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Sample records for advanced insar time

  1. Characterizing and estimating noise in InSAR and InSAR time series with MODIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhart, William D.; Lohman, Rowena B.

    2013-01-01

    InSAR time series analysis is increasingly used to image subcentimeter displacement rates of the ground surface. The precision of InSAR observations is often affected by several noise sources, including spatially correlated noise from the turbulent atmosphere. Under ideal scenarios, InSAR time series techniques can substantially mitigate these effects; however, in practice the temporal distribution of InSAR acquisitions over much of the world exhibit seasonal biases, long temporal gaps, and insufficient acquisitions to confidently obtain the precisions desired for tectonic research. Here, we introduce a technique for constraining the magnitude of errors expected from atmospheric phase delays on the ground displacement rates inferred from an InSAR time series using independent observations of precipitable water vapor from MODIS. We implement a Monte Carlo error estimation technique based on multiple (100+) MODIS-based time series that sample date ranges close to the acquisitions times of the available SAR imagery. This stochastic approach allows evaluation of the significance of signals present in the final time series product, in particular their correlation with topography and seasonality. We find that topographically correlated noise in individual interferograms is not spatially stationary, even over short-spatial scales (<10 km). Overall, MODIS-inferred displacements and velocities exhibit errors of similar magnitude to the variability within an InSAR time series. We examine the MODIS-based confidence bounds in regions with a range of inferred displacement rates, and find we are capable of resolving velocities as low as 1.5 mm/yr with uncertainties increasing to ∼6 mm/yr in regions with higher topographic relief.

  2. Time Series Analysis of Insar Data: Methods and Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Sunar, Filiz; Wdowinski, Shimon; Cano-Cabral, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Time series analysis of InSAR data has emerged as an important tool for monitoring and measuring the displacement of the Earth's surface. Changes in the Earth's surface can result from a wide range of phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, variations in ground water levels, and changes in wetland water levels. Time series analysis is applied to interferometric phase measurements, which wrap around when the observed motion is larger than one-half of the radar wavelength. Thus, the spatio-temporal ''unwrapping" of phase observations is necessary to obtain physically meaningful results. Several different algorithms have been developed for time series analysis of InSAR data to solve for this ambiguity. These algorithms may employ different models for time series analysis, but they all generate a first-order deformation rate, which can be compared to each other. However, there is no single algorithm that can provide optimal results in all cases. Since time series analyses of InSAR data are used in a variety of applications with different characteristics, each algorithm possesses inherently unique strengths and weaknesses. In this review article, following a brief overview of InSAR technology, we discuss several algorithms developed for time series analysis of InSAR data using an example set of results for measuring subsidence rates in Mexico City.

  3. The Advancement of Intraplate Tectonic Motion Detection by the Use of Atmospherically Corrected InSAR Time-series and its Decomposition into a 3D Field Vector in South-East Sicily, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, A.; Bekaert, D. P.; Bonforte, A.; Guglielmino, F.; Hooper, A. J.; Stramondo, S.; Zucca, F.

    2014-12-01

    This study provides insights into the advancements gained by applying a tropospheric correction to a time-series InSAR small baseline network processed using the StaMPS software for the Hyblean Plateau in south-east Sicily, Italy. The contribution of the atmosphere is one of the major error sources in repeat-pass InSAR in general. For time-series analysis spatial and temporal "filtering" of the interferometric phase can be used to address atmospheric signals. This however might be at the cost of smoothing and removal of the "tectonic deformation". We applied a tropospheric correction to each interferogram based on estimates of the ERA-Interim weather model, provided by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). This approach is part of the InSAR Atmospheric Correction Toolbox (Bekaert et al, in prep) and converts the tropospheric water vapor content into the phase-delay of the radar line-of-sight. For the analysis we used 49 descending and 58 ascending Envisat SAR images, which cover the time period from 2003 until 2010. In addition, we have processed 30 SAR images of RADARSAT-2 for the period between 2010-2012. Furthermore, we used the different viewing geometries and the integration of GPS data to decompose the single line-of-sight velocities into a 3-dimensional field vector by applying the SISTEM approach (Guglielmino et al. 2011). First results reveal that the atmospherically corrected data retain the deformation signal along geological structures like the Scicli-Ragusa fault whilst the standard filtering approach is canceling out these very slow deformation patterns. Simultaneously, the variability of the signal in space is diminished and thus gives more confidence on the deformation patterns observed by the SAR. Consequently, the decomposition of the line-of-sight velocities and the integration with the GPS data allows us to retrieve a more realistic deformation field.

  4. InSAR data for monitoring land subsidence: time to think big

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, A.; Colombo, D.; Fumagalli, A.; Novali, F.; Rucci, A.

    2015-11-01

    Satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data have proven effective and valuable in the analysis of urban subsidence phenomena based on multi-temporal radar images. Results obtained by processing data acquired by different radar sensors, have shown the potential of InSAR and highlighted the key points for an operational use of this technology, namely: (1) regular acquisition over large areas of interferometric data stacks; (2) use of advanced processing algorithms, capable of estimating and removing atmospheric disturbances; (3) access to significant processing power for a regular update of the information over large areas. In this paper, we show how the operational potential of InSAR has been realized thanks to the recent advances in InSAR processing algorithms, the advent of cloud computing and the launch of new satellite platforms, specifically designed for InSAR analyses (e.g. Sentinel-1a operated by the ESA and ALOS2 operated by JAXA). The processing of thousands of SAR scenes to cover an entire nation has been performed successfully in Italy in a project financed by the Italian Ministry of the Environment. The challenge for the future is to pass from the historical analysis of SAR scenes already acquired in digital archives to a near real-time monitoring program where up to date deformation data are routinely provided to final users and decision makers.

  5. A Multiscale Approach to InSAR Time Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetland, E. A.; Muse, P.; Simons, M.; Lin, N.; Dicaprio, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    We present a technique to constrain time-dependent deformation from repeated satellite-based InSAR observations of a given region. This approach, which we call MInTS (Multiscale InSAR Time Series analysis), relies on a spatial wavelet decomposition to permit the inclusion of distance based spatial correlations in the observations while maintaining computational tractability. As opposed to single pixel InSAR time series techniques, MInTS takes advantage of both spatial and temporal characteristics of the deformation field. We use a weighting scheme which accounts for the presence of localized holes due to decorrelation or unwrapping errors in any given interferogram. We represent time-dependent deformation using a dictionary of general basis functions, capable of detecting both steady and transient processes. The estimation is regularized using a model resolution based smoothing so as to be able to capture rapid deformation where there are temporally dense radar acquisitions and to avoid oscillations during time periods devoid of acquisitions. MInTS also has the flexibility to explicitly parametrize known time-dependent processes that are expected to contribute to a given set of observations (e.g., co-seismic steps and post-seismic transients, secular variations, seasonal oscillations, etc.). We use cross validation to choose the regularization penalty parameter in the inversion of for the time-dependent deformation field. We demonstrate MInTS using a set of 63 ERS-1/2 and 29 Envisat interferograms for Long Valley Caldera.

  6. Advanced InSAR imaging for dune mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havivi, Shiran; August, Yitzhak; Blumberg, Dan G.; Rotman, Stanley R.

    2015-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970's, remote sensing imagery both optical and radar, are used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of Aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two images or more. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This research aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation, or, coherence change detection, can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the Nitzanim coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of varying levels of stability and vegetation cover and have been monitored meteorologically, geomorphologically and

  7. Bridge Deformation Monitoring: Instight From InSAR Time-Series And Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshiri, Roghayeh; Motagh, Mahdi; Baes, Marzieh; Sharifi, Mohammad-Ali

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the capability of advanced InSAR time-series techniques such as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) for monitoring of civil engineering structures like bridge. Deformation monitoring of bridges are essential to mitigate not only the financial and human losses, but also ecological and environmental-related problems. Assessment of deformation during bridge lifespan can provide invaluable insight for better planning and management. The study area, Lake Urmia Causeway (LUC) in northwest Iran, consists of one bridge and two embankments on both sides of it. The difference between the deformation rate of the embankments on both sides of the bridge may seriously damage the bridge itself, so it is very important to accurately monitor them in space and time in order to assess the state of the bridge concerning deformations. In this study we apply the InSAR time-series technique of SBAS for 58 SAR images including 10 ALOS, 30 Envisat and 18 TerraSAR-X (TSX) to assess deflation of embankments of Urmia bridge during 2003-2013. The InSAR results are used in a 2D Finite Element Model (FEM) to assess structural stability of the embankments.

  8. A multiscale approach to InSAR time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, M.; Hetland, E. A.; Muse, P.; Lin, Y. N.; Dicaprio, C.; Rickerby, A.

    2008-12-01

    We describe a new technique to constrain time-dependent deformation from repeated satellite-based InSAR observations of a given region. This approach, which we call MInTS (Multiscale analysis of InSAR Time Series), relies on a spatial wavelet decomposition to permit the inclusion of distance based spatial correlations in the observations while maintaining computational tractability. This approach also permits a consistent treatment of all data independent of the presence of localized holes in any given interferogram. In essence, MInTS allows one to considers all data at the same time (as opposed to one pixel at a time), thereby taking advantage of both spatial and temporal characteristics of the deformation field. In terms of the temporal representation, we have the flexibility to explicitly parametrize known processes that are expected to contribute to a given set of observations (e.g., co-seismic steps and post-seismic transients, secular variations, seasonal oscillations, etc.). Our approach also allows for the temporal parametrization to includes a set of general functions (e.g., splines) in order to account for unexpected processes. We allow for various forms of model regularization using a cross-validation approach to select penalty parameters. The multiscale analysis allows us to consider various contributions (e.g., orbit errors) that may affect specific scales but not others. The methods described here are all embarrassingly parallel and suitable for implementation on a cluster computer. We demonstrate the use of MInTS using a large suite of ERS-1/2 and Envisat interferograms for Long Valley Caldera, and validate our results by comparing with ground-based observations.

  9. InSAR time series analysis for monitoring of natural and anthropogenic hazards with high temporal resolution (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, S. V.; d'Oreye, N.; Gonzalez, P. J.; Tiampo, K. F.

    2013-12-01

    Modern Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites and satellite constellations are capable of acquiring data at high spatial resolution and increasing temporal resolution allowing detection of ground deformation signals with a minimal delay. Advanced interferometric SAR (InSAR) processing techniques, such as Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) and Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset (MSBAS) are capable of producing time series of ground deformation with a very high sub-centimeter precision. Additionally MSBAS allows combination of various InSAR data into a single set of vertical and horizontal deformation time series further improving their temporal resolution and precision. Developed methodologies are ready for operational monitoring of natural and anthropogenic hazards, including landslides, volcanoes, earthquakes and tectonic motion and ground subsidence caused by mining and groundwater extraction. Here we present various case studies where an InSAR time series analysis was able to map ground deformation with superior resolution and precision, including mining subsidence in the Greater Luxembourg region and southern Saskatchewan, groundwater extraction related subsidence in the Greater Vancouver Region, volcanic deformation in the Virunga Volcanic Province, and tectonic deformation and landslide in northern California. Often, InSAR is the best cost-efficient solution with no restrictions on spatial coverage, weather or lighting condition and timing. It is anticipated that the use of SAR data for mapping hazards will increase in the future as data access improves.

  10. A Multiscale Approach to InSAR Time Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, M.; Hetland, E. A.; Muse, P.; Lin, Y.; Dicaprio, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    We describe progress in the development of MInTS (Multiscale analysis of InSAR Time Series), an approach to constructed self-consistent time-dependent deformation observations from repeated satellite-based InSAR images of a given region. MInTS relies on a spatial wavelet decomposition to permit the inclusion of distance based spatial correlations in the observations while maintaining computational tractability. In essence, MInTS allows one to considers all data at the same time as opposed to one pixel at a time, thereby taking advantage of both spatial and temporal characteristics of the deformation field. This approach also permits a consistent treatment of all data independent of the presence of localized holes due to unwrapping issues in any given interferogram. Specifically, the presence of holes is accounted for through a weighting scheme that accounts for the extent of actual data versus the area of holes associated with any given wavelet. In terms of the temporal representation, we have the flexibility to explicitly parametrize known processes that are expected to contribute to a given set of observations (e.g., co-seismic steps and post-seismic transients, secular variations, seasonal oscillations, etc.). Our approach also allows for the temporal parametrization to include a set of general functions in order to account for unexpected processes. We allow for various forms of model regularization using a cross-validation approach to select penalty parameters. We also experiment with the use of sparsity inducing regularization as a way to select from a large dictionary of time functions. The multiscale analysis allows us to consider various contributions (e.g., orbit errors) that may affect specific scales but not others. The methods described here are all embarrassingly parallel and suitable for implementation on a cluster computer. We demonstrate the use of MInTS using a large suite of ERS-1/2 and Envisat interferograms for Long Valley Caldera, and validate

  11. New perspectives and advanced approaches on effectively processing Big InSAR data: from long term ERS archives to new Sentinel-1 massive data flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casu, Francesco; De Luca, Claudio; Elefante, Stefano; Lanari, Riccardo; Manunta, Michele; Zinno, Ivana

    2015-04-01

    Advanced differential Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Interferometry (InSAR) usually identifies a set of algorithms, tools and methodologies for the generation of Earth's surface deformation maps and time series computed from a sequence of multi-temporal differential SAR interferograms. Such techniques found their success on the large availability of SAR data archives acquired over time by several satellite systems. Indeed, the current radar Earth Observation (EO) scenario takes advantage of the widely diffused long-term C-band ESA (e.g. ERS-1, ERS-2 and ENVISAT) and Canadian (RADARSAT-1/2) SAR data archives, which have been acquired during the last 20 years, as well as of data sequences provided by the X-band generation SAR sensors, such as the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) and TerraSAR-X (TSX) constellations. Moreover, a massive and ever increasing data flow will be further supplied by the recently launched (April 2014) Copernicus (European Union) SENTINEL-1A SAR satellite, which will also be paired during 2016 with the SENTINEL-1B twin system that will allow halving the constellation revisit time (from 12 to 6 days). In this context, the massive exploitation of these Big InSAR Data archives for the generation of advanced products will open new research perspectives to understand Earth's surface deformation dynamics at global scale. However, to reach this ambitious goal, Big InSAR Data has to be effectively exploited to generate accurate advanced products in short time frames. Therefore the need of new InSAR processing approaches, efficient algorithms and high performance computing facilities represents the basis for fully benefiting from such a Big Data. In this work we first present the recently proposed Parallel Small BAseline Subset (P-SBAS) InSAR algorithm that has been designed to process big volumes of InSAR data in short times and unsupervised manner by exploiting High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities. Then, we show how the P-SBAS approach is well suitable for

  12. Towards Insar Everywhere, all the Time, with SENTINEL-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhong; Wright, Tim; Hooper, Andrew; Crippa, Paola; Gonzalez, Pablo; Walters, Richard; Elliott, John; Ebmeier, Susanna; Hatton, Emma; Parsons, Barry

    2016-06-01

    Sentinel-1A was launched in April 2014, and has been collecting data routinely over more than one year. Sentinel-1B is set for launch on 22 April 2016. The Sentinel-1 constellation has several advantages over previous radar missions for InSAR applications: (1) Data are being acquired systematically for tectonic and volcanic areas, (2) Images cover a wide footprint, 250 km from near to far range in Interferometric Wide Swath (TOPS) mode, (3) Small perpendicular and temporal baselines greatly improve interferometric coherence at C-band, (4) Data are freely available to all users, (5) The mission is planned to be operational for 20 years, with 1C and 1D planned for future launches. These features enable us to map geological processes occurring in any place at anytime using InSAR. We will review progress within COMET towards our ultimate goal of building a fully-automated processing system that provides deformation results and derived products to the wide InSAR and Geophysics communities. In addition to high-resolution-ECMWFbased atmospheric correction model, we will show results of a systematic analysis of interferometric coherence in tectonic and volcanic areas, and discuss the future goals and timeline for the COMET InSAR automated processing system.

  13. InSAR and GPS time series analysis: Crustal deformation in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C. W.; Plag, H.

    2010-12-01

    Several previous studies have successfully demonstrated that long time series (e.g. >5 years) of GPS measurements can be employed to detect tectonic signals with a vertical rate greater than 0.3 mm/yr (e.g. Hill and Blewitt, 2006; Bennett et al. 2009). However, GPS stations are often sparse, with spacing from a few kilometres to a few hundred kilometres. Interferometric SAR (InSAR) can complement GPS by providing high horizontal spatial resolution (e.g. meters to tens-of metres) over large regions (e.g. 100 km × 100 km). A major source of error for repeat-pass InSAR is the phase delay in radio signal propagation through the atmosphere. The portion of this attributable to tropospheric water vapour causes errors as large as 10-20 cm in deformation retrievals. InSAR Time Series analysis with Atmospheric Estimation Models (InSAR TS + AEM), developed at the University of Glasgow, is a robust time series analysis approach, which mainly uses interferograms with small geometric baselines to minimise the effects of decorrelation and inaccuracies in topographic data. In addition, InSAR TS + AEM can be used to separate deformation signals from atmospheric water vapour effects in order to map surface deformation as it evolves in time. The principal purposes of this study are to assess: (1) how consistent InSAR-derived deformation time series are with GPS; and (2) how precise InSAR-derived atmospheric path delays can be. The Yucca Mountain, Nevada region is chosen as the study site because of its excellent GPS network and extensive radar archives (>10 years of dense and high-quality GPS stations, and >17 years of ERS and ENVISAT radar acquisitions), and because of its arid environment. The latter results in coherence that is generally high, even for long periods that span the existing C-band radar archives of ERS and ENVISAT. Preliminary results show that our InSAR LOS deformation map agrees with GPS measurements to within 0.35 mm/yr RMS misfit at the stations which is the

  14. Multi Band Insar Analysis of Subsidence Development Based on the Long Period Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çomut, F. C.; Ustun, A.; Lazecky, M.; Aref, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    The SAR Interferometry (InSAR) application has shown great potential in monitoring of land terrain changes and in detection of land deformations such as subsidence. Longer time analysis can lead to understand longer trends and changes. Using different bands of SAR satellite (C- from ERS 1-2 and Envisat, L- from ALOS) over the study area, we achieve knowledge of movements in long-term and evaluation of its dynamic changes within observed period of time. Results from InSAR processing fit with the position changes in vertical direction based on GPS network established over the basin as an effective geodetic network. Time series (StaMPS PS+SB) of several points over Çumra County in eastern part of Konya City show a general trend of the deformation that is expected to be approximately between -13 to -17 mm/year. Northern part of Karaman is affected by faster subsidence, borders of the subsidence trough were identified from Envisat. Presenting InSAR results together with GIS information about locations and time of occurrence of sudden subsidence, urban/industrial growth in time and climate changes helps in better understanding of the situation. This way, the impact of natural and man-made changes will be shown for urban planning thanks to InSAR and GIS comparisons with hydrogeological modeling. In this study we present results of differential and multitemporal InSAR series using different bands and GIS conjunction associated with seasonal and temporal groundwater level changes in Konya Closed Basin.

  15. Advanced InSAR Processing in the Footsteps of SqueeSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Even, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Several years ago a promising approach for processing InSAR time series was introduced under the name SqueeSAR [1]. The successful application of this framework poses some delicate questions. This paper focuses on the problem that real data do rarely behave perfectly Gaussian. An augmentation of the stochastic model underlying the phase linking step is presented and the applicability under the assumption of complex elliptically symmetric distribution is discussed. Results from tests with two time series of TerraSAR-X HRS data are presented and preliminary conclusions drawn.

  16. Multiscale InSAR Time Series (MInTS) analysis of surface deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetland, E. A.; Musé, P.; Simons, M.; Lin, Y. N.; Agram, P. S.; Dicaprio, C. J.

    2012-02-01

    We present a new approach to extracting spatially and temporally continuous ground deformation fields from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data. We focus on unwrapped interferograms from a single viewing geometry, estimating ground deformation along the line-of-sight. Our approach is based on a wavelet decomposition in space and a general parametrization in time. We refer to this approach as MInTS (Multiscale InSAR Time Series). The wavelet decomposition efficiently deals with commonly seen spatial covariances in repeat-pass InSAR measurements, since the coefficients of the wavelets are essentially spatially uncorrelated. Our time-dependent parametrization is capable of capturing both recognized and unrecognized processes, and is not arbitrarily tied to the times of the SAR acquisitions. We estimate deformation in the wavelet-domain, using a cross-validated, regularized least squares inversion. We include a model-resolution-based regularization, in order to more heavily damp the model during periods of sparse SAR acquisitions, compared to during times of dense acquisitions. To illustrate the application of MInTS, we consider a catalog of 92 ERS and Envisat interferograms, spanning 16 years, in the Long Valley caldera, CA, region. MInTS analysis captures the ground deformation with high spatial density over the Long Valley region.

  17. Multiscale InSAR Time Series (MInTS) analysis of surface deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetland, E. A.; Muse, P.; Simons, M.; Lin, Y. N.; Agram, P. S.; DiCaprio, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new approach to extracting spatially and temporally continuous ground deformation fields from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data. We focus on unwrapped interferograms from a single viewing geometry, estimating ground deformation along the line-of-sight. Our approach is based on a wavelet decomposition in space and a general parametrization in time. We refer to this approach as MInTS (Multiscale InSAR Time Series). The wavelet decomposition efficiently deals with commonly seen spatial covariances in repeat-pass InSAR measurements, such that coefficients of the wavelets are essentially spatially uncorrelated. Our time-dependent parametrization is capable of capturing both recognized and unrecognized processes, and is not arbitrarily tied to the times of the SAR acquisitions. We estimate deformation in the wavelet-domain, using a cross-validated, regularized least-squares inversion. We include a model-resolution-based regularization, in order to more heavily damp the model during periods of sparse SAR acquisitions, compared to during times of dense acquisitions. To illustrate the application of MInTS, we consider a catalog of 92 ERS and Envisat interferograms, spanning 16 years, in the Long Valley caldera, CA, region. MInTS analysis captures the ground deformation with high spatial density over the Long Valley region.

  18. New evidence for active tectonics at the boundary of the Kashi Depression, China, from time series InSAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping; Wen, Yangmao; Xu, Caijun; Liu, Yang; Fok, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    Kashi Depression is one of the most complex active tectonic areas in the southern flank of Tianshan, China. Due to the lack of ground observations, the boundary of basin mountain transition zone and the interseismic activity of the Tianshan have not been clearly determined. In this study, 48 Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) imagery acquired from 2003 to 2010 are used to construct interferograms for measuring high-resolution interseismic deformation in the Kashi Depression area. A global atmospheric model ERA-Interim provided by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and a global network orbital correction are applied to remove atmospheric effect, and the long-wavelength orbital errors, respectively, for the interferograms. Interferometric SAR time series with Atmospheric Estimation Model (InSAR TS + AEM) are then used to obtain a deformation rate map for the Kashi Depression area. The InSAR rate map indicates that the north part of South Atushi Fault has ~ 3 mm/year uplift relative to that of the south part. This result manifests the main tectonic deformation potentially occurs along the Southern Atushi Fault. Based on a simple edge dislocation model, the dip angle of 31 ± 0.6°, slip rate of 2.3 ± 0.1 mm/year, and locking depth of 10.6 ± 0.4 km for the Southern Atushi Fault between Tianshan Orogenic Belt and the Kashi Depression are obtained. This modeling result shows in good agreement with the InSAR derived rates. Our results show that the Southern Atushi Fault is the main active fault in block boundary region between the south of Tianshan and the Tarim Basin.

  19. Characterization of Ground Deformation above AN Urban Tunnel by Means of Insar Time Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, A.; Iannacone, J.; Falorni, G.; Berti, M.; Corsini, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ground deformation produced by tunnel excavation in urban areas can cause damage to buildings and infrastructure. In these contexts, monitoring systems are required to determine the surface area affected by displacement and the rates of movement. Advanced multi-image satellite-based InSAR approaches are uniquely suited for this purpose as they provide an overview of the entire affected area and can measure movement rates with millimeter precision. Persistent scatterer approaches such as SqueeSAR™ use reflections off buildings, lampposts, roads, etc to produce a high-density point cloud in which each point has a time series of deformation spanning the period covered by the imagery. We investigated an area of about 10 km2 in North Vancouver, (Canada) where the shaft excavation of the Seymour-Capilano water filtration plant was started in 2004. As part of the project, twin tunnels in bedrock were excavated to transfer water from the Capilano Reservoir to the treatment plant. A radar dataset comprising 58 images (spanning March 2001 - June 2008) acquired by the Radarsat-1 satellite and covering the period of excavation was processed with the SqueeSAR™ algorithm (Ferretti et al., 2011) to assess the ground deformation caused by the tunnel excavation. To better characterize the deformation in the time and space domains and correlate ground movement with excavation, an in-depth time series analysis was carried out. Berti et al. (2013) developed an automatic procedure for the analysis of InSAR time series based on a sequence of statistical tests. The tool classifies time series into six distinctive types (uncorrelated; linear; quadratic; bilinear; discontinuous without constant velocity; discontinuous with change in velocity) which can be linked to different physical phenomena. It also provides a series of descriptive parameters which can be used to characterize the temporal changes of ground motion. We processed the movement time series with PSTime to determine the

  20. Advanced Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Imaging Radar (InSAR) for Dune Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havivi, Shiran; Amir, Doron; Schvartzman, Ilan; August, Yitzhak; Mamman, Shimrit; Rotman, Stanely R.; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available lose particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970s, remote sensing imagery, both optical and radar, have been used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two or more images. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR methods. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This work aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the coherence change detection method was used, in order to identify dune stability or instability and the dune activity level. The Nitzanim-Ashdod coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of

  1. InSAR time series analysis of crustal deformation in southern California from 1992-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Lundgren, P.

    2010-12-01

    Since early the 1990’s, Interferometric Satellite Aperture Radar (InSAR) data has had some success imaging surface deformation of plate boundary deformation zones. The ~18 years of extensive data collection over southern California now make it possible to generate a long time interval InSAR-based line-of-sight (LOS) velocity map to examine the resolution of both steady-state and transient deformation processes. We perform InSAR time series analysis on an extensive catalog of ERS-1/2 and Envisat data from 1992 up to the present in southern California by applying a variant of the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) time series analysis approach. Despite the limitation imposed by atmospheric phase delay, the large number of data acquisitions and long duration of data sampling allow us to effectively suppress the atmospheric noise through spatiotemporal smoothing in the time series analysis. We integrate an updated version of a California GPS velocity solution with InSAR to constrain the long wavelength deformation signals while estimating and removing the effect of orbital error. A large number of interferograms (> 800) over 5 tracks in southern California have been processed and analyzed. We examine the time dependency of resulting deformation patterns. Preliminary results from the ~18 year time series already reveal some interesting features. For example, the InSAR LOS displacements show significant transient variations in greater spatial resolution following the 1999 Mw7.1 Hector Mine earthquake. The 7-year post-seismic rate map demonstrates a broad transient deformation pattern and much localized deformation near the fault surface trace, reflecting a combined effect from afterslip, poroelastic, and viscoelastic relaxation at different spatiotemporal scales. We observe a variation of deformation rate across the Blackwater-Little lake fault system in the Eastern California Shear Zone, suggesting a possible transient variation over this part of the plate boundary. The In

  2. Investigating the Creeping Segment of the San Andreas Fault using InSAR time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolandone, Frederique; Ryder, Isabelle; Agram, Piyush S.; Burgmann, Roland; Nadeau, Robert M.

    2010-05-01

    We exploit the advanced Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique referred to as the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm to analyze the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault in Central California. Various geodetic creep rate measurements along the Central San Andreas Fault (CSAF) have been made since 1969 including creepmeters, alignment arrays, geodolite, and GPS. They show that horizontal surface displacements increase from a few mm/yr at either end to a maximum of up to ~34 mm/yr in the central portion. They also indicate some discrepancies in rate estimates, with the range being as high as 10 mm/yr at some places along the fault. This variation is thought to be a result of the different geodetic techniques used and of measurements being made at variable distances from the fault. An interferometric stack of 12 interferograms for the period 1992-2001 shows the spatial variation of creep that occurs within a narrow (<2 km) zone close to the fault trace. The creep rate varies spatially along the fault but also in time. Aseismic slip on the CSAF shows several kinds of time dependence. Shallow slip, as measured by surface measurements across the narrow creeping zone, occurs partly as ongoing steady creep, along with brief episodes with slip from mm to cm. Creep rates along the San Juan Bautista segment increased after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and slow slip transients of varying duration and magnitude occurred in both transition segments The main focus of this work is to use the SBAS technique to identify spatial and temporal variations of creep on the CSAF. We will present time series of line-of-sight (LOS) displacements derived from SAR data acquired by the ASAR instrument, on board the ENVISAT satellite, between 2003 and 2009. For each coherent pixel of the radar images we compute time-dependent surface displacements as well as the average LOS deformation rate. We compare our results with characteristic repeating microearthquakes that

  3. Application of Time Series Insar Technique for Deformation Monitoring of Large-Scale Landslides in Mountainous Areas of Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, T.; Lu, P.; Liu, C.; Wan, H.

    2016-06-01

    Western China is very susceptible to landslide hazards. As a result, landslide detection and early warning are of great importance. This work employs the SBAS (Small Baseline Subset) InSAR Technique for detection and monitoring of large-scale landslides that occurred in Li County, Sichuan Province, Western China. The time series INSAR is performed using descending scenes acquired from TerraSAR-X StripMap mode since 2014 to get the spatial distribution of surface displacements of this giant landslide. The time series results identify the distinct deformation zone on the landslide body with a rate of up to 150mm/yr. The deformation acquired by SBAS technique is validated by inclinometers from diverse boreholes of in-situ monitoring. The integration of InSAR time series displacements and ground-based monitoring data helps to provide reliable data support for the forecasting and monitoring of largescale landslide.

  4. A time series deformation estimation in the NW Himalayas using SBAS InSAR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Venkataraman, G.

    2012-12-01

    A time series land deformation studies in north western Himalayan region has been presented in this study. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) is an important tool for measuring the land displacement caused by different geological processes [1]. Frequent spatial and temporal decorrelation in the Himalayan region is a strong impediment in precise deformation estimation using conventional interferometric SAR approach. In such cases, advanced DInSAR approaches PSInSAR as well as Small base line subset (SBAS) can be used to estimate earth surface deformation. The SBAS technique [2] is a DInSAR approach which uses a twelve or more number of repeat SAR acquisitions in different combinations of a properly chosen data (subsets) for generation of DInSAR interferograms using two pass interferometric approach. Finally it leads to the generation of mean deformation velocity maps and displacement time series. Herein, SBAS algorithm has been used for time series deformation estimation in the NW Himalayan region. ENVISAT ASAR IS2 swath data from 2003 to 2008 have been used for quantifying slow deformation. Himalayan region is a very active tectonic belt and active orogeny play a significant role in land deformation process [3]. Geomorphology in the region is unique and reacts to the climate change adversely bringing with land slides and subsidence. Settlements on the hill slopes are prone to land slides, landslips, rockslides and soil creep. These hazardous features have hampered the over all progress of the region as they obstruct the roads and flow of traffic, break communication, block flowing water in stream and create temporary reservoirs and also bring down lot of soil cover and thus add enormous silt and gravel to the streams. It has been observed that average deformation varies from -30.0 mm/year to 10 mm/year in the NW Himalayan region . References [1] Massonnet, D., Feigl, K.L.,Rossi, M. and Adragna, F. (1994) Radar interferometry mapping of

  5. Characterization of open and closed volcanic systems in Indonesia and Mexico using InSAR time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussard, E.; Amelung, F.; Aoki, Y.

    2013-08-01

    use 2007-2011 Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) data to perform an arc-wide interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series survey of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) and to study time-dependent ground deformation of four Indonesian volcanoes selected following the 2007-2009 study of Chaussard and Amelung (2012). Our objectives are to examine whether arc volcanoes exhibit long-term edifice-wide cyclic deformation patterns that can be used to characterize open and closed volcanic systems and to better constrain in which cases precursory inflation is expected. We reveal deformation cycles at both regularly active and previously inactive Indonesian volcanoes, but we do not detect deformation in the TMVB, reflecting a lower activity level. We identify three types of relationships between deformation and activity: inflation prior to eruption and associated with or followed by deflation (Kerinci and Sinabung), inflation without eruption and followed by slow deflation (Agung), and eruption without precursory deformation (Merapi, Colima, and Popocatépetl; at Merapi, no significant deformation is detected even during eruption). The first two cases correspond to closed volcanic systems and suggest that the traditional model of magmatic systems and eruptive cycles do apply to andesitic volcanoes (i.e., inflation and deflation episodes associated with magma accumulation or volatile exsolution in a crustal reservoir followed by eruptions or in situ cooling). In contrast, the last case corresponds to open volcanic systems where no significant pressurization of the magmatic reservoirs is taking place prior to eruptions and thus no long-term edifice-wide ground deformation can be detected. We discuss these results in terms of InSAR's potential for forecasting volcanic unrest.

  6. Deformation in the Basin & Range Province and Rio Grande Rift using InSAR Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, H.; Pisaniello, M.; Pritchard, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    High heat flow in the Basin and Range Province and Rio Grande Rift has been attributed to partial melting in the crust and upper mantle as a result of ongoing extension (e.g. Lachenbruch 1978). We would then expect to observe surface deformation in areas with actively moving magmatic fluids. The distribution of these magmatic fluids has implications for the rheology of the crust and upper mantle. For this study, we use InSAR to locate deformation due to magmatic sources as well as localized hydrologic deformation. While our focus is magmatic deformation, hydrologic signals are important for correcting geodetic data used to monitor tectonic activity. InSAR is a suitable technique for a large study in the Basin and Range and Rio Grande Rift since SAR acquisitions are both numerous and temporally extensive in these regions. We use ERS-1, ERS-2, and ENVISAT SAR images from 1992-2010 to create time series' with interferograms up to 1800km long from both ascending and descending satellite tracks. Each time series has an average of 100 interferograms reducing the atmospheric noise that masks small deformation signals in single interferograms. The time series' results are validated using overlapping tracks and are further compared to signals identified in previous geophysical studies (e.g. Reilinger and Brown 1980, Massonnet et al 1997, Finnegan and Pritchard 2009). We present results for several areas of deformation in the Basin & Range Province and Rio Grande Rift. An agricultural area near Roswell, NM exhibits seasonal uplift and subsidence of ±3.5cm/yr between 1992 and 1999. Results indicate subsidence on the order of 1cm/yr and uplift of 2cm/yr at the Raft River power plant, ID that is likely related to the start of geothermal fluid production and injection. Just north of the Raft River plant, we detect what appears to be rapid agricultural subsidence in an area extending for 50km. We discuss subsidence of ~2cm/yr in Escalante Valley, UT that is comparable to

  7. InSAR time-series constraints on inter-seismic strain accumulation and creep distribution along North Anatolian and Chaman Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havazli, E.; Fattahi, H.; Amelung, F.

    2013-12-01

    In many aspects, the San Andreas and the North Anatolian fault zones show many similarities. They are similarly right-lateral, strike-slip faults, at the same time, are transforms. However, they vary in the maximum amount of lateral displacement and show different topographic features. The maximum offset is nearly 300 km along the San Andreas Fault whereas it is approximately 85-90 km along the North Anatolian Fault. In recent years, interseismic crustal velocities and strains have been determined for North Anatolian Fault Zone through repeated measurements using the Global Positioning System and satellite radar interferometry. The Chaman Fault in Pakistan and Afghanistan is the only major fault along the western India-Eurasia plate boundary zone and probably accommodates the entire relative plate motion of 30-35 mm/yr. Recent GPS and InSAR studies on the Chaman fault yield slip rates of 18 × 1 mm/yr. The inconsistency in geologic, geodetic and seismic slip rates along the Chaman Fault need investigations to better understand the geodynamic responses of the Indo-Asia collision along its western boundary. We use InSAR time-series analysis using archived and new SAR imagery to constrain strain accumulation across the North Anatolian Fault and Chaman Faults. We expect a relative accuracy of InSAR measurements better than 1 mm/yr over 100 km, made possible by recent advances in flattening residual, orbital error and atmospheric correction strategies [Fattahi & Amelung, 2013]. After validation of the technique in Southern San Andreas Fault, using GPS observations, we apply the same InSAR time-series approach to constrain strain accumulation across the North Anatolian and Chaman Faults. We will use the InSAR data to establish the first-order fault properties of the Chaman and North Anatolian Faults (creep distribution, locking depth) using analytical two-dimensional elastic strain accumulation models along different transects across the faults. Our preliminary results

  8. Edgelist phase unwrapping algorithm for time series InSAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Shanker, A Piyush; Zebker, Howard

    2010-03-01

    We present here a new integer programming formulation for phase unwrapping of multidimensional data. Phase unwrapping is a key problem in many coherent imaging systems, including time series synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR), with two spatial and one temporal data dimensions. The minimum cost flow (MCF) [IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 36, 813 (1998)] phase unwrapping algorithm describes a global cost minimization problem involving flow between phase residues computed over closed loops. Here we replace closed loops by reliable edges as the basic construct, thus leading to the name "edgelist." Our algorithm has several advantages over current methods-it simplifies the representation of multidimensional phase unwrapping, it incorporates data from external sources, such as GPS, where available to better constrain the unwrapped solution, and it treats regularly sampled or sparsely sampled data alike. It thus is particularly applicable to time series InSAR, where data are often irregularly spaced in time and individual interferograms can be corrupted with large decorrelated regions. We show that, similar to the MCF network problem, the edgelist formulation also exhibits total unimodularity, which enables us to solve the integer program problem by using efficient linear programming tools. We apply our method to a persistent scatterer-InSAR data set from the creeping section of the Central San Andreas Fault and find that the average creep rate of 22 mm/Yr is constant within 3 mm/Yr over 1992-2004 but varies systematically with ground location, with a slightly higher rate in 1992-1998 than in 1999-2003. PMID:20208954

  9. Time series analysis of ERS and ENVISAT InSAR data in Northern Mojave, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, G.; Liu, Z.; Lundgren, P.

    2010-12-01

    The Garlock fault is the only major left-lateral fault in Southern California and is viewed as a conjugate structure with respect to faults in the San Andreas system and the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ). Previous results obtained with InSAR data analysis suggest that during the 1992-2000 decade, a prominent fault system in the ECSZ (the Blackwater - Little Lake fault system) accommodated strain at a rate exceeding its long-term (geologic) rate by a factor of at least 3. During the same period, the study also suggests that the Garlock fault accumulated strain at a slower rate than its geological rate, or even not at all in its eastern section. This intriguing observation raised a number of questions about the temporal behavior of faults in the northern Mojave and stress transfer between near-by structures. With an InSAR archive of almost 18 years, we revisit the northern Mojave Desert faults area to determine whether the rapid strain accumulation observed between 1992 and 2000 is actually occurring at a steady rate or whether its rate varies over the 1992-2000 time period. Because of the small magnitude of the signal, a careful treatment of errors due to atmospheric phase delay must be undertaken. We use the newly released North America Regional Reanalysis (NARR) global atmospheric model distributed by NOAA to estimate the radar phase delay produced by the stratified atmosphere. For each epoch of radar acquisition, a vertical profile of the air index of refraction is computed at each of the NARR grid nodes. The phase delay at each image pixel is then estimated by interpolation within the NARR grid and integration along the atmospheric column above the elevation of the pixel. A comparison between the model-derived and InSAR observed phase-topography dependence shows that, for Southern California, global models provide an effective way of correcting phase delay signal due to the stratified troposphere. The complete ERS/ENVISAT archive is processed and

  10. Time-scale and mechanism of subsidence at Lassen Volcanic Center, CA, from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Amy L.; Biggs, Juliet; Lu, Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Observations of volcanic subsidence have contributed to our understanding of the eruption cycle, hydrothermal systems and the formation of continental crust. Lassen Volcanic Center is one of two volcanoes in the southern Cascades known to have subsided in recent decades, but the onset, temporal evolution, and cause of subsidence remain unconstrained. Here we use multiple sets of InSAR data, each corrected using the North American Regional Reanalysis atmospheric model, to determine the temporal and spatial characteristics of deformation between 1992 and 2010. Throughout this period all datasets reveal subsidence of a broad, 30-40 km wide region at rates of ~ 10 mm/yr. Evaluating past geodetic studies we suggest that subsidence may have been ongoing since the 1980s, before which it is unlikely that significant ground deformation occurred. By combining multiple tracks of InSAR data we find that the ratio of horizontal to vertical displacements is high (up to 3:1), and source inversions favour a point source located at ~ 8 km depth. Time-series analysis suggests that the rate of volume change of this source may have varied over time. The source geometry and the temporal evolution of deformation contrasts to subsidence observed at nearby Medicine Lake Volcano since the 1950s. We evaluate possible causes of subsidence at Lassen Volcanic Center in light of tectonic setting and hydrothermal activity, and suggest that regional GPS measurements will be key to understanding the role of crustal extension plus other hydrothermal/magmatic processes in deformation during recent decades.

  11. Ground Deformation Mapping of Houston-Galveston, Texas Using InSAR Time-Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    QU, F.; Lu, Z.; Bawden, G. W.; Kim, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Houston-Galveston region in Texas has been subsiding due to the combined effects of groundwater withdrawal, hydrocarbon extraction, soil compaction, and active faulting. This human- and partially nature-induced ground deformation has gradually threatened the stability of urban infrastructure and caused the loss of wetland habitat along the Gulf of Mexico. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) exploiting multiple SAR images has the capability of obtaining ground motions in high spatial resolution over large coverage. In this study, ERS-1/2 (1993-2000), ENVISAT (2004-2010), and ALOS (2007-2011) datasets are used to unravel the characteristics of ground deformation from 1993 to 2011 over the Houston-Galveston area. The persistent scatterer InSAR (PSInSAR) time-series analysis technique is employed to estimate the spatial and temporal variations of ground motions during 20 years. The ERS-1/2 PSInSAR products have measured subsidence (up to 5 cm/yr) in the northwest Houston area as well as a slight uplift (1 cm/yr) in the southeast region from 1993 to 2000. The subsidence rate (up to 2 cm/yr) between 2004 and 2011 has been obtained from ENVISAT and ALOS data. Our results indicate that the pattern of ground deformation was nearly concentric around the location of intense groundwater withdrawal and the subsiding area has been shrinking and migrating toward the northeast after 2000. In addition, an approximately 2 cm of differential subsidence across faults are observed. Presence of faults can induce localized surface displacements, aggravate localized subsidence, discontinue the integrity of ground water flow, and limit the horizontal spread of subsidence funnels. Finally, our long-term measurement of ground deformation has also been validated by GPS observations in study area.

  12. Advanced InSAR techniques for the management and characterization of geothermal resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, F.; Falorni, G.; Morgan, J.; Rucci, A.; Ferretti, A.

    2012-04-01

    InSAR is a remote sensing tool that has applications in both geothermal exploitation and in the management of producing fields. The technique has developed rapidly in recent years and the most evolved algorithms, now capable of providing precise ground movement measurements with unprecedented spatial density over large areas, allow the monitoring of the effects of fluid injection and extraction on surface deformation and the detection of active faults. Multi-interferogram approaches have been used at several geothermal sites in different stages of development. SqueeSAR™, which represents the latest breakthrough in InSAR technology, provides a significant increase in the spatial density of measurement points by exploiting signal returns from both point-like and distributed scatterers. Furthermore, recent satellite radar sensors have a higher spatial resolution (down to 1 m), as well as a higher temporal frequency of image acquisitions (down to a few days). The coupling of the new algorithm with this new generation of satellites provides a valuable tool for monitoring the different phases of geothermal production and in support of the decision making process. Some examples from the US are presented here: the first case study involves the use of InSAR within a suite of tools for exploration of the San Emidio geothermal field in Nevada. This project aimed to develop geophysical techniques to identify and map large aperture fractures for the placement of new production/exploration wells. The second and third examples examine two zones in California: the Salton Sea area, where multi-interferogram InSAR provided an overview of surface deformation at a producing geothermal reservoir. Surface deformation in this area was complex, and the added detail provided insight into the interplay of tectonics and production activities. Additional InSAR studies have also been carried out at the Geysers field in order to evaluate the behavior of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) in

  13. Estimating time-dependent magma source properties at the Long Valley caldera using InSAR and GPS time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riel, B. V.; Simons, M.; Agram, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    For the past few decades, the Long Valley caldera in California has experienced several inflation and deflation episodes leading to uplift and subsidence, respectively, of the resurgent dome. The abundance of geodetic measurements from leveling, microgravity, GPS, two-color electronic distance meter (EDM), and interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) time series has allowed the geodetic community to closely monitor surface deformation of the caldera. However, estimation of the source properties of the underlying magma chamber has led to a number of different models that often disagree over important features, such as chamber depth, chamber shape, influence of the south moat fault on the southern edge of the caldera, etc. These discrepancies can often be attributed to strong non-linearities of the different source models and trade-offs between various parameters. Furthermore, underestimation of the observation errors and uncertainties regarding the elastic structure can lead to biases and overconfidence of the inversion results. We address these issues by studying the 2002-2003 inflation episode due to the availability of GPS, EDM, and InSAR time series for that time period. We first use a transient detection approach that incorporates compressed sensing principles to compactly reconstruct temporally and spatially coherent transient signals for the GPS and EDM data. A similar approach is used to construct a continuous InSAR time series formed from over 200 ERS and Envisat interferograms over a 20-year time period. We compute static offsets for the 2002-2003 inflation event and perform a fully Bayesian analysis to estimate parameter values and uncertainties for various non-linear source models. Additionally, we also test a linear source model consisting of a grid of point volume-sources. By again using compressed sensing principles, we show that the linear model is largely consistent with the more compact non-linear analytical models. We use the linear model

  14. InSAR processing for volcano monitoring and other near-real time applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaans, Karsten; Hooper, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Radar interferometry (InSAR, interferometric synthetic aperture radar) is routinely used to measure surface deformation prior to, during, and after volcanic events, although not in a monitoring capacity. The improved data availability of some current satellite missions presents us with the opportunity to do just that. We present here a fast and flexible algorithm to estimate coherence and select points on an interferogram-by-interferogram basis, which overcomes limitations of the conventional boxcar ensemble method in areas of marginal coherence. Time series methods, which offer an alternative way to select coherent points, are typically slow, and do not allow for insertion of new data without reprocessing the entire data set. Our new algorithm calculates the coherence for each point based on an ensemble of points with similar amplitude behavior throughout the data set. The points that behave similarly are selected prior to new images being acquired, on the assumption that the behavior of these nearby points does not change rapidly through time. The resulting coherence estimate is superior in resolution and noise level to the boxcar method. In contrast to most other time series methods, we select a different set of coherent points for each interferogram, avoiding the selection compromise inherent to other time series methods. The relative simplicity of this strategy compared to other time series techniques means we can process new images in about 1 h for a typical setup.

  15. One year after the Abruzzo 2009 earthquake: pre-, co- and post-seismic surface deformation investigation through advanced InSAR analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    On 6 April 2009, at 01:33 UTC, a magnitude (Mw) 6.3 earthquake struck central Italy, partially destroying L'Aquila, several surrounding villages, and causing hundreds of casualties. Immediately, the Italian Civil Protection and the scientific community started the work to mitigate the effects and analyze the causes of the natural catastrophe. At the same time almost all the existing spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems imaged the L'Aquila area revealing, through InSAR analyses, the undeniable scar produced by the seismic event on the Earth's surface. Moreover, some of these sensors continued to image the area affected by the seismic displacements, including the advanced SAR sensors of the COSMO/Skymed constellation of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). We present in this study the results achieved by the InSAR group of the IREA-CNR institute, through an extended InSAR-based analysis carried out on the displacements of the area affected by the seismic event. We show first the results achieved by applying the Differential SAR Interferometry (InSAR) algorithm referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique (Berardino et al., 2002) to analyze the temporal evolution of the detected displacements retrieved through the data acquired, from ascending and descending orbits, by the C-band ENVISAT sensor of the European Space Agency (ESA) starting from 2002. This permitted us to investigate possible long term pre-seismic phenomena and provided several co-seismic deformation maps; the latter have been combined with the homologous co-seismic deformation maps retrieved by processing InSAR data pairs acquired by X-band (COSMO/Skymed and TERRASAR-X) and L-band (ALOS-PALSAR) SAR sensors. These co-seismic displacements have been jointly inverted in order to provide insights on the deformation source. The final results are focused on the exploitation of COSMO/SkyMed data acquired on both right ascending and descending orbits. The ascending dataset is composed by 32

  16. Interseismic strain accumulation across the North Tabriz Fault (NW Iran) deduced from InSAR time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimzadeh, Sadra; Cakir, Ziyadin; Osmanoğlu, Batuhan; Schmalzle, Gina; Miyajima, Masakatsu; Amiraslanzadeh, Reza; Djamour, Yahya

    2013-05-01

    We present the surface deformation along the North Tabriz Fault (NTF) deduced from Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) technique. The NTF, a major right-lateral strike-slip fault within the active Arabia-Eurasia collision zone, is located 40-45 km southwest of the Mw 6.5 and Mw 6.3, August 11, 2012 earthquake sequence that caused heavy damage and more than 300 deaths in Ahar, NW Iran. InSAR time series analysis of 17 ENVISAT radar images acquired between 2004 and 2010 using combination of the permanent scatterers InSAR (PSI) and the small baseline InSAR (SBAS) approach reveals sub-centimeter interseismic strain accumulation across the NTF and rapid subsidence in the Tabriz basin. Elastic dislocation modeling of the mean line-of-sight velocity field estimated from SBAS time series yields an average slip rate of 8.7 ± 2.5 mm/year with a locking depth of 15.8 ± 10.8 km. This rate is consistent with previous geodetic estimates based on recent Global Positioning System measurements, and suggests a recurrence interval of 250-300 years for major earthquakes of Mw 7.0-7.3 on the NTF, much shorter than those estimated from paleoseismic investigations (821 ± 176 years). This in turn implies a high seismic potential on the NTF taking into account the occurrence of the two last earthquakes on the NTF in 1721 and 1780. SAR time series analysis also reveals three regions of rapid subsidence with a maximum rate of 20 mm/year near the Tabriz thermal power plant in the Tabriz basin. Piezometric data from groundwater wells suggest that accelerated subsidence over the last several years may result from fluctuations in the ground water table.

  17. Spatiotemporal Characterization of Aquifers Using InSAR Time Series and Time-dependent Poroelastic Modeling in Phoenix, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. M.; Shirzaei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Alluvial basins in Phoenix experience surface deformation due to large volumes of fluid withdrawn and added to aquifers. The spatiotemporal pattern of deformation is controlled by pumping and recharge rates, hydraulic boundaries, and properties such as diffusivity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity. Land subsidence can cause damages to structures, earth fissures, and a permanent loss of aquifer storage; effects are often apparent after the onset of sustained events. Improving our understanding of the source and mechanisms of deformation is important for risk management and future planning. Monitoring subsidence and uplift using InSAR allows for detailed, dense spatial coverage with less than one cm measurement precision. Envisat data acquired from 2003-11 includes 38 ascending and 53 descending SAR images forming 239 and 423 coherent interferograms respectively. Displacement is separated into vertical and horizontal components by accounting for the satellite look angle and combining ascending and descending line of sight (LOS) data. Vertical velocity from Envisat reveals subsidence reaching -1.84 cm/yr and 0.60 cm/yr uplift. ERS 1&2 satellites delivered useful data from 1992-97, comprised of 6 ascending and 12 descending SAR images. Ascending images form 7 interferograms with LOS velocity from -1.23 to 1.65 cm/yr; descending images produce 25 interferograms with LOS velocity rates from -1.40 to 0.75 cm/yr. InSAR time series are compared with hydraulic head levels from 33 observation wells. Wavelet decomposition is used to separate the long-term, inelastic components from cyclic, elastic signals in InSAR and well level data. The specific storage coefficient, a parameter used in poroelastic models, is estimated as the ratio of cyclic vertical deformation to the equivalent component of the well level time series. Poroelastic theory assumes that pore pressure and fluid mass within the aquifer change during fluid withdrawal, while the relatively impermeable

  18. Detection of fault creep around NAF by InSAR time series analysis using PALSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Tomonori

    2011-11-01

    North Anatolian Fault (NAF) has several records of a huge earthquake occurrence in the last one century, which is well-known as a risky active fault. Some signs indicating a creep displacement could be observed on the Ismetpasa segment. It is reported so far that the San Andreas Fault in California, the Longitudinal Valley fault in Taiwan and the Valley Fault System in Metro Manila also exhibit fault creep. The fault with creep deformation is aseismic and never generates the large-scale earthquakes. But the scale and rate of fault creep are important factors to watch the fault behavior and to understand the cycle of earthquake. The purpose of this study is to investigate the distribution of spatial and temporal change on the ground motion due to fault creep in the surrounding of the Ismetpasa, NAF. DInSAR is capable to catch a subtle land displacement less than a centimeter and observe a wide area at a high spatial resolution. We applied InSAR time series analysis using PALSAR data in order to measure long-term ground deformation from 2007 until 2011. As a result, the land deformation that the northern and southern parts of the fault have slipped to east and west at a rate of 7.5 and 6.5 mm/year in line of sight respectively were obviously detected. In addition, it became clear that the fault creep along the NAF extended 61 km in east to west direction.

  19. 2003-2010 InSAR time series at Dallol, a proto-volcanic magmatic system in Afar (Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Adriano; Pagli, Carolina; Keir, Derek; Wright, Tim; Acocella, Valerio

    2013-04-01

    Quaternary extension and volcanism in Afar focus along magmatic segments, like the Erta Ale Ridge. Here we study the ground deformation at Dallol, in northern Afar (Ethiopia) along the Afar rift axis. Dallol rift lies in a depressed area ~120 m below sea level, it includes a ~40 m high mound and an active hydrothermal field. In 1993 a seismic swarm occurred NW of Dallol and was probably associated to a dyke intrusion. In 2004 another seismic swarm occurred SE of Dallol. In a previous study we used InSAR data to show that this seismicity was induced by a dyke intrusion in October 2004, probably fed by a shallow (1.5-3.3 km) magma chamber. Here we analyze the ground deformation at Dallol between 2003 and 2010, using InSAR time series computed with pi-rate software. These data suggest that after the dyking event, during ~3 years, the mound slowly uplifted, until 2008, then subsided very quickly up to 2010. Preliminary inversion of the InSAR data between 2008 and 2010 for the subsidence period shows a deformation source shallower than the dike source. We tested different sources (Mogi, ellipsoid, Sill). Depths vary between 0.8-1.8 km depending on the chosen source. Preliminary analysis highlights a mean-term correlation (2007-2010) between long term deformations in Dallol and other volcanoes belonging to the Erta Ale Ridge.

  20. InSAR time series monitoring at Istanbul city shows faulting, landslides and soil compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiencke, K.; Walter, T. R.; Manzo, M.; Manconi, A.; Solaro, G.; Lanari, R.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing data is providing important information for understanding and monitoring geohazards, yet availability of such data often has remained difficult. In an attempt to ease access to earth science and especially satellite radar data in near real time, the geohazard scientific community initiated the Geohazard Supersites. As a contribution to the Group on Earth Observations (GEO), this concept is supported by the European Space Agency (ESA). Here we describe the use of the Geohazard Supersites platform to understand and monitor deformation activity in the vicinity of Istanbul city. Istanbul, with more than 10 million inhabitants, is one of the largest multiethnic cities in the world. Among several problems, this megacity is menaced by the hazard of earthquakes. In the 20th century, a progressive westward migration of earthquake events has ruptured more than 700 km of the North Anatolian Fault. The presence of a seismic gap implies that the next major event could occur nearby the city centre itself. We have used the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) approach, to study the evolving deformation history of the last two decades at unprecedented spatial and temporal detail. Images provided by ESA and acquired by the ERS1, ERS2 and ENVISAT satellites between 1992 and now have been analyzed. Our results show several ongoing deformation phenomena, in particular, the co-seismic displacement caused by the North Anatolian Fault seismic events, and the extended subsidence pattern in urban areas underlain by young sediments. As seen from the InSAR time series data, subsidence rates changed after 1999. The rate of change may relate to time-dependent rheologic responses that will be investigated in further detail in a separate paper. Singular value decomposition of these data significantly augments the interpretability of the observed deformations. We find that deformation regions are overlapping in time and space, though at different signatures, trends and

  1. Persistent Scatterer InSAR time series analysis of the creeping section of the North Anatolian Fault at Ismetpasa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, E.; Cakir, Z.; Akoglu, A. M.; Ergintav, S.; Dogan, U.; Ozener, H.; Meghraoui, M.

    2012-04-01

    Although the creep along the Ismetpasa section of the North Anatolian Fault was noticed over half a century ago, its spatiotemporal nature is still poorly known due to lack of geodetic and seismological studies along the fault. Analysis of ERS (C-band) data acquired between 1992 and 2001 suggested an average creep rate of 9±3 mm along a fault segment of ~70 km long despite the difficulties arising from limited number of images available, atmospheric artefacts and low coherency that are common in classical long-term InSAR studies (Cakir et al., 2005). These inferences have been supported by a recent study of stacked PALSAR (L-band) interferograms spanning the period between 2007 and 2010 (Fialko et al., 2011). In this study, we use the Persistent Scatterer InSAR technique to better constrain the spatiotemporal characteristics of the surface creep. InSAR time series have been calculated using 27 Envisat ASAR images that were acquired between 2003 and 2010 in descending track 479. The results clearly reveal the gradual transition between the creeping and locked segments of the NAF west of Ismetpasa. Its eastern termination cannot be determined since the surface creep appears to continue further east (east of 33.4E) along the fault outside the Envisat image frame. The length of the creeping section therefore appears to be longer than 70 km. The creep rate is also tightly constrained and found to be in the range of 10-11 mm/yr along most of its length, consistent with the GPS measurements from a small-aperture geodetic network near Ismetpasa and recently reported PALSAR measurements (Fialko et al., 2011). Preliminary analysis confirms shallow locking depths for creeping as inferred by the previous studies.

  2. Volcano Deformation and Modeling on Active Volcanoes in the Philippines from ALOS InSAR Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Rivera, Anieri M.; Amelung, Falk; Eco, Rodrigo

    2015-05-01

    Bulusan, Kanlaon, and Mayon volcanoes have erupted over the last decade, and Taal caldera showed signs of volcanic unrest within the same time range. Eruptions at these volcanoes are a threat to human life and infrastructure, having over 1,000,000 people living within 10 km from just these 4 volcanic centers. For this reason, volcano monitoring in the Philippines is of extreme importance. We use the ALOS-1 satellite from the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to make an InSAR time series analysis over Bulusan, Kanlaon, Mayon, and Taal volcanoes for the 2007-2011 period. Time-dependent deformation was detected at all of the volcanoes. Deformation related to changes in pressurization of the volcanic systems was found on Taal caldera and Bulusan volcanoes, with best fitting Mogi sources located at half-space depths of 3.07 km and 0.5 km respectively.

  3. Characterizing Magmatic Sources in the Central Andes Volcanic Zone with a Regional InSAR Time Series Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. T.; Pritchard, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Central Andes Volcanic Zone (CVZ) contains many intriguing areas of ongoing crustal deformation detectable with InSAR. Foremost among these are the 1-2cm/yr radar line-of-sight (LOS) inflations near Uturuncu Volcano in Bolivia and the Lazufre volcanic area spanning the border of Chile and Argentina (Pritchard and Simons 2002). These two deformation sources are intriguing in that they are long-lived (>10yrs), have large diameters (>50km), and have modeled sources at mid-crustal depths (10-20km). For Uturuncu, the best-fitting source depths coincide with the seismically imaged Altiplano-Puna Magma Body (eg. Chimielowsi et al. 1999, Zandt et al. 2003). Regional InSAR time series analysis enables the spatial and temporal comparison of the Uturuncu and Lazufre signals with other deformations in a sub-region of the CVZ from 1992 to the present. Our study focuses on volcanic deformation, but we also resolve non-magmatic deformation signals including landslides and salars. The study region benefits from a large InSAR dataset of 631 ERS and ENVISAT interferograms, distributed between two descending tracks and two ascending tracks, covering up to 870 kilometers along the volcanic arc. We employ an inversion method based on the SBAS algorithm (Berardino 2002), but modified to avoid interpolation across dates with incoherent values. This modification effectively deals with the heterogeneous spatial extents and data gaps present in individual interferograms for long tracks. With our time series results we investigate the timing of possible magma migrations and we explore the parameters of forward models that match observations. Results indicate continuing monotonic inflation styles at Uturuncu and Lazufre with maximum LOS uplift at 1.0cm/yr and 2.5cm/yr respectively (Pritchard and Simons 2004, Froger et al. 2007, Ruch et al. 2009). We discuss evidence for 2mm/yr broad LOS deflation collocated with the Uturuncu inflation signal and comment on possible models for its origin

  4. General considerations for a Sentinel-1 constellation InSAR time series processing chain for ground deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, P. J.; Wright, T. J.; Hooper, A. J.; Walters, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Sentinel-1A was launched on April 3rd, 2014. It is the first satellite of a European Space Agency (ESA) constellation that promises to revolutionize measurement of deformation of the Earth's surface. The constellation is designed to acquire data globally as frequently as every 6 days on the same orbital pass, and every 3 days in alternating ascending and descending orbits over the same regions. This data acquisition plan is possible due to a much larger swath coverage than previous SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) sensors. In addition, all observations from Copernicus, the European Commission Earth Observation program, have a liberal data policy, which will enable full exploitation of the archived Sentinel-1 big data, both for scientific and commercial use.Sentinel-1, and similar future constellations, shape a new landscape in the way that InSAR data have traditionally been processed. We have started to develop a completely new re-engineered and adapted InSAR time series processing approach, which efficiently processes the data from this new type of SAR constellation, with the goal to deliver ground deformation products with the highest possible precision. In summary, the proposed system approach will require the development of an automatic, almost unsupervised, system that integrates methods to obtain time-dependent surface deformation estimates and correction products for atmospheric noise and refined orbits. The ground velocity maps will ideally meet the desired precision of 1 mm/yr / 100 km to measure strain-rates (10 nanostrain/yr) at a comparable level of precision to current existing sparse regional GPS measurement networks.In this communication, we describe the different steps we have adopted to partially solve: 1) coregistration of TOPS (Terrain Observation with Progressive Scans) SAR images to enable interferometry, 2) how to manage the ambiguity between ground motion in azimuth and in line-of-sight for TOPS InSAR, 3) how to process efficiently newly

  5. Time Series Surface Deformation using Multi-Temporal InSAR Technique at Mount Sinabung Eruption in North Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Eui-Hong; Lee, ChangWook; Jo, Eunyoung; Lee, SeulKi; Kim, KiYeon

    2014-05-01

    Sinabung volcano in Indonesia is a part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, formed due to the subduction between the Eurasian and the Indo-Australian plate. After about 400-year dormancy, Sinabung volcano erupted on August 29, 2010 and January 4, 2014, recently. We study the surface deformation of Sinabung volcano using ALOS/PALSAR and RADARSAT-2 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images acquired from February 2007 to September 2013. Based on multi-temporal InSAR processing, we can generate the ground surface deformation map due to the 2010 eruption. During the 3 years before the 2010 eruption, the volcano inflated at an average rate ~1.7 cm/yr with marked higher rate of 6.6 cm/year during the 6 months prior to the 2010 eruption. The inflation is constrained to the top of the volcano. Since the 2010 eruption to January 2011, the volcano has subsided for about 3 cm (or about 6 cm/yr). The observed inflation and deflation are modeled with a Mogi and Prolate spheroid source. The source of inflation is located about 0.3 - 1.3 km below sea level directly underneath the crater. On the other hand, deflation source is modeled about 0.6-1.0 km with coeruption period. The average volumetric change was about from 1.9x10-6 to -2.7x10-5 km3/yr during the eruption event using ALOS/PALSAR images. Recently, RADARSAT-2 SAR data were applied to new eruption event from September 2013 to January 2014 for frequently eruption during short time period. We interpret the inflation was due to magma accumulation at a shallow reservoir beneath the Sinabung volcano. The deflation was due to the magma withdrawal from the shallow reservoir during the eruption as well as thermo-elastic compaction of erupted material.

  6. Recent Advances on INSAR Temporal Decorrelation: Theory and Observations Using UAVSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavalle, M.; Hensley, S.; Simard, M.

    2011-01-01

    We review our recent advances in understanding the role of temporal decorrelation in SAR interferometry and polarimetric SAR interferometry. We developed a physical model of temporal decorrelation based on Gaussian-statistic motion that varies along the vertical direction in forest canopies. Temporal decorrelation depends on structural parameters such as forest height, is sensitive to polarization and affects coherence amplitude and phase. A model of temporal-volume decorrelation valid for arbitrary spatial baseline is discussed. We tested the inversion of this model to estimate forest height from model simulations supported by JPL/UAVSAR data and lidar LVIS data. We found a general good agreement between forest height estimated from radar data and forest height estimated from lidar data.

  7. Hydrothermal fluid flow models of Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy constrained by InSAR surface deformation time series observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, P.; Lanari, R.; Manzo, M.; Sansosti, E.; Tizzani, P.; Hutnak, M.; Hurwitz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy, located along the Bay of Naples, has a long history of significant vertical deformation, with the most recent large uplift (>1.5m) occurring in 1983-1984. Each episode of uplift has been followed by a period of subsidence that decreases in rate with time and may be punctuated by brief episodes of lesser uplift. The large amplitude of the major uplifts that occur without volcanic activity, and the subsequent subsidence has been argued as evidence for hydrothermal amplification of any magmatic source. The later subsidence and its temporal decay have been argued as due to diffusion of the pressurized caldera fill material into the less porous surrounding country rock. We present satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) time series analysis of ERS and Envisat data from the European Space Agency, based on exploiting the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) approach [Berardino et al., 2002]; this allows us to generate maps of relative surface deformation though time, beginning in 1992 through 2007, that are relevant to both ascending and descending satellite orbits. The general temporal behavior is one of subsidence punctuated by several lesser uplift episodes. The spatial pattern of deformation can be modeled through simple inflation/deflation sources in an elastic halfspace. Given the evidence to suggest that fluids may play a significant role in the temporal deformation of Campi Flegrei, rather than a purely magmatic or magma chamber-based interpretation, we model the temporal and spatial evolution of surface deformation as a hydrothermal fluid flow process. We use the TOUGH2-BIOT2 set of numerical codes [Preuss et al., 1999; Hsieh, 1996], which couple multi-phase (liquid-gas) and multi-component (H2O-CO2) fluid flow in a porous or fractured media with plane strain deformation and fluid flow in a linearly elastic porous medium. We explore parameters related to the depth and temporal history of fluid injection, fluid

  8. Magnitude and extent of land subsidence in central Mexico revealed by regional InSAR ALOS time-series survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussard, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Amelung, F.; Cabral-Cano, E.

