) Synthetic aperture imaging can be accomplished using a stationary antenna and rotating target or a...with a series of pulses from the moving antenna (Figure 6). Inverse synthetic aperture radar ( ISAR ) assumes a stationary radar radiating a moving

  9. Recent advances in intravital imaging of dynamic biological systems.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has opened a new era in the field of biological imaging. Focal excitation of fluorophores by simultaneous attack of multiple (normally "two") photons generates images with high spatial resolution, and use of near-infrared lasers for multiphoton excitation allows penetration of thicker specimens, enabling biologists to visualize living cellular dynamics deep inside tissues and organs without thin sectioning. Moreover, the minimized photo-bleaching and toxicity associated with multiphoton techniques is beneficial for imaging of live specimens for extended observation periods. Here we focus on recent findings using intravital multiphoton imaging of dynamic biological systems such as the immune system and bone homeostasis. The immune system comprises highly dynamic networks, in which many cell types actively travel throughout the body and interact with each other in specific areas. Therefore, real-time intravital imaging represents a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms underlying this dynamic system.

  10. PIFEX: An advanced programmable pipelined-image processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gennery, D. B.; Wilcox, B.

    1985-01-01

    PIFEX is a pipelined-image processor being built in the JPL Robotics Lab. It will operate on digitized raster-scanned images (at 60 frames per second for images up to about 300 by 400 and at lesser rates for larger images), performing a variety of operations simultaneously under program control. It thus is a powerful, flexible tool for image processing and low-level computer vision. It also has applications in other two-dimensional problems such as route planning for obstacle avoidance and the numerical solution of two-dimensional partial differential equations (although its low numerical precision limits its use in the latter field). The concept and design of PIFEX are described herein, and some examples of its use are given.

  11. Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources at Detroit Edison

    SciTech Connect

    Haukur Asgeirsson; Richard Seguin

    2004-01-31

    (Utility) led team, which also includes: DTE Energy Technology (DER provider & Aggregator), Electrical Distribution Design (Virginia Tech company supporting DEW); Systems Integration Specialists Company (real-time protocol integrator); and OSIsoft (software system for managing real-time information). This work was performed in anticipation of being selected for Phase II of the Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources project.

  12. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Fade Compensation Protocol Impact on Very Small-Aperture Terminal Bit Error Rate Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Christina B.; Coney, Thom A.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) communications system operates at Ka band. ACTS uses an adaptive rain fade compensation protocol to reduce the impact of signal attenuation resulting from propagation effects. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of an analysis characterizing the improvement in VSAT performance provided by this protocol. The metric for performance is VSAT bit error rate (BER) availability. The acceptable availability defined by communication system design specifications is 99.5% for a BER of 5E-7 or better. VSAT BER availabilities with and without rain fade compensation are presented. A comparison shows the improvement in BER availability realized with rain fade compensation. Results are presented for an eight-month period and for 24 months spread over a three-year period. The two time periods represent two different configurations of the fade compensation protocol. Index Terms-Adaptive coding, attenuation, propagation, rain, satellite communication, satellites.

  13. The outcome of interprofessional education: Integrating communication studies into a standardized patient experience for advanced practice nursing students.

    PubMed

    Defenbaugh, Nicole; Chikotas, Noreen E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the impact of standardized patient experiences (SPE) in the education of the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN). The education of the APN requires educators to make every attempt to promote competency in the areas of communication and clinical-decision making. SPE programs have been found to improve the interpersonal, problem solving, and critical thinking skills of nursing students. For this research twenty-nine APN students participated in SPEs over the course of two semesters. Fifteen student volunteers of those 29 participants were then interviewed three months after the experience. Results revealed that having an expert in the field of communication studies increased awareness of communication skills and how to improve nurse-patient encounters in the clinical setting. The interprofessional collaboration during the SPEs assisted in facilitating the application of learned communication skills into patient-centered care of the APN student.

  14. Earth-Image Tracking in the IR for Deep Space Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Chen, Yinging; Lee, Shinhak; Ortiz, Gerard G.

    2005-01-01

    Sub-microradian level laser beam pointing to an Earth-based receiver is required for deep space optical communications. This requires a beacon emanated from Earth towards the spacecraft. The beacon could be a laser or reflected sunlight from Earth. Earth image tracking in the visible is hampered by significant albedo variations and/or crescent Earth image yielding large central errors. Here, we report results of Earth-image tracking in the infrared (8 to 13 micron) region of the spectrum with the aim of substantially alleviating the two challenges mentioned earlier.

  15. New concepts in standing advanced diagnostic equine imaging.

    PubMed

    Porter, Erin G; Werpy, Natasha M

    2014-04-01

    This article addresses the clinical application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) as applied to the standing equine patient. This discussion includes the logistics, advantages, disadvantages, and limitations of imaging a standing horse. In addition, a brief review is given of the physics of these modalities as applied in clinical practice, and the currently available hardware and software required by these techniques for image acquisition and artifact reduction. The appropriate selection of clinical cases for standing MRI and CT is reviewed, focusing on cases that are capable of undergoing standing surgeries following lesion diagnosis.

  16. EO-1 Advanced Land Imager Technology Validation Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    133 3-108 Ghosting effects observed in Mount Etna lava flows 134 3-109 Cross section of ALI SCA 135 3-110 Generation of Lunar ghosts by scattering...images from a typical Lunar calibration. 3.2.2.4.2.2 Lava Flow Observation Ghost images have also been observed in the Mount Etna observation on 203091955...7. Odd and even pixels appear shifted by 15 frames within the ghost image Figure 3-108. Ghosting effects observed in Mount Etna lava flows (Band 7

  17. Advances in fntd technology: Instrumentation, image processing and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartz, James Andrew

    Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detectors (FNTDs), based on Al2O 3:C,Mg single crystal material, enable diffraction limited imaging of ionization patterns. This fast, luminescent material is thermally and optically stable. This work expands and assesses the capability of FNTD technology to measure radiation dose quickly and accurately, especially neutron radition. Developments in FNTD instrumentation, software, image reconstruction, image processing and data processing improved ease of use, productivity and reliability and brought the technology into commercial viability. Descriptions of these developments are presented. Additionally, these developments were assessed and were found to comply with ANSI and ISO standards for personnel neutron dosimetry. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  18. 3D Imaging with Structured Illumination for Advanced Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Dagel, Amber Lynn; Kast, Brian A.; Smith, Collin S.

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) information in a physical security system is a highly useful dis- criminator. The two-dimensional data from an imaging systems fails to provide target dis- tance and three-dimensional motion vector, which can be used to reduce nuisance alarm rates and increase system effectiveness. However, 3D imaging devices designed primarily for use in physical security systems are uncommon. This report discusses an architecture favorable to physical security systems; an inexpensive snapshot 3D imaging system utilizing a simple illumination system. The method of acquiring 3D data, tests to understand illumination de- sign, and software modifications possible to maximize information gathering capability are discussed.

  19. MO-D-213-06: Quantitative Image Quality Metrics Are for Physicists, Not Radiologists: How to Communicate to Your Radiologists Using Their Language

    SciTech Connect

    Szczykutowicz, T; Rubert, N; Ranallo, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A framework for explaining differences in image quality to non-technical audiences in medial imaging is needed. Currently, this task is something that is learned “on the job.” The lack of a formal methodology for communicating optimal acquisition parameters into the clinic effectively mitigates many technological advances. As a community, medical physicists need to be held responsible for not only advancing image science, but also for ensuring its proper use in the clinic. This work outlines a framework that bridges the gap between the results from quantitative image quality metrics like detectability, MTF, and NPS and their effect on specific anatomical structures present in diagnostic imaging tasks. Methods: Specific structures of clinical importance were identified for a body, an extremity, a chest, and a temporal bone protocol. Using these structures, quantitative metrics were used to identify the parameter space that should yield optimal image quality constrained within the confines of clinical logistics and dose considerations. The reading room workflow for presenting the proposed changes for imaging each of these structures is presented. The workflow consists of displaying images for physician review consisting of different combinations of acquisition parameters guided by quantitative metrics. Examples of using detectability index, MTF, NPS, noise and noise non-uniformity are provided. During review, the physician was forced to judge the image quality solely on those features they need for diagnosis, not on the overall “look” of the image. Results: We found that in many cases, use of this framework settled mis-agreements between physicians. Once forced to judge images on the ability to detect specific structures inter reader agreement was obtained. Conclusion: This framework will provide consulting, research/industrial, or in-house physicists with clinically relevant imaging tasks to guide reading room image review. This framework avoids use

  20. Volumes to learn: advancing therapeutics with innovative computed tomography image data analysis.

    PubMed

    Maitland, Michael L

    2010-09-15

    Semi-automated methods for calculating tumor volumes from computed tomography images are a new tool for advancing the development of cancer therapeutics. Volumetric measurements, relying on already widely available standard clinical imaging techniques, could shorten the observation intervals needed to identify cohorts of patients sensitive or resistant to treatment.

  1. Role of Advanced Laryngeal Imaging in Glottic Cancer: Early Detection and Evaluation of Glottic Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tibbetts, Kathleen M; Tan, Melin

    2015-08-01

    Laryngeal cancer accounts for approximately 2.4% of new malignancies worldwide each year. Early identification of laryngeal neoplasms results in improved prognosis and functional outcomes. Imaging plays an integral role in the diagnosis, staging, and long-term follow-up of laryngeal cancer. This article highlights advanced laryngeal imaging techniques and their application to early glottic neoplasms.

  2. Decoding mobile-phone image sensor rolling shutter effect for visible light communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Optical wireless communication (OWC) using visible lights, also known as visible light communication (VLC), has attracted significant attention recently. As the traditional OWC and VLC receivers (Rxs) are based on PIN photo-diode or avalanche photo-diode, deploying the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor as the VLC Rx is attractive since nowadays nearly every person has a smart phone with embedded CMOS image sensor. However, deploying the CMOS image sensor as the VLC Rx is challenging. In this work, we propose and demonstrate two simple contrast ratio (CR) enhancement schemes to improve the contrast of the rolling shutter pattern. Then we describe their processing algorithms one by one. The experimental results show that both the proposed CR enhancement schemes can significantly mitigate the high-intensity fluctuations of the rolling shutter pattern and improve the bit-error-rate performance.

  3. Two Years of ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) Propagation Studies in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Charles E.; Jaeger, Bradley E.

    1996-01-01

    The Alaska Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) propagation terminal (APT) is located on top of the engineering building on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus. The latitude and longitude of the site are 64 degrees 51 minutes, 28 seconds N and 147 degrees, 48 minutes, 59 seconds west. The geometrical elevation angle to ACTS is 7.97 degrees; including a normal atmospheric refractivity, the elevation angle increases to 8.10 degrees. The azimuth angle to ACTS is 129.36 degrees. The terminal is located at 580 feet above mean sea level. The site is located in ITU-R rain zone C and Crane global model zone B1. ACTS transmits vertical polarization beacons at 27.505 and 20.185 GHz. At the APT, the polarization tilt angle is 19.4 degrees rotated CCW with respect to vertical when looking towards the satellite. The beacons are transmitted in a CONUS pattern. The ACTS beacon footprint at the Alaska APT is 9 dB down from the transmission pattern peak at 27.505 GHz and 11 dB down from the pattern peak at 20.185 GHz.