    2013-05-01

    Massive groundwater extraction is very common in Mexico and is well known to result in land subsidence. However, most surveys dedicated to land subsidence focus on one single city, mainly Mexico City, and thus fail to provide a comprehensive picture of the problem. Here we use a space-based radar remote sensing technique, known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to detect land subsidence in the entire central Mexico area. We used data from the Japanese satellite ALOS, processed over 600 SAR images acquired between 2007-2011 and produced over 3000 interferograms to cover and area of 200,000 km2 in central Mexico. We identify land subsidence in twenty-one areas, including seventeen cities, namely from east to west, Puebla, Mexico city, Toluca de Lerdo, Queretaro, San Luis de la Paz, south of San Luis de la Paz, Celaya, south of Villa de Reyes, San Luis Potosi, west of Villa de Arista, Morelia, Salamanca, Irapuato, Silao, Leon, Aguascalientes, north of Aguascalientes, Zamora de Hidalgo, Guadalajara, Ahuacatlan, and Tepic. Subsidence rates of 30 cm/yr are observed in Mexico City, while in the other locations typical rates of 5-10 cm/yr are noticed. Regional surveys of this type are necessary for the development of hazard mitigation plans and efficient use of ground-based monitoring. We additionally correlate subsidence with land use, surface geology, and faults distribution and suggest that groundwater extraction for agricultural, urban, and industrial uses are the main causes of land subsidence. We also reveal that the limits of the subsiding areas often correlate with existing faults, motion on these faults being driven by water extraction rather than by tectonic activity. In all the subsiding locations we observe high ground velocity gradients emphasizing the significant risks associated with land subsidence in central Mexico. Averaged 2007-2011 ground velocity map from ALOS InSAR time-series in central Mexico, revealing land subsidence in 21

  9. Spatiotemporal distribution of strain field and hydraulic conductivity at the Phoenix valley basins, constrained using InSAR time series and time-dependent models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. M.; Shirzaei, M.

    2015-12-01

    Poroelastic theory suggests that long-term aquifer deformation is linearly proportional to changes in pore pressure. Land subsidence is the surface expression of deformation occurring at depth that is observed with dense, detailed, and high precision interferometric SAR data. In earlier work, Miller & Shirzaei [2015] identified zones of subsidence and uplift across the Phoenix valley caused by pumping and artificial recharge operations. we combined ascending and descending Envisat InSAR datasets to estimate vertical and horizontal displacement time series from 2003-2010. Next, wavelet decomposition was used to extract and compare the elastic components of vertical deformation and hydraulic head data to estimate aquifer storage coefficients. In the following, we present the results from elastic aquifer modeling using a 3D array of triangular dislocations, extending from depth of 0.5 to 3.5 km. We employ a time-dependent modeling scheme to invert the InSAR displacement time series, solving for the spatiotemporal distribution of the aquifer-aquitard compaction. Such models are used to calculate strain and stress fields and forecast the location of extensional cracks and earth fissures, useful for urban planning and management. Later, applying the framework suggested by Burbey [1999], the optimum compaction model is used to estimate the 3D distribution of hydraulic conductivities as a function of time. These estimates are verified using in-situ and laboratory observations and provide unique evidence to investigate the stress-dependence of the hydraulic conductivity and its variations due to pumping, recharge, and injection. The estimates will also be used in groundwater flow models, enhancing water management in the valley and elsewhere. References Burby, T. J. (1999), Effects of horizontal strain in estimating specific storage and compaction in confined and leaky aquifer systems, Hydrogeology Journal, 7(6), 521-532, doi:10.1007/s100400050225

  10. Remote sensing measurements of thermokarst subsidence using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Chen, A. C.; Gusmeroli, A.; Zebker, H. A.; Zhang, T.

    2015-09-01

    Thawing of ice-rich permafrost followed by surface subsidence results in irregular, depressed landforms known as thermokarst. Many remote sensing studies have identified thermokarst landforms and mapped their changes. However, the intrinsic dynamic thermokarst process of surface subsidence remains a challenge to quantify and is seldom examined using remote sensing methods. In this study we used spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data to map surface subsidence trends at a thermokarst landform located near Deadhorse on the North Slope of Alaska. A pipeline access road constructed in the 1970s triggered the thawing of the permafrost, causing subsequent expansion of the thermokarst landform. Using Phased Array type L band Synthetic Aperture Radar images acquired by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-1, our InSAR analysis reveals localized thermokarst subsidence of 2-8 cm/yr between 2006 and 2010, equivalent to an ice volume loss of about 1.2 × 107 m3/yr. Comparisons between InSAR subsidence trends and lidar microtopography suggest a characteristic time of 8 years of thermokarst development. We also quantitatively explain the difficulty, uncertainties, and possible biases in separating thermokarst-induced, irreversible subsidence from cyclic seasonal deformation. Our study illustrates that InSAR is an effective tool for mapping and studying active thermokarst processes and quantifying ice loss.

  11. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrola, E. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Sacco, G.; Zebker, H. A.; Simons, M.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) is a software development effort in its second year within the NASA Advanced Information Systems and Technology program. The ISCE will provide a new computing environment for geodetic image processing for InSAR sensors that will enable scientists to reduce measurements directly from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products without first requiring them to develop detailed expertise in radar processing methods. The environment can serve as the core of a centralized processing center to bring Level-0 raw radar data up to Level-3 data products, but is adaptable to alternative processing approaches for science users interested in new and different ways to exploit mission data. The NRC Decadal Survey-recommended DESDynI mission will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystem. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment is planned to become a key element in processing DESDynI data into higher level data products and it is expected to enable a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data, than current approaches. At the core of ISCE is both legacy processing software from the JPL/Caltech ROI_PAC repeat-pass interferometry package as well as a new InSAR processing package containing more efficient and more accurate processing algorithms being developed at Stanford for this project that is based on experience gained in developing processors for missions such as SRTM and UAVSAR. Around the core InSAR processing programs we are building object-oriented wrappers to enable their incorporation into a more modern, flexible, extensible software package that is informed by modern programming methods, including rigorous componentization of processing codes, abstraction and generalization of data models, and a robust, intuitive user interface with

  12. Subsidence monitoring in coal area using time-series InSAR combining persistent scatterers and distributed scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengjia; Wang, Chao; Tang, Yixian; Fu, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    In coal mining areas, ground subsidence persistently happens, which produces serious environmental issues and affects the development of cities. To monitor the ground deformation due to coal mining, a modified time-series InSAR technique combining persistent scatterers (PSs) and distributed scatterers (DSs) is presented in this paper. In particular, DSs are efficiently identified using classified information and statistical characteristics. Furthermore, a two-scale network is introduced into traditional PSI to deal with PSs and DSs in a multi-layer framework by taking the advantage of the robust of PSs and the widely distribution of DSs. The proposed method is performed to investigate the subsidence of Huainan City, Anhui province (China), during 2012-2013 using 14 scenes of Radarsat-2 images. Experimental results show that the proposed method can ease the estimation complexity and significantly increase the spatial density of measurement points, which can provide more detailed deformation information. Result shows that there are obvious subsidence areas detected in the test site with subsidence velocity larger than 5 cm/year. The proposed method brings practical applications for non-urban area deformation monitoring.

  13. The combined use of InSAR and GPS Time-Series to Infer the Deformation Signals at the Yellowstone Caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, A.; Tizzani, P.; Battaglia, M.; Castaldo, R.; Lanari, R.; Zeni, G.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the Yellowstone caldera geological unrest between 1977 and 2010 by analyzing temporal changes in differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), precise spirit leveling andgravity measurements. The analysis of the 1992-2010 displacement time series has been retrieved by applying an "improved" version of the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) InSAR technique which complements a novel multi-temporal noise filtering approach with a suitable identification of the network of small baseline pairs. As a result, we have identified three areas of deformation: (i) the Mallard Lake (ML) and Sour Creek (SC) resurgent domes, (ii) a region close to the Northern Caldera Rim (NCR), and (iii) the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP). While the eastern SRP shows a signal related to tectonic deformation, the other two regions are influenced by the caldera unrest. We removed the tectonic signal from the InSAR displacements, and we modeled the InSAR, leveling, and gravity measurements to retrieve the best fitting source parameters. Our findings confirmed the existence of different distinct sources, beneath the brittle-ductile transition zone, which have been intermittently active during the last three decades. Moreover, we interpreted our results in the light of existing seismic tomography studies. Concerning the SC dome, we highlighted the role of hydrothermal fluids as the driving force behind the 1977-1983 uplift; since 1983-1993 the deformation source transformed into a deeper one with a higher magmatic component. Furthermore, our results support the magmatic nature of the deformation source beneath ML dome for the overall investigated period. Finally, the uplift at NCR is interpreted as magma accumulation, while its subsidence could either be the result of fluids migration outside the caldera or the gravitational adjustment of the source from a spherical to a sill-like geometry.

  14. Orogen-Wide InSAR Time Series for Detecting Deformation Sources: The Zagros and Makran of Southern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.; Barnhart, W. D.

    2011-12-01

    We present interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series maps that span the eastern Zagros (Fars Arc) collisional belt and western Makran accretionary prism of Southern Iran. Given the upcoming availability of large volumes of SAR data from new platforms, such as Sentinel 1 and potentially DESDynI, we explore computationally efficient approaches for extracting deformation time series when the signal of interest is small compared to the level of noise in individual interferograms. We use 12 descending and 2 ascending multi-frame (2-4 frames) Envisat tracks and 2 ascending ALOS tracks spanning 2003-2010 and 2006-2010. We implement a linear inversion, similar to the Small Baseline Subset (SBaS) technique, to derive surface displacements at individual acquisition dates from trees of interferograms with perpendicular baselines less than 350m for Envisat and 1500m for ALOS pairs. This spatially extensive dataset allows us to investigate several attributes of interferometry that vary spatially and temporally over large distances, including changes in phase coherence relative to elevation and relief as well as land use. Through synthetic tests and observed data, we explore various sources of potential error in calculation of time series, including variable coherence of pixels between interferograms in a single track, ambiguities in phase unwrapping, and orbital ramp estimation over scenes with variable correlated noise structure. We present examples of detected signals with both temporally variable characteristics and small magnitudes, including surface/subsurface salt deformation, aseismic deformation across Minab-Zendan-Palami strike-slip zone, and subsidence due to hydrocarbon extraction.

  15. Magnitude and extent of land subsidence in central Mexico revealed by regional InSAR ALOS time-series survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussard, Estelle; Amelung, Falk; Wdowinski, Shimon; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    The societal impacts of land subsidence are colossal, both in terms of decrease in water resources and in threat to human life due to buildings damages and increase in flood risk from rivers. Most subsidence surveys in Mexico focus on Mexico City, known to subside since the 1950s, while a few studies have documented the occurrence of land subsidence in other medium to large-seized cities of central Mexico. However, because most works target one single city, they fail to reveal the bigger picture. Here we use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) time-series analysis of ALOS L-band SAR data to resolve land subsidence in an area of 200,000 km2 in central Mexico. We processed over 600 SAR images acquired between 2007-2011 and produced over 3000 interferograms. The data reveal significant subsidence in seventeen cities, including sixteen with over 100, 000 inhabitants and allow mapping of subsidence with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Land subsidence is detected, from east to west, in Puebla (population of 2.5 million), Mexico city (population of 21 million), Toluca de Lerdo (population of 427K), Queretaro (population of 825K), San Luis de la Paz (population of 101K), Celaya (population of 266K), San Luis Potosi (population of 936K), Morelia (population of 537K), Salamanca (population of 144K), Irapuato (population of 317K), Silao (population of 147K), Leon (population of 1.4 million), Aguascalientes (population of 735K), Zamora de Hidalgo (population of 186K), Guadalajara (population of 3.8 million), Ahuacatlan (population of 6.5K), and Tepic (population of 261K). We additionally identify subsidence in 3 agricultural areas outside major urban centers: 20 km southwest of the city of San Luis de la Paz, south of Villa de Reyes (40 km south of San Luis Potosi), and west of villa de Arista (50 km north of San Luis Potosi). The time-series suggest nearly constant rates of subsidence at most the locations over the 2-years period spanned by the SAR

  16. Gravity-driven deformation of Tenerife measured by InSAR time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, J.; Tizzani, P.; Manzo, M.; Borgia, A.; González, P. J.; Martí, J.; Pepe, A.; Camacho, A. G.; Casu, F.; Berardino, P.; Prieto, J. F.; Lanari, R.

    2009-02-01

    We study the state of deformation of Tenerife (Canary Islands) using Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR). We apply the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) DInSAR algorithm to radar images acquired from 1992 to 2005 by the ERS sensors to determine the deformation rate distribution and the time series for the coherent pixels identified in the island. Our analysis reveals that the summit area of the volcanic edifice is characterized by a rather continuous subsidence extending well beyond Las Cañadas caldera rim and corresponding to the dense core of the island. These results, coupled with GPS ones, structural and geological information and deformation modeling, suggest an interpretation based on the gravitational sinking of the dense core of the island into a weak lithosphere and that the volcanic edifice is in a state of compression. We also detect more localized deformation patterns correlated with water table changes and variations in the deformation time series associated with the seismic crisis in 2004.

  17. Seven years of postseismic deformation following the 2003 Mw = 6.8 Zemmouri earthquake (Algeria) from InSAR time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Esra; Meghraoui, Mustapha; Cakir, Ziyadin; Akoglu, Ahmet M.; Mimouni, Omar; Chebbah, Mouloud

    2012-05-01

    We study the postseismic surface deformation of the Mw 6.8, 2003 Zemmouri earthquake (northern Algeria) using the Multi-Temporal Small Baseline InSAR technique. InSAR time series obtained from 31 Envisat ASAR images from 2003 to 2010 reveal sub-cm coastline ground movements between Cap Matifou and Dellys. Two regions display subsidence at a maximum rate of 2 mm/yr in Cap Djenet and 3.5 mm/yr in Boumerdes. These regions correlate well with areas of maximum coseismic uplifts, and their association with two rupture segments. Inverse modeling suggest that subsidence in the areas of high coseismic uplift can be explained by afterslip on shallow sections (<5 km) of the fault above the areas of coseismic slip, in agreement with previous GPS observations. The earthquake impact on soft sediments and the ground water table southwest of the earthquake area, characterizes ground deformation of non-tectonic origin. The cumulative postseismic moment due to 7 years afterslip is equivalent to an Mw 6.3 earthquake. Therefore, the postseismic deformation and stress buildup has significant implications on the earthquake cycle models and recurrence intervals of large earthquakes in the Algiers area.

  18. Quantifying changes in land-surface height in bioenergy palm oil plantations (Sumatra) using InSAR time series.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Waldron, Susan; Li, Zhenhong

    2013-04-01

    Tropical peatlands in Southeast Asia cover ~ 439,238 km sq. and represent ~77 % of global tropical peatland carbon stores and ~11 % of global peatland area. These landscapes are substantial C stores accounting for ~17-19 % of the global peat C pool (Page et al., 2010). Within southeast Asia, Indonesian peatlands hold most C (57.4 Pg, 65 %), followed by Malaysia (9.1 Pg, 10 %). In recent decades the drive to use these soils for agriculture and often the palm oil biogenergy crop, has driven fire-clearing, deforestation and drainage of these carbon landscapes. The drainage can lead to respiration of the soil carbon store and subsidence of the peatland (Hooijer et al., 2012), reducing their strength as a current C store and their capacity for future soil C storage. Using field-based surveying to monitor changes in the past peatland surface height, and over the large areas typical of commercial agricultural palm oil plantations, is challenging such that measurements are more likely to describe a small area and be only a snapshot in time. Upscaling and understanding the rate of change in surface height through time may be overcome using remote sensing approaches. Here we present data on the change in peatland surface height in Indonesia palm oil plantations, detected using the Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) Small BAseline Set (SBAS) approach (Berardino et al., 2002). Using data from July 2007 to January 2011, we have generated a map of the rate of change of mean height, and time series of change in surface height for several plantation areas. To do this we used two independent ALOS L-band tracks SAR images, as there is a lack of ground data for validation, coherence in output provides confidence the results are representative. Our analysis to date shows that in drained and planted palm oil areas: 1) the rate of change in surface height (decrease) can vary; 2) the decrease in surface height can be up to 5 cm/year; 3) the largest decrease in surface height

  19. Time-dependent model of aseismic slip on the central San Andreas Fault from InSAR time series and repeating earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshmanesh, M.; Shirzaei, M.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2015-09-01

    The Central segment of San Andreas Fault (CSAF) is characterized by a nearly continuous right-lateral aseismic slip. However, observations of the creep rate obtained using small characteristically repeating earthquakes (CREs) show pulses of creep along the CSAF, which may indicate spatially and temporally variable seismic hazard along the CSAF. Therefore, the goal of this study is to obtain a high-resolution time-dependent model of creep along the CSAF to examine this hypothesis. To this end, we apply a time-dependent creep modeling approach, which combines interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) surface deformation time series and observations of fault creep obtained from CREs. The SAR data set includes C band scenes acquired by the ERS-2 and Envisat satellites between 2003 and 2011. The resulting creep rate distribution implies a peak rate up to 32 mm/yr along the central part of the CSAF. Afterslip due to the 2004 Parkfield earthquake on the southeastern segment of the CSAF is also manifest in the model, and there is clear evidence of creep pulsing along strike and depth of the CSAF. Estimated annual rate of slip deficit accumulation is equivalent to a magnitude 5.6-5.7 earthquake. Taking advantage of the time-dependence of our model, we also refine the scaling relationship, which associates the released seismic moment due to a CRE event with the amount of creep on the fault, surrounding the CRE patches. This study provides the first kinematic model of creep pulsing, constrained using geodetic and seismic data, which can enhance time-dependent seismic hazard maps and improve earthquake operational forecast models.

  20. Ground deformation associated with post-mining activity at the French-German border revealed by novel InSAR time series method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, Sergey; d'Oreye, Nicolas; Smets, Benoît

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel methodology for integration of multiple InSAR data sets for computation of two dimensional time series of ground deformation. The proposed approach allows combination of SAR data acquired with different acquisition parameters, temporal and spatial sampling and resolution, wavelength and polarization. Produced time series have combined coverage, improved temporal resolution and lower noise level. We apply this methodology for mapping coal mining related ground subsidence and uplift in the Greater Region of Luxembourg along the French-German border. For this we processed 167 Synthetic Aperture Radar ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT images acquired between 1995 and 2009 from one ascending (track 29) and one descending (track 337) tracks and created over five hundred interferograms that were used for time series analysis. Derived vertical and east-west linear deformation rates show with remarkable precision a region of localized ground deformation located above and caused by mining and post-mining activities. Time series of ground deformation display temporal variability: reversal from subsidence to uplift and acceleration of subsidence in the vertical component, and horizontal motion toward the center of the subsidence on the east-west component. InSAR results are validated by leveling measurements collected by the French Geological Survey (BRGM) during 2006-2008. We determined that deformation rate changes are mainly caused by water level variations in the mines. Due to higher temporal and spatial resolution the proposed space-borne method detected a larger number of subsidence and uplift areas in comparison to leveling measurements restricted to annual monitoring of benchmark points along roads. We also identified one deformation region that is not precisely located above the mining sites. Comparison of InSAR measurements with the water levels measured in the mining pits suggest that part of the water that filled the galleries after termination of the

  1. Deformation Mapping for Coal Mining Using Time-Series InSAR Combining Persistent Scatterer and Distributed Scatterer in Huainan City, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengjia; Tang, Yixian; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Hong

    2015-05-01

    A modified time-series InSAR technique combing Persistent Scatterers and Distributed scatterers is applied to obtain the deformation information at coal mining areas in Huainan city. In order to select DSs, a selecting strategy combining both classified information and statistical characteristics is used. To control error propagation and improve computational efficiency, a region growing-based strategy is applied to extract the deformation rate at DSs. A series of Radarsat-2 HH polarization images collected in Huainan over a period of approximately two years are processed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. The experimental results show that zones with obvious subsidence are detected in coal mining areas with a maximum deformation rate larger than 10.7 cm/year during the observation period.

  2. Evaluation of the potential of InSAR time series to study the spatio-temporal evolution of piezometric levels in the Madrid aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béjar-Pizarro, M.; Ezquerro Martín, P.; Herrera, G.; Tomás, R.; Guardiola-Albert, C.; Ruiz Hernández, J. M.; Marchamalo Sacristán, M.; Martínez Marín, R.

    2015-11-01

    The Tertiary detritic aquifer of Madrid (TDAM), with an average thickness of 1500 m and a heterogeneous, anisotropic structure, supplies water to Madrid, the most populated city of Spain (3.2 million inhabitants in the metropolitan area). Besides its complex structure, a previous work focused in the north-northwest of Madrid city showed that the aquifer behaves quasi elastically trough extraction/recovery cycles and ground uplifting during recovery periods compensates most of the ground subsidence measured during previous extraction periods (Ezquerro et al., 2014). Therefore, the relationship between ground deformation and groundwater level through time can be simulated using simple elastic models. In this work, we model the temporal evolution of the piezometric level in 19 wells of the TDAM in the period 1997-2010. Using InSAR and piezometric time series spanning the studied period, we first estimate the elastic storage coefficient (Ske) for every well. Both, the Ske of each well and the average Ske of all wells, are used to predict hydraulic heads at the different well locations during the study period and compared against the measured hydraulic heads, leading to very similar errors when using the Ske of each well and the average Ske of all wells: 14 and 16 % on average respectively. This result suggests that an average Ske can be used to estimate piezometric level variations in all the points where ground deformation has been measured by InSAR, thus allowing production of piezometric level maps for the different extraction/recovery cycles in the TDAM.

  3. Time-dependent Model of Aseismic slip on the Central San Andreas Fault from InSAR Time Series and Repeating Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshmanesh, M.; Shirzaei, M.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Central segment of the San Andreas Fault (CSAF) is characterized by a nearly continuous right-lateral aseismic slip. Geodetic observations of surface deformation along CSAF indicate interseismic strain accumulation with a rate of about 10 mm/yr. The creep rates obtained using Characteristic Repeating Earthquakes (CRE) show pulses of creep affecting most of the CSAF, suggesting spatiotemporal variability of seismic hazard. Therefore, a high resolution time-dependent model of creep on the CSAF can greatly enhance the knowledge of aseismic and seismic faulting processes as well as the seismic hazard estimates. We used InSAR surface deformation time series in conjunction with observations of fault creep obtained from CRE. The SAR data set includes C-band scenes acquired by the ERS-2 and Envisat during period 2003-2011, comprising 46 images, resulted in about 150 interferograms. Within the same observation period, the CRE data set includes more than 630 repeating sequences. Understanding the spatiotemporal distribution of creep, we implement a time-dependent modeling scheme, allowing us to jointly invert the surface deformation time series and CRE estimates of the fault creep.The distribution of obtained creep rate on the CSAF includes features similar to that reported in earlier works. The map of long-term slip rate reveals that fastest creep rate occurs at the central part of CSAF with an average rate of 27 mm/yr, which is less than the long-term shearing rate. Moving northwestward, the slip rate gradually drops to less than half of its long-term rate. The spatiotemporal map of the creep includes unique features such as afterslip due to the 2004 Parkfield earthquake affecting the southeastern part of the CSAF and the clear evidence of creep pulsing along strike and depth of the CSAF with a period of 1.5 to 2 years. Considering 34.5 mm/yr as the long-term shearing rate, the zone of afterslip is characterized by relaxation time of about 16.35 years. The moment

  4. Slow Moving Hazard Hotspot from InSAR Data: improving communication with decision makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Casagli, Nicola; Catani, Filippo; Tofani, Veronica

    2010-05-01

    Slow moving hazards are not always taken seriously in the management and governance of mountain risks. This is because of their relatively low threat to human lives compared to rapid mass movement. However, these kinds of slow processes can remain active for long period of time. Also, it could leave a great threat to properties and infrastructures. Hence, for an advanced risk management strategy, it is important to include slow moving hazards when dealing with long-term mountain risks. Thanks to the rapid development of advanced InSAR processing, especially with the advent of long-term InSAR approaches, it is possible to detect ground motion with millimeter precision for a long period of spanning time. However, considering the complexity and ambiguity of the data processing, for those who are mainly dealing with risk management and governance, the technical part of InSAR processing is sometimes equivocal and difficult to understand. Providing an understandable hazard map might be more helpful for them. With this motive, we introduce an approach of producing slow moving hazard hotspot map from previous InSAR outcomes. Compared to traditional InSAR maps, the hotspot map is straightforward and easy to understand. To present the usefulness of hotspot map, an example in the Arno river basin in central Italy is presented. Several landslides activities are confirmed as active from the hotspot map. Some of them are further investigated in order to evaluate the previous mitigation efforts. Also, the map provides an approach of detecting and mapping new landslides rapidly and accurately. Except for landslide hazards, subsidence dangers are identified in the Mugello Circuit which is the race track for Moto GP and the test track for Ferrari Formula 1 team. In all, the hotspot map is proven to be an efficient, effective and easily understandable communication approach between technicians and decision makers.

  5. ERS-ENVISAT InSAR deformation time-series: a powerful tool to investigate long term surface deformation of large areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    Satellite time series have already provided key measurements to retrieve information on the dynamic nature of Earth surface processes. We exploit in this work the availability of the large archives of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired by the ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT sensors of the European Space Agency (ESA) during the 1992-2009 time period, in order to investigate long term surface deformation of large areas. To achieve this result we take advantage of the Differential SAR Interferometry (InSAR) algorithm referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique (Berardino et al., 2002), which allows us to generate mean deformation velocity maps and corresponding time-series by exploiting temporally overlapping SAR dataset collected by the ERS and ENVISAT sensors (Pepe et al., 2005). In particular, we focus on the results obtained by retrieving ERS-ENVISAT deformation time-series from 1992 till today in selected case studies relevant to different scenarios. We start from the analysis of the Mt. Etna volcano (Italy) and the Napoli Bay area (Italy), the latter including three volcanic systems (the Campi Flegrei caldera, the Somma-Vesuvio volcanic complex and the Ischia island) and the city of Napoli. In addition, we present the results relevant to the cities of Istanbul (Turkey) and Roma (Italy). The overall analyses are carried out by using averaged (multilook) InSAR interferograms with a spatial resolution of about 100 x 100 m. Moreover, in selected zones we further investigate localized phenomena by zooming in the areas of interest and carrying out a InSAR analysis at full spatial resolution scale (Lanari et al., 2004). In these cases we also exploit the doppler centroid variations of the post-2000 acquisitions of the ERS-2 sensor and the carrier frequency difference between the ERS-1/2 and the ENVISAT systems in order to maximize the number of investigated SAR pixels and to improve their geocoding. The presented results demonstrate the unique

  6. An attempt to detect preseismic displacement field of the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake using InSAR small baseline time-series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, M.; Fukushima, Y.; Hirahara, K.; Hashimoto, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake (Mj 7.2) occurred at 8:43, JST on June 14 2008, in the northeastern Honshu, Japan. This earthquake caused significant amount of ground displacements with more than 2m of uplift and 1.5m of horizontal displacement at the Kurikoma2 GPS station of GEONET network operated by the Geographical Survey Institute (GSI).In a few years prior to the earthquake, the Kurikoma2 station displaced about 1cm and 2cm to the southeast and upward directions, respectively, according to GSI's analysis. We perform an InSAR small baseline (SB) time-series analysis in order to investigate this slow non-steady movement in detail. We applied an InSAR SB time-series analysis based on Schmidt and Bürgmann (2003; JGR, vol. 108). This method can mitigate atmospheric and orbital artifacts, which constitute dominant sources of error, by assuming a temporal smoothness of displacements. We used seven SAR data acquired by PALSAR onboard the ALOS satellite. We selected three interferograms and stacked them after converting to velocity. For the small baseline processing, we selected and processed 17 small-baseline pairs with definition of small baseline to be less than 2000 m for the perpendicular baseline and 1000 days for the temporal baseline. The interferograms were unwrapped and solved for the temporal evolution of displacements with the time steps defined by the SAR acquisition dates. Preliminary results indicate that atmospheric and orbital effects are still higher than the expected amplitude of preseismic displacements. Though the noise may further be mitigated by careful tuning of analysis parameters, our preliminary results suggest that we probably need more realistic atmospheric correction using independent data such as GPS and meteorological data. Acknowledgment PALSAR data are shared by PIXEL (PALSAR Interferometry Consortium to Study our Evolving Land surface), and provided from JAXA under a contract with ERI, Univ. of Tokyo. The ownership of PALSAR

  7. Measurement of long-term land subsidence by combination of InSAR and time series analysis - Application study to Kanto Plains of Japan -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, T.; Rokugawa, S.; Matsushima, J.

    2009-04-01

    InSAR is an application technique of synthetic aperture radars and is now drawing attention as a methodology capable of measuring subtle surface deformation over a wide area with a high spatial resolution. In this study, the authors applied the method of measuring long-term land subsidence by combining InSAR and time series analysis to Kanto Plains of Japan using 28 images of ENVISAT/ASAR data. In this measuring method, the value of land deformation is set as an unknown parameter and the optimal solution to the land deformation amount is derived by applying a smoothness-constrained inversion algorithm. The vicinity of the Kanto Plain started to subside in the 1910s, and became exposed to extreme land subsidence supposedly in accordance with the reconstruction efforts after the Second World War and the economic development activities. The main causes of the land subsidence include the intake of underground water for the use in industries, agriculture, waterworks, and other fields. In the Kujukuri area, the exploitation of soluble natural gas also counts. The Ministry of Environment reported in its documents created in fiscal 2006 that a total of 214 km2 in Tokyo and the six prefectures around the Plain had undergone a subsidence of 1 cm or more per a year. As a result of long-term land subsidence over approximately five and a half years from 13th January, 2003, to 30th June, 2008, unambiguous land deformation was detected in six areas: (i) Haneda Airport, (ii) Urayasu City, (iii) Kasukabe-Koshigaya, (iv) Southern Kanagawa, (v) Toride-Ryugasaki, and (vi) Kujukuri in Chiba Prefecture. In particular, the results for the Kujukuri area were compared with the leveling data taken around the same area to verify the measuring accuracy. The comparative study revealed that the regression formula between the results obtained by time series analysis and those by the leveling can be expressed as a straight line with a gradient of approximately 1, though including a bias of about

  8. Monitoring of Land Deformation Due to Oil Production by InSAR Time Series Analysis Using PALSAR Data in Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Tomonori; Narita, Tatsuhiko

    2015-05-01

    The target area of this study is the Maracaibo sedimentary basin located in the western part of Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela. The full-scale exploration and development for oil resources in Venezuela which was the greatest oil-producing country in South America had begun at the Maracaibo sedimentary basin in the 1910s, and it was a center of the oil product in Venezuela until the 1980s. But, in most of oil fields in the Maracaibo sedimentary basin, there is concern over the drain on recoverable reserves due to deterioration, and the production amount of petroleum in Venezuela has been diminishing these days. Leveling and GPS surveying were carried out in the past, and they revealed that the large-scale subsidence phenomenon of which cumulative subsidence amount was approximately 5 meter had occurred. The authors applied the vertical displacement measurement by InSAR time series analysis using PALSAR data obtained in the Fine-beam and ScanSAR observation mode. As a result, it could be confirmed clear ground deformation in the surrounding of three oil fields (Tia Juana, Lagunillas and Bachaquero) and easily recognized that the areas of phase anomalies detected by this analysis had expanded and the number of interference fringes had increased over time. The annual velocity of vertical ground surface displacement measured by InSAR time series analysis was -51 mm per year, -103 mm per year and -58 mm per year in Tia Juana, Lagunillas and Bachaquero oil field respectively. The tendency that an earth surface shifted towards the center of phase anomalies was detected from the result of the horizontal ground change measurement. It was interpreted from Google Earth and Landsat images that oil-related facilities (mainly bowling stations) were built intensively over the areas where phase anomalies were detected. Therefore, it was inferred that there was a high association between the operation activity of the oil field and ground deformation. In addition, the deterioration

  9. Natural and anthropogenic ground subsidence in the Sibari Plain basin (Southern Italy) detected by Envisat and Cosmo-SkyMed InSAR time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianflone, Giuseppe; Tolomei, Cristiano; Brunori, Carlo Alberto; Dominici, Rocco

    2015-04-01

    We investigated surface ground deformations in the Sibari Plain (SP - Calabria, Southern Italy) which representing a Holocene coastal plain located along the boundary between Calabrian Arc and Southern Apennines. The plain is characterized by intense urbanization, groundwater exploitation, hydrogeological instability and the presence of capable faults. Our study is founded on the application of the Small Baseline Subset multi-temporal InSAR technique to two SAR datasets acquired from 2003 up to 2013 by Envisat (ESA, European Space Agency) and COSMO-SkyMed (ASI, Italian Space Agency) satellites. The Up component records a widespread subsidence, up to ~ 20 mm/yr (Envisat and COSMO-SkyMed sensors), along the whole coastal sector from Villapiana Lido to Marina di Schiavonea, while low positive values ( ~1 mm/yr) are present moving inland. Along the coastal area, the East component is characterized by common positive values (Eastward displacement), only in correspondence of the Laghi di Sibari and the Corigliano industrial area negative values are recorded. We investigate the possible triggering subsidence mechanisms through the interpretation of the interferometric results based on geological, hydrogeological and land use information. The thickness of the Plio-Quaternary succession is reconstructed by deep exploration wells and seismic data and a direct correlation between it and the subsidence, recorded by the InSAR data, is observed. Recent study describes an active oblique-contractional belt (the Amendolara Ridge) in the Ionian Sea in front on the SP. We suggest that this active back thrusting can triggered a flexural subsidence mechanism. We try to find correlations among ground deformation, recent fault activity and earthquakes occurrence. In detail, we analyze the Envisat and COSMO-SkyMed both ascending and descending time series depending on the earthquakes happened, during the period of InSAR data availability, close to the capable faults present in the study

  10. Inter- and Post-Seismic Ground Deformation of the 2012 Emilia Seismic Sequence By Means of COSMO-Skymed and Ers-Envisat InSAR Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzo, G.; Tolomei, C.; Salvi, S.; Atzori, S.; Merryman Boncori, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    On May 20, 2012, a moderate earthquake of local magnitude, M 5.9 started a seismic sequence in the central Po Plain of Northern Italy. The mainshock occurred in an area where seismicity of comparable magnitude has neither been recorded nor reported in the historical record over the last 1,000 years. On May 29, 2012 a second large earthquake of M 5.8 occurred 12 km WSW of the mainshock, starting a new seismic sequence in the western area; a total of seven earthquakes with M >5 occurred in the area between May 20 and June 3, 2012. After the first mainshock, a COSMO-SkyMed acquisition plan was going to provide data over a wide area of the Emilia Region covering both the epicentral region and the adjacent West and East areas, and was later extended up to December 31th, 2013 to monitor the post-seismic deformation. Using multitemporal SBAS InSAR technique we measured co and post-seismic deformations; . we used COSMO-SkyMed image datasets spanning the time period 2012-2013, along both ascending and descending orbit. Moreover we studied the pre-seismic (inter-seismic) phase by means of ERS1/2 and ASAR-Envisat data covering the 1992-2010 temporal interval. In this framework the Emilia seismic sequence represents a very interesting case for the study of the complete seismic cycle.

  11. 4D map of the Kilauea summit shallow magmatic system constrained by InSAR time series and geometry-free inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, G.; Shirzaei, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Kilauea volcano, Hawaii Island, is one of the most active volcanoes worldwide. Its complex system, including magma reservoirs and rift zones, provides a unique opportunity to investigate the dynamics of magma transport and supply. The models explaining the system are yet limited to the first order analytical solutions with fixed geometry. To obtain a 4D map of the volume changes at the Kilauea summit magmatic system (KSMS), we implement a novel geometry-free time-dependent inverse modeling scheme, using a distribution of point center of dilatations (PCDs). The model is constrained using high resolution surface deformation data, which are obtained through InSAR time series analysis of well populated SAR data sets acquired at two overlapping tracks of Envisat satellite during 2003 and 2011. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the 4D maps of volume change identifies five major active reservoir beneath Kilauea caldera. The southern caldera reservoir (SCR) gains volume slowly till 2006 before its rapid inflation during 2006 - mid-2007, followed by deflation until the start of re-inflation in mid-2010. Other reservoirs show episodic temporal correlation and anti-correlation with SCR. We found that the top-down relation between reservoirs at the Kilauea summit is not necessarily valid at all time scales. Identifying statistically significant PCDs through Chi-square test, we develop and apply a boundary element modeling scheme to solve for the volume change time series and complex geometry of the summit magmatic system. Availability of such models allows realistic estimates of volume change and associated seismic hazard and enhance the forecast models.

  12. Wetland InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.

    2006-12-01

    Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of InSAR provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of InSAR for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by

  13. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Sacco, Gian Franco; Gurrola, Eric M.; Zabker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    This computing environment is the next generation of geodetic image processing technology for repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) sensors, identified by the community as a needed capability to provide flexibility and extensibility in reducing measurements from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products. This software allows users of interferometric radar data the flexibility to process from Level 0 to Level 4 products using a variety of algorithms and for a range of available sensors. There are many radar satellites in orbit today delivering to the science community data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible large-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and the Earth's ecosystem. The proposed DESDynI mission, now under consideration by NASA for launch later in this decade, would provide time series and multiimage measurements that permit 4D models of Earth surface processes so that, for example, climate-induced changes over time would become apparent and quantifiable. This advanced data processing technology, applied to a global data set such as from the proposed DESDynI mission, enables a new class of analyses at time and spatial scales unavailable using current approaches. This software implements an accurate, extensible, and modular processing system designed to realize the full potential of InSAR data from future missions such as the proposed DESDynI, existing radar satellite data, as well as data from the NASA UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar), and other airborne platforms. The processing approach has been re-thought in order to enable multi-scene analysis by adding new algorithms and data interfaces, to permit user-reconfigurable operation and extensibility, and to capitalize on codes already developed by NASA and the science community. The framework incorporates modern programming methods based on recent research, including object-oriented scripts controlling legacy and

  14. Insights Into Aleutian Volcanism from Insar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Dzurisin, D.

    2013-12-01

    With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has become an increasingly important technique for studying magma dynamics at volcanoes in remote regions, such as the Aleutian Islands. The spatial distribution of surface deformation derived from InSAR data enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic processes. To study Aleutian volcanism, we processed nearly 12,000 SAR images acquired by ERS-1, JERS-1, ERS-2, Radarsat-1, Envisat, ALOS, and TerraSAR-X from the early 1990s to 2010. We combined these SAR images to produce about 25,000 interferograms, which we analyzed for evidence of surface deformation at most of the arc's Holocene volcanoes. Where surface displacements were sufficiently strong, we used analytical models to estimate the location, shape, and volume change of deformation sources. This paper summarizes deformation processes at Aleutian volcanoes observed with InSAR, including: (1) time-variant volcanic inflation and magmatic intrusion, (2) deformation preceding and accompanying seismic swarms , (3) persistent volcano-wide subsidence at calderas that last erupted tens of years ago, (4) episodic magma intrusion and associated tectonic stress release, (5) subsidence caused by a decrease in pore fluid pressure in active hydrothermal systems, (6) subsidence of surface lava and pyroclastic flows, and (7) a lack of deformation at some volcanoes with recent eruptions, where deformation might be expected. Among the inferred mechanisms are magma accumulation in and withdrawal from crustal magma reservoirs, pressurization/depressurization of hydrothermal systems, and thermo-elastic contraction of young lava flows. Our work demonstrates that deformation patterns and associated magma supply mechanisms at Aleutian volcanoes are diverse and vary in both space and time. By combining InSAR results with information from the geologic record, accounts of historical

  15. Post-seismic Deformation of Mojave Earthquakes using Full-Resolution InSAR Time-Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, M.; Peltzer, G.

    2015-12-01

    Surface deformation in the Mojave Desert in the last two decades has been dominated by the effects of the 1992 Landers and 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes. In the post-seismic periods following these events, broad scale patterns were interpreted as afterslip on deep parts of the faults or viscoelastic relaxation in the lower crust and upper mantle. In the near-field of the faults, smaller size features of the displacement field were interpreted as poro-elastic relaxation of crustal fluid pressure gradients produced by the co-seismic stress change. We reanalyze the entire archive of the European Space Agency ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT radar data to define the spatial and temporal characteristics of the near-field deformation following the two events, achieving coverage during the 1992-2010 time period. The raw data are processed into interferograms using the JPL ISCE software. The interferograms are corrected for the tropospheric phase delay using the ECMWF GCM and orbit errors are estimated in the data network over entire scenes. Time-series of surface displacement maps of sub-regions near the faults are then constructed using the full resolution of the radar images (~20 m). Deformation features within and near the earthquake faults are characterized by a fast LOS velocity exponentially decaying with time over 1-2 years, followed by a steady deformation corresponding to the long-term strain in the Mojave. Shorter relaxation times are generally observed in regions where the crust sustained extension during the preceding earthquakes suggesting that crustal tension increases the diffusivity of fluids in the shallow crust. In the Johnson Valley-Homestead Valley pull-apart we estimate a relaxation time of ~400 days. Along the northern section of the HME fault rupture, the narrow zone of subsidence has a relaxation time of ~240 days, which can be explained by intensely damaged rocks within the fault zone.

  16. Spatiotemporal characterization of land subsidence and uplift in Phoenix using InSAR time series and wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Megan Marie; Shirzaei, Manoochehr

    2015-08-01

    The effects of land subsidence pose a significant hazard to the environment and infrastructure in the arid, alluvial basins of Phoenix, Arizona. Improving our understanding of the source and mechanisms of subsidence is important for planning and risk management. Here we employ multitemporal interferometric analysis of large synthetic aperture radar data sets acquired by ERS and Envisat satellites to investigate ground deformation. The ERS data sets from 1992 to 1996 and Envisat, 2003-2010, are used to generate line of sight (LOS) time series and velocities in both the ascending and descending tracks. The general deformation pattern is consistent among data sets and is characterized by three zones of subsidence and a broad zone of uplift. The multitrack Envisat LOS time series of surface deformation are inverted to obtain spatiotemporal maps of the vertical and horizontal deformation fields. We use observation wells to provide an in situ, independent data set of hydraulic head levels. Then we analyze vertical interferometric synthetic aperture radar and hydraulic head level time series using continuous wavelet transform to separate periodic signal components and the long-term trend. The isolated signal components are used to estimate the elastic storage coefficient, the inelastic skeletal storage coefficient, and compaction time constants. Together these parameters describe the storage response of an aquifer system to changes in hydraulic head and surface elevation. Understanding aquifer parameters is useful for the ongoing management of groundwater resources.

  17. Precursory deformation and depths of magma storage revealed by regional InSAR time series surveys: example of the Indonesian and Mexican volcanic arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussard, E.; Amelung, F.; Aoki, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Despite the threat posed to millions of people living in the vicinity of volcanoes, only a fraction of the worldwide ~800 potentially active arc volcanoes have geodetic monitoring. Indonesian and Mexican volcanoes are sparsely monitored with ground-based methods but especially dangerous, emphasizing the need for remote sensing monitoring. In this study we take advantage of over 1200 ALOS InSAR images to survey the entire west Sunda and Mexican volcanic arcs, covering a total of 500 000 km2. We use 2 years of data to monitor the background activity of the Indonesian arc, and 4 years of data at four volcanic edifices (Sinabung, Kerinci, Merapi, and Agung), as well as 4 years of data to survey the Mexican arc. We derive time-dependent ground deformation data using the Small Baseline technique with DEM error correction. We detect seven volcanoes with significant deformation in the west-Sunda arc: six inflating volcanoes (Sinabung, Kerinci, Slamet, Lawu, Lamongan, and Agung) and one deflating volcano (Anak Krakatau). Three of the six inflating centers erupted during or after the observation period. We detect inflation prior to Sinabung's first Holocene eruption in September 2010, followed by a small deflation of the summit area. A similar signal is observed at Kerinci before and after its April 2009 eruption. We also detect uplift prior to Slamet's eruption in April 2009. Agung, in Bali, whose last eruption was in 1964, has been inflating steadily between mid 2007 and early 2009, followed by a period with little deformation until mid-2011. Inflation not followed by eruption is also observed at Lamongan and Lawu, both historically active centers. The close relation between periods of activity and observed deformation suggests that edifice inflation is of magmatic origin and represents the pressurization of reservoirs caused by ascent of new magma. We model the observed deformation and show that the seven deforming Indonesian volcanoes have shallow magma reservoirs at ~1

  18. Subsidence history of the city of Morelia, Mexico based on InSAR images processed as time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, S. H.; Suárez, G.; López-Quiroz, P.

    2012-04-01

    The city of Morelia in central Mexico sits on lacustrine and fluvio-lacustrine deposits. Subsidence due to the extraction of water from the subsoil is evidenced by the presence of differential soil compaction, causing faulting and cracking of the ground and adjacent constructions. In order to study the subsidence history of the past nine years, twenty-eight ENVISAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images acquired between May 2003 and September 2010 were processed using ROI_PAC. All scenes are descending orbit images. The resulting interferograms were filtered using an adaptive filter and, in order to increase coherence and signal-to-noise ratio, they were unwrapped using the "branch-cut" algorithm. A subset of the resulting interferograms was selected based on the following criteria. Only interferograms with spatial baseline of less than 400 m and a temporal baseline of less than 420 days were considered. The primary objective of our work was to determine the temporal evolution of the subsidence in different parts of the city. To this end, selected pixels are inverted in an independent manner from neighbouring pixels using a time series analysis. Preliminary results suggest that the central part of the basin, near the fault known as the "Central Camionera", the subsidence is almost constant with a value of 3 to 4 cm/yr until 2008. From this date on, the subsidence rates increase to values with an average of 7 to 8 cm/yr. This increase in the subsidence rate is clearly appreciated in the appearance of two clearly visible circular patterns from 2008 to 2010. Currently, an inversion is being conducted to obtain the overall subsidence history of the basin.

  19. Determination of Effects of Coastal Deformation Caused by Waves and Storms at Black Sea Coast of Turkey utilizing InSAR Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seker, D. Z.; Direk, S.; Musaoglu, N.; Gazioglu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many pressures are exerted on the coastal zones. Winds and waves effect the landscapes mainly on coastal areas. More dramatic deformation occurs with coastal storms like hurricanes which bring strong winds and waves to change the topography of coast. The coastal areas at Black Sea are under pressure of strong wind, waves and storms. Sometimes waves reaches to 10 m height, thus the landscapes of the coastal areas change very dramatically. Advances in Space geodesy have made it possible to determine variations on the Earth with high precision especially by using InSAR technique. InSAR technique is able to cover large areas and can be used in all weather conditions at high spatial resolution. With InSAR technique sub-cm level surface deformation can be determined. Recently, InSAR is the most often used technique to monitor crustal deformation, subsidence and landslides. The aim of this study is to make temporal and spatial analysis and determine the effects of strong wind and wave storms on the coast of Karasu in Black Sea Region of Turkey. By temporal analysis will be able to see the deformation on coast of Karasu in time domain where spatial analysis will show us the changes in landscapes.

  20. Lava Lake Level Drop and Related Ground Subsidence in the Nyiragongo Main Crater (D.R.Congo) Measured by Close-Range Photogrammetry and InSAR Time-Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, B.; d'Oreye, N.; Samsonov, S. V.; Nobile, A.; Geirsson, H.; Kervyn, F.

    2015-12-01

    Nyiragongo volcano is the most active African volcano and among the most active volcanoes on Earth. It is also among the infrequent volcanoes that host a long-lived lava lake. The morphology of the Nyiragongo main crater is characterized by 2 levels of remnant platforms partly preserved and attached to its inner flanks, which correspond to former lava lake levels, and by a bottom "active" platform, which delimits the current active lava lake. The elevation of the bottom platform increases through time, with successive lava lake overflows. After a period of low level between late 2010 and August 2011, the lava lake next came back to its highest level. However, on September 30, 2011, it started a long and progressive fall, reaching ~70 m below the bottom platform in July 2014. This recent evolution of the lava lake, which occurred at the same time period as eruptive events at the neighboring Nyamulagira volcano, was accompanied by a ground subsidence of the bottom platform, leading to the appearance of ring fissures. This ground deformation is restricted to the bottom platform and, hence, suggests a very shallow source for the observed movement. All these changes in the Nyiragongo main crater were recorded by time-series of photographs, allowing the 3D reconstruction of the crater using close-range photogrammetric techniques and, hence, a detailed measurement of the observed changes. The ground subsidence was also recorded by time-series of RADARSAT-2 and CosmoSky-Med SAR interferograms, providing more detailed information on the velocity of deformation. Based on field data and the photogrammetric and InSAR time-series measurements, several hypotheses on the cause(s) of these changes in the Nyiragongo crater are discussed. The present work also highlights the potential of close-range photogrammetry and high-resolution InSAR to study and monitor active volcanoes in Equatorial environment.

  1. Geodetic imaging of tectonic deformation with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, Heresh

    Precise measurements of ground deformation across the plate boundaries are crucial observations to evaluate the location of strain localization and to understand the pattern of strain accumulation at depth. Such information can be used to evaluate the possible location and magnitude of future earthquakes. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) potentially can deliver small-scale (few mm/yr) ground displacement over long distances (hundreds of kilometers) across the plate boundaries and over continents. However, Given the ground displacement as our signal of interest, the InSAR observations of ground deformation are usually affected by several sources of systematic and random noises. In this dissertation I identify several sources of systematic and random noise, develop new methods to model and mitigate the systematic noise and to evaluate the uncertainty of the ground displacement measured with InSAR. I use the developed approach to characterize the tectonic deformation and evaluate the rate of strain accumulation along the Chaman fault system, the western boundary of the India with Eurasia tectonic plates. I evaluate the bias due to the topographic residuals in the InSAR range-change time-series and develope a new method to estimate the topographic residuals and mitigate the effect from the InSAR range-change time-series (Chapter 2). I develop a new method to evaluate the uncertainty of the InSAR velocity field due to the uncertainty of the satellite orbits (Chapter 3) and a new algorithm to automatically detect and correct the phase unwrapping errors in a dense network of interferograms (Chapter 4). I develop a new approach to evaluate the impact of systematic and stochastic components of the tropospheric delay on the InSAR displacement time-series and its uncertainty (Chapter 5). Using the new InSAR time-series approach developed in the previous chapters, I study the tectonic deformation across the western boundary of the India plate with Eurasia and

  2. Volcano-tectonic deformation in the Kivu Region, Central Africa: Results from multi-year InSAR time series analysis and continuous GNSS observations of the Kivu Geodetic Network (KivuGNet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geirsson, Halldor; D'Oreye, Nicolas; Smets, Benoît; Nobile, Adriano; Samsonov, Sergey; De Rauw, Dominique; Mashagiro, Niche; Kervyn, Francois

    2016-04-01

    The Kivu Region in Central Africa is a topographic dome cut by the depression of the western branch of the East African Rift, where the Nubia plate and the Victoria micro-plate are diverging by approximately 2-3 mm/yr (Stamps et al. 2008). Two closely spaced and frequently active volcanoes, Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira, are located at the plate boundary. Here, deformation signals from transient deformation events (i.e. earthquakes, eruptions, rifting episodes, intrusions or other subsurface mass movements) are intertwined with the more perpetual nature of inter-seismic strain accumulation and gradual magma accumulation. Here, we present deformation results from six years of operation of the 15- station KivuGNet (Kivu Geodetic Network) in the Kivu Region and multi-year InSAR time series of the region using the MSBAS approach (Samsonov & d'Oreye, 2012). Since 2009, KivuGNet has captured transient deformation from a) the 2010 eruption of Nyamulagira, b) the 2011-2012 eruption of Nyamulagira c) the Mw5.8 August 7, 2015 Katana earthquake at the western border of Lake Kivu. Importantly, the GPS data also show an ongoing deformation signal, which is most readily explained by long-term magma accumulation under the volcanic region. We use the GPS and InSAR deformation signals to constrain and compare source parameters of simplistic elastic models for the different time periods. Although not well constrained, most of the time periods indicate the presence of a deep (~15-30 km) magmatic source centered approximately under Nyamulagira or to the southeast of Nyamulagira, that inflates between eruptions and deflates during eruptions.

  3. Measuring Thermokarst Subsidence Using InSAR: Potential and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Chen, A. C.; Gusmeroli, A.; Zebker, H. A.; Zhang, T.

    2014-12-01

    Thawing of ice-rich permafrost results in irregular, depressed landforms known as thermokarst terrain. The significant subsidence leading to thermokarst features can expand lakes, drain lakes, accelerate thaw, disturb the soil column, and promote erosion. Consequently, it affects many permafrost-region processes including vegetation succession, hydrology, and carbon storage and cycling. Many remote sensing studies identify thermokarst landforms and catalog their ever-changing areas. Yet the intrinsic dynamic thermokarst process, namely surface subsidence, remains a challenge to map and is seldom examined using remote sensing methods. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a remote sensing technique that uses a time-series of satellite SAR images to measure cm-level land surface deformation. We demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of space-borne InSAR data to map thermokarst subsidence at a site located near Prudhoe Bay, on the North Slope of Alaska. A pipeline access road was constructed at this site in the 1970s, and is likely to have triggered the thawing of the region's permafrost, causing subsequent expansion of thermokarst-landform terrain. Our InSAR analysis using ALOS PALSAR images reveals that the thermokarst landforms in this region have undergone up to 10 cm of surface subsidence each summer from 2007 to 2010. This pilot study demonstrates the application of InSAR to map localized mass movement in permafrost terrain. We also illustrate how the effectiveness and accuracy of InSAR measurements are limited by several factors such as loss of interferometric coherence due to fast changes of ground surface conditions, spatial and temporal resolutions of InSAR data, and difficulty separating long-term and seasonal deformation signals.

  4. Land deformation in Saint Louis, Missouri measured by ALOS InSAR and PolINSAR validated with DGPS base stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghulam, A.

    2011-12-01

    DInSAR is a solid technique to estimate land subsidence and rebound using phase information from multiple SAR acquisitions over the same location from the same orbits, but from a slightly different observing geometry. However, temporal decorrelation and atmospheric effects are often a challenge to the accuracy of the DInSAR measurements. Such uncertainties may be overcome using time series interferogram stacking, e.g., permanent scatterer interferometry (Ferretti, et al., 2000, 2001). However, it requires large number of image collections. In this paper, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data pairs from the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) sensor onboard Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) are used to measure seasonal and annual land surface deformation over Saint Louis, Missouri. The datasets cover four years of time period spanning from 2006 to 2010. With the limited data coverage that is not suitable for permanent scatterer interferometry, the paper demonstrates the efficacy of dual pair interferometry from both fine-beam single polarization mode and dual-pol polarimetric images and short baseline interferometry (SBAS) approach (Berardino, et al., 2002) with an estimation accuracy comparable to differential global position systems (DGPS). We also present the impact of using assumed phase-stable ground control points versus GPS base stations for orbital refinement and phase unwrapping on overall measurement accuracy by comparing the deformation results from DInSAR and Polarimetric InSAR with DGPS base stations and ground truthing.

  5. InSAR imagery pattern matching validation for landslide assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbulea, Manole-Stelian; Gogu, Radu; Teleaga, Delia; Marcel Manoli, Daniel; Priceputu, Adrian; Gaitanaru, Dragos Stefan; Ungureanu, Constantin; Anghel, Alexandra; Andronic, Adrian; Niculescu, Alexandru; Liviu Bugea, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    quantify the point displacement. The set of maps resulted from analysis show the displacement field of the landslides or the velocity-time diagrams, making this kind of information vital for early detection of changes in the landslide state of activity. Furthermore, the analysis of cumulative displacement maps in a quasi-continuous surface allows identification of a landslide characterized by different patterns, indicating partial activations or other site-specific surface processes. The research carried-out proposes calibrating pattern recognition algorithms by classical on-site monitoring such as topographical and inclinometrical surveys. The image processing provides information about the dynamics of vertical displacements of soil surface and can be used to identify both landslide type and horizontal geometry giving hints about the total displaced mass. This work was supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, Program for research - Space Technology and Advanced Research - STAR, project number 30/2012.

  6. InSAR Time Series Analysis and Geophysical Modeling of City Uplift Associated with Geothermal Drillings in Staufen im Breisgau, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motagh, M.; Lubitz, C.

    2014-12-01

    Geothermal energy is of increasing importance as alternative, environmentally friendly technology for heat management. Direct interaction with the subsurface requires careful implementation, in particular in geological complex regions. The historical city Staufen im Breisgau, SW Germany, has attracted national attention as a case of implementation failure with severe consequences, causing debates on the applicability and security of this sustainable technique. Located at the eastern transition zone of the Upper Rhine Graben and the Schwarzwald massif, the geothermal potential is high at Staufen due to strong temperature gradients. In September 2007, seven boreholes for geothermal probes were drilled up to a depth of 140 m to provide a new heat management for the city hall. Within five years an uplift phenomenon has been observed in Staufen reaching more than 40 cm in places and 269 buildings were damaged. Hydro-chemical driven anhydrite-gypsum transformation in the subsurface was identified as the cause leading to volume increase that is observable as surface uplift. This process is associated with the geothermal drilling activities that have crossed several groundwater levels. In this work, we summarize and present the findings of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) analysis of the uplift in Staufen over the last five years from July 2008 through July 2013. By applying the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) method, we find a localized elliptical-shaped deformation field in NE-SW orientation. Area of maximum uplift is located 50 m NNE of the drilling zone. At this location, we observe a cumulative uplift of approx. 13.7 cm ± 0.34 cm (mean value within an area of 30 m by 30 m) from July 2008 to July 2009, which reduced to cumulative uplift of 3 cm ± 0.25 cm from July 2012 to July 2013. The deceleration can be related to applied countermeasures as borehole sealing and groundwater pumping. The observed ground surface response was compared to

  7. A dense medium electromagnetic scattering model for the InSAR correlation of snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yang; Siqueira, Paul; Treuhaft, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Snow characteristics, such as snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow grain size, are important characteristics for the monitoring of the global hydrological cycle and as indicators of climate change. This paper derives an interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) scattering model for dense media, such as snow, which takes into account multiple scattering effects through the Quasi-Crystalline Approximation. The result of this derivation is a simplified version of the InSAR correlation model derived for relating the InSAR correlation measurements to the snowpack characteristics of grain size, volume fraction, and layer depth as well as those aspects of the volume-ground interaction that affects the interferometric observation (i.e., the surface topography and the ratio of ground-to-volume scattering). Based on the model, the sensitivity of the InSAR correlation measurements to the snow characteristics is explored by simulation. Through this process, it is shown that Ka-band InSAR phase has a good sensitivity to snow grain size and volume fraction, while for lower frequency signals (Ku-band to L-band), the InSAR correlation magnitude and phase have a sensitivity to snow depth. Since the formulation depends, in part, on the pair distribution function, three functional forms of the pair distribution function are implemented and their effects on InSAR phase measurements compared. The InSAR scattering model described in this paper is intended to be an observational prototype for future Ka-band and L-band InSAR missions, such as NASA's Surface Water and Ocean Topography and NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar missions, planned for launch in the 2020-2021 time frame. This formulation also enables further investigation of the InSAR-based snow retrieval approaches.

  8. Atmospheric Effects on InSAR Measurements and Their Mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiao-li; Li, Zhi-wei; Zhu, Jian-jun; Feng, Guang-cai; Long, Jiang-ping

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a powerful technology for observing the Earth surface, especially for mapping the Earth's topography and deformations. InSAR measurements are however often significantly affected by the atmosphere as the radar signals propagate through the atmosphere whose state varies both in space and in time. Great efforts have been made in recent years to better understand the properties of the atmospheric effects and to develop methods for mitigating the effects. This paper provides a systematic review of the work carried out in this area. The basic principles of atmospheric effects on repeat-pass InSAR are first introduced. The studies on the properties of the atmospheric effects, including the magnitudes of the effects determined in the various parts of the world, the spectra of the atmospheric effects, the isotropic properties and the statistical distributions of the effects, are then discussed. The various methods developed for mitigating the atmospheric effects are then reviewed, including the methods that are based on PSInSAR processing, the methods that are based on interferogram modeling, and those that are based on external data such as GPS observations, ground meteorological data, and satellite data including those from the MODIS and MERIS. Two examples that use MODIS and MERIS data respectively to calibrate atmospheric effects on InSAR are also given.

  9. Active anthropogenic and surface salt deformation measured by InSAR, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, C.; Webb, A. G.; Lasserre, C.; Doin, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the global occurrence of salt, very few salt bodies outcrop and are presently preserved at the surface. Because of this much of our knowledge on salt structures is sourced from subsurface imaging and modeling and less from field based studies. Using interferometry of synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) we monitor surface displacements across four surface salt outcrops in the western margin of the Kuqa fold-thrust belt of Xinjiang Province, China. An InSAR time series was constructed from 40 Envisat ASAR C-band images between June 2003 and October 2010. Interferometric processing was completed using the New Small Baseline Algorithm Subset (NSBAS). These poorly studied salt structures provide a fresh opportunity to study how salt behaves on the surface. The salt bodies outcrop along an active intracontinental thrust system between the Tian Shan and Tarim basin to the south. The four surface namakiers (salt glaciers) were analyzed in this study include: the Quele, Awate, Bozidun, and an unnamed structure referred to as the Western namakier. The ~35 km long Quele namakier is a line-sourced structure advancing along the Quele salt thrust. The other three namakiers range between ~1-3 km long and are point-sourced structures. The namakiers studied display non-steady deformation with rates of displacement varying between uplifts of up to +4 cm/yr and subsidence rates of -4 cm/yr. Additionally, the Kuqa fold-thrust belt hosts a number of hydrocarbon fields and InSAR measurements detect significant anthropogenic deformation associated with hydrocarbon extraction and fluid injection.

  10. Multidimensional High Spatiotemporal Resolution InSAR Time Series Assist Interdisciplinary Space- And Ground-Based Monitoring To Reveal Pre-Eruptive Signals At Nyamulagira Volcano (North Kivu, D.R.C.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Oreye, N.; Smets, B.; Kervyn, F.; Kervyn, M.; Albino, F.; Arellano, S. R.; Arjona, A. A.; Carn, S. A.; Fernandez, J.; Galle, B.; Gonzalez, P. J.; Head, E.; Pallero, J.; Prieto, J. F.; Samsonov, S. V.; Tedesco, D.; Tiampo, K. F.; Wauthier, C.

    2013-12-01

    Interdisciplinary space- and ground-based monitoring systems allowed the quantitative and detailed study of the Nyamulagira 2010 eruption (Congo). Field observations revealed the event as 4 eruptive phases delimited by major changes in effusive activity. Signals from ground deformation, seismicity, SO2 emission and thermal flux correlate with these eruptive phases. Moreover, MSBAS InSAR time series combining data acquired under different geometries and with different satellites (Samsonov and d'Oreye, 2012) allowed the detection of pre-, co- and inter-eruptive deformation in the Nyamulagira volcanic field. Using 8 years of ENVISAT, RADARSAT2 and ALOS data, the MSBAS method reveals the first unambiguous pre-eruptive ground deformations in the Virunga Volcanic Province. Precursory ground deformations are detected up to 3 weeks prior the onset of the 2010 eruption by images acquired by 3 different sensors in different geometries. These deformations took place in the main crater and along the SE flank of the volcano, where eruptive fractures will ultimately opened. Deformations coincide with small, though clear, increase of the short period seismicity and SO2 emissions.These seismic and SO2 variations alone were too small, however, to raise attention. The pre-eruptive ground deformation signals revealed by InSAR are of about the same amplitude and spatial extent as atmospheric noise and therefore cannot be identified on individual differential interferograms. Conventional time-series methods based on single acquisition geometry do not have a sufficient time resolution to discriminate such a precursory signal from an atmospheric artifact. The 3-week precursors detected at Nyamulagira contrast with the only precursory signal previously recognized so far in the Virunga, namely the increase of tremors and long period seismicity no more than few hours or days before the eruption onset. In January 2010, such short-term seismic precursors were detected less than two hours

  11. Confined aquifer head measurements and storage properties in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, from spaceborne InSAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyi; Knight, Rosemary; Zebker, Howard A.; Schreüder, Willem A.

    2016-05-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), a remote sensing technique for measuring centimeter-level surface deformation, is used to estimate hydraulic head in the confined aquifer of the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado. Reconstructing head measurements from InSAR in agricultural regions can be difficult, as InSAR phase data are often decorrelated due to vegetation growth. Analysis of 17 L-band ALOS PALSAR scenes, acquired between January 2007 and March 2011, demonstrates that comprehensive InSAR deformation measurements can be recovered over the vegetated groundwater basin with an improved processing strategy. Local skeletal storage coefficients and time delays between the head change and deformation are estimated through a joint InSAR-well data analysis. InSAR subsidence estimates are transformed to head changes with finer temporal and spatial resolution than is possible using existing well records alone. Both InSAR and well data suggest that little long-term water-storage loss occurred in the SLV over the study period and that inelastic compaction was negligible. The seasonal head variations derived from InSAR are consistent with the existing well data at most locations where confined aquifer pumping activity dominates. Our results demonstrate the advantages of InSAR measurements for basin-wide characterization of aquifer storage properties and groundwater levels over agricultural regions.

  12. Advances in time-of-flight PET.

    PubMed

    Surti, Suleman; Karp, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review and an update on time-of-flight PET imaging with a focus on PET instrumentation, ranging from hardware design to software algorithms. We first present a short introduction to PET, followed by a description of TOF PET imaging and its history from the early days. Next, we introduce the current state-of-art in TOF PET technology and briefly summarize the benefits of TOF PET imaging. This is followed by a discussion of the various technological advancements in hardware (scintillators, photo-sensors, electronics) and software (image reconstruction) that have led to the current widespread use of TOF PET technology, and future developments that have the potential for further improvements in the TOF imaging performance. We conclude with a discussion of some new research areas that have opened up in PET imaging as a result of having good system timing resolution, ranging from new algorithms for attenuation correction, through efficient system calibration techniques, to potential for new PET system designs. PMID:26778577

  13. A Network Inversion Filter combining GNSS and InSAR for tectonic slip modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, D. P. S.; Segall, P.; Wright, T. J.; Hooper, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    Studies of the earthquake cycle benefit from long-term time-dependent slip modeling, as it can be a powerful means to improve our understanding on the interaction of earthquake cycle processes such as interseismic, coseismic, post seismic, and aseismic slip. Observations from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) allow us to model slip at depth with a higher spatial resolution than when using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) alone. While the temporal resolution of InSAR has typically been limited, the recent fleet of SAR satellites including Sentinel-1, COSMO-SkyMED, and RADARSAT-2 permits the use of InSAR for time-dependent slip modeling at intervals of a few days when combined. With the vast amount of SAR data available, simultaneous data inversion of all epochs becomes challenging. Here we expanded the original network inversion filter to include InSAR observations of surface displacements in addition to GNSS. In the Network Inversion Filter (NIF) framework, geodetic observations are limited to those of a given epoch, with a stochastic model describing slip evolution over time. The combination of the Kalman forward filtering and backward smoothing allows all geodetic observations to constrain the complete observation period. Combining GNSS and InSAR allows modeling of time-dependent slip at unprecedented spatial resolution. We validate the approach with a simulation of the 2006 Guerrero slow slip event. We highlight the importance of including InSAR covariance information and demonstrate that InSAR provides an additional constraint on the spatial extent of the slow slip.

  14. Landslide-dammed lakes detection via ALOS/PALSAR InSAR DEM: A case study of the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Tomohito; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Iwashita, Keishi; Kudou, Katsuteru; Fujii, Hisao; Nishikawa, Hajime; Sensing Specialist Yukihiro Suzuoki, Remote

    On 14th June 2008, the Japan Meteorological Agency recorded a 7.2 magnitude (Richter scale) earthquake with an epicenter depth of 8 km in the southern Iwate prefecture of the Tohoku region of Japan. In the hardest hit prefectures of Iwate and Miyagi, the earthquake produced 15 new landslide-dammed lakes; a phenomenon common when the earthquake hypocenter is within inland areas. In our last study, we demonstrated that interferometric SAR (InSAR) technique can detect surface displacements within centimeter accuracy and create detailed three-dimensional terrain information. In this study, we developed a new methodology to detect landslide-dammed lakes using Digital Drainage Models (DDMs) generated from the DEM's cre-ated with InSAR data. Using our technique, small scale topographical change was detected by comparing pre-earthquake DEM's such as created from the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) data and post-earthquake DEM's created from the Advanced Land Observing System (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data. Pre-and post-earthquake changes in the drainage networks were detected by comparing DDM features derived from an existing DEM to DDM features derived from a post-earthquake DEM created from ALOS InSAR data. It was verified that landslide-dammed lakes were detected specifically in the area where drainage network with more than three of the river-order computed from DDM's shifted before and after the earthquake. Thus, InSAR DEM generated from ALOS/PALSAR can provide timely and useful spatial information for detecting landslide-dammed lakes.