  4. Wild Orangutan Males Plan and Communicate Their Travel Direction One Day in Advance

    PubMed Central

    van Schaik, Carel P.; Damerius, Laura; Isler, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The ability to plan for the future beyond immediate needs would be adaptive to many animal species, but is widely thought to be uniquely human. Although studies in captivity have shown that great apes are capable of planning for future needs, it is unknown whether and how they use this ability in the wild. Flanged male Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii) emit long calls, which females use to maintain earshot associations with them. We tested whether long calls serve to communicate a male's ever-changing predominant travel direction to facilitate maintaining these associations. We found that the direction in which a flanged male emits his long calls predicts his subsequent travel direction for many hours, and that a new call indicates a change in his main travel direction. Long calls given at or near the night nest indicate travel direction better than random until late afternoon on the next day. These results show that male orangutans make their travel plans well in advance and announce them to conspecifics. We suggest that such a planning ability is likely to be adaptive for great apes, as well as in other taxa. PMID:24040357

  5. Advanced practice registered nurse usability testing of a tailored computer-mediated health communication program.

    PubMed

    Lin, Carolyn A; Neafsey, Patricia J; Anderson, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the usability of a touch-screen-enabled Personal Education Program with advanced practice RNs. The Personal Education Program is designed to enhance medication adherence and reduce adverse self-medication behaviors in older adults with hypertension. An iterative research process was used, which involved the use of (1) pretrial focus groups to guide the design of system information architecture, (2) two different cycles of think-aloud trials to test the software interface, and (3) post-trial focus groups to gather feedback on the think-aloud studies. Results from this iterative usability-testing process were used to systematically modify and improve the three Personal Education Program prototype versions-the pilot, prototype 1, and prototype 2. Findings contrasting the two separate think-aloud trials showed that APRN users rated the Personal Education Program system usability, system information, and system-use satisfaction at a moderately high level between trials. In addition, errors using the interface were reduced by 76%, and the interface time was reduced by 18.5% between the two trials. The usability-testing processes used in this study ensured an interface design adapted to APRNs' needs and preferences to allow them to effectively use the computer-mediated health-communication technology in a clinical setting.

  6. Advanced Tracers in PET Imaging of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Hua; Liu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers by positron emission tomography (PET) allows for the noninvasive detection and characterization of biological changes at the molecular level, leading to earlier disease detection, objective monitoring of therapies, and better prognostication of cardiovascular diseases progression. Here we review, the current role of PET in cardiovascular disease, with emphasize on tracers developed for PET imaging of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25389529

  7. Advanced millimeter-wave security portal imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-03-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance as a security tool to augment conventional metal detectors and baggage x-ray systems for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This acceptance indicates that the technology has matured; however, many potential improvements can yet be realized. The authors have developed a number of techniques over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, and high-frequency high-bandwidth techniques. All of these may improve the performance of new systems; however, some of these techniques will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. Reducing this cost may require the development of novel array designs. In particular, RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems. Highfrequency, high-bandwidth designs are difficult to achieve with conventional mm-wave electronic devices, and RF photonic devices may be a practical alternative. In this paper, the mm-wave imaging techniques developed at PNNL are reviewed and the potential for implementing RF photonic mm-wave array designs is explored.

  8. Visualizing Chemistry: The Progess and Promise of Advanced Chemical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Committee on Revealing Chemistry Through Advanced Chemical Imaging

    2006-09-01

    The field of chemical imaging can provide detailed structural, functional, and applicable information about chemistry and chemical engineering phenomena that have enormous impacts on medicine, materials, and technology. In recognizing the potential for more research development in the field of chemical imaging, the National Academies was asked by the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, U.S. Army, and National Cancer Institute to complete a study that would review the current state of molecular imaging technology, point to promising future developments and their applications, and suggest a research and educational agenda to enable breakthrough improvements in the ability to image molecular processes simultaneously in multiple physical dimensions as well as time. The study resulted in a consensus report that provides guidance for a focused research and development program in chemical imaging and identifies research needs and possible applications of imaging technologies that can provide the breakthrough knowledge in chemistry, materials science, biology, and engineering for which we should strive. Public release of this report is expected in early October.

  9. Advanced Scintillator Detectors for Neutron Imaging in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geppert-Kleinrath, Verena; Danly, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Simpson, Raspberry; Volegov, Petr; Wilde, Carl

    2016-10-01

    The neutron imaging team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been providing two-dimensional neutron imaging of the inertial confinement fusion process at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for over five years. Neutron imaging is a powerful tool in which position-sensitive detectors register neutrons emitted in the fusion reactions, producing a picture of the burning fuel. Recent images have revealed possible multi-dimensional asymmetries, calling for additional views to facilitate three-dimensional imaging. These will be along shorter lines of sight to stay within the existing facility at NIF. In order to field imaging capabilities equivalent to the existing system several technological challenges have to be met: high spatial resolution, high light output, and fast scintillator response to capture lower-energy neutrons, which have scattered from non-burning regions of fuel. Deuterated scintillators are a promising candidate to achieve the timing and resolution required; a systematic study of deuterated and non-deuterated polystyrene and liquid samples is currently ongoing. A test stand has been implemented to measure the response function, and preliminary data on resolution and light output have been obtained at the LANL Weapons Neutrons Research facility.

  10. Advances in computed radiography systems and their physical imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Davies, A G; Kengyelics, S M

    2007-12-01

    Radiological imaging is progressing towards an all-digital future, across the spectrum of medical imaging techniques. Computed radiography (CR) has provided a ready pathway from screen film to digital radiography and a convenient entry point to PACS. This review briefly revisits the principles of modern CR systems and their physical imaging characteristics. Wide dynamic range and digital image enhancement are well-established benefits of CR, which lend themselves to improved image presentation and reduced rates of repeat exposures. However, in its original form CR offered limited scope for reducing the radiation dose per radiographic exposure, compared with screen film. Recent innovations in CR, including the use of dual-sided image readout and channelled storage phosphor have eased these concerns. For example, introduction of these technologies has improved detective quantum efficiency (DQE) by approximately 50 and 100%, respectively, compared with standard CR. As a result CR currently affords greater scope for reducing patient dose, and provides a more substantive challenge to the new solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors.

  11. ADVANCED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Venkatasubramanian, Palamadai N.; Wyrwicz, Alice M.; Zhao, Jin-cheng; Shi, Changbin; Akers, Amy; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Awad, Issam A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We sought to assess the appearance of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in murine Ccm1 and Ccm2 gene knockout models, and to develop a technique of lesion localization for correlative pathobiologic studies Methods Brains from eighteen CCM mutant mice (Ccm1+/-Trp53-/- and Ccm2+/-Trp53-/-) and 28 controls were imaged by gradient recalled echo (T2*)-weighted MR at 4.7 T and 14.1 T in vivo and/or ex vivo. After MR imaging, the brains were removed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and cells were laser microdissected for molecular biologic studies. Results T2*-weighted MR imaging of brains in vivo and ex vivo revealed lesions similar to human CCMs in mutant mice, but not in control animals. Stereotactic localization and hematoxylin and eosin-staining of correlative tissue sections confirmed lesion histology, and revealed other areas of dilated capillaries in the same brains. Some lesions were identified by MR imaging at 14.1 T, but not at 4.7 T. PCR amplification from Ccm1 and β-actin genes was demonstrated from nucleic acids extracted from laser microdissected lesional and perilesional cells. Conclusions The high field MR imaging techniques offer new opportunities for further investigation of disease pathogenesis in vivo, and the localization, staging and histobiologic dissection of lesions, including the presumed earliest stages of CCM lesion development. PMID:18981891

  12. Communicate!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Stuart

    This ten chapter book is designed to provide high school students with an understanding of basic communication processes. The first five chapters include discussions of language development, function, and acquisition in relation to both human and non-human communication. The sixth chapter contains specimen linguistic analyses of speech and…

  13. Abnormal corpus callosum connectivity, socio-communicative deficits, and motor deficits in children with autism spectrum disorder: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hanaie, Ryuzo; Mohri, Ikuko; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Tachibana, Masaya; Matsuzaki, Junko; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Norihiko; Taniike, Masako

    2014-09-01

    In addition to social and communicative deficits, many studies have reported motor deficits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study investigated the macro and microstructural properties of the corpus callosum (CC) of 18 children with ASD and 12 typically developing controls using diffusion tensor imaging tractography. We aimed to explore whether abnormalities of the CC were related to motor deficits, as well as social and communication deficits in children with ASD. The ASD group displayed abnormal macro and microstructure of the total CC and its subdivisions and its structural properties were related to socio-communicative deficits, but not to motor deficits in ASD. These findings advance our understanding of the contributions of the CC to ASD symptoms.

  14. Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James

    2010-01-01

    NASA s communication work for the UAS Command and Control area will build upon work currently being conducted under NASA Recovery Act funds. Communication portions of UAS NextGen ConOps, Stateof- the-Art assessment, and Gap Analysis. Preliminary simulations for UAS CNPC link scalability assessment. Surrogate UAS aircraft upgrades. This work will also leverage FY10 in-guide funding for communication link model development. UAS are currently managed through exceptions and are operating using DoD frequencies for line-of-sight (LOS) and satellite-based communications links, low-power LOS links in amateur bands, or unlicensed Instrument/Scientific/Medical (ISM) frequencies. None of these frequency bands are designated for Safety and Regularity of Flight. No radio-frequency (RF) spectrum has been allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) specifically for UAS command and control links, for either LOS or Beyond LOS (BLOS) communication.

  15. Advances and perspectives in lung cancer imaging using multidetector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel

    2012-10-01

    The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (CT) into clinical practice has revolutionized many aspects of the clinical work-up. Lung cancer imaging has benefited from various breakthroughs in computing technology, with advances in the field of lung cancer detection, tissue characterization, lung cancer staging and response to therapy. Our paper discusses the problems of radiation, image visualization and CT examination comparison. It also reviews the most significant advances in lung cancer imaging and highlights the emerging clinical applications that use state of the art CT technology in the field of lung cancer diagnosis and follow-up.

  16. Performance evaluation of secured DICOM image communication with next generation internet protocol IPv6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fenghai; Zhang, Jianguo; Chen, Xiaomeng; Huang, H. K.

    2005-04-01

    Next Generation Internet (NGI) technology with new communication protocol IPv6 emerges as a potential solution for low-cost and high-speed networks for image data transmission. IPv6 is designed to solve many of the problems of the current version of IP (known as IPv4) with regard to address depletion, security, autoconfiguration, extensibility, and more. We choose CTN (Central Test Node) DICOM software developed by The Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology to implement IPv6/IPv4 enabled DICOM communication software on different operating systems (Windows/Linux), and used this DICOM software to evaluate the performance of the IPv6/IPv4 enabled DICOM image communication with different security setting and environments. We compared the security communications of IPsec with SSL/TLS on different TCP/IP protocols (IPv6/IPv4), and find that there are some trade-offs to choose security solution between IPsec and SSL/TLS in the security implementation of IPv6/IPv4 communication networks.

  17. Estimation, transmission, and distribution of motion information in future image communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupeau, Bertrand

    1993-10-01

    There is no doubt that in a near future a large number of image processing techniques will be based on motion compensation, making thus very common the cascading of several 'motion compensated' devices in the same image chain. A reference scheme for the optimum use of motion compensation in future image communication networks is presented. Motion estimation is performed once only, at a very early stage of the process chain, then motion information is encoded, transmitted in a separate data channel and distributed to the cascaded motion compensated processes. The distribution scenario must take into consideration the various transformations performed on the image signal since its origination so that the motion information distributed is always consistent with the pictures to process. The problems of the representation of motion relatively to a given source image signal and of its adjustment to new frame rate environments are especially addressed.

  18. The new kid on the block for advanced imaging in Barrett's esophagus: a review of volumetric laser endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Arvind J; Smith, Michael S; Pleskow, Douglas K

    2016-05-01

    Advanced imaging techniques used in the management of Barrett's esophagus include electronic imaging enhancement (e.g. narrow band imaging, flexible spectral imaging color enhancement, and i-Scan), chromoendoscopy, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. Electronic imaging enhancement is used frequently in daily practice, but use of the other advanced technologies is not routine. High-definition white light endoscopy and random four quadrant biopsy remain the standard of care for evaluation of Barrett's esophagus; this is largely due to the value of advanced imaging technologies not having been validated in large studies or in everyday practice. A new advanced imaging technology called volumetric laser endomicroscopy is commercially available in the United States. Its ease of use and rapid acquisition of high-resolution images make this technology very promising for widespread application. In this article we review the technology and its potential for advanced imaging in Barrett's esophagus.

  19. Recent Advances in Cardiac Computed Tomography: Dual Energy, Spectral and Molecular CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Danad, Ibrahim; Fayad, Zahi A.; Willemink, Martin J.; Min, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) evolved into a powerful diagnostic tool and it is impossible to imagine current clinical practice without CT imaging. Due to its widespread availability, ease of clinical application, superb sensitivity for detection of CAD, and non-invasive nature, CT has become a valuable tool within the armamentarium of the cardiologist. In the last few years, numerous technological advances in CT have occurred—including dual energy CT (DECT), spectral CT and CT-based molecular imaging. By harnessing the advances in technology, cardiac CT has advanced beyond the mere evaluation of coronary stenosis to an imaging modality tool that permits accurate plaque characterization, assessment of myocardial perfusion and even probing of molecular processes that are involved in coronary atherosclerosis. Novel innovations in CT contrast agents and pre-clinical spectral CT devices have paved the way for CT-based molecular imaging. PMID:26068288

  20. Pediatric Cerebellar Tumors: Emerging Imaging Techniques and Advances in Understanding of Genetic Features.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Asim F; Siddiqui, Adeel; Klimo, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Cerebellar tumors are the most common group of solid tumors in children. MR imaging provides an important role in characterization of these lesions, surgical planning, and postsurgical surveillance. Preoperative imaging can help predict the histologic subtype of tumors, which can provide guidance for surgical planning. Beyond histology, pediatric brain tumors are undergoing new classification schemes based on genetic features. Intraoperative MR imaging has emerged as an important tool in the surgical management of pediatric brain tumors. Effective understanding of the imaging features of pediatric cerebellar tumors can benefit communication with neurosurgeons and neuro-oncologists and can improve patient management.

  1. Proceedings of the Seventeenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 17) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX) is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investors from domestic and international organizations. NAPEX 17 was held on 15 June 1993. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to slant path propagation studies and experiments. The second session focused on propagation studies for mobile and personal communications. Preceding NAPEX 17, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop was held on 14 June 1993 to review ACTS propagation activities with emphasis on ACTS experiments status and data collection, processing, and exchange.

  2. Recent Efforts in Advanced High Frequency Communications at the Glenn Research Center in Support of NASA Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will discuss research and technology development work at the NASA Glenn Research Center in advanced frequency communications in support of NASAs mission. An overview of the work conducted in-house and also in collaboration with academia, industry, and other government agencies (OGA) in areas such as antenna technology, power amplifiers, radio frequency (RF) wave propagation through Earths atmosphere, ultra-sensitive receivers, among others, will be presented. In addition, the role of these and other related RF technologies in enabling the NASA next generation space communications architecture will be also discussed.

  3. WE-H-206-00: Advances in Preclinical Imaging.

    PubMed

    La Riviere, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Lihong V. Wang: Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), combining non-ionizing optical and ultrasonic waves via the photoacoustic effect, provides in vivo multiscale functional, metabolic, and molecular imaging. Broad applications include imaging of the breast, brain, skin, esophagus, colon, vascular system, and lymphatic system in humans or animals. Light offers rich contrast but does not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as x-rays do. Consequently, high-resolution pure optical imaging (e.g., confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography) is limited to penetration within the optical diffusion limit (∼1 mm in the skin). Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, provides fine spatial resolution but suffers from both poor contrast in early-stage tumors and strong speckle artifacts. In PAT, pulsed laser light penetrates tissue and generates a small but rapid temperature rise, which induces emission of ultrasonic waves due to thermoelastic expansion. The ultrasonic waves, orders of magnitude less scattering than optical waves, are then detected to form high-resolution images of optical absorption at depths up to 7 cm, conquering the optical diffusion limit. PAT is the only modality capable of imaging across the length scales of organelles, cells, tissues, and organs (up to whole-body small animals) with consistent contrast. This rapidly growing technology promises to enable multiscale biological research and accelerate translation from microscopic laboratory discoveries to macroscopic clinical practice. PAT may also hold the key to label-free early detection of cancer by in vivo quantification of hypermetabolism, the quintessential hallmark of malignancy.

  4. Modular space station, phase B extension. Information management advanced development. Volume 2: Communications terminal breadboard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    The design and development of the communications terminal breadboard for the modular space station are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) history of communications terminal breadboard, (2) requirements analysis, (3) technology goals in terminal design, and (4) communications terminal board integration tests.

  5. Advanced characterization of microscopic kidney biopsies utilizing image analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Goudas, Theodosios; Doukas, Charalampos; Chatziioannou, Aristotle; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    Correct annotation and identification of salient regions in Kidney biopsy images can provide an estimation of pathogenesis in obstructive nephropathy. This paper presents a tool for the automatic or manual segmentation of such regions along with methodology for their characterization in terms of the exhibited pathology. The proposed implementation is based on custom code written in Java and the utilization of open source tools (i.e. RapidMiner, ImageJ). The corresponding implementation details along with the initial evaluation of the proposed integrated system are also presented in the paper.

  6. Thermal Infrared Imaging Spectrometer - An advanced optics technology instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, Colin; Labaw, Clayton; Sobel, Harold; Kahle, Anne

    1990-01-01

    Through the use of a special optical filter, the Thermal Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, an airborne multispectral IR imaging instrument operating in the thermal emission region (7.5-14 microns), will achieve signal-to-noise ratios greater than 600 with ambient temperature optics. This instrument will be used to do compositional surface mapping of the terrain, and will refine the ability to categorize rock families and types by providing much higher spectral resolution in the emission region than was previously available. Details of the optical system, the detector, the cooler system, and the support electronics are described.

  7. Advanced InSAR imaging for dune mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havivi, Shiran; August, Yitzhak; Blumberg, Dan G.; Rotman, Stanley R.

    2015-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970's, remote sensing imagery both optical and radar, are used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of Aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two images or more. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This research aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation, or, coherence change detection, can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the Nitzanim coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of varying levels of stability and vegetation cover and have been monitored meteorologically, geomorphologically and

  8. Use of CCSDS and OSI Protocols on the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chirieleison, Don

    1996-01-01

    Although ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) provides an almost error-free channel during much of the day and under most conditions, there are times when it is not suitable for reliably error-free data communications when operating in the uncoded mode. Because coded operation is not always available to every earth station, measures must be taken in the end system to maintain adequate throughput when transferring data under adverse conditions. The most effective approach that we tested to improve performance was the addition of an 'outer' Reed-Solomon code through use of CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) GOS 2 (a forward error correcting code). This addition can benefit all users of an ACTS channel including those applications that do not require totally reliable transport, but it is somewhat expensive because additional hardware is needed. Although we could not characterize the link noise statistically (it appeared to resemble uncorrelated white noise, the type that block codes are least effective in correcting), we did find that CCSDS GOS 2 gave an essentially error-free link at BER's (bit error rate) as high as 6x10(exp -4). For users that demand reliable transport, an ARQ (Automatic Repeat Queuing) protocol such as TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) or TP4 (Transport Protocol, Class 4) will probably be used. In this category, it comes as no surprise that the best choice of the protocol suites tested over ACTS was TP4 using CCSDS GOS 2. TP4 behaves very well over an error-free link which GOS 2 provides up to a point. Without forward error correction, however, TP4 service begins to degrade in the 10(exp -7)-10(exp -6) range and by 4x10(exp -6), it barely gives any throughput at all. If Congestion Avoidance is used in TP4, the degradation is even more pronounced. Fortunately, as demonstrated here, this effect can be more than compensated for by choosing the Selective Acknowledgment option. In fact, this option can enable TP4 to

  9. A Review of Significant Advances in Neutron Imaging from Conception to the Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenizer, J. S.

    This review summarizes the history of neutron imaging with a focus on the significant events and technical advancements in neutron imaging methods, from the first radiograph to more recent imaging methods. A timeline is presented to illustrate the key accomplishments that advanced the neutron imaging technique. Only three years after the discovery of the neutron by English physicist James Chadwick in 1932, neutron imaging began with the work of Hartmut Kallmann and Ernst Kuhn in Berlin, Germany, from 1935-1944. Kallmann and Kuhn were awarded a joint US Patent issued in January 1940. Little progress was made until the mid-1950's when Thewlis utilized a neutron beam from the BEPO reactor at Harwell, marking the beginning of the application of neutron imaging to practical applications. As the film method was improved, imaging moved from a qualitative to a quantitative technique, with applications in industry and in nuclear fuels. Standards were developed to aid in the quantification of the neutron images and the facility's capabilities. The introduction of dynamic neutron imaging (initially called real-time neutron radiography and neutron television) in the late 1970's opened the door to new opportunities and new challenges. As the electronic imaging matured, the introduction of the CCD imaging devices and solid-state light intensifiers helped address some of these challenges. Development of improved imaging devices for the medical community has had a major impact on neutron imaging. Additionally, amorphous silicon sensors provided improvements in temporal resolution, while providing a reasonably large imaging area. The development of new neutron imaging sensors and the development of new neutron imaging techniques in the past decade has advanced the technique's ability to provide insight and understanding of problems that other non-destructive techniques could not provide. This rapid increase in capability and application would not have been possible without the

  10. Advanced Computer Image Generation Techniques Exploiting Perceptual Characteristics. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenger, Anthony J.; And Others

    This study suggests and identifies computer image generation (CIG) algorithms for visual simulation that improve the training effectiveness of CIG simulators and identifies areas of basic research in visual perception that are significant for improving CIG technology. The first phase of the project entailed observing three existing CIG simulators.…

  11. Fabry-Perot MEMS Accelerometers for Advanced Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chisum, Brad

    2015-05-31

    This report summarizes the technical achievements that occurred over the duration of the project. On November 14th, 2014, Lumedyne Technologies Incorporated was acquired. As a result of the acquisition, the work toward seismic imaging applications was suspended indefinitely. This report captures the progress achieved up to that time.

  12. Advances in low energy neutral atom imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, E.E.; Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Moore, K.R. ); Gruntman, M. . Space Sciences Center)

    1993-01-01

    Recently proposed low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging techniques use a collisional process to convert the low energy neutrals into ions before detection. At low energies, collisional processes limit the angular resolution and conversion efficiencies of these devices. However, if the intense ultraviolet light background can be suppressed, direct LENA detection is possible. We present results from a series of experiments designed to develop a novel filtering structure based on free-standing transmission gratings. If the grating period is sufficiently small, free standing transmission gratings can be employed to substantially polarize ultraviolet (UV) light in the wavelength range 300 [Angstrom] to 1500 [Angstrom]. If a second grating is placed behind the first grating with its axis of polarization oriented at a right angle to the first's, a substantial attenuation of UV radiation is achievable. ne neutrals will pass through the remaining open area of two gratings and be detected without UV background complications. We have obtained nominal 2000 [Angstrom] period (1000 [Angstrom] bars with 1000 [Angstrom] slits) free standing, gold transmission gratings and measured their UV and atomic transmission characteristics. The geometric factor of a LENA imager based on this technology is comparable to that of other proposed LENA imagers. In addition, this of imager does not distort the neutral trajectories, allowing for high angular resolution.