  15. Helmand river hydrologic studies using ALOS PALSAR InSAR and ENVISAT altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Kim, J.-W.; Lee, H.; Shum, C.K.; Duan, J.; Ibaraki, M.; Akyilmaz, O.; Read, C.-H.

    2009-01-01

    The Helmand River wetland represents the only fresh-water resource in southern Afghanistan and one of the least mapped water basins in the world. The relatively narrow wetland consists of mostly marshes surrounded by dry lands. In this study, we demonstrate the use of the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) Interferometric SAR (InSAR) to detect the changes of the Helmand River wetland water level. InSAR images are combined with the geocentric water level measurements from the retracked high-rate (18-Hz) Environmental Satellite (Envisat) radar altimetry to construct absolute water level changes over the marshes. It is demonstrated that the integration of the altimeter and InSAR can provide spatio-temporal measurements of water level variation over the Helmand River marshes where in situ measurements are absent. ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  16. Methods of InSAR atmosphere correction for volcano activity monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    When a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal propagates through the atmosphere on its path to and from the sensor, it is inevitably affected by atmospheric effects. In particular, the applicability and accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques for volcano monitoring is limited by atmospheric path delays. Therefore, atmospheric correction of interferograms is required to improve the performance of InSAR for detecting volcanic activity, especially in order to advance its ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive changes in deformation dynamics. In this paper, we focus on InSAR tropospheric mitigation methods and their performance in volcano deformation monitoring. Our study areas include Okmok volcano and Unimak Island located in the eastern Aleutians, AK. We explore two methods to mitigate atmospheric artifacts, namely the numerical weather model simulation and the atmospheric filtering using Persistent Scatterer processing. We investigate the capability of the proposed methods, and investigate their limitations and advantages when applied to determine volcanic processes. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  17. Global Tropospheric Noise Maps for InSAR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S. H.; Hensley, S.; Agram, P. S.; Chaubell, M.; Fielding, E. J.; Pan, L.

    2014-12-01

    Radio wave's differential phase delay variation through the troposphere is the largest error sources in Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements, and water vapor variability in the troposphere is known to be the dominant factor. We use the precipitable water vapor (PWV) products from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors mounted on Terra and Aqua satellites to produce tropospheric noise maps of InSAR. We estimate the slope and y-intercept of power spectral density curve of MODIS PWV and calculate the structure function to estimate the expected tropospheric noise level as a function of distance. The results serve two purposes: 1) to provide guidance on the expected covariance matrix for geophysical modeling, 2) to provide quantitative basis for the science Level-1 requirements of the planned NASA-ISRO L-band SAR mission (NISAR mission). We populate lookup tables of such power spectrum parameters derived from each 1-by-1 degree tile of global coverage. The MODIS data were retrieved from OSCAR (Online Services for Correcting Atmosphere in Radar) server. Users will be able to use the lookup tables and calculate expected tropospheric noise level of any date of MODIS data at any distance scale. Such calculation results can be used for constructing covariance matrix for geophysical modeling, or building statistics to support InSAR missions' requirements. For example, about 74% of the world had InSAR tropospheric noise level (along a radar line-of-sight for an incidence angle of 40 degrees) of 2 cm or less at 50 km distance scale during the time period of 2010/01/01 - 2010/01/09.

  18. Vegetation, smegetation: How InSAR research on tectonics and land surface change has expanded from the deserts to the rain forests and beyond.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The upcoming avalanche of openly available SAR imagery is expanding the horizons of what can and cannot be accomplished with InSAR. Historically, InSAR performed best in arid regions - an observation that became a bit of a self-fulfilling prophecy as satellite agencies acquired less data in regions with vegetation and agricultural activity. Here we present an overview of the development of InSAR research in tectonics and land surface change over the past 2+ decades, with a view towards some of the new advances in modeling and data management that will be necessary to fully take advantage of SAR data in the near future. One of the most basic breakthroughs will be that issues with decorrelation and the need for sophisticated time series analysis just to enable phase unwrapping will no longer be a major problem over many areas of the globe. New challenges will be the interpretation of coherent signal related to vegetation, soil moisture and time-variable phase scattering height in regions that previously would have just been flagged as "noise". We present results based on the ingestion of independent optical and radar observation types into SAR time series analysis, with applications to deformation sources in the Central and Eastern United States.The land surface properties in the Central and Eastern United States differ from those in the arid regions where InSAR has often been used, both in the presence of vegetation and the often very rapid changes in surface scattering characteristics that occur seasonally and during single events (snowfall, flooding, etc.). In the past, observations were so sparse that these changes resulted in decorrelation, rendering the data unusable. However, shorter acquisition times and a wider range of radar wavelengths allow the extraction of coherent signals from these areas, even spanning large snow storms. The resulting data contain signals that were often disregarded during InSAR time series analysis, but that must be either accounted

  19. A Community-Contributed InSAR Product Archive at UNAVCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S.; Crosby, C. J.; Meertens, C.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA-supported seamless synthetic aperture radar archive (SSARA) project at UNAVCO has implemented a distributed access system for SAR data and derived data products (i.e. interferograms) through the use of simple web services. Under the SSARA project, a user-contributed InSAR archive for interferograms, time series, and other derived data products was developed at UNAVCO. The InSAR archive is based on the hierarchical data format release 5 (HDF5) data format and provides storage, distribution, and sharing of research results within the geodesy community. HDF5 is the preferred format for InSAR data products because it provides a more robust set of features for storing InSAR data. HDF5 has been adopted by the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) and is also used in InSAR time series analysis software packages such as GIAnT from Caltech. Digital object identifiers (DOI) have been incorporated into the archive allowing users to assign a permanent location for their processed result and easily references the final data products. Further development has led to the adoption of the HDF-EOS5 specification that provides standards for data and metadata storage within HDF5. This provides easier integration with GIS software packages such as ArcGIS and GDAL and conversion to other data formats like NetCDF and GeoTIFF.

  20. 49 CFR 71.2 - Annual advancement of standard time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... advances in time or changeover dates different from those specified in ”, which are those specified in... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Annual advancement of standard time. 71.2 Section 71.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES §...

  1. 49 CFR 71.2 - Annual advancement of standard time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... advances in time or changeover dates different from those specified in ”, which are those specified in... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Annual advancement of standard time. 71.2 Section 71.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES §...

  2. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Gurrola, Eric; Sacco, Gian Franco; Zebker, Howard

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a flexible and extensible Interferometric SAR (InSAR) Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) for geodetic image processing. ISCE was designed from the ground up as a geophysics community tool for generating stacks of interferograms that lend themselves to various forms of time-series analysis, with attention paid to accuracy, extensibility, and modularity. The framework is python-based, with code elements rigorously componentized by separating input/output operations from the processing engines. This allows greater flexibility and extensibility in the data models, and creates algorithmic code that is less susceptible to unnecessary modification when new data types and sensors are available. In addition, the components support provenance and checkpointing to facilitate reprocessing and algorithm exploration. The algorithms, based on legacy processing codes, have been adapted to assume a common reference track approach for all images acquired from nearby orbits, simplifying and systematizing the geometry for time-series analysis. The framework is designed to easily allow user contributions, and is distributed for free use by researchers. ISCE can process data from the ALOS, ERS, EnviSAT, Cosmo-SkyMed, RadarSAT-1, RadarSAT-2, and TerraSAR-X platforms, starting from Level-0 or Level 1 as provided from the data source, and going as far as Level 3 geocoded deformation products. With its flexible design, it can be extended with raw/meta data parsers to enable it to work with radar data from other platforms

  3. Monitoring delta subsidence with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, S.; Overeem, I.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Can subsidence in river deltas be monitored in near real-time at the spatial and temporal resolution needed for informing critical management decisions? Interferometric Synthetic Radar Aperture (InSAR) is a satellite-based technique that can map ground deformation with millimeter-scale vertical resolution over thousands of square kilometers. InSAR has enormous potential to shed light on the dynamics of actively subsiding deltas, but the technique is not commonly applied outside of major cities due to the difficulty of performing InSAR in wet, vegetated settings. Given these limitations, how can InSAR best serve the global effort to monitor sinking deltas? Here, an overview of InSAR processing is provided that addresses delta-specific challenges, including frequent cloud-cover in tropical areas; noisy signals in wetlands and flooded fields; dense forests that interact unpredictably with different radar wavelengths; flat landscapes that hinder image stacking algorithms; rapid urban development that can render Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) inaccurate; and a lack of in situ GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers for InSAR calibration. InSAR has unique value for monitoring subsidence in deltas, and some natural and anthropogenic drivers of subsidence can be resolved by InSAR. High-resolution InSAR measurements from the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) are then presented and validated against GPS data. Surface motion is shown to reflect subsurface stratigraphy, and sediment compaction is shown to be the most important factor in this delta on short (non-tectonic) timescales. Average compaction rates throughout the eastern delta range from 0 to > 18 mm/y, varying by more than an order of magnitude depending on the ages and grain sizes of surface and subsurface sediment layers. Fastest subsidence is observed in Holocene organic-rich mud, and slowest subsidence is observed along the Meghna River and in areas with surface or subsurface sand deposits. Although groundwater

  4. InSAR bias and uncertainty due to the systematic and stochastic tropospheric delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, Heresh; Amelung, Falk

    2015-12-01

    We quantify the bias and uncertainty of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) displacement time series and their derivatives, the displacement velocities, by analyzing the systematic and stochastic components of the temporal variation of the tropospheric delay. The biases due to the systematic seasonal delay depend on the SAR acquisition times, whereas the uncertainties depend on the standard deviation of the random delay, the number of acquisitions, the total time span covered, and the covariance of the time series of the stochastic delay between a pixel and the reference. We study the contribution of the wet delay to the InSAR observations along the western India plate boundary using (i) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer precipitable water vapor, (ii) stratified tropospheric delay estimated from the ERA-I global atmospheric model, and (iii) seven Envisat InSAR swaths. Our analysis indicates that the amplitudes of the annual delay vary by up to ~10 cm in this region equivalent to a maximum displacement bias of ~24 cm in InSAR line of sight direction between two epochs (assuming Envisat IS6 beam mode). The stratified tropospheric delay correction mitigates this bias and reduces the scatter due to the stochastic delay. For ~7 years of Envisat acquisitions along the western India plate boundary, the uncertainty of the InSAR velocity field due to the residual stochastic wet delay after stratified tropospheric delay correction using the ERA-I model is in the order of ~2 mm/yr over 100 km and ~4 mm/yr over 400 km. We discuss the implication of the derived uncertainties on the full variance-covariance matrix of the InSAR data.

  5. Long-range ground deformation monitoring by InSAR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokugawa, S.; Nakamura, T.

    2015-11-01

    InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) analysis is an effective technique to map 3-dimensional surface deformation with high spatial resolution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of InSAR analysis when applied to ground monitoring of an environmental disaster. We performed a time series InSAR analysis using ENVISAT/ASAR and ALOS/PALSAR data and commercial software to investigate subsidence around the Kanto District of Japan. We also investigated techniques for efficient early detection of landslides in Kyushu using time series analysis that incorporated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. ENVISAT/ASAR data acquired from 2003-2010 and ALOS/PALSAR data acquired from 2006-2011 were used to detect poorly expressed geomorphological deformation by conducting time series analyses of periodically acquired SAR data. In addition, to remove noise caused by geographical feature stripes or phase retardation, we applied median filtering, histogram extraction processing, and clarification of the displacement with a Laplacian filter. The main functions of the InSAR time series analysis are the calculation of phase differences between two images and the inversion with smoothness constraint for the estimation of deformation along the line of sight. The results enabled us to establish criteria for the selection of suitable InSAR data pairs, and provided the final error estimation of the derived surface deformation. The results of the analysis in the Kanto District suggested that localized areas of uplift and subsidence have occurred at irregular intervals in this area. Furthermore, the method offers the possibility of early warning of environmental disasters such as landslide and abrupt subsidence. Our results confirm the effectiveness of InSAR analysis for the monitoring of ground deformation over wide areas via the detection of localized subsidence and landslides.

  6. InSAR Observations and Finite Element Modeling of Crustal Deformation Around a Surging Glacier, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaans, K.; Auriac, A.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hooper, A. J.; Bjornsson, H.; Pálsson, F.; Pinel, V.; Feigl, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Icelandic ice caps, covering ~11% of the country, are known to be surging glaciers. Such process implies an important local crustal subsidence due to the large ice mass being transported to the ice edge during the surge in a few months only. In 1993-1995, a glacial surge occurred at four neighboring outlet glaciers in the southwestern part of Vatnajökull ice cap, the largest ice cap in Iceland. We estimated that ~16±1 km3 of ice have been moved during this event while the fronts of some of the outlet glaciers advanced by ~1 km.Surface deformation associated with this surge has been surveyed using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) acquisitions from 1992-2002, providing high resolution ground observations of the study area. The data show about 75 mm subsidence at the ice edge of the outlet glaciers following the transport of the large volume of ice during the surge (Fig. 1). The long time span covered by the InSAR images enabled us to remove ~12 mm/yr of uplift occurring in this area due to glacial isostatic adjustment from the retreat of Vatnajökull ice cap since the end of the Little Ice Age in Iceland. We then used finite element modeling to investigate the elastic Earth response to the surge, as well as confirm that no significant viscoelastic deformation occurred as a consequence of the surge. A statistical approach based on Bayes' rule was used to compare the models to the observations and obtain an estimate of the Young's modulus (E) and Poisson's ratio (v) in Iceland. The best-fitting models are those using a one-kilometer thick top layer with v=0.17 and E between 12.9-15.3 GPa underlain by a layer with v=0.25 and E from 67.3 to 81.9 GPa. Results demonstrate that InSAR data and finite element models can be used successfully to reproduce crustal deformation induced by ice mass variations at Icelandic ice caps.Fig. 1: Interferograms spanning 1993 July 31 to 1995 June 19, showing the surge at Tungnaárjökull (Tu.), Skaftárjökull (Sk.) and S

  7. Time series and MinTS analysis of strain accumulation along the Haiyuan fault (Gansu, China) over the 2003-2010 period, from ENVISAT InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, R.; Lasserre, C.; Lin, N.; Simons, M.; Doin, M.; Hetland, E. A.; Muse, P.; Peltzer, G.; Jianbao, S.; Dailu, R.

    2010-12-01

    We use SAR interferometry to measure the strain accumulation along the left-lateral Haiyuan fault system (hereafter HFS), that marks the north-eastern boundary of the tibetan plateau. The last major earthquakes that occured along the HFS are the M~8 1920 Haiyuan earthquake (strike-slip mechanism) and the Ml=8-8.3 1927 Gulang earthquake that ruptured a thrust fault system. There has been no known large earthquake on the central section of the HFS, the “Tianzhu seismic gap”, in the last ~1000 years. We first analyze the complete ENVISAT SAR data archive along three descending and two ascending tracks for the 2003-2009 period and construct an InSAR-based mean line-of-sight (LOS) velocity map around the HFS from the eastern end of the Qilian Shan (102° E), to the west, to the Liupan Shan (106° E), to the east. We empirically correct our interferograms for propagation delays associated with changes on the stratified atmospheric structure. We then estimate the mean LOS velocity for each track using a time series analysis which reveals the existence of a 40 km long creeping segment located at the western end of the 1920 rupture. Extending from the Jingtai pull-apart basin, which shows a 2-3 mm/yr subsidence rate, to the Mao Mao Shan, the creep rate is estimated to reach 8 mm/yr locally and is higher than the long term loading rate of the Haiyuan fault, estimated geodetically at 5±1 mm/yr. The surface extension of the creeping segment is colocated with strong micro- and moderate seismic activity. We also explore the possibility of transient creep during the 2003-2010 time period, using a SBAS style, smoothed, time series analysis and the Multiscale Interferometric Time Series method (MinTS, CalTech, see Hetland et al. 2010 AGU abstract). While classic time series methods are based on a pixel-by-pixel approach and do not consider spatial data covariances, due to residual atmospheric noise, the wavelet decomposition of each interferograms and the time inversion in the

  8. Studies of Grounding Line Migration Over Rutofrd Ice Stream Using 3D Short Repeat-Time Series From Multi-Track InSAR Acquisitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, P.; Minchew, B. M.; Riel, B. V.; Simons, M.; Gardner, A. S.; Agram, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been known that basal mechanics of ice streams are sensitive to short- timescale hourly to seasonal forcings, such as water pressure fluctuations and tidal loading as well as long-timescale (yearly to decadal) thinning. Designing SAR short repeat time observations to cover nearly an entire test-site in Antarctica from ascending and descending orbital directions, using every available SAR satellite is fundamental for understanding a new class of phenomena, underlying the physics of glaciers and ice streams. Understanding grounding-line dynamics is necessary for predictions of long-term ice-sheet stability. However, despite growing observations of the tidal influence on grounding-line migration, this short-timescale migration is poorly understood, with most modeling attempts assuming beam theory to calculate displacements. Knowing the position of the grounding line with accuracy is important for the global mass balance of ice sheets or for quantitatively modeling the mechanical interaction between ice shelves and ice sheets. Here we present a general method for retrieving three dimensional displacement vector given a set of multiple tracks, multiple geometry SAR acquisitions. The algorithm extends the single line of sight mathematical framework to the four spatial and temporal dimensions including both range and azimuth measurements. We designed COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) observations of Rutford Ice Stream to cover nearly the grounding zone from ascending and descending orbital directions using every available CSK satellite This spatially comprehensive observational scheme allowed us to derive time series of the 3-dimensional surface displacement for the grounding zone, facilitating studies of ice stream mechanics and tidally induced grounding line migrations with unprecedented spatial extent and temporal resolution. Having a constellation with occasional 1- day repeat time and an average 4-days repeat time is beneficial when looking at displacements of more than

  9. Advances in Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Beck, John G.; Gizon, Laurent; Kosovichev, Alexander F.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Time-distance helioseismology is a way to measure travel times between surface locations for waves traversing the solar interior. Coupling the travel with an extensive modeling effort has proven to be a powerful tool for measuring flows and other wave speed inhomogeneities in the solar interior. Problems receiving current attention include studying the time variation of the meridional circulation and torsional oscillation and active region emergence and evolution, current results on these topics will be presented.

  10. Advances in coincidence time resolution for PET.

    PubMed

    Cates, Joshua W; Levin, Craig S

    2016-03-21

    Coincidence time resolution (CTR), an important parameter for time-of-flight (TOF) PET performance, is determined mainly by properties of the scintillation crystal and photodetector used. Stable production techniques for LGSO:Ce (Lu1.8Gd0.2SiO5:Ce) with decay times varying from ∼ 30-40 ns have been established over the past decade, and the decay time can be accurately controlled with varying cerium concentration (0.025-0.075 mol%). This material is promising for TOF-PET, as it has similar light output and equivalent stopping power for 511 keV annihilation photons compared to industry standard LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce, and the decay time is improved by more than 30% with proper Ce concentration. This work investigates the achievable CTR with LGSO:Ce (0.025 mol%) when coupled to new silicon photomultipliers. Crystal element dimension is another important parameter for achieving fast timing. 20 mm length crystal elements achieve higher 511 keV photon detection efficiency, but also introduce higher scintillation photon transit time variance. 3 mm length crystals are not practical for PET, but have reduced scintillation transit time spread. The CTR between pairs of 2.9 × 2.9 × 3 mm(3) and 2.9 × 2.9 × 20 mm(3) LGSO:Ce crystals was measured to be 80 ± 4 and 122 ± 4 ps FWHM, respectively. Measurements of light yield and intrinsic decay time are also presented for a thorough investigation into the timing performance with LGSO:Ce (0.025 mol%). PMID:26914187

  11. Quantitative Real-Time PCR: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Singh, Charanjeet; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction is a technique for simultaneous amplification and product quantification of a target DNA as the process takes place in real time in a "closed-tube" system. Although this technique can provide an absolute quantification of the initial template copy number, quantification relative to a control sample or second sequence is typically adequate. The quantification process employs melting curve analysis and/or fluorescent detection systems and can provide amplification and genotyping in a relatively short time. Here we describe the properties and uses of various fluorescent detection systems used for quantification. PMID:26843055

  12. Advanced spectral methods for climatic time series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ghil, M.; Allen, M.R.; Dettinger, M.D.; Ide, K.; Kondrashov, D.; Mann, M.E.; Robertson, A.W.; Saunders, A.; Tian, Y.; Varadi, F.; Yiou, P.

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of univariate or multivariate time series provides crucial information to describe, understand, and predict climatic variability. The discovery and implementation of a number of novel methods for extracting useful information from time series has recently revitalized this classical field of study. Considerable progress has also been made in interpreting the information so obtained in terms of dynamical systems theory. In this review we describe the connections between time series analysis and nonlinear dynamics, discuss signal- to-noise enhancement, and present some of the novel methods for spectral analysis. The various steps, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of these methods, are illustrated by their application to an important climatic time series, the Southern Oscillation Index. This index captures major features of interannual climate variability and is used extensively in its prediction. Regional and global sea surface temperature data sets are used to illustrate multivariate spectral methods. Open questions and further prospects conclude the review.

  13. Measurement of Sinkhole Formation and Progression with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Blom, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Bayou Corne Sinkhole initially formed in August 2012 from sidewall collapse of a brine cavern within the Napoleonville Salt Dome in southeastern Louisiana. The sinkhole, initially ~1 hectare in size, has expanded to ~10 hectare surface coverage by July 2013, as material continued to fill the subterranean void. Here we show that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) could have reliably forecast the formation and location of the Bayou Corne Sinkhole at least a month in advance from the large precursory surface deformation that occurred in the area where the sinkhole later formed. The Mississippi delta region has been imaged since 2009 using the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), and radar data over the Napoleonville Salt Dome had been acquired on 2 July 2012, only a month before the sinkhole developed. Using radar interferometry, we show significant surface deformation of up to 250 mm occurred between 23 June 2011, and 2 July 2012, in an extended area encompassing the sinkhole site. The InSAR results show no measurable deformation prior to 23 June 2011. The measured precursory deformation pattern is consistent with compressive loading at the surface due to removal of support caused by a vertically oriented subsurface fracture. The measured strains relate directly to subsurface geology, salt rock properties, and internal stresses caused by the salt dome sidewall collapse. Measurements made with UAVSAR since the sinkhole formation, between August 2012 and July 2013, show progression of the surface deformation well beyond the limited extent of the sinkhole itself, with growth of the sinkhole following the direction of maximum surface deformation. These results show that even in radar-challenging environments such as the swamplands of Bayou Corne, L-band InSAR can be used to study the underlying geophysics of sinkhole formation and, furthermore, that InSAR data collected operationally for hazard monitoring could

  14. Coastal and Wetlands Applications for an InSAR Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, T.; Amelung, F.; Gourmelen, N.; Kim, S.; Osmanoglu, B.; Wdowinski, S.

    2006-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has found wide application in the study of Earth surface change, including earthquake and volcano deformation, motion of glaciers and ice sheets, and ground subsidence due to fluid extraction. In the last few years, InSAR may have significant application in studies of wetlands, coastal regions, and related environmental problems. These are becoming increasingly important as global warming contributes to sea level rise, with consequent modification or loss of coastal habitat, and increased storm frequency/intensity, with consequent increased hazard to coastal communities. Most of these applications would benefit from increased data availability and spatial resolution. A common problem for many InSAR studies in these areas is the influence of spatially and temporally variable tropospheric water vapor. Multiple interferograms can be used to average down tropospheric noise, or selectively edit image pairs where tropospheric noise is high. Alternately, the Permanent Scatterer (PSInSAR) technique can produce an average surface change rate over several months or years for coastal land applications where the assumption of steady state deformation is reasonable (e.g., some land subsidence applications). This technique also effectively identifies tropospheric noise. Common to both approaches is the need for large numbers of images, closely spaced in time. Wetland water levels also change on short time scales (days to weeks) implying the need for frequent coverage. Hence, such applications benefit from mission scenarios emphasizing repeat times shorter than 7 days. Assuming global coverage is desirable, the requirement for rapid re-survey suggests that multi-satellite constellations should be considered.

  15. Estimating snow water equivalent (SWE) using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, Elias J.

    Since the early 1990s, radar interferometry and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) have been used extensively to measure changes in the Earth's surface. Previous research has presented theory for estimating snow properties, including potential for snow water equivalent (SWE) retrieval, using InSAR. The motivation behind using remote sensing to estimate SWE is to provide a more complete, continuous set of "observations" to assist in water management operations, climate change studies, and flood hazard forecasting. The research presented here primarily investigates the feasibility of using the InSAR technique at two different wavelengths (C-Band and L-Band) for SWE retrieval of dry snow within the Kuparuk watershed, North Slope, Alaska. Estimating snow distribution around meteorological towers on the coastal plain using a three-day repeat orbit of C-Band InSAR data was successful (Chapter 2). A longer wavelength L-band SAR is evaluated for SWE retrievals (Chapter 3) showing the ability to resolve larger snow accumulation events over a longer period of time. Comparisons of InSAR estimates and late spring manual sampling of SWE show a R2 = 0.61 when a coherence threshold is used to eliminate noisy SAR data. Qualitative comparisons with a high resolution digital elevation model (DEM) highlight areas of scour on windward slopes and areas of deposition on leeward slopes. When compared to a mid-winter transect of manually sampled snow depths, the InSAR SWE estimates yield a RMSE of 2.21cm when a bulk snow density is used and corrections for bracketing the satellite acquisition timing is performed. In an effort to validate the interaction of radar waves with a snowpack, the importance of the "dry snow" assumption for the estimation of SWE using InSAR is tested with an experiment in Little Cottonwood Canyon, Alta, Utah (Chapter 5). Snow wetness is shown to have a significant effect on the velocity of propagation within the snowpack. Despite the radar

  16. [Intravaginal ejaculatory latency time: Advances in studies].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-rong; Xie, Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Although premature ejaculation (PE) is a common type of male sexual dysfunction, to date we lack a unified definition of PE. The multidimensional definition of PE has been accepted by more and more clinicians. Intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) is one of the three important dimensions (time to ejaculation, inability to control or delay ejaculation, and negative consequences) for defining PE. Rapid ejaculation is one of the core symptoms of PE and IELT is an objective measurement as well as an important tool for the evaluation of PE. This article reviews estimated IELT, stopwatch-measured IELT, the correlation between estimated and stopwatch-measured IELT, and the factors affecting IELT in the general male population, PE patients, and those complaining of PE. PMID:26939403

  17. Advances in NIF Shock Timing Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, Harry

    2012-10-01

    Experiments are underway to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to multiple shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of all four shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). Experiments are now routinely conducted in a mirrored keyhole geometry, which allows for simultaneous diagnosis of the shock timing at both the hohlraum pole and equator. Further modifications are being made to improve the surrogacy to ignition hohlraums by replacing the standard liquid deuterium (D2) capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. These experiments will remove any possible surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporate the physics of shock release from the ice layer, which is absent in current experiments. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  18. InSAR Forensics: Tracing InSAR Scatterers in High Resolution Optical Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, XiaoXiang

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a step towards a better interpretation of the scattering mechanism of different objects and their deformation histories in SAR interferometry (InSAR). The proposed technique traces individual SAR scatterer in high resolution optical images where their geometries, materials, and other properties can be better analyzed and classified. And hence scatterers of a same object can be analyzed in group, which brings us to a new level of InSAR deformation monitoring.

  19. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment on the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Shams, K. S.; Gurrola, E. M.; George, B. A.; Knight, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    In response to the needs of the international scientific and operational Earth observation communities, spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems are being tasked to produce enormous volumes of raw data daily, with availability to scientists to increase substantially as more satellites come online and data becomes more accessible through more open data policies. The availability of these unprecedentedly dense and rich datasets has led to the development of sophisticated algorithms that can take advantage of them. In particular, interferometric time series analysis of SAR data provides insights into the changing earth and requires substantial computational power to process data across large regions and over large time periods. This poses challenges for existing infrastructure, software, and techniques required to process, store, and deliver the results to the global community of scientists. The current state-of-the-art solutions employ traditional data storage and processing applications that require download of data to the local repositories before processing. This approach is becoming untenable in light of the enormous volume of data that must be processed in an iterative and collaborative manner. We have analyzed and tested new cloud computing and virtualization approaches to address these challenges within the context of InSAR in the earth science community. Cloud computing is democratizing computational and storage capabilities for science users across the world. The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been an early adopter of this technology, successfully integrating cloud computing in a variety of production applications ranging from mission operations to downlink data processing. We have ported a new InSAR processing suite called ISCE (InSAR Scientific Computing Environment) to a scalable distributed system running in the Amazon GovCloud to demonstrate the efficacy of cloud computing for this application. We have integrated ISCE with Polyphony to

  20. Pre-2014 mudslides at Oso revealed by InSAR and multi-source DEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Lu, Z.; QU, F.

    2014-12-01

    The landslide is a process that results in the downward and outward movement of slope-reshaping materials including rocks and soils and annually causes the loss of approximately $3.5 billion and tens of casualties in the United States. The 2014 Oso mudslide was an extreme event costing nearly 40 deaths and damaging civilian properties. Landslides are often unpredictable, but in many cases, catastrophic events are repetitive. Historic record in the Oso mudslide site indicates that there have been serial events in decades, though the extent of sliding events varied from time to time. In our study, the combination of multi-source DEMs, InSAR, and time-series InSAR analysis has enabled to characterize the Oso mudslide. InSAR results from ALOS PALSAR show that there was no significant deformation between mid-2006 and 2011. The combination of time-series InSAR analysis and old-dated DEM indicated revealed topographic changes associated the 2006 sliding event, which is confirmed by the difference of multiple LiDAR DEMs. Precipitation and discharge measurements before the 2006 and 2014 landslide events did not exhibit extremely anomalous records, suggesting the precipitation is not the controlling factor in determining the sliding events at Oso. The lack of surface deformation during 2006-2011 and weak correlation between the precipitation and the sliding event, suggest other factors (such as porosity) might play a critical role on the run-away events at this Oso and other similar landslides.

  1. Comparison of Ground Deformation Measurements and Atmospheric Artifacts Using Insar Cosmo-Skymed and GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbini, S.; Prati, C.; Errico, M.; Novali, F.; Santi, E.

    2012-12-01

    Integrating and exploiting the synergetic combination of the InSAR and GPS techniques allows overcoming the limitations inherent in the use of each technique alone. GPS-based estimates of tropospheric delays may contribute in obtaining better corrections of the wet tropospheric path delay in InSAR signals. This will enhance the coherence and will allow the application of InSAR in a wider range of applications. The test area chosen for the comparison between InSAR and GPS data is in northeastern Italy, in particular, in the city of Bologna (urbanized area) and in the surroundings of Medicina (agricultural area). In these sites, two permanent GPS stations (EUREF EPN sites) of the University of Bologna are operational since mid 1999 (BOLG) and 1996 (MSEL) respectively. The InSAR data used are the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) images made available by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The Permanent Scatterers (PS) technique was applied to a number of repeated CSK strip map SAR images acquired over a 40x40 square km area encompassing the two towns mentioned above. The results of this work demonstrate, on the one hand, the CSK capabilities to operate in a repeated interferometric survey mode for measuring ground deformation with millimeter accuracy in different environments. On the other, the comparison of the differential height between the two stations derived with the GPS and the InSAR data, using both acquisition geometries, is satisfactory. Elevation, ground deformation and atmospheric artifacts were estimated in correspondence of the identified PS and compared with the GPS measurements carried out at the same acquisition time by the permanent stations at Bologna and Medicina. The comparison of the differential height between the two stations shows the sensitivity of the GPS height solution to the length of the observation interval. The vertical dispersion achieved by GPS is higher than that achieved by PS InSAR, as expected; however, a similar linear trend appears in the

  2. A persistent scatterer method for retrieving accurate InSAR ground deformation map over vegetation-decorrelated areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Zebker, H. A.; Knight, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    InSAR is commonly used to measure surface deformation between different radar passes at cm-scale accuracy and m-scale resolution. However, InSAR measurements are often decorrelated due to vegetation growth, which greatly limits high quality InSAR data coverage. Here we present an algorithm for retrieving InSAR deformation measurements over areas with significant vegetation decorrelation through the use of adaptive interpolation between persistent scatterer (PS) pixels, those points at which surface scattering properties do not change much over time and thus decorrelation artifacts are minimal. The interpolation filter restores phase continuity in space and greatly reduces errors in phase unwrapping. We apply this algorithm to process L-band ALOS interferograms acquired over the San Luis Valley, Colorado and the Tulare Basin, California. In both areas, groundwater extraction for irrigation results in land deformation that can be detected using InSAR. We show that the PS-based algorithm reduces the artifacts from vegetation decorrelation while preserving the deformation signature. The spatial sampling resolution achieved over agricultural fields is on the order of hundreds of meters, usually sufficient for groundwater studies. The improved InSAR data allow us further to reconstruct the SBAS ground deformation time series and transform the measured deformation to head levels using the skeletal storage coefficient and time delay constant inferred from a joint InSAR-well data analysis. The resulting InSAR-head and well-head measurements in the San Luis valley show good agreement with primary confined aquifer pumping activities. This case study demonstrates that high quality InSAR deformation data can be obtained over vegetation-decorrrelated region if processed correctly.

  3. InSAR Tropospheric Correction Methods: A Statistical Comparison over Different Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, D. P.; Walters, R. J.; Wright, T. J.; Hooper, A. J.; Parker, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Observing small magnitude surface displacements through InSAR is highly challenging, and requires advanced correction techniques to reduce noise. In fact, one of the largest obstacles facing the InSAR community is related to tropospheric noise correction. Spatial and temporal variations in temperature, pressure, and relative humidity result in a spatially-variable InSAR tropospheric signal, which masks smaller surface displacements due to tectonic or volcanic deformation. Correction methods applied today include those relying on weather model data, GNSS and/or spectrometer data. Unfortunately, these methods are often limited by the spatial and temporal resolution of the auxiliary data. Alternatively a correction can be estimated from the high-resolution interferometric phase by assuming a linear or a power-law relationship between the phase and topography. For these methods, the challenge lies in separating deformation from tropospheric signals. We will present results of a statistical comparison of the state-of-the-art tropospheric corrections estimated from spectrometer products (MERIS and MODIS), a low and high spatial-resolution weather model (ERA-I and WRF), and both the conventional linear and power-law empirical methods. We evaluate the correction capability over Southern Mexico, Italy, and El Hierro, and investigate the impact of increasing cloud cover on the accuracy of the tropospheric delay estimation. We find that each method has its strengths and weaknesses, and suggest that further developments should aim to combine different correction methods. All the presented methods are included into our new open source software package called TRAIN - Toolbox for Reducing Atmospheric InSAR Noise (Bekaert et al., in review), which is available to the community Bekaert, D., R. Walters, T. Wright, A. Hooper, and D. Parker (in review), Statistical comparison of InSAR tropospheric correction techniques, Remote Sensing of Environment

  4. Investigation of ionospheric effects on SAR Interferometry (InSAR): A case study of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wu; Ding, Xiao-Li; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Bo-Chen; Qu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has demonstrated its potential for high-density spatial mapping of ground displacement associated with earthquakes, volcanoes, and other geologic processes. However, this technique may be affected by the ionosphere, which can result in the distortions of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, phases, and polarization. Moreover, ionospheric effect has become and is becoming further significant with the increasing interest in low-frequency SAR systems, limiting the further development of InSAR technique. Although some research has been carried out, thorough analysis of ionospheric influence on true SAR imagery is still limited. Based on this background, this study performs a thorough investigation of ionospheric effect on InSAR through processing L-band ALOS-1/PALSAR-1 images and dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) data over Hong Kong, where the phenomenon of ionospheric irregularities often occurs. The result shows that the small-scale ionospheric irregularities can cause the azimuth pixel shifts and phase advance errors on interferograms. Meanwhile, it is found that these two effects result in the stripe-shaped features in InSAR images. The direction of the stripe-shaped effects keep approximately constant in space for our InSAR dataset. Moreover, the GPS-derived rate of total electron content change index (ROTI), an index to reflect the level of ionospheric disturbances, may be a useful indicator for predicting the ionospheric effect for SAR images. This finding can help us evaluate the quality of SAR images when considering the ionospheric effect.

  5. Answering the right question - integration of InSAR with other datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley, Rachel; McCormack, Harry; Burren, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The capabilities of satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) are well known, and utilized across a wide range of academic and commercial applications. However there is a tendency, particularly in commercial applications, for users to ask 'What can we study with InSAR?'. When establishing a new technique this approach is important, but InSAR has been possible for 20 years now and, even accounting for new and innovative algorithms, this ground has been thoroughly explored. Too many studies conclude 'We show the ground is moving here, by this much', and mention the wider context as an afterthought. The focus needs to shift towards first asking the right questions - in fields as diverse as hazard awareness, resource optimization, financial considerations and pure scientific enquiry - and then working out how to achieve the best possible answers. Depending on the question, InSAR (and ground deformation more generally) may provide a large or small contribution to the overall solution, and there are usually benefits to integrating a number of techniques to capitalize on the complementary capabilities and provide the most useful measurements. However, there is still a gap between measurements and answers, and unlocking the value of the data relies heavily on appropriate visualization, integrated analysis, communication between technique and application experts, and appropriate use of modelling. We present a number of application examples, and demonstrate how their usefulness can be transformed by moving from a focus on data to answers - integrating complementary geodetic, geophysical and geological datasets and geophysical modeling with appropriate visualization, to enable comprehensive solution-focused interpretation. It will also discuss how forthcoming developments are likely to further advance realisation of the full potential satellite InSAR holds.

  6. Tracking lava flow emplacement on the east rift zone of Kilauea, Hawai'i with InSAR coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, H. R.; Schmidt, D. A.; Poland, M. P.; Cashman, K. V.

    2010-12-01

    Remote sensing of lava flows from the Pu`u `O`o-Kupaianaha eruption on the east rift zone of Kilauea serves to document the ongoing eruption, while yielding insights into how lava flow fields develop. InSAR is widely used to measure deformation by detecting minute changes in ground surfaces that stay correlated during repeat observations. The eruption and emplacement of fresh lava on the surface, however, disrupts the coherence of the radar echoes, allowing the area of these flows to be mapped with InSAR coherence images. We use InSAR correlation to visualize surface flow activity from 2003-2010 in order to quantify eruption rates and explore lava flow behavior from emplacement onward. This method for mapping flows does not require daylight, cloudless skies, or access to the active flow fields that is necessary for traditional visual surveys. We produce coherence maps for hundreds of 35 to 105-day periods from twelve tracks of ENVISAT SAR data using the GAMMA software package. By combining these coherence maps we create a unique dataset with which to develop this technique and amass lava flow observations. Where correlation images overlap in time, they are summed and normalized to derive a time series of surface coherence with a spatial resolution of 20 meters and a temporal resolution of as little as a few days. We identify existing stable flows by their high radar coherence, and determine a coherence threshold that is applied to each correlation image. This threshold is calibrated so as to reduce the effects of varying baseline, time duration, and atmospheric effects between images, as well as decorrelation due to vegetation. The final images illustrate lava flow activity that corresponds well with surface flow outlines and tube locations recorded by the USGS mapping effort. The InSAR-derived results serve to enhance these traditional maps by documenting pixel-scale changes over time. When compared with forward looking infrared (FLIR) thermal imagery, pixel

  7. Towards Run-time Assurance of Advanced Propulsion Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Edmond; Schierman, John D.; Schlapkohl, Thomas; Chicatelli, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This paper covers the motivation and rationale for investigating the application of run-time assurance methods as a potential means of providing safety assurance for advanced propulsion control systems. Certification is becoming increasingly infeasible for such systems using current verification practices. Run-time assurance systems hold the promise of certifying these advanced systems by continuously monitoring the state of the feedback system during operation and reverting to a simpler, certified system if anomalous behavior is detected. The discussion will also cover initial efforts underway to apply a run-time assurance framework to NASA's model-based engine control approach. Preliminary experimental results are presented and discussed.

  8. Advanced propeller noise prediction in the time domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Dunn, M. H.; Spence, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    The time domain code ASSPIN gives acousticians a powerful technique of advanced propeller noise prediction. Except for nonlinear effects, the code uses exact solutions of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation with exact blade geometry and kinematics. By including nonaxial inflow, periodic loading noise, and adaptive time steps to accelerate computer execution, the development of this code becomes complete.

  9. InSAR detection of permafrost landform dynamics at Kapp Linné central Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rune Lauknes, Tom; Christiansen, Hanne; Eckerstorfer, Markus; Larsen, Yngvar

    2013-04-01

    Permafrost is one of six cryospheric indicators of global climate change. As permafrost contains various forms of ground ice, thawing, degradation and speed up of particularly ice-rich periglacial landforms can lead to substantial landscape change and development. This has geomorphological, biological and socio-economical impacts, with changes in the water balance, increase in greenhouse gas emissivity, changes in flora and fauna and impacts on infrastructure. The present scientific challenge is to combine detailed site/point scale geomorphological field process observations with remote sensing data covering at landscape scale. We apply a multi-temporal satellite radar interferometric (InSAR) method to data obtained using the TerraSAR-X satellite. TerraSAR-X has a high spatial resolution and with 11 days repeat cycle, it is well suited to detect seasonal permafrost deformation. To test the usability of X-band InSAR data, we compare hourly field measurements between 2008-2011 of solifluction ground deformation at Kapp Linné, central Svalbard, with InSAR deformation time-series. We show that InSAR is able to pick up the seasonal deformation patterns of frost heave, ground settlement and associated solifluction as well as the interannual downslope movement. These results are a promising first step towards successful upscaling periglacial field point measurements to landscape scale, enabling observations of periglacial processes in larger parts of the permafrost landscapes.

  10. Investigation of interseismic deformation along the central section of the North Anatolian fault (Turkey) using InSAR observations and earthquake-cycle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialko, Y.; Kaneko, Y.; Tong, X.; Sandwell, D. T.; Furuya, M.

    2011-12-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of interseismic deformation along the central section of the North Anatolian fault (NAF) in Turkey using L-band Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data collected by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. We generated satellite line-of-sight (LOS) velocities for the three ascending ALOS tracks (603-605) covering the NAF between 31.2-33.2 deg. East. LOS velocity maps for each track were obtained by averaging 15 to 30 radar interferograms spanning a time period of 4 years between 2007 and 2010. The average LOS velocities reveal discontinuities of up to ~6 mm/year across the geologically mapped fault trace. Assuming that these discontinuities are due to horizontal surface motion, they imply fault creep at a rate of ~10 mm/year, accounting for nearly half of the relative plate motion accommodated by this segment of the NAF. The inferred lateral extent of significant shallow creep is in excess of 60 km. These inferences are broadly consistent with previously reported trilateration surveys and InSAR results based on C-band ERS data (Cakir et al., 2005) that suggested that the NAF segment near Ismetpasa may be only partially locked. If so, the deeper locked portion of the fault must be characterized by a higher stressing rate, and presumably shorter recurrence interval. We are modeling available InSAR and GPS data using numerical simulations of spontaneous earthquake sequences that incorporate laboratory-derived rate-and-state friction laws. The goal of these simulations is to constrain key parameters of fault friction such as the depth extent of the velocity-strengthening and velocity-weakening layers, the long-term fault slip rate, and stress evolution in the seismogenic crust.

  11. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE): A Python Framework for Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Gurrola, E. M.; Agram, P. S.; Sacco, G. F.; Lavalle, M.

    2015-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE, funded by NASA ESTO) provides a modern computing framework for geodetic image processing of InSAR data from a diverse array of radar satellites and aircraft. ISCE is both a modular, flexible, and extensible framework for building software components and applications as well as a toolbox of applications for processing raw or focused InSAR and Polarimetric InSAR data. The ISCE framework contains object-oriented Python components layered to construct Python InSAR components that manage legacy Fortran/C InSAR programs. Components are independently configurable in a layered manner to provide maximum control. Polymorphism is used to define a workflow in terms of abstract facilities for each processing step that are realized by specific components at run-time. This enables a single workflow to work on either raw or focused data from all sensors. ISCE can serve as the core of a production center to process Level-0 radar data to Level-3 products, but is amenable to interactive processing approaches that allow scientists to experiment with data to explore new ways of doing science with InSAR data. The NASA-ISRO SAR (NISAR) Mission will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystems. ISCE is planned as the foundational element in processing NISAR data, enabling a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data. NISAR will be but one mission in a constellation of radar satellites in the future delivering such data. ISCE currently supports all publicly available strip map mode space-borne SAR data since ERS and is expected to include support for upcoming missions. ISCE has been incorporated into two prototype cloud-based systems that have demonstrated its elasticity in addressing larger data processing problems in a "production" context and its ability to be

  12. Handling the Diversity in the Coming Flood of InSAR Data with the InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Gurrola, E. M.; Sacco, G. F.; Agram, P. S.; Lavalle, M.; Zebker, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA ESTO-developed InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) provides acomputing framework for geodetic image processing for InSAR sensors that ismodular, flexible, and extensible, enabling scientists to reduce measurementsdirectly from a diverse array of radar satellites and aircraft to newgeophysical products. ISCE can serve as the core of a centralized processingcenter to bring Level-0 raw radar data up to Level-3 data products, but isadaptable to alternative processing approaches for science users interested innew and different ways to exploit mission data. This is accomplished throughrigorous componentization of processing codes, abstraction and generalization ofdata models, and a xml-based input interface with multi-level prioritizedcontrol of the component configurations depending on the science processingcontext. The proposed NASA-ISRO SAR (NISAR) Mission would deliver data ofunprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies inclimate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystems. ISCE is planned tobecome a key element in processing projected NISAR data into higher level dataproducts, enabling a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of thelong time and large spatial scales of these new data than current approaches.NISAR would be but one mission in a constellation of radar satellites in thefuture delivering such data. ISCE has been incorporated into two prototypecloud-based systems that have demonstrated its elasticity to addressing largerdata processing problems in a "production" context and its ability to becontrolled by individual science users on the cloud for large data problems.

  13. Combined DEM Extration Method from StereoSAR and InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Zhang, J. X.; Duan, M. Y.; Huang, G. M.; Yang, S. C.

    2015-06-01

    A pair of SAR images acquired from different positions can be used to generate digital elevation model (DEM). Two techniques exploiting this characteristic have been introduced: stereo SAR and interferometric SAR. They permit to recover the third dimension (topography) and, at the same time, to identify the absolute position (geolocation) of pixels included in the imaged area, thus allowing the generation of DEMs. In this paper, StereoSAR and InSAR combined adjustment model are constructed, and unify DEM extraction from InSAR and StereoSAR into the same coordinate system, and then improve three dimensional positioning accuracy of the target. We assume that there are four images 1, 2, 3 and 4. One pair of SAR images 1,2 meet the required conditions for InSAR technology, while the other pair of SAR images 3,4 can form stereo image pairs. The phase model is based on InSAR rigorous imaging geometric model. The master image 1 and the slave image 2 will be used in InSAR processing, but the slave image 2 is only used in the course of establishment, and the pixels of the slave image 2 are relevant to the corresponding pixels of the master image 1 through image coregistration coefficient, and it calculates the corresponding phase. It doesn't require the slave image in the construction of the phase model. In Range-Doppler (RD) model, the range equation and Doppler equation are a function of target geolocation, while in the phase equation, the phase is also a function of target geolocation. We exploit combined adjustment model to deviation of target geolocation, thus the problem of target solution is changed to solve three unkonwns through seven equations. The model was tested for DEM extraction under spaceborne InSAR and StereoSAR data and compared with InSAR and StereoSAR methods respectively. The results showed that the model delivered a better performance on experimental imagery and can be used for DEM extraction applications.

  14. GIAnT - Generic InSAR Analysis Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agram, P.; Jolivet, R.; Riel, B. V.; Simons, M.; Doin, M.; Lasserre, C.; Hetland, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a computing framework for studying the spatio-temporal evolution of ground deformation from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data. Several open-source tools including Repeat Orbit Interferometry PACkage (ROI-PAC) and InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) from NASA-JPL, and Delft Object-oriented Repeat Interferometric Software (DORIS), have enabled scientists to generate individual interferograms from raw radar data with relative ease. Numerous computational techniques and algorithms that reduce phase information from multiple interferograms to a deformation time-series have been developed and verified over the past decade. However, the sharing and direct comparison of products from multiple processing approaches has been hindered by - 1) absence of simple standards for sharing of estimated time-series products, 2) use of proprietary software tools with license restrictions and 3) the closed source nature of the exact implementation of many of these algorithms. We have developed this computing framework to address all of the above issues. We attempt to take the first steps towards creating a community software repository for InSAR time-series analysis. To date, we have implemented the short baseline subset algorithm (SBAS), NSBAS and multi-scale interferometric time-series (MInTS) in this framework and the associated source code is included in the GIAnT distribution. A number of the associated routines have been optimized for performance and scalability with large data sets. Some of the new features in our processing framework are - 1) the use of daily solutions from continuous GPS stations to correct for orbit errors, 2) the use of meteorological data sets to estimate the tropospheric delay screen and 3) a data-driven bootstrapping approach to estimate the uncertainties associated with estimated time-series products. We are currently working on incorporating tidal load corrections for individual interferograms and propagation of

  15. Subsidence monitoring update for Emilia-Romagna region (Italy) by integrated use of InSAR and GNSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitelli, Gabriele; Bonsignore, Flavio; Del Conte, Sara; Novali, Fabrizio; Pellegrino, Immacolata; Vittuari, Luca

    2014-05-01

    The alluvial plain sector (Po Plain) of Emilia Romagna region (Northern Italy) is a subsiding sedimentary basin, due to both natural and human-induced subsidence phenomena. Different Institutions without a plan consistent at regional scale initially monitored subsidence. In 1999 ARPA (Regional Agency for Environmental Prevention) Emilia-Romagna, on behalf of the Emilia-Romagna Region and in collaboration with DICAM Department of the Bologna University, established a network composed by 2300 leveling benchmarks, connected to 60 GNSS points, covering the whole Po Plain sector of the region. In 2005-2006 a first radar interferometry (PSInSAR™) analysis was conducted, exploiting both ESA (ERS - Envisat) and Radarsat satellite data. ARPA, on behalf of the Emilia-Romagna Region, with advisory from DICAM and in collaboration with TRE Tele-Rilevamento Europa, has recently updated the regional subsidence map of the Po Plain sector, using a new integrated approach: in the last campaign, the measurement of the vertical displacement was in fact obtained by the combined use of permanent GNSS stations and advanced InSAR data. The integrated use of these complementary techniques allows to take advantage of the strengths offered by each approach, overcoming their weaknesses. A SqueeSAR™ analysis of Radarsat radar images, acquired between 2006 and 2011, was carried out over the whole regional plain territory (more than 13.000 km2), allowing to obtain a map of vertical displacement for more than 2.000.000 measurement points (MP), with an average point density of 200MP/km2. In parallel, the data from 17 permanent GNSS stations with a long acquisition period were processed with appropriate time series analysis in order to calibrate and validate the InSAR results. The final calibrated outcomes have permitted to obtain a complete and homogeneous map of the subsidence phenomena at regional scale, defining a both "absolute" and relative velocity datum with respect to the ITRF

  16. Global database of InSAR earthquake source models: A tool for independently assessing seismic catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A. M.; Weston, J. M.; Funning, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    Earthquake source models are routinely determined using seismic data and are reported in many seismic catalogues, such as the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (GCMT) catalogue. Recent advances in space geodesy, such as InSAR, have enabled the estimation of earthquake source parameters from the measurement of deformation of the Earth's surface, independently of seismic information. The absence of an earthquake catalogue based on geodetic data prompted the compilation of a large InSAR database of CMT parameters from the literature (Weston et al., 2011, hereafter referred to as the ICMT database). Information provided in published InSAR studies of earthquakes is used to obtain earthquake source parameters, and equivalent CMT parameters. Multiple studies of the same earthquake are included in the database, as they are valuable to assess uncertainties in source models. Here, source parameters for 70 earthquakes in an updated version of the ICMT database are compared with those reported in global and regional seismic catalogues. There is overall good agreement between parameters, particularly in fault strike, dip and rake. However, InSAR centroid depths are systematically shallower (5-10 km) than those in the EHB catalogue, but this is reduced for depths from inversions of InSAR data that use a layered half-space. Estimates of the seismic moment generally agree well between the two datasets, but for thrust earthquakes there is a slight tendency for the InSAR-determined seismic moment to be larger. Centroid locations from the ICMT database are in good agreement with those from regional seismic catalogues with a median distance of ~6 km between them, which is smaller than for comparisons with global catalogues (17.0 km and 9.2 km for the GCMT and ISC catalogues, respectively). Systematic tests of GCMT-like inversions have shown that similar mislocations occur for several different degree 20 Earth models (Ferreira et al., 2011), suggesting that higher resolution Earth models

  17. The InSAR Italy portal for open access to crustal deformation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano; Tolomei, Cristiano; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Lanari, Riccardo; Pepe, Antonio; Marchetti, Pier Giorgio; Della Vecchia, Andrea; Mantovani, Simone

    2014-05-01

    InSAR Italy is a web portal devised to provide open access services to crustal deformation data measured using multitemporal SAR Interferometry techniques over the Italian territory. It is an evolution of the VELISAR initiative, promoted in 2006 by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, and originally participated by IREA-CNR and TRE srl. InSAR Italy was developed tailoring the Multi-sensor Evolution Analysis (MEA) environment, an Earth Observation and geospatial data analysis tool empowered with OGC standard interfaces. The web interface allows an easy browsing of the ground deformation maps obtained for each satellite image dataset, leading to a clear picture and improved analysis of the displacement time series over single pixels or large areas. Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) are used to access and process the maps, respectively. The crustal deformation data are provided by INGV and IREA-CNR as products of publicly-funded research projects, and are disseminated in compliance with the national legislation on the Open Data Access; metadata associated to the products are published according to the INSPIRE specifications. The information provided through InSAR Italy is mainly based on InSAR data maintained in the ESA archives, in particular from the ERS satellites for the 1992-2000 period, and ENVISAT for the period 2003-2010, however, ground velocity maps obtained from COSMO-SkyMed data will also be released in the near future. The InSAR Italy deformation maps consist of time series of ground displacement at resolution varying between 5 and 80 m, and the relative mean velocity values. The data sets can be queried and mean velocities can be recalculated over user-defined time periods, to account for possible non-linear displacement trends. The MEA spatiotemporal data analysis capability allows to investigate deformation phenomena occurring at very different spatial scales, from single buildings to entire regions

  18. Monitoring ground deformation in the Hangjiahu Plain using InSAR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong'an; Zhang, Yonghong; Luo, Guangfei; Mao, Weihua; Kang, Yonghui; Zhu, Yanmin

    2015-12-01

    Affected by over-exploration of groundwater for a long time, the Hangjiahu Plain in Zhejiang province, southeast of China, has suffering serious ground subsidence during the past several decades. In this paper, we investigate the time series InSAR technique for the generation of subsidence maps over this plain. 25 Radarsat-2 images acquired from Jan 2012 to Nov 2014 are used. The results show that serious subsidence has taken place in the north and southeast of Jiaxing, the east and north of Huzhou, and the north of Hangzhou. Meanwhile some rebound occurs in the east of Jiaxing and the southeast of Huzhou. The results are compared with 35 levelling measurements. The standard deviation of the error between the two data is 3.01mm, which demonstrate that time series InSAR technique has good accuracy for subsidence monitoring.

  19. InSAR observations of the 2007 Pisco, Peru earthquake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, J.; Dixon, T.; Amelung, F.

    2008-05-01

    InSAR is a powerful tool for studying large earthquakes since it gives a spatially dense surface displacement field. We use data from three different satellites: Envisat, ERS-2 and ALOS, each with different characteristics. Envisat and ERS-2 are C-band satellites (wavelength, l=5.6 cm) operated by the European Space Agency and ALOS is a Japanese satellite with an L-band SAR (l=23.6 cm). Differences in the timing of availability of radar images from each satellite mean they cover different periods of the earthquake cycle and measure the surface displacement field in along different line-of-sight vectors. We combine these observations to produce a model of the slip distribution on the subduction interface and find a single asperity centred under the Paracas Penninsula. This corresponds to the second of two asperities identified by the inversion of seimic waveforms.

  20. Potential and limits of InSAR to characterize interseismic deformation independently of GPS data: Application to the southern San Andreas Fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussard, E.; Johnson, C. W.; Fattahi, H.; Bürgmann, R.

    2016-03-01

    The evaluation of long-wavelength deformation associated with interseismic strain accumulation traditionally relies on spatially sparse GPS measurements, or on high spatial-resolution InSAR velocity fields aligned to a GPS-based model. In this approach the InSAR contributes only short-wavelength deformation and the two data sets are dependent, thereby challenging the evaluation of the InSAR uncertainties and the justification of atmospheric corrections. Here we present an analysis using 7 years of Envisat InSAR data to characterize interseismic deformation along the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF) and the San Jacinto Fault (SJF) in southern California, where the SAF bifurcates onto the Mission Creek (MCF) and the Banning (BF) fault strands. We outline the processing steps for using InSAR alone to characterize both the short- and long-wavelength deformation, and evaluate the velocity field uncertainties with independent continuous GPS data. InSAR line-of-sight (LOS) and continuous GPS velocities agree within ˜1-2 mm/yr in the study area, suggesting that multiyear InSAR time series can be used to characterize interseismic deformation with a higher spatial resolution than GPS. We investigate with dislocation models the ability of this mean LOS velocity field to constrain fault slip rates and show that a single viewing geometry can help distinguish between different slip-rate scenarios on the SAF and SJF (˜35 km apart) but multiple viewing geometries are needed to differentiate slip on the MCF and BF (<12 km apart). Our results demonstrate that interseismic models of strain accumulation used for seismic hazards assessment would benefit from the consideration of InSAR mean velocity maps.

  1. Retrieving three-dimensional displacement fields of mining areas from a single InSAR pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi Wei; Yang, Ze Fa; Zhu, Jian Jun; Hu, Jun; Wang, Yun Jia; Li, Pei Xian; Chen, Guo Liang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for retrieving three-dimensional (3-D) displacement fields of mining areas from a single interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) pair. This method fully exploits the mechanism of mining subsidence, specifically the proportional relationship between the horizontal displacement and horizontal gradient of vertical displacements caused by underground mining. This method overcomes the limitations of conventional InSAR techniques that can only measure one-dimensional (1-D) deformation of mining area along the radar line-of-sight direction. The proposed method is first validated with simulated 3-D displacement fields, which are obtained by the FLAC software. The root mean square errors of the 3-D displacements retrieved by the proposed method are 13.7, 27.6 and 3.6 mm for the West-East, North-South, and Up-Down components, respectively. We then apply the proposed method to estimate the 3-D displacements of the Qianyingzi and the Xuzhou coal mines in China, respectively, each along with two Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array Type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar images. Results show that the estimated 3-D displacement is highly consistent with that of the field surveying. This demonstrates that the proposed method is an effective approach for retrieving 3-D mining displacement fields and will play an important role in mining-related hazard prevention and environment assessment under limited InSAR acquisitions.

  2. Salt Kinematics and InSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftabi, Pedarm; Talbot, hristopher; Fielding, Eric

    2005-01-01

    As part of a long-term attempt to learn how the climatic and tectonic signal interact to shape a steady state mountain monitored displacement of a markers in SE termination and also near the summit of a small viscous salt fountain extruding onto the Central plateau of Iran. The marker displacements relate to the first InSAR interferograms of salt extrusion (980913 to 990620) calculated Earth tides, winds, air pressures and temperatures. In the first documented staking exercise, hammered wooden stakes vertically through the surgical marl (c. 1 Ocm deep) onto the top of crystalline salt. These stakes installed in an irregular array elongate E-W along the c.50 m high cliff marking the effective SE terminus of the glacier at Qum Kuh(Centra1 Iran) ,just to the E of a NE trending river cliff about 40 m high. We merely measured the distances between pairs of stakes with known azimuth about 2 m apart to calculate sub horizontal strain in a small part of Qum Kuh. Stakes moved and micro strains for up to 46 pairs of stakes (p strain= ((lengthl-length2)/1engthl) x 10-1) was calculated for each seven stake epochs and plotted against their azimuth on simplified array maps. The data fit well the sine curves cxpected of the maximum and minimum strain ellipses. The first documented stakes located on the SE where the InSAR image show -1 1 to 0 mm pink to purple, 0 to lOmm purple to blue, and show high activity of salt in low activity area of the InSAR image (980913 to 990620).Short term micro strains of stake tie lines record anisotropic expansions due to heating and contraction due to cooling. All epochs changed between 7 to 1 17 days (990928 to000 1 16), showed 200 to 400 micro strain lengthening and shortening. The contraction and extension existed in each epoch, but the final strain was extension in E-W in Epoch land 6, contraction in E-W direction during epochs 2-3-4-5 and 7. The second pair of stakes hammered about 20 cm deep into the deep soils(more than 1 m) , near summit

  3. Inelastic Behavior of the Lithosphere as Inferred From InSAR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, M.; Choi, E.

    2001-12-01

    Constraining the visco-elastic structure of the lithosphere relies on observations of the time-dependent response of the Earth's surface to large perturbations. These perturbations include volcanic intrusions and earthquakes. Models of the inelastic response benefit from a good model of the perturbing process as well as spatially and temporally dense observations of deformation. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) can provide a complete spatial map of the deformation field. We can detect displacement rates of a few millimeters per year by combining many independent interferograms. We can resolve both horizontal and vertical components of the deformation field by combining interferograms from different viewing geometries. This ability to resolve both horizontal and vertical deformation is critical to discriminating between different rheological models. We demonstrate the use of InSAR to constrain the perturbing process, by considering the co-seismic deformation field associated with the 1999 Mw 7.1 Hector Mine earthquake. The spatial coverage of the InSAR data for this event permits us to not only develop a detailed model of co-seismic slip including the fault geometry, but also provides a sensitivity to the presence of elastic layering and may also suggests the need to incorporate inelastic yielding during or soon after the earthquake. We illustrate the ability to detect small-scale deformation using InSAR observations of the lithospheric response to the 1975-1985 rifting episode in the Krafla segment of the Northern Volcanic Zone in Iceland. This region experienced a maximum total opening of about 5 to 8~m. Our observations span the time period from 1992-2000, many years after the perturbing event. We use interferograms from several satellite line-of-sight (LOS) directions including two ascending orbital tracks and one descending orbital track. Each track has multiple independent interferograms. Where available, we compare our InSAR observations with

  4. InSAR Analysis of Induced Seismicity: Examples From Southern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, W. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present interferormetric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) analysis of human-induced ground deformation in the Raton Basin of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico, including displacements from a wastewater injection-induced earthquake. Geodetic observations of both seismic and aseismic surface displacements provide an additional tool to further constrain spatially and temporally variable deformation within these basins. Using Envisat observations, we image co-seismic surface displacements of the 2011 Trinidad earthquake and find that the earthquake slipped within the crystalline basement underlying basin sedimentary rocks and in the vicinity of high-volume wastewater injection wells. The spatial and temporal separation between the earthquake and the wastewater wells suggests a pore pressure migration triggering mechanism is present. The finite slip distributions further highlight the location and orientation of previously unmapped, seismogenic faults. Lastly, the precise earthquake location afforded by InSAR observations provides a well-located earthquake source that can be used to calibrate other regional earthquakes locations. Additionally, we derive InSAR time series observations from ALOS imagery acquired from 2007-2011. These results highlight ongoing regions of surface subsidence within the basin, presumably caused by extraction of coal-bed methane and water that is later reinjected. While it is not clear if there is a causative relationship between regions of co-located surface subsidence and recorded earthquakes, the time series permits us to exclude several other hypotheses for the causes of increased seismicity in the Raton Basin, including volcanic activity related to the Rio Grande Rift. Furthermore, the InSAR time series analysis provides a calibration source for hydrological models that assess subsurface stress changes from the removal and injection of fluids. Forthcoming work will provide a detailed time series of surface deformation occurring

  5. Engaging students in geodesy: A quantitative InSAR module for undergraduate tectonics and geophysics classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, H.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Pritchard, M. E.; Lohman, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    In the last several decades, advances in geodetic technology have allowed us to significantly expand our knowledge of processes acting on and beneath the Earth's surface. Many of these advances have come as a result of EarthScope, a community of scientists conducting multidisciplinary Earth science research utilizing freely accessible data from a variety of instruments. The geodetic component of EarthScope includes the acquisition of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, which are archived at the UNAVCO facility. Interferometric SAR complements the spatial and temporal coverage of GPS and allows monitoring of ground deformation in remote areas worldwide. However, because of the complex software required for processing, InSAR data are not readily accessible to most students. Even with these challenges, exposure at the undergraduate level is important for showing how geodesy can be applied in various areas of the geosciences and for promoting geodesy as a future career path. Here we present a module focused on exploring the tectonics of the western United States using InSAR data for use in undergraduate tectonics and geophysics classes. The module has two major objectives: address topics concerning tectonics in the western U.S. including Basin and Range extension, Yellowstone hotspot activity, and creep in southern California, and familiarize students with how imperfect real-world data can be manipulated and interpreted. Module questions promote critical thinking skills and data literacy by prompting students to use the information given to confront and question assumptions (e.g. 'Is there a consistency between seismic rates and permanent earthquake deformation? What other factors might need to be considered besides seismicity?'). The module consists of an introduction to the basics of InSAR and three student exercises, each focused on one of the topics listed above. Students analyze pre-processed InSAR data using MATLAB, or an Excel equivalent, and draw on GPS and

  6. InSAR Terrain Mapping Using ICESat Laser Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, D.; Guritz, R.; Muskett, R.; Lingle, C.; Sauber, J.

    2006-12-01

    High quality geodetic ground control is time-consuming and costly to acquire in remote regions, where logistical operations are difficult to support. Hence, there is a strong interest in establishing new sources of ground control points that can be used in conjunction with Interferometric SAR (InSAR) for producing accurate digital elevation models (DEMs). In January 2003, NASA launched the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) into high polar orbit onboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). A major objective of this spaceborne laser altimeter system, with orbital coverage extending from 86° N to 86° S, is to provide elevation measurements of the Earth's topography with unprecedented accuracy. The intent of our project is to assess the accuracy of ICESat elevation data and evaluate its utility as ground control for topographic mapping. Our study area lies near Barrow, Alaska; 15,650 sq. km of coastal plain adjacent to the Arctic Ocean, characterized by vast expanses of tundra, lakes, and arctic wetlands of such low relief as to be nearly devoid of terrain features. Accuracy of the ICESat elevation measurements is assessed through comparison with differential GPS (DGPS) data, acquired along ICESat ground tracks crossing our study area. Using DGPS as the reference, ICESat yields a mean offset of -0.04 ± 0.15 m for fast static measurements on frozen tundra lakes and 0.22 ± 0.96 m for two kinematic DGPS profiles along the ICESat ground track. These results suggests that ICESat-derived elevations on the Arctic coastal plain are more than sufficiently accurate for use as ground control in DEM generation. The only clear limitation of the ICESat data is the non-uniform distribution of the ICESat tracks within the 33 day near-repeat sub-cycle. Although the coverage is poor at equatorial latitudes, track separation in the Arctic is on the order of tens of kilometers because of orbital convergence at the Poles. To test whether these data can be used

  7. The design of an advanced CCD timing generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guimei; Wu, Songbo; Wan, Min; Bao, Bin; Deng, JueQiong; Duan, Jing

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes how to design and develop an advanced Charge Coupled Device (CCD) timing generator which can obtain high precise CCD output signals. Above all, theory of the design and implementation of CCD timing generator is introduced based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices in detail. Secondly, it studies and analyzes the influencing factors that the waveform of CCD driving timing signals have on qualities of CCD output signals, which contain duty-cycle of HCCD clock, positive width of RST, signal-skew and delays among these signals. Then some skills are presented to improve and optimize the design in the phase of coding, compiling and placement and routing, which include code constraint, incremental placement and so on. Finally, simulation and verification of the design are performed with simulation tools, and hardware tests are carried out and experiment results are proved by oscilloscope.