  13. An overview on the advances in cardiovascular interventional MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Saborowski, Olaf; Saeed, Maythem

    2007-06-01

    Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (iCMR) represents a new discipline whose systematic development will foster minimally invasive interventional procedures without radiation exposure. New generations of open, wide and short bore MR scanners and real time sequences made cardiovascular intervention possible. MR compatible endovascular catheters and guide-wires are needed for delivery of devices such as stents or atrial septal defect (ASD) closures. Catheter tracking is based on active and passive approaches. Currently performed MR-guided procedures are used to monitor, navigate and track endovascular catheters and to deliver local therapeutic agents to targets, such as infarcted myocardium and vascular walls. Heating of endovascular MR catheters, guide-wires and devices during imaging still presents high safety risks. MR contrast media improve the capabilities of MR imaging by enhancing blood signal, pathologic targets (such as myocardial infarctions and atherosclerotic plaques), endovascular catheters and by tracking injected therapeutic agents. Labeling injected soluble therapeutic agents, genes or cells with MR contrast media enables interventionalists to ensure the administration of the drugs in the target and to trace their distribution in the targets. The future clinical use of this iCMR technique requires (1) high spatial and temporal resolution imaging, (2) special catheters and devices and (3) effective therapeutic agents, genes or cells. These conditions are available at a low scale at the present time and need to be developed in the near future. Such progress will lead to improved patient care and minimize invasiveness.

  14. Support for Advanced Imaging of Premixed Turbulent Combustion Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    quantifies mean flame properties (e.g., mean progress variable fields ), chemical reaction sheet wrinkling by turbulence (e. g., reaction sheet...orientation statistics, curvatures and surface density data) and important velocities (e. g., velocity field of reactants, reaction sheet displacement speeds...with stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) to measure flamelet wrinkling, flamelet speeds and the reactant velocity field in order to relate

  15. Advanced scanners and imaging systems for earth observations. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Assessments of present and future sensors and sensor related technology are reported along with a description of user needs and applications. Five areas are outlined: (1) electromechanical scanners, (2) self-scanned solid state sensors, (3) electron beam imagers, (4) sensor related technology, and (5) user applications. Recommendations, charts, system designs, technical approaches, and bibliographies are included for each area.

  16. Advances in Focal Plane Wavefront Estimation for Directly Imaging Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Groff, Tyler Dean

    2015-01-01

    To image cold exoplanets directly in visible light, an instrument on a telescope needs to suppress starlight by about 9 orders of magnitude at small separations from the star. A coronagraph changes the point spread function to create regions of high contrast where exoplanets or disks can be seen. Aberrations on the optics degrade the contrast by several orders of magnitude, so all high-contrast imaging systems incorporate one or more deformable mirrors (DMs) to recover regions of high contrast. With a coronagraphic instrument planned for the WFIRST-AFTA space telescope, there is a pressing need for faster, more robust estimation and control schemes for the DMs. Non-common path aberrations limit conventional phase conjugation schemes to medium star-to-planet contrast ratios of about 1e-6. High-contrast imaging requires estimation and control of both phase and amplitude in the same beam path as the science camera. Field estimation is a challenge since only intensity is measured; the most common approach, including that planned for WFIRST-AFTA, is to use DMs to create diversity, via pairs of small probe shapes, thereby allowing disambiguation of the electric field. Most implementations of DM Diversity require at least five images per electric field estimate and require narrowband measurements. This paper describes our new estimation algorithms that improve the speed (by using fewer images) and bandwidth of focal plane wavefront estimation. For narrowband estimation, we are testing nonlinear, recursive algorithms such as an iterative extended Kalman filter (IEKF) to use three images each iteration and build better, more robust estimates. We are also exploring the use of broadband estimation without the need for narrowband sub-filters and measurements. Here we present simulations of these algorithms with realistic noise and small signals to show how they might perform for WFIRST-AFTA. Once validated in simulations, we will test these algorithms experimentally in

  17. Wireless image-data transmission from an implanted image sensor through a living mouse brain by intra body communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Hajime; Takehara, Hiroaki; Nagata, Kengo; Haruta, Makito; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Intra body communication technology allows the fabrication of compact implantable biomedical sensors compared with RF wireless technology. In this paper, we report the fabrication of an implantable image sensor of 625 µm width and 830 µm length and the demonstration of wireless image-data transmission through a brain tissue of a living mouse. The sensor was designed to transmit output signals of pixel values by pulse width modulation (PWM). The PWM signals from the sensor transmitted through a brain tissue were detected by a receiver electrode. Wireless data transmission of a two-dimensional image was successfully demonstrated in a living mouse brain. The technique reported here is expected to provide useful methods of data transmission using micro sized implantable biomedical sensors.

  18. X-ray imaging in advanced studies of ophthalmic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angelica M. V.; Barros, Paulo S. M.; Morelhao, Sergio L.

    2006-07-15

    Microscopic characterization of pathological tissues has one major intrinsic limitation, the small sampling areas with respect to the extension of the tissues. Mapping possible changes on vast tissues and correlating them with large ensembles of clinical cases is not a feasible procedure for studying most diseases, as for instance vision loss related diseases and, in particular, the cataract. Although intraocular lens implants are successful treatments, cataract still is a leading public-health issue that grows in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. In this work we have exploited the radiation-tissue interaction properties of hard x-rays--very low absorption and scattering--to map distinct lesions on entire eye lenses. At the used synchrotron x-ray photon energy of 20 keV (wavelength {lambda}=0.062 nm), scattering and refraction are angular resolved effects. It allows the employed x-ray image technique to efficiently characterize two types of lesions in eye lenses under cataractogenesis: distributions of tiny scattering centers and extended areas of fiber cell compaction. The data collection procedure is relatively fast; allowing dozens of samples to be totally imaged (scattering, refraction, and mass absorption images) in a single day of synchrotron beam time. More than 60 cases of canine cataract, not correlated to specific causes, were investigated in this first application of x-rays to image entire lenses. Cortical opacity cases, or partial opacity, could be related to the presence of calcificated tissues at the cortical areas, clearly visible in the images, whose elemental contents were verified by micro x-ray fluorescence as very rich in calcium. Calcificated tissues were also observed at nuclear areas in some cases of hypermature cataract. Total opacity cases without distinguishable amount of scattering centers consist in 70% of the analyzed cases, where remarkable fissure marks owing to extended areas of fiber

  19. Multifunctional nanomaterials for advanced molecular imaging and cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Prasad

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for use in biomedical applications, including cancer and stem cell imaging, disease diagnosis and drug delivery. The development of nanosystems has aided in understanding the molecular mechanisms of many diseases and permitted the controlled nanoscale manipulation of biological phenomena. In recent years, many studies have focused on the use of several kinds of nanomaterials for cancer and stem cell imaging and also for the delivery of anticancer therapeutics to tumor cells. However, the proper diagnosis and treatment of aggressive tumors such as brain and breast cancer requires highly sensitive diagnostic agents, in addition to the ability to deliver multiple therapeutics using a single platform to the target cells. Addressing these challenges, novel multifunctional nanomaterial-based platforms that incorporate multiple therapeutic and diagnostic agents, with superior molecular imaging and targeting capabilities, has been presented in this work. The initial part of this work presents the development of novel nanomaterials with superior optical properties for efficiently delivering soluble cues such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into brain cancer cells with minimal toxicity. Specifically, this section details the development of non-toxic quantums dots for the imaging and delivery of siRNA into brain cancer and mesenchymal stem cells, with the hope of using these quantum dots as multiplexed imaging and delivery vehicles. The use of these quantum dots could overcome the toxicity issues associated with the use of conventional quantum dots, enabled the imaging of brain cancer and stem cells with high efficiency and allowed for the delivery of siRNA to knockdown the target oncogene in brain cancer cells. The latter part of this thesis details the development of nanomaterial-based drug delivery platforms for the co-delivery of multiple anticancer drugs to brain tumor cells. In particular, this part of the thesis focuses on

  20. Advanced synchronous luminescence imaging for chemical and medical diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2006-09-05

    A diagnostic method and associated system includes the steps of exposing at least one sample location with excitation radiation through a single optical waveguide or a single optical waveguide bundle, wherein the sample emits emission radiation in response to the excitation radiation. The same single optical waveguide or the single optical waveguide bundle receives at least a portion of the emission radiation from the sample, thus providing co-registration of the excitation radiation and the emission radiation. The wavelength of the excitation radiation and emission radiation is synchronously scanned to produce a spectrum upon which an image can be formed. An increased emission signal is generated by the enhanced overlap of the excitation and emission focal volumes provided by co-registration of the excitation and emission signals thus increasing the sensitivity as well as decreasing the exposure time necessary to obtain an image.

  1. Pulse laser imaging amplifier for advanced ladar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khizhnyak, Anatoliy; Markov, Vladimir; Tomov, Ivan; Murrell, David

    2016-05-01

    Security measures sometimes require persistent surveillance of government, military and public areas Borders, bridges, sport arenas, airports and others are often surveilled with low-cost cameras. Their low-light performance can be enhanced with laser illuminators; however various operational scenarios may require a low-intensity laser illumination with the object-scattered light intensity lower than the sensitivity of the Ladar image detector. This paper discusses a novel type of high-gain optical image amplifier. The approach enables time-synchronization of the incoming and amplifying signals with accuracy <= 1 ns. The technique allows the incoming signal to be amplified without the need to match the input spectrum to the cavity modes. Instead, the incoming signal is accepted within the spectral band of the amplifier. We have gauged experimentally the performance of the amplifier with a 40 dB gain and an angle of view 20 mrad.

  2. [Status and advances of RGD molecular imaging in lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Yue, Ning; Yuan, Shuanghu; Yang, Guoren

    2014-12-01

    Lung cancer has been one of the most common and the highest mortality rates malignant tumors at home and abroad. Sustained angiogenesis was not only the characteristic of malignant tumors, but also the foundation of tumor proliferation, invasion, recurrence and metastasis, it was also one of the hot spots of treatments in lung cancer biology currently. Integrins played an important part in tumor angiogenesis. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides could combine with integrins specifically, and the application of radionuclide-labeled RGD molecular probes enabled imaging of tumor blood vessels to reflect its changes. The lung cancer imaging of RGD peptides at home and abroad in recent years was reviewed in this article.

  3. World Wide Web interface to digital imaging and communication in medicine-capable image servers.

    PubMed

    Browning, G C; Liang, Y; Buckwalter, K A; Kruger, R A; Aisen, A

    1996-11-01

    As a trial project, the Indiana University Department of Radiology has develop[ed a low-cost manner of distributing radiological images throughout a medical environment using the World Wide Web (WWW). The interface requires the user to have a WWW-browser client, such as Netscape, running on UNIX, PC, or Macintosh platforms. A forms-based interface allows the user to query several DICOM-capable machines at the machine, patient, study, series, and image levels. Once an image transfer is initiated, images are prewindowed from 16- to 8-bits, compressed using public domain Joint Photographic Expert Group (JPEG) compression routines, transferred to the WWW client program, and decompressed and displayed using a locally selected image viewing program. At the currently implemented level of compression (75% quality), the entire fetch-transform-JPEG-display process takes 2 to 5 seconds over Ethernet, depending on the platform used.

  4. Advanced technologies in image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Balter, James M; Cao, Yue

    2007-10-01

    In addition to rapid developments in the use of stationary radiographs and computed tomography scans in treatment rooms, a variety of additional technologies is on the horizon to aid in guided treatment. Some of these (fluoroscopy and tomosynthesis) are variations on the use of existing hardware, whereas others (electromagnetic localization, magnetic resonance imaging) represent significant departures from recently adopted technologic concepts. This review introduces these methods and explores their potential for initial use in guidance.

  5. DoD Advanced, Image-Evaluation Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    Module 40 14 Two-Port, Image- Evaluation Concept 43 15 Basic Schematic for System Responsivity Measurements 48 16 Basic Schematic for System Spatial...Response Measurements 49 17 Basic Schematic for System Resoltivity Response Measurements 50 18 Example of Point Source Spreading 62 viii TABLES Table...Hybrid Target Generator Component Specifications (Visible) 31 Target Pattern Specifications 32 6 Extended Basic Commands 38-39 Typical Software Supported

  6. A modulated pulse laser for underwater detection, ranging, imaging, and communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochenour, Brandon; Mullen, Linda; Muth, John

    2012-06-01

    A new, modulated-pulse, technique is currently being investigated for underwater laser detection, ranging, imag- ing, and communications. This technique represents a unique marriage of pulsed and intensity modulated sources. For detection, ranging, and imaging, the source can be congured to transmit a variety of intensity modulated waveforms, from single-tone to pseudorandom code. The utility of such waveforms in turbid underwater envi- ronments in the presence of backscatter is investigated in this work. The modulated pulse laser may also nd utility in underwater laser communication links. In addition to exibility in modulation format additional variable parameters, such as macro-pulse width and macro-pulse repetition rate, provide a link designer with additional methods of optimizing links based on the bandwidth, power, range, etc. needed for the application. Initial laboratory experiments in simulated ocean waters are presented.

  7. Automated alignment system for optical wireless communication systems using image recognition.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Paul; Weiss, Alexander; Zimmermann, Horst

    2014-07-01

    In this Letter, we describe the realization of a tracked line-of-sight optical wireless communication system for indoor data distribution. We built a laser-based transmitter with adaptive focus and ray steering by a microelectromechanical systems mirror. To execute the alignment procedure, we used a CMOS image sensor at the transmitter side and developed an algorithm for image recognition to localize the receiver's position. The receiver is based on a self-developed optoelectronic integrated chip with low requirements on the receiver optics to make the system economically attractive. With this system, we were able to set up the communication link automatically without any back channel and to perform error-free (bit error rate <10⁻⁹) data transmission over a distance of 3.5 m with a data rate of 3 Gbit/s.

  8. Compressive Sampling based Image Coding for Resource-deficient Visual Communication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianming; Zhai, Deming; Zhou, Jiantao; Zhang, Xinfeng; Zhao, Debin; Gao, Wen

    2016-04-14

    In this paper, a new compressive sampling based image coding scheme is developed to achieve competitive coding efficiency at lower encoder computational complexity, while supporting error resilience. This technique is particularly suitable for visual communication with resource-deficient devices. At the encoder, compact image representation is produced, which is a polyphase down-sampled version of the input image; but the conventional low-pass filter prior to down-sampling is replaced by a local random binary convolution kernel. The pixels of the resulting down-sampled pre-filtered image are local random measurements and placed in the original spatial configuration. The advantages of local random measurements are two folds: 1) preserve high-frequency image features that are otherwise discarded by low-pass filtering; 2) remain a conventional image and can therefore be coded by any standardized codec to remove statistical redundancy of larger scales. Moreover, measurements generated by different kernels can be considered as multiple descriptions of the original image and therefore the proposed scheme has the advantage of multiple description coding. At the decoder, a unified sparsity-based soft-decoding technique is developed to recover the original image from received measurements in a framework of compressive sensing. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme is competitive compared with existing methods, with a unique strength of recovering fine details and sharp edges at low bit-rates.

  9. Advances in imaging chest tuberculosis: blurring of differences between children and adults.

    PubMed

    Andronikou, Savvas; Vanhoenacker, Filip M; De Backer, Adelard I

    2009-12-01

    This article reviews the ongoing role of imaging in the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and its complications. A modern imaging classification of TB, taking into account both adults and children and the blurring of differences in the presentation patterns, must be absorbed into daily practice. Clinicians must not only be familiar with imaging features of TB but also become expert at detecting these when radiologists are unavailable. Communication between radiologists and clinicians with regard to local constraints, patterns of disease, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection rates, and imaging parameters relevant for management (especially in drug resistance programs) is paramount for making an impact with imaging, and preserving clinician confidence. Recognition of special imaging, anatomic and vulnerability differences between children and adults is more important than trying to define patterns of disease exclusive to children.

  10. Advanced imaging of the macrostructure and microstructure of bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genant, H. K.; Gordon, C.; Jiang, Y.; Link, T. M.; Hans, D.; Majumdar, S.; Lang, T. F.

    2000-01-01

    Noninvasive and/or nondestructive techniques are capable of providing more macro- or microstructural information about bone than standard bone densitometry. Although the latter provides important information about osteoporotic fracture risk, numerous studies indicate that bone strength is only partially explained by bone mineral density. Quantitative assessment of macro- and microstructural features may improve our ability to estimate bone strength. The methods available for quantitatively assessing macrostructure include (besides conventional radiographs) quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and volumetric quantitative computed tomography (vQCT). Methods for assessing microstructure of trabecular bone noninvasively and/or nondestructively include high-resolution computed tomography (hrCT), micro-computed tomography (muCT), high-resolution magnetic resonance (hrMR), and micromagnetic resonance (muMR). vQCT, hrCT and hrMR are generally applicable in vivo; muCT and muMR are principally applicable in vitro. Although considerable progress has been made in the noninvasive and/or nondestructive imaging of the macro- and microstructure of bone, considerable challenges and dilemmas remain. From a technical perspective, the balance between spatial resolution versus sampling size, or between signal-to-noise versus radiation dose or acquisition time, needs further consideration, as do the trade-offs between the complexity and expense of equipment and the availability and accessibility of the methods. The relative merits of in vitro imaging and its ultrahigh resolution but invasiveness versus those of in vivo imaging and its modest resolution but noninvasiveness also deserve careful attention. From a clinical perspective, the challenges for bone imaging include balancing the relative advantages of simple bone densitometry against the more complex architectural features of bone or, similarly, the deeper research requirements against the broader clinical needs. The

  11. The environment-pathogen-host axis in communicable and non-communicable diseases: recent advances in experimental and clinical research.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Stefanie; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    Allergies and autoimmune diseases are spreading worldwide. Control of infections, on the other hand, remains an issue, even in the post-antibiotic era. Chronic or poorly controlled infections occur in immune compromised individuals such as HIV patients, hospitalized patients exposed to multi-resistant bacteria, or patients on immunosuppressive treatment. They may become an even more emerging issue in an ageing population. At the same time, profound environmental changes such as global warming, urbanization, increasing environmental pollution and novel food engineering technologies may alter the abundance or aggressiveness of allergens/allergen carriers in our environment. Likewise, changes in dietary habits - and possibly also use of antibiotics - have an impact on the composition of our natural microbial flora in the gut, airways and skin, which may alter susceptibility for common diseases, among them allergies, asthma and atopic eczema. At the recently founded Institute of Environmental Medicine of the Technische Universität Munich, located in Augsburg at the UNIKA-T, experimental, clinical and translational research is focused on the complex interactions of environment, pathogen and host in expression or control of communicable and non-communicable diseases. We present our research concept and recent findings in environment - host interactions.

  12. Electron Trajectory Reconstruction for Advanced Compton Imaging of Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plimley, Brian Christopher

    Gamma-ray imaging is useful for detecting, characterizing, and localizing sources in a variety of fields, including nuclear physics, security, nuclear accident response, nuclear medicine, and astronomy. Compton imaging in particular provides sensitivity to weak sources and good angular resolution in a large field of view. However, the photon origin in a single event sequence is normally only limited to the surface of a cone. If the initial direction of the Compton-scattered electron can be measured, the cone can be reduced to a cone segment with width depending on the uncertainty in the direction measurement, providing a corresponding increase in imaging sensitivity. Measurement of the electron's initial direction in an efficient detection material requires very fine position resolution due to the electron's short range and tortuous path. A thick (650 mum), fully-depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) developed for infrared astronomy has 10.5-mum position resolution in two dimensions, enabling the initial trajectory measurement of electrons of energy as low as 100 keV. This is the first time the initial trajectories of electrons of such low energies have been measured in a solid material. In this work, the CCD's efficacy as a gamma-ray detector is demonstrated experimentally, using a reconstruction algorithm to measure the initial electron direction from the CCD track image. In addition, models of fast electron interaction physics, charge transport and readout were used to generate modeled tracks with known initial direction. These modeled tracks allowed the development and refinement of the reconstruction algorithm. The angular sensitivity of the reconstruction algorithm is evaluated extensively with models for tracks below 480 keV, showing a FWHM as low as 20° in the pixel plane, and 30° RMS sensitivity to the magnitude of the out-of-plane angle. The measurement of the trajectories of electrons with energies as low as 100 keV have the potential to make electron

  13. Advanced human machine interaction for an image interpretation workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, S.; Martin, M.; van de Camp, F.; Peinsipp-Byma, E.; Beyerer, J.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, many new interaction technologies have been developed that enhance the usability of computer systems and allow for novel types of interaction. The areas of application for these technologies have mostly been in gaming and entertainment. However, in professional environments, there are especially demanding tasks that would greatly benefit from improved human machine interfaces as well as an overall improved user experience. We, therefore, envisioned and built an image-interpretation-workstation of the future, a multi-monitor workplace comprised of four screens. Each screen is dedicated to a complex software product such as a geo-information system to provide geographic context, an image annotation tool, software to generate standardized reports and a tool to aid in the identification of objects. Using self-developed systems for hand tracking, pointing gestures and head pose estimation in addition to touchscreens, face identification, and speech recognition systems we created a novel approach to this complex task. For example, head pose information is used to save the position of the mouse cursor on the currently focused screen and to restore it as soon as the same screen is focused again while hand gestures allow for intuitive manipulation of 3d objects in mid-air. While the primary focus is on the task of image interpretation, all of the technologies involved provide generic ways of efficiently interacting with a multi-screen setup and could be utilized in other fields as well. In preliminary experiments, we received promising feedback from users in the military and started to tailor the functionality to their needs

  14. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for liver imaging: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Veronica; Borghi, Alberto; Piscaglia, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS), providing relevant informations not available with non-enhanced ultrasonography, greatly impacted the practice of liver imaging. The characterization of focal liver lesions (FLLs), is obtained in a rapid, accurate and safe way and is considered the main hepatic indication; however CEUS offers other established or emergent relevant applications. Metastases detection and assessment of response to locoregional tumor treatment are accepted applications with specific indications. Needle guidance in case of poorly or non visible target lesions at conventional ultrasound is also accepted. The early assessment of response to systemic treatment, and in particular to antiangiogenic ones, by quantification software is an emergent application. The manageability of CEUS determined also its use in the operating theatre, improving the accuracy of intraoperatory US with a significant impact on final surgical strategy. In cirrhotic patients, the role of CEUS was proven highly accurate and sensitive in the characterization of portal vein thrombosis, by identification of contrast arterial enhancement inside the thrombus, that occurs only in case of neoplastic origin. In recent years microbubbles taken up by Kupffer cells, thus possessing a "postvascular" phase, were registered as ultrasound contrast agent in Japan (Sonazoid). During the post-vascular phase tumoral tissue tend to appear as a contrast defect image due to the lack of Kupffer cells, strongly contributing to tumor staging beside characterization. Newly developed techniques, such as fusion imaging or real-time three dimensional US, in addition to other applications of CEUS, in terms of post-transplantation or cholecystitis-related complications, have been recently proposed and will be discussed.

  15. Advanced Thermal Emission Imaging Systems Definition and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, Karl; Nava, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS), Raytheon Company, is pleased to submit this quarterly progress report of the work performed in the third quarter of Year 2 of the Advanced THEMIS Project, July through September 2002. We review here progress in the proposed tasks. During July through September 2002 progress was made in two major tasks, Spectral Response Characterization and Flight Instrument Definition. Because of staffing problems and technical problems earlier in the program we have refocused the remaining time and budget on the key technical tasks. Current technical problems with a central piece of test equipment has lead us to request a 1 quarter extension to the period of performance. This request is being made through a separate letter independent of this report.