  8. Characteristics of Ionospheric Signals in L-band SAR/INSAR Data and Methods for their Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.

    2009-12-01

    The impact of ionospheric propagation effects on the signal properties of L-band SAR systems is significant. Recent theoretical analyses of ionospheric distortions in low-frequency SAR signals have indicated many effects that are likely to affect the quality of SAR, interferometric SAR (InSAR), and polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) data acquired in L-band. Faraday rotation, relative range shifts, internal deformations of the image amplitude, range and azimuth blurring, and interferometric phase errors are some of the most significant effects. Several examples have been published that show unambiguous detection of total electron content (TEC), including TEC gradients. While SAR is sensitive to ionospheric delay on all spatial scales, it is the small scale ionospheric disturbances that have the most significant impact on InSAR applications. The significance of the ionosphere for InSAR-derived deformation analysis depends on three general conditions: i) the spatio-temporal signature of the ionospheric path delay and its manifestation in the SAR observables; ii) the spatio-temporal properties of the deformation signal and the temporal sampling of this signal; iii) the sophistication of the applied InSAR technique and the assumptions inherent to the processing method. With this paper we will introduce the spatio-temporal characteristics of ionospheric signals in L-band SAR and InSAR data both from theory and observations. We will focus our investigations on the equatorial anomaly region located ±15 degrees about the magnetic equator, and the Polar Regions, as most small scale ionospheric anomalies occur in these areas. Data from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) sensor aboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) will be used to investigate demonstrate and catalogue typical ionospheric signals observed by L-band SAR systems. Ionospheric theory will be presented to explain the origin of observed

  9. The Advanced X-ray Timing Array (AXTAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Paul; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Strohmayer, Tod

    The Advanced X-ray Timing Array (AXTAR) is an X-ray observatory mission concept that combines very large collecting area, broadband spectral coverage, high time resolution, highly flexible scheduling, and an ability to respond promptly to time-critical targets of opportunity. It is optimized for submillisecond timing of bright Galactic X-ray sources in order to study phenomena at the natural time scales of neutron star surfaces and black hole event horizons, thus probing the physics of ultradense matter, strongly curved spacetimes, and intense magnetic fields. AXTAR's main instrument, the Large Area Timing Array (LATA), is a collimated, thick Si pixel detector with 2-50 keV coverage and 8m2 collecting area. Key features of the LATA include: 1 microsecond absolute time accuracy, 600 eV energy resolution, and minimal deadtime even on sources as bright as Sco X-1. For timing observations of accreting neutron stars and black holes, AXTAR provides at least an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over both the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and Constellation-X. A sensitive Sky Monitor acts as a trigger for pointed observations of X-ray transients and also provides continuous monitoring of the X-ray sky with 20 times the sensitivity of the RXTE ASM and a source localization accuracy of 1 arcmin. The baseline mission concept builds on detector and electronics technology previously developed for other applications with support from NASA, DOE, DARPA, and DHS, and thus offers high scientific impact at moderate, known cost and minimal technical risk.

  10. The Advanced X-ray Timing Array (AXTAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Paul S.; Chakrabarty, D.; Strohmayer, T.; AXTAR Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    The Advanced X-ray Timing Array (AXTAR) is an X-ray observatory combining very large collecting area, broadband spectral coverage, high time resolution, highly flexible scheduling, and an ability to respond promptly to time-critical targets of opportunity. It is optimized for submillisecond timing of bright Galactic X-ray sources in order to study phenomena at the natural time scales of neutron star surfaces and black hole event horizons, thus probing the physics of ultradense matter, strongly curved spacetimes, and intense magnetic fields. AXTAR's main instrument, the Large Area Timing Array (LATA), is a collimated, thick Si pixel detector with 2-50 keV coverage and 8 m2 collecting area. Key features of the LATA include: 1 µs absolute time accuracy, 600 eV energy resolution, and minimal deadtime even on sources as bright as Sco X-1. For timing observations of accreting neutron stars and black holes, AXTAR provides at least an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over both the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and Constellation-X. A sensitive Sky Monitor acts as a trigger for pointed observations of X-ray transients and also provides continuous monitoring of the X-ray sky with 20 times the sensitivity of the RXTE ASM and a source localization accuracy of 1 arcmin. The baseline mission concept builds on detector and electronics technology previously developed for other applications with support from NASA, DOE, DARPA, and DHS, and thus offers high scientific impact at moderate, known cost and minimal technical risk.

  11. Diverse deformation patterns of Aleutian volcanoes from InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Dzurisin, D.; Wicks, C., Jr.; Power, J.

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter-to-subcentimeter precision at a spatial resolution of tens of meters over an area of hundreds to thousands of square kilometers. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, InSAR has become an increasingly important measurement technique for constraining magma dynamics of volcanoes over remote regions such as the Aleutian Islands. The spatial pattern of surface deformation data derived from InSAR images enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic processes. This paper summarizes the diverse deformation patterns of the Aleutian volcanoes observed with InSAR and demonstrates that deformation patterns and associated magma supply mechanisms in the Aleutians are diverse and vary between volcanoes. These findings provide a basis for improved models and better understanding of magmatic plumbing systems.

  12. Estimation of base station position using timing advance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitoharju, Matti; Ali-Löytty, Simo; Wirola, Lauri

    2011-10-01

    Timing Advance is used in TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access) systems, such as GSM and LTE, to synchronize the mobile phone to the cellular BS (Base Station). Mobile phone positioning can use TA measurements if BS positions are known, but in many cases BS positions are not in the public domain. In this work we study how to use a set of TA measurements taken by mobile phones at known positions to estimate the position of a BS. This paper describes two methods -- GMF (Gaussian Mixture Filter) and PMF (Point Mass Filter) for estimation of the BS position. Positioning performance is evaluated using simulated and real measurements. In suburban field tests, TA measurements suffice to determine BS position with an error comparable to the TA granularity (550m). GMF computes BS position much faster than PMF and is only slightly less accurate.

  13. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  14. An Advanced Time Averaging Modelling Technique for Power Electronic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankuloski, Goce

    For stable and efficient performance of power converters, a good mathematical model is needed. This thesis presents a new modelling technique for DC/DC and DC/AC Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) converters. The new model is more accurate than the existing modelling techniques such as State Space Averaging (SSA) and Discrete Time Modelling. Unlike the SSA model, the new modelling technique, the Advanced Time Averaging Model (ATAM) includes the averaging dynamics of the converter's output. In addition to offering enhanced model accuracy, application of linearization techniques to the ATAM enables the use of conventional linear control design tools. A controller design application demonstrates that a controller designed based on the ATAM outperforms one designed using the ubiquitous SSA model. Unlike the SSA model, ATAM for DC/AC augments the system's dynamics with the dynamics needed for subcycle fundamental contribution (SFC) calculation. This allows for controller design that is based on an exact model.

  15. High Resolution Interseismic Velocity Model of the San Andreas Fault From GPS and InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, X.; Sandwell, D. T.; Smith-Konter, B. R.

    2011-12-01

    We recover the interseismic deformation along the entire San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) at a spatial resolution of 200 meters by combining InSAR and GPS observations using a dislocation model. Previous efforts to compare 17 different GPS-derived strain rate models of the SAFS shows that GPS data alone cannot uniquely resolve the rapid velocity gradients near faults, which are critical for understanding the along-strike variations in stress accumulation rate and associated earthquake hazard. To improve the near-fault velocity resolution, we integrate new GPS observations with InSAR observations, initially from ALOS (Advanced Land Observation Satellite launched by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) ascending data (spanning 2006.5-2010), using a remove/restore approach. More than 1100 interferograms were processed with the newly developed InSAR processing software GMTSAR. The integration uses a dislocation-based velocity model to interpolate the Line-Of-Sight (LOS) velocity at the full resolution of the InSAR data in radar coordinates. The residual between the model and InSAR LOS velocity are stacked and high-pass filtered, then added back to the model. This LOS velocity map covers almost entire San Andreas Fault System (see Figure 1) from Maacama Fault to the north to the Superstition Hills Fault to the south. The average standard deviation of the LOS velocity model ranges from 2 to 4 mm/yr. Our initial results show previously unknown details in along-strike variations in surface fault creep. Moreover, the high resolution velocity field can resolve asperities in these "creeping" sections that are important for understanding moment accumulation rates and seismic hazards. We find that much of the high resolution velocity signal is related to non-tectonic processes (e.g., ground subsidence and uplift) sometimes very close to the fault zone. The near-fault deformation signal extracted from this velocity map can provide tighter constraints on fault slip rates and

  16. Analysing Post-Seismic Deformation of Izmit Earthquake with Insar, Gnss and Coulomb Stress Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alac Barut, R.; Trinder, J.; Rizos, C.

    2016-06-01

    On August 17th 1999, a Mw 7.4 earthquake struck the city of Izmit in the north-west of Turkey. This event was one of the most devastating earthquakes of the twentieth century. The epicentre of the Izmit earthquake was on the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) which is one of the most active right-lateral strike-slip faults on earth. However, this earthquake offers an opportunity to study how strain is accommodated in an inter-segment region of a large strike slip fault. In order to determine the Izmit earthquake post-seismic effects, the authors modelled Coulomb stress changes of the aftershocks, as well as using the deformation measurement techniques of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). The authors have shown that InSAR and GNSS observations over a time period of three months after the earthquake combined with Coulomb Stress Change Modelling can explain the fault zone expansion, as well as the deformation of the northern region of the NAF. It was also found that there is a strong agreement between the InSAR and GNSS results for the post-seismic phases of investigation, with differences less than 2mm, and the standard deviation of the differences is less than 1mm.

  17. Flow excursion time scales in the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sulfredge, C.D.

    1995-04-01

    Flow excursion transients give rise to a key thermal limit for the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor because its core involves many parallel flow channels with a common pressure drop. Since one can envision certain accident scenarios in which the thermal limits set by flow excursion correlations might be exceeded for brief intervals, a key objective is to determine how long a flow excursion would take to bring about a system failure that could lead to fuel damage. The anticipated time scale for flow excursions has been examined by subdividing the process into its component phenomena: bubble nucleation and growth, deceleration of the resulting two-phase flow, and finally overcoming thermal inertia to heat up the reactor fuel plates. Models were developed to estimate the time required for each individual stage. Accident scenarios involving sudden reduction in core flow or core exit pressure have been examined, and the models compared with RELAP5 output for the ANS geometry. For a high-performance reactor like the ANS, flow excursion time scales were predicted to be in the millisecond range, so that even very brief transients might lead to fuel damage. These results should prove useful whenever one must determine the time involved in any portion of a flow excursion transient.

  18. Virtual Drawdown Tests of Groundwater Aquifers from Insar Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebker, H. A.; Chen, J.; Smith, R.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater management depends on the type and quality of field data available describing a given aquifer system. Our increasing reliance on groundwater, especially as traditional surface supplies continue to be overexploited due to rising population and standard of living, requires that we better understand the state of our subsurface supplies. Groundwater aquifers, and the water flow models that relate aquifer parameters to management strategies, are typically characterized in terms of how much water is available at any point in the basin (storativity), and how easily water can flow from one point to another (transmissivity). Often these parameters are estimated by field drawdown tests, in which a known quantity of water is withdrawn from the aquifer, and the resulting spatial and temporal distribution of hydraulic head analyzed. Pumping tests can be expensive and time consuming, so that for most aquifer systems very few drawdown test data sets exist. Here we show that estimates for storativity and hydraulic conductance can be derived from time series InSAR observations coupled with well head measurements. While this requires the presence of monitoring wells in the basin, monitor-only wells are often fairly plentiful. Comparison of hydraulic head and InSAR deformation data at a monitoring well yields the ratio of head to subsidence and any time delay between the two, from which we solve for the needed conductivity and storativity. We present examples of these parameters associated with groundwater systems in the San Luis Valley, CO, and the Central Valley area of California, as observed by several spaceborne radar systems and validated by comparison with field data. The fundamental relation between pressure and stress resulting in changes in hydraulic head yields a simple linear relationship between deformation Δb, hydraulic head Δh, and skeletal storage coefficient: Sk = Δb / Δh, so that measuring deformation everywhere above an aquifer over time yields

  19. High quality InSAR data linked to seasonal change in hydraulic head for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Jessica A.; Knight, Rosemary; Zebker, Howard A.; Schreüder, Willem A.; Shanker Agram, Piyush; Lauknes, Tom R.

    2011-12-01

    In the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado legislation passed in 2004 requires that hydraulic head levels in the confined aquifer system stay within the range experienced in the years 1978-2000. While some measurements of hydraulic head exist, greater spatial and temporal sampling would be very valuable in understanding the behavior of the system. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide fine spatial resolution measurements of Earth surface deformation, which can be related to hydraulic head change in the confined aquifer system. However, change in cm-scale crop structure with time leads to signal decorrelation, resulting in low quality data. Here we apply small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to InSAR data collected from 1992 to 2001. We are able to show high levels of correlation, denoting high quality data, in areas between the center pivot irrigation circles, where the lack of water results in little surface vegetation. At three well locations we see a seasonal variation in the InSAR data that mimics the hydraulic head data. We use measured values of the elastic skeletal storage coefficient to estimate hydraulic head from the InSAR data. In general the magnitude of estimated and measured head agree to within the calculated error. However, the errors are unacceptably large due to both errors in the InSAR data and uncertainty in the measured value of the elastic skeletal storage coefficient. We conclude that InSAR is capturing the seasonal head variation, but that further research is required to obtain accurate hydraulic head estimates from the InSAR deformation measurements.

  20. Advanced X-Ray Timing Array (AXTAR) Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Randall C.; Thompson, Kevin S.

    2011-01-01

    The animation depicts NASA's concept for a next-generation Advanced X-ray Timing Mission. The models and their textures doe not necessarily represent the final iteration. Delivery specifications include launch with Taurus II or Falcon 9, mass of 2650 kg, with a circular low earth orbit at approximately 600 km. The inclination depends on the launch vehicle and spacecraft mass. AXTAR's prime instrument will probe the physics of neutron stars and black holes through X-ray timing and spectral measurements. The primary instrument will be the Large Area Timing Array (LATA). The Sky Monitor Clusters configuration consists of 27 Sky Monitor cameras th at are grouped in five clusters. This configuration will achieve approximately 85 percent all sky coverage. Spacecraft components include a science bus to house the LATA of supermodules; a spacecraft bus to house components such as propulsion tanks, avionics, and reaction wheels; solar arrays configured from space-qualified GaAs 3-junction cells; star trackers for attitude knowledge; a propulsion system of four pods, each containing one 100 lbf and two 5 lbf engines; a launch vehicle adaptor; and a radiation shield.

  1. A Hybrid-Cloud Science Data System Enabling Advanced Rapid Imaging & Analysis for Monitoring Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, H.; Owen, S. E.; Yun, S.; Lundgren, P.; Moore, A. W.; Fielding, E. J.; Radulescu, C.; Sacco, G.; Stough, T. M.; Mattmann, C. A.; Cervelli, P. F.; Poland, M. P.; Cruz, J.

    2012-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions, landslides, and levee failures are some examples of hazards that can be more accurately forecasted with sufficient monitoring of precursory ground deformation, such as the high-resolution measurements from GPS and InSAR. In addition, coherence and reflectivity change maps can be used to detect surface change due to lava flows, mudslides, tornadoes, floods, and other natural and man-made disasters. However, it is difficult for many volcano observatories and other monitoring agencies to process GPS and InSAR products in an automated scenario needed for continual monitoring of events. Additionally, numerous interoperability barriers exist in multi-sensor observation data access, preparation, and fusion to create actionable products. Combining high spatial resolution InSAR products with high temporal resolution GPS products--and automating this data preparation & processing across global-scale areas of interests--present an untapped science and monitoring opportunity. The global coverage offered by satellite-based SAR observations, and the rapidly expanding GPS networks, can provide orders of magnitude more data on these hazardous events if we have a data system that can efficiently and effectively analyze the voluminous raw data, and provide users the tools to access data from their regions of interest. Currently, combined GPS & InSAR time series are primarily generated for specific research applications, and are not implemented to run on large-scale continuous data sets and delivered to decision-making communities. We are developing an advanced service-oriented architecture for hazard monitoring leveraging NASA-funded algorithms and data management to enable both science and decision-making communities to monitor areas of interests via seamless data preparation, processing, and distribution. Our objectives: * Enable high-volume and low-latency automatic generation of NASA Solid Earth science data products (InSAR and GPS) to support hazards

  2. Investigating subsidence at volcanoes in northern California using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A. L.; Biggs, J.; Annen, C.; Lu, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Both Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV) and Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC), northern CA, show signs of subsidence at rates of ~1 cm/yr. Leveling and campaign GPS measurements show that MLV has subsided at a constant rate for over 50 years, making the geodetic history of this volcano unique in both its duration and continuity. Here, we summarise and build upon the existing geodetic records at MLV and LVC, using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to extend the time-series of deformation measurements to 2011. We also use the improved spatial resolution of InSAR measurements to investigate causes of long-term subsidence, providing new insight into magmatic storage conditions at MLV and the timescales of deformation due to cooling and crystallization. A large InSAR dataset has been acquired for the volcanoes of northern CA, but application of the data has been limited by extensive noise and incoherence. We analyse multiple datasets from MLV and LVC and, with the use of multi-temporal InSAR analysis methods (noise-based stacking, π-RATE and StaMPS), demonstrate how InSAR may be used more successfully as a monitoring tool in this region. By comparing InSAR results for MLV to past geodetic studies, we demonstrate that subsidence is on going at ~1 cm/yr with no detectable change in rate. We find that the best fitting source geometry to InSAR data is a sill approximated by a horizontal penny-shaped crack, with radius 2 km and depth 11 km, undergoing volume loss at a rate of -0.0022 km3/yr. We discuss possible source mechanisms of long-term subsidence, investigating volume loss due to cooling and crystallization of an intrusion. We calculate the temperature, melt fraction and volume loss of an intrusion over time using petrological information and a numerical thermal model of heat loss by conduction. The geometry of the intrusion is based upon the depth and radius of the penny-shaped crack model. We run simulations for a range of thicknesses between that of a single

  3. High Resolution Rapid Revisits Insar Monitoring of Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhroy, V.; Li, J.; Charbonneau, F.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring surface deformation on strategic energy and transportation corridors requires high resolution spatial and temporal InSAR images for mitigation and safety purposes. High resolution air photos, lidar and other satellite images are very useful in areas where the landslides can be fatal. Recently, radar interferometry (InSAR) techniques using more rapid revisit images from several radar satellites are increasingly being used in active deformation monitoring. The Canadian RADARSAT Constellation (RCM) is a three-satellite mission that will provide rapid revisits of four days interferometric (InSAR) capabilities that will be very useful for complex deformation monitoring. For instance, the monitoring of surface deformation due to permafrost activity, complex rock slide motion and steam assisted oil extraction will benefit from this new rapid revisit capability. This paper provide examples of how the high resolution (1-3 m) rapid revisit InSAR capabilities will improve our monitoring of surface deformation and provide insights in understanding triggering mechanisms. We analysed over a hundred high resolution InSAR images over a two year period on three geologically different sites with various configurations of topography, geomorphology, and geology conditions. We show from our analysis that the more frequent InSAR acquisitions are providing more information in understanding the rates of movement and failure process of permafrost triggered retrogressive thaw flows; the complex motion of an asymmetrical wedge failure of an active rock slide and the identification of over pressure zones related to oil extraction using steam injection. Keywords: High resolution, InSAR, rapid revisits, triggering mechanisms, oil extraction.

  4. Investigating Subsidence Resulting from Ground Water Withdrawal in the Cedar Valley, Utah Region Using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzenstein, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ground water withdrawal has long been known as a potential source of land subsidence, particularly in arid regions where natural ground water recharge is low relative to the volumes of water produced. Throughout the last decade, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has proved to be a valuable tool to quantify aquifer system response to ground water withdrawal in arid portions of the western United States. The vast spatial coverage (~10,000 square miles minimum) and precise vertical resolution (<1 centimeter) make the InSAR method extremely useful in detecting small perturbations of surface elevation resulting from a wide range of natural and anthropogenic sources. This study utilized InSAR to investigate the source of ground fissures observed near the Enoch Graben and Quichapa Lake in Cedar Valley, UT. InSAR data were processed covering the time periods of November 14, 1992 - October 17, 2000 (ERS-1 and ERS-2 data) and October 26, 2004 - August 31, 2010 (Envisat dat). Individual and stacked interferograms delineate subsidence features in the vicinity of the observed ground fissuring with cumulative magnitudes as high as 11 cm and 17 cm for the Enoch graben and Quichapa Lake areas respectively. Additional subsidence was detected in other areas within Cedar Valley that correspond well with the locations of active municipal ground water wells. Additionally, several subsidence features not associated with the fissures of interest were observed. One in particular located between the small communities of Enterprise and Beryl, Utah exhibits over 50 cm of subsidence during the period of this study. This agricultural area is typified by pivot irrigation with ground water produced from the local alluvial aquifer. True subsidence magnitudes may be much higher as a large portion of the area in the vicinity of the pivot irrigation is decorrelated in the InSAR result. The magnitudes and locations of all subsidence features observed are presented and discussed.

  5. Curvelet-based compressive sensing for InSAR raw data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Marcello G.; da Silva Pinho, Marcelo; Fernandes, David

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the compression performance of SAR raw data for interferometry applications collected by airborne from BRADAR (Brazilian SAR System operating in X and P bands) using the new approach based on compressive sensing (CS) to achieve an effective recovery with a good phase preserving. For this framework is desirable a real-time capability, where the collected data can be compressed to reduce onboard storage and bandwidth required for transmission. In the CS theory, a sparse unknown signals can be recovered from a small number of random or pseudo-random measurements by sparsity-promoting nonlinear recovery algorithms. Therefore, the original signal can be significantly reduced. To achieve the sparse representation of SAR signal, was done a curvelet transform. The curvelets constitute a directional frame, which allows an optimal sparse representation of objects with discontinuities along smooth curves as observed in raw data and provides an advanced denoising optimization. For the tests were made available a scene of 8192 x 2048 samples in range and azimuth in X-band with 2 m of resolution. The sparse representation was compressed using low dimension measurements matrices in each curvelet subband. Thus, an iterative CS reconstruction method based on IST (iterative soft/shrinkage threshold) was adjusted to recover the curvelets coefficients and then the original signal. To evaluate the compression performance were computed the compression ratio (CR), signal to noise ratio (SNR), and because the interferometry applications require more reconstruction accuracy the phase parameters like the standard deviation of the phase (PSD) and the mean phase error (MPE) were also computed. Moreover, in the image domain, a single-look complex image was generated to evaluate the compression effects. All results were computed in terms of sparsity analysis to provides an efficient compression and quality recovering appropriated for inSAR applications

  6. An Advanced Real-Time Earthquake Information System in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, I.; Nakamura, H.; Suzuki, W.; Kunugi, T.; Aoi, S.; Fujiwara, H.

    2015-12-01

    J-RISQ (Japan Real-time Information System for earthquake) has been developing in NIED for appropriate first-actions to big earthquakes. When an earthquake occurs, seismic intensities (SI) are calculated first at each observation station and sent to the Data Management Center in different timing. The system begins the first estimation when the number of the stations observing the SI of 2.5 or larger exceeds the threshold amount. It estimates SI distribution, exposed population and earthquake damage on buildings by using basic data for estimation, such as subsurface amplification factors, population, and building information. It has been accumulated in J-SHIS (Japan Seismic Information Station) developed by NIED, a public portal for seismic hazard information across Japan. The series of the estimation is performed for each 250m square mesh and finally the estimated data is converted into information for each municipality. Since October 2013, we have opened estimated SI, exposed population etc. to the public through the website by making full use of maps and tables.In the previous system, we sometimes could not inspect the information of the surrounding areas out of the range suffered from strong motions, or the details of the focusing areas, and could not confirm whether the present information was the latest or not without accessing the website. J-RISQ has been advanced by introducing the following functions to settle those problems and promote utilization in local areas or in personal levels. In addition, the website in English has been released.・It has become possible to focus on the specific areas and inspect enlarged information.・The estimated information can be downloaded in the form of KML.・The estimated information can be updated automatically and be provided as the latest one.・The newest information can be inspected by using RSS readers or browsers corresponding to RSS.・Exclusive pages for smartphones have been prepared.The information estimated

  7. Multi-scale InSAR analysis of aseismic creep across the San Andreas, Calevaras,and Hayward Fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agram, P. S.; Simons, M.

    2011-12-01

    We apply the Multi-scale Interferometric Time-series (MInTS) technique, developed at Caltech,to study spatial variations in aseismic creep across the San Andreas, Calaveras and Hayward Faultsystems in Central California.Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) Time-series methods estimate the spatio-temporal evolution of surface deformation using multiple SAR interferograms. Traditional time-series analysis techniques like persistent scatterers and short baseline methods assume the statistical independence of InSAR phase measurements over space and time when estimating deformation. However, existing atmospheric phase screen models clearly show that noise in InSAR phase observations is correlated over the spatial domain. MInTS is an approach designed to exploit the correlation of phase observations over space to significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the estimated deformation time-series compared to the traditional time-series InSAR techniques. The MInTS technique reduces the set of InSAR observations to a set of almost uncorrelated observations at various spatial scales using wavelets. Traditional inversion techniques can then be applied to the wavelet coefficients more effectively. Creep across the Central San Andreas Fault and the Hayward Fault has been studied previously using C-band (6 cm wavelength) ERS data, but detailed analysis of the transition zone between the San Andreas and Hayward Faults was not possible due to severe decorrelation. Improved coherence at L-band (24 cm wavelength) significantly improves the spatial coverage of the estimated deformation signal in our ALOS PALSAR data set. We analyze 450 ALOS PALSAR interferograms processed using 175 SAR images acquired between Dec 2006 and Dec 2010 that cover the area along the San Andreas Fault System from Richmond in the San Francisco Bay Area to Maricopa in the San Joaquin Valley.We invert the InSAR phase observations to estimate the constant Line-of-Sight (LOS) deformation

  8. Detecting and monitoring UCG subsidence with InSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R J; Foxall, W; Yang, X

    2012-03-23

    The use of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to measure surface subsidence caused by Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is tested. InSAR is a remote sensing technique that uses Synthetic Aperture Radar images to make spatial images of surface deformation and may be deployed from satellite or an airplane. With current commercial satellite data, the technique works best in areas with little vegetation or farming activity. UCG subsidence is generally caused by roof collapse, which adversely affects UCG operations due to gas loss and is therefore important to monitor. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of InSAR in measuring surface subsidence related to coal mining and surface deformation caused by a coal mining roof collapse in Crandall Canyon, Utah is imaged as a proof-of-concept. InSAR data is collected and processed over three known UCG operations including two pilot plants (Majuba, South Africa and Wulanchabu, China) and an operational plant (Angren, Uzbekistan). A clear f eature showing approximately 7 cm of subsidence is observed in the UCG field in Angren. Subsidence is not observed in the other two areas, which produce from deeper coal seams and processed a smaller volume. The results show that in some cases, InSAR is a useful tool to image UCG related subsidence. Data from newer satellites and improved algorithms will improve effectiveness.

  9. Advancing Leadership in Sport: Time to Take Off the Blinkers?

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, Andrew; Collins, Dave

    2016-09-01

    While leadership is one of the most significant factors in sport, most research has focused on who effective leaders are and what they overtly do rather than why and how they lead in a certain way at a certain time. Presumably shaped by social norms, the bulk of this work has also overstated the role of bright (or socially desirable) leadership intentions and behaviours; or at least overlooked how this style fits with the 'darker' (or socially undesirable) intentions and behaviours that are prevalent and effective in applied practice. Contextualising this situation against the origins and dominant paradigms of sport-specific study, we therefore highlight the need for greater emphasis on both the cognitive and dark sides of leadership. Regarding the former, we argue that expert leadership requires cognitive excellence given that optimal and consistent impact requires the conscious selection, combination and deployment of leadership behaviours. Regarding the latter, we also argue that bright intentions and behaviours can often only be a part of an effective leadership repertoire and can beneficially operate in tandem with inherently dark alternatives. To advance knowledge and practice, we therefore call for a more pragmatic approach to research that considers both the cognitive mechanisms-namely professional judgement and decision making-and the full spectrum of intentions and behaviours that underpin real world leadership. PMID:26914268

  10. Visible Earthquakes: a web-based tool for visualizing and modeling InSAR earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funning, G. J.; Cockett, R.

    2012-12-01

    InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a technique for measuring the deformation of the ground using satellite radar data. One of the principal applications of this method is in the study of earthquakes; in the past 20 years over 70 earthquakes have been studied in this way, and forthcoming satellite missions promise to enable the routine and timely study of events in the future. Despite the utility of the technique and its widespread adoption by the research community, InSAR does not feature in the teaching curricula of most university geoscience departments. This is, we believe, due to a lack of accessibility to software and data. Existing tools for the visualization and modeling of interferograms are often research-oriented, command line-based and/or prohibitively expensive. Here we present a new web-based interactive tool for comparing real InSAR data with simple elastic models. The overall design of this tool was focused on ease of access and use. This tool should allow interested nonspecialists to gain a feel for the use of such data and greatly facilitate integration of InSAR into upper division geoscience courses, giving students practice in comparing actual data to modeled results. The tool, provisionally named 'Visible Earthquakes', uses web-based technologies to instantly render the displacement field that would be observable using InSAR for a given fault location, geometry, orientation, and slip. The user can adjust these 'source parameters' using a simple, clickable interface, and see how these affect the resulting model interferogram. By visually matching the model interferogram to a real earthquake interferogram (processed separately and included in the web tool) a user can produce their own estimates of the earthquake's source parameters. Once satisfied with the fit of their models, users can submit their results and see how they compare with the distribution of all other contributed earthquake models, as well as the mean and median

  11. Monitoring of precursor landslide surface deformation using InSAR image in Kuchi-Sakamoto, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H. P.; Nakajima, H.; Nakano, T.; Daimaru, H.

    2014-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is the technique to obtain ground surface images using microwave that is emitted from and received on the antenna. The Kuchi-Sakamoto area, 2.2 km2 in precipitous mountains, central Japan, has suffered from frequent landslides, and slow landslide surface deformation has been monitored by on-site extensometer; however, such the monitoring method cannot detect the deformation in the whole area. Because satellite InSAR is effective tool to monitor slow landslide suface deformation, it is a promising tool for detecting precursor deformation and preparing effective measures against serious landslide disasters. In this study Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) / Phased Array type L-band SAR (PALSAR) data were used, and InSAR images were produced from the PALSAR data that were observed between 5 Sep 2008 and 21 Oct 2008 (from descending orbit) and between 20 Jul 2008 and 7 Sep 2009 (from ascending orbit). InSAR image from descending orbit was found to detect clear precursor landslide surface deformation on a slope; however, InSAR image on ascending orbit did not always detect clear precursor deformation. It is thought to be related with atmospheric moisture condition, length of observation baseline and so on. Furthermore, after phase unwrapping on InSAR images, 2.5-dimensional deformation was analized. This analysis needed both ascending and descending InSAR images and culculated quasi east-west deformation component (Figs. (a) and (b)) and quasi up-down deformation component (Figs. (c) and (d)). The resulting 2.5D calculation gave westward deformation and mixture of upward and downward deformations on the precursor landslide surface deformation slope (blue circles in Figs. (c) and (d)), where remarkable disrupted deep landslide occurred during Nov 2012 and 25 Jun 2013, judging from result of airborne LiDAR survey and field survey; the occurrence date is not precisely identified. The figure remains the issue that eliminating "real

  12. Cascades of InSAR in the Cascades - outlook for the use of InSAR and space-based imaging catalogues in a Subduction Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has long demonstrated its utility to studies of subduction zone earthquakes, crustal events and volcanic processes, particularly in regions with very good temporal data coverage (e.g., Japan), or arid regions where the timescale of surface change is long compared to the repeat time of the available SAR imagery (e.g., portions of South America). Recently launched and future SAR missions with open data access will increase the temporal sampling rates further over many areas of the globe, resulting in a new ability to lower the detection threshold for earthquakes and, potentially, interseismic motion and transients associated with subduction zone settings. Here we describe some of the anticipated detection abilities for events ranging from earthquakes and slow slip along the subduction zone interface up to landslides, and examine the variations in land use around the circum-Pacific and how that and its changes over time will affect the use of InSAR. We will show the results of an effort to combine Landsat and other optical imagery with SAR data catalogues in the Pacific Northwest to improve the characterization of ground deformation signals, including the identification of "spurious" signals that are not related to true ground deformation. We also describe prospects for working with other communities that are interested in variations in soil moisture and vegetation structure over the same terrain.

  13. MINERVA: An INSAR Monitoring Service for Volcanic Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampellini, M. L.; Sansosti, E.; Usai, S.; Lanari, R.; Borgstrom, S.; van Persie, M.; Ricciardi, G. P.; Maddalena, V.; Cicero, L.; Pepe, A.

    2004-06-01

    MINERVA (Monitoring by Interferometric SAR of Environmental Risk in Volcanic Areas) is a small scale service demonstration project financed by ESA in the Data User Programme framework. The objective of the project is the design, development and assessment of a demonstrative information service based on the interferometric processing of images acquired from either the ASAR instrument on board ENVISAT-I or SAR instruments on board ERS1/2. The system is based on a new approach for the processing of INSAR data, which allows to optimize the quality of interferograms spanning from 35 days up to several years, and to merge them to generate a single solution describing the temporal evolution of the ground deformations in the examined risk area. The system allows to update this solution each time a new SAR image is available, and constitutes therefore an innovative tool for monitoring of the ground displacements in risk areas. The system has been implemented and demonstrated at Osservatorio Vesuviano (Naples, Italy), which is the institution responsible for monitoring the volcanic phenomena in the Neapolitan volcanic district, and for alerting the Italian civil authorities (''Protezione Civile'') in case such monitoring activity reveals signals of imminent eruptions. In particular, the MINERVA system has been used to monitor the ground deformations at the Phlegrean Fields, a densely populated, high-hazard zone which is subject to alternate phases of uplift and subsidence, accompanied often by seismic activity.

  14. A Survey of Landslide Activity in the Columbia River Gorge from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, X.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Columbia River Gorge contains several large landslide complexes that have exhibited historical movement, both catastrophic and slow moving. Monitoring the kinematics of active movement helps to characterize the ongoing natural hazard. In this study, we document the status of several large landslide complexes along the Columbia River Gorge. We use synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from multiple satellites (ERS, ENVISAT and ALOS) to reveal the spatial-temporal movement of slow-moving landslides over two decades, 1992-2011. To increase the spatial extent of the signal we developed a new InSAR time-series method based on pixel coherence and derived the time series of the landslides. We also investigate the ability of Persistent Scatterer InSAR to better illuminate active movement. While many historical landslide complexes show minimal or non-existent movement, we measure significant creep on the Redbluff landslide, which is part of the Cascade Landslide Complex near the Bonneville Dam. The InSAR time-series data reveal approximately 25 cm of line-of-sight movement from 5 years of ALOS observations, which translates into greater than 60 cm of downslope movement. The Redbluff landslide is seasonally activated, with accelerated movement observed during the early winter of each year. However, the amplitude of the seasonal signal is variable from year-to-year. To assess the triggering mechanisms, we compared the deformation time series data with local precipitation data. The deformation correlates well with precipitation, implying the slow movement is controlled by rainfall that infiltrates to the base of the slide. A preliminary comparison with the bare earth 2m-resolution digital elevation model from LiDAR reveals that the overall deformation pattern and the active perimeter is highly correlated with the morphology of the landslide.

  15. Eclipse Power -- Advances From Ancient Times to Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, E. F.; Engle, S. G.; Devinney, E. J.

    2007-05-01

    From ancient times to the present, eclipses and related occultations have been pivotal in the development of Astronomy and in the advancement of our understanding of the physical world. As discussed here, in modern astrophysics eclipsing binaries play major roles by returning a wealth of fundamental information and basic data about the physical properties of stars, as well as providing vital tests of stellar structure and evolution, accurate distances and so much more. Eclipsing binaries also serve as testbeds of various aspects of modern physics and astrophysics including General Relativity, nuclear and atomic physics and plasma physics. Eclipsing binaries in nearby galaxies are now even important in in cosmology by serving as first class ``standard candles'' that are leading to a significant improvement in the extragalactic distance scale. Also, eclipsing star-planet systems (ten discovered so far) are providing important properties of extrasolar planets (masses, radii and densities) that cannot be obtained by any other means. Moreover, from wide-field photometric surveys, the number of eclipsing binaries has greatly increased from a few thousand to over ten thousand known systems today. However, the pace of the discovery of new eclipsing systems is expected to explode during the next decade. Ground-based and orbiting wide-field programs that include Pan-STARRS, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), COROT, Kepler, Gaia and several others are expected to generate several million additional binary systems! To cope with analyzing and scientifically exploiting these overwhelming data, non-personal automatic and semi-autonomous approaches to light curve analysis are being developed. In particular, a new approach to this problem being developed by us and our colleagues is discussed that utilizes Artificial Intelligence (AI) / Neural Networks (NN) to find the best light curve solutions. This is part of a new program known as ``Eclipsing Binaries with Artificial

  16. InSAR analysis of the crustal deformation affecting the megacity of Istanbul: the results of the FP7 Marsite Project as a GEO Supersite Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solaro, Giuseppe; Bonano, Manuela; Manzo, Mariarosaria

    2016-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is one of the most active faults worldwide, extending approximately 1,200 km from Eastern Turkey to the Northern Aegean Sea. During the 20th century series of damaging earthquakes occurred along the NAF, generally propagated westward towards Istanbul; the last one occurred in 1999 at Izmit, a city 80 km away from Istanbul. Within this scenario, the FP7 MARsite project (New Directions in Seismic Hazard assessment through Focused Earth Observation in Marmara Supersite), supported by EU, intends to collect, share and integrate multidisciplinary data (seismologic, geochemical, surveying, satellite, etc.) in order to carry out assessment, mitigation and management of seismic risk in the region of the Sea of Marmara. In the framework of the MARsite project, we performed the analysis and monitoring of the surface deformation affecting the Istanbul mega city by exploiting the large archives of X-band satellite SAR data, made available through the Supersites Initiatives, and by processing them via the advanced multi-temporal and multi-scale InSAR technique, known as the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) approach. In particular, we applied the SBAS technique to a dataset of 101 SAR images acquired by the TerraSAR-X constellation of the German Space Agency (DLR) over descending orbits and spanning the November 2010 - August 2014 time interval. From,these images, we generated 312 differential interferograms with a maximum spatial separation (perpendicular baseline) between the acquisition orbits of about 500 m., that were used to generate, via the SBAS approach, mean deformation velocity map and corresponding ground time series of the investigated area. The performed InSAR analysis reveals a generalized stability over the Istanbul area, except for some localized displacements, related to subsidence and slope instability phenomena. In particular, we identified: (i) a displacement pattern related to the Istanbul airport, showing a mostly linear

  17. Simultaneous Inversion of GPS and InSAR for Regional Kinematics and Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, R.

    2009-12-01

    The growth of continuous GPS networks and acquisition of InSAR data require fully time-dependent methods for their tectonic analyses. We are working on developing the merger of the kinematic block-model approach with transient deformation with the aim of interpreting the entire geodetic time series. The steady linear motions of the GPS sites are estimated through parameters that describe the block motions (angular velocities) plus elastic strain rates from locked faults and anelastic strain rates from distributed deformation. Through the kinematic model, the steady site velocities have a high degree of spatial correlation. Transients such as earthquakes, after-slip, slow-slip events and volcanic sources are described by a small number of free parameters that are estimated by direct inversion of the position time series simultaneously with the kinematic model parameters. InSAR data are used as line-of-sight displacements between two times (acquisition dates) and are matched by the time-dependent deformation model. We utilize both continuous and survey-mode GPS time series. To date we have applied the method to Cascadia, New Zealand, Sumatra, Papua (Indonesia), Yellowstone (Payne et al., this meeting), and Japan (Ohzono et al., this meeting). In addition to the information we can gain about the kinematics and transients, the method has applications in event detection and outlier removal.

  18. Advances in Reservoir Monitoring Using High Resolution Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasco, D. W.; Ferretti, A.; Novali, F.; Tamburini, A.; Fumagalli, A.; Rucci, A.; Falorni, G.

    2009-12-01

    Surface deformation monitoring provides unique data for observing and measuring the performance of producing hydrocarbon reservoirs, for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS). To this aim, radar interferometry (InSAR) and, in particular, multi-interferogram Permanent Scatterer (PS) techniques are innovative, valuable and cost-effective tools. Depending on reservoir characteristics and depth, oil or gas production can induce surface subsidence or, in the cases of EOR and CCS, ground heave, potentially triggering fault reactivation and in some cases threatening well integrity. Mapping the surface effects of fault reactivation, due to either fluid extraction or injection, usually requires the availability of hundreds of measurement points per square km with millimeter-level precision, which is time consuming and expensive to obtain using traditional monitoring techniques, but can be readily obtained with InSAR data. Moreover, more advanced InSAR techniques developed in the last decade are capable of providing millimeter precision, comparable to optical leveling, and a high spatial density of displacement measurements, over long periods of time without need of installing equipment or otherwise accessing the study area. Until recently, a limitation to the application of InSAR was the relatively long revisiting time (24 or 35 days) of the previous generation of C-band satellites (ERS1-2, Envisat, Radarsat). However, a new generation of X-band radar satellites (TerraSAR-X and the COSMO-SkyMed constellation), which have been operational since 2008, are providing significant improvements. TerraSAR-X has a repeat cycle of 11 days while the two sensors of the COSMO-SkyMed constellation have an effective repeat cycle of just 8 days (the third sensor has already been successfully launched and is presently in the calibration phase). With the launch of the fourth satellite of the constellation, COSMO-SkyMed will have a revisiting time of

  19. Using InSAR to Analyze the Effects of Oil Extraction on the Kuparuk Oil Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluyut, E.; Liu, L.; Zebker, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ground deformation around oil fields is a major concern in regards to the impacts of this human-induced change on the environment. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) was used to map the ground deformation in the area of the Kuparuk Oil Field in Northern Alaska from 2007 to 2010. Data packages from the Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) and corresponding data for the digital elevation model (DEM) were used to create interferograms and the DEM. This was done using MATLAB and Python on a Linux operating system. Selected interferograms were cropped and errors from noise, topography, or atmosphere were minimized through fitting and stacking techniques. After analysis, the InSAR data yielded a chronology of a change in ground deformation around the Kuparuk Oil Field, which is correlated to a history of recovery techniques. Analysis of interferograms from before, in transition, and after application of different techniques can determine patterns of ground deformation in the field. It was found that positive ground deformation was more prevalent before the implementation of new oil recovery techniques as opposed to after implementation, with negative ground deformation occurring during the transition of the applications that allowed for more productive oil extraction. These results quantitatively demonstrate the magnitude of land subsidence that actively recovered oil fields induce. They also suggest that new methods of enhanced oil recovery are stabilizing the subterranean layers being drilled, creating a decrease in positive land deformation. This could support the continuation of research in fields of enhanced oil recovery and carbon sequestration.

  20. GPS Position Time Series @ JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Susan; Moore, Angelyn; Kedar, Sharon; Liu, Zhen; Webb, Frank; Heflin, Mike; Desai, Shailen

    2013-01-01

    Different flavors of GPS time series analysis at JPL - Use same GPS Precise Point Positioning Analysis raw time series - Variations in time series analysis/post-processing driven by different users. center dot JPL Global Time Series/Velocities - researchers studying reference frame, combining with VLBI/SLR/DORIS center dot JPL/SOPAC Combined Time Series/Velocities - crustal deformation for tectonic, volcanic, ground water studies center dot ARIA Time Series/Coseismic Data Products - Hazard monitoring and response focused center dot ARIA data system designed to integrate GPS and InSAR - GPS tropospheric delay used for correcting InSAR - Caltech's GIANT time series analysis uses GPS to correct orbital errors in InSAR - Zhen Liu's talking tomorrow on InSAR Time Series analysis

  1. Reconciling Earthquake Source Parameters from InSAR and Long-period Seismic Waveform Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakibay Senobari, N.; Funning, G.; Ferreira, A. M. G.; Weston, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Comparisons between earthquake source parameters as determined by InSAR and the global centroid moment tensor (GCMT) catalogue show discrepancies between locations derived using these independent methods (Ferreira et al., 2011; Weston et al., 2011, 2012). Earthquake centroid location determination using InSAR data (named the 'InSAR Centroid Moment Tensor', or 'ICMT' location) is more robust, since it is independent of Earth velocity structure errors that impact on longperiod surface wave inversions used in the GCMT method. Ferreira et al (2011) showed that these discrepancies cannot be resolved at present by applying more detailed 3D Earth velocity structures from mantle tomography models. Earthquake location determination is dependent on the assumed velocity structure, not only in the GCMT method, but also in all of the seismic based earthquake source parameter inversions. Velocity structures are typically produced by seismic tomography, which itself depends on seismic phase travel times. These travel times are a function of source location and origin time, plus the path between the source and receivers. Errors in source location can therefore be compounded as errors in the velocity structure. In a preliminary study we analyze longperiod seismic data for four shallow continental earthquakes studied with InSAR - Zarand Mw 6.5 (Iran, 2005), Eureka Valley Mw 6.1 (California, 1993), Aiquile Mw 6.5 (Bolivia, 1998) and Wells Mw 6.0 (Nevada, 2008). We use the spectral element wave propagation package, SPECFEM3D GLOBE, and Earth model S40RTS (Ritsema et al., 2010) to calculate Green's functions and synthetic seismograms for these events using their ICMT source locations. Using a cross-correlation method we were able to estimate phase shifts for each source-receiver pair between synthetic and observed long period waveforms. We believe these phase shifts may correspond to unmodeled heterogeneity in the S40RTS model, and if systematically documented could provide additional

  2. Advancing Knowledge in Higher Education: Universities in Turbulent Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Tanya, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last three decades, higher education institutions have experienced massive changes. In particular, institutions of higher education have been positioned as a means to contribute to the knowledge economy and gain a level of competitive advantage in the global marketplace. "Advancing Knowledge in Higher Education: Universities in…

  3. Afar-wide Crustal Strain Field from Multiple InSAR Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagli, C.; Wright, T. J.; Wang, H.; Calais, E.; Bennati Rassion, L. S.; Ebinger, C. J.; Lewi, E.

    2010-12-01

    Onset of a rifting episode in the Dabbahu volcanic segment, Afar (Ethiopia), in 2005 renewed interest in crustal deformation studies in the area. As a consequence, an extensive geodetic data set, including InSAR and GPS measurements have been acquired over Afar and hold great potential towards improving our understanding of the extensional processes that operate during the final stages of continental rupture. The current geodetic observational and modelling strategy has focused on detailed, localised studies of dyke intrusions and eruptions mainly in the Dabbahu segment. However, an eruption in the Erta ‘Ale volcanic segment in 2008, and cluster of earthquakes observed in the Tat Ale segment, are testament to activity elsewhere in Afar. Here we make use of the vast geodetic dataset available to obtain strain information over the whole Afar depression. A systematic analysis of all the volcanic segments, including Dabbahu, Manda-Hararo, Alayta, Tat ‘Ale Erta Ale and the Djibouti deformation zone, is undertaken. We use InSAR data from multiple tracks together with available GPS measurements to obtain a velocity field model for Afar. We use over 300 radar images acquired by the Envisat satellite in both descending and ascending orbits, from 12 distinct tracks in image and wide swath modes, spanning the time period from October 2005 to present time. We obtain the line-of-sight deformation rates from each InSAR track using a network approach and then combine the InSAR velocities with the GPS observations, as suggested by Wright and Wang (2010) following the method of England and Molnar (1997). A mesh is constructed over the Afar area and then we solve for the horizontal and vertical velocities on each node. The resultant full 3D Afar-wide velocity field shows where current strains are being accumulated within the various volcanic segments of Afar, the width of the plate boundary deformation zone and possible connections between distinct volcanic segments on a

  4. Moon-Based INSAR Geolocation and Baseline Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guang; Ren, Yuanzhen; Ye, Hanlin; Guo, Huadong; Ding, Yixing; Ruan, Zhixing; Lv, Mingyang; Dou, Changyong; Chen, Zhaoning

    2016-07-01

    Earth observation platform is a host, the characteristics of the platform in some extent determines the ability for earth observation. Currently most developing platforms are satellite, in contrast carry out systematic observations with moon based Earth observation platform is still a new concept. The Moon is Earth's only natural satellite and is the only one which human has reached, it will give people different perspectives when observe the earth with sensors from the moon. Moon-based InSAR (SAR Interferometry), one of the important earth observation technology, has all-day, all-weather observation ability, but its uniqueness is still a need for analysis. This article will discuss key issues of geometric positioning and baseline parameters of moon-based InSAR. Based on the ephemeris data, the position, liberation and attitude of earth and moon will be obtained, and the position of the moon-base SAR sensor can be obtained by coordinate transformation from fixed seleno-centric coordinate systems to terrestrial coordinate systems, together with the Distance-Doppler equation, the positioning model will be analyzed; after establish of moon-based InSAR baseline equation, the different baseline error will be analyzed, the influence of the moon-based InSAR baseline to earth observation application will be obtained.

  5. Novel Advancements in Internet-Based Real Time Data Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Gerry; Welch, Clara L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    AZ Technology has been working with MSFC Ground Systems Department to find ways to make it easier for remote experimenters (RPI's) to monitor their International Space Station (ISS) payloads in real-time from anywhere using standard/familiar devices. AZ Technology was awarded an SBIR Phase I grant to research the technologies behind and advancements of distributing live ISS data across the Internet. That research resulted in a product called "EZStream" which is in use on several ISS-related projects. Although the initial implementation is geared toward ISS, the architecture and lessons learned are applicable to other space-related programs. This paper presents the high-level architecture and components that make up EZStream. A combination of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) and custom components were used and their interaction will be discussed. The server is powered by Apache's Jakarta-Tomcat web server/servlet engine. User accounts are maintained in a My SQL database. Both Tomcat and MySQL are Open Source products. When used for ISS, EZStream pulls the live data directly from NASA's Telescience Resource Kit (TReK) API. TReK parses the ISS data stream into individual measurement parameters and performs on-the- fly engineering unit conversion and range checking before passing the data to EZStream for distribution. TReK is provided by NASA at no charge to ISS experimenters. By using a combination of well established Open Source, NASA-supplied. and AZ Technology-developed components, operations using EZStream are robust and economical. Security over the Internet is a major concern on most space programs. This paper describes how EZStream provides for secure connection to and transmission of space- related data over the public Internet. Display pages that show sensitive data can be placed under access control by EZStream. Users are required to login before being allowed to pull up those web pages. To enhance security, the EZStream client/server data transmissions can

  6. Post-eruptive inflation of Okmok Volcano, Alaska, from InSAR, 2008–2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qu, Feifei; Lu, Zhong; Poland, Michael; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Zhang, Qin; Jung, Hyung-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Okmok, a ~10-km wide caldera that occupies most of the northeastern end of Umnak Island, is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc. The most recent eruption at Okmok during July-August 2008 was by far its largest and most explosive since at least the early 19th century. We investigate post-eruptive magma supply and storage at the volcano during 2008–2014 by analyzing all available synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of Okmok acquired during that time period using the multi-temporal InSAR technique. Data from the C-band Envisat and X-band TerraSAR-X satellites indicate that Okmok started inflating very soon after the end of 2008 eruption at a time-variable rate of 48-130 mm/y, consistent with GPS measurements. The “model-assisted” phase unwrapping method is applied to improve the phase unwrapping operation for long temporal baseline pairs. The InSAR time-series is used as input for deformation source modeling, which suggests magma accumulating at variable rates in a shallow storage zone at ~3.9 km below sea level beneath the summit caldera, consistent with previous studies. The modeled volume accumulation in the 6 years following the 2008 eruption is ~75% of the 1997 eruption volume and ~25% of the 2008 eruption volume.

  7. Sparsity-driven tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric water vapor using GNSS and InSAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heublein, Marion; Alshawaf, Fadwa; Zhu, Xiao Xiang; Hinz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    An accurate knowledge of the 3D distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere is a key element for weather forecasting and climate research. On the other hand, as water vapor causes a delay in the microwave signal propagation within the atmosphere, a precise determination of water vapor is required for accurate positioning and deformation monitoring using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). However, due to its high variability in time and space, the atmospheric water vapor distribution is difficult to model. Since GNSS meteorology was introduced about twenty years ago, it has increasingly been used as a geodetic technique to generate maps of 2D Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV). Moreover, several approaches for 3D tomographic water vapor reconstruction from GNSS-based estimates using the simple least squares adjustment were presented. In this poster, we present an innovative and sophisticated Compressive Sensing (CS) concept for sparsity-driven tomographic reconstruction of 3D atmospheric wet refractivity fields using data from GNSS and InSAR. The 2D zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimates are obtained by a combination of point-wise estimates of the wet delay using GNSS observations and partial InSAR wet delay maps. These ZWD estimates are aggregated to derive realistic wet delay input data of 100 points as if corresponding to 100 GNSS sites within an area of 100 km × 100 km in the test region of the Upper Rhine Graben. The made-up ZWD values can be mapped into different elevation and azimuth angles. Using the Cosine transform, a sparse representation of the wet refractivity field is obtained. In contrast to existing tomographic approaches, we exploit sparsity as a prior for the regularization of the underdetermined inverse system. The new aspects of this work include both the combination of GNSS and InSAR data for water vapor tomography and the sophisticated CS estimation. The accuracy of the estimated 3D water

  8. Data assimilation experiment for reproducing localized delay signals derived from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Y.; Furuya, M.

    2014-12-01

    InSAR phase signals are affected by the Earth's atmosphere like those of the GNSS. Therefore, InSAR can detect water vapor distribution with unprecedented spatial resolution if there are neither surface deformation signals or other errors, and thus is potentially useful for meteorological applications. However, there has been only a few studies using InSAR as a water vapor sensor (e.g. Hanssen et al., 1999, Kinoshita et al., 2013).We reported six case studies that detected localized water vapor signals with InSAR based on ALOS/PALSAR data (Kinoshita et al., JpGU 2013), some of which reached over 20 cm in the LOS direction within 10 km2. Each signal located at the very location of high rainfall intensity in the weather radar data. Such localized signals strongly suggest the existence of developed convective systems at the SAR observation time.To investigate the mechanism of the localized delay signals in the interferogram, we performed the WRF simulation in the case of Niigata on 25 August 2010. We used the JMA MSM data and the NCEP high-resolution SST data as the initial values. Two nested domains were used and horizontal resolutions of them were 3 km and 1 km, respectively. The WRF simulation could reproduce the convective system that extended east and west, and the shape of the reproduced convective system was similar to the localized signals in the interferogram, whereas the location of the reproduced convective system was about 30 km north of that of observed signals.To improve the location of the reproduced convective system, we performed the 4DVAR experiment implemented in the WRF data assimilation model. In this study, we assimilated zenith total delay data derived from the Japanese GNSS network, GEONET. Due to the limitation of the computational resource, we performed the 4DVAR data assimilation in the coarser domain (10 km) and then we downscaled the assimilated initial value to the finer domain (2.5 km). The simulation with the assimilation could

  9. Spatial and Temporal Characterization of the Portuguese Bend Landslide, California, Using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabro, M.; Schmidt, D.; Roering, J.; Douglas, R.

    2007-12-01

    region, spanning the same time interval and area as the InSAR data. The InSAR result for the magnitude of the phase change in the summer months is validated by reducing the three component GPS data to the satellite's line-of-sight. Combining InSAR and GPS with rain gauge data, our long term objective is to better understand the mechanical and hydrological properties of the Portuguese Bend Landslide and monitor its activity over the past decade.

  10. Deformation of the Aniakchak Caldera, Alaska, mapped by InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Lu, Zhiming

    2004-01-01

    The deformation of Aniakchak volcano is investigated using 19 ERS-1 / 2 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from 1992 through 2002. InSAR images from the different time intervals reveal that the10-km-wide caldera has been subsiding during the time of investigation. The pattern of subsidence does not following the pyroclastic flows from the last eruption of the caldera in 1931. The maximum subsidence is near the center of the caldera, with a rate of up to 13 mm/yr. Deformation outside the caldera is insignificant. Least squares inversion of the multi-temporal deformation maps indicates that the subsidence rate has been relatively constant. Field observations have identified numerous fumaroles inside the caldera. In 1973, temperatures of 80??C were measured at a depth of 15 cm in loose volcanic rubble adjacent to the small cinder cone (about 1.5 km northeast of the vent of the 1931 eruption), whereas springs near a caldera lake had a temperature of 25??C in July 1993. Therefore, we suggest the observed subsidence at Aniakchak caldera is most likely caused by the reduction of pore fluid pressure of a hydrothermal system located a few kilometers beneath the caldera.

  11. InSAR Monitoring of Surface Deformation in Alberta's Oil Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearse, J.; Singhroy, V.; Li, J.; Samsonov, S. V.; Shipman, T.; Froese, C. R.

    2013-05-01

    Alberta's oil sands are among the world's largest deposits of crude oil, and more than 80% of it is too deep to mine, so unconventional in-situ methods are used for extraction. Most in situ extraction techniques, such as Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD), use steam injection to reduce the viscosity of the bitumen, allowing it to flow into wells to be pumped to the surface. As part of the oil sands safety and environmental monitoring program, the energy regulator uses satellite radar to monitor surface deformation associated with in-situ oil extraction. The dense vegetation and sparse infrastructure in the boreal forest of northern Alberta make InSAR monitoring a challenge; however, we have found that surface heave associated with steam injection can be detected using traditional differential InSAR. Infrastructure and installed corner reflectors also allow us to use persistent scatterer methods to obtain time histories of deformation at individual sites. We have collected and processed several tracks of RADARSAT-2 data over a broad area of the oil sands, and have detected surface deformation signals of approximately 2-3 cm per year, with time series that correlate strongly with monthly SAGD steam injection volumes.

  12. Application of InSAR and gravimetric surveys for developing construction codes in zones of land subsidence induced by groundwater extraction: case study of Aguascalientes, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Martínez, J.; Wdowinski, S.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Hernández-Marín, M.; Ortiz-Lozano, J. A.; Oliver-Cabrera, T.; Solano-Rojas, D.; Havazli, E.

    2015-11-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has become a valuable tool for surface deformation monitoring, including land subsidence associated with groundwater extraction. Another useful tools for studying Earth's surface processes are geophysical methods such as Gravimetry. In this work we present the application of InSAR analysis and gravimetric surveying to generate valuable information for risk management related to land subsidence and surface faulting. Subsidence of the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico is presented as study case. Aguascalientes local governments have addressed land subsidence issues by including new requirements for new constructions projects in the State Urban Construction Code. Nevertheless, the resulting zoning proposed in the code is still subjective and not clearly defined. Our work based on gravimetric and InSAR surveys is aimed for improving the subsidence hazard zoning proposed in the State Urban Code in a more comprehensive way. The study includes a 2007-2011 ALOS InSAR time-series analysis of the Aguascalientes valley, an interpretation of the compete Bouguer gravimetric anomaly of the Aguascalientes urban area, and the application of time series and gravimetric anomaly maps for improve the subsidence hazard zoning of Aguascalientes City.

  13. Investigating Persistent and Distributed Scatterers to Better Resolve Low Amplitude Deformation with InSAR in Vegetated Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, X.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Multi-temporal InSAR methods are successful at revealing low amplitude surface deformation by reducing the noise from the atmosphere and the Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The Persistent Scatters (PS) InSAR and Small baseline (SBAS) methods are used widely by the InSAR community. However, it is still challenging to recover low deformation rates in highly vegetated mountainous areas. Our goal is to explore different approaches to identifying PS or stable Distributed Scatterers (DS) for multi-temporal InSAR processing. We are investigating the following methods: 1) amplitude dispersion (Ferretti et al., 2001); 2) average correlation; 3) spatial correlation of phase (Hooper et al., 2004); 4) comparison of phase against a known mathematical model (Shanker and Zebker, 2007); 5) statistical analysis of the coherence matrix (Ferretti et al., 2011); 6) polarimetric bounce characteristics. We first align the SAR images to form a stack of Single Look Complex (SLC) using "batch processing". We work with this 3-dimensional SLC stack to identify high-quality PS and DS using the aforementioned methods. Next we design a filter based on the characteristics of the scatterers to form interferograms. This comparative study on identifying and filtering PS and DS can be integrated with interferogram stacking or time-series approaches like PSInSAR, SBAS or wavelet-based methods. We are working with the ERS-1, ERS-2 and ALOS-1 SAR data to study landslides and volcano deformation over various terrains in the Cascade Range. From these observations we will be able to construct better physical models to explain various deformation processes.

  14. Advances in Robotic-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy over Time

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Emma F. P.; Boris, Ronald; Masterson, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP), robotics has become increasingly more commonplace in the armamentarium of the urologic surgeon. Robotic utilization has exploded across surgical disciplines well beyond the fields of urology and prostate surgery. The literature detailing technical steps, comparison of large surgical series, and even robotically focused randomized control trials are available for review. RALP, the first robot-assisted surgical procedure to achieve widespread use, has recently become the primary approach for the surgical management of localized prostate cancer. As a result, surgeons are constantly trying to refine and improve upon current technical aspects of the operation. Recent areas of published modifications include bladder neck anastomosis and reconstruction, bladder drainage, nerve sparing approaches and techniques, and perioperative and postoperative management including penile rehabilitation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in perioperative management and surgical technique for RALP. PMID:24327925

  15. InSAR imaging of volcanic deformation over cloud-prone areas - Aleutian islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter-tosubcentimeter precision and spatial resolution of tens-of meters over a relatively large region. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, INSAR is an important technique for measuring ground-surface deformation of volcanoes over cloud-prone and rainy regions such as the Aleutian Islands, where only less than 5 percent of optical imagery is usable due to inclement weather conditions. The spatial distribution of surface deformation data, derived from INSAR images, enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic processes. This paper reviews the basics of INSAR for volcanic deformation mapping and the INSAR studies of ten Aleutian volcanoes associated with both eruptive and noneruptive activity. These studies demonstrate that all-weather INSAR imaging can improve our understanding of how the Aleutian volcanoes work and enhance our capability to predict future eruptions and associated hazards.

  16. VOLInSAR-PF, the InSAR Volcano Observatory Service at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Reunion Island).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froger, Jean-Luc; Cayol, Valérie; Augier, Aurélien; Souriot, Thierry

    2010-05-01

    Since 2003, we carry out a systematic InSAR survey of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano, Reunion Island, in the framework of an AO-ENVISAT project. Since 2005 this activity gets the status of Observatory Service of the Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand (OPGC). From 375 ASAR images acquired between 2003 and 2010, we have produced more than 2100 interferograms that allowed us to map the deformations related to 21 eruptions and thus to better understand the internal processes acting during each eruption. In the same time, we have developed an automatic procedure to provide full resolution interferograms, trough a dedicated WEB site, to the Volcano Observatory of Piton de la Fournaise (OVPF), and our other partners, within a few hours after receiving the ASAR images. In this way, our work is a first step toward an operational system of InSAR monitoring of volcanic activity. Since the beginning of 2010, the VOLInSAR-PF database is also open to the entire community, trough an anonymous login that gives access to slightly reduced resolution interferograms. We will present the VOLInSAR-PF database, the main results it provides concerning the way Piton de la Fournaise is deforming, and the main perspectives for monitoring provided by the new InSAR data (PALSAR-ALOS, TerraSAR-X, RADARSAT-2, COSMO-Skymed) we are beginning to integrate in the database.

  17. Surface Creep Along the 1999 Izmit Earthquake's Rupture (Turkey) from InSAR, GPS and Terrestrial LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, Z.; Aslan, G.; Dogan, U.; Kaya, S.; Ergintav, S.; Oz, D.; Celik, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies based on InSAR and GPS observations have shown that the Izmit-Akyazı segment of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) began slipping aseismically following the August 17, 1999 Izmit earthquake and continue for more than 13 years. To monitor this long-lasting afterslip, we use new SAR data, GPS and terrestrial LIDAR measurements along the fault. InSAR time series are calculated using 32 TerraSAR-X radar images acquired between 2011 and 2015 with the small baseline InSAR (SBAS) approach using the Supersites Istanbul archive provided by the German Aerospace Center, DLR (project HAZ2584_Marmara) (Hooper, 2008). The results show that the Izmit fault still creeps, but in an episodic manner. Two creep events are detected in the beginning and at end of 2013, each with an offset of ~20 mm between Izmit and Lake Sapanca. Campaign GPS measurements on a recently established network with 35 benchmarks and LIDAR measurements on three sites confirm the ongoing aseismic activity along the fault (TÜBİTAK project no: 113Y102).

  18. Recent advances to obtain real - Time displacements for engineering applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent developments and approaches (using GPS technology and real-time double-integration) to obtain displacements and, in turn, drift ratios, in real-time or near real-time to meet the needs of the engineering and user community in seismic monitoring and assessing the functionality and damage condition of structures. Drift ratios computed in near real-time allow technical assessment of the damage condition of a building. Relevant parameters, such as the type of connections and story structural characteristics (including geometry) are used in computing drifts corresponding to several pre-selected threshold stages of damage. Thus, drift ratios determined from real-time monitoring can be compared to pre-computed threshold drift ratios. The approaches described herein can be used for performance evaluation of structures and can be considered as building health-monitoring applications.

  19. Definition of the time-space propagation of ground deformation of the instable Eastern Flank of Mt.Etna between 2007 and 2010 from ALOS PALSAR InSAR data and comparison with CGPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandura, Danila; Cannavò, Flavio; Aloisi, Marco; Bruno, Valentina; Mattia, Mario; Weigmuller, Urs

    2013-04-01

    In this work we apply techniques of image processing to analyze 19 ALOS PALSAR images covering the time interval between 27 January 2007 and 07 may 2010 in order to analyze the time-space propagation of the ground deformation at the Eastern Flank of Mt. Etna. The proposed methodology compares one image to another, with the aim to find changes in the spatial location of deformation. This allows us to estimate the direction and the amplitude of the time-space propagation of ground deformation calculating a pre-defined distance between two Gaussian distributions. The main result of this kind of analysis is the confirm that the instable Eastern Flank of Mt. Etna is undergoing to an effect of rotation. In particular our work shows an area of clockwise rotation which extends in the eastern flank, bounded approximately to the North by the North-East Rift and the Pernicana fault system, to the North-East by the Ripe della Naca fault scarps and to the East by the Timpe fault system. In correspondence with these structures the rotation reverses and becomes counter-clockwise. These effects of rotations are strongly controlled by the main tectonic features acting as real barriers to the propagation of the deformation. Finally we have compared these results with the analysis of the strain parameters calculated starting from the CGPS data of the 38-stations "Etna@net" network, covering the same time span of the ALOS data. This comparison has also confirmed the presence of a main rotation of the eastern flank and the difference of motion between different sectors of this instable flank.