  16. Magnetic particle imaging: advancements and perspectives for real-time in vivo monitoring and image-guided therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablico-Lansigan, Michele H.; Situ, Shu F.; Samia, Anna Cristina S.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging biomedical imaging technology that allows the direct quantitative mapping of the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. MPI's increased sensitivity and short image acquisition times foster the creation of tomographic images with high temporal and spatial resolution. The contrast and sensitivity of MPI is envisioned to transcend those of other medical imaging modalities presently used, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray scans, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this review, we present an overview of the recent advances in the rapidly developing field of MPI. We begin with a basic introduction of the fundamentals of MPI, followed by some highlights over the past decade of the evolution of strategies and approaches used to improve this new imaging technique. We also examine the optimization of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers used for imaging, underscoring the importance of size homogeneity and surface engineering. Finally, we present some future research directions for MPI, emphasizing the novel and exciting opportunities that it offers as an important tool for real-time in vivo monitoring. All these opportunities and capabilities that MPI presents are now seen as potential breakthrough innovations in timely disease diagnosis, implant monitoring, and image-guided therapeutics.

  17. Advanced Tomographic Imaging Methods for the Analysis of Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    practical point-of-view, these CT resultg suggest that machining -1.5 m from each side of the 38 mg/cm would produce a foam with a reasonably uniform...NMR spectra of samples taken from the left (closest to the cord) and right sides of the right hand layer show the elastomeric components of these to...12.8 mm. One two-component layer, due to the inner liner of the tire, is barely visible on the right side of the Figure 5. Image (80 x 80 x 500 um

  18. Mueller matrix signature in advanced fluorescence microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Qiu, Jianjun; Kao, Fu-Jen; Diaspro, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated the measurement and characterization of the polarization properties of a fluorescence signal using four-channel photon counting based Stokes-Mueller polarization microscopy. Thus, Lu-Chipman decomposition was applied to extract the critical polarization properties such as depolarization, linear retardance and the optical rotation of collagen type I fiber. We observed the spatial distribution of anisotropic and helical molecules of collagen from the reconstructed 2D Mueller images based on the fluorescence signal in a pixel-by-pixel manner.

  19. Advanced imaging microscope tools applied to microgravity research investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, L.; Samson, J.; Conrad, D.; Clark, K.

    1998-01-01

    The inability to observe and interact with experiments on orbit has been an impediment for both basic research and commercial ventures using the shuttle. In order to open the frontiers of space, the Center for Microgravity Automation Technology has developed a unique and innovative system for conducting experiments at a distance, the ``Remote Scientist.'' The Remote Scientist extends laboratory automation capability to the microgravity environment. While the Remote Scientist conceptually encompasses a broad spectrum of elements and functionalities, the development approach taken is to: • establish a baseline capability that is both flexible and versatile • incrementally augment the baseline with additional functions over time. Since last year, the application of the Remote Scientist has changed from protein crystal growth to tissue culture, specifically, the development of skeletal muscle under varying levels of tension. This system includes a series of bioreactor chambers that allow for three-dimensional growth of muscle tissue on a membrane suspended between the two ends of a programmable force transducer that can provide automated or investigator-initiated tension on the developing tissue. A microscope objective mounted on a translation carriage allows for high-resolution microscopy along a large area of the tissue. These images will be mosaiced on orbit to detect features and structures that span multiple images. The use of fluorescence and pseudo-confocal microscopy will maximize the observational capabilities of this system. A series of ground-based experiments have been performed to validate the bioreactor, the force transducer, the translation carriage and the image acquisition capabilities of the Remote Scientist. • The bioreactor is capable of sustaining three dimensional tissue culture growth over time. • The force transducer can be programmed to provide static tension on cells or to simulate either slow or fast growth of underlying tissues in

  20. Advances in non-invasive imaging of intracranial vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, H. R.; Grieve, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Intra-arterial catheter angiography has, in the past, been the mainstay for the investigation of intracranial vascular disease. It is, however, invasive, usually requires in-patients admission, and is associated with a rate of neurological complications between 1% and 3%. In recent years, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and CT angiography (CTA) have emerged as non-invasive alternatives for imaging blood vessels and have made a significant impact on neuroradiological investigations. It is the purpose of this article to explain the basic technical principles of these two methods and to give an overview of their current clinical applications. PMID:10700757

  1. Picture archiving and communication system and its impact on image viewing in physical therapy practice.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Reg B; Fallano, Joel; Shannon, Kenneth J; Carrino, John A; Sinclair, Jacquelyn; Khorasani, Ramin

    2006-12-01

    Imaging plays an increasing role in physical therapy (PT) practice. We sought to determine if picture archiving and communication system (PACS) deployment would increase the proportion of imaging studies viewed by physical therapists (PTs) at the point of care and to assess PTs' perception of the value of access to imaging information. The study was performed in a 720-bed urban teaching hospital where an average of 2,000 rehabilitation visits per month are performed by 12 PTs. We compared the proportion of imaging studies viewed by PTs before and after PACS implementation. We surveyed PTs to assess their perception on the value of access to imaging studies. Film library records pre-PACS and web server audit trail post-PACS implementation were reviewed to measure access. Chi-square was used to compare proportions and trends. During the 3-month period before PACS usage, PTs viewed 1% (6/505) of imaging studies, citing time as the primary barrier. Post-PACS, the proportion of imaging studies viewed rose from 28% (95/344, second month) to 84% (163/192, fifth month) (p < 0.0001, chi-square). Most PTs believed that access to imaging studies has high value and has a positive impact on clinical practice. Physical therapists rarely viewed imaging studies before PACS due to time barriers. They viewed more imaging studies (84%) post-PACS and felt that access to imaging studies has a positive impact on clinical practice. Further studies are needed to assess whether PACS enhances PTs' clinical decision making and improves patient outcomes.

  2. Dawn of Advanced Molecular Medicine: Nanotechnological Advancements in Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Shaffer, Travis M.; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role not only in our everyday life (with all its benefits and dangers) but also in medicine. Nanoparticles are to date the most intriguing option to deliver high concentrations of agents specifically and directly to cancer cells; therefore, a wide variety of these nanomaterials has been developed and explored. These span the range from simple nanoagents to sophisticated smart devices for drug delivery or imaging. Nanomaterials usually provide a large surface area, allowing for decoration with a large amount of moieties on the surface for either additional functionalities or targeting. Besides using particles solely for imaging purposes, they can also carry as a payload a therapeutic agent. If both are combined within the same particle, a theranostic agent is created. The sophistication of highly developed nanotechnology targeting approaches provides a promising means for many clinical implementations and can provide improved applications for otherwise suboptimal formulations. In this review we will explore nanotechnology both for imaging and therapy to provide a general overview of the field and its impact on cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:25271430

  3. INVITED REVIEW--IMAGE REGISTRATION IN VETERINARY RADIATION ONCOLOGY: INDICATIONS, IMPLICATIONS, AND FUTURE ADVANCES.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yang; Lawrence, Jessica; Cheng, Kun; Montgomery, Dean; Forrest, Lisa; Mclaren, Duncan B; McLaughlin, Stephen; Argyle, David J; Nailon, William H

    2016-01-01

    The field of veterinary radiation therapy (RT) has gained substantial momentum in recent decades with significant advances in conformal treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), and intensity-modulated (IMRT) techniques. At the root of these advancements lie improvements in tumor imaging, image alignment (registration), target volume delineation, and identification of critical structures. Image registration has been widely used to combine information from multimodality images such as computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET) to improve the accuracy of radiation delivery and reliably identify tumor-bearing areas. Many different techniques have been applied in image registration. This review provides an overview of medical image registration in RT and its applications in veterinary oncology. A summary of the most commonly used approaches in human and veterinary medicine is presented along with their current use in IGRT and adaptive radiation therapy (ART). It is important to realize that registration does not guarantee that target volumes, such as the gross tumor volume (GTV), are correctly identified on the image being registered, as limitations unique to registration algorithms exist. Research involving novel registration frameworks for automatic segmentation of tumor volumes is ongoing and comparative oncology programs offer a unique opportunity to test the efficacy of proposed algorithms.

  4. United by Goals: There Is No Integrated Advancement without Communications and Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiConsiglio, John

    2011-01-01

    The idea behind integrated advancement is simple and dates back to the 1990s: A strong relationship between advancement offices conserves resources. It leads to a more efficient workforce. It portrays a highly unified message to stakeholders, including donors, alumni, local officials, and opinion leaders. In short, the entire advancement team…

  5. Adaptation of commercial microscopes for advanced imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brideau, Craig; Poon, Kelvin; Stys, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Today's commercially available microscopes offer a wide array of options to accommodate common imaging experiments. Occasionally, an experimental goal will require an unusual light source, filter, or even irregular sample that is not compatible with existing equipment. In these situations the ability to modify an existing microscopy platform with custom accessories can greatly extend its utility and allow for experiments not possible with stock equipment. Light source conditioning/manipulation such as polarization, beam diameter or even custom source filtering can easily be added with bulk components. Custom and after-market detectors can be added to external ports using optical construction hardware and adapters. This paper will present various examples of modifications carried out on commercial microscopes to address both atypical imaging modalities and research needs. Violet and near-ultraviolet source adaptation, custom detection filtering, and laser beam conditioning and control modifications will be demonstrated. The availability of basic `building block' parts will be discussed with respect to user safety, construction strategies, and ease of use.

  6. Advanced electron crystallography through model-based imaging

    PubMed Central

    Van Aert, Sandra; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T.; den Dekker, Arnold J.; Van Dyck, Dirk; Bals, Sara; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2016-01-01

    The increasing need for precise determination of the atomic arrangement of non-periodic structures in materials design and the control of nanostructures explains the growing interest in quantitative transmission electron microscopy. The aim is to extract precise and accurate numbers for unknown structure parameters including atomic positions, chemical concentrations and atomic numbers. For this purpose, statistical parameter estimation theory has been shown to provide reliable results. In this theory, observations are considered purely as data planes, from which structure parameters have to be determined using a parametric model describing the images. As such, the positions of atom columns can be measured with a precision of the order of a few picometres, even though the resolution of the electron microscope is still one or two orders of magnitude larger. Moreover, small differences in average atomic number, which cannot be distinguished visually, can be quantified using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy images. In addition, this theory allows one to measure compositional changes at interfaces, to count atoms with single-atom sensitivity, and to reconstruct atomic structures in three dimensions. This feature article brings the reader up to date, summarizing the underlying theory and highlighting some of the recent applications of quantitative model-based transmisson electron microscopy. PMID:26870383

  7. Advanced image manipulation controller for cockpit LCD displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Gopal

    1998-09-01

    Key features of a family of LSI integrated circuits will be explained. These DSP devices are capable of taking digital inputs of either NTSC/PAL/SECAM video in YCrCb 4:2:2 format, or computer graphics data from a PC in RGB 8:8:8 format, de- interlacing the data (if required), then re-sizing the resolution of the image independently in the horizontal and vertical axes to fit arbitrary display resolutions. The devices use patented digital filter techniques to perform zoom-only or both zoom as well as shrink. The devices also include registers that allow for cropping the active input image, and registers to completely control horizontal and vertical timing parameters for LCD displays. Current members of this family work at clock rates of up to 84 MHz, at resolutions of 1024 X 768, and upcoming members of the family will raise both the target resolution and pixel rates. All these parts generate all timing signals required by the display. Typically, no external memory is required for zooming and shrinking. Cockpit display applications that could benefit from this chip include processing and display of video, FLIR, EFIS/EICAS displays, radar, digital terrain maps, ultrasonic/sonar, computer graphics/symbol generators, etc. The devices are members of the gmZx family of scaling chips, first introduced in April '97.

  8. Crosswell Imaging Technology & Advanced DSR Navigation for Horizontal Directional Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Stolarczyk

    2008-08-08

    The objective of Phase II is to develop and demonstrate real-time measurement-while-drilling (MWD) for guidance and navigation of drill strings during horizontal drilling operations applicable to both short and long holes. The end product of Phase II is a functional drill-string assembly outfitted with a commercial version of Drill String Radar (DSR). Project Objectives Develop and demonstrate a dual-phase methodology of in-seam drilling, imaging, and structure confirmation. This methodology, illustrated in Figure 1, includes: (1) Using RIM to image between drill holes for seam thickness estimates and in-seam structures detection. Completed, February 2005; and (2) Using DSR for real-time MWD guidance and navigation of drillstrings during horizontal drilling operations. Completed, November 2008. As of November 2008, the Phase II portion of Contract DE-FC26-04NT42085 is about 99% complete, including milestones and tasks original outlined as Phase II work. The one percent deficiency results from MSHA-related approvals which have yet to be granted (at the time of reporting). These approvals are pending and are do not negatively impact the scope of work or project objectives.

  9. Advanced 3D polarimetric flash ladar imaging through foliage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, James T.; Moran, Steven E.; Roddier, Nicolas; Vercillo, Richard; Bridges, Robert; Austin, William

    2003-08-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional flash ladar system technologies are under development that enables remote identification of vehicles and armament hidden by heavy tree canopies. We have developed a sensor architecture and design that employs a 3D flash ladar receiver to address this mission. The receiver captures 128×128×>30 three-dimensional images for each laser pulse fired. The voxel size of the image is 3"×3"×4" at the target location. A novel signal-processing algorithm has been developed that achieves sub-voxel (sub-inch) range precision estimates of target locations within each pixel. Polarization discrimination is implemented to augment the target-to-foliage contrast. When employed, this method improves the range resolution of the system beyond the classical limit (based on pulsewidth and detection bandwidth). Experiments were performed with a 6 ns long transmitter pulsewidth that demonstrate 1-inch range resolution of a tank-like target that is occluded by foliage and a range precision of 0.3" for unoccluded targets.

  10. Aircraft corrosion and crack inspection using advanced magneto-optic imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, David K.; Fitzpatrick, Gerald L.; Skaugset, Richard L.; Shih, William C.

    1996-11-01

    A next generation magneto-optic imaging system, the MOI 303, has recently been introduced with the ability to generate real-time, complete, 2D eddy current images of cracks and corrosion in aircraft. The new imaging system described features advanced, digital remote control operation and on- screen display of setup parameters for ease of use. This instrument gives the inspector the capability to more rapidly scan large surfaces areas. The magneto-optic/eddy current imaging technology has already been formally approved for inspection of surface cracking on an aircraft fuselage. The improved magneto-optic imager is now poised to aid rapid inspection for corrosion and subsurface cracking. Previous magneto-optic imaging systems required the inspector to scan the surface twice for complete inspection coverage: a second scan was necessary with the imager rotated about 90 degrees from the orientation of the first pass. However, by providing eddy current excitation simultaneously from two orthogonal directions, complete, filled-in magneto-optic images are now generated regardless of the orientation of the imager. THese images are considerably easier to interpret and evaluate. In addition, there is a synergism obtained in applying eddy current excitation simultaneously in multiple directions: better penetration is obtained and the resulting images have better signal to noise levels compared to those produced with eddy current excitation applied only in one direction. Examples of these improved images are presented.

  11. Advanced Image Processing for Defect Visualization in Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Winfree, William P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of a defect visualization process based on pulse infrared thermography are presented. Algorithms have been developed to reduce the amount of operator participation required in the process of interpreting thermographic images. The algorithms determine the defect's depth and size from the temporal and spatial thermal distributions that exist on the surface of the investigated object following thermal excitation. A comparison of the results from thermal contrast, time derivative, and phase analysis methods for defect visualization are presented. These comparisons are based on three dimensional simulations of a test case representing a plate with multiple delaminations. Comparisons are also based on experimental data obtained from a specimen with flat bottom holes and a composite panel with delaminations.

  12. Advanced satellite sensors: Low Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) imager

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Imaging of low energy neutral atoms (LENDs) created by electron capture by magnetospheric plasma ions from interactions with cold geocoronal neutrals promises to be a revolutionary technique for providing unprecedented information about the global structure and dynamics of the terrestrial magnetosphere. This has significant implications in space weather forecasting, weather-induced satellite upset diagnostics, and revolutionary insights into global magnetospheric physics. The Los Alamos Space and Atmospheric Sciences Group has completed extensive neutral atom simulations and detailed instrument definition, and we designed a proof-of-concept demonstration prototype and have obtained externally- funded programs for full instrument development

  13. Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  14. Communication: An Arena of Development. Advances in Applied Developmental Psychology, Volume 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budwig, Nancy, Ed.; Uzgiris, Ina C., Ed.; Wertsch, James V., Ed.

    This volume compiles papers from a 1996 conference on communication held at Clark University (Worcester, Massachusetts). The goal of the conference was to share the work and ideas regarding the development of communication and meaning comprehension. The papers are organized into three parts, covering the organization and the origins of…

  15. The Research Communication Continuum: Linking Public Engagement Skills to the Advancement of Cross-Disciplinary Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpert, Carol Lynn

    2016-01-01

    This paper theorizes and provides evidence of a "Research Communication Continuum" in which acquisition of skills conducive to communication with broader audiences contributes to greater efficacy in cross-disciplinary discourse and collaboration among scientists and engineers engaged in research; and, vice versa, acquisition of skills…

  16. Advanced Theory of Mind in Children Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundqvist, Anett; Ronnberg, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on the attainment of Theory of Mind (ToM) in children (aged 6 to 13) with complex communication needs who used augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The AAC group (n = 14) was matched to a younger group, without disabilities, vis-a-vis nonverbal mental age. A second comparison group consisting of children with mild…

  17. Advanced Optical Technologies in NASA's Space Communication Program: Status, Challenges, and Future Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John

    2004-01-01

    A goal of the NASA Space Communications Project is to enable broad coverage for high-data-rate delivery to the users by means of ground, air, and space-based assets. The NASA Enterprise need will be reviewed. A number of optical space communications technologies being developed by NASA will be described, and the prospective applications will be discussed.

  18. Advanced diagnostic imaging and surgical treatment of an odontogenic retromasseteric abscess in a guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Capello, V; Lennox, A

    2015-02-01

    A two-year-old guinea pig presented for difficulty chewing. Examination and diagnostic imaging, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance, revealed an odontogenic retromasseteric abscess associated with a mandibular cheek tooth. Treatment included removal of the abscess and marsupialisation of the surgical site for repeated debridement and healing by second intention. Unique features of this case included the use of advanced diagnostic imaging and utilisation of marsupialisation for surgical correction.

  19. Approximating tasseled cap values to evaluate brightness, greenness, and wetness for the Advanced Land Imager (ALI)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamamoto, Kristina H.; Finn, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The Tasseled Cap transformation is a method of image band conversion to enhance spectral information. It primarily is used to detect vegetation using the derived brightness, greenness, and wetness bands. An approximation of Tasseled Cap values for the Advanced Land Imager was investigated and compared to the Landsat Thematic Mapper Tasseled Cap values. Despite sharing similar spectral, temporal, and spatial resolution, the two systems are not interchangeable with regard to Tasseled Cap matrices.

  20. Advanced Communication Architectures and Technologies for Missions to the Outer Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K.; Hayden, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Missions to the outer planets would be considerably enhanced by the implementation of a future space communication infrastructure that utilizes relay stations placed at strategic locations in the solar system. These relay stations would operate autonomously and handle remote mission command and data traffic on a prioritized demand access basis. Such a system would enhance communications from that of the current direct communications between the planet and Earth. The system would also provide high rate data communications to outer planet missions, clear communications paths during times when the sun occults the mission spacecraft as viewed from Earth, and navigational "lighthouses" for missions utilizing onboard autonomous operations. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Recent Advances in Photoacoustic Imaging for Deep-Tissue Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng; Lin, Jing; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI), a novel imaging modality based on photoacoustic effect, shows great promise in biomedical applications. By converting pulsed laser excitation into ultrasonic emission, PAI combines the advantages of optical imaging and ultrasound imaging, which benefits rich contrast, high resolution and deep tissue penetration. In this paper, we introduced recent advances of contrast agents, applications, and signal enhancement strategies for PAI. The PA contrast agents were categorized by their components, mainly including inorganic and organic PA contrast agents. The applications of PAI were summarized as follows: deep tumor imaging, therapeutic responses monitoring, metabolic imaging, pH detection, enzyme detection, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection, metal ions detection, and so on. The enhancement strategies of PA signals were highlighted. In the end, we elaborated on the challenges and provided perspectives of PAI for deep-tissue biomedical applications. PMID:27877243

  2. Correlation between iodine-131 MIBG imaging and biological markers in advanced neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.D.; Helson, L.; Benua, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging was performed in 38 patients with advanced neuroblastoma. Abnormal images were found in patients with elevations of urinary vanillylmandelic acid and dopamine and high serum neuron-specific enolase levels. Normal or minimal elevation of markers was seen in patients with negative images. In follow-up studies after chemotherapy, the disappearance of abnormal uptake was noted in those patients with normal marker values. A persistently abnormal uptake occurred in patients with high marker values. Conversion from a normal image to an abnormal image also occurred in patients whose markers became elevated. I-131 MIBG imaging is sensitive in detecting active foci of a neuroblastoma and is useful in monitoring chemotherapy in these patients.

  3. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain pathway, from injury site to behavioral consequence, in a quantitative manner. Such a development could lead to diagnostics determining the source of pain (peripheral or central), objective monitoring of treatment progression, and, hopefully, objective biomarkers of pain. PMID:24228169

  4. Recent Advances in Photoacoustic Imaging for Deep-Tissue Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Lin, Jing; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI), a novel imaging modality based on photoacoustic effect, shows great promise in biomedical applications. By converting pulsed laser excitation into ultrasonic emission, PAI combines the advantages of optical imaging and ultrasound imaging, which benefits rich contrast, high resolution and deep tissue penetration. In this paper, we introduced recent advances of contrast agents, applications, and signal enhancement strategies for PAI. The PA contrast agents were categorized by their components, mainly including inorganic and organic PA contrast agents. The applications of PAI were summarized as follows: deep tumor imaging, therapeutic responses monitoring, metabolic imaging, pH detection, enzyme detection, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection, metal ions detection, and so on. The enhancement strategies of PA signals were highlighted. In the end, we elaborated on the challenges and provided perspectives of PAI for deep-tissue biomedical applications.

  5. Advanced imaging systems for diagnostic investigations applied to Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peccenini, E.; Albertin, F.; Bettuzzi, M.; Brancaccio, R.; Casali, F.; Morigi, M. P.; Petrucci, F.

    2014-12-01

    The diagnostic investigations are an important resource in the studies on Cultural Heritage to enhance the knowledge on execution techniques, materials and conservation status of a work of art. In this field, due to the great historical and artistic value of the objects, preservation is the main concern; for this reason, new technological equipment has been designed and developed in the Physics Departments of the Universities of Ferrara and Bologna to enhance the non-invasive approach to the study of pictorial artworks and other objects of cultural interest. Infrared (IR) reflectography, X-ray radiography and computed tomography (CT), applied to works of art, are joined by the same goal: to get hidden information on execution techniques and inner structure pursuing the non-invasiveness of the methods, although using different setup and physical principles. In this work transportable imaging systems to investigate large objects in museums and galleries are presented. In particular, 2D scanning devices for IR reflectography and X-ray radiography, CT systems and some applications to the Cultural Heritage are described.

  6. Advanced tools for astronomical time series and image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    The algorithms described here, which I have developed for applications in X-ray and γ-ray astronomy, will hopefully be of use in other ways, perhaps aiding in the exploration of modern astronomy's data cornucopia. The goal is to describe principled approaches to some ubiquitous problems, such as detection and characterization of periodic and aperiodic signals, estimation of time delays between multiple time series, and source detection in noisy images with noisy backgrounds. The latter problem is related to detection of clusters in data spaces of various dimensions. A goal of this work is to achieve a unifying view of several related topics: signal detection and characterization, cluster identification, classification, density estimation, and multivariate regression. In addition to being useful for analysis of data from space-based and ground-based missions, these algorithms may be a basis for a future automatic science discovery facility, and in turn provide analysis tools for the Virtual Observatory. This chapter has ties to those by Larry Bretthorst, Tom Loredo, Alanna Connors, Fionn Murtagh, Jim Berger, David van Dyk, Vicent Martinez & Enn Saar.