  20. Neonatal amygdala lesions advance pubertal timing in female rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Shannon B.Z.; Raper, Jessica; Bachevalier, Jocelyne; Wallen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Summary Social context influences the timing of puberty in both humans and nonhuman primates, such as delayed first ovulation in low-ranking rhesus macaques, but the brain region(s) mediating the effects of social context on pubertal timing are unknown. The amygdala is important for responding to social information and thus, is a potential brain region mediating the effects of social context on pubertal timing. In this study, female rhesus macaques living in large, species-typical, social groups received bilateral neurotoxic amygdala lesions at one month of age and pubertal timing was examined beginning at 14 months of age. Pubertal timing was affected in neonatal amygdala-lesioned females (Neo-A), such that they experienced significantly earlier menarche and first ovulation than did control females (Neo-C). Duration between menarche and first ovulation did not differ between Neo-A and Neo-C females, indicating earlier first ovulation in Neo-A females was likely a consequence of earlier menarche. Social rank of Neo-A females was related to age at menarche, but not first ovulation, and social rank was not related to either event in Neo-C females. It is more likely that amygdalectomy affects pubertal timing through its modulation of GABA-ergic mechanisms rather than as a result of the removal of a social-contextual inhibition on pubertal timing. PMID:25462903

  1. Groundwater storage variations in Madrid (Central Spain) from InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béjar-Pizarro, Marta; Ezquerro, Pablo; Herrera, Gerardo; Tomás, Roberto; Guardiola-Albert, Carolina; Ruiz-Hernandez, Jose M.; Fernandez-Merodo, Jose A.; Marchamalo, Miguel; Martinez, Ruben

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater resources are decreasing in many regions of the world and the future water supply for many populations is threatened. Future climatic conditions and population growth are expected to intensify the problem. Identifying where groundwater storage loss is occurring and understanding the factors that control this process is crucial to mitigate its adverse consequences. In this work, we apply satellite-based measurements of ground deformation over the Tertiary detritic aquifer of Madrid (TDAM), Central Spain, to infer the spatio-temporal evolution of water levels and identify areas vulnerable to groundwater storage loss. Using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data during the period 1992-2010 and piezometric time series on 19 well sites covering the period 1997-2010, we model groundwater levels and estimate reservoir capacity variations during the study period. This information is used to quantify groundwater storage loss and identify vulnerable areas. Our results reveal a region of ~200 km² where groundwater storage loss occurred in two different periods, 1991-1999 and 2005-2010. A combination of factors including the occurrence of two severe droughts and the existence of multiple private wells exploited by local entities and individuals for water supply, are probably controlling the inferred groundwater storage loss. This study illustrates how InSAR data can be used to detect vulnerable areas with a tendency to loss storage so that measures can be implemented to mitigate its adverse consequences in future drought periods.

  2. Quiescent deformation of the Aniakchak Caldera, Alaska mapped by InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Lu, Zhiming; Neal, C.; Wicks, C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The 10-km-wide caldera of the historically active Aniakchak volcano, Alaska, subsides ???13 mm/yr, based on data from 19 European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1 and ERS-2) interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images from 1992 through 2002. The pattern of subsidence does not reflect the distribution of pyroclastic deposits from the last eruption in 1931 and therefore is not related to compaction of fragmental debris. Weighted least-squares inversion of the deformation maps indicates a relatively constant subsidence rate. Modeling the deformation with a Mogi point source locates the source of subsidence at ???4 km below the central caldera floor, which is consistent with the inferred depth of magma storage before the 1931 eruption. Magmatic CO2 and He have been measured at a warm soda spring within the caldera, and several sub-boiling fumaroles persist elsewhere in the caldera. These observations suggest that recent subsidence can be explained by the cooling or degassing of a shallow magma body (???4 km deep), and/or the reduction of the pore-fluid pressure of a cooling hydrothermal system. Ongoing deformation of the volcano detected by InSAR, in combination with magmatic gas output from at least one warm spring, and infrequent low-level bursts of seismicity below the caldera, indicate that the volcanic system is still active and requires close attention for the timely detection of possible hazards. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  3. Integrating ALOS-2 and Sentinel-1 InSAR data for systematic volcano deformation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, James; Biggs, Juliet; Ebmeier, Susanna; Parker, Amy

    2016-04-01

    The recent launches of the Sentinel-1 and ALOS-2 satellites provide a wealth of new Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data for Earth observation purposes. We exploit these data for volcano deformation monitoring with a particular focus on Latin America, which is nominated as a priority target area under the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites volcano pilot program. By conducting an integrated survey that employs both Sentinel-1 and ALOS-2 we are able to achieve previously unprecedented levels of spatial and temporal resolution and combat decorrelation arising from vegetation cover. Latin America is an ideal target region as it has a diversity of geographic volcano locations (e.g., dense rainforest to high-altitude deserts), as well as abundant and varied volcanic activity. The numerous local volcano observatories can also directly benefit from this additional InSAR data when integrating it alongside ground-based observations. To further facilitate this impact we are directing our data outputs to a global volcano deformation database in near-real-time to provide a first-order access point for observatory staff and research scientists in need of satellite-derived ground-deformation results. We will draw upon a selection of case studies within Latin America to demonstrate our approach and how it can enhance volcano monitoring and eruption forecasting efforts.

  4. Advancing critical care: time to kiss the right frog

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The greatest advances in critical care over the past two decades have been achieved through doing less to the patient. We have learnt through salutary experience that our burgeoning Master-of-the-Universe capabilities and the oh-so-obvious stratagems instilled in us from youth were often ineffective or even deleterious. This re-education process, however, is far from complete. We are now rightly agonizing over the need for better characterization of pathophysiology, earlier identification of disease processes and a more directed approach to therapeutic intervention. We need to delineate the point at which intrinsic and protective adaptation ends and true harmful pathology begins, and how our iatrogenic meddling either helps or hinders. We need to improve trial design in the heterogeneous populations we treat, and to move away from syndromic fixations that, while offering convenience, have generally proved counterproductive. Importantly, we need to discover a far more holistic approach to patient care, evolving from the prevailing overmedicalized, number-crunching perspective towards a true multidisciplinary effort that embraces psychological as well as physiological well-being, with appropriate pharmacological minimization or supplementation. Complacency, with an unfair apportion of blame on the patient for not getting better, is the biggest threat to continued improvement. PMID:23514321

  5. Influence of Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-12-15

    The influence of Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance for the electron-ion collision is investigated in turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal method and the effective Dupree potential term associated with the plasma turbulence are employed to obtain the occurrence scattering time as a function of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, thermal energy, and Debye length. The result shows that the occurrence scattering time advance decreases with an increase of the Dupree diffusivity. Hence, we have found that the influence of plasma turbulence diminishes the occurrence time advance in forward electron-ion collisions in thermal turbulent plasmas. The occurrence time advance shows that the propensity of the occurrence time advance increases with increasing scattering angle. It is also found that the effect of turbulence due to the Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance decreases with an increase of the thermal energy. In addition, the variation of the plasma turbulence on the occurrence scattering time advance due to the plasma parameters is also discussed.

  6. Integrated analysis of PALSAR/Radarsat-1 InSAR and ENVISAT altimeter data for mapping of absolute water level changes in Louisiana wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, J.-W.; Lu, Zhiming; Lee, H.; Shum, C.K.; Swarzenski, C.M.; Doyle, T.W.; Baek, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has been used to detect relative water level changes in wetlands. We developed an innovative method to integrate InSAR and satellite radar altimetry for measuring absolute or geocentric water level changes and applied the methodology to remote areas of swamp forest in coastal Louisiana. Coherence analysis of InSAR pairs suggested that the HH polarization is preferred for this type of observation, and polarimetric analysis can help to identify double-bounce backscattering areas in the wetland. ENVISAT radar altimeter-measured 18-Hz (along-track sampling of 417 m) water level data processed with regional stackfile method have been used to provide vertical references for water bodies separated by levees. The high-resolution (~ 40 m) relative water changes measured from ALOS PALSAR L-band and Radarsat-1 C-band InSAR are then integrated with ENVISAT radar altimetry to obtain absolute water level. The resulting water level time series were validated with in situ gauge observations within the swamp forest. We anticipate that this new technique will allow retrospective reconstruction and concurrent monitoring of water conditions and flow dynamics in wetlands, especially those lacking gauge networks. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Time Pressure and Phonological Advance Planning in Spoken Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damian, Markus F.; Dumay, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Current accounts of spoken production debate the extent to which speakers plan ahead. Here, we investigated whether the scope of phonological planning is influenced by changes in time pressure constraints. The first experiment used a picture-word interference task and showed that picture naming latencies were shorter when word distractors shared…

  8. Real-time PCR: Advanced technologies and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book brings together contributions from 20 experts in the field of PCR, providing a broad perspective of the applications of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The editors state in the preface that the aim is to provide detailed insight into underlying principles and methods of qPCR to provide ...

  9. Advanced clinical monitoring: considerations for real-time hemodynamic diagnostics.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, J. M.; Cordova, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to ease staffing burdens and potentially improve patient outcome in an intensive care unit (ICU) environment, we are developing a real-time system to accurately and efficiently diagnose cardiopulmonary emergencies. The system is being designed to utilize all relevant routinely-monitored physiological data in order to automatically diagnose potentially fatal events. The initial stage of this project involved formulating the overall system design and appropriate methods for real-time data acquisition, data storage, data trending, waveform analysis, and implementing diagnostic rules. Initially, we defined a conceptual analysis of the minimum physiologic data set, and the monitoring time-frames (trends) which would be required to diagnose cardiopulmonary emergencies. Following that analysis, we used a fuzzy logic diagnostic engine to analyze physiological data during a simulated arrhythmic cardiac arrest (ACA) in order to assess the validity of our diagnostic methodology. We used rate, trend, and morphologic data extracted from the following signals: expired CO2 time-concentration curve (capnogram), electrocardiogram, and arterial blood pressure. The system performed well: The fuzzy logic engine effectively diagnosed the likelihood of ACA from the subtle hemodynamic trends which preceded the complete arrest. As the clinical picture worsened, the fuzzy logic-based system accurately indicated the change in patient condition. Termination of the simulated arrest was rapidly detected by the diagnostic engine. In view of the effectiveness of this fuzzy logic implementation, we plan to develop additional fuzzy logic modules to diagnose other cardiopulmonary emergencies. PMID:7950025

  10. TerraSAR InSAR Investigation of Active Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, L.; Burgmann, R.

    2009-12-01

    We aim to utilize advanced analysis of TerraSAR-X data to investigate the dynamics and interactions of solid Earth deformation processes, such as earthquakes and fault creep, and Earth surface processes, such as land subsidence and groundwater movements, in a densely populated, urban region, the San Francisco Bay Area. Ongoing deformation imaging reveals a number of natural hazards including elastic strain accumulation about seismologic faults, active landsliding, land subsidence and rebound, and settling of unconsolidated sediments that are highly susceptible to liquefaction. Up to now, we have ordered and received 20 more TerraSAR-X Spotlight Single Look Complex (SLC) images and a few Stripmap SLC images delivered by DLR and got a few preliminary results. The TerraSAR-X images were acquired over the San Francisco Bay Area particularly around an area of active landsliding, coastal subsidence and shallow Hayward fault creep near the city of Berkeley. Berkeley is situated between latitude 37.45 and 38.00, longitude 237.30 and 238.00. The data acquisition interval is from November, 2008 to now. Four types of Spotlight images and one type of Stripmap images in time sequence were ordered and acquired: spot_012, spot_038, spot_049, spot_075 and strip_003, having different look angles and pass directions. Access to the SAR data is via ftp about 10 days after acquisition date. The data is supplied in TerraSAR-X standard SLC COSAR (COmplex SAR) format with orbital information in an Extensible Markup Language (XML) header. The file contains integer real-complex components with double sampling and calibration constants for values. I am using ROI_PAC to do the interferograms. But ROI_PAC was designed to process the raw data rather SLC images. So there are some problems in azimuth processing with TerraSAR SLC data especially the Spotlight data. We now have some preliminary results of Stripmap interferograms and Spotlight interferograms but still work on those problems and

  11. Sentinel-1 Constellation for nationwide deformation mapping with InSAR -- From science to operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehls, John; Larsen, Yngvar; Marinkovic, Petar

    2016-04-01

    For more than a decade, InSAR has been used in Norway study landslides and subsidence. Initial studies concentrated on understanding and validating the technique in various settings. During the last five years, however, we have moved towards using InSAR in operational settings. Of all the challenges we have faced, the largest has been regular access to SAR imagery. The Sentinel-1 constellation will bring a paradigm shift to the field with its operational characteristics: mission configuration, acquisition planning, and data distribution policy. For the first time, we will have nationwide acquisitions with an unprecedented temporal spacing. By the end of this year, we will have a sufficiently long time series of data to produce an initial version of a national deformation map. Within the ESA SEOM InSARap project, we have developed the necessary updates of interferometric processing tools necessary to handle the novel TOPS mode, and successfully demonstrated the performance of S1 InSAR in a number of scientific applications. However, to fully exploit the key advantages of the Sentinel-1 mission, we still face a number of scientific and operational challenges, due to the new and unique characteristics of the mission. Specifically, the large coverage and dense temporal sampling results in very large data sets with a vastly increased information content, which still needs new algorithmic development to extract. In the context of national mapping, optimal harmonization of deformation maps based on overlapping individual S1 stacks is the most prominent challenge. Urban areas in Norway face much the same problems as many other cities throughout the world; subsidence due to soil compaction and groundwater changes or excavation, and resulting damage to infrastructure. More unique to Norway is the threat to lives caused by large unstable rock slopes along the steep fjords. In the 20th century alone, catastrophic rock slope failures leading to tsunamis in fjords and large

  12. Effects of the troposphere on GPS and InSAR point target analysis for measurement of crustal deformation and vertical motion near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Plag, H.; Kreemer, C. W.; Li, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Precise measurement of vertical motions of the solid Earth with space based geodetic techniques such as GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is complicated by the presence of the atmosphere. A fundamental question is to what degree do GPS and InSAR provide similar information about the delays in signal propagation associated with the troposphere. Knowledge of this relationship can improve methods for using GPS to correct for the effects of atmosphere in InSAR, or vice versa. To isolate residual signals associated with the atmosphere in GPS using the GIPSY-OASIS II software, we apply a height-dependent dry delay, and solve for wet zenith delay and its two horizontal gradients every five minutes as a random walk process. We estimate the residual phase from InSAR as the difference between phase and the expected phase based on interferometric point target analysis performed with the Gamma IPTA software module. We will investigate correlations between 1) the GPS troposphere zenith delay estimates at the time of radar scene acquisition, 2) the GPS height estimate residual to the linear rate in height, and 3) the GAMMA IPTA derived atmospheric delays (including orbit errors). As a test case we will use the long running and stable GPS sites of the Basin and Range Geodetic Network (BARGEN) in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These sites have been shown to exhibit extremely clean time series, likely attributable to the very high quality monumentation, stability of GPS equipment, dry atmosphere over the Great Basin, and low rates of crustal deformation. This, in addition to the high density of stations (16 sites within a 50 km radius), makes the Yucca mountain regional network one of the best possible localities for the analysis of the relative contributions to noise in GPS vertical rates and atmospheric contributions to InSAR measurements.

  13. Combination of Insar and GPS to Measure Ground Motions and Atmospheric Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbini, S.; Prati, C.; Errico, M.; Ferri, S.; Novali, F.; Scirpoli, S.; Tiberi, L.

    2010-12-01

    The combination of different techniques such as InSAR and GPS is characterized by the added value of taking advantage of their complementary strengths and of minimizing their respective weaknesses, thus allowing for the full exploitation of the complementary aspects by overcoming the limitations inherent in the use of each technique alone. Another important aspect of the GPS/InSAR integration regards the fact that today’s application of interferometric SAR techniques is limited by the knowledge of the wet tropospheric path delay in microwave observations. GPS-based estimates of tropospheric delays may help in obtaining better corrections which will enhance the coherence and will allow the application of InSAR in a wider range of applications. The area selected for the InSAR/GPS comparison/integration is in northeastern Italy and includes the town of Bologna, and two nearby sites Medicina (agricultural area) and Loiano (a small city on the Apennines) where a small network of permanent GPS stations is operated by the University of Bologna. The InSAR data used are the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) images made available by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) in the framework of the research contract AO-1140. The Permanent Scatterers (PS) technique will be applied to a number of repeated CSK strip map SAR images acquired over a 40x40 square km area encompassing the towns mentioned above. Ultimately this work will contribute demonstrating the CSK capabilities to operate in a repeated interferometric survey mode for measuring ground deformation with millimeter accuracy in different environments. A PS is a target whose radar signature is stable with time. Such targets can be identified by means of multiple SAR observations and they can be exploited for jointly estimating their relative motion and the atmospheric artifacts on a grid that can be quite dense in space but not in time (depending on the SAR revisiting time interval). On the contrary the GPS can provide very frequent time

  14. Langley advanced real-time simulation (ARTS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Daniel J.; Cleveland, Jeff I., II

    1988-01-01

    A system of high-speed digital data networks was developed and installed to support real-time flight simulation at the NASA Langley Research Center. This system, unlike its predecessor, employs intelligence at each network node and uses distributed 10-V signal conversion equipment rather than centralized 100-V equipment. A network switch, which replaces an elaborate system of patch panels, allows the researcher to construct a customized network from the 25 available simulation sites by invoking a computer control statement. The intent of this paper is to provide a coherent functional description of the system. This development required many significant innovations to enhance performance and functionality such as the real-time clock, the network switch, and improvements to the CAMAC network to increase both distances to sites and data rates. The system has been successfully tested at a usable data rate of 24 M. The fiber optic lines allow distances of approximately 1.5 miles from switch to site. Unlike other local networks, CAMAC does not buffer data in blocks. Therefore, time delays in the network are kept below 10 microsec total. This system underwent months of testing and was put into full service in July 1987.

  15. INVESTIGATION OF CRUSTAL MOTION IN THE TIEN SHAN USING INSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R J

    2011-02-25

    The northern Tien Shan of Central Asia is an area of active mid-continent deformation. Although far from a plate boundary, this region has experienced 5 earthquakes larger than magnitude 7 in the past century and includes one event that may as be as large as Mw 8.0. Previous studies based on GPS measurements indicate on the order of 23 mm/yr of shortening across the entire Tien Shan and up to 15 mm/year in the northern Tien Shan (Figure 1). The seismic moment release rate appears comparable with the geodetic measured slip, at least to first order, suggesting that geodetic rates can be considered a proxy for accumulation rates of stress for seismic hazard estimation. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar may provide a means to make detailed spatial measurements and hence in identifying block boundaries and assisting in seismic hazard. Therefore, we hoped to define block boundaries by direct measurement and by identifying and resolving earthquake slip. Due to political instability in Kyrgzystan, the existing seismic network has not performed as well as required to precisely determine earthquake hypocenters in remote areas and hence InSAR is highly useful. In this paper we present the result of three earthquake studies and show that InSAR is useful for refining locations of teleseismically located earthquakes. ALOS PALSAR data is used to investigate crustal motion in the Tien Shan mountains of Central Asia. As part of the work, considerable software development was undertaken to process PALSAR data. This software has been made freely available. Two damaging earthquakes have been imaged in the Tien Shan and the locations provided by ALOS InSAR have helped to refine seismological velocity models. A third earthquake south of Kyrgyzstan was also imaged. The use of InSAR data and especially L band is therefore very useful in providing groundtruth for earthquake locations.

  16. Advances in time-dependent current-density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Arjan

    In this work we solve the problem of the gauge dependence of molecular magnetic properties (magnetizabilities, circular dichroism) using time-dependent current-density functional theory [1]. We also present a new functional that accurately describes the optical absorption spectra of insulators, semiconductors and metals [2] N. Raimbault, P.L. de Boeij, P. Romaniello, and J.A. Berger Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 066404 (2015) J.A. Berger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 137402 (2015) This study has been partially supported through the Grant NEXT No. ANR-10-LABX-0037 in the framework of the Programme des Investissements d'Avenir.

  17. InSAR and Numeric Modeling for Land Subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulamu, A.; Grzovic, M.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring land subsidence due to coal mining is a function of several controlling factors, including: depth of the mine, stratigraphy, presence or absence of faults, thickness of mineral seam, mining method used, and hydrogeological conditions. Numerical modeling, e.g., finite element modeling (FEM), provides a comprehensive tool to simulate three-dimensional deformation at specific locations. The basis of the FEM is the representation of a body or a structure by an assemblage of subdivisions called finite elements, which requires the availability of site specific environmental and physical characteristics. The lack of availability of the necessary data leads to large uncertainties in subsidence estimates. With the use of InSAR, many of the needed controlling parameters for improving mine subsidence rate estimates can be identified. Coupling InSAR with FEM can further improve subsidence rate estimates through additional analysis yielding information on the relative importance of various controlling parameters contributing to the mine subsidence, the key mechanisms of failure associated with these parameters, and the surface expressions of these processes. In this contribution, we show that utilizing InSAR and FEM leads to an overall enhanced understanding of mine behavior, including the physical mechanisms that lead to mine subsidence through understanding the rheological behavior of the material over the mine in response to wide range of physical and environmental conditions.

  18. Interglacial climate dynamics and advanced time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudelsee, Manfred; Bermejo, Miguel; Köhler, Peter; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    Studying the climate dynamics of past interglacials (IGs) helps to better assess the anthropogenically influenced dynamics of the current IG, the Holocene. We select the IG portions from the EPICA Dome C ice core archive, which covers the past 800 ka, to apply methods of statistical time series analysis (Mudelsee 2010). The analysed variables are deuterium/H (indicating temperature) (Jouzel et al. 2007), greenhouse gases (Siegenthaler et al. 2005, Loulergue et al. 2008, L¨ü thi et al. 2008) and a model-co-derived climate radiative forcing (Köhler et al. 2010). We select additionally high-resolution sea-surface-temperature records from the marine sedimentary archive. The first statistical method, persistence time estimation (Mudelsee 2002) lets us infer the 'climate memory' property of IGs. Second, linear regression informs about long-term climate trends during IGs. Third, ramp function regression (Mudelsee 2000) is adapted to look on abrupt climate changes during IGs. We compare the Holocene with previous IGs in terms of these mathematical approaches, interprete results in a climate context, assess uncertainties and the requirements to data from old IGs for yielding results of 'acceptable' accuracy. This work receives financial support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Project ClimSens within the DFG Research Priority Program INTERDYNAMIK) and the European Commission (Marie Curie Initial Training Network LINC, No. 289447, within the 7th Framework Programme). References Jouzel J, Masson-Delmotte V, Cattani O, Dreyfus G, Falourd S, Hoffmann G, Minster B, Nouet J, Barnola JM, Chappellaz J, Fischer H, Gallet JC, Johnsen S, Leuenberger M, Loulergue L, Luethi D, Oerter H, Parrenin F, Raisbeck G, Raynaud D, Schilt A, Schwander J, Selmo E, Souchez R, Spahni R, Stauffer B, Steffensen JP, Stenni B, Stocker TF, Tison JL, Werner M, Wolff EW (2007) Orbital and millennial Antarctic climate variability over the past 800,000 years. Science 317:793. Köhler P, Bintanja R

  19. Forecasting and Managing Groundwater Resources Using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebker, H. A.; Knight, R. J.; Chen, J.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater management is highly dependent on the type and quality of field data available describing a given aquifer system. Our increasing reliance on groundwater, especially as traditional surface supplies continue to be overexploited due to rising population and standard of living, requires that we better understand the state of our subsurface supplies and how to best manage them. The dense spatial and temporal variability of subsidence provided by time series InSAR allows us to constrain the extent of an aquifer, its storage coefficient, estimates of hydraulic head, and hydraulic conductivity. We present examples of these parameters associated with groundwater systems in the San Luis Valley, CO, and the Central Valley area of California, as observed by several spaceborne radar systems and validated by comparison with field data. Groundwater is one component of a water system, which includes surface supplies and all of the various sources and end uses of water in a particular area. Confined aquifers remain the most difficult components of a full water system to characterize and properly manage, as they lie deep underground and are hidden from direct observation. We show that observing subtle deformations of the surface elevations on the order of mm to cm yield important constraints on the underlying aquifer and its hydraulic properties, because variations in the surface height expresses changes in water pressure below. The fundamental relation between pressure and stress resulting in changes in hydraulic head yields a simple linear relationship between deformation Δb, hydraulic head Δh, and skeletal storage coefficient: Sk = Δb / Δh, so that measuring deformation everywhere above an aquifer over time yields change in head. Using InSAR-observed temporal response of the head (deformation) to changes in forcing by water sources and sinks, and applying the one dimensional diffusion equation resulting from Darcy's Law and the continuity relation allows us to

  20. Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis: 2. Coeruptive deflation, July-August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A hydrovolcanic eruption near Cone D on the floor of Okmok caldera, Alaska, began on 12 July 2008 and continued until late August 2008. The eruption was preceded by inflation of a magma reservoir located beneath the center of the caldera and ~3 km below sea level (bsl), which began immediately after Okmok's previous eruption in 1997. In this paper we use data from several radar satellites and advanced interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques to produce a suite of 2008 coeruption deformation maps. Most of the surface deformation that occurred during the eruption is explained by deflation of a Mogi-type source located beneath the center of the caldera and 2–3 km bsl, i.e., essentially the same source that inflated prior to the eruption. During the eruption the reservoir deflated at a rate that decreased exponentially with time with a 1/e time constant of ~13 days. We envision a sponge-like network of interconnected fractures and melt bodies that in aggregate constitute a complex magma storage zone beneath Okmok caldera. The rate at which the reservoir deflates during an eruption may be controlled by the diminishing pressure difference between the reservoir and surface. A similar mechanism might explain the tendency for reservoir inflation to slow as an eruption approaches until the pressure difference between a deep magma production zone and the reservoir is great enough to drive an intrusion or eruption along the caldera ring-fracture system.

  1. Integrating Remote Sensing Data, Hybrid-Cloud Computing, and Event Notifications for Advanced Rapid Imaging & Analysis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, H.; Owen, S. E.; Yun, S.; Lundgren, P.; Fielding, E. J.; Agram, P.; Manipon, G.; Stough, T. M.; Simons, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Wilson, B. D.; Poland, M. P.; Cervelli, P. F.; Cruz, J.

    2013-12-01

    Space-based geodetic measurement techniques such as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) are now important elements in our toolset for monitoring earthquake-generating faults, volcanic eruptions, hurricane damage, landslides, reservoir subsidence, and other natural and man-made hazards. Geodetic imaging's unique ability to capture surface deformation with high spatial and temporal resolution has revolutionized both earthquake science and volcanology. Continuous monitoring of surface deformation and surface change before, during, and after natural hazards improves decision-making from better forecasts, increased situational awareness, and more informed recovery. However, analyses of InSAR and GPS data sets are currently handcrafted following events and are not generated rapidly and reliably enough for use in operational response to natural disasters. Additionally, the sheer data volumes needed to handle a continuous stream of InSAR data sets also presents a bottleneck. It has been estimated that continuous processing of InSAR coverage of California alone over 3-years would reach PB-scale data volumes. Our Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis for Monitoring Hazards (ARIA-MH) science data system enables both science and decision-making communities to monitor areas of interest with derived geodetic data products via seamless data preparation, processing, discovery, and access. We will present our findings on the use of hybrid-cloud computing to improve the timely processing and delivery of geodetic data products, integrating event notifications from USGS to improve the timely processing for response, as well as providing browse results for quick looks with other tools for integrative analysis.

  2. Advancing Cell Biology Through Proteomics in Space and Time (PROSPECTS)*

    PubMed Central

    Lamond, Angus I.; Uhlen, Mathias; Horning, Stevan; Makarov, Alexander; Robinson, Carol V.; Serrano, Luis; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Werenskiold, Anne Katrin; Andersen, Jens S.; Vorm, Ole; Linial, Michal; Aebersold, Ruedi; Mann, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The term “proteomics” encompasses the large-scale detection and analysis of proteins and their post-translational modifications. Driven by major improvements in mass spectrometric instrumentation, methodology, and data analysis, the proteomics field has burgeoned in recent years. It now provides a range of sensitive and quantitative approaches for measuring protein structures and dynamics that promise to revolutionize our understanding of cell biology and molecular mechanisms in both human cells and model organisms. The Proteomics Specification in Time and Space (PROSPECTS) Network is a unique EU-funded project that brings together leading European research groups, spanning from instrumentation to biomedicine, in a collaborative five year initiative to develop new methods and applications for the functional analysis of cellular proteins. This special issue of Molecular and Cellular Proteomics presents 16 research papers reporting major recent progress by the PROSPECTS groups, including improvements to the resolution and sensitivity of the Orbitrap family of mass spectrometers, systematic detection of proteins using highly characterized antibody collections, and new methods for absolute as well as relative quantification of protein levels. Manuscripts in this issue exemplify approaches for performing quantitative measurements of cell proteomes and for studying their dynamic responses to perturbation, both during normal cellular responses and in disease mechanisms. Here we present a perspective on how the proteomics field is moving beyond simply identifying proteins with high sensitivity toward providing a powerful and versatile set of assay systems for characterizing proteome dynamics and thereby creating a new “third generation” proteomics strategy that offers an indispensible tool for cell biology and molecular medicine. PMID:22311636

  3. InSAR measurements of compaction and subsidence in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Stephanie A.; Overeem, Irina; Steckler, Michael S.; Syvitski, James P. M.; Seeber, Leonardo; Akhter, S. Humayun

    2014-08-01

    Many of the world's largest river deltas are sinking due to sediment loading, compaction, and tectonics but also recently because of groundwater extraction, hydrocarbon extraction, and reduced aggradation. Little is known, however, about the full spatial variability of subsidence rates in complex delta systems. This study reconstructs subsidence rates in the eastern portion of the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD), Bangladesh, covering more than 10,000 km2 at a high spatial resolution of 100 m. The map was produced using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) covering the period 2007 to 2011. Eighteen Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased-Array L-band SAR scenes were used to generate 30 interferograms calibrated with GPS. Interferograms were stacked to yield average subsidence rates over the study period. Small Baseline Subset-InSAR was then applied to validate the results against an additional GPS record from Dhaka, Bangladesh. Land subsidence of 0 to > 10 mm/yr is seen in Dhaka, with variability likely related to local variations in shallow subsurface sediment properties. Outside of the city, rates vary from 0 to > 18 mm/yr, with the lowest rates appearing primarily in Pleistocene Madhupur Clay and the highest rates in Holocene organic-rich muds. Results demonstrate that subsidence in this delta is primarily controlled by local stratigraphy, with rates varying by more than an order of magnitude depending on lithology. The ability of L-band InSAR to differentiate between stratigraphic units in this humid, vegetated subtropical river delta demonstrates the power of interferometry as a tool for studying the subsurface in deltaic environments.

  4. Living Fully in the Shadow of Mortal Time: Psychosocial Assets in Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Meg; Marchand, Lucille

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize the strategies and psychosocial conditions that influence how resilient people live in the face of advanced cancer. Methods Grounded theory interviews and surveys of ten resilient people with advanced cancer were collected and analyzed. Findings Personal assets including positive relationships, purpose in life, faith, and a sense of mastery contributed to living fully in “mortal time.” Strategies included embracing paradox, reframing time, deepening connections, and aligning actions with priorities. Open-ended interviews yielded rich illness and life stories; many participants requested a copy of the transcript. Conclusions Resilient people use a range of strategies to thrive in the face of advanced cancer. PMID:23923470

  5. Interseismic accumulation across the Khoy fault from InSAR measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni Aref, Mohammad; Çakir, Ziyadin; Karimzadeh, Sadra

    2016-04-01

    The Khoy fault is part of a long right lateral strike slip fault that runs in NW-SE direction between Çaldıran in eastern Turkey and Tabriz in northwest of Iran within the Turkish-Iranian plateau that accommodates the plate convergence between Eurasia and Arabia. It connects the North Tabriz Fault (NTF) with the Gailatu-Siah Chesmeh and Çaldiran faults, and thus is named here the Çaldiran-Tabriz fault (CTF). The CTF, unlike the North and East Anatolian faults to the west, does not have a clear morphological expression in the topography along much of it length. Active fault maps show a distributed deformation zone. Nevertheless, it has produced several devastating large earthquakes both recently (e.g., Ms 7.3, 1976 Çaldiran earthquake), and historical times (e.g., Ms > 7, 1721 and 1780 Tabriz earthquakes).The recent double earthquakes (Mw 6.5 and 6.2) of August 11th, 2012 in Ahar-Varzaghan area 40-45 km north of the NTF manifest the seismic activity of the region. Recent geodetic studies using GPS InSAR suggest 9±2 mm/yr of slip rate for the NTF, which is significantly higher than geologically determined slip rates (e.g., 2-4 mm/yr). In this study, we use InSAR data acquired from 2003 and 2010 on a descending orbit track of ENVISAT satellite, across the Khoy fault zone, which is the north-western continuation of the NTF north of the Urmia Lake. We use the Stanford method of persistent scatter interferometry (StaMPS) technique to overcome the decorelation problem with time and over large areas. The line of sight velocity field we obtained clearly delineates the shear zone that trends NW-SW aligning with the NTF. We project the mean line of sigh velocity field derived by InSAR time series onto fault parallel horizontal velocity field, assumed that vertical offset rate of the Khoy fault is negligible. Single screw dislocation models in elastic half-space model were applied along the fault zone to estimate slip rate, locking depth and fault location within 95

  6. The Sentinel-1 Constellation - A new era of operational InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. J.; Hooper, A. J.; Marinkovic, P.; González, P. J.; Walters, R.; Elliott, J. R.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Larsen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The launch of Sentinel-1A on 3 April 2014 by the European Space Agency will transform our ability to monitor our restless planet with InSAR. For the first time, radar data will be acquired systematically and frequently (every 6 days once Sentinel-1B is launched in 2016) over all the tectonic and volcanic areas of the planet; the data will be freely available to the whole community; the mission has a long duration, with future launches planned to extend the time series to at least 20 years. In this presentation, I will discuss some the processing challenges, present preliminary differential interferograms and time series, and speculatively look back from 2034 on what the mission has achieved. Sentinel-1 acquires radar data in a novel mode, known as Interferometric Wide Swath or TOPS (Terrain Observation with Progressive Scans in azimuth) mode. TOPS mode has some advantages, the most significant of which is that a 250 km wide image can be acquired without the scalloping effect that is seen in conventional ScanSAR amplitude images. However, because the Doppler centroid varies in azimuth, phase artefacts are introduced in TOPS-mode interferograms unless the images are co-registered with an azimuth accuracy of ~5 cm. This, and the bursted nature of TOPS data, introduces new challenges and opportunities to InSAR processing. We show how the required coregistration accuracy can be achieved with an end-to-end geometric approach, and by exploitation of the view angle diversity in burst and swath overlap regions. We also discuss different strategies for when and how to stitch the bursts, which depend on the application domain and processing methodology. The systematic acquisitions and free and open data policy provide new opportunities for routine analysis and operational applications of InSAR. COMET (* http://comet.nerc.ac.uk) aims to provide processed results for all the tectonic and volcanic regions of the planet, and we will present preliminary results of our processing

  7. 48 CFR 1552.215-74 - Advanced understanding-uncompensated time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-uncompensated time. 1552.215-74 Section 1552.215-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL... Clauses 1552.215-74 Advanced understanding—uncompensated time. As prescribed in 1515.408(b), insert the...—Uncompensated Time (AUG 1999) (a) The estimated cost of this contract is based upon the Contractor's...

  8. Characterization of a Real-time Neutron Imaging Test Station at China Advanced Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Linfeng; Han, Songbai; Wang, Hongli; Wei, Guohai; Wang, Yu; Wu, Meimei; Liu, Yuntao; Chen, Dongfeng

    A real-time neutron imaging test station was recently installed at the China Advanced Research Reactor. The objective of this work was to determine its operational characteristics, including neutron beam profile, the spatial resolution and time resolution. The performance of the equipment was demonstrated by a real time neutron imaging test of the water dynamics in a fuel cell.

  9. Semantic Interpretation of Insar Estimates Using Optical Images with Application to Urban Infrastructure Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhu, X. X.

    2015-08-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) has been an established method for long term large area monitoring. Since the launch of meter-resolution spaceborne SAR sensors, the InSAR community has shown that even individual buildings can be monitored in high level of detail. However, the current deformation analysis still remains at a primitive stage of pixel-wise motion parameter inversion and manual identification of the regions of interest. We are aiming at developing an automatic urban infrastructure monitoring approach by combining InSAR and the semantics derived from optical images, so that the deformation analysis can be done systematically in the semantic/object level. This paper explains how we transfer the semantic meaning derived from optical image to the InSAR point clouds, and hence different semantic classes in the InSAR point cloud can be automatically extracted and monitored. Examples on bridges and railway monitoring are demonstrated.

  10. Baseline Estimation Algorithm with Block Adjustment for Multi-Pass Dual-Antenna Insar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guowang; Xiong, Xin; Xu, Qing; Gong, Zhihui; Zhou, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Baseline parameters and interferometric phase offset need to be estimated accurately, for they are key parameters in processing of InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar). If adopting baseline estimation algorithm with single pass, it needs large quantities of ground control points to estimate interferometric parameters for mosaicking multiple passes dual-antenna airborne InSAR data that covers large areas. What's more, there will be great difference between heights derived from different passes due to the errors of estimated parameters. So, an estimation algorithm of interferometric parameters with block adjustment for multi-pass dual-antenna InSAR is presented to reduce the needed ground control points and height's difference between different passes. The baseline estimation experiments were done with multi-pass InSAR data obtained by Chinese dual-antenna airborne InSAR system. Although there were less ground control points, the satisfied results were obtained, as validated the proposed baseline estimation algorithm.

  11. Comparison of DEMs Derived from InSAR and Optical Stereo Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Y. S.; Rao, K. S.

    2004-06-01

    Optical stereo and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques were used to process the IRS-1C PAN stereo and ERS-1&2 tandem data respectively over Koyna and Mumbai test sites for digital elevation model (DEM) generation. For processing the data sets of optical stereo and InSAR, PCI OrthoEngine and Gamma softwares were used respectively. Heights from Survey of India topomaps (SOI) and GPS were used as ground control points in the process of DEM generation. A comparison was made between the DEMs of optical stereo and InSAR. It is observed that RMS error in the estimation of height of GCPs are 20 m and 9 m using optical stereo and InSAR respectively for Koyna test site. The same for Mumbai test site are 11 m and 16 m for the two techniques. By selecting random points from SOI maps, the RMS errors for koyna test site are 16 m and 30 m in height for optical stereo and InSAR respectively. The same for Mumbai test site using GPS data are 10 m and 13 m respectively. The DEMs were also compared in terms of contours drawn with an interval of 20 m. From the contours, we observed that optical stereo gave better contours than that of InSAR for Koyna test site. However, for Mumbai test site, the contours from InSAR are better than that of optical stereo. To exploit the com plementarities of the two techniques, DEMs were fused by replacing holes in the InSAR data with the DEM derived from optical stereo technique. We did not observe much change in the contours of InSAR DEM after fusion. It is concluded that better data sets are required for DEM generation using optical stereo. Using better phase unwrapping techniques, one may get better DEM using InSAR technique.

  12. Allan Variance Computed in Space Domain: Definition and Application to InSAR Data to Characterize Noise and Geophysical Signal.

    PubMed

    Cavalié, Olivier; Vernotte, François

    2016-04-01

    The Allan variance was introduced 50 years ago for analyzing the stability of frequency standards. In addition to its metrological interest, it may be also considered as an estimator of the large trends of the power spectral density (PSD) of frequency deviation. For instance, the Allan variance is able to discriminate different types of noise characterized by different power laws in the PSD. The Allan variance was also used in other fields than time and frequency metrology: for more than 20 years, it has been used in accelerometry, geophysics, geodesy, astrophysics, and even finances. However, it seems that up to now, it has been exclusively applied for time series analysis. We propose here to use the Allan variance on spatial data. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is used in geophysics to image ground displacements in space [over the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image spatial coverage] and in time thanks to the regular SAR image acquisitions by dedicated satellites. The main limitation of the technique is the atmospheric disturbances that affect the radar signal while traveling from the sensor to the ground and back. In this paper, we propose to use the Allan variance for analyzing spatial data from InSAR measurements. The Allan variance was computed in XY mode as well as in radial mode for detecting different types of behavior for different space-scales, in the same way as the different types of noise versus the integration time in the classical time and frequency application. We found that radial Allan variance is the more appropriate way to have an estimator insensitive to the spatial axis and we applied it on SAR data acquired over eastern Turkey for the period 2003-2011. Spatial Allan variance allowed us to well characterize noise features, classically found in InSAR such as phase decorrelation producing white noise or atmospheric delays, behaving like a random walk signal. We finally applied the spatial Allan variance to an InSAR time

  13. Repeat-pass InSAR processing for Vegetation Height Calculation: Theory and a validated example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, P.; Lei, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of the vegetation height for a forested region is often used as a proxy for stem volume, biomass, and for characterizing habitats of a variety of plant and animal species. For this reason, remote sensing measures available from stereography, lidar, and InSAR have been important tools for airborne and spaceborne platforms. Among these and other candidates for measuring vegetation heights, InSAR has the advantage of achieving wide coverage areas (on the order of 100 km in cross-track swath) over short time periods, thus making it practical for large-scale assessments of the global environment. The determination of forest stand height (FSH), which is an assessment made on the order of one to ten hectares of resolution, InSAR can provide measures that are proportional to FSH. These are: 1.) interferometric phase compared to a known DEM, preferably of the bald earth, 2.) interferometric correlation (polarimetric or otherwise), which is related to the volume scattering nature of the target, and 3.) interferometric correlation which is related to the temporal decorrelation of the target. Of these, while the volumetric aspect of interferometric correlation is of keen interest, because of the dominant error source of temporal decorrelation, it comes at the cost of the need to perform single-pass interferometry. While such satellite systems do exist (notably the TanDEM-X mission), for vegetation applications, lower frequency systems such as ALOS-1 and -2, and the future NASA radar mission at L-band, provides better signal returns from throughout the vegetation canopy. Hence, rather than relying on volumetric correlation to provide the desired FSH signature, repeat-pass observations of temporal decorrelation are coupled with a vegetation model for this decorrelation to determine the vegetation height. In order to demonstrate this technique, the University of Massachusetts has used 46-day repeat-pass ALOS data to estimate FSH over the US State of Maine, nearly a 10

  14. The wet refractivity tomography for improving the InSAR deformation measurements on Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinetti, Claudia; Aranzulla, Massimo; Guglielmino, Francesco; Cannavo', Flavio; Romaniello, Vito; Briole, Pierre; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In the frame of the EC FP7 MED-SUV project, we carried out a study to improve the accuracy of the ground deformation monitoring at Mt. Etna volcano (Italy) by modelling of the tropospheric delays. We use GPS and multispectral satellite data to reduce the atmospheric artefacts in the SAR interferometry. Among various effects affecting interferograms, atmospheric artefacts are among the most significant and the most difficult to model. Due to the orography of Mt. Etna and the space-time variability weather conditions, it has been shown that the atmospheric heterogeneities can affect GPS and InSAR measurements at a vey high level, with extreme values of anomalies with respect to a standard model that can reach 100 mm (or 4 C-band fringes) in some cases. For these reasons the estimation of Mt. Etna atmospheric anomalies is crucial to calibrate the InSAR measurements. Nowadays the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo (INGV-OE) monitors the ground deformations at Mt. Etna with a network of 42 GPS permanent stations spread over and around the entire volcano edifice. Data collected by the GPS monitoring network have been processed by the GAMIT software, by adopting the Vienna Mapping Functions (VMF1) to improve the modelling of the tropospheric delays. A specific software has been developed in order to derive the tomographic imagery of the troposphere over Etna volcano starting from the tropospheric delays calculated by GPS in all the stations of the network. The algorithm developed has been validated by using synthetic tests. They consist in assuming different structures of atmospheric anomalies in the input data and verifying that the algorithm is able to reproduce them. The test results confirmed the capability of the software to return the simulated anomalies faithfully. With the aim of applying the tomography algorithm to a real case, we introduce the water vapour content estimated by the MODIS instrument on board of the satellites Terra

  15. Post-2008 Inflation of Okmok Volcano, Alaska, from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; QU, F.; Dzurisin, D.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    Okmok Volcano, a dominantly basaltic volcanic complex that occupies most of the northeastern end of Umnak Island, is among the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc (Lu and Dzurisin, 2014). Minor ash eruptions were reported a dozen times since the 1930s. Blocky basalt flows were extruded during dominantly effusive eruptions in 1945, 1958, and 1997, together with minor amounts of ash. From the 1930s to 1997, all of Okmok's eruptions originated from Cone A within the summit caldera. The most recent eruption at Okmok during July-August 2008 was by far the largest and most explosive eruption since at least the early 19th century. The eruption issued from a new vent in the northeast part of the caldera near Cone D, about 5 km northeast of Cone A. The eruption was strongly hydrovolcanic in nature and produced a new tuff cone roughly 240 m high, dramatically altering the landscape inside the caldera. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations suggest that a magma reservoir, probably an interconnected network of magma bodies of varying sizes located beneath the caldera and centered ~3 km BSL, was responsible for volcano-wide deformation during 1992-2008, including the 1997 and 2008 eruptions (Lu and Dzurisin, 2014). The reservoir inflated at a variable rate before the 1997 and 2008 eruptions, and withdrawal of magma during both eruptions depressurized the reservoir, causing rapid volcano-wide subsidence. In this study, we report re-inflation of the Okmok reservoir from 2008 to 2014. InSAR imagery from X-band TerraSAR-X, C-band Envisat and L-band ALOS PALSAR satellites indicate that Okmok started inflating soon after the end of 2008 eruption at a rate of 5-10 cm/year, which is confirmed by GPS measurements. Deformation modeling suggests the inflation source is located beneath the center of Okmok caldera at ~3 km BSL, which is essentially the same location responsible for uplift and subsidence during 1992-2008. Lu, Z., and Dzurisin, D., 2014. "InSAR

  16. Potential of Multi-Temporal InSAR Techniques for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazecky, M.; Sousa, J. J.; Perissin, D.; Hlavacova, I.; Patricio, G.; Papco, J.; Rapant, P.; Real, N.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper it is clearly demonstrated that InSAR techniques may be particularly useful as a hot spot indicator of relative structures deformation over large areas, making it possible to develop interferometric based methodologies for SHM. Different case studies from structural health monitoring of buildings, bridges and highways and dams in Slovakia, Czech Republic, Hong Kong and Portugal processed within the scope of “RemotWatch - Alert and Monitoring System for Physical Structures” project using non-linear and other SHM-optimized algorithms of SARPROZ software, are reported. For the future investigation it is expected, that due to the faster product delivery of new missions (e.g. SENTINEL-1), it will be possible to deliver new workflows suitable for near-real time analysis aimed to better understanding of the deformation characteristics of the structures in urban and extra urban areas, important for structure stability and risk management applications.

  17. Processing advances for localization of beaked whales using time difference of arrival.

    PubMed

    Baggenstoss, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the localization of clicking Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) using an array of widely spaced bottom-mounted hydrophones. A set of signal and data processing advances are presented that together make reliable tracking a possibility. These advances include a species-specific detector, elimination of spurious time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) estimates, improved tracking of TDOA estimates, positive association of TDOA estimates using different hydrophone pairs, and joint localization of multiple whales. A key innovation in three of these advances is the principle of click-matching. The methods are demonstrated using real data. PMID:23742359

  18. Probing Mechanical Properties of Rock with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jónsson, S.

    2012-04-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations from satellites have revolutionized our crustal deformation measurement capabilities with its high spatial resolution, global coverage, and low cost. The high spatial resolution (typically 5-20 m) allows us to map many small-scale surface deformation phenomena in great detail. These include surface faulting, fissuring, fault creep, and other strain localization phenomena. Another advantage of the small-scale deformation mapping is that it can provide information about mechanical properties of near-surface rocks. Several studies have already been published on using InSAR to probe material properties of rock. Strain localizations at fault zones have been observed in co-seismic deformation fields near to large earthquakes and interpreted as expressions of weak fault zone materials that are a factor of two more compliant than the surrounding unbroken rock [Fialko et al., 2002]. Peltzer et al. [1999] argued that asymmetries in coseismic deformation patterns observed by InSAR showed evidence for non-linear elasticity, i.e. that the elastic moduli of shallow crustal material are different for compression and extension, due to small-scale cracks in the medium. This interpretation was later disputed by Funning et al. [2007], who provided an alternative explanation for observed deformation pattern based on along-strike variations in fault geometry and slip. In addition, observations and modeling of poro-elastic rebound after earthquakes have provided information about the difference in undrained and drained Poisson's ratio values of the near-surface rocks [Peltzer et al., 1996; Jónsson et al., 2003]. More recently we have used InSAR observations to put bounds on the tensional bulk strength of surface rocks. A dyke intrusion that took place in western Saudi Arabia in 2009 caused many moderate-sized earthquakes and extensive surface faulting. InSAR data of the area show that large-scale (40 km x 40 km) east

  19. Handbook II: Advanced Teaching Strategies for Adjunct and Part-Time Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greive, Donald E., Ed.

    This handbook is designed to help part-time and adjunct faculty who need professional enhancement but do not have the time for formal coursework. The focus is on the modern student, who differs in many ways from the traditional college student. The book provides more advanced strategies that those presented in the earlier "Handbook for…

  20. Subsidence and associated shallow faulting hazard assessment in central Mexico using InSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Solano Rojas, D. E.; Oliver-Cabrera, T.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.; Wdowinski, S.; DeMets, C.; Pacheco, J.

    2014-12-01

    While subsidence has affected Mexico City for over a century, other cities in central Mexico have been subjected to subsidence since the '80, as a result of their large urban expansion, population increase and aggressive groundwater extraction rates. The continuous subsidence results in severe damage to urban infrastructure and civil structures. Unfortunately the damage cost assessment and vulnerability are difficult to evaluate, because of the variable geographic extent and the continuous nature of the process, which have different characteristics than localized, short duration hazards, as earthquakes or flood events.We have monitored land subsidence in 17 cities in central Mexico using both InSAR and GPS observations. InSAR provides an unsurpassed synoptic view of the earth's dynamic surface. However, different satellite sensors and sometimes widely spaced data availability make it difficult to derive long-term time series, rapid changes or nonlinear variations of subsidence velocities. To alleviate this situation, higher temporal resolution subsidence observations of associated fault motion has been pursued using continuously operating GPS stations. We have developed a GPS network that covers 6 urban centers to detect short duration variations using different processing schemes that include both real-time solutions using RTNet as well as daily solution using Gipsy-Oasis.Cartographic products based on these techniques have been merged with other population, hydrology and meteorology data sets. This approach allows a better hazard assessment and provides information for other purposes, such as vulnerability for shallow faulting, land use zonations, and other decision elements for water resource management agencies. We will provide examples of these hazard assessments for several cities, including Mexico City, Aguascalientes, Morelia, Irapuato and Celaya and the challenges encountered to integrate these results with other data sets from federal and state

  1. Subsidence in the Central Valley, California 2007 - present measured by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, T. G.; Liu, Z.; Jones, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Subsidence caused by groundwater pumping in the rich agricultural area of California's Central Valley has been a problem for decades. Over the last few years, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations from satellite and aircraft platforms have been used to produce maps of subsidence with ~cm accuracy. For this study, we have obtained and analyzed Japanese PALSAR data for 2006 - 2011, Canadian Radarsat-1 data for 2011 - 2013, Radarsat-2 data for 2012 - 2015, and ESA's Sentinel-1A for 2015 and produced maps of subsidence for those periods. High resolution InSAR data were also acquired along the California Aqueduct by the NASA UAVSAR from 2013 - 2015. Using multiple scenes acquired by these systems, we were able to produce the time histories of subsidence at selected locations and transects showing how subsidence varies both spatially and temporally. The maps show that subsidence is continuing in areas with a history of subsidence and that the rates and areas affected have increased due to increased groundwater extraction during the extended western US drought. The high resolution maps from UAVSAR were used to identify and quantify new, highly localized areas of accelerated subsidence along the California Aqueduct that occurred in 2014. The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) funded this work to provide the background and an update on subsidence in the Central Valley to support future policy. Geographic Information System (GIS) files are being furnished to DWR for further analysis of the 4 dimensional subsidence time-series maps. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA.

  2. A geometry-based image search engine for advanced RADARSAT-1/2 GIS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotamraju, Vinay; Rabus, Bernhard; Busler, Jennifer

    2012-06-01

    Space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors, such as RADARSAT-1 and -2, enable a multitude of defense and security applications owing to their unique capabilities of cloud penetration, day/night imaging and multi-polarization imaging. As a result, advanced SAR image time series exploitation techniques such as Interferometric SAR (InSAR) and Radargrammetry are now routinely used in applications such as underground tunnel monitoring, infrastructure monitoring and DEM generation. Imaging geometry, as determined by the satellite orbit and imaged terrain, plays a critical role in the success of such techniques. This paper describes the architecture and the current status of development of a geometry-based search engine that allows the search and visualization of archived and future RADARSAT-1 and -2 images appropriate for a variety of advanced SAR techniques and applications. Key features of the search engine's scalable architecture include (a) Interactive GIS-based visualization of the search results; (b) A client-server architecture for online access that produces up-to-date searches of the archive images and that can, in future, be extended to acquisition planning; (c) A techniquespecific search mode, wherein an expert user explicitly sets search parameters to find appropriate images for advanced SAR techniques such as InSAR and Radargrammetry; (d) A future application-specific search mode, wherein all search parameters implicitly default to preset values according to the application of choice such as tunnel monitoring, DEM generation and deformation mapping; (f) Accurate baseline calculations for InSAR searches, and, optimum beam configuration for Radargrammetric searches; (g) Simulated quick look images and technique-specific sensitivity maps in the future.

  3. Remotely Sensing Tundra Fire Impacts Using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Jafarov, E. E.; Williams, C. A.; Rogan, J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Fire is a major disturbance affecting the arctic tundra and boreal forests, with a significant impacts on the ecosystem, soil hydrology, carbon cycling, and permafrost. The increasing trend in frequency and severity of large fires since 1980, associated with progressively drier conditions, is expected to continue and lead to still greater impacts. In this study, we explore the use of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to map and quantify several results of tundra fires, including fire severity, the increase in permafrost active layer thickness (ALT), and changes in organic layer thickness. Here we present as an example observations of the Anaktuvuk River fire on the North Slope of Alaska, which burned over 1,000 km2 of tundra in the summer of 2007. Fire causes an abrupt change in the surface scattering characteristics and results in a large drop in InSAR coherence. The magnitude of coherence loss is proportional to the amount of vegetation burned, and thus fire severity. Coherence between two PALSAR images taken by the Japanese ALOS satellite before and after the Anaktuvuk River fire shows a spatial pattern consistent with a map of burn severity based on optical MODIS images using differential Normalized Burn Ratio. Additionally, we used InSAR to calculate the seasonal ground subsidence for the 2006 and 2009 thaw seasons representing pre- and post-fire conditions, and estimated the change in ALT using a retrieval algorithm. Our results are consistent with the 8 to 24 cm ALT increases derived from in situ probing measurements, which we relate to the change in the organic layer thickness due to the fire. Our results illustrate the potential of InSAR for remote sensing of fire impacts in Arctic regions. (a) Burn severity for the Anaktuvuk Rivre Fire based on differential Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) from MODIS images. (b) Interferometric coherence loss due to the fire. Spatial mean has been subtracted. Negative values (yellow and red colors) indicate

  4. Generalized interpretation scheme for arbitrary HR InSAR image pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, Markus; Thiele, Antje; Schulz, Karsten

    2013-10-01

    Land cover classification of remote sensing imagery is an important topic of research. For example, different applications require precise and fast information about the land cover of the imaged scenery (e.g., disaster management and change detection). Focusing on high resolution (HR) spaceborne remote sensing imagery, the user has the choice between passive and active sensor systems. Passive systems, such as multispectral sensors, have the disadvantage of being dependent from weather influences (fog, dust, clouds, etc.) and time of day, since they work in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, active systems like Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provide improved capabilities. As an interactive method analyzing HR InSAR image pairs, the CovAmCohTM method was introduced in former studies. CovAmCoh represents the joint analysis of locality (coefficient of variation - Cov), backscatter (amplitude - Am) and temporal stability (coherence - Coh). It delivers information on physical backscatter characteristics of imaged scene objects or structures and provides the opportunity to detect different classes of land cover (e.g., urban, rural, infrastructure and activity areas). As example, railway tracks are easily distinguishable from other infrastructure due to their characteristic bluish coloring caused by the gravel between the sleepers. In consequence, imaged objects or structures have a characteristic appearance in CovAmCoh images which allows the development of classification rules. In this paper, a generalized interpretation scheme for arbitrary InSAR image pairs using the CovAmCoh method is proposed. This scheme bases on analyzing the information content of typical CovAmCoh imagery using the semisupervised k-means clustering. It is shown that eight classes model the main local information content of CovAmCoh images sufficiently and can be used as basis for a classification scheme.

  5. Antarctic mass budget from 1975-2015 using InSAR, Landsat and RACMO-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.; Rignot, E. J.; Li, X.

    2015-12-01

    Ice Sheet Mass balance is measured from the difference between the ice discharge along the coast and surface mass balance of the drainage basins of the glaciers. Precise estimation of the mass balance of each glacier needs an exact delineation of their drainage basin, which, ultimately, is defined by the flow of the ice. The precision of mapping is, however, limited by the precision of the actual maps of ice flow, mainly based on speckle tracking, which is not sufficient to fully capture the direction of flow in slow-moving parts of the ice sheets. Here we revisit prior drainage basins of Antarctica using a new precise velocity map based on the interferometric phase by combining InSAR tracks from ALOS/PALSAR-1, ENVISAT/ASAR, ERS-1/-2 and RADARSAT-1/-2. We map ice flow in the interior of the ice sheet at the meter/year level precision. We discuss differences observed between new divides and topographic divides. In addition, we combine this information with a new bed topography from the mass conservation approach and a time history of glacier velocity from Landsat 1975-2015 and InSAR 1992-2015 to calculate the continental discharge since 1975. The results are combined with RACMO2 output products to reconstruct the mass balance of the ice sheet for the past 40 years. The results indicate a significant increase in mass loss from Antarctica starting in the 1990s. This work was performed at UC Irvine and Caltech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with NASA.

  6. Use of multitemporal InSAR data to develop geohazard scenarios for Bandung, Western Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano; Tolomei, Cristiano; Duro, Javier; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Koudogbo, Fifamè

    2015-04-01

    The Greater Bandung metropolitan area is the second largest urban area in Indonesia, with a population of 8.6 million. It is subject to a variety of geohazards: volcanic hazards from seven active volcanoes within a radius of 50 km; high flood hazards, seismic hazard due to crustal active faults, the best known being the 30-km long Lembang fault, 10 km North of the city centre; subsidence hazards due to strong aquifer depletion; landslide hazard in the surrounding high country. In the framework of the FP7 RASOR project, multitemporal satellite SAR data have been processed over Bandung, Western Java. We used the SBAS InSAR technique (Berardino et al., 2002) to process two ALOS-1 datasets, to investigate the various sources of surface deformation acting in the area in the period 2008-2011. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) has also been applied to achieve ground motion measurements with millimetric precision and high accuracy. The PSI processing technique considers a system of points that reflect the radar signal from the satellite continuously through the time. It makes use of differential interferometric phase measurements to generate long term terrain deformation and digital surface model maps. The GlobalSARTM algorithms developed by Altamira Information are applied to COSMO-SkyMed data acquired to measure ground motion over the area of interest. Strong ground displacements (up to 7 cm/yr) due to groundwater abstraction have been measured in the Bandung basin. The identification of long wavelength signals from tectonic sources is difficult due to the limited InSAR coherence outside of the urban environment. Limited deformation is observed also in the Tangkuban Perahu volcano to the north. The spatial and temporal distribution of the ground motion is important supporting information for the generation of long term subsidence and flood hazard scenarios.

  7. An Improved Multi-Temporal Insar Method for Increasing Spatial Resolution of Surface Deformation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T.; Liu, G.; Jia, H.; Lin, H.; Zhang, R.; Yu, B.; Luo, Q.

    2013-10-01

    The multi-temporal interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) technology has proven very useful in extracting surface deformation with time series of SAR images over a study area. To increase spatial resolution of deformation information, this paper presents an improved multi-temporal InSAR (MTI) method by tracking both the point-like targets (PTs) and the distributed targets (DTs) with temporal steadiness of radar backscattering. The valid pixels corresponding to PTs and DTs are identified mainly by thresholding of the amplitude dispersion index (ADI) and the Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC). To efficiently reduce error propagation, a hierarchical analysis strategy is applied to extract deformation rates at the valid pixels. For the pixels with lower ADI values, the deformation rates are estimated on an optimized network by a least squared estimator and a region growing method. For the pixels with higher ADI values, they are classified into several groups by the ADI intervals, and the deformation rates are estimated through the multi-levels of processing. The nonlinear deformation values at all the valid pixels are estimated by spatiotemporally filtering and spatially integrating. The proposed MTI algorithm has been tested for subsidence detection over Tianjin in China using the 40 high resolution TerraSAR-X images acquired between 2009 and 2010, and validated by using the ground-based leveling measurements. The testing results indicate that the spatial resolution and coverage of subsidence data can be increased dramatically by the hierarchical analysis, and the accuracy in subsidence values derived from the MTI solution can reach up to a millimeter level.

  8. Persistent Scatterer InSAR monitoring of Bratislava urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakon, Matus; Perissin, Daniele; Papco, Juraj; Lazecky, Milan

    2014-05-01

    ) technique, covering the target area with 57 Envisat ASAR images from Ascending Track No. 229 (32) and Descending Track No. 265 (25) captured between years 2002 and 2010. Processing involves Sarproz (Copyright (c) 2009 Daniele Perissin) a powerful software solution for obtaining differential interferograms and performing PSInSAR methodology. The area of interest to investigate the deformation phenomena is covering approximately 16 by 16 kilometers (256 sqkm). For evaluation of PSInSAR potential to detect and monitor ground displacements, PS derived time series of deformation signal were compared to the field GNSS data from three GNSS stations coded PIL1, BRAT and GKU4. By the detailed look on the deformation maps the investigated urban area of Bratislava is relatively stable with the deformation rates within the few (±5) millimeters. The comparison of PSInSAR derived time series with GNSS data indicates good correlation and confirms achievable precision and applicability of InSAR measurements for ground stability monitoring purposes. Data for this work were provided by European Space Agency within the Category-1 project ID 9981: "Detection of ground deformation using radar interferometry techniques". The authors are grateful to the Tatrabanka Foundation and The National Scholarship Programme of the Slovak Republic for the opportunity to work together. Data have been processed by the Sarproz (Copyright (c) 2009 Daniele Perissin) and visualised in Google Earth. This paper is also the result of the implementation of the project: the National Centre of Earth's Surface Deformation Diagnostic in the area of Slovakia, ITMS 26220220108 supported by the Research and Development Operational Programme funded by the ERDF and the grant No. 1/0642/13 of the Slovak Grant Agency VEGA.

  9. Forest stand structure from airborne polarimetric InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzter, H.; Saich, P.; Luckman, A. J.; Skinner, L.; Grant, J.

    2002-01-01

    Interferometric SAR at short wavelengths can be used to retrieve stand height of forests. We evaluate the precision of tree height estimation from airborne single-pass interferometric E-SAR data at X-band VV polarisation and repeat-pass L-band polarimetric data. General yield class curves were used to estimate tree height from planting year, tree species and yield class data provided by the Forest Enterprise. The data were compared to tree height estimates from X-VV single-pass InSAR and repeat-pass polarimetric InSAR at L-band acquired by DLR's E-SAR during the SHAC campaign 2000. The effect of gap structure and incidence angle on retrieval precision of tree height from interferometric SAR is analysed. Appropriate correction methods to improve tree height retrieval are proposed. The coherent microwave model CASM is used with a Lindenmayer system tree model to simulate the observed underestimation of stand height in the presence of gaps.

  10. Duration, magnitude, and frequency of subaerial volcano deformation events: New results from Latin America using InSAR and a global synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, T. J.; Pritchard, M. E.; Riddick, S. N.

    2010-01-01

    We combine new observations of volcano deformation in Latin America with more than 100 previous deformation studies in other areas of the world to constrain the frequency, magnitude, and duration of subaerial volcano deformation events. We discuss implications for eruptive hazards from a given deformation event and the optimum repeat interval for proposed InSAR satellite missions. We use L band (23.6 cm wavelength) satellite-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to make the first systematic search for deformation in all volcanic arcs of Latin America (including Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and the northern and southern Andes), spanning 2006-2008. We combine L and C band (5.6 cm wavelength) InSAR observations over the southern Andes volcanoes to extend the time series from 2002 to 2008 and assess the capabilities of the different radars: L band gives superior results in highly vegetated areas. Our observations reveal 11 areas of volcano deformation, some of them in areas that were thought to be dormant. There is a lack of observed deformation at several erupting volcanoes, probably due to temporal aliasing. The total number of deforming volcanoes in the central and southern Andes now totals 15 (from observations between 1992 and 2008), comparable to the Alaska/Aleutian arc. Globally, volcanoes deform across a variety of time scales (from seconds to centuries) often without eruption and with no apparent critical observation time scale, although observations made every minute are sometimes necessary to see precursors to eruption.

  11. MATLAB toolbox for EnviSAT InSAR data processing, visualization, and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhidong; Ma, Zunjing; Chen, Ganlu; Chen, Yan; Lu, Yilong

    2012-10-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an emerging technology with increasing applications in for high precision interferometry and 3-D digital elevation model (DEM) ground mapping. This paper presents a user-friendly MATLAB Toolbox for enhanced InSAR applications based on European Space Agency (ESA) SAR missions. The developed MATLAB tools can provide high quality and flexible data processing, visualization and analyzing functions by tapping on MATLAB's rich and powerful mathematics and graphics tools. Case studies are presented to with enhanced InSAR and DEM processing, visualization, and analysis examples.

  12. A fast InSAR raw signal simulation based on GPGPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhihua; Yu, Anxi; He, Feng; Liang, Diannong

    2011-10-01

    Under the precision constraint of interferometric SAR simulation applications, a range frequency fast algorithm is proposed to increase the InSAR raw signal simulation efficiency and the GPGPU technique is used to implement the raw signal simulation of large 10km×10km nature scene. The experiment results validate the proposed fast algorithm and the GPGPU technique. The total speedup of GPU over CPU is 4, and some local grogram speedup is over 14, which makes the InSAR raw signal simulation more practical in the InSAR system simulation.

  13. Advances in Disentangling Age, Cohort, and Time Effects: No Quadrature of the Circle, but a Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masche, J. Gowert; van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.

    2004-01-01

    Based on Schaie's (1965) general developmental model, various data-driven and theory-based approaches to the exploration and disentangling of age, cohort, and time effects on human behavior have emerged. This paper presents and discusses an advancement of data-driven interpretations that stresses parsimony when interpreting the results of…

  14. Optimal Time Advance In Terminal Area Arrivals: Throughput vs. Fuel Savings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadovsky, Alexander V .; Swenson, Harry N.; Haskell, William B.; Rakas, Jasenka

    2011-01-01

    The current operational practice in scheduling air traffic arriving at an airport is to adjust flight schedules by delay, i.e. a postponement of an aircrafts arrival at a scheduled location, to manage safely the FAA-mandated separation constraints between aircraft. To meet the observed and forecast growth in traffic demand, however, the practice of time advance (speeding up an aircraft toward a scheduled location) is envisioned for future operations as a practice additional to delay. Time advance has two potential advantages. The first is the capability to minimize, or at least reduce, the excess separation (the distances between pairs of aircraft immediately in-trail) and thereby to increase the throughput of the arriving traffic. The second is to reduce the total traffic delay when the traffic sample is below saturation density. A cost associated with time advance is the fuel expenditure required by an aircraft to speed up. We present an optimal control model of air traffic arriving in a terminal area and solve it using the Pontryagin Maximum Principle. The admissible controls allow time advance, as well as delay, some of the way. The cost function reflects the trade-off between minimizing two competing objectives: excess separation (negatively correlated with throughput) and fuel burn. A number of instances are solved using three different methods, to demonstrate consistency of solutions.