  7. Significant advancement of mass spectrometry imaging for food chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Zaima, Nobuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Food contains various compounds that have an impact on our daily lives. Many technologies have been established to analyze these molecules of interest in foods. However, the analysis of the spatial distribution of these compounds in foods using conventional technology, such as high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is difficult. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) is considered an ideal complementary approach. MALDI-MSI is a two-dimensional MALDI-MS technology that can detect compounds in a tissue section without extraction, purification, separation, or labeling. MALDI-MSI can be used to visualize the spatial distribution of chemical compounds or biomolecules in foods. Although the methodology of MALDI-MSI in food science is not yet fully established, the versatility of MALDI-MSI is expected to open a new frontier in food science. Herein, we describe the principles and applications of MALDI-MSI in food science and related fields.

  8. High-speed indoor optical wireless communication system with single channel imaging receiver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Lim, Christina; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2012-04-09

    In this paper we experimentally investigate a gigabit indoor optical wireless communication system with single channel imaging receiver. It is shown that the use of single channel imaging receiver rejects most of the background light. This single channel imaging receiver is composed of an imaging lens and a small photo-sensitive area photodiode attached on a 2-axis actuator. The actuator and photodiode are placed on the focal plane of the lens to search for the focused light spot. The actuator is voice-coil based and it is low cost and commercially available. With this single channel imaging receiver, bit rate as high as 12.5 Gbps has been successfully demonstrated and the maximum error-free (BER<10⁻⁹) beam footprint is even larger than 1 m. Compared with our previous experimental results with a single wide field-of-view non-imaging receiver, an improvement in error-free beam footprint of >20% has been achieved. When this system is integrated with our recently proposed optical wireless based indoor localization system, both high speed wireless communication and mobility can be provided to users over the entire room. Furthermore, theoretical analysis has been carried out and the simulation results agree well with the experiments. In addition, since the rough location information of the user is available in our proposed system, instead of searching for the focused light spot over a large area on the focal plane of the lens, only a small possible area needs to be scanned. By further pre-setting a proper comparison threshold when searching for the focused light spot, the time needed for searching can be further reduced.

  9. The Image-Accumulation Technique as a Variable in Multiple-Image Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Peter Tim-Kui; Reeve, Robert H.

    A study was conducted to determine the relative effectiveness of various techniques of accumulating and organizing images in multiple-screen, slide-tape presentations of geographical information. Identical stimulus materials were presented in five different ways from sequential presentation to accumulated presentation to programed accumulated…

  10. A geometry-based image search engine for advanced RADARSAT-1/2 GIS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotamraju, Vinay; Rabus, Bernhard; Busler, Jennifer

    2012-06-01

    Space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors, such as RADARSAT-1 and -2, enable a multitude of defense and security applications owing to their unique capabilities of cloud penetration, day/night imaging and multi-polarization imaging. As a result, advanced SAR image time series exploitation techniques such as Interferometric SAR (InSAR) and Radargrammetry are now routinely used in applications such as underground tunnel monitoring, infrastructure monitoring and DEM generation. Imaging geometry, as determined by the satellite orbit and imaged terrain, plays a critical role in the success of such techniques. This paper describes the architecture and the current status of development of a geometry-based search engine that allows the search and visualization of archived and future RADARSAT-1 and -2 images appropriate for a variety of advanced SAR techniques and applications. Key features of the search engine's scalable architecture include (a) Interactive GIS-based visualization of the search results; (b) A client-server architecture for online access that produces up-to-date searches of the archive images and that can, in future, be extended to acquisition planning; (c) A techniquespecific search mode, wherein an expert user explicitly sets search parameters to find appropriate images for advanced SAR techniques such as InSAR and Radargrammetry; (d) A future application-specific search mode, wherein all search parameters implicitly default to preset values according to the application of choice such as tunnel monitoring, DEM generation and deformation mapping; (f) Accurate baseline calculations for InSAR searches, and, optimum beam configuration for Radargrammetric searches; (g) Simulated quick look images and technique-specific sensitivity maps in the future.

  11. Application of wavelets to image coding in an rf-link communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, C. S. J.; Conners, Gary H.; Muczynski, Joe

    1995-04-01

    The joint University of Rochester/Rochester Institute of Technology `Center for Electronic Imaging Systems' (CEIS) is designed to focus on research problems of interest to industrial sponsors, especially the Rochester Imaging Consortium. Compression of tactical images for transmission over an rf link is an example of this type of research project which is being worked on in collaboration with one of the CEIS sponsors, Harris Corporation/RF Communications. The Harris digital video imagery transmission system (DVITS) is designed to fulfill the need to transmit secure imagery between unwired locations at real-time rates. DVITS specializes in transmission systems for users who rely on hf equipment operating at the low end of the frequency spectrum. However, the inherently low bandwidth of hf combined with transmission characteristics such as fading and dropout severely restrict the effective throughput. The problem at designing a system such as DVITS is particularly challenging because of bandwidth and signal/noise limitations, and because of the dynamic nature of the operational environment. In this paper, a novel application of wavelets in tactical image coding is proposed to replace the current DCT compression algorithm in the DVITS system. THe effects of channel noise on the received image are determined and various design strategies combining image segmentation, compression, and error correction are described.

  12. Effect of Picture Archiving and Communication System Image Manipulation on the Agreement of Chest Radiograph Interpretation in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Denise A.; Naqvi, Asad Ahmed; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth; Flavin, Michael P.; Manson, David; Soboleski, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Variability in image interpretation has been attributed to differences in the interpreters’ knowledge base, experience level, and access to the clinical scenario. Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) has allowed the user to manipulate the images while developing their impression of the radiograph. The aim of this study was to determine the agreement of chest radiograph (CXR) impressions among radiologists and neonatologists and help determine the effect of image manipulation with PACS on report impression. Materials and Methods: Prospective cohort study included 60 patients from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit undergoing CXRs. Three radiologists and three neonatologists reviewed two consecutive frontal CXRs of each patient. Each physician was allowed manipulation of images as needed to provide a decision of “improved,” “unchanged,” or “disease progression” lung disease for each patient. Each physician repeated the process once more; this time, they were not allowed to individually manipulate the images, but an independent radiologist presets the image brightness and contrast to best optimize the CXR appearance. Percent agreement and opposing reporting views were calculated between all six physicians for each of the two methods (allowing and not allowing image manipulation). Results: One hundred percent agreement in image impression between all six observers was only seen in 5% of cases when allowing image manipulation; 100% agreement was seen in 13% of the cases when there was no manipulation of the images. Conclusion: Agreement in CXR interpretation is poor; the ability to manipulate the images on PACS results in a decrease in agreement in the interpretation of these studies. New methods to standardize image appearance and allow improved comparison with previous studies should be sought to improve clinician agreement in interpretation consistency and advance patient care. PMID:27274414

  13. Advances in augmentative and alternative communication as quality-of-life technology.

    PubMed

    Hill, Katya

    2010-02-01

    Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) technology is recommended for individuals with significant communication disorders, who may have motor limitations and other challenges that impact quality of life (QOL). The goal of AAC treatment is to optimize communication. This article presents innovations to the primary, secondary, and tertiary AAC components that are considered by rehabilitation clinicians when matching people with technology (MPT). Language considerations are paramount to the MPT process, and innovations are discussed on how features may enhance language performance. AAC technology has made performance and outcome gains contributing to the QOL of people who cannot speak.

  14. Noncompaction cardiomyopathy: The role of advanced multimodality imaging techniques in diagnosis and assessment.

    PubMed

    Chebrolu, Lakshmi H; Mehta, Anjlee M; Nanda, Navin C

    2017-02-01

    Noncompaction cardiomyopathy (NCCM) is a unique cardiomyopathy with a diverse array of genotypic and phenotypic manifestations. Its hallmark morphology consists of a bilayered myocardium with a compact epicardial layer and prominent trabeculations that comprise the noncompacted endocardial layer. The controversial diagnostic criteria for NCCM have been frequently discussed in the literature. This review touches on those diagnostic criteria, delves further into the evolving use of advanced imaging techniques within the major imaging modalities (echocardiography, computed tomography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging), and proposes an alternative algorithm incorporating these techniques for aiding with the diagnosis of NCCM.

  15. Imaging heterogeneous absorption distribution of advanced breast cancer by optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2010-01-01

    Tumor vascular patterns of advanced breast cancers are complex and heterogeneous. Two typical light absorption patterns of periphery enhancement and posterior shadowing have been observed when imaging these advanced cancers using optical tomography guided by ultrasound. We perform a series simulation and phantom experiments to systemically evaluate the effects of target parameters, target locations, and target optical properties on imaging periphery enhancement absorption distribution using reflection geometry. Large tumors are modeled as concentric semiellipsoidal targets of different outer shell and inner core optical properties. We show that larger targets of more than 3 to 4 cm diameter with outer shell thicknesses less than 1 cm can be resolved at a depth less than 3 cm. A clinical example is given to show the complex vasculature distributions seen from an advanced cancer. PMID:21198181

  16. Advanced endoscopic imaging for gastric cancer assessment: new insights with new optics?

    PubMed

    Serrano, M; Kikuste, I; Dinis-Ribeiro, M

    2014-12-01

    The most immediate strategy for improving survival of gastric cancer patients is secondary prevention through diagnosis of early gastric cancer either through screening or follow-up of individuals at high risk. Endoscopy examination is therefore of paramount importance and two general steps are to be known in assessing gastric mucosa - detection and characterization. Over the past decade, the advent of advanced endoscopic imaging technology led to diverse descriptions of these modalities reporting them to be useful in this setting. In this review, we aim at summarizing the current evidence on the use of advance imaging in individuals at high-risk (i.e., advance stages of gastric atrophy/intestinal metaplasia) and in those harbouring neoplastic lesions, and address its potential usefulness providing the readers a framework to use in daily practice. Further research is also suggested.

  17. TU-AB-204-04: Advances in CBCT for Breast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, J.

    2015-06-15

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  18. TU-AB-204-01: Advances in C-Arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.

    2015-06-15

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  19. TU-AB-204-03: Advances in CBCT for Orhtopaedics and Bone Health Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zbijewski, W.

    2015-06-15

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  20. MO-C-18A-01: Advances in Model-Based 3D Image Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G; Pan, X; Stayman, J; Samei, E

    2014-06-15

    Recent years have seen the emergence of CT image reconstruction techniques that exploit physical models of the imaging system, photon statistics, and even the patient to achieve improved 3D image quality and/or reduction of radiation dose. With numerous advantages in comparison to conventional 3D filtered backprojection, such techniques bring a variety of challenges as well, including: a demanding computational load associated with sophisticated forward models and iterative optimization methods; nonlinearity and nonstationarity in image quality characteristics; a complex dependency on multiple free parameters; and the need to understand how best to incorporate prior information (including patient-specific prior images) within the reconstruction process. The advantages, however, are even greater – for example: improved image quality; reduced dose; robustness to noise and artifacts; task-specific reconstruction protocols; suitability to novel CT imaging platforms and noncircular orbits; and incorporation of known characteristics of the imager and patient that are conventionally discarded. This symposium features experts in 3D image reconstruction, image quality assessment, and the translation of such methods to emerging clinical applications. Dr. Chen will address novel methods for the incorporation of prior information in 3D and 4D CT reconstruction techniques. Dr. Pan will show recent advances in optimization-based reconstruction that enable potential reduction of dose and sampling requirements. Dr. Stayman will describe a “task-based imaging” approach that leverages models of the imaging system and patient in combination with a specification of the imaging task to optimize both the acquisition and reconstruction process. Dr. Samei will describe the development of methods for image quality assessment in such nonlinear reconstruction techniques and the use of these methods to characterize and optimize image quality and dose in a spectrum of clinical