  15. The Role and Timing of Palliative Care in Supporting Persons with Intellectual Disability and Advanced Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, Mary; McCallion, Philip; Fahey-McCarthy, Elizabeth; Connaire, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To better describe the role and timing of palliative care in supporting persons with intellectual disabilities and advanced dementia (AD). Background: Specialist palliative care providers have focused mostly on people with cancers. Working with persons with intellectual disabilities and AD offers opportunities to expand such palliative care…

  16. Imaging irregular magma reservoirs with InSAR and GPS observations: Application to Kilauea and Copahue volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, P.; Camacho, A.; Poland, M. P.; Miklius, A.; Samsonov, S. V.; Milillo, P.

    2013-12-01

    The availability of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) data has increased our awareness of the complexity of volcano deformation sources. InSAR's spatial completeness helps identify or clarify source process mechanisms at volcanoes (i.e. Mt. Etna east flank motion; Lazufre crustal magma body; Kilauea dike complexity) and also improves potential model realism. In recent years, Bayesian inference methods have gained widespread use because of their ability to constrain not only source model parameters, but also their uncertainties. They are computationally intensive, however, which tends to limit them to a few geometrically rather simple source representations (for example, spheres). An alternative approach involves solving for irregular pressure and/or density sources from a three-dimensional (3-D) grid of source/density cells. This method has the ability to solve for arbitrarily shaped bodies of constant absolute pressure/density difference. We compare results for both Bayesian (a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm) and the irregular source methods for two volcanoes: Kilauea, Hawaii, and Copahue, Argentina-Chile border. Kilauea has extensive InSAR and GPS databases from which to explore the results for the irregular method with respect to the Bayesian approach, prior models, and an extensive set of ancillary data. One caveat, however, is the current restriction in the irregular model inversion to volume-pressure sources (and at a single excess pressure change), which limits its application in cases where sources such as faults or dikes are present. Preliminary results for Kilauea summit deflation during the March 2011 Kamoamoa eruption suggests a northeast-elongated magma body lying roughly 1-1.5 km below the surface. Copahue is a southern Andes volcano that has been inflating since early 2012, with intermittent summit eruptive activity since late 2012. We have an extensive InSAR time series from RADARSAT-2 and COSMO-SkyMed data, although both are

  17. Characteristics of first-time fathers of advanced age: a Norwegian population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The modern phenomenon of delayed parenthood applies not only to women but also to men, but less is known about what characterises men who are expecting their first child at an advanced age. This study investigates the sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviour, health problems, social relationships and timing of pregnancy in older first-time fathers. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted of 14 832 men who were expecting their first child, based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) carried out by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Data were collected in 2005–2008 by means of a questionnaire in gestational week 17–18 of their partner’s pregnancy, and from the Norwegian Medical Birth Register. The distribution of background variables was investigated across the age span of 25 years and above. Men of advanced age (35–39 years) and very advanced age (40 years or more) were compared with men aged 25–34 years by means of bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results The following factors were found to be associated with having the first child at an advanced or very advanced age: being unmarried or non-cohabitant, negative health behaviour (overweight, obesity, smoking, frequent alcohol intake), physical and mental health problems (lower back pain, cardiovascular diseases, high blood pressure, sleeping problems, previous depressive symptoms), few social contacts and dissatisfaction with partner relationship. There were mixed associations for socioeconomic status: several proxy measures of high socioeconomic status (e.g. income >65 000 €, self-employment) were associated with having the first child at an advanced or very advanced age, as were several other proxy measures of low socioeconomic status (e.g. unemployment, low level of education, immigrant background).The odds of the child being conceived after in vitro fertilisation were threefold in men aged 34–39 and fourfold from 40

  18. The variety of subaerial active salt deformations in the Kuqa fold-thrust belt (China) constrained by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Cindy; Webb, A. Alexander G.; Lasserre, Cécile; Doin, Marie-Pierre; Renard, François; Lohman, Rowena; Li, Jianghai; Baudoin, Patrick F.

    2016-09-01

    Surface salt bodies in the western Kuqa fold-thrust belt of northwestern China allow study of subaerial salt kinematics and its possible correlations with weather variations. Ephemeral subaerial salt exposure during the evolution of a salt structure can greatly impact the subsequent development and deformation of its tectonic setting. Here, we present a quantitative time-lapse survey of surface salt deformation measured from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) using Envisat radar imagery acquired between 2003 and 2010. Time series analysis and inspection of individual interferograms confirm that the majority of the salt bodies in western Kuqa are active, with significant InSAR observable displacements at 3 of 4 structures studied in the region. Subaerial salt motion toward and away from the satellite at rates up to 5 mm/yr with respect to local references. Rainfall measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and temperature from a local weather station are used to test the relationship between seasonality and surface salt motion. We observe decoupling between surface salt motion and seasonality and interpret these observations to indicate that regional and local structural regimes exert primary control on surface salt displacement rates.

  19. Evolution of unrest at Laguna del Maule volcanic field (Chile) from InSAR and GPS measurements, 2003 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mével, Hélène; Feigl, Kurt L.; Córdova, Loreto; DeMets, Charles; Lundgren, Paul

    2015-08-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in the southern volcanic zone of the Chilean Andes exhibits a large volume of rhyolitic material erupted during postglacial times (20-2 ka). Since 2007, LdM has experienced an unrest episode characterized by high rates of deformation. Analysis of new GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data reveals uplift rates greater than 190 mm/yr between January 2013 and November 2014. The geodetic data are modeled as an inflating sill at depth. The results are used to calculate the temporal evolution of the vertical displacement. The best time function for modeling the InSAR data set is a double exponential model with rates increasing from 2007 through 2010 and decreasing slowly since 2010. We hypothesize that magma intruding into an existing silicic magma reservoir is driving the surface deformation. Modeling historical uplift at Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Three Sisters volcanic fields suggests a common temporal evolution of vertical displacement rates.

  20. InSAR Detection of Ground Deformation in Megalopolises of Pearl River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing

    Megalopolises in the Pearl River Delta, including Guangzhou and Hong Kong, have experienced various degree of ground subsidence. The causes can be divided into two categories: natural subsidence and the human-induced subsidence. Monitoring the ground subsidence can not only help people to find out the distributions in both spatial and temporal fields, but also guide people to minimize the hazard ahead. Thus, it is significant to monitor the ground subsidence accurately, timely and frequently. This dissertation research uses the Environmental Satellite Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ENVISAT ASAR) data received at the Chinese University of Hong Kong Satellite Remote Sensing Receiving Station and SAR Interferometry (InSAR) technology as a powerful tool for large-scale ground deformation monitoring in Guangzhou and Hong Kong areas. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) method is used to detect ground deformation in the urban area of Guangzhou city. A ground deformation rate map with scattered distribution of point targets shows the maximum subsidence (rise) rate as high as -26 to -20 mma-1 (16-21 mma-1 ), implying that the study area is an active zone for ground deformation. Based on the point target map, a contour ground deformation rate map is generated. All the six ground collapse accidents that occurred in 2007-2008 fall within the subsidence zones, qualitatively validating the IPTA results. Ground subsidence and geological conditions on Datansha Island are examined. The results indicate that the local geological conditions and underground engineering projects are responsible for ground subsidence and ground collapse accidents occurred there. To interpret the distribution of active ground subsidence zones, a local geological map is used as a reference for generating a series of thematic maps. The results show that geological faults, rock distribution, over-development, and underground engineering projects may be four factors leading to the distribution of

  1. Source parameters of the 2008 Bukavu-Cyangugu earthquake estimated from InSAR and teleseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oreye, Nicolas; González, Pablo J.; Shuler, Ashley; Oth, Adrien; Bagalwa, Louis; Ekström, Göran; Kavotha, Déogratias; Kervyn, François; Lucas, Celia; Lukaya, François; Osodundu, Etoy; Wauthier, Christelle; Fernández, José

    2011-02-01

    the earthquake occurred in the shallow crust, at approximately 8 km depth. Inversions of ENVISAT (Environment Satellite) and ALOS (Advanced Land Observation Satellite) data place the earthquake at 9 km. A comparison of the scalar moment (9.43 ± 0.06 × 1017 Nm from seismology and 8.99 ± 0.010 × 1017 Nm from the joint InSAR solution) shows good agreement between the two data sets. Such an agreement is in contrast to the large discrepancies observed (up to an order of magnitude) in other places along the EAR where similar earthquake sequences are associated with magmatic intrusion. From this, we infer that the rupture was brittle and occurred with little aseismic deformation as might be expected from magma injection. Our results provide insights into the style of rifting occurring in the South Kivu Volcanic Province and hence will aid future studies on seismic risk in the context of Lake Kivu and underline the importance of systematic monitoring of the EAR area.

  2. Comparison of four moderate-size earthquakes in southern California using seismology and InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mellors, R.J.; Magistrale, H.; Earle, P.; Cogbill, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    Source parameters determined from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements and from seismic data are compared from four moderate-size (less than M 6) earthquakes in southern California. The goal is to verify approximate detection capabilities of InSAR, assess differences in the results, and test how the two results can be reconciled. First, we calculated the expected surface deformation from all earthquakes greater than magnitude 4 in areas with available InSAR data (347 events). A search for deformation from the events in the interferograms yielded four possible events with magnitudes less than 6. The search for deformation was based on a visual inspection as well as cross-correlation in two dimensions between the measured signal and the expected signal. A grid-search algorithm was then used to estimate focal mechanism and depth from the InSAR data. The results were compared with locations and focal mechanisms from published catalogs. An independent relocation using seismic data was also performed. The seismic locations fell within the area of the expected rupture zone for the three events that show clear surface deformation. Therefore, the technique shows the capability to resolve locations with high accuracy and is applicable worldwide. The depths determined by InSAR agree with well-constrained seismic locations determined in a 3D velocity model. Depth control for well-imaged shallow events using InSAR data is good, and better than the seismic constraints in some cases. A major difficulty for InSAR analysis is the poor temporal coverage of InSAR data, which may make it impossible to distinguish deformation due to different earthquakes at the same location.

  3. Magma and fluid migration at Yellowstone Caldera in the last three decades inferred from InSAR, leveling, and gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizzani, P.; Battaglia, M.; Castaldo, R.; Pepe, A.; Zeni, G.; Lanari, R.

    2015-04-01

    We studied the Yellowstone caldera geological unrest between 1977 and 2010 by investigating temporal changes in differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), precise spirit leveling and gravity measurements. The analysis of the 1992-2010 displacement time series, retrieved by applying the SBAS InSAR technique, allowed the identification of three areas of deformation: (i) the Mallard Lake (ML) and Sour Creek (SC) resurgent domes, (ii) a region close to the Northern Caldera Rim (NCR), and (iii) the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP). While the eastern SRP shows a signal related to tectonic deformation, the other two regions are influenced by the caldera unrest. We removed the tectonic signal from the InSAR displacements, and we modeled the InSAR, leveling, and gravity measurements to retrieve the best fitting source parameters. Our findings confirmed the existence of different distinct sources, beneath the brittle-ductile transition zone, which have been intermittently active during the last three decades. Moreover, we interpreted our results in the light of existing seismic tomography studies. Concerning the SC dome, we highlighted the role of hydrothermal fluids as the driving force behind the 1977-1983 uplift; since 1983-1993 the deformation source transformed into a deeper one with a higher magmatic component. Furthermore, our results support the magmatic nature of the deformation source beneath ML dome for the overall investigated period. Finally, the uplift at NCR is interpreted as magma accumulation, while its subsidence could either be the result of fluids migration outside the caldera or the gravitational adjustment of the source from a spherical to a sill-like geometry.

  4. Deformation Associated With the M8.1 April 1, 2007 Solomon Islands Earthquake Observed With InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelung, F.; Baker, S.

    2008-05-01

    On April 1, 2007, an Mw 8.1 earthquake occurred in the Solomon Islands located in the southwest Pacific. The earthquake resulted in considerable ground displacement and generated a tsunami that caused further damage on the island communities. Phased-Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data onboard the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Advance Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) was used to detect the co- seismic deformation associated with the earthquake. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) analysis of images acquired before and after the earthquake provided measurements of the spatial extent and magnitude of deformation. To gain a better understanding of the fault geometry and earthquake parameters, we generated fault models using inverse modeling of the observed interferograms.

  5. The duration, magnitude, and frequency of subaerial volcano deformation events: New InSAR results from Latin America and a global synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Fournier, T.; Riddick, S.; Jay, J.; Henderson, S. T.

    2009-12-01

    We combine new observations of volcano deformation in Latin America with more than 100 previous deformation studies in other areas of the world to constrain the frequency, magnitude, and duration of subaerial volcano deformation events. We discuss implications for eruptive hazards from a given deformation event and the optimum repeat interval for proposed InSAR satellite missions. We use L-band (23.6 cm wavelength) satellite-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to make the first systematic search for deformation in all volcanic arcs of Latin America (including Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and the northern and southern Andes), spanning 2006-2008. We combine L- and C-band (5.6 cm wavelength) InSAR observations over the southern Andes volcanoes to extend the time series from 2002-2008 and assess the capabilities of the different radars -- L-band gives superior results in highly vegetated areas. Our observations reveal 11 areas of volcano deformation, some of them in areas that were thought to be dormant. There is a lack of deformation at several erupting volcanoes, probably due to temporal aliasing. The total number of deforming volcanoes in the central and southern Andes now totals 15, comparable to the Alaska/Aleutian arc. Globally, volcanoes deform across a variety of timescales (from seconds to centuries) often without eruption, and with no apparent critical observation timescale, although observations made every minute are sometimes necessary to see precursors to eruption.

  6. Source mechanism analysis of strong mining induced seismic event and its influence on ground deformation observed by InSAR technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzinski, Lukasz; Mirek, Katarzyna; Mirek, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    On April 17th, 2015 a strong shallow seismic event M4.0 struck a mining panel in the Wujek-Slask coal mine, southern Poland. The event was widely felt, followed with rockburst and caused a strong damages inside mining corridors. Unfortunately two miners are trapped by tunnels collapse. Full Moment Tensor (MT) estimated with regional broad-band signals shows that the event was characterized with very high isotropic (implosive) part. Mining inspections verified the occurrence of a rockfall and floor uplift. Very shallow foci depth (less than 1000m) and collapse - like MT solution suggest that event could be responsible for surface deformation in the vicinity of epicenter. To verified this issue we used the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar technique (InSAR). The InSAR relies on measuring phase differences between two SAR images (radarograms). The measured differences may be computed into a single interferometric image. i.e. an interferogram. Interferogram computed from two radarograms of the same terrain taken at different time allows detecting changes in elevation of the terrain. Two SAR scenes acquired by Sentinel-1 satellite (European Space Agency) were processed to obtain the interferogram covered study area (12.04.2015 and 24.04.2015). 12 days interval differential interferogram shows distinctive concentric feature which indicate subsidence trough. Subsidence pattern shows 1 cycle of deformation corresponding with about 2.5 cm subsidence. The InSAR solution support the reliability of very strong implosive MT part.

  7. Advanced X-Ray Timing Array Mission: Conceptual Spacecraft Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. C.; Johnson, L.; Thomas, H. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Baysinger, M.; Maples, C. D.; Fabisinski, L.L.; Hornsby, L.; Thompson, K. S.; Miernik, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced X-Ray Timing Array (AXTAR) is a mission concept for submillisecond timing of bright galactic x-ray sources. The two science instruments are the Large Area Timing Array (LATA) (a collimated instrument with 2-50-keV coverage and over 3 square meters of effective area) and a Sky Monitor (SM), which acts as a trigger for pointed observations of x-ray transients. The spacecraft conceptual design team developed two spacecraft concepts that will enable the AXTAR mission: A minimal configuration to be launched on a Taurus II and a larger configuration to be launched on a Falcon 9 or similar vehicle.

  8. Resolving three-dimensional surface displacements from InSAR measurements: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Li, Z. W.; Ding, X. L.; Zhu, J. J.; Zhang, L.; Sun, Q.

    2014-06-01

    One-dimensional measurement along the Line-Of-Sight (LOS) direction has greatly limited the capability of InSAR technique in the investigation of surface displacements and their dynamics. In recent years, great efforts have been made to resolve complete three-dimensional (3-D) displacements from InSAR measurements. This contribution is intended to provide a systematic review of the progress achieved in this field. Based on an analysis of the InSAR LOS measurements, we first cover two commonly used techniques, i.e., Offset-Tracking and multi-aperture InSAR (MAI), with which the surface displacement in the azimuth direction can be measured together with the LOS displacement. Several methods for mapping 3-D displacements using InSAR measurements are subsequently presented and categorized into three groups: (i) combination of multi-pass LOS and azimuth measurements; (ii) integration of InSAR and GPS data; and (iii) prior information assisted approaches. The strengths and weaknesses of each method are analyzed to show the applicability of each method to specific 3-D displacement mapping cases, in hope to provide a useful guidance in choosing a suitable approach accordingly. Finally, suggestions for resolving the challenging issues and outlook of future research are given.

  9. Active landslides detection at regional scale: comparing multitemporal InSAR with "handmade" inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derron, Marc-Henri; Michoud, Clément; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Runne Lauknes, Tom

    2013-04-01

    Advanced multitemporal differential SAR interferometry has proved to be able to detect unexpected active landslides in areas difficult to access. That makes this technique very useful to complete inventories. But that does not mean that applying A-DInSAR is a sufficient tool to build an inventory. Some A-DInSAR results have been compared in areas where independent landslides inventories exists, in Norway (J. Dehls at the Geological Survey of Norway) and Italy (A. Tamburini, TRE Milano). Roughly, depending on the surface cover, geomorphology and images availability, from 0 to 50% of the already known landslides can be detected with A-DInSAR results. We are testing a similar approach in Switzerland, in the county of Vaud where two landslides inventories are available (DUTI 1985, Jaboyedoff 2009). A set of 24 Envisat ASAR images (single frame/ single track) have been processed with PS-INSAR and SBAS techniques. Because of the large variety of surface cover (urban, forested, rocky) and morphology (plane and mountainous areas), both techniques provides very different results depending on local conditions.

  10. Joint inversion of InSAR and teleseismic broadband waveform data using ABIC: application to the 1997 Manyi, Tibet earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukahata, Y.; Funning, G. J.; Yagi, Y.; Parsons, B.

    2005-12-01

    There now exist numerous cases in which InSAR data have been used to estimate the distribution of coseismic slip on faults during earthquakes. InSAR data are largely very well suited for this task, having both high spatial resolution and large areal coverage on the ground, which translate to good spatial resolution at depth. The disadvantage with using InSAR to estimate earthquake slip is its lack of temporal resolution, limited by the long time duration between satellite passes, meaning that the evolution of slip on the fault cannot be determined. Detailed information about the temporal history of an earthquake rupture can be obtained seismologically; however such data have lower spatial resolving power than InSAR, and may be subject to tradeoffs between depth and origin time. Ideally, an earthquake source model would make use of the complimentary strengths of these two data types by inverting them simultaneously to find a model with good resolution in both space and time. In order to accommodate these two different datasets in a single inversion, we derive and utilise a method based upon Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) for such a problem for the first time. The ABIC function, a statistical construct based upon the principle of maximum likelihood, has the property that when minimised numerically, the three hyperparameters that control the inversion -- two weighting parameters controlling the relative importance of the spatial and temporal smoothing constraints on the model to the observed data in the inversion, and another controlling the relative weighting of the two datasets in the inversion -- can be obtained objectively, and an optimal inverse model thus generated. We apply this technique to the Mw 7.6, 8th November 1997 Manyi earthquake in central northern Tibet. The input datasets are three short-interval ERS-2 interferograms from adjacent tracks that cover the coseismic deformation, and vertical component (P-wave) data from 10 Global Seismic

  11. Simplex GPS and InSAR Inversion Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay W.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Pierce, Marlon E.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the shape of the Earth's surface can be routinely measured with precisions better than centimeters. Processes below the surface often drive these changes and as a result, investigators require models with inversion methods to characterize the sources. Simplex inverts any combination of GPS (global positioning system), UAVSAR (uninhabited aerial vehicle synthetic aperture radar), and InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar) data simultaneously for elastic response from fault and fluid motions. It can be used to solve for multiple faults and parameters, all of which can be specified or allowed to vary. The software can be used to study long-term tectonic motions and the faults responsible for those motions, or can be used to invert for co-seismic slip from earthquakes. Solutions involving estimation of fault motion and changes in fluid reservoirs such as magma or water are possible. Any arbitrary number of faults or parameters can be considered. Simplex specifically solves for any of location, geometry, fault slip, and expansion/contraction of a single or multiple faults. It inverts GPS and InSAR data for elastic dislocations in a half-space. Slip parameters include strike slip, dip slip, and tensile dislocations. It includes a map interface for both setting up the models and viewing the results. Results, including faults, and observed, computed, and residual displacements, are output in text format, a map interface, and can be exported to KML. The software interfaces with the QuakeTables database allowing a user to select existing fault parameters or data. Simplex can be accessed through the QuakeSim portal graphical user interface or run from a UNIX command line.

  12. Virtual California: Earthquake Statistics, Surface Deformation Patterns, Surface Gravity Changes and InSAR Interferograms for Arbitrary Fault Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, K.; Sachs, M. K.; Heien, E. M.; Rundle, J. B.; Fernandez, J.; Turcotte, D.; Donnellan, A.

    2014-12-01

    With the ever increasing number of geodetic monitoring satellites, it is vital to have a variety of geophysical numerical simulators to produce sample/model datasets. Just as hurricane forecasts are derived from the consensus among multiple atmospheric models, earthquake forecasts cannot be derived from a single comprehensive model. Here we present the functionality of Virtual California, a numerical simulator that can generate sample surface deformations, surface gravity changes, and InSAR interferograms in addition to producing earthquake statistics and forecasts.Virtual California is a boundary element code designed to explore the seismicity of today's fault systems. For arbitrary input fault geometry, Virtual California can output simulated seismic histories of 50,000 years or more. Using co-seismic slips from the output data, we generate surface deformation maps, surface gravity change maps, and InSAR interferograms as viewed by an orbiting satellite. Furthermore, using the times between successive earthquakes we generate probability distributions and earthquake forecasts.Virtual California is now supported by the Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics. The source code is available for download and it comes with a users' manual. The manual includes instructions on how to generate fault models from scratch, how to deploy the simulator across a parallel computing environment, etc.http://geodynamics.org/cig/software/vc/

  13. Response of forearc crustal faults to the megathrust earthquake cycle: InSAR evidence from Mejillones Peninsula, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzaei, M.; Bürgmann, R.; Oncken, O.; Walter, T. R.; Victor, P.; Ewiak, O.

    2012-06-01

    We report on a rare example of aseismic response of a creeping fault to the earthquake cycle of a nearby megathrust. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is used to detect and analyze shallow creep of two crustal faults at Mejilones Peninsula, Northern Chile, located in the hanging wall of the 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla subduction earthquake. We generate two independent time series of surface deformation spanning ∼3.5 yr of late interseismic and ∼1.5 yr early postseismic deformation associated with this event. The analysis reveals creep on the Mejillones fault as well as on a previously unmapped fault to the west of the Mejillones fault. The InSAR deformation maps and distributed slip models obtained from the data reveal that fault creep reversed between the interseismic and postseismic periods. Given the regional stress field perturbations due to interseismic and coseismic deformation, we argue that the observed shallow creep and its slip reversal are directly linked to the megathrust seismic cycle. Moreover, from similar eastward dips but opposite slip directions of the two faults, we infer that fault strength must be very low and that the kinematics is controlled by crustal flexure associated with the seismic cycle on the underlying megathrust.

  14. InSAR observations of aseismic slip associated with an earthquake swarm in the Columbia River flood basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicks, C.; Thelen, W.; Weaver, C.; Gomberg, J.; Rohay, A.; Bodin, P.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009 a swarm of small shallow earthquakes occurred within the basalt flows of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The swarm occurred within a dense seismic network in the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site. Data from the seismic network along with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the European Space Agencys (ESA) ENVISAT satellite provide insight into the nature of the swarm. By modeling the InSAR deformation data we constructed a model that consists of a shallow thrust fault and a near horizontal fault. We suggest that the near horizontal lying fault is a bedding-plane fault located between basalt flows. The geodetic moment of the modeled fault system is about eight times the cumulative seismic moment of the swarm. Precise location estimates of the swarm earthquakes indicate that the area of highest slip on the thrust fault, ???70mm of slip less than ???0.5km depth, was not located within the swarm cluster. Most of the slip on the faults appears to have progressed aseismically and we suggest that interbed sediments play a central role in the slip process. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. InSAR detection of aquifer recovery: Case studies of Koehn Lake (central California) and Lone Tree Gold Mine (Basin and Range)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Greene, F.; Amelung, F.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic intervention in groundwater flow and aquifer storage often results in vertical movements of Earth's surface, which are well detected by InSAR observations. Most anthropogenic intervention occurs due to groundwater extraction for both agriculture and human consumption and results in land subsidence. However in some cases, ending anthropogenic intervention can lead to aquifer recovery and, consequently, surface uplift. In this study we present two such cases of aquifer recovery. The first case is the aquifer beneath Koehn Lake in Central California, which was overused to meet agricultural demands until the 1990's. The second case is the Lone Tree Gold Mine in Nevada that during active mining in the 1991-2006 groundwater pumping disrupted the aquifer and cause subsidence. But after mining ceased, groundwater flow was recovered and resulted in uplift. In both cases we studied the surface uplift using InSAR time series observations. We conduct an ERS and Envisat InSAR survey over Koehn Lake in California and Lone Tree Gold Mine in Nevada between 1992 and 2010. We followed the SBAS algorithm to generate a time-series of ground displacements and average velocities of pixels, which remain coherent through time in the SAR dataset. A total of 100 and 80 combined ERS and Envisat SAR dates are inverted for Koehn Lake and Lone Tree Gold Mine respectively. Results for the Koehn Lake area indicate a rapid uplift of about 3.5 mm/yr between 1992-2000 and a slower uplift rate of 1.6 mm/yr between 2000-2004, suggesting a decrease in the recovery process. The observed uplift correlates well with groundwater level increase in the Koehn Lake area. Results for the Lone Tree Gold Mine show a constant subsidence (~ 1 cm/yr) due to groundwater extraction between 1992-2006, but uplift of ~1 cm/yr since the beginning of 2007. In both case studies, InSAR observations reveal that the aquifer recovery is accompanied by surface uplift. We plan to use the InSAR observations and the

  16. Real-time compressed video ultrasound using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brent K.; Carter, Stephen J.; Cook, Jay F.; Abbe, Brian S.; Pinck, Deborah; Rowberg, Alan H.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have an in-kind grant from NASA to investigate the application of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to teleradiology and telemedicine using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) uplink. We have recently completed three series of experiments with the ACTS/AMT. Although these experiments were multifaceted, the primary objective was the determination and evaluation of transmitting real- time compressed ultrasound video imagery over the ACTS/AMT satellite link, a primary focus of the author's current ARPA Advanced Biomedical Technology contract. These experiments have demonstrated that real-time compressed ultrasound video imagery can be transmitted over multiple ISDN line bandwidth links with sufficient temporal, contrast and spatial resolution for clinical diagnosis of multiple disease and pathology states to provide subspecialty consultation and education at a distance.

  17. Water Vapour GNSS Based Tomography For Wet Delay Compensation In In-SAR Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notarpietro, Riccardo; Cucca, Manuela; Perona, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    One of the most challenging exploitation of GNSS signals for meteorological applications is the retrieval of Water Vapor tridimensional distribution. The real-time (or quasi real-time) knowledge of such distributions could be very useful for several applications: from operative meteorology to atmospheric modeling, or for atmospheric compensation purposes applied for example to SAR or In-SAR observations, in order to improve land remote sensing. In the framework of the European Space Agency project METAWAVE (Mitigation of Electromagnetic Transmission errors induced by Atmospheric Water Vapor Effects), several techniques were investigated in order to find out an In-SAR data compensation strategy for the propagation delay effects due to Water Vapour. Thanks to METAWAVE, a quite dense GPS network (7 dual frequency GPS receivers) was deployed over COMO area and was used for an extensive measurement campaign. The acquired L1 and L2 carrier phase observations were processed in terms of hourly averaged Zenith Wet Delays. These vertical information were mapped along the correspondent line of sights (by up-sampling at 30 second sample times the 15 minutes GPS satellites positions obtained from IGS files) and inverted using a tomographic procedure. The used algorithm performs a first reconstruction (namely, the tomographic pre-processing) based on generalized inversion mechanisms, in order to define a low resolution first guess for the next step. This second step inverts GPS observables using a more refined algebraic tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to improve both vertical and horizontal resolution. Results of this inversion are Wet Refractivity maps distributed over an area of 16 km x 20 km (x 10 km height) around the COMO city, characterized by horizontal resolutions varying from 2 km to 4 km and vertical resolution of 500m. This contribution deals with the description of the results obtained evaluating Water Vapour path delays from such Wet Refractivity maps

  18. Advanced detection, isolation, and accommodation of sensor failures in turbofan engines: Real-time microcomputer implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaat, John C.; Merrill, Walter C.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced Detection, Isolation, and Accommodation Program is to improve the overall demonstrated reliability of digital electronic control systems for turbine engines. For this purpose, an algorithm was developed which detects, isolates, and accommodates sensor failures by using analytical redundancy. The performance of this algorithm was evaluated on a real time engine simulation and was demonstrated on a full scale F100 turbofan engine. The real time implementation of the algorithm is described. The implementation used state-of-the-art microprocessor hardware and software, including parallel processing and high order language programming.

  19. UTILIZING RESULTS FROM INSAR TO DEVELOP SEISMIC LOCATION BENCHMARKS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SEISMIC SOURCE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    M. BEGNAUD; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    Obtaining accurate seismic event locations is one of the most important goals for monitoring detonations of underground nuclear teats. This is a particular challenge at small magnitudes where the number of recording stations may be less than 20. Although many different procedures are being developed to improve seismic location, most procedures suffer from inadequate testing against accurate information about a seismic event. Events with well-defined attributes, such as latitude, longitude, depth and origin time, are commonly referred to as ground truth (GT). Ground truth comes in many forms and with many different levels of accuracy. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) can provide independent and accurate information (ground truth) regarding ground surface deformation and/or rupture. Relating surface deformation to seismic events is trivial when events are large and create a significant surface rupture, such as for the M{sub w} = 7.5 event that occurred in the remote northern region of the Tibetan plateau in 1997. The event, which was a vertical strike slip even appeared anomalous in nature due to the lack of large aftershocks and had an associated surface rupture of over 180 km that was identified and modeled using InSAR. The east-west orientation of the fault rupture provides excellent ground truth for latitude, but is of limited use for longitude. However, a secondary rupture occurred 50 km south of the main shock rupture trace that can provide ground truth with accuracy within 5 km. The smaller, 5-km-long secondary rupture presents a challenge for relating the deformation to a seismic event. The rupture is believed to have a thrust mechanism; the dip of the fimdt allows for some separation between the secondary rupture trace and its associated event epicenter, although not as much as is currently observed from catalog locations. Few events within the time period of the InSAR analysis are candidates for the secondary rupture. Of these, we have

  20. Monitoring of Three Case Studies of Creeping Landslides in Ecuador using L-band SAR Interferometry (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorga Torres, T. M.; Mohseni Aref, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tannia Mayorga Torres1,21 Universidad Central del Ecuador. Faculty of Geology, Mining, Oil, and Environment 2 Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship 2015-16 IntroductionLandslides lead to human and economic losses across the country, mainly in the winter season. On the other hand, satellite radar data has cost-effective benefits due to open-source software and free availability of data. With the purpose of establishing an early warning system of landslide-related surface deformation, three case studies were designed in the Coast, Sierra (Andean), and Oriente (jungle) regions. The objective of this work was to assess the capability of L-band InSAR to get phase information. For the calculation of the interferograms in Repeat Orbit Interferometry PACkage, the displacement was detected as the error and was corrected. The coherence images (Figure 1) determined that L-band is suitable for InSAR processing. Under this frame, as a first approach, the stacking DInSAR technique [1] was applied in the case studies [2]; however, due to lush vegetation and steep topography, it is necessary to apply advanced InSAR techniques [3]. The purpose of the research is to determine a pattern of data acquisition and successful results to understand the spatial and temporal ground movements associated with landslides. The further work consists of establishing landslide inventories to combine phases of SAR images to generate maps of surface deformation in Tumba-San Francisco and Guarumales to compare the results with ground-based measurements to determine the maps' accuracy. References[1] Sandwell D., Price E. (1998). Phase gradient approach to stacking interferograms. Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 103, N. B12, pp. 30,183-30,204. [2] Mayorga T., Platzeck G. (2014). Using DInSAR as a tool to detect unstable terrain areas in an Andes region in Ecuador. NH3.5-Blue Poster B298, Vol. 16, EGU2014-16203. Austria. [3] Wasowski J., Bovenga F. (2014). Investigating landslides and unstable slopes with

  1. A method for constraining canopy height using single-polarization L-band Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prush, V. B.; Lohman, R.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past two decades, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has proven to be a useful technique for observing a wide range of sources of crustal motion, including groundwater extraction and deformation related to volcanic processes and earthquakes. In this study we introduce a new method for the application of InSAR to the determination of canopy height in forests where extensive clearcutting has occurred. Our region of study is the Pacific Northwest, specifically Washington and Oregon, where clearcutting has been a common logging technique since the earliest days of the timber industry in the region. We analyzed twenty-nine interferograms of the Pacific Northwest in this study. The interferograms were processed using single-polarization Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired by the Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS). ALOS data is acquired at L-band (~24 cm), which provides high coherence in a region that is heavily forested and has high relief. Regions that have undergone clearcutting within the past 10 to 15 years are characterized in the interferograms by quasi-rectangular regions of line-of-sight phase change between clearcuts and the surrounding standing forest. This phase difference correlates linearly with interferometric baseline, allowing us to attribute the observed phase difference between clearcut areas and standing forest to an effective digital elevation model (DEM) error. By focusing only on the phase change over the short spatial scale between standing forest and adjacent regions that have been logged, we remove the effect of longer spatial scale atmospheric noise and satellite orbital errors. A ratio of Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) bands 2 and 7 (0.52-0.60 and 2.08-2.35 μm, respectively) was used to identify and remove areas that were logged during the timespan of the SAR data (2007 to 2011). We present a map of canopy height throughout the western coast of Oregon and Washington. Observed canopy heights are

  2. The deformation of ice-debris landforms in the Khumbu Region from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, D. A.; Barker, A. D.; Hallet, B.

    2014-12-01

    We present new interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) results for the Khumbu region, Nepal, using PALSAR data from the ALOS1 satellite. Glaciers and ice-debris landforms represent a critical water resource to communities in the Himalayas and other relatively arid alpine environments. Changes in climate have impacted this resource as the volume of ice decreases. The monitoring of rock glaciers and debris covered glaciers is critical to the assessment of these natural resources and associated hazards (e.g. Glacial Lake Outburst Floods--GLOFs). Satellite data provide one means to monitor ice-containing landforms over broad regions. InSAR measures the subtle deformation of the surface, with mm precision, that is related to deformation or changes in ice volume within rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers. While previous work in the region had used C-band (6 cm wavelength) SAR data from the ERS satellite, we utilize L-band data (24 cm) from the ALOS satellite, which provides better coherence, especially where the phase gradient is large. After processing 20 differential interferograms that span from 2008 to 2011, we focus on the 5 interferograms with the best overall coherence. Based on three 45-day interferograms and two 3-year interferograms, all of which have relatively small perpendicular baselines (<260 m), we report line-of-sight surface displacement rates within the Khumbu region and calculate the down-slope surface speed of the active glaciers. From the 3-year interferograms, we map the boundary of active movement along the perimeter of the debris-covered toe of Khumbu Glacier. Movement over this longer time period leads to a loss of coherence, clearly delimiting actively moving areas. Of particular note, active movement is detected in the glacier-moraine dam of Imja Lake, which has implications for GLOF hazard. The significant vertical relief in the Himalaya region poses a challenge for doing differential radar interferometry, as artifacts in the

  3. The Time-Frequency Signatures of Advanced Seismic Signals Generated by Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C. R.; Huang, C. J.; Lin, C. R.; Wang, C. C.; Kuo, B. Y.; Yin, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The seismic monitoring is expected to reveal the process of debris flow from the initial area to alluvial fan, because other field monitoring techniques, such as the video camera and the ultrasonic sensor, are limited by detection range. For this reason, seismic approaches have been used as the detection system of debris flows over the past few decades. The analysis of the signatures of the seismic signals in time and frequency domain can be used to identify the different phases of debris flow. This study dedicates to investigate the different stages of seismic signals due to debris flow, including the advanced signal, the main front, and the decaying tail. Moreover, the characteristics of the advanced signals forward to the approach of main front were discussed for the warning purpose. This study presents a permanent system, composed by two seismometers, deployed along the bank of Ai-Yu-Zi Creek in Nantou County, which is one of the active streams with debris flow in Taiwan. The three axes seismometer with frequency response of 7 sec - 200 Hz was developed by the Institute of Earth Sciences (IES), Academia Sinica for the purpose to detect debris flow. The original idea of replacing the geophone system with the seismometer technique was for catching the advanced signals propagating from the upper reach of the stream before debris flow arrival because of the high sensitivity. Besides, the low frequency seismic waves could be also early detected because of the low attenuation. However, for avoiding other unnecessary ambient vibrations, the sensitivity of seismometer should be lower than the general seismometer for detecting teleseism. Three debris flows with different mean velocities were detected in 2013 and 2014. The typical triangular shape was obviously demonstrated in time series data and the spectrograms of the seismic signals from three events. The frequency analysis showed that enormous debris flow bearing huge boulders would induce low frequency seismic

  4. Combination of Light and Melatonin Time Cues for Phase Advancing the Human Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Tina M.; Markwald, Rachel R.; Chinoy, Evan D.; Snider, Jesse A.; Bessman, Sara C.; Jung, Christopher M.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Photic and non-photic stimuli have been shown to shift the phase of the human circadian clock. We examined how photic and non-photic time cues may be combined by the human circadian system by assessing the phase advancing effects of one evening dose of exogenous melatonin, alone and in combination with one session of morning bright light exposure. Design: Randomized placebo-controlled double-blind circadian protocol. The effects of four conditions, dim light (∼1.9 lux, ∼0.6 Watts/m2)-placebo, dim light-melatonin (5 mg), bright light (∼3000 lux, ∼7 Watts/m2)-placebo, and bright light-melatonin on circadian phase was assessed by the change in the salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) prior to and following treatment under constant routine conditions. Melatonin or placebo was administered 5.75 h prior to habitual bedtime and 3 h of bright light exposure started 1 h prior to habitual wake time. Setting: Sleep and chronobiology laboratory environment free of time cues. Participants: Thirty-six healthy participants (18 females) aged 22 ± 4 y (mean ± SD). Results: Morning bright light combined with early evening exogenous melatonin induced a greater phase advance of the DLMO than either treatment alone. Bright light alone and melatonin alone induced similar phase advances. Conclusion: Information from light and melatonin appear to be combined by the human circadian clock. The ability to combine circadian time cues has important implications for understanding fundamental physiological principles of the human circadian timing system. Knowledge of such principles is important for designing effective countermeasures for phase-shifting the human circadian clock to adapt to jet lag, shift work, and for designing effective treatments for circadian sleep-wakefulness disorders. Citation: Burke TM; Markwald RR; Chinoy ED; Snider JA; Bessman SC; Jung CM; Wright Jr KP. Combination of light and melatonin time cues for phase advancing the human circadian

  5. Phase advancement and nucleus-specific timing of thalamocortical activity during slow cortical oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Slézia, Andrea; Hangya, Balázs; Ulbert, István; Acsády, László

    2011-01-01

    The exact timing of cortical afferent activity is instrumental for the correct coding and retrieval of internal and external stimuli. Thalamocortical inputs represent the most significant subcortical pathway to the cortex, but the precise timing and temporal variability of thalamocortical activity is not known. To examine this question, we studied the phase of thalamic action potentials relative to cortical oscillations and established correlations among phase, the nuclear location of the thalamocortical neurons and the frequency of cortical activity. The phase of thalamic action potentials depended on the exact frequency of the slow cortical oscillation both on long (minutes) and short (single wave) time scales. Faster waves were accompanied by phase advancement in both cases. Thalamocortical neurons located in different nuclei fired at significantly different phases of the slow waves but were active at similar phase of spindle oscillations. Different thalamic nuclei displayed distinct burst patterns. Bursts with higher number of action potentials displayed progressive phase advancement in a nucleus-specific manner. Thalamic neurons located along nuclear borders were characterized by mixed burst and phase properties. Our data demonstrate that the temporal relationship between cortical and thalamic activity is not fixed but displays dynamic changes during oscillatory activity. The timing depends on the precise location and exact activity of thalamocortical cells and the ongoing cortical network pattern. This variability of thalamic output and its coupling to cortical activity can enable thalamocortical neurons to actively participate in the coding and retrieval of complex cortical signals. PMID:21228169

  6. Advanced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy Techniques for the Investigation of Peptide Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Neil R.

    The ubiquitous cross beta sheet peptide motif is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative diseases while at the same time offers remarkable potential for constructing isomorphic high-performance bionanomaterials. Despite an emerging understanding of the complex folding landscape of cross beta structures in determining disease etiology and final structure, we lack knowledge of the critical initial stages of nucleation and growth. In this dissertation, I advance our understanding of these key stages in the cross-beta nucleation and growth pathways using cutting-edge microscopy techniques. In addition, I present a new combined time-resolved fluorescence analysis technique with the potential to advance our current understanding of subtle molecular level interactions that play a pivotal role in peptide self-assembly. Using the central nucleating core of Alzheimer's Amyloid-beta protein, Abeta(16 22), as a model system, utilizing electron, time-resolved, and non-linear microscopy, I capture the initial and transient nucleation stages of peptide assembly into the cross beta motif. In addition, I have characterized the nucleation pathway, from monomer to paracrystalline nanotubes in terms of morphology and fluorescence lifetime, corroborating the predicted desolvation process that occurs prior to cross-beta nucleation. Concurrently, I have identified unique heterogeneous cross beta domains contained within individual nanotube structures, which have potential bionanomaterials applications. Finally, I describe a combined fluorescence theory and analysis technique that dramatically increases the sensitivity of current time-resolved techniques. Together these studies demonstrate the potential for advanced microscopy techniques in the identification and characterization of the cross-beta folding pathway, which will further our understanding of both amyloidogenesis and bionanomaterials.

  7. InSAR Identifies Mine-Dewatering Associated Bedrock Compaction and Subsidence in North- Central Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzenstein, K. W.; Bell, J. W.; Watters, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    During the last decade, InSAR has been used extensively for the delineation of aquifer-system response to heavy groundwater pumping. A number of studies have demonstrated the vastly improved spatial resolution afforded by InSAR relative to traditional surveying techniques in detecting groundwater-related effects, including subsidence. This has allowed for further understanding of the complexity of subsidence bowls and the role of secondary factors such as structure, aquifer material properties and other previously unforeseen factors. In the western U.S., ground subsidence related to mine dewatering is a common occurrence due to the very large volumes of water (as high as 100,000 acre-ft/yr) that are typically pumped in order to lower the local groundwater table to facilitate the excavation of open pit and underground mines. Several gold mines located along the Carlin Trend of Central Nevada have produced distinct InSAR-identified subsidence signals of greater aerial extent and magnitude than most municipal groundwater signals, including signals partly or entirely within bedrock. One signal in particular shows a minimum of 54 cm of cumulative dewatering related subsidence between June 1, 1992 and September 21, 2000. Our study has produced many (>50) interferograms, each covering different time intervals, allowing a better understanding of how the subsidence signal has evolved in response to varied pumping rates from dewatering wells. Since the spatial resolution of the InSAR is much better than that of the monitoring well locations, the complexity of the signal is better delineated. The aerial extent of the subsidence feature is impressive as it extends as far as 20 km away from the location of the extraction wells used for dewatering. The area of maximum subsidence correlates well with the area of maximum groundwater drawdown, however the subsidence signal extends well beyond (as much as 8-10 km) the observed groundwater drawdown pattern. This suggests a much

  8. InSAR Observation of Ground Surface Deformations Associated to Aquifer Storage and Recovery: A Case study for Future CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, J.; Heggy, E.; Bonneville, A.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage in subsurface has been suggested as a potential method to reduce the steep increase of exogenic CO2 in the atmosphere resulting from man-made industrial activities. Our site of Pendleton, OR is used as an analog to understand reservoirs' dynamic response for future CO2 sequestration. The CO2 sequestration simulation is carried out by injecting drainage water in the permeable basalt confined aquifer during winter and recovering it in summer. However, an extensive monitoring is necessary to measure the potential dilatation and subsidence of the ground during the injection and recovery. Two Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques; Differential inSAR associated with the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) Time Series approach and Permanent Scatterer inSAR (PSinSAR), are performed herein to assess the potential ground deformation associated to these injections and recoveries. The two inSAR techniques are applied on three different radar frequencies; ALOS PALSAR L-Band, Radarsat-2 C-Band and TerraSAR-X X-Band, which allow us to select the most adequate inSAR technique and Radar frequency for monitoring urban and semi-vegetated areas. The potential for sub-wavelength deformations in such type of terrains due to fluid recovery and injections, is explored through this study. Our discontinuous four-years of Line Of Sight (LOS) displacement observations, in areas with low decorrelation near the injection points, suggest that surface deformation associated with water injection and recovery follows an uplift and subsidence cycle with an amplitude of ~4 mm. While observed displacements are geographically correlated to injections and recoveries, they are temporally out-phased with these events due to the subsurface hydraulic conductivity. The sub-centimetric LOS displacements observed with Radar inSAR techniques in Pendleton after water injection in this basaltic confined aquifer suggest that the potential for CO2 sequestration is

  9. Application of Differential InSAR to Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eneva, M.; Baker, E.; Xu, H.

    2001-12-01

    In a NASA funded project we are applying differential InSAR to measure surface deformation associated with mining at depth. Surface displacement can be caused by rockbursts associated with mine collapse or mining-induced stress released on nearby tectonic features. The latter type of rockbursts are similar to tectonic earthquakes, but generally occur at shallower depths than non-induced events of similar size. Thus significant co-seismic surface changes may accompany them. In addition, subsidence of a more gradual type may result from ongoing soft-rock (e.g., coal, potash, salt) mining. While such subsidence can accidentally occur above abandoned mines, it is most often planned as part of the ongoing ore extraction, especially in so-called long-wall mining. Predicting the amount and spatial extent of this subsidence is an aspect of mining engineering. It is important to compare these predictions with measurements of the actual deformation. Although mines use leveling and GPS measurements to monitor subsidence, these are generally performed with much smaller frequency (e.g., annually) and lower spatial resolution than repeat-pass differential InSAR can provide. We are using ERS-1/2 raw SAR data provided by ESA and Eurimage, and the Gamma software for their processing. At present we are focused on the processing and modeling of data from two representative sites. By the end of the project we will have analyzed several more sites of subsidence and M>4.5 rockbursts. As an example of mining subsidence, we are currently analyzing data from the site of a coal mine in Colorado (USA), operating in a relatively flat and arid area. Numerous adjacent long-wall panels of extraction are used, some exceeding 5 km in length. A 600 to 750-m length of panel may be extracted per month, with a maximum subsidence of 1.5 to 1.8 m expected over each panel. The surface deformation can be monitored especially well during the summers of 1995 and 1996, when nine good-quality ERS-1/2 SAR

  10. InSAR reveals coastal subsidence in the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua; Wright, Tim J.; Yu, Yongping; Lin, Hong; Jiang, Lilong; Li, Changhui; Qiu, Guangxin

    2012-12-01

    The Pearl River Delta (PRD) is one of the most important economic regions with the highest population densities in China. With its dramatic increasing population and economy, hazards associated with land subsidence frequently occur here that amplify the negative effect of sea level rise. However, land subsidence has not been regularly measured in this region. Here, we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to investigate the rate and extent of land subsidence in the PRD region. Assuming purely vertical displacements, multi-track interferograms from different viewing geometries are combined to estimate the linear rate map and time series at a higher resolution in time than is possible with a single track. The results show apparent subsidence along the coastal region of Shenzhen associated with rapid urban development in recent years. The average subsidence rate within 500 m of the coast is about 2.5 mm yr-1, and the maximum is up to about 6 mm yr-1 with respect to the central part of the city. Much of the land surface in the PRD is less than 2 m above mean sea level; high-precision geodetic measurements throughout the PRD region are therefore critical for conducting risk assessments, considering the rate of about 2-3 mm yr-1 of current global sea level rise.

  11. InSAR constraints on the kinematics and magnitude of the 2001 Bhuj earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, D.; Bürgmann, R.

    2005-12-01

    The Mw 7.6 Bhuj intraplate event occurred along a blind thrust within the Kutch Rift basin of western India in January of 2001. The lack of any surface rupture and limited geodetic data have made it difficult to place the event on a known fault and constrain its source parameters. Moment tensor solutions and aftershock relocations indicate that the earthquake was a reverse event along an east-west striking, south dipping fault. In an effort to image the surface deformation, we have processed a total of 9 interferograms that span the coseismic event. Interferometry has proven difficult for the region because of technical difficulties experienced by the ERS Satellite around the time of the earthquake and because of low coherence. The stabilization of the orbital control by the European Space Agency beginning in 2002 has allowed us to interfere more recent SAR data with pre-earthquake data. Therefore, all available interferograms of the event include the first year of any postseismic deformation. The source region is characterized by broad floodplains interrupted by isolated highlands. Coherence is limited to the surrounding highlands and no data is available directly over the epicenter. Using the InSAR data along two descending and one ascending tracks, we perform a gridded search for the optimal source parameters of the earthquake. The deformation pattern is modeled assuming uniform slip on an elastic dislocation. Since the highland regions are discontinuous, the coherent InSAR phase is isolated to several individual patches. For each iteration of the gridded search algorithm, we optimize the fit to the data by solving for number of 2π phase cycles between coherent patches and the orbital gradient across each interferogram. Since the look angle varies across a SAR scene, a variable unit vector is calculated for each track. Inversion results place the center of the fault plane at 70.33° E/23.42° N at a depth of 21 km, and are consistent with the strike and dip

  12. Gulf Coast Subsidence: Crustal Loading, Geodesy, and Recent InSAR and UAVSAR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, R. G.; Dokka, R. K.; Fielding, E. J.; Hawkins, B. P.; Hensley, S.; Ivins, E. R.; Jones, C. E.; Lohman, R. B.; Zheng, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of the Gulf Coast has received increasing attention in the years since hurricanes Katrina and Rita. A quantitative geophysical basis for measuring, predicting, and understanding subsidence rates, their geographic distribution, and temporal variability, is necessary for long term protection of lives and property in addition to being a challenging scientific problem. Analysis of historical and continuing geodetic measurements identifies a surprising degree of complexity in subsidence, including regions that are subsiding at rates faster than those considered during planning for hurricane protection of New Orleans and other population centers (http://www.mvn.usace.army.mil/pdf/hps_verticalsettlement.pdf), and for coastal restoration planning for coastal Louisiana (http://www.coast2050.gov/2050reports.htm) (Dokka, 2011, J. Geophys. Res., 116, B06403, doi:10.1029/2010JB008008). Meanwhile, traditional geodetic data provide precise information at single points, InSAR observations provide geographically dense constraints on surface deformation. Available radar data sources include C and L band satellite, and NASA/JPL airborne UAVSAR L band data. The Gulf Coast environment is very challenging for InSAR techniques, especially with systems not designed for interferometry. The shorter wavelength C band data decorrelates over short time periods necessitating more elaborate analysis techniques. We have early results from new persistent scatterer methods and masking techniques to eliminate areas affected by water level changes, all applied to C-band satellite radar data. Limited L-Band ALOS/PALSAR satellite data are available for analysis using conventional interferometry, unfortunately this Japanese satellite system recently failed. Most importantly, we now have airborne UAVSAR repeat pass interferometry data sets spanning a total interval of 514 days (http://uavsar.jpl.nasa.gov/). These data can constrain geophysical models of crustal behavior, leading to

  13. The Chimera II Real-Time Operating System for advanced sensor-based control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David B.; Schmitz, Donald E.; Khosla, Pradeep K.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to the Chimera II Real-Time Operating System, which has been developed for advanced sensor-based control applications. The Chimera II provides a high-performance real-time kernel and a variety of IPC features. The hardware platform required to run Chimera II consists of commercially available hardware, and allows custom hardware to be easily integrated. The design allows it to be used with almost any type of VMEbus-based processors and devices. It allows radially differing hardware to be programmed using a common system, thus providing a first and necessary step towards the standardization of reconfigurable systems that results in a reduction of development time and cost.

  14. Mitigation of atmospheric phase delays in InSAR data, with application to the eastern California shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymofyeyeva, Ekaterina; Fialko, Yuri

    2015-08-01

    We present a method for estimating radar phase delays due to propagation through the troposphere and the ionosphere based on the averaging of redundant interferograms that share a common scene. Estimated atmospheric contributions can then be subtracted from the radar interferograms to improve measurements of surface deformation. Inversions using synthetic data demonstrate that this procedure can considerably reduce scatter in the time series of the line-of-sight displacements. We demonstrate the feasibility of this method by comparing the interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series derived from ERS-1/2 and Envisat data to continuous Global Positioning System data from eastern California. We also present results from several sites in the eastern California shear zone where anomalous deformation has been reported by previous studies, including the Blackwater fault, the Hunter Mountain fault, and the Coso geothermal plant.

  15. Astrochronologic Testing in Deep-Time Strata: Historical Overview and Recent Advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    The quest for astronomical-climate rhythms ("Milankovitch cycles") in Phanerozoic strata is now commonplace, and has yielded fundamental advancements in our understanding of climate change, paleoceanography, astrodynamics, geochronology and chronostratigraphy. Of central importance to this success has been the development of astrochronologic testing methods for the evaluation of astronomical-climate influence on sedimentation; this can be especially challenging for deep-time strata that lack sufficient independent time control (e.g., radioisotopic data) to unambiguously calibrate observed spatial rhythms to temporal periods. Most deep-time (pre-Pleistocene) astrochronologic testing methods fall into one of two categories: (1) those that test for expected amplitude or frequency modulation imposed by an astronomical signal, or (2) those that test for bedding hierarchies ("frequency ratios") that are predicted by the dominant astronomical periods. In this talk, I discuss the historical context of these methods, recent advances that overcome subjective evaluation and circular reasoning, and their implementation in a new "open source" software package for astrochronology (Meyers, 2014, astrochron: An R Package for Astrochronology).

  16. [Recent advances in surgical technology--open MRI and "real-time" navigation].

    PubMed

    Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Hashizume, Makoto

    2002-11-01

    Many advances of neurosurgery had been achieved about diagnostic and operative tools such as CT scan, MRI, stereotaxy, and microscope, in 20th century. However, intraoperative diagnostic tools are not sufficient for providing solid data. So we developed new operating system for 21st century (Intelligent Operating Theater: IOT). The IOT has an open MRI machine for intraoperative MR imaging that provides objective anatomical data and the "real-time" navigation updated with iMRI that navigates surgeons to the target area. The IOT has contributed to the improvement of the resection rate in brain tumor cases. PMID:12524895

  17. A generalized nonlinear time-domain tracking control model for advanced technology telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulich, Bobby; Pflibsen, Kent; Sheppard, Chris; Calmes, Lonnie

    1990-07-01

    The tracking performance of advanced technology telescopes is presently predicted by a time-domain nonlinear control model which incorporates the complex frequency-dependent transfer characteristics of a type II servosystem, including (1) rate and acceleration feedforward, (2) gimbal-drive motors, (3) motor power amplifiers, (4) mechanical drivetrain, (5) telescope structure, and (6) encoders. Disturbances generated by bearing friction, drive motor magnetic cogging, drive motor friction and torque constant variations, wind loads, etc, are included to enhance the accuracy of tracking error predictions under operating conditions. The model is useful in both initial design studies and the evaluation of proposed design modifications.

  18. Development plan for an advanced drilling system with real-time diagnostics (Diagnostics-While-Drilling)

    SciTech Connect

    FINGER,JOHN T.; MANSURE,ARTHUR J.; PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.; GLOWKA,D.A.

    2000-02-01

    This proposal provides the rationale for an advanced system called Diagnostics-while-drilling (DWD) and describes its benefits, preliminary configuration, and essential characteristics. The central concept is a closed data circuit in which downhole sensors collect information and send it to the surface via a high-speed data link, where it is combined with surface measurements and processed through drilling advisory software. The driller then uses this information to adjust the drilling process, sending control signals back downhole with real-time knowledge of their effects on performance. The report presents background of related previous work, and defines a Program Plan for US Department of Energy (DOE), university, and industry cooperation.

  19. Advanced detection, isolation and accommodation of sensor failures: Real-time evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Walter C.; Delaat, John C.; Bruton, William M.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced Detection, Isolation, and Accommodation (ADIA) Program is to improve the overall demonstrated reliability of digital electronic control systems for turbine engines by using analytical redundacy to detect sensor failures. The results of a real time hybrid computer evaluation of the ADIA algorithm are presented. Minimum detectable levels of sensor failures for an F100 engine control system are determined. Also included are details about the microprocessor implementation of the algorithm as well as a description of the algorithm itself.

  20. Advanced detection, isolation, and accommodation of sensor failures - Real-time evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Walter C.; Delaat, John C.; Bruton, William M.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced Detection, Isolation, and Accommodation (ADIA) program is to improve the overall demonstrated reliability of digital electronic control systems for turbine engines by using analytical redundancy to detect sensor failures. The results of a real-time hybrid computer evaluation of the ADIA algorithm are presented. Minimum detectable levels of sensor failures for an F100 engine control system are determined. Also included are details about the microprocessor implementation of the algorithm as well as a description of the algorithm itself.

  1. Assessing the productivity of advanced practice providers using a time and motion study.

    PubMed

    Ogunfiditimi, Folusho; Takis, Lisa; Paige, Virginia J; Wyman, Janet F; Marlow, Elissa

    2013-01-01

    The Resource-Based Relative Value Scale is widely used to measure healthcare provider productivity and to set payment standards. The scale, however, is limited in its assessment of pre- and postservice work and other potentially non-revenue-generating healthcare services, what we have termed service-valued activity (SVA). In an attempt to quantify SVA, we conducted a time and motion study of providers to assess their productivity in inpatient and outpatient settings. Using the Standard Time and Motion Procedures checklist as a methodological guide, we provided personal digital assistants (PDAs) that were prepopulated with 2010 Current Procedural Terminology codes to 19 advanced practice providers (APPs). The APPs were instructed to identify their location and activity each time the PDA randomly alarmed. The providers collected data for 3 to 5 workdays, and those data were separated into revenue-generating services (RGSs) and SVAs. Multiple inpatient and outpatient departments were assessed. The inpatient APPs spent 61.6 percent of their time on RGSs and 35.1 percent on SVAs. Providers in the outpatient settings spent 59.0 percent of their time on RGSs and 38.2 percent on SVAs. This time and motion study demonstrated an innovative method and tool for the quantification and analysis of time spent on revenue- and non-revenue-generating services provided by healthcare professionals. The new information derived from this study can be used to accurately document productivity, determine clinical practice patterns, and improve deployment strategies of healthcare providers. PMID:23821897

  2. Advanced receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (ARAIM) schemes with GNSS time offsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yun; Wang, Jinling; Jiang, Yiping

    2013-07-01

    Within the current Advanced Receiver Integrity Monitoring (ARAIM) scheme, the time offsets between different Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) constellations are estimated along with a position solution and the GNSS receiver clock error. This scheme is called the Time-offsets Estimated ARAIM, or the TOE ARAIM. In order to enhance the interoperability and compatibility between different constellations, the time offsets are expected to be broadcast to users in future multi-GNSS positioning and navigation applications. This paper describes two new ARAIM schemes to make use of the Broadcast Time Offsets (BTOs): Time Offset Observed ARAIM (TOO ARAIM) and Time Offset Synchronized ARAIM (TOS ARAIM). It has been shown that the VPL performances of these two new ARAIM schemes rely strongly on the accuracy of BTOs. By varying the error model of the BTOs, the simulation results also demonstrate that the proposed new TOO ARAIM scheme can outperform the existing TOE ARAIM scheme-even if the accuracy of BTOs for integrity is degraded to 4.5 m and the probability of a BTO fault is relaxed to 10-2 h-1. In addition, the new Time Offset Synchronized ARAIM scheme (TOS ARAIM) can also perform better than the existing TOE ARAIM scheme if the accuracy of BTOs for integrity can reach 0.75 m. As the TOO ARAIM also has a very relaxed requirement on BTOs and better VPL performance, the TOO ARAIM is regarded as a superior ARAIM scheme for multi-GNSS with BTOs available.

  3. Determining snow depth using Ku-band interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. R.; Kruse, F. A.; Bickel, D. L.; Dunkel, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Monitoring seasonal snow accumulation is important for evaluation of snow models, for short- and long-term snow cover monitoring, and for both military and civilian activities in cold climates. Improved spatial analysis of snow depth and volume can help decision makers plan for future events and mitigate risk. Current snow depth measurement methods fall short of operational requirements. This research explored a new approach for determining snow depth using Ku-band multi-pass (monostatic) airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). A perturbation method that isolated and compared high frequency terrain phase to elevation was used to generate Snow-Off and Snow-On DEMs from the InSAR phase data. Differencing the InSAR DEMs determined elevation change caused by accumulated snow. Comparison of InSAR snow depths to manual snow depth measurements indicated average InSAR snow depth errors of -8cm, 95cm, -49cm, 176cm, 87cm, and 42cm for six SAR pairs. The source of these errors appears to be mostly related to uncorrected slope and tilt in fitted low frequency planes. Results show that this technique has promise but accuracy could be substantially improved by the use of bistatic SAR systems, which would allow for more stable and measurable interferometric baselines.

  4. Precursory Slope Deformation around Landslide Area Detected by Insar Throughout Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, T.; Wada, K.; Yamanaka, M.; Kamiya, I.; Nakajima, H.

    2016-06-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique is able to detect a slope deformation around landslide (e.g., Singhroy et al., 2004; Une et al., 2008; Riedel and Walther, 2008; Sato et al., 2014). Geospatial Information Authority (GSI) of Japan has been performing the InSAR analysis regularly by using ALOS/PALSAR data and ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 data throughout Japan. There are a lot of small phase change sites except for crustal deformation with earthquake or volcano activity in the InSAR imagery. Most of the phase change sites are located in landslide area. We conducted field survey at the 10 sites of those phase change sites. As a result, we identified deformation of artificial structures or linear depressions caused by mass movement at the 9 sites. This result indicates that InSAR technique can detect on the continual deformation of landslide block for several years. GSI of Japan will continue to perform the InSAR analysis throughout Japan. Therefore, we will be able to observe and monitor precursory slope deformation around landslide areas throughout Japan.

  5. Improvement of the Accuracy of InSAR Image Co-Registration Based On Tie Points – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Weibao; Li, Yan; Li, Zhilin; Ding, Xiaoli

    2009-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a new measurement technology, making use of the phase information contained in the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. InSAR has been recognized as a potential tool for the generation of digital elevation models (DEMs) and the measurement of ground surface deformations. However, many critical factors affect the quality of InSAR data and limit its applications. One of the factors is InSAR data processing, which consists of image co-registration, interferogram generation, phase unwrapping and geocoding. The co-registration of InSAR images is the first step and dramatically influences the accuracy of InSAR products. In this paper, the principle and processing procedures of InSAR techniques are reviewed. One of important factors, tie points, to be considered in the improvement of the accuracy of InSAR image co-registration are emphatically reviewed, such as interval of tie points, extraction of feature points, window size for tie point matching and the measurement for the quality of an interferogram. PMID:22399966

  6. ICESat GLAS Elevation Changes and ALOS PALSAR InSAR Line-Of-Sight Changes on the Continuous Permafrost Zone of the North Slope, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muskett, Reginald

    2016-04-01

    Measuring centimeter-scale and smaller surface changes by satellite-based systems on the periglacial terrains and permafrost zones of the northern hemisphere is an ongoing challenge. We are investigating this challenge by using data from the NASA Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (ICESat GLAS) and the JAXA Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (ALOS PALSAR) on the continuous permafrost zone of the North Slope, Alaska. Using the ICESat GLAS exact-repeat profiles in the analysis of ALOS PALSAR InSAR Line-Of-Sight (LOS) changes we find evidence of volume scattering over much of the tundra vegetation covered active-layer and surface scattering from river channel/banks (deposition and erosion), from rock outcropping bluffs and ridges. Pingos, ice-cored mounds common to permafrost terrains can be used as benchmarks for assessment of LOS changes. For successful InSAR processing, topographic and tropospheric phase cannot be assumed negligible and must be removed. The presence of significant troposphere phase in short-period repeat interferograms renders stacking ill suited for the task of deriving verifiable centimeter-scale surface deformation phase and reliable LOS changes. Ref.: Muskett, R.R. (2015), ICESat GLAS Elevation Changes and ALOS PALSAR InSAR Line-Of-Sight Changes on the Continuous Permafrost Zone of the North Slope, Alaska. International Journal of Geosciences, 6 (10), 1101-1115. doi:10.4236/ijg.2015.610086 http://www.scirp.org/Journal/PaperDownload.aspx?paperID=60406

  7. Spatial-temporal heterogeneity of land subsidence evolution in Beijing based on InSAR and cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Ke, Y.; Gong, H.; Li, X.; Zhu, L.; Chen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Land subsidence is a common natural hazard occurring in extensive areas in the world. In Beijing, the capital city of China, there has been serious land subsidence due to overexploitation of ground water during the recent decades. Five major subsidence tunnels have formed. Across the Beijing plain area, the ground is sinking at the rate of 30-100mm/year. Uneven subsidence leads to ground fissure and building destruction, and has caused great economical and property loss. To better characterize and understand regional land subsidence evolution, it is critical to monitor the time-series dynamics of subsidence, and capture the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of the subsidence evolution. Interferometric SAR technique, as it provides high spatial resolution and wide range of observation, have been successfully used to monitor regional ground deformation. The objective of this study is to derive time-series regional land subsidence dynamics in Beijing, and based on which, analyze and assess the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of the evolution using cluster analysis. First, ENVISAT ASAR (2003-2009 years, 28 scenes, track number: 218) datasets during 2003-2010 covering Beijing plain area were utilized to obtain time-series subsidence rate using Persistent Scatter InSAR (PS-InSAR) technique provided in SARProz software. Second, time-series subsidence characteristics of the PS points were analyzed and the PS points were clustered based on Self-Organization feature Maps (SOM) algorithm considering environmental factors such as groundwater level and lithologic characters. This study demonstrates that based on InSAR measurements and SOMs algorithm, the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of land subsidence evolution can be captured. Each cluster shows unique spatial-temporal evolution pattern. The results of this study will facilitate further land subsidence modeling and prediction at regional spatial scale.

  8. Spatial-temporal heterogeneity of land subsidence evolution in Beijing based on InSAR and cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Y.; Li, Y.; Gong, H.; Pan, Y.; Zhu, L.; Chen, B.

    2015-12-01

    Land subsidence is a common natural hazard occurring in extensive areas in the world. In Beijing, the capital city of China, there has been serious land subsidence due to overexploitation of ground water during the recent decades. Five major subsidence tunnels have formed. Across the Beijing plain area, the ground is sinking at the rate of 30-100mm/year. Uneven subsidence leads to ground fissure and building destruction, and has caused great economical and property loss. To better characterize and understand regional land subsidence evolution, it is critical to monitor the time-series dynamics of subsidence, and capture the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of the subsidence evolution. Interferometric SAR technique, as it provides high spatial resolution and wide range of observation, have been successfully used to monitor regional ground deformation. The objective of this study is to derive time-series regional land subsidence dynamics in Beijing, and based on which, analyze and assess the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of the evolution using cluster analysis. First, ENVISAT ASAR (2003-2009 years, 28 scenes, track number: 218) datasets during 2003-2010 covering Beijing plain area were utilized to obtain time-series subsidence rate using Persistent Scatter InSAR (PS-InSAR) technique provided in SARProz software. Second, time-series subsidence characteristics of the PS points were analyzed and the PS points were clustered based on Self-Organization feature Maps (SOM) algorithm considering environmental factors such as groundwater level and lithologic characters. This study demonstrates that based on InSAR measurements and SOMs algorithm, the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of land subsidence evolution can be captured. Each cluster shows unique spatial-temporal evolution pattern. The results of this study will facilitate further land subsidence modeling and prediction at regional spatial scale.

  9. Comparative Effectiveness of Early versus Conventional Timing of Dialysis Initiation in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Deidra C.; Scialla, Julia J.; Boulware, L. Ebony; Navaneethan, Sankar D.; Nally, Joseph V.; Liu, Xiaobo; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse D.; Ephraim, Patti L.; Jolly, Stacey E.; Sozio, Stephen M.; Michels, Wieneke M.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Tangri, Navdeep; Shafi, Tariq; Wu, Albert W.; Bandeen-Roche, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous observational studies examining outcomes associated with the timing of dialysis initiation in the US have often been limited by lead time and survivor bias. Study Design Retrospective cohort study comparing the effectiveness of early versus later (conventional) dialysis initiation in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). The analysis employed inverse probability weighting to account for an individual’s contribution to different exposure groups over time in a pooled logistic regression model. Patients contributed risk to both exposure categories (early and later initiation) until there was a clear treatment strategy [i.e. dialysis was initiated early, or estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) fell below 10 ml/min per 1.73 m2]. Setting & Participants CKD patients who had at least one face-to-face outpatient encounter with a Cleveland Clinic health care provider as of January 1, 2005 and at least two estimated eGFRs in the range of 20 to 30 ml/min per 1.73m2 measured at least 180 days apart. Predictors Timing of dialysis initiation as determined using model-based interpolation of eGFR trajectories over time. Timing was defined as early (interpolated eGFR at dialysis initiation ≥10 ml/min per 1.73m2) or later (eGFR < 10), and was time-varying. Outcomes Death from any cause occurring from the time that eGFR was equal to 20 ml/min per 1.73m2 through September 15, 2009. Results The study population consisted of 652 patients meeting inclusion criteria. The majority of the study population (71.3%) did not initiate dialysis during follow up. Patients who did not initiate dialysis (n=465) were older, more likely to be Caucasian, and had more favorable laboratory profiles than those who initiated. Overall, 146 initiated early, and 80 had eGFR fall below 10 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Many participants (n=426) were censored prior to attaining a clear treatment strategy and were considered undeclared. There was no statistically significant survival

  10. Developing an Error Model for Ionospheric Phase Distortions in L-Band SAR and InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Agram, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    Many of the recent and upcoming spaceborne SAR systems are operating in the L-band frequency range. The choice of L-band has a number of advantages especially for InSAR applications. These include deeper penetration into vegetation, higher coherence, and higher sensitivity to soil moisture. While L-band SARs are undoubtedly beneficial for a number of earth science disciplines, their signals are susceptive to path delay effects in the ionosphere. Many recent publications indicate that the ionosphere can have detrimental effects on InSAR coherence and phase. It has also been shown that the magnitude of these effects strongly depends on the time of day and geographic location of the image acquisition as well as on the coincident solar activity. Hence, in order to provide realistic error estimates for geodetic measurements derived from L-band InSAR, an error model needs to be developed that is capable of describing ionospheric noise. With this paper, we present a global ionospheric error model that is currently being developed in support of NASA's future L-band SAR mission NISAR. The system is based on a combination of empirical data analysis and modeling input from the ionospheric model WBMOD, and is capable of predicting ionosphere-induced phase noise as a function of space and time. The error model parameterizes ionospheric noise using a power spectrum model and provides the parameters of this model in a global 1x1 degree raster. From the power law model, ionospheric errors in deformation estimates can be calculated. In Polar Regions, our error model relies on a statistical analysis of ionospheric-phase noise in a large number of SAR data from previous L-band SAR missions such as ALOS PALSAR and JERS-1. The focus on empirical analyses is due to limitations of WBMOD in high latitude areas. Outside of the Polar Regions, the ionospheric model WBMOD is used to derive ionospheric structure parameters for as a function of solar activity. The structure parameters are

  11. InSAR observations of lake loading at Yangzhuoyong Lake, Tibet: Constraints on crustal elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenliang; Amelung, Falk; Doin, Marie-Pierre; Dixon, Timothy H.; Wdowinski, Shimon; Lin, Guoqing

    2016-09-01

    We use Envisat 2003-2010 InSAR imagery over Yangzhuoyong Lake in southeastern Tibet to study the elastic response of the Earth's crust to variations in lake level. The net lake level drop during our study period is ∼3 m with seasonal variations of more than 1 m. The time-series close to the lake center shows a high correlation with the lake level history. Near the lake center the unit response with respect to lake level change is 2.5 mm/m in radar line-of-sight direction, or ∼2.7 mm/yr in vertical direction, corresponding to a vertical response of ∼4.3 mm/Gt load change. We show that the observations are most sensitive to the elastic properties of the crust in the 5-15 km depth range and explain them with a layered elastic half-space model with a Young's modulus of 50 ± 9GPa Young's modulus in the top 15 km of the crust and using moduli inferred from seismology at greater depth. The inferred Young's modulus is ∼25% smaller than the seismic modulus, which we attribute to damaged rock and the presence of fluids.

  12. Surface Deformation of Los Humeros Caldera, Mexico, Estimated by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos Basurto, R.; Lopez Quiroz, P.; Carrasco Nuñez, G.; Doin, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Los Humeros caldera is located in the eastern part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, to the north of the state of Puebla and bordering the west side of the state of Veracruz. The study of the caldera, is of great interest because there is a geothermal field currently working inside of it. In fact, Los Humeros, is the third more important geothermal field in Mexico. In this work, we used InSAR to estimate the surface deformation on the caldera, aiming to contribute to its modeling and to help preventing subsidence related hazards on the geothermal field and surroundings. On this study, we calculated 34 interferograms from 21 SAR images of the ENVISAT European Space Agency Mission. The analysis of the interferograms, allow us to detect, decorrelation of the interferometric signal increased, when time spans were greater than 70 days. Also, for those with good signal correlation, the atmospheric signal dominated the interferogram, masking completely the deformation. Moreover, residual orbital ramps were detected, in some of the calculated interferograms. An algorithm capable to remove all the interferogram signal contributions but the deformation related, has been implemented. Resulting deformation and its correlation with several variables like the geology, the hydrogeology and the seismic records, were analysed through its integration in a Geographic Information System.

  13. Rating health and stability of engineering structures via classification indexes of InSAR Persistent Scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratesi, Fabio; Tapete, Deodato; Terenzi, Gloria; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Moretti, Sandro

    2015-08-01

    We propose a novel set of indexes to classify the information content of Persistent Scatterers (PS) and rate the health of engineering structures at urban to local scale. PS are automatically sampled and grouped via 'control areas' coinciding with the building and its surrounding environment. Density over the 'control areas' and velocity of PS are converted respectively into: Completeness of Information Index (Ici) that reflects the PS coverage grade; and Conservation Criticality Indexes (Icc) which rate the health condition of the monument separately for the object and surrounding control areas. The deformation pattern over the structure is classified as isolated (i) or diffused (d) based on the Velocity Distribution Index (Ivd). Both Ici and Icc are rated from A to E classes using a colour-coded system that intentionally emulates an energy-efficiency scale, to encourage the exploitation of PS by stakeholders and end-users in the practise of engineering surveying. Workability and reliability of the classification indexes are demonstrated over the urban heritage of Florence, Italy, using well established ERS-1/2 (1992-2000) descending, ENVISAT (2003-2010) ascending and descending PS datasets. The indexes are designed in perspective of handling outputs from InSAR processing of higher-resolution time series.

  14. An active ring fault detected at Tendürek volcano by using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathke, H.; Sudhaus, H.; Holohan, E. P.; Walter, T. R.; Shirzaei, M.

    2013-08-01

    ring faults are present at many ancient, deeply eroded volcanoes, they have been detected at only very few modern volcanic centers. At the so far little studied Tendürek volcano in eastern Turkey, we generated an ascending and a descending InSAR time series of its surface displacement field for the period from 2003 to 2010. We detected a large (~105 km2) region that underwent subsidence at the rate of ~1 cm/yr during this period. Source modeling results show that the observed signal fits best to simulations of a near-horizontal contracting sill located at around 4.5 km below the volcano summit. Intriguingly, the residual displacement velocity field contains a steep gradient that systematically follows a system of arcuate fractures visible on the volcano's midflanks. RapidEye satellite optical images show that this fracture system has deflected Holocene lava flows, thus indicating its presence for at least several millennia. We interpret the arcuate fracture system as the surface expression of an inherited ring fault that has been slowly reactivated during the detected recent subsidence. These results show that volcano ring faults may not only slip rapidly during eruptive or intrusive phases, but also slowly during dormant phases.

  15. Time-temperature-stress capabilities of composite materials for advanced supersonic technology application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, James R.; Haskins, James F.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced composites will play a key role in the development of the technology for the design and fabrication of future supersonic vehicles. However, incorporating the material into vehicle usage is contingent on accelerating the demonstration of service capacity and design technology. Because of the added material complexity and lack of extensive data, laboratory replication of the flight service will provide the most rapid method to document the airworthiness of advanced composite systems. Consequently, a laboratory program was conducted to determine the time-temperature-stress capabilities of several high temperature composites. Tests included were thermal aging, environmental aging, fatigue, creep, fracture, tensile, and real-time flight simulation exposure. The program had two phases. The first included all the material property determinations and aging and simulation exposures up through 10,000 hours. The second continued these tests up to 50,000 cumulative hours. This report presents the results of the Phase 1 baseline and 10,000-hr aging and flight simulation studies, the Phase 2 50,000-hr aging studies, and the Phase 2 flight simulation tests, some of which extended to almost 40,000 hours.

  16. Advanced video extensometer for non-contact, real-time, high-accuracy strain measurement.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Tian, Long

    2016-08-22

    We developed an advanced video extensometer for non-contact, real-time, high-accuracy strain measurement in material testing. In the established video extensometer, a "near perfect and ultra-stable" imaging system, combining the idea of active imaging with a high-quality bilateral telecentric lens, is constructed to acquire high-fidelity video images of the test sample surface, which is invariant to ambient lighting changes and small out-of-plane motions occurred between the object surface and image plane. In addition, an efficient and accurate inverse compositional Gauss-Newton algorithm incorporating a temporal initial guess transfer scheme and a high-accuracy interpolation method is employed to achieve real-time, high-accuracy displacement tracking with negligible bias error. Tensile tests of an aluminum sample and a carbon fiber filament sample were performed to demonstrate the efficiency, repeatability and accuracy of the developed advanced video extensometer. The results indicate that longitudinal and transversal strains can be estimated and plotted at a rate of 117 fps and with a maximum strain error less than 30 microstrains. PMID:27557188

  17. Time-temperature-stress capabilities of composite materials for advanced supersonic technology application, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, J. R.; Haskins, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Implementation of metal and resin matrix composites into supersonic vehicle usage is contingent upon accelerating the demonstration of service capacity and design technology. Because of the added material complexity and lack of extensive service data, laboratory replication of the flight service will provide the most rapid method of documenting the airworthiness of advanced composite systems. A program in progress to determine the time temperature stress capabilities of several high temperature composite materials includes thermal aging, environmental aging, fatigue, creep, fracture, and tensile tests as well as real time flight simulation exposure. The program has two parts. The first includes all the material property determinations and aging and simulation exposures up through 10,000 hours. The second continues these tests up to 50,000 cumulative hours. Results are presented of the 10,000 hour phase, which has now been completed.

  18. Advanced Engine Health Management Applications of the SSME Real-Time Vibration Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorucci, Tony R.; Lakin, David R., II; Reynolds, Tracy D.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Real Time Vibration Monitoring System (RTVMS) is a 32-channel high speed vibration data acquisition and processing system developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). It Delivers sample rates as high as 51,200 samples/second per channel and performs Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) processing via on-board digital signal processing (DSP) chips in a real-time format. Advanced engine health assessment is achieved by utilizing the vibration spectra to provide accurate sensor validation and enhanced engine vibration redlines. Discrete spectral signatures (such as synchronous) that are indicators of imminent failure can be assessed and utilized to mitigate catastrophic engine failures- a first in rocket engine health assessment. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  19. [Timing of Advance Care Planning in frail elderly patients: when to start?].

    PubMed

    Ott, Brenda; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W; de Ruiter, Corinne M; van Delden, Hans J J M

    2015-01-01

    Advance Care Planning (ACP) is the process of discussing and recording patient preferences concerning goals for end-of-life care and to facilitate decision-making. ACP is an essential element of care for frail elderly patients because frailty increases the risks of negative health outcomes and loss of function. In this article, we present three patient cases to illustrate how general practitioners (GPs) can perform ACP and to demonstrate the importance of early and iterative end-of-life discussions with frail elderly patients. Good timing is decisive for the success of the intervention. GPs are in a key position to identify and discuss ACP matters at an early stage, supported by the geriatrician if necessary. Posing the 'surprise question' has proved helpful to determine timing. Complex ACP interventions contribute to care which is better adapted to the needs of frail elderly patients. PMID:25650032

  20. Recent land subsidence caused by the rapid urban development in the Hanoi region (Vietnam) using ALOS InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, V. K.; Doubre, C.; Weber, C.; Gourmelen, N.; Masson, F.

    2014-03-01

    Since the 1990s the land subsidence due to the rapid urbanization has been considered a severely destructive hazard in the center of Hanoi City. Although previous studies and measurements have quantified the subsiding deformation in Hanoi center, no data exist for the newly established districts in the south and the west, where construction development has been most significant and where groundwater pumping has been very intensive over the last decade. With a multi-temporal InSAR approach, we quantify the spatial distribution of the land subsidence in the entire Hanoi urban region using ALOS images over the 2007-2011 period. The map of the mean subsidence velocity reveals that the northern bank of the Red River appears stable, whereas some areas in southern bank are subsiding with a mean vertical rate up to 68.0 mm yr-1, especially within the three new urban districts of Hoang Mai, Ha Dong - Thanh Xuan and Hoai Duc - Tu Liem. We interpret the spatial distribution of the surface deformation as the combination of the nature of the unsaturated layer, the lowering of groundwater in the aquifers due to pumping withdrawal capacity, the increase of built-up surfaces and the type of building foundation. The piezometric level in Qp aquifer lowers particularly after 2008, whereas the groundwater level in Qh aquifer remains steady, even if it loses its seasonal fluctuation in urban areas and drawdowns in neighboring water production plants. The time evolution deduced from the InSAR time series is consistent with previous leveling data and shows that the lowering rate of the surface slightly decreases till 2008. The analysis of groundwater levels in instrumented wells shows a correlation between the behavior of groundwater with the urban development and the acceleration of groundwater withdrawal. Also, the time variations suggest that the deformation became non-stationary, with upward and downward transient displacements related to the charge and discharge of the aquifers.

  1. MPACT FY2011 Advanced Time-Correlated Measurement Research at INL

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; S. M. Watson

    2011-09-01

    Simulations and experiments have been carried out to investigate advanced time-correlated measurement methods for characterizing and assaying nuclear material for safeguarding the nuclear fuel cycle. These activities are part of a project studying advanced instrumentation techniques in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development program and its Materials Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies (MPACT) program. For fiscal year 2011 work focused on examining the practical experimental aspects of using a time-tagged, associated-particle electronic neutron generator for interrogating low-enrichment uranium in combination with steady-state interrogation using a moderated 241Am-Li neutron source. Simulation work for the project involved the use of the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo simulation tool to determine the relative strength and the time-of-flight energy spectra of different sample materials under irradiation. Work also took place to develop a post-processor parser code to extract comparable data from the MCNP5&6 codes. Experiments took place using a commercial deuterium-tritium associated-particle electronic neutron generator to irradiate a number of uranium-bearing material samples. Time-correlated measurements of neutron and photon signatures of these measurements were made using five liquid scintillator detectors in a novel array, using high-speed waveform digitizers for data collection. This report summarizes the experiments that took place in FY2011, presents preliminary analyses that have been carried out to date for a subpart of these experiments, and describes future activities planned in this area. The report also describes support Idaho National Laboratory gave to Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2011 to facilitate 2-dimensional imagery of mixed-oxide fuel pins for safeguards applications as a part of the MPACT program.

  2. Advanced Kalman Filter for Real-Time Responsiveness in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Gregory Francis

    2014-06-10

    Complex engineering systems pose fundamental challenges in real-time operations and control because they are highly dynamic systems consisting of a large number of elements with severe nonlinearities and discontinuities. Today’s tools for real-time complex system operations are mostly based on steady state models, unable to capture the dynamic nature and too slow to prevent system failures. We developed advanced Kalman filtering techniques and the formulation of dynamic state estimation using Kalman filtering techniques to capture complex system dynamics in aiding real-time operations and control. In this work, we looked at complex system issues including severe nonlinearity of system equations, discontinuities caused by system controls and network switches, sparse measurements in space and time, and real-time requirements of power grid operations. We sought to bridge the disciplinary boundaries between Computer Science and Power Systems Engineering, by introducing methods that leverage both existing and new techniques. While our methods were developed in the context of electrical power systems, they should generalize to other large-scale scientific and engineering applications.

  3. [Spatial-temporal evolution characterization of land subsidence by multi-temporal InSAR method and GIS technology].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bei-Bei; Gong, Hui-Li; Li, Xiao-Juan; Lei, Kun-Chao; Duan, Guang-Yao; Xie, Jin-Rong

    2014-04-01

    Long-term over-exploitation of underground resources, and static and dynamic load increase year by year influence the occurrence and development of regional land subsidence to a certain extent. Choosing 29 scenes Envisat ASAR images covering plain area of Beijing, China, the present paper used the multi-temporal InSAR method incorporating both persistent scatterer and small baseline approaches, and obtained monitoring information of regional land subsidence. Under different situation of space development and utilization, the authors chose five typical settlement areas; With classified information of land-use, multi-spectral remote sensing image, and geological data, and adopting GIS spatial analysis methods, the authors analyzed the time series evolution characteristics of uneven settlement. The comprehensive analysis results suggests that the complex situations of space development and utilization affect the trend of uneven settlement; the easier the situation of space development and utilization, the smaller the settlement gradient, and the less the uneven settlement trend. PMID:25007621

  4. InSAR constraints on the source parameters of the 2001 Bhuj earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, D. A.; Bürgmann, R.

    2006-01-01

    We present InSAR results of the coseismic displacement field for the January 2001 Bhuj earthquake. Using InSAR data along multiple tracks, we determine the optimal source parameters of the earthquake. The deformation pattern is first modeled assuming uniform slip on an elastic dislocation. A grid search is used to constrain the source location and finiteness assuming a strike, rake, and dip consistent with seismic studies. An inversion for the distributed slip places oblique reverse slip at depth with strike-slip motion resolved at shallower depths. The estimated size of the event is Mw 7.6. Results also suggest that the postseismic response is minimal.

  5. UAVSAR: InSAR and PolSAR Test Bed for the Proposed NI-SAR Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Hensley, S.; Lou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    UAVSAR, which first became operational in 2009, has served as an operational testbed for the NI-SAR L-band radar concept and a unique instrument in its own right. UAVSAR supports a broad array of basic and applied geoscience, covering on smaller scale all the disciplines NI-SAR would be able to address on a global scale. Although designed specifically to provide high accuracy repeated flight tracks and precise imaging geometry for InSAR-based solid earth studies, its fully polarimetric operation, low noise, and consistent calibration accuracy has made it a premier instrument for PolSAR-based studies also. Since 2009 it has successfully imaged more than 16 million km2 and >4300 quad-polarimetric data products are now publicly available online. Upgrades made in the last year to automate the repeat track processing serve as a model for generating large volumes of InSAR products: Since January 2014 more than 700 interferometric products have been released, exceeding the output of all previous years combined. Standardly available products now include browse images of all InSAR acquisitions and coregistered single-look complex image stacks suitable for standard time series analysis. Here we present an overview of the wide range of studies utilizing UAVSAR data including those based on polarimetry and pair-wise and times series interferometry, highlighting both the unique capabilities of UAVSAR and the ways in which NI-SAR would be able to dramatically extend the capabilities. This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. Monitoring of seismic time-series with advanced parallel computational tools and complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kechaidou, M.; Sirakoulis, G. Ch.; Scordilis, E. M.

    2012-04-01

    Earthquakes have been in the focus of human and research interest for several centuries due to their catastrophic effect to the everyday life as they occur almost all over the world demonstrating a hard to be modelled unpredictable behaviour. On the other hand, their monitoring with more or less technological updated instruments has been almost continuous and thanks to this fact several mathematical models have been presented and proposed so far to describe possible connections and patterns found in the resulting seismological time-series. Especially, in Greece, one of the most seismically active territories on earth, detailed instrumental seismological data are available from the beginning of the past century providing the researchers with valuable and differential knowledge about the seismicity levels all over the country. Considering available powerful parallel computational tools, such as Cellular Automata, these data can be further successfully analysed and, most important, modelled to provide possible connections between different parameters of the under study seismic time-series. More specifically, Cellular Automata have been proven very effective to compose and model nonlinear complex systems resulting in the advancement of several corresponding models as possible analogues of earthquake fault dynamics. In this work preliminary results of modelling of the seismic time-series with the help of Cellular Automata so as to compose and develop the corresponding complex networks are presented. The proposed methodology will be able to reveal under condition hidden relations as found in the examined time-series and to distinguish the intrinsic time-series characteristics in an effort to transform the examined time-series to complex networks and graphically represent their evolvement in the time-space. Consequently, based on the presented results, the proposed model will eventually serve as a possible efficient flexible computational tool to provide a generic

  7. Real-time infrared target processor for advanced land fire control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithopoulos, Erik; Sevigny, Leandre; Laurent, John

    1994-10-01

    The infrared target processor (IRTP) is a real-time processor capable of automatic and operator-aided detection, lock-on and tracking of multiple targets in infrared imagery. The IRTP has been developed under a feeder project to the advanced land fire control system (ALFCS) program, a project to develop accurate fire on the move capability for Canadian tanks. The IRTP is built around the datacube pipelined architecture using commercially available image processing and general purpose components. Presently, the IRTP is capable of real-time detection and tracking of up to five targets at video rates (30 frames/sec), and its operation is controlled via a single monitor that contains graphical control panels and a real- time video display. To augment the operation of the target detection/tracking and the gun fire control operations of the ALFCS a position orientation system (POS) can be used to provide accurate vertical reference measurements of the turret. The POS is built around an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and specialized real-time software implemented on a general purpose CPU card. Although the IRTP is currently being developed for ALFCS applications, the testbed architecture and algorithms are flexible and the system has been used to test and develop algorithms for general target processing applications.

  8. Advanced Automation for Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry-New Opportunities for Real-Time Autonomous Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Wong, C. M.; Salmonson, J. D.; Yost, R. A.; Griffin, T. P.; Yates, N. A.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The utility of MS/MS for both target compound analysis and the structure elucidation of unknowns has been described in a number of references. A broader acceptance of this technique has not yet been realized as it requires large, complex, and costly instrumentation which has not been competitive with more conventional techniques. Recent advancements in ion trap mass spectrometry promise to change this situation. Although the ion trap's small size, sensitivity, and ability to perform multiple stages of mass spectrometry have made it eminently suitable for on-line, real-time monitoring applications, advance automation techniques are required to make these capabilities more accessible to non-experts. Towards this end we have developed custom software for the design and implementation of MS/MS experiments. This software allows the user to take full advantage of the ion trap's versatility with respect to ionization techniques, scan proxies, and ion accumulation/ejection methods. Additionally, expert system software has been developed for autonomous target compound analysis. This software has been linked to ion trap control software and a commercial data system to bring all of the steps in the analysis cycle under control of the expert system. These software development efforts and their utilization for a number of trace analysis applications will be described.

  9. A day at a time: caregiving on the edge in advanced COPD

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, A Catherine; Young, Joanne; Donahue, Margaret; Rocker, Graeme

    2010-01-01

    The human cost of advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) for informal caregivers in Canada is mostly unknown. Formal care is episodic, and informal caregivers provide the bulk of care between exacerbations. While patients fear becoming burdensome to family, we lack relevant data against which to assess the validity of this fear. The purpose of our qualitative study was to better understand the extent and nature of ‘burden’ experienced by informal caregivers in advanced COPD. The analysis of 14 informal caregivers interviews yielded the global theme ‘a day at a time,’ reflecting caregivers’ approach to the process of adjusting/coping. Subthemes were: loss of intimate relationship/identity, disease-related demands, and coping-related factors. Caregivers experiencing most distress described greater negative impact on relational dynamics and identity, effects they associated with increasing illness demands especially care recipients’ difficult, emotionally controlling attitudes/behaviors. Our findings reflect substantial caregiver vulnerability in terms of an imbalance between burden and coping capacity. Informal caregivers provide necessary, cost-effective care for those living with COPD and/or other chronic illness. Improved understanding of the physical, emotional, spiritual, and relational factors contributing to their vulnerability can inform new chronic care models better able to support their efforts. PMID:20631814

  10. A Detailed View of Rockslide Deformation Patterns in Northern Norway Using Both Ascending and Descending High-Resolution TerraSAR-X Satellite InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, H.; Lauknes, T.; Dehls, J. F.; Larsen, Y.; Corner, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    Norway is particularly susceptible to large rockslides due to its many fjords and steep mountains. One of the most dangerous hazards related to rock slope failures are tsunamis that can lead to large loss of life. Many rockslides are clustered east of the Lyngen fjord in Troms county, northern Norway, where several mapped unstable rock slopes occur within the zone of sporadic permafrost. Among these, the Jettan rockslide at Nordnes has been classified as high-risk due to the severe consequences should catastrophic failure occur. In order to fully understand the kinematics and geometric configurations susceptible for sliding, it is imperative to obtain precise measurements of the stability of potential unstable rock slopes. Multi-temporal satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques involve comparing the phase information from multiple spaceborne SAR images, produced at different times, to detect millimeter to centimeter scale ground deformation patterns. However, the satellite radar is only capable of measuring displacement that has a component in the radar line-of-sight (LOS). By combining InSAR data acquired in both ascending and descending orbits, it is possible to extract more information about the true displacement vector, increasing the interpretability of the displacement patterns. In this study, we apply multitemporal InSAR methods to an extensive time series of TerraSAR-X data collected in both ascending and descending geometries during the summer seasons in the period 2009-2012. The estimated deformation rates from the ascending and descending geometries are decomposed into deformation in the vertical and east/west directions, dip angle and total deformation. For the study area, we present examples of the detailed deformation patterns obtained by using both ascending and descending SAR data, together with mapped geological structures and geomorphological elements in the field. Finally, we validate the estimated displacement

  11. A system for advanced real-time visualization and monitoring of MR-guided thermal ablations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothgang, Eva; Gilson, Wesley D.; Hornegger, Joachim; Lorenz, Christine H.

    2010-02-01

    In modern oncology, thermal ablations are increasingly used as a regional treatment option to supplement systemic treatment strategies such as chemotherapy and immunotherapy. The goal of all thermal ablation procedures is to cause cell death of disease tissue while sparing adjacent healthy tissue. Real-time assessment of thermal damage is the key to therapeutic efficiency and safety of such procedures. Magnetic resonance thermometry is capable of monitoring the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of temperature changes during thermal ablations. In this work, we present an advanced monitoring system for MR-guided thermal ablations that includes multiplanar visualization, specialized overlay visualization methods, and additional methods for correcting errors resulting from magnetic field shifts and motion. To ensure the reliability of the displayed thermal data, systematic quality control of thermal maps is carried out on-line. The primary purpose of this work is to provide clinicians with an intuitive tool for accurately visualizing the progress of thermal treatment at the time of the procedure. Importantly, the system is designed to be independent of the heating source. The presented system is expected to be of great value not only to guide thermal procedures but also to further explore the relationship between temperature-time exposure and tissue damage. The software application was implemented within the eXtensible Imaging Platform (XIP) and has been validated with clinical data.

  12. Recent advances in real-time analysis of ionograms and ionospheric drift measurements with digisondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, B. W.; Huang, X.; Galkin, I. A.; Paznukhov, V.; Kozlov, A.

    2005-08-01

    Reliable long distance RF communication and transionospheric radio links depend critically on space weather, and specifically ionospheric conditions. Modern ground-based ionosondes provide space weather parameters in real-time including the vertical electron density distribution up to ˜1000 km and the velocity components of the ionospheric F region drift. A global network of digisondes distributes this information in real-time via internet connections. The quality of the automatic scaling of the echo traces in ionograms was a continuous concern ever since first attempts have been reported. The modern low-power ionosonde with ˜100 W transmitters (compared to several kilowatt for the older ionosondes) relies on more sophisticated signal processing to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and to retrieve the essential ionospheric characteristics. Recent advances in the automatic scaling algorithm ARTIST have significantly increased the reliability of the autoscaled data, making the data, in combination with models, more useful for ionospheric now-casting. Vertical and horizontal F region drift velocities are a new real-time output of the digisondes. The “ionosonde drift” is derived from the measured Doppler frequency shift and angle of arrival of ionospherically reflected HF echoes, a method similar to that used by coherent VHF and incoherent scatter radars.

  13. Real-time manned simulation of advanced terminal area guidance concepts for short-haul operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, L.; Obrien, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    A real-time simulation was conducted of three-dimensional area navigation and four-dimensional area navigation equipped (STOL) aircraft operating in a high-density terminal area traffic environment. The objectives were to examine the effects of 3D RNAV and 4D RNAV equipped aircraft on the terminal area traffic efficiency, and to examine the performance of an air traffic control system concept and associated controller display proposed for use with advanced RNAV systems. Three types of STOL aircraft were simulated each with different performance capabilities. System performance was measured in both the 4D mode and in a 3D mode; the 3D mode, used as a baseline, was simply the 4D mode less any time specification. The results show that communications workload in the 4D mode was reduced by about 35 percent compared to the 3D, while 35 percent more traffic was handled with the 4D. Aircraft holding time in the 4D mode was only 30 percent of that required in the 3D mode. In addition, the orderliness of traffic was improved significantly in the 4D mode.

  14. Damage Proxy Map from InSAR Coherence Applied to February 2011 M6.3 Christchurch Earthquake, 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-oki Earthquake, and 2011 Kirishima Volcano Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S.; Agram, P. S.; Fielding, E. J.; Simons, M.; Webb, F.; Tanaka, A.; Lundgren, P.; Owen, S. E.; Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.

    2011-12-01

    Under ARIA (Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis) project at JPL and Caltech, we developed a prototype algorithm to detect surface property change caused by natural or man-made damage using InSAR coherence change. The algorithm was tested on building demolition and construction sites in downtown Pasadena, California. The developed algorithm performed significantly better, producing 150 % higher signal-to-noise ratio, than a standard coherence change detection method. We applied the algorithm to February 2011 M6.3 Christchurch earthquake in New Zealand, 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake in Japan, and 2011 Kirishima volcano eruption in Kyushu, Japan, using ALOS PALSAR data. In Christchurch area we detected three different types of damage: liquefaction, building collapse, and landslide. The detected liquefaction damage is extensive in the eastern suburbs of Christchurch, showing Bexley as one of the most significantly affected areas as was reported in the media. Some places show sharp boundaries of liquefaction damage, indicating different type of ground materials that might have been formed by the meandering Avon River in the past. Well reported damaged buildings such as Christchurch Cathedral, Canterbury TV building, Pyne Gould building, and Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament were detected by the algorithm. A landslide in Redcliffs was also clearly detected. These detected damage sites were confirmed with Google earth images provided by GeoEye. Larger-scale damage pattern also agrees well with the ground truth damage assessment map indicated with polygonal zones of 3 different damage levels, compiled by the government of New Zealand. The damage proxy map of Sendai area in Japan shows man-made structure damage due to the tsunami caused by the M9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake. Long temporal baseline (~2.7 years) and volume scattering caused significant decorrelation in the farmlands and bush forest along the coastline. The 2011 Kirishima volcano eruption caused a lot of ash

  15. Institutional Advancement Strategies in Hard Times. AAHE-ERIC/Higher Education Research Report No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Michael D.; Sherratt, Gerald R.

    The historical role of institutional advancement and the specific activities and trends currently affecting it are reviewed, and four strategies for advancement programs are suggested. Institutional advancement includes alumni relations, fund-raising, public relations, internal and external communications, and government relations, and its…

  16. Semi-physical Simulation of the Airborne InSAR based on Rigorous Geometric Model and Real Navigation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changyong, Dou; Huadong, Guo; Chunming, Han; yuquan, Liu; Xijuan, Yue; Yinghui, Zhao

    2014-03-01

    Raw signal simulation is a useful tool for the system design, mission planning, processing algorithm testing, and inversion algorithm design of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Due to the wide and high frequent variation of aircraft's trajectory and attitude, and the low accuracy of the Position and Orientation System (POS)'s recording data, it's difficult to quantitatively study the sensitivity of the key parameters, i.e., the baseline length and inclination, absolute phase and the orientation of the antennas etc., of the airborne Interferometric SAR (InSAR) system, resulting in challenges for its applications. Furthermore, the imprecise estimation of the installation offset between the Global Positioning System (GPS), Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and the InSAR antennas compounds the issue. An airborne interferometric SAR (InSAR) simulation based on the rigorous geometric model and real navigation data is proposed in this paper, providing a way for quantitatively studying the key parameters and for evaluating the effect from the parameters on the applications of airborne InSAR, as photogrammetric mapping, high-resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) generation, and surface deformation by Differential InSAR technology, etc. The simulation can also provide reference for the optimal design of the InSAR system and the improvement of InSAR data processing technologies such as motion compensation, imaging, image co-registration, and application parameter retrieval, etc.

  17. Accelerated Ground Deformation of the Yellowstone Caldera, 2004-2008: Update from GPS and InSAR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W.; Smith, R. B.; Wicks, C.; Puskas, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Yellowstone volcanic system is characterized by decadal-scale episodes of ground deformation, extensive seismicity, extraordinarily high heat flow exceeding ~2,000 mW/m2, and widespread hydrothermal activity. In mid-2004, ground motion of the 640,000 year-old, 40-km-wide by 60-km-long Yellowstone caldera unexpectedly changed from subsidence to uplift at rates of up to 7 cm/yr based upon GPS and InSAR measurements. This pronounced uplift, three to four times faster than earlier historic deformation episodes, was also accompanied by a subsidence of up to 4 cm/yr across the northwest caldera rim near the Norris Geyser Basin. Source modeling of the deformation data indicated magmatic injection of a volcanic sill 10 km beneath the caldera that coincides with the top of a tomographically imaged magma body. As an update to the initial observations it shows that the uplift rate has diminished to ~5 cm/yr since mid-2006 and continued to fall 2008, whereas the Norris subsidence episode ceased near the middle of 2006. To better assess these spatial and temporal variations of the deformation field, we conducted a GPS survey of 17 sites, originally observed beginning in 1987, in the summer of 2008 to supplement data from the 13 permanent GPS stations of the Yellowstone GPS network. Updated 3D source modeling based on these data and 2008 InSAR observations provides key information on the temporal variations and volcanic properties of this important episode of Yellowstone deformation.

  18. Stress interaction at the Lazufre volcanic region, as constrained by InSAR, seismic tomography and boundary element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas R.; Lundgren, Paul; Spica, Zack; Legrand, Denis

    2016-04-01

    The Azufre-Lastarria volcanic complex in the central Andes has been recognized as a major region of magma intrusion. Both deep and shallow inflating reservoirs inferred through InSAR time series inversions, are the main sources of a multi-scale deformation accompanied by pronounced fumarolic activity. The possible interactions between these reservoirs, as well as the path of propagating fluids and the development of their pathways, however, have not been investigated. Results from recent seismic noise tomography in the area show localized zones of shear wave velocity anomalies, with a low shear wave velocity region at 1 km depth and another one at 4 km depth beneath Lastarria. Although the inferred shallow zone is in a good agreement with the location of the shallow deformation source, the deep zone does not correspond to any deformation source in the area. Here, using the boundary element method (BEM), we have performed an in-depth continuum mechanical investigation of the available ascending and descending InSAR data. We modelled the deep source, taking into account the effect of topography and complex source geometry on the inversion. After calculating the stress field induced by this source, we apply Paul's criterion (a variation on Mohr-Coulomb failure) to recognize locations that are liable for failure. We show that the locations of tensile and shear failure almost perfectly coincide with the shallow and deep anomalies as identified by shear wave velocity, respectively. Based on the stress-change models we conjecture that the deep reservoir controls the development of shallower hydrothermal fluids; a hypothesis that can be tested and applied to other volcanoes.

  19. Interseismic Crustal Deformation in and around the Atotsugawa Fault System, Central Japan, Detected by InSAR and GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Y.; Sagiya, T.; Nishimura, T.

    2015-12-01

    Interseismic crustal deformation of active faults provides crucial information to understand the stress accumulation process on the fault planes. Recently, the interseismic surface movements are detected with very high spatial resolution using combination of InSAR and GNSS survey. Most of the successful reports, however, addressed the fault creep in less vegetated area which enables C-band SAR interferometry. In this study, we report the interseismic crustal deformation in and around the Atotsugawa fault system, a strike-slip active fault in central Japan. This area is covered with dense vegetation in summer and with heavy snow in winter. We created a series of InSAR images acquired by ALOS/PALSAR and applied SBAS based time-series analysis (Berardino et al., 2002) to extract small deformation. Next, we corrected the long wave-length phase trend by GNSS network maintained by Japanese University Group (e.g, Ohzono et al., 2011) and GSI, Japan. The mean velocity field thus obtained shows a strain concentration zone along the Ushikubi fault, a major strand of the Atotsugawa fault system. The Ushikubi fault is seismically less active than the Atotsugawa fault, but it shows good correlation with a zone of large spatial gradient of Bouguer gravity anomaly. We further discuss on the deformation style at the junction between the Atotsugawa fault and the Hida mountain range (Tateyama volcano). Acknowledgement: The PALSAR level 1.0 data were provided by JAXA via the PALSAR Interferometry Consortium to Study our Evolving Land surface (PIXEL) based on a cooperative research contract between JAXA and the ERI, the University of Tokyo. The PALSAR product is owned by JAXA and METI.

  20. How accurately can current, planned and proposed InSAR missions measure slow, long-wavelength tectonic strain? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. J.; Garthwaite, M.; Jung, H.; Shepherd, A.

    2010-12-01

    Since the launch of ERS-1 in 1991, InSAR has been widely used to measure large deformation events such as earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. In the last decade, small strains accumulating around locked crustal faults and dormant volcanic edifices have also been measured, in certain favourable conditions. In this presentation, we discuss the accuracy of current, planned and proposed InSAR missions. We quantify the main contributions to the error budget of a single interferogram at different spatial scales: atmospheric and orbital errors dominate at long wavelengths (tens of kilometres), and errors from system noise and surface incoherence at short spatial scales (tens of metres). We show that the optimum method for combining multiple interferograms to measure the average line-of-sight (LOS) deformation rate is via a weighted linear inversion of a connected network of short-interval interferograms. The LOS accuracy is strongly dependent on the mission length and satellite revisit time, as well as the spatial length scale. For example, to obtain an LOS accuracy of 1 mm/yr over 100 km requires 5 years of observation with a 13-day repeat, or 7 years for a 35-day repeat. We assess the ability of current (ERS/Envisat), planned (Sentinel-1), and proposed (SuperSAR, DesDYNI) satellite missions to measure long wavelength tectonic strain by estimating the proportion of global straining areas (as defined by the Global Strain Rate Map) where the strain rates are higher than the measurement error. The results highlight the importance of obtaining measurements in three dimensions in order to monitor all actively deforming regions. Of the planned/proposed missions, only SuperSAR (submitted to ESA’s Earth Explorer 8 call) has the ability to achieve 1 mm/yr accuracy over 100 km in all three dimensions after 5 years of observation. This is sufficient to map strain accumulating around faults that are responsible for 95% of damaging onshore earthquakes.

  1. Sustained Water Changes in California during Drought and Heavy Precipitation Inferred from GPS, InSAR, and GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argus, D. F.; Fu, Y.; Landerer, F. W.; Wiese, D. N.; Farr, T. G.; Liu, Z.; Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    About 1200 GPS sites in the westernmost United States are used to weigh changes in surface water as a function of location from 2006 to 2015. The effect of known changes in water in artificial reservoirs is removed, allowing changes in the total of snow, soil moisture, and mountain fracture groundwater to be inferred from GPS. In this study water changes inferred from GPS are placed into the context of complementary InSAR and GRACE data. The southern Central Valley (the San Joaquin Valley and Tulare Basin) is subsiding at spectacular rates of 0.01 m/yr to 0.2 m/yr in response to groundwater management. We construct an elastic model of groundwater change of the southern Central Valley, using GRACE as the basis of total groundwater loss and InSAR to infer the lateral distribution of that groundwater loss. This elastic model of Central Valley groundwater loss is removed from the GPS displacements. Because snow in California is insignificant in October, and because changes in soil moisture between successive autumns are small, we can infer changes in Sierra Nevada mountain fracture groundwater to be: -19 km3 during drought from 2006 to 2009, +35 km3 during heavy precipitation from 2009 to 2011, and -38 km3 during drought from 2011 to 2014 (start and end times are all in October). We infer changes in Sierra Nevada mountain groundwater to be playing an important role in modulating Central Valley groundwater loss. Total water in the Sierra Nevada recovered by 16 km3 from October 2014 to April 2015, but water is being lost again in summer 2015.

  2. Deformation signals in the currently-rifting Afar (Ethiopia) Rift measured with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagli, C.; Wright, T. J.; Wang, H.; Hamling, I. J.; Kier, D.; Belachew, M.; Ebinger, C.

    2008-12-01

    A major rifting episode is currently occurring in the Dabbahu magmatic segment in the Afar region. The rifting episode began in September-October 2005, when continuous seismicity, a volcanic eruption and extensive diking occurred along the 60-km-long magmatic segment. Since then, nine additional dike intrusions occurred in the area and have been detected by radar interferometry (InSAR), with the most recent dike intrusion occurring between July 4-21, 2008 at the southern edge of the segment. We used radar images acquired by the European satellite, Envisat, in both descending and ascending orbits to form interferograms, spanning the time period from October 2005 to the present. The interferograms cover the main magmatic segments in the Afar region including Dabbahu, Hararo, Alayta and Erta Ale. The recorded interferograms were inverted using a least-squares method to obtain average deformation maps and a time series of incremental deformations. Preliminary results indicate that rapid deformation is currently confined to the Dabbahu region with no large deformation signals observed in the nearby magmatic segments. High rates of deformation are observed in the Dabbahu segment associated with shallow magma movements and possible visco-elastic relaxation. Outside the Dabbahu segment, the largest signal is a broad area subsiding at a steady rate of 10 cm/yr, located south east of the Dabbahu segment, and east of the Hararo segment. Our preliminary interpretation is that this represents deep flow of magma away from the Hararo segment and towards Dabbahu. The observed deformation patterns will also be compared to seismicity observed over the same time periods.

  3. A new look at vertical motion around the San Andreas Fault in the Southern California from Integrated GPS and InSAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W. C.; Johnson, K. M.; Weldon, R. J.; Blewitt, G.; Burgette, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Here we report on a new analysis of GPS and space-based InSAR-estimated vertical motions in the vicinity of the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF) near the eastern Transverse Ranges. We consider GPS data from all of the available high precision geodetic networks in southern California such as the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory and SCIGN networks. We analyze raw GPS observations using the GIPSY-OASIS software, and align the solutions to the newly updated NA12 reference frame, derived from ITRF2008. Vertical data are considered if the station has at least 4 years of data, have time series that are fit well by a linear plus seasonal terms plus steps from known equipment changes and earthquakes. We supplement the data with rates from time series analyses of ERS and ENVISAT radar data between 1992 and 2009, obtained from the WinSAR archive. We use 532 scenes from 7 track/frames to form 7476 interferograms, providing line-of-sight (LOS) velocities for overlapping descending (6) and ascending (1) frames. To separate the vertical from the horizontal signals, we align the InSAR LOS rates to the GPS LOS rates using a bilinear transformation and subtract the LOS signal of horizontal deformation estimated from a strain rate map constructed from horizontal GPS velocities. The result is an InSAR LOS rate map aligned to NA12, which we unproject into the vertical direction. InSAR and GPS motions track one another well, with RMS difference in vertical rate of 1.0 mm/yr, where the signal of vertical rate varies between -5.0 and 2.6 mm/yr. Aligning the InSAR to GPS reduces errors in InSAR attributable to long wavelength effects from the atmosphere and orbit uncertainties. The vertical rates show both basin-scale pockets of subsidence and regional wavelength variations in uplift rate. We detect previously reported signals in the San Bernadino, San Jacinto, Pomona, and LA basins with both the GPS and InSAR. Near the coast uplift patterns are similar to those from repeated leveling

  4. Using InSAR to Evaluate Pumping-Related Aquifer-System Response Between 1992 and 2007 in Ground-Water Basins of Eastern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D. J.; Arai, R.; Bell, J.

    2008-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has become a commonly used tool to detect and measure the magnitude and spatial variation of aquifer-system response, specifically subsidence, in groundwater basins in Nevada. Previous work has included InSAR studies of Las Vegas, which has a well-documented history of water-level changes and subsidence. The purpose of this study was to extend InSAR studies from Las Vegas to the north to Ely, Nevada in order to evaluate on a reconnaissance level the present groundwater system response to pumping in 35 hydrographic basins. These data will form a baseline for the proposed Southern Nevada Water Authority's In-state Groundwater Project which is designed to provide as much as 202 hm3/yr (164,000 acre-ft/yr) from 6 of these basins to the Las Vegas metropolitan area. We have processed more than 100 interferometric pairs using ERS and Envisat data from the WInSAR and GeoEarthscope archives covering the time period 1992-2007. Results were analyzed in time series in order to identify potential atmospheric and topographic artifacts, and to verify the occurrence of the groundwater signal. The preliminary results show that some principal groundwater basins currently undergoing moderate levels of groundwater pumping exhibit small, localized subsidence signals of a few centimeters for one or more years. These basins include Lake, Patterson, Butte, and White River Valleys, where annual pumping rates are on the order of 2.5-16.0 hm3/yr (2000-13,000 acre-ft/yr). Spring and Cave Valleys have localized subsidence signals away from known pumping centers. Localized signals are also located near the towns of McGill and Ely, Nevada in Steptoe Valley. These small amplitude signals are consistent with the low to moderate levels of pumping presently occurring in these valleys. The InSAR results also showed that some other basins undergoing moderate levels of pumping do not exhibit any visible evidence of aquifer-system impact. Due to the

  5. On the use of InSAR technology to assess land subsidence in Jakarta coastal flood plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudogbo, Fifame; Duro, Javier; Garcia Robles, Javier; Arnaud, Alain; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.

    2014-05-01

    Jakarta is the capital of Indonesia and is home to approximately 10 million people on the coast of the Java Sea. It is situated on the northern coastal alluvial plane of Java which shares boundaries with West Java Province in the south and in the east, and with Banten Province in the west. The Capital District of Jakarta (DKI) sits in the lowest lying areas of the basin. Its topography varies, with the northern part just meters above current sea level and lying on a flood plain. Subsequently, this portion of the city frequently floods. The southern part of the city is hilly. Thirteen major rivers flow through Jakarta to the Java Sea. The Ciliwung River is the most significant river and divides the city West to East. In the last three decades, urban growing of Jakarta has been very fast in sectors as industry, trade, transportation, real estate, among others. This exponential development has caused several environmental issues; land subsidence is one of them. Subsidence in Jakarta has been known since the early part of the 20th century. It is mainly due to groundwater extraction, the fast development (construction load), soil natural consolidation and tectonics. Evidence of land subsidence exists through monitoring with GPS, level surveys and InSAR investigations. InSAR states for "Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar". Its principle is based on comparing the distance between the satellite and the ground in consecutive satellite passes over the same area on the Earth's surface. Radar satellites images record, with very high precision, the distance travelled by the radar signal that is emitted by the satellite is registered. When this distance is compared through time, InSAR technology can provide highly accurate ground deformation measurements. ALTAMIRA INFORMATION, company specialized in ground motion monitoring, has developed GlobalSARTM, which combines several processing techniques and algorithms based on InSAR technology, to achieve ground motion

  6. Determination of creep rate and extent at Ismetpasa section of the North Anatolian Fault using Persistent Scatterer InSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, E.; Cakir, Z.; Dogan, U.; Akoglu, A. M.; Ozener, H.; Ergintav, S.; Meghraoui, M.

    2012-12-01

    Although fault creep was discovered over half a century ago along the Ismetpasa section of the North Anatolian Fault, its spatiotemporal nature is still poorly known due to lack of geodetic and seismological studies along the fault. Despite the difficulties arising from atmospheric artifacts and low coherency, classical long-term InSAR analysis of ERS (C-band) data between 1992 and 2001 suggested an average creep rate of 9±3 mm along a fault segment of ~70 km long (Cakir et al., 2005). Even though these estimations were obtained from a limited number of available images, these results have been supported by a recent study of stacked PALSAR (L-band) interferograms spanning the period between 2007 and 2010 (Fialko et al., 2011). In this study, we use the Persistent Scatterer InSAR technique to better constrain spatiotemporal characteristics of the surface creep. We analyzed 55 Envisat ASAR images on 2 descending tracks (479 and 207) between 2003 and 2010 and calculated InSAR time series. The PS-InSAR results show clearly the gradual transition between the creeping and locked sections of the NAF west of Ismetpasa. On the contrary, its eastern boundary is crudely determined near 33.4E since the signal is disturbed by the postseismic deformation of the Orta earthquake (June 6, 2000, Mw=6.0). The extent of the creeping section therefore appears to be approximately 81.5 km. The creep rate is also robustly constrained and found to be in the range of 10±2 mm/yr near to Ismetpasa, consistent with the GPS measurements from a small-aperture geodetic network near Ismetpasa and recently reported PALSAR measurements (Fialko et al., 2011). Furthermore, elastic dislocation modeling suggests shallow creeping depth (< 5 km).

  7. Thickness distribution of a cooling pyroclastic flow deposit on Augustine Volcano, Alaska: Optimization using InSAR, FEMs, and an adaptive mesh algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterlark, Timothy; Lu, Zhiming; Rykhus, Russ

    2006-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery documents the consistent subsidence, during the interval 1992-1999, of a pyroclastic flow deposit (PFD) emplaced during the 1986 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska. We construct finite element models (FEMs) that simulate thermoelastic contraction of the PFD to account for the observed subsidence. Three-dimensional problem domains of the FEMs include a thermoelastic PFD embedded in an elastic substrate. The thickness of the PFD is initially determined from the difference between post- and pre-eruption digital elevation models (DEMs). The initial excess temperature of the PFD at the time of deposition, 640 ??C, is estimated from FEM predictions and an InSAR image via standard least-squares inverse methods. Although the FEM predicts the major features of the observed transient deformation, systematic prediction errors (RMSE=2.2 cm) are most likely associated with errors in the a priori PFD thickness distribution estimated from the DEM differences. We combine an InSAR image, FEMs, and an adaptive mesh algorithm to iteratively optimize the geometry of the PFD with respect to a minimized misfit between the predicted thermoelastic deformation and observed deformation. Prediction errors from an FEM, which includes an optimized PFD geometry and the initial excess PFD temperature estimated from the least-squares analysis, are sub-millimeter (RMSE=0.3 mm). The average thickness (9.3 m), maximum thickness (126 m), and volume (2.1 ?? 107 m3) of the PFD, estimated using the adaptive mesh algorithm, are about twice as large as the respective estimations for the a priori PFD geometry. Sensitivity analyses suggest unrealistic PFD thickness distributions are required for initial excess PFD temperatures outside of the range 500-800 ??C. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Integrated Analysis of the 12th January 2010, Mw 7.0, Haiti Earthquake Using InSAR, MAI, GPS, and Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, J. M.; Jung, H.; Funning, G. J.; Ferreira, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Haiti earthquake, Mw 7.0, 12th January 2010, caused widespread destruction and resulted in more than 230,000 deaths. It is believed to have occurred on previously unknown fault(s), raising many questions concerning the tectonics and seismic hazard in this region. While accurate source models are key for robust seismic hazard assessments, existing source models for the Haiti earthquake from various datasets - geodetic (Calais et al., 2010), seismic (Nettles and Hjorjleifsdottir, 2010) and a combination of the two (Hayes et al., 2010) - show discrepancies, particularly concerning the fault geometry. We investigate these discrepancies using multiple aperture InSAR (MAI) data, along with seismo-geodetic analyses based on a new joint earthquake source inversion approach. Similar to previous geodetic models of this event, this study includes measurements of horizontal and line of sight displacement from GPS and InSAR data, respectively. However, we also extract further horizontal (along-track) measurements from the InSAR data using an updated MAI processing flow, incorporating flat-Earth and topographic phase corrections (Jung et al., 2009) . Despite the additional geodetic measurements, part of the signal is underwater, and thus seismic data (teleseismic long-period body and surface waves) are also included to further constrain the source parameters. We carry out geodetic and seismic-only inversions, as well as novel joint inversions taking, for the first time, realistic 3D Earth structure into account when modelling the seismic data. Initial results suggest that the addition of MAI and GPS data to the source inversions helps better constrain the strike and dip angle. However, the dip of our model is shallower (52°) than existing source models (60° - 70°) and the best fitting fault is buried ~ 4 km deeper than previously reported. We explore and discuss the implications of these findings in terms of earthquake slip distribution, mechanism and its tectonic context.

  9. Characterizing 6 August 2007 Crandall Canyon mine collapse from ALOS PALSAR InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Wicks, Charles, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    same as the moment of the collapse source, with each larger than the seismically computed moment. Our InSAR results, including the location of the event, the extent of the collapsed area, and constraints on the shearing component of the deformation source, all confirm and extend recent seismic studies of the 6 August 2007 event.

  10. Quantifying sub-pixel urban impervious surface through fusion of optical and inSAR imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, L.; Jiang, L.; Lin, H.; Liao, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we explored the potential to improve urban impervious surface modeling and mapping with the synergistic use of optical and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) imagery. We used a Classification and Regression Tree (CART)-based approach to test the feasibility and accuracy of quantifying Impervious Surface Percentage (ISP) using four spectral bands of SPOT 5 high-resolution geometric (HRG) imagery and three parameters derived from the European Remote Sensing (ERS)-2 Single Look Complex (SLC) SAR image pair. Validated by an independent ISP reference dataset derived from the 33 cm-resolution digital aerial photographs, results show that the addition of InSAR data reduced the ISP modeling error rate from 15.5% to 12.9% and increased the correlation coefficient from 0.71 to 0.77. Spatially, the improvement is especially noted in areas of vacant land and bare ground, which were incorrectly mapped as urban impervious surfaces when using the optical remote sensing data. In addition, the accuracy of ISP prediction using InSAR images alone is only marginally less than that obtained by using SPOT imagery. The finding indicates the potential of using InSAR data for frequent monitoring of urban settings located in cloud-prone areas. Copyright ?? 2009 by Bellwether Publishing, Ltd. All right reserved.

  11. Optimal estimation of tropospheric delay corrections to INSAR results from GPS observations based on SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaogang; Li, Derena; Liao, Mingsheng; Cheng, Liang

    2007-06-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has been demonstrated useful for topographic mapping and surface deformation measurement. However, the atmospheric disturbance, especially the tropospheric heterogeneity, represents a major limitation to accuracy. It is usually difficult to accurately model and correct the atmospheric effects. Consequently, significant errors are often resulted in misinterpretation of InSAR results. The purpose of this paper is to seek to reduce the atmospheric effects on repeat-pass InSAR using independent datasets, viz. Global Positioning System (GPS). A between-site and between-epoch double-differencing algorithm for the generation of tropospheric corrections to InSAR results based on GPS observations is applied. In order to correct the radar results on a pixel-by-pixel basis, the Support Vector Machine (SVM) with adaptive parameters is introduced to regressively estimate tropospheric corrections over unknown points using the sparse GPS-derived corrections. The feasibility of applying SVM in troposphetic corrections estimation is examined by using data from the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN). Cross-validation tests show that SVM method is more suitable than the conventional inverse distance weighted (IDW) method; it accounts for not only topography-dependent but also topography-independent atmospheric effects, so it seems optimal to estimate the tropospheric delay corrections of unknown pixels from GPS data.

  12. Creep Along the North Anatolian Fault at Ismetpasa (Western Turkey) Deduced From InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, Z.; Ergintav, S.; Akoglu, A. M.; Belabbes, S.; Meghraoui, M.

    2004-12-01

    Although creeping along the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) at Ismetpasa (Turkey) was discovered some thirty years ago, about a decade after the first observation of the phenomenon along the San Andreas Fault in California, little is known about its extent and rate. In order to reveal its three dimensional nature and rupture characteristics, we use Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) and dislocations on rectangular faults in elastic half space. Interferograms with temporal baselines ranging between 1.25 and 5 years show that creeping starts at the western termination of the 1943 (Mw=7.6) earthquake rupture and continues about 70-km to the west overlapping with the eastern part of the 185-km-long rupture of the 1944 (Mw=7.3) earthquake. Maximum creep rate is 10 mm/year approximately in the mid point of the creeping part of the rupture segment diminishing gradually towards the edges. Near Ismetpasa, InSAR data yield 7.7 mm/year of creep rate, consistent with those deduced from instrumental (triangulation and creepmeters) measurements (i.e. 9 mm/year). Modeling of the InSAR and GPS data suggests that the fault creep occurs most probably at a shallow depth (0-7 km). InSAR data do not support the previous claims of creep events triggered by the 1999 Izmit earthquake.

  13. Influence of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue Behavior of an Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Carroll; Laura Carroll

    2011-09-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened), is a candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS provides improved creep resistance through a composition based on 316 stainless steel (SS) with additions of Ti and Nb to form nano-scale MC precipitates in the austenitic matrix. The low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of a HT-UPS alloy has been investigated at 650 C, 1.0% total strain, and an R ratio of -1 with hold times as long as 9000 sec at peak tensile strain. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is compared to that of 316 SS. The cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and the deformed microstructures. Cracking in both alloys is transgranular (initiation and propagation) in the case of continuous cycle fatigue, while the primary cracks also propagate transgranularly during creep-fatigue cycling. Internal grain boundary damage as a result of the tensile hold is present in the form of fine cracks for hold times of 3600 sec and longer and substantially more internal cracks are visible in 316 SS than HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material are different. An equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas tangles of dislocations are present at the nanoscale MC precipitates in HT-UPS and no cellular substructure is observed.

  14. The best timing for administering systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shimodaira, Yusuke; Harada, Kazuto; Lin, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, outcomes for patients with rectal cancer have improved considerably. However, several questions have emerged as survival times have lengthened and quality of life has improved for these patients. Currently patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are often recommended multimodality therapy with fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CT) and radiation followed by total mesorectal excision (TME), with consideration given to FOLFOX before chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Recently, Garcia-Aguilar and colleagues reported in Lancet Oncology that the addition of mFOLFOX6 administered between CRT and surgery affected the number of patients achieving pathologic complete response (pathCR), which is of great interest from the standpoint of pursuit of optimal timing of systemic CT delivery. This was a multicenter phase II study consisting of 4 sequential treatment groups of patients with LARC, and they reported that patients given higher number CT cycles between CRT and surgery achieved higher rates of pathCR than those given standard treatment. There was no association between response improvement and tumor progression, increased technical difficulty, or surgical complications. Ongoing phase III clinical trial further assessing this strategy might result in a paradigm shift. PMID:26889491

  15. Time-Resolved Research at the Advanced Photon Source Beamline 7-ID

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne, Eric M.; Adams, Bernhard; Arms, Dohn A.; Chollet, Matthieu; Li, Yuelin; Walko, Donald A.; Wang Jin; Landahl, Eric C.

    2010-06-23

    The Sector 7 undulator beamline (7-ID) of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is dedicated to time-resolved x-ray research and is capable of ultrafast measurements on the order of 100 ps. Beamline 7-ID has a laser laboratory featuring a Ti:Sapphire system (average power of 2.5 W, pulse duration <50 fs, repetition rate 1-5 kHz) that can be synchronized to the bunch pattern of the storage ring. The laser is deliverable to x-ray enclosures, which contain diffractometers, as well as motorized optical tables for table-top experiments. Beamline 7-ID has a single APS Undulator A and uses a diamond (111) double-crystal monochromator, providing good energy resolution over a range of 6-24 keV. Available optics include Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors to microfocus the x-ray beam. A variety of time-resolved diffraction and spectroscopy research is available at 7-ID, with experiments being done in the atomic, molecular, optical, chemistry, and solid state (bulk and surface) fields.

  16. Time-Resolved Research at the Advanced Photon Source Beamline 7-ID

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne, Eric M.; Adams, Bernhard; Arms, Dohn A.; Chollet, Matthieu; Landahl, Eric C.; Li, Yuelin; Walko, Donald A.; Wang, Jin

    2010-08-02

    The Sector 7 undulator beamline (7-ID) of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is dedicated to time-resolved x-ray research and is capable of ultrafast measurements on the order of 100 ps. Beamline 7-ID has a laser laboratory featuring a Ti:Sapphire system (average power of 2.5W, pulse duration <50 fs, repetition rate 1-5 kHz) that can be synchronized to the bunch pattern of the storage ring. The laser is deliverable to x-ray enclosures, which contain diffractometers, as well as motorized optical tables for table-top experiments. Beamline 7-ID has a single APS Undulator A and uses a diamond (111) double-crystal monochromator, providing good energy resolution over a range of 6-24 keV. Available optics include Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors to microfocus the x-ray beam. A variety of time-resolved diffraction and spectroscopy research is available at 7-ID, with experiments being done in the atomic, molecular, optical, chemistry, and solid state (bulk and surface) fields.

  17. Investigating long-term subsidence at Medicine Lake Volcano, CA, using multitemporal InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Amy L.; Biggs, Juliet; Lu, Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Long-term volcanic subsidence provides insight into intereruptive processes, which comprise the longest portion of the eruptive cycle. Ground-based geodetic surveys of Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV), northern CA, document subsidence at rates of ˜-10 mm yr-1 between 1954 and 2004. The long observation period plus the duration and stable magnitude of this signal presents an ideal opportunity to study long-term volcanic deformation, but this first requires accurate knowledge of the geometry and magnitude of the source. Best-fitting analytical source models to past levelling and GPS data sets show conflicting source parameters-primarily the model depth. To overcome this, we combine multiple tracks of InSAR data, each with a different look angle, to improve upon the spatial resolution of ground-based measurements. We compare the results from InSAR to those of past geodetic studies, extending the geodetic record to 2011 and demonstrating that subsidence at MLV continues at ˜-10 mm yr-1. Using geophysical inversions, we obtain the best-fitting analytical source model-a sill located at 9-10 km depth beneath the caldera. This model geometry is similar to those of past studies, providing a good fit to the high spatial density of InSAR measurements, while accounting for the high ratio of vertical to horizontal deformation derived from InSAR and recorded by existing levelling and GPS data sets. We discuss possible causes of subsidence and show that this model supports the hypothesis that deformation at MLV is driven by tectonic extension, gravitational loading, plus a component of volume loss at depth, most likely due to cooling and crystallization within the intrusive complex that underlies the edifice. Past InSAR surveys at MLV, and throughout the Cascades, are of variable success due to dense vegetation, snow cover and atmospheric artefacts. In this study, we demonstrate how InSAR may be successfully used in this setting by applying a suite of multitemporal analysis methods

  18. InSAR measurements around active faults: creeping Philippine Fault and un-creeping Alpine Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series analyses have been frequently applied to measure the time-series of small and quasi-steady displacements in wide areas. Large efforts in the methodological developments have been made to pursue higher temporal and spatial resolutions by using frequently acquired SAR images and detecting more pixels that exhibit phase stability. While such a high resolution is indispensable for tracking displacements of man-made and other small-scale structures, it is not necessarily needed and can be unnecessarily computer-intensive for measuring the crustal deformation associated with active faults and volcanic activities. I apply a simple and efficient method to measure the deformation around the Alpine Fault in the South Island of New Zealand, and the Philippine Fault in the Leyte Island. I use a small-baseline subset (SBAS) analysis approach (Berardino, et al., 2002). Generally, the more we average the pixel values, the more coherent the signals are. Considering that, for the deformation around active faults, the spatial resolution can be as coarse as a few hundred meters, we can severely 'multi-look' the interferograms. The two applied cases in this study benefited from this approach; I could obtain the mean velocity maps on practically the entire area without discarding decorrelated areas. The signals could have been only partially obtained by standard persistent scatterer or single-look small-baseline approaches that are much more computer-intensive. In order to further increase the signal detection capability, it is sometimes effective to introduce a processing algorithm adapted to the signal of interest. In an InSAR time-series processing, one usually needs to set the reference point because interferograms are all relative measurements. It is difficult, however, to fix the reference point when one aims to measure long-wavelength deformation signals that span the whole analysis area. This problem can be

  19. The 2014 Napa valley earthquake constrained by InSAR and GNSS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polcari, Marco; Fernández, José; Palano, Mimmo; Albano, Matteo; Samsonov, Sergey; Stramondo, Salvatore; Zerbini, Susanna

    2015-04-01

    In this work InSAR and GNSS data have been exploited to evaluate the 3D displacement field produced by the Mw 6.0 earthquake occurred on August 24th, 2014, southwest of Napa Valley, California. The earthquake epicenter is located within the San Andreas Fault system, which forms the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. As the Pacific plate moves to the northwest, relative to North America, deformation occurs between the major faults in the System. The InSAR data are those of the Sentinel-1 satellite recently launched on April 3rd, 2014. This satellite is capable of acquiring data in several modes such as Interferometric Wide (IW), Extra Wide (EW) swath mode or the Stripmap mode, thus varying area coverage and pixel resolution. Here a pair of SAR images, acquired in Stripmap mode with an incidence angle of about 23° and a pixel resolution of about 4 meters in both directions, covering an area of 70x180 Km have been used. The pre- and post-earthquake images have been acquired on August 7th and August 31st, 2014 respectively. They are characterized by a perpendicular baseline of 2 meters and have been cut around the epicenter and multi-looked by a factor of 15x15 in range and azimuth to obtain a pixel size of about 60x60 m. The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) provided by the SRTM mission has been used to remove the topographic phase. Moreover, the Goldstein filtering and the Minimum Cost Flow (MCF) phase unwrapping algorithm were also applied. The analyzed GNSS dataset, spanning the 1st August 2014 - 2nd September 2014 period, includes 32 stations belonging to the Bay Area Regional Deformation Network and 301 additional continuous stations available from the UNAVCO and the CDDIS archives. The whole network of stations has been organized into seven sub-networks of about 50 sites each. The sub-networks were processed sharing a number of common sites to provide the necessary ties between them. The results of this processing step are daily estimates of

  20. InSAR analysis of surface deformation over permafrost to estimate active layer thickness based on one-dimensional heat transfer model of soils

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Zhao, Rong; Hu, Jun; Wen, Lianxing; Feng, Guangcai; Zhang, Zeyu; Wang, Qijie

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to estimate active layer thickness (ALT) over permafrost based on InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) observation and the heat transfer model of soils. The time lags between the periodic feature of InSAR-observed surface deformation over permafrost and the meteorologically recorded temperatures are assumed to be the time intervals that the temperature maximum to diffuse from the ground surface downward to the bottom of the active layer. By exploiting the time lags and the one-dimensional heat transfer model of soils, we estimate the ALTs. Using the frozen soil region in southern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) as examples, we provided a conceptual demonstration of the estimation of the InSAR pixel-wise ALTs. In the case study, the ALTs are ranging from 1.02 to 3.14 m and with an average of 1.95 m. The results are compatible with those sparse ALT observations/estimations by traditional methods, while with extraordinary high spatial resolution at pixel level (~40 meter). The presented method is simple, and can potentially be used for deriving high-resolution ALTs in other remote areas similar to QTP, where only sparse observations are available now. PMID:26480892

  1. InSAR analysis of surface deformation over permafrost to estimate active layer thickness based on one-dimensional heat transfer model of soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiwei; Zhao, Rong; Hu, Jun; Wen, Lianxing; Feng, Guangcai; Zhang, Zeyu; Wang, Qijie

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to estimate active layer thickness (ALT) over permafrost based on InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) observation and the heat transfer model of soils. The time lags between the periodic feature of InSAR-observed surface deformation over permafrost and the meteorologically recorded temperatures are assumed to be the time intervals that the temperature maximum to diffuse from the ground surface downward to the bottom of the active layer. By exploiting the time lags and the one-dimensional heat transfer model of soils, we estimate the ALTs. Using the frozen soil region in southern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) as examples, we provided a conceptual demonstration of the estimation of the InSAR pixel-wise ALTs. In the case study, the ALTs are ranging from 1.02 to 3.14 m and with an average of 1.95 m. The results are compatible with those sparse ALT observations/estimations by traditional methods, while with extraordinary high spatial resolution at pixel level (~40 meter). The presented method is simple, and can potentially be used for deriving high-resolution ALTs in other remote areas similar to QTP, where only sparse observations are available now. PMID:26480892

  2. Finding a Balance: Fifteen Institutional Case Studies on the Relationship between Part-Time Work and Advanced Level Study. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Ann, Ed.; Spours, Ken, Ed.

    This document presents and discusses case studies that examined the relationship between part-time employment and advanced level study at 15 schools in Essex, England. "Foreword" (David Jones) provides a brief overview of the project. "Finding a Balance--Fifteen Institutional Case Studies on the Relationship between Part-time Work and Advanced…

  3. High Resolution Two Dimensional TEC Imaging by an Improvement of Multiple-Aperture InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, Yanling; GUO, Linying; WU, Jicang

    2015-04-01

    In traditional InSAR especially the L-band InSAR study, ionosphere effect has always been regarded as noise or error source to be removed. The emergence of multiple-aperture InSAR (MAI) made it possible to extract ionosphere signal from InSAR technology. The principle of MAI is to split the SAR spectrum along azimuth direction into forward- and backward-looking images and then form two different-looking interferograms. The differential of the two interferograms is the multiple-aperture interferogram. Due to the linear relation between MAI phase and the derivative of ionospheric along the azimuth direction, we can obtain the TEC(Total Electron Content) variation by integrating the MAI phase. During the integration we found that the estimation of integration constant is very important, which determined the extent of consistency of the derived TEC distribution. We proposed an filtering algorithm to make the integration constant more reasonable so as to improve the accuracy of TEC distribution. Furthermore to validate the effect of this improved algorithm we compared it with the unimproved one ,and then CODE ionospheric VTEC data is interpolated to evaluate the ionospheric accuracy of the new method. The result showed the two-dimensional TEC using MAI possessed the advantage of very high spatial resolution and high accuracy, which not only can be used for InSAR ionospheric correction, but also for the space detection of ionosphere, whose spatial resolution is higher than any other space technology, such as radiosonde, GPS and GPS occultation etc.

  4. Quantifying INSAR Temporal Decorrelation and its impact on estimation of vegetation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, B. D.; Siqueira, P.; Hensley, S.; Ahmed, R.

    2007-12-01

    The National Research Council was commissioned by NASA to conduct a decadal survey to assess the strategy NASA should take for Earth science and applications from Space. One of the recommendations of this report is for a mission called 'DESDynI', consisting of an L-band SAR and a laser altimeter, to measure surface and ice sheet deformation, and to measure vegetation structure for ecosystem health. Measuring vegetation structure with an L-band repeat-pass InSAR mission requires that temporal decorrelation between the SAR observations be well understood. In the worst case, temporal decorrelation would exceed the volumetric decorrelation (which may be modeled as a function of the vegetation structure), making accurate vegetation height inversion impossible from the InSAR data. In the best case, non-negligible temporal decorrelation would bias the estimation. In order to quantify InSAR temporal decorrelation over forested areas, the NASA/JPL AIRSAR SAR conducted a comprehensive series of InSAR flightlines in 2004 over the La Selva Biological Reserve, Costa Rica (a mature, well-characterized tropical rainforest), collecting both single-pass and repeat-pass InSAR data at a variety of baselines and temporal separations (0 meters to 200 meters, 20 minutes to 2 weeks). Results of this analysis will be presented. The L-band ALOS PALSAR SAR, launched in 2006, and currently collecting data sets globally, has a 46 day repeat orbit and baselines less than 1km. Data from this mission, as well as from the 1978 Seasat SAR (which had a 3 day repeat for much of the mission) should likewise provide important characterizations of temporal decorrelation over forested regions. Possible observation strategies for DESDynI may have to accommodate temporal decorrelation effects through more frequent observations of areas subject to weather-induced decorrelation, similar to global observation strategies for optical sensors.

  5. Monitoring subsidence with InSAR and inference of groundwater change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, T. G.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater use is increasing in many parts of the world due to population pressure and reduced availability of surface water and rainfall. California's Central Valley and southern Arizona in particular have experienced subsidence in many groundwater basins in recent years due to groundwater overdraft. In order to make informed decisions for adaptation, water resource managers need to know the extent of groundwater depletion, both spatially and volumetrically, and to be able to monitor it over long periods. Water wells provide one solution, but owing to remoteness, funding limitations, a lack of wells, and the difficulty of mandating government monitoring of private wells, less direct methods are necessary. Mapping and monitoring subsidence and rebound from orbit with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) may provide important indicators of groundwater state and dynamics for water resource managers as well as warnings of potential damage to infrastructure. We are working with water resource managers at the California Department of Water Resources to produce and update maps of subsidence 'hot-spots' where subsidence threatens to cause irreversible aquifer compaction and loss of groundwater storage capacity. In the future, Germany's TerraSAR-X, Italy's Cosmo SkyMed, Japan's PALSAR-2, Europe's Sentinels, and NASA's NISAR offer the promise of extending the time series of observations and expanding this capability to regions of the world with no effective means to monitor the state of their groundwater. This would provide societal benefits to large segments of the global population dependent on groundwater to bridge gaps in surface and rain water supply. As Earth's climate changes, monitoring of this critical resource will help reduce conflicts over water. * Work performed under contract to NASA

  6. Advanced real-time dynamic scene generation techniques for improved performance and fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Mark H.; Buford, James A.; Mayhall, Anthony J.

    2000-07-01

    Recent advances in real-time synthetic scene generation for Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) improve both performance and fidelity. Modeling ground target scenarios requires tradeoffs because of limited texture memory for imagery and limited main memory for elevation data. High- resolution insets have been used in the past to provide better fidelity in specific areas, such as in the neighborhood of a target. Improvements for ground scenarios include smooth transitions for high-resolution insets to reduce high spatial frequency artifacts at the borders of the inset regions and dynamic terrain paging to support large area databases. Transport lag through the scene generation system, including sensor emulation and interface components, has been dealt with in the past through the use of sub-window extraction from oversize scenes. This compensates for spatial effects of transport lag but not temporal effects. A new system has been developed and used successfully to compensate for a flashing coded beacon in the scene. Other techniques have been developed to synchronize the scene generator with the seeker under test (SUT) and to model atmospheric effects, sensor optic and electronics, and angular emissivity attenuation.

  7. Advancement of Solidification Processing Technology Through Real Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy: Sample Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of samples were prepared for the real time X-ray transmission microscopy (XTM) characterization. In the first series directional solidification experiments were carried out to evaluate the critical velocity of engulfment of zirconia particles in the Al and Al-Ni eutectic matrix under ground (l-g) conditions. The particle distribution in the samples was recorded on video before and after the samples were directionally solidified. In the second series samples of the above two type of composites were prepared for directional solidification runs to be carried out on the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) aboard the space shuttle during the LMS mission in June 1996. X-ray microscopy proved to be an invaluable tool for characterizing the particle distribution in the metal matrix samples. This kind of analysis helped in determining accurately the critical velocity of engulfment of ceramic particles by the melt interface in the opaque metal matrix composites. The quality of the cast samples with respect to porosity and instrumented thermocouple sheath breakage or shift could be easily viewed and thus helped in selecting samples for the space shuttle experiments. Summarizing the merits of this technique it can be stated that this technique enabled the use of cast metal matrix composite samples since the particle location was known prior to the experiment.

  8. Integration of InSAR and GIS in the Study of Surface Faults Caused by Subsidence-Creep-Fault Processes in Celaya, Guanajuato, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Avila-Olivera, Jorge A.; Farina, Paolo; Garduno-Monroy, Victor H.

    2008-05-07

    In Celaya city, Subsidence-Creep-Fault Processes (SCFP) began to become visible at the beginning of the 1980s with the sprouting of the crackings that gave rise to the surface faults 'Oriente' and 'Poniente'. At the present time, the city is being affected by five surface faults that display a preferential NNW-SSE direction, parallel to the regional faulting system 'Taxco-San Miguel de Allende'. In order to study the SCFP in the city, the first step was to obtain a map of surface faults, by integrating in a GIS field survey and an urban city plan. The following step was to create a map of the current phreatic level decline in city with the information of deep wells and using the 'kriging' method in order to obtain a continuous surface. Finally the interferograms maps resulted of an InSAR analysis of 9 SAR images covering the time interval between July 12 of 2003 and May 27 of 2006 were integrated to a GIS. All the maps generated, show how the surface faults divide the city from North to South, in two zones that behave in a different way. The difference of the phreatic level decline between these two zones is 60 m; and the InSAR study revealed that the Western zone practically remains stable, while sinkings between the surface faults 'Oriente' and 'Universidad Pedagogica' are present, as well as in portions NE and SE of the city, all of these sinkings between 7 and 10 cm/year.

  9. Interaction of Porosity with an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: a Real-Time Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kaukler, W.; Catalina, A.; Stefanescu, D.; Curreri, P.

    1999-01-01

    Problems associated with formation of porosity during solidification continue to have a daily impact on the metal forming industry. Several past investigations have dealt with the nucleation and growth aspects of porosity. However, investigations related to the interaction of porosity with that of a solidification front has been limited mostly to organic analogues. In this paper we report on real time experimental observations of such interactions in metal alloys. Using a state of the art X-Ray Transmission Microscope (XTM) we have been able to observe and record the dynamics of the interaction. This includes distortion of the solid/liquid interface near a poro.sity, solute segr,egation patterns surrounding a porosity and the change in shape of the porosity during interaction with an advancing solid/liquid interface. Results will be presented for different Al alloys and growth conditions. The experimental data will be compared to theory using a recently developed 2D numerical model. The model employs a finite difference approach where the solid/liquid interface is defined through the points at which the interface intersects the grid lines. The transport variables are calculated at these points and the motion of the solidification front is determined by the magnitude of the transport variables. The model accounts for the interplay of the thermal and solutal field and the influence of capilarity to predict the shape of the solid/liquid interface with time in the vicinity of porosity. One can further calculate the perturbation of the solutal field by the presence of porosity in the melt.

  10. - and Syn-Eruptive Surface Movements of Azerbaijan Mud Volcanoes Detected Through Insar Analysis: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonielli, Benedetta; Monserrat, Oriol; Bonini, Marco; Righini, Gaia; Sani, Federico; Luzi, Guido; Feyzullayev, Akper; Aliyev, Chingiz

    2014-05-01

    Mud volcanism is a process that consists in the extrusion of mud, fragments or blocks of country rocks, saline waters and gases, mostly methane. This mechanism is typically linked to in-depth hydrocarbon traps, and it builds up a variety of conical edifices with dimension and morphology similar to those of magmatic volcanoes. Interferometry by Satellite Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques have been commonly used to monitor and investigate the ground deformation connected to the eruptive phases of magmatic volcanoes. InSAR techniques have also been employed to explore the ground deformation associated with the LUSI mud volcano in Java (Indonesia). We aim to carry out a study on the paroxysmal activities of the Azerbaijan mud volcanoes, among the largest on Earth, using similar techniques. In particular the deformations of the mud volcanic systems were analyzed through the technique of satellite differential interferometry (DInSAR), thanks to the acquisition of 16 descending and 4 ascending Envisat images, spanning about 4 years (October 2003-November 2007); these data were provided by the European Space Agency. The preliminary analysis of a set of 77 interferograms and the unwrapping process elaboration of some of them selected according to the best coherence values, allowed the detection of significant deformations in correspondence of Ayaz-Akhtarma and Khara Zira Island mud volcanoes. This analysis has allowed to identify relevant ground deformations of the volcanic systems in connection with the main eruptive events in 2005 and in 2006 respectively, that are recorded by the catalogue of Azerbaijan mud volcano eruptions until 2007. The preliminary analysis of the interferograms of the Ayaz-Akhtarma and the Khara Zira mud volcanoes shows that the whole volcano edifice or part of it is subject to a ground displacement before or in coincidence with the eruption. Assuming that the movement is mainly vertical, we suppose that deformation is due to bulging of the volcanic

  11. Seasonal Dynamics of a Drained Thermokarst Lake Basin on the North Slope of Alaska From InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Parsekian, A.; Grosse, G.; Jones, B. M.; Zebker, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Thermokarst lakes (or thaw lakes) are ubiquitous and dynamic landscape features on the Arctic coastal plain of Alaska. They form as ice-rich permafrost thaws and grow laterally and vertically, coalesce with other lakes, and often rapidly drain, forming a dry and depressed basin denoted as drained thermokarst lake basins (DTLBs). Vertical deformation of the ground from settlement and heave occurs during thermokarst evolution. These morphological variations are a result of changes in the thermal regime of the landscape and mechanical and hydrological changes in the sediment and surface vegetation. These changes also affect carbon exchange and stability of the permafrost carbon pool. We apply radar interferometry (InSAR) techniques using data acquired over a 100 km by 70 km area by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS-PALSAR) to monitor surface deformation of DTLBs near Prudhoe Bay from space. Over the period 2007-2010, the entire tundra area experienced thaw settlement and frost heave on the order of 3 cm due to melting and refreezing of pore ice in the active layer. A vast majority of the DTLBs appear to be moving along with the surrounding tundra area, however our study in fine spatial and temporal detail reveals a unique and significant seasonal settlement and heave at one basin located at (70.138621N, 148.649614W). The area of deformation is bounded by a historical lake shore on its west edge and a residual low pond on its east side. The seasonal deformation increases from about 2 cm near the center of the basin to about 9 cm near the west edge, well exceeding the measurement precision that is of the order of 1 cm. The spatial pattern and magnitude of subsidence repeated in all four years. We attribute the seasonal deformation at this DTLB to one or more of three possible mechanisms: a thick active layer (> 1 m) over the DTLB, a thick talik (unfrozen) layer beneath the DTLB, and seasonal surface drainage and flooding as the DLTB is connected to a thaw lake

  12. GPS and Satellite InSAR Observations of Landslide Activity at the Sinking Canyon in South Central Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, M. H.; Glenn, N. F.; Thackray, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Multiple rotational, transitional, and lateral spread landslides have occurred in south central Idaho where basalt lava flows overly unconsolidated lake and fluvial sediments at the Sinking Canyon. The canyon is about 0.1 km deep and 0.25-1 km wide along a 4-km segment of the Salmon Falls Creek (SFC). Local topography and hydrological conditions are most likely the major triggering factors that have initiated landslides by increasing the gravitational stresses and weakening the canyon wall materials. Landslide activity has created natural dams of SFC, which in turn has resulted in forming large lakes with a potential flooding hazard to life and property downstream. In this study, we use campaign Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of 2003-2004 and Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric (InSAR) data acquired during 1992-2007 by the European radar satellites (ERS-1 and ERS-2) to identify, monitor, and analyze recent landslide activity at SFC. Results show that three main landslides have been active during the period of observation: the Salmon Falls landslide (SFL) that has been first reported in 1999, the historical 1937 landslide, and a third unnamed landslide to the north of the 1937 slide. InSAR measurements indicate that the SFL has been active during the period of our earliest interferogram (1992-1993) whereas the slide head has detached and has moved away from the eastern canyon wall about 3 cm. Over the years, the SFL body and toe have been pushed westward repetitively at rates of about 3-7 cm/yr. The toe is confined by the western canyon wall and thus is pushed upward in some years causing slight uplift (2-3 cm). Our field observations reveal many transverse and radial cracks associated with the deformation pattern caused by recurring motions. The historic 1937 slide is the largest mass wasting and is the least active landslide in the study area. The unnamed slide shows episodic activity with varying rates (0-4 cm/yr) of line-of-sight motions. This

  13. Coseismic Faults and Crust Deformation Accompanied the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake, China by Field Investigation and InSAR Interferogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, K.; Si, H.; Fujiwara, H.; Ozawa, T.

    2008-12-01

    The devastated Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake occurred along the steep eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau in Sichuan, China, on 12 May 2008. Over 86,592 people were dead or missing, 374159 injured, and more than 4.8 million homeless. The ruptures possibly occurred over a length of 285 km along the northeast striking Longmen Shan (LMS) thrust belt. In order to study the oversized fault ruptures, existing active faults related and relationships with the damages caused, we conducted field investigations during 4-15 June and 3-9 October 2008, covered about 140km length of LMS faults, including Beichuan(BC), Anxian(AC), Mianzhu, Shifang, Pengzhou, Dujiangyan, Yingxiu (YX) and Wenchuan. On the field investigation we found coseismic surface faults along several profiles perpendicular to the LMS faults. The coseismic surface faults we discovered were at Leigu(L), Hanwang(H), Yinghua(Y), Bailu(BL), Xiaoyudong(X), and Baiyunding (BYD). Of them the maximum vertical displacement reached 4.6m at L, Beichuan County. The uplifting displacements dominated in the southwestern section of the rupture. Moreover, the northwest-striking left-lateral fault was found with horizontal displacement of 2.8m, and vertical of 1.5m as well, at X, Pengzhou City. The left-lateral fault, inversely under-controlled movement of right- lateral fault in the area, showed the complexity of the fault movements. The field results showed the coseismic surface ruptures locally while the overall faults movements and Crust deformation could be understood by the Interferometric SAR(InSAR) technique (NIED, 2008) using data from the Phased Array L-band SAR sensor (PALSAR) equipped on Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). The larger deformation zones detected by InSAR interferogram occurred with a width of ~30 km in southwestern section, and of ~10km in northeastern section of LMS faults. In the southwestern section, the deformation zone occurred mostly within the existing active faults zones: Guanxian

  14. Advanced Fire Information System - A real time fire information system for Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, P. E.; Roy, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) lead by the Meraka Institute and supported by the South African National Space Agency (SANSA) developed the Advanced Fire Information System (AFIS) to provide near real time fire information to a variety of operational and science fire users including disaster managers, fire fighters, farmers and forest managers located across Southern and Eastern Africa. The AFIS combines satellite data with ground based observations and statistics and distributes the information via mobile phone technology. The system was launched in 2004, and Eskom (South Africa' and Africa's largest power utility) quickly became the biggest user and today more than 300 Eskom line managers and support staff receive cell phone and email fire alert messages whenever a wildfire is within 2km of any of the 28 000km of Eskom electricity transmission lines. The AFIS uses Earth observation satellites from NASA and Europe to detect possible actively burning fires and their fire radiative power (FRP). The polar orbiting MODIS Terra and Aqua satellites provide data at around 10am, 15pm, 22am and 3am daily, while the European Geostationary MSG satellite provides 15 minute updates at lower spatial resolution. The AFIS processing system ingests the raw satellite data and within minutes of the satellite overpass generates fire location and FRP based fire intensity information. The AFIS and new functionality are presented including an incident report and permiting system that can be used to differentiate between prescribed burns and uncontrolled wild fires, and the provision of other information including 5-day fire danger forecasts, vegetation curing information and historical burned area maps. A new AFIS mobile application for IOS and Android devices as well as a fire reporting tool are showcased that enable both the dissemination and alerting of fire information and enable user upload of geo tagged photographs and on the fly creation of fire reports

  15. The relative timing between eye and hand in rapid sequential pointing is affected by time pressure, but not by advance knowledge.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, F J A; van Polanen, V; Savelsbergh, G J P; Bennett, S J

    2011-08-01

    The present study examined the effect of timing constraints and advance knowledge on eye-hand coordination strategy in a sequential pointing task. Participants were required to point at two successively appearing targets on a screen while the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) and the trial order were manipulated, such that timing constraints were high (ISI = 300 ms) or low (ISI = 450 ms) and advance knowledge of the target location was present (fixed order) or absent (random order). Analysis of eye and finger onset and completion times per segment of the sequence indicated that oculo-manual behaviour was in general characterized by eye movements preceding the finger, as well as 'gaze anchoring' (i.e. eye fixation of the first target until completion of the finger movement towards that target). Advance knowledge of future target locations lead to shorter latency times of eye and hand, and smaller eye-hand lead times, which in combination resulted in shorter total movement times. There was, however, no effect of advance knowledge on the duration of gaze anchoring. In contrast, gaze anchoring did change as a function of the interval between successive stimuli and was shorter with a 300 ms ISI versus 450 ms ISI. Further correlation analysis provided some indication that shorter residual latency is associated with shorter pointing duration, without affecting accuracy. These results are consistent with a neural mechanism governing the coupling of eye and arm movements, which has been suggested to reside in the superior colliculus. The temporal coordination resulting from this coupling is a function of the time pressure on the visuo-manual system resulting from the appearance of external stimuli. PMID:21744087

  16. Using Data Mining to Explore Which Students Use Advanced Placement to Reduce Time to Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eykamp, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    This chapter explores how multiple approaches including data mining can help examine how the lengths of student enrollment are associated with varying numbers of advanced placement units. (Contains 3 tables and 5 figures.)

  17. Ground Displacement Trends in an Urban Environment Using Multi-Temporal InSAR Analysis and Two Decades of Multi-Sensor Satellite-Based SAR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas, Iuliana; Necsoiu, Marius; Mendes, Diana Aldea; Gheorghe, Mihaela; Gheorghe, Diana

    2015-05-01

    This exploratory research used three sets of single polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite data and a multi-temporal radar interferometry (InSAR) methodology to determine the spatial evolution and ground displacement trends of several industrial parks located in the metropolitan area of Bucharest, Romania. From 70candidate areas, 20 large industrial parks were selected for analysis and interpretation. InSAR analysis used SAR data acquired between 1992 and 2014 by ERS-1/-2, ENVISAT, and TerraSAR-X satellites. Ground movement patterns identified before and after 2000 were linked to groundwater table investigations based on 25 water wells, located on or in the proximity of these areas. The analysis revealed an initial subsidence or no change in uplift areas before 2000, followed by a return to zonal movement. This trend may also be related to the shutting down of industries that consumed large amounts of water, which increased deep groundwater pressure. Only one continuous subsidence trend was identified for an industrial area located south of the city, an area which continues to be active over time. Ongoing research is focused on using traditional geological andgeomorphologic investigations, as well as comparisons with fieldGlobal Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data.

  18. Coseismic and postseismic deformation from the 14 November 2007 Mw 7.8 Tocopilla earthquake, as investigated by INSAR, and seismic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motagh, M.; Schurr, B.; Hooper, A. J.; Anderssohn, J.; Moreno, M.; Wang, R.

    2010-12-01

    On November 14, 2007 a Mw=7.8 earthquake occurred in Tocopilla region of northern Chile, between the cities of Iquique and Antofagasta. Here we investigate coseismic surface deformation, fault slip distribution and postseismic deformation associated with this earthquake using satellite radar interferometry observations in combination with seismic data. The coseismic slip model is derived by the inversion of InSAR observations acquired by the Envisat satellite in Wide Swath (WS) and Image modes, with the fault geometry constrained by aftershocks. We infer an area of ~ 160 km by 50 km along the Nazca-South America convergent margin, between latitudes 22° S and 23.5° S, ruptured during the mainshock. The coseismic fault slip occurs between ~ 30 and 50 km depth, where we observe two high-slip regions (asperities) with the peak slip of ~ 1.5 m and 2.5 m beneath the earthquake epicenter and northeast of Mejillones Peninsula, respectively. We supplement this source parameter study with InSAR observations of postseismic deformation, obtained by time-series analysis of interferograms covering the entire length of the rupture area for several years before and after the earthquake.

  19. Fault and anthropogenic processes in central California constrained by satellite and airborne InSAR and in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Lundgren, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) system is the primary plate boundary in California, with the central SAF (CSAF) lying adjacent to the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), a vast structural trough that accounts for about one-sixth of the United Sates' irrigated land and one-fifth of its extracted groundwater. The CSAF displays a range of fault slip behavior with creeping in its central segment that decreases towards its northwest and southeast ends, where the fault transitions to being fully locked. At least six Mw ~6.0 events since 1857 have occurred near the Parkfield transition, most recently in 2004. Large earthquakes also occurred on secondary faults parallel to the SAF, the result of distributed deformation across the plate boundary zone. Recent studies have revealed the complex interaction between anthropogenic related groundwater depletion and the seismic activity on adjacent faults through stress interaction. Despite recent progress, many questions regarding fault and anthropogenic processes in the region still remain. For example, how is the relative plate motion accommodated between the CSAF and off-fault deformation? What is the distribution of fault creep and slip deficit at shallow depths? What are the spatiotemporal variations of fault slip? What are the spatiotemporal characteristics of anthropogenic and lithospheric processes and how do they interact with each other? To address these, we combine satellite InSAR and NASA airborne UAVSAR data to image on and off-fault deformation. The UAVSAR data cover fault perpendicular swaths imaged from opposing look directions and fault parallel swaths since 2009. The much finer spatial resolution and optimized viewing geometry provide important constraints on near fault deformation and fault slip at very shallow depth. We performed a synoptic InSAR time series analysis using ERS-1/2, Envisat, ALOS and UAVSAR interferograms. The combined C-band ERS-1/2 and Envisat data provide a long time interval of SAR data over the region

  20. Response Times of Children and Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome on an "Advanced" Test of Theory of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaland, Nils; Smith, Lars; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2007-01-01

    In the present study the response times of 10- to 20-year-old participants with Asperger syndrome (AS) (N = 21) of normal intelligence and a control group of typically developing individuals (N = 20) were recorded on a new "advanced" test of theory of mind. This test taps the ability to make mental-state inferences versus physical-state inferences…

  1. Research and development program for the development of advanced time-temperature dependent constitutive relationships. Volume 2: Programming manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassenti, B. N.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a 10-month research and development program for nonlinear structural modeling with advanced time-temperature constitutive relationships are presented. The implementation of the theory in the MARC nonlinear finite element code is discussed, and instructions for the computational application of the theory are provided.

  2. Timing of Therapies in the Multidisciplinary Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: Available Evidence and Implications for Routine Practice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Francesco; Chau, Ian

    2016-07-01

    A multimodality disciplinary approach is paramount for the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Over the last decade, (chemo)radiotherapy followed by surgery plus or minus adjuvant chemotherapy has represented the mainstay of treatment for this disease. Nevertheless, robust evidence suggesting the optimal timing and sequence of therapies in this setting has been overall limited. A number of questions are still unsolved including the length of the interval between neoadjuvant radiotherapy and surgery or the timing of systemic chemotherapy. Interestingly, emerging data support the contention that altering sequence or timing or both of the components of this multimodality approach may provide an opportunity to implement treatment strategies that far better address the risk and expectations of individual patients. In this article, we review the available evidence on timing of therapies in the multidisciplinary treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer and discuss the potential implications for routine practice that may derive from a change of the currently accepted treatment paradigm. PMID:27238468

  3. A real-time simulation evaluation of an advanced detection, isolation and accommodation algorithm for sensor failures in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.; Delaat, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    An advanced sensor failure detection, isolation, and accommodation (ADIA) algorithm has been developed for use with an aircraft turbofan engine control system. In a previous paper the authors described the ADIA algorithm and its real-time implementation. Subsequent improvements made to the algorithm and implementation are discussed, and the results of an evaluation presented. The evaluation used a real-time, hybrid computer simulation of an F100 turbofan engine.

  4. A real-time simulation evaluation of an advanced detection. Isolation and accommodation algorithm for sensor failures in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.; Delaat, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    An advanced sensor failure detection, isolation, and accommodation (ADIA) algorithm has been developed for use with an aircraft turbofan engine control system. In a previous paper the authors described the ADIA algorithm and its real-time implementation. Subsequent improvements made to the algorithm and implementation are discussed, and the results of an evaluation presented. The evaluation used a real-time, hybrid computer simulation of an F100 turbofan engine.

  5. A computer program for estimating the power-density spectrum of advanced continuous simulation language generated time histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program for performing frequency analysis of time history data is presented. The program uses circular convolution and the fast Fourier transform to calculate power density spectrum (PDS) of time history data. The program interfaces with the advanced continuous simulation language (ACSL) so that a frequency analysis may be performed on ACSL generated simulation variables. An example of the calculation of the PDS of a Van de Pol oscillator is presented.

  6. Tenfold Disparity Between Decadal InSAR and Millennial Morphochronologic Slip-Rates on the Karakorum Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, M.; Ryerson, F. J.; Tapponnier, P.; Finkel, R. C.; van der Woerd, J.; Li, H.; Liu, Q.

    2004-12-01

    The role of the Karakorum Fault in the kinematics of present-day deformation in Tibet is debated. Although it is the main dextral strike-slip fault north of the Himalayas, recent InSAR data are interpreted to suggest that it is barely active, moving at a rate of 1 ± 3 mm/yr. Surface exposure dating of moraines and terraces south of Bangong lake tell a different story, suggesting it slips ten times as fast. At one site on the west side of the Gar graben (32° 3' N-80° 1' E, 4365 m-4760 m), at the foot of the Aliyari Range, we sampled quartz-rich, rooted blocks on the lateral moraine crests of a large till complex. The moraines are offset right-laterally relative to the valley of the Manikala Daer Glacier. Twenty-seven samples were dated using cosmogenic 10Be. The offsets of 2 well-defined moraine crests (M1 and M2E), obtained from retro-deformation of 1 m-resolution IKONOS images, are 220 ± 10 m and 1520 ± 50 m, respectively. The 10Be exposure ages fall in distinct clusters: 21 ± 0.1 ka and 40 ± 3 ka on M1, and 140 ± 5.5 ka and 180 ± 14 ka on M2. The ages of maximum sample abundance correlate remarkably well with the ages of the coldest periods derived from proxy paleo-temperature records (SPECMAP), suggesting that the Manikala glacier crossed the fault to emplace moraines northeast of the range front only during the LGM and penultimate glacial maximum (late stage 6), and implying little erosion. Pairing the abandonment ages of the two moraines ( ˜ 21 and 140 ka) with their offsets yields concordant dextral slip-rates of 10.9 ± 0.6 and 10.5 ± 0.5 mm/yr. The resulting, average slip rate (10.7 ± 0.7 mm/yr) we derive for the last 150 ka is comparable to the geological rate obtained by Lacassin et al., [2004] (10 ± 3 mm/yr in the last 34 Ma) and to the GPS geodetic rate determined by Banerjee and Burgmann, [2002] (11 ± 4 mm/yr). It is almost 3 times greater than that measured in India by Brown et al., [2002] (4 ± 1 mm/yr) and three times smaller than that

  7. A prototype of an automated high resolution InSAR volcano-monitoring system in the MED-SUV project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Tanvir A.; Minet, Christian; Fritz, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic processes which produce a variety of geological and hydrological hazards are difficult to predict and capable of triggering natural disasters on regional to global scales. Therefore it is important to monitor volcano continuously and with a high spatial and temporal sampling rate. The monitoring of active volcanoes requires the reliable measurement of surface deformation before, during and after volcanic activities and it helps for the better understanding and modelling of the involved geophysical processes. Space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR), persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI) and small baseline subset algorithm (SBAS) provide a powerful tool for observing the eruptive activities and measuring the surface changes of millimetre accuracy. All the mentioned techniques with deformation time series extraction address the challenges by exploiting medium to large SAR image stacks. The process of selecting, ordering, downloading, storing, logging, extracting and preparing the data for processing is very time consuming has to be done manually for every single data-stack. In many cases it is even an iterative process which has to be done regularly and continuously. Therefore, data processing becomes slow which causes significant delays in data delivery. The SAR Satellite based High Resolution Data Acquisition System, which will be developed at DLR, will automate this entire time consuming tasks and allows an operational volcano monitoring system. Every 24 hours the system runs for searching new acquired scene over the volcanoes and keeps track of the data orders, log the status and download the provided data via ftp-transfer including E-Mail alert. Furthermore, the system will deliver specified reports and maps to a database for review and use by specialists. The user interaction will be minimized and iterative processes will be totally avoided. In this presentation, a prototype of SAR Satellite based High Resolution Data

  8. SENTINEL-1 Insar Processing of Corner Reflector Information in the Northern-Bohemian Coal Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlaváčová, I.; Halounová, L.; Stanislav, P.

    2016-06-01

    The mining area previously monitored by TerraSAR-X InSAR is now monitored by Sentinel-1 InSAR. Although the processing of the IWS (TOPS) mode requires additional processing steps and the coregistration has to be performed with the precision of 0.001 pixel (in the azimuth direction), if an area within one burst is processed, such a precise coregistration is not necessary. Information from 11 corner reflectors is evaluated, and significant movements at one of them were detected. Although it seems to be uplift, it is more probable that the movement is in down-the-slope direction, which has a negative sensitivity with regard to the satellite line of sight. The movement is similar to the one detected by TerraSAR-X satellite in the past. At the end of the monitoring period, the movement seems to settle down; future monitoring will show more about the dynamicity of the movement.

  9. InSAR detects increase in surface subsidence caused by an Arctic tundra fire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Lin; Jafarov, Elchin E.; Schaefer, Kevin M.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Zebker, Howard A.; Williams, Christopher A.; Rogan, John; Zhang, Tingjun

    2014-01-01

    Wildfire is a major disturbance in the Arctic tundra and boreal forests, having a significant impact on soil hydrology, carbon cycling, and permafrost dynamics. This study explores the use of the microwave Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique to map and quantify ground surface subsidence caused by the Anaktuvuk River fire on the North Slope of Alaska. We detected an increase of up to 8 cm of thaw-season ground subsidence after the fire, which is due to a combination of thickened active layer and permafrost thaw subsidence. Our results illustrate the effectiveness and potential of using InSAR to quantify fire impacts on the Arctic tundra, especially in regions underlain by ice-rich permafrost. Our study also suggests that surface subsidence is a more comprehensive indicator of fire impacts on ice-rich permafrost terrain than changes in active layer thickness alone.

  10. InSAR detects increase in surface subsidence caused by an Arctic tundra fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Jafarov, Elchin E.; Schaefer, Kevin M.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Zebker, Howard A.; Williams, Christopher A.; Rogan, John; Zhang, Tingjun

    2014-06-01

    Wildfire is a major disturbance in the Arctic tundra and boreal forests, having a significant impact on soil hydrology, carbon cycling, and permafrost dynamics. This study explores the use of the microwave Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique to map and quantify ground surface subsidence caused by the Anaktuvuk River fire on the North Slope of Alaska. We detected an increase of up to 8 cm of thaw-season ground subsidence after the fire, which is due to a combination of thickened active layer and permafrost thaw subsidence. Our results illustrate the effectiveness and potential of using InSAR to quantify fire impacts on the Arctic tundra, especially in regions underlain by ice-rich permafrost. Our study also suggests that surface subsidence is a more comprehensive indicator of fire impacts on ice-rich permafrost terrain than changes in active layer thickness alone.

  11. Crustal Rebound due to Lake Mass Changes Measured by InSAR: Constraints on Lithosphere Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, M. P.; Twardzik, C.; Cavalié, O.; Lasserre, C.

    2015-12-01

    SAR interferometry has proven to be a reliable method for detecting small displacements due to ground subsidence. Here, we relate ground motion around the lake Mead (Nevada, USA) and lake Siling Co (Tibet, China) measured by InSAR to water loading in order to constrain the rheology of the lithosphere.Lake Mead, an artificial reservoir, has been filled with water in 1935. We analyzed ~500 interferograms based on 62 ERS images and on 40 ENVISAT images acquired between 1992 and 2010. Interferograms are inverted to solve for the time series of ground motion in the lake Mead area. Temporal smoothing allows to reduce the turbulent atmospheric delays. Spatio-temporal series of the deformation from 1992 to 2010 show a broad subsidence pattern correlated with lake level from 1992 to 2010. We model the deformation, taking into account the water and sediment loading history of the lake since 1935. The two-layer visco-elastic model proposed by Kaufmann and Amelung (2000), with a mantle viscosity of 1018 Pa s, adjusts well the data up to 2001, but overpredicts the deformation after 2001. We will discuss the models that could explain the deformation evolution. The Siling Co lake is the largest endorheic lake in Central Tibet. In 1972-1999 its water level remained stable, while it increased by about 1.0~m/yr in the period 2000-2006. The increased rate gradually stepped down to 0.2~m/yr in 2007-2011. We analysed 107 ERS and Envisat SAR images during the period 1992-2011. The deformation amplitude closely follows the lake level temporal evolution, except that subsidence continues in 2008-2011, while the lake level stagnated. This temporal evolution suggests a non elastic relaxation process taking place at a decade time-scale. Phase delay maps are used to constrain possible layered visco-elastic rheological models. An elastic model could partly explain the observed subsidence rate if elastic moduli are about twice lower than those extracted from Vp/Vs profiles. The surface

  12. Inversion of InSAR Data for the Aseismic Slip-Rate on the Hayward Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, D. A.; Bürgmann, R.; Nadeau, R.; D'Alessio, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Hayward fault is a major strand of the San Andreas fault system, and has received considerable attention because of the seismic hazard it poses to the San Francisco Bay Area. We perform a least-squares inversion of multiple geodetic and seismic data sets to determine the strike-slip distribution of the aseismic slip-rate on the fault. The analysis focuses on the northern 60 km of the fault where surface creep rates appear to be constant over the past several decades. InSAR data from 24 independent ERS interferograms are stacked to obtain range-change rates from 1992 to 2000. Surface displacement rates at 43 sites are observed using GPS from 1994 to 2002. Surface creep observations and estimates of deep slip rates determined from characteristic repeating earthquake sequences are also incorporated in the inversion. The densely spaced InSAR data require a non-planar fault surface to adequately model the near-fault data. The fault is discretized into 283 triangular dislocation elements that approximate the non-planar attributes of the fault surface. South of Hayward, a steeply, east-dipping fault geometry accommodates the divergence of the surface trace and the micro-seismicity at depth. Laplacian smoothing and a positivity constraint are included in the inversion. The InSAR data provide the greatest resolution on the shallow portion of the fault. The additional data sets help to complement the InSAR data and improve the model resolution. The inversion result suggests a heterogeneous distribution of aseismic slip-rate that is characterized by both locked and freely slipping patches. A seismic cluster beneath San Leandro coincides with a creeping patch as resolved by the geodetic data. A locked region at depth coincides with the source region of the 1868 earthquake (M 6.8) on the southern Hayward fault.

  13. Tropospheric Correction for InSAR Using Interpolated ECMWF Data and GPS Zenith Total Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Frank H.; Fishbein, Evan F.; Moore, Angelyn W.; Owen, Susan E.; Fielding, Eric J.; Granger, Stephanie L.; Bjorndahl, Fredrik; Lofgren Johan

    2011-01-01

    To mitigate atmospheric errors caused by the troposphere, which is a limiting error source for spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imaging, a tropospheric correction method has been developed using data from the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and the Global Positioning System (GPS). The ECMWF data was interpolated using a Stretched Boundary Layer Model (SBLM), and ground-based GPS estimates of the tropospheric delay from the Southern California Integrated GPS Network were interpolated using modified Gaussian and inverse distance weighted interpolations. The resulting Zenith Total Delay (ZTD) correction maps have been evaluated, both separately and using a combination of the two data sets, for three short-interval InSAR pairs from Envisat during 2006 on an area stretching from northeast from the Los Angeles basin towards Death Valley. Results show that the root mean square (rms) in the InSAR images was greatly reduced, meaning a significant reduction in the atmospheric noise of up to 32 percent. However, for some of the images, the rms increased and large errors remained after applying the tropospheric correction. The residuals showed a constant gradient over the area, suggesting that a remaining orbit error from Envisat was present. The orbit reprocessing in ROI_pac and the plane fitting both require that the only remaining error in the InSAR image be the orbit error. If this is not fulfilled, the correction can be made anyway, but it will be done using all remaining errors assuming them to be orbit errors. By correcting for tropospheric noise, the biggest error source is removed, and the orbit error becomes apparent and can be corrected for

  14. SAR and InSAR georeferencing algorithms for inertial navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, M.; Kulpa, K.; Pinelli, G.; Samczynski, P.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents the concept of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Interferemetric SAR (InSAR) georeferencing algorithms dedicated for SAR based augmented Inertial Navigation Architecture (SARINA). The SARINA is a novel concept of the Inertial Navigation System (INS), which utilized the SAR radar as an additional sensor to provide information about the platform trajectory position and compensate an aircraft drift due to Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) errors, Global Positioning System (GPS) lack of integrity, etc.

  15. Simulation Studies of the Effect of Forest Spatial Structure on InSAR Signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guoqing; Liu, Dawei; Ranson, K. Jon; Koetz, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    The height of scattering phase retrieved from InSAR data is considered being correlated with the tree height and the spatial structure of the forest stand. Though some researchers have used simple backscattering models to estimate tree height from the height of scattering center, the effect of forest spatial structure on InSAR data is not well understood yet. A three-dimensional coherent radar backscattering model for forest canopies based on realistic three-dimensional scene was used to investigate the effect in this paper. The realistic spatial structure of forest canopies was established either by field measurements (stem map) or through use of forest growth model. Field measurements or a forest growth model parameterized using local environmental parameters provides information of forest species composition and tree sizes in certain growth phases. A fractal tree model (L-system) was used to simulate individual 3- D tree structure of different ages or heights. Trees were positioned in a stand in certain patterns resulting in a 3-D medium of discrete scatterers. The radar coherent backscatter model took the 3-D forest scene as input and simulates the coherent radar backscattering signature. Interferometric SAR images of 3D scenes were simulated and heights of scattering phase centers were estimated from the simulated InSAR data. The effects of tree height, crown cover, crown depth, and the spatial distribution patterns of trees on the scattering phase center were analyzed. The results will be presented in the paper.

  16. Nyamulagira’s magma plumbing system inferred from 15 years of InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wauthier, Christelle; Cayol, Valerie; Poland, Michael; Kervyn, François; D'Oreye, Nicolas; Hooper, Andrew; Samsonov, Sergei; Tiampo, Kristy; Smets, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Nyamulagira, located in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo on the western branch of the East African rift, is Africa’s most active volcano, with an average of one eruption every 3 years since 1938. Owing to the socio-economical context of that region, the volcano lacks ground-based geodetic measurements but has been monitored by interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) since 1996. A combination of 3D Mixed Boundary Element Method and inverse modelling, taking into account topography and source interactions, is used to interpret InSAR ground displacements associated with eruptive activity in 1996, 2002, 2004, 2006 and 2010. These eruptions can be fitted by models incorporating dyke intrusions, and some (namely the 2006 and 2010 eruptions) require a magma reservoir beneath the summit caldera. We investigate inter-eruptive deformation with a multi-temporal InSAR approach. We propose the following magma plumbing system at Nyamulagira by integrating numerical deformation models with other available data: a deep reservoir (c. 25 km depth) feeds a shallower reservoir (c. 4 km depth); proximal eruptions are fed from the shallow reservoir through dykes while distal eruptions can be fed directly from the deep reservoir. A dyke-like conduit is also present beneath the upper southeastern flank of Nyamulagira.

  17. InSAR detects possible thaw settlement in the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rykhus, R.P.; Lu, Zhiming

    2008-01-01

    Satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has proven to be an effective tool for monitoring surface deformation from volcanoes, earthquakes, landslides, and groundwater withdrawal. This paper seeks to expand the list of applications of InSAR data to include monitoring subsidence possibly associated with thaw settlement over the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain. To test our hypothesis that InSAR data are sufficiently sensitive to detect subsidence associated with thaw settlement, we acquired all Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1 (JERS-1) L-band data available for the summers of 1996, 1997, and 1998 over two sites on the Alaska North Slope. The least amount of subsidence for both study sites was detected in the interferograms covering the summer of 1996 (2-3 cm), interferograms from 1997 and 1998 revealed that about 3 cm of subsidence occurred at the northern Cache One Lake site, and about 5 cm of subsidence was detected at the southern Kaparuk River site. These preliminary results illustrate the capacity of the L-band (24 cm) wavelength JERS-1 radar data to penetrate the short Arctic vegetation to monitor subsidence possibly associated with thaw settlement of the active layer and (or) other hydrologic changes over relatively large areas. ?? 2008 CASI.

  18. Block adjustment of airborne InSAR based on interferogram phase and POS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xijuan; Zhao, Yinghui; Han, Chunming; Dou, Changyong

    2015-12-01

    High-precision surface elevation information in large scale can be obtained efficiently by airborne Interferomatric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) system, which is recently becoming an important tool to acquire remote sensing data and perform mapping applications in the area where surveying and mapping is difficult to be accomplished by spaceborne satellite or field working. . Based on the study of the three-dimensional (3D) positioning model using interferogram phase and Position and Orientation System (POS) data and block adjustment error model, a block adjustment method to produce seamless wide-area mosaic product generated from airborne InSAR data is proposed in this paper. The effect of 6 parameters, including trajectory and attitude of the aircraft, baseline length and incline angle, slant range, and interferometric phase, on the 3D positioning accuracy is quantitatively analyzed. Using the data acquired in the field campaign conducted in Mianyang county Sichuan province, China in June 2011, a mosaic seamless Digital Elevation Model (DEM) product was generated from 76 images in 4 flight strips by the proposed block adjustment model. The residuals of ground control points (GCPs), the absolute positioning accuracy of check points (CPs) and the relative positioning accuracy of tie points (TPs) both in same and adjacent strips were assessed. The experimental results suggest that the DEM and Digital Orthophoto Map (DOM) product generated by the airborne InSAR data with sparse GCPs can meet mapping accuracy requirement at scale of 1:10 000.

  19. Monitoring CO2 sequestration with a network inversion InSAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabus, B.; Ghuman, P.; MacDonald, B.

    2009-05-01

    The capture, containment and long-term storage of CO2 is increasingly discussed as an important means to counter climate change resulting from the ongoing release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. This CO2 sequestration often requires the pumping of the gas into deep saline aquifers. However, before sequestration can be regarded as a longterm solution it is necessary to investigate under which conditions permanent and leakless capture of the CO2 is achieved in the substrate. We demonstrate that a combination of spaceborne synthetic aperture interferometry (InSAR) and ground based measurements of ground uplift caused by the underground release and spreading of the CO2 can be forged into a powerful tool to monitor sequsetration. We use a novel InSAR approach, which combines the benefits of a point-based persistent scatterer algorithm with a network inversion approach, and an additional temporal filter to remove atmospheric disturbances also at smaller scales down to 1 km and less. Using case studies from several injection wells we show that InSAR and ground based data in conjunction with geological and structural information above the aquifer, as well as detailed injection logs, allow to monitor the volumetric spread of CO2 at the mm per year level. For the majority of the studied wells CO2 appears to approach a stable sequestration state, however, in at least one case our results suggest leakage outside the aquifer.

  20. Advanced karst hydrological and contaminant monitoring techniques for real-time and high resolution applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In telogenetic and soil-mantled karst aquifers, the movement of autogenic recharge through the epikarstic zone and into the regional aquifer can be a complex process and have implications for flooding, groundwater contamination, and other difficult to capture processes. Recent advances in instrument...

  1. Real-time application of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques for research aircraft simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Steven B.

    1990-01-01

    Visual aids are valuable assets to engineers for design, demonstration, and evaluation. Discussed here are a variety of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques used to enhance the displays of test aircraft dynamics. The new software's capabilities are examined and possible future uses are considered.

  2. Just-in-Time Teaching: A Tool for Enhancing Student Engagement in Advanced Foreign Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abreu, Laurel; Knouse, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have indicated a need for further research on effective pedagogical strategies designed for advanced foreign language courses in the postsecondary setting, especially in light of decreased enrollments at this level and the elimination of foreign language programs altogether in some institutions (Paesani & Allen, 2012). This article…

  3. Identification of mine collapses, explosions and earthquakes using INSAR: a preliminary investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall, B; Sweeney, J J; Walter, W R

    1998-07-07

    Interferograms constmcted from satellite-borne synthetic aperture radar images have the capability of mapping sub-cm ground surface deformation over areas on the order of 100 x 100 km with a spatial resolution on the order of 10 meters. We investigate the utility of synthetic aperture radar interferomehy (InSAR) used in conjunction with regional seismic methods in detecting and discriminating different types of seismic events in the context of special event analysis for the CTBT. For this initial study, we carried out elastic dislocation modeling of underground explosions, mine collapses and small (M<5.5) shallow earthquakes to produce synthetic interferograms and then analyzed satellite radar data for a large mine collapse. The synthetic modeling shows that, for a given magnitude each type of event produces a distinctive pattern of ground deformation that can be recognized in, and recovered from, the corresponding interferogram. These diagnostic characteristics include not only differences in the polarities of surface displacements but also differences in displacement amplitudes from the different sources. The technique is especially sensitive to source depth, a parameter that is crucial in discriminating earthquakes from the other event types but is often very poorly constrained by regional seismic data alone. The ERS radar data analyzed is from a ML 5.2 seismic event that occurred in southwestern Wyoming on February 3,1995. Although seismic data from the event have some characteristics of an underground explosion, based on seismological and geodetic data it has been identified as being caused by a large underground collapse in the Solvay Mine. Several pairs of before-collapse and after-collapse radar images were phase processed to obtain interferograms. The minimum time separation for a before-collapse and after-collapse pair was 548 days. Even with this long time separation, phase coherence between the image pairs was acceptable and a deformation map

  4. Mapping Slumgullion Landslide in Colorado, USA Using Airborne Repeat-Pass InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.; Glennie, C. L.; Wang, G.; Lu, Z.; Fernandez-Diaz, J. C.; Cao, N.; Zaugg, E.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) uses two or more SAR images over the same area to determine landscape topography or ground deformation. An interferogram, generated by the phase components of two coherent SAR images, depicts range changes between the radar and the ground resolution elements, and can be used to derive both landscape topography and subtle changes in surface elevation. However, spaceborne repeat-pass interferometry has two main drawbacks: effects due to differences in atmospheric temperature, pressure, and water vapour at two observation times, and loss of coherence due to long spatial and temporal baselines between observations. Airborne repeat-pass interferometry does not suffer from these drawbacks. The atmospheric effect in case of airborne DInSAR becomes negligible due to smaller swath coverage, and the coherence can be maintained by using smaller spatial and temporal baselines. However, the main technical limitation concerning airborne DInSAR is the need of precise motion compensation with an accurate navigation system to correct for the significant phase errors due to typical flight instability from air turbulence. Here, we present results from a pilot study conducted on July 2015 using both X-band and L-band SlimSAR airborne system over the Slumgullion landslide in Colorado in order to (1) acquire the differential interferograms from the airborne platform, (2) understand their source of errors, and (3) pave a way to improve the precision of the derived surface deformation. The landslide movement estimated from airborne DInSAR is also compared with coincident GPS, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), airborne LiDAR, and spaceborne DInSAR measurements using COSMO-SkyMed images. The airborne DInSAR system has a potential to provide time-transient variability in land surface topography with high-precision and high-resolution, and provide researchers with greater flexibility in selecting the temporal and spatial baselines of the data

  5. Spatial variations in slip deficit on the central San Andreas Fault from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Isabelle; Bürgmann, Roland

    2008-12-01

    We use ERS InSAR measurements to record spatial variations in creep rate along the creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault (SAF), California, between 1992 and 2001. Inversion of geodetic data yields a slip rate distribution along the creeping segment, which is used for first-order moment release and deficit calculations. We present a time-averaged spatial picture of surface deformation and associated subsurface creep. An interferometric stack is constructed from 12 interferograms that show good coherence. For the decade of observation, the total right-lateral offset spanned by the data is ~34 mmyr-1. Along most of the length of the creeping segment, this offset occurs within a narrow (<2 km) zone close to the fault trace. In the northern part, a minor part of the offset is taken up by the nearby Calaveras-Paicines Fault. In general, the observed rates of surface creep are consistent with those obtained by several other studies for a longer and/or earlier period of time, using different geodetic methods. This suggests that the average creep rate has been constant over a period of almost four decades. A joint GPS-InSAR inversion implies that the shallow creep rate is variable along strike, reaching up to 31.5 +/- 1 mmyr-1 in the central section of the creeping segment, tapering off along-strike to the south and becoming partitioned across two subparallel faults in the north. The deep slip rate beneath the seismogenic layer is 33 +/- 3 mmyr-1. The difference between shallow and deep slip rates suggests that there is a shallow slip deficit on the creeping segment of the SAF (CSAF). Moment release rate due to aseismic slip is approximately three orders of magnitude greater than seismic moment release. The annual creep on the CSAF is equivalent to the moment released in a M 6 earthquake. The equivalent moment of the slip deficit relative to the deep slip rate is between 4.1 × 1017 and 8.4 × 1017 N myr-1, which is equivalent to a magnitude 5.7-5.9 earthquake. Over a

  6. Using InSAR to investigate long term caldera unrest: case studies from Yellowstone and Long Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    battaglia, maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Interpreting geodetic measurements can be particularly difficult in the case of slow, years-to-decades deformation, such as that commonly observed at large Quaternary silicic calderas. For example, Yellowstone caldera has shown a complex behavior over recent decades: uplift of resurgent domes within the caldera started sometime after 1923, reaching a total of 90 cm, but in 1984 the deformation reversed to subsidence at a rate of 1-2 cm/yr until 1992. Starting in 1992, the deformation began migrating from one resurgent dome to the other, and deformation was also detected along the caldera boundary - the so-called Northern Caldera Rim - starting in the mid-1990s. Evidence from geodetic surveys suggests that magma intrusion and/or pressurization of hydrothermal fluids may both drive uplift at Yellowstone. Geodetic measurements at Long Valley caldera have also revealed multiple episodes of caldera uplift, but in contrast to Yellowstone, deformation is largely restricted to the caldera's single resurgent dome. The fact that the energy released during the resurgent dome uplift is much larger than that which can be explained by seismic activity within and around the caldera, together with the observation that the onset of accelerated deformation precedes increases in earthquake activity by several weeks, suggests that the major source of caldera unrest is probably magma intrusion beneath the resurgent dome. Here we present time series of surface deformation for Yellowstone and Long Valley retrieved by applying the SBAS InSAR technique. We estimate the average regional deformation signal by using the mean velocity values derived from coherent SAR pixels belonging to areas outside the caldera. This tectonic signal is removed from the InSAR displacement and we modeled the InSAR, leveling, and gravity measurements to retrieve the best fitting source parameters. For Yellowstone caldera, different distinct sources, either hydrothermal or magmatic, have been intermittently

  7. Hydrodynamics of the Groundwater-Fed Sian Ka'an Wetlands, Mexico, From InSAR and SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondwe, B. R.; Hong, S.; Wdowinski, S.; Bauer-Gottwein, P.

    2008-12-01

    The 5300 km2 pristine Sian Ka'an wetland in Mexico is fed entirely by groundwater from the karst aquifer of the Yucatan Peninsula. The area is undeveloped and hence difficult to access. The inflow through underground rivers and karst structures is hard to observe resulting in difficulties to understand, quantify and predict the wetland dynamics. Remotely sensed Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data offer new opportunities to get hydrodynamic information, which is useful for wetland management. InSAR data produces temporal phase-changes of the backscattered radar signal, which can be related to the water level changes in vegetated wetlands. SAR data reveals information of surface properties such as the degree of flooding through the amplitude of the backscattered signal. We used RADARSAT-1 InSAR and SAR data to form 36 interferograms and 13 flooding maps with 24 to 48 day intervals covering the time span of October 2006 to March 2008. The dataset has a high spatial resolution of ca. 20 to 60 m. Sian Ka'an consists of a mosaic of freshwater sloughs, canals, floodplains and brackish tidally-influenced areas. Throughout most of the year, water level changes in the wetland are almost uniform, resulting in a very low fringe signal in the InSAR-observations. However, during periods of maximum water levels in the wetland, steeper gradients of water level changes are observed in the wetland's sloughs, more than in the surrounding floodplains. The data reveal that two sloughs and a canal-shaped feature are main source areas feeding water into the wetland. The maximum relative water level changes observed in the wetland are 48 cm. Tide-induced water level changes appear to occur in 3 separate areas, with a maximum relative change of 24 cm, corresponding well with tidal predictions. The interferograms also reveal information about surface water flow directions and local-scale flow divides in the wetland, which are important

  8. About Time: A Metacognitive View of Time and Workload Created by Technological Advancements in an Odl Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gous, Ignatius G. P.; Roberts, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Management of time and workload is influenced by the quality of awareness of impacting factors. Faculty has to attend to many responsibilities, with technology in teaching a recent but game-changing impacting factor. This article is a case study which explores the metacognitive awareness of the impact of technology on teaching, learning and…

  9. Multi-temporal InSAR monitoring of landslides in a tropical urban environment: focus on Bukavu (DR Congo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Adriano; Monsieurs, Elise; Dewitte, Olivier; d'Oreyes, Nicolas; Kervyn, Francois

    2016-04-01

    The western branch of the East African Rift System, in Central Africa, is characterized by the presence of several geohazards: earthquakes, volcanoes, and landslides. Every year, landslides cause fatalities, structural and functional damage to infrastructure and private properties with serious disruptions of the organization of societies and severe impact on the populations. These impacts are particularly important in the city of Bukavu (DR Congo) located within the Rift, on the southern shore of Lake Kivu. Large slow-moving landslides continuously affect highly populated slopes in the city. However little is known about their actual kinematics and the processes at play. Here we use multi-temporal InSAR technique to monitor these ground deformations. Using 50 Cosmo-SkyMed SAR images, acquired between March - October 2015 with a revisiting time of 8 days (ascending and descending orbits), we produce displacement-rate maps and ground deformation time series using the PS technique. Movements with a velocity >5cm/yr are detected, which is consistent with field observations. DGPS measurements, taken at 21 benchmarks in the area during the same period, allow validating the results. Similar ground deformation rates are found for the period 2002-2008 using Envisat ASAR images. Furthermore, comparison with rainfall monitoring data acquire on site should help us to understand the influence of water and the tropical seasonality in the slide mechanisms.

  10. Detection of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake-induced landslide surface deformation in Kathmandu using InSAR images from PALSAR-2 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroshi P.; Une, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies reported that the 2015 Gorkha earthquake (Mw 7.8), which occurred in Nepal, triggered landslides in mountainous areas. In Kathmandu, earthquake-induced land subsidence was identified by interpreting local phase changes in interferograms produced from Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2/Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 data. However, the associated ground deformation was not discussed in detail. We studied line-of-sight (LoS) changes from InSAR images in the SE area of Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu. To obtain the change in LoS caused only by local, short-wavelength surface deformation, we subtracted the change in LoS attributed to coseismic deformation from the original change in LoS. The resulting change in LoS showed that the river terrace was driven to the bottom of the river valley. We also studied the changes in LoS in both ascending and descending InSAR images of the area along the Bishnumati River and performed 2.5D analysis. Removing the effect of coseismic deformation revealed east-west and up-down components of local surface deformation, indicating that the river terrace deformed eastward and subsided on the western riverbank of the river. On the east riverbank, the river terrace deformed westward and subsided. However, in the southern part of the river basin, the river terrace deformed westward and was uplifted. The deformation data and field survey results indicate that local surface deformation in these two areas was not caused by land subsidence but by a landslide (specifically, lateral spread).

  11. Feasibility and Timing of Cytoreduction Surgery in Advanced (Metastatic or Recurrent) Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors During the Era of Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Chun; Liao, Chien-Hung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Yen-Yang; MA, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was dramatically improved in the era of imatinib. Cytoreduction surgery was advocated as an additional treatment for advanced GISTs, especially when patients having poor response to imatinib or developing resistance to it. However, the efficacy and benefit of cytoreduction were still controversial. Likewise, the sequence between cytoreduction surgery and imatinib still need evaluation. In this study, we tried to assess the feasibility and efficiency of cytoreduction in advanced GISTs. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of timing of the cytoreduction surgery on the prognosis of advanced GISTs. We conducted a prospective collecting retrospective review of patients with advanced GISTs (metastatic, unresectable, and recurrent GISTs) treated in Chang Gung memorial hospital (CGMH) since 2001 to 2013. We analyzed the impact of cytoreduction surgery to response to imatinib, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced GISTs. Moreover, by the timing of cytoreduction to imatinib, we divided the surgical patients who had surgery before imatinib use into early group and those who had surgery after imatinib into late. We compared the clinical response to imatinib, PFS and OS between early and late cytoreduction surgical groups. Totally, 182 patients were enrolled into this study. Seventy-six patients underwent cytoreduction surgery. The demographic characteristics and tumor presentation were similar between surgical and non-surgical groups. The surgical group showed better complete response rate (P < 0.001) and partial response rate (P = 0.008) than non-surgical group. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year PFS were significantly superior in surgical group (P = 0.003). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year OS were superior in surgical group, but without statistical significance (P = 0.088). Dividing by cytoreduction surgical timing, the demographic

  12. Surface deformation in areas of abandoned mining: a case study of InSAR applied in the Northumberland region of the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccormack, Harry; Bateson, Luke; Banton, Carl; Holley, Rachel; Lawrence, David; Cigna, Francesca; Watson, Ian; Burren, Richard

    2013-04-01

    The United Kingdom has a rich history of coal mining probably dating back to Roman times, and this was a driving force behind the industrial revolution. Although the amount of mining has decreased significantly in recent years, the effects of mining on ground stability are widespread, complex and under-monitored. The Coal Authority is responsible for protecting the public and environment in coal mining areas. Particularly they are responsible for administering coal mining subsidence damage claims and preventing problems due to rising groundwater in old mining areas. Drawing on the expertise of Fugro NPA (FNPA) and the British Geological Survey (BGS), the aim of this project was to show how a wide-area ground stability dataset with associated geological interpretation could help the Coal Authority better administer their subsidence claims and groundwater management. This work was performed within the Terrafirma project. The study area chosen was the Northumberland and Durham coalfield where the last active mine closed in 2005. More than 20 seams have been mined and as depths increased this led to the need to pump water to prevent the mines from flooding. As the mines shut down the pumping stopped, causing the water level to rise and recover. Using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques FNPA produced a surface deformation dataset which was interpreted by BGS to add value in the form of geological interpretation. The dataset covers two epochs; 1995-2000 and 2002-2008. During the earlier epoch eight to nine 'hotspots' of subsidence were identified, mainly in the south of the study area. All but one of the subsidence areas shows a strong spatial correlation with areas of past mining. However there is a discrepancy in the timing of InSAR deformations and the timing of subsidence that would be expected given the type of workings. It is suspected that the spatial and temporal pattern of deformation relates not only to material extraction but also to

  13. A map of strain rate for Eastern Turkey, from InSAR and GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; Parsons, B.; Wright, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Tectonic deformation in Eastern Turkey is dominated by strain localisation on two major strike-slip faults; the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) and the East Anatolian Fault (EAF). Here we use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to map interseismic strain across the Eurasian-Arabian plate boundary zone in Eastern Turkey, covering both the NAF and the EAF. Most previous InSAR interseismic studies of the NAF have used only descending track data, and in these studies it was therefore necessary to assume purely horizontal, fault-parallel motion in modelling deformation. The slip rate of the EAF has been the focus of only a few geological and geodetic studies, and InSAR has not previously been used to measure interseismic strain accumulation across this fault. We construct ~400 Envisat interferograms on three descending and two ascending tracks in Eastern Turkey, covering both the NAF and EAF. We use these data to generate five line-of-sight velocity maps (ratemaps) using the PiRATE software package (Wang et al., GRL, 2009), which implements a multi-interferogram network approach in order to maximise spatial coverage and correct for orbital errors. We find that the five InSAR ratemaps agree best in overlapping regions when all interferograms are first corrected for atmospheric effects using model outputs from the ERA-Interim global atmospheric model (Jolivet et al., GRL, 2011). From these five overlapping ratemaps, we model elastic strain accumulation for both the NAF and EAF, and calculate slip rates of 20×3 mm/yr and 10×2 mm/yr respectively, with associated locking depths of 16×9 km and 13×4 km. We then use the ratemaps, together with a compilation of GPS data in the area, to calculate a velocity field for Eastern Turkey. We find that the velocity field derived from InSAR and GPS data significantly reduces the uncertainty of east-west velocities when compared with the velocity field derived from GPS data alone, and shows that strain is mainly localised

  14. Crustal Velocity Field from InSAR and GPS reveals Internal Deformation of Western Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Wright, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Two contrasting views continue to dominate the debate about continental tectonics - do the continents behave like the oceans, with a few large plates (blocks) separated by major faults (e.g. Tapponnier et al., 1982, 2001; Thatcher, 2007; Meade, 2007), or is a smooth continuum a more appropriate and compact description (e.g. England and Molnar, 1997, 2005). The Tibetan plateau has long been the testing ground for this debate and despite decades of research it has yet to be put to bed. Existing observations of crustal deformation in Tibet are largely derived from the Global Positioning System (GPS). Because large gaps in the GPS coverage exist, particularly in central and Western Tibet, the data have been used to support both the models (e.g. England and Molnar, 2005; Thatcher, 2007; Meade, 2007). On the other hand, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) offers an independent means of measuring present-day crustal deformation with a spatial resolution of a few tens of meters and an accuracy comparable to with GPS (e.g., Wright et al., 2001, 2004; Wang et al 2009). We have used InSAR data from multiple tracks in conjunction with available GPS to constrain a 2D velocity field model for the Tibetan plateau. About 300 ERS/Envisat interferograms are produced spanning 6 tracks (five descending and one ascending), covering ~200,000 km2 of Western Tibet. Each track is analysed using a network approach which yields line-of-sight deformation rates and realistic uncertainties (Biggs et al., 2007; Elliott et al., 2008; Wang et al., 2009). These are combined with the GPS, using full covariances, by adapting the velocity field method of England and Molnar (1997) to incorporate InSAR observations. Initially, we set up a triangular mesh spanning the target area; we then solve for the horizontal velocities on each node, as well as additional orbital and atmospheric terms for the InSAR data. The solution is regularised using Laplacian smoothing, whose weight is determined as

  15. Interseismic strain accumulation across the North Anatolian Fault measured using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; Parsons, B. E.; Wright, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is a major feature of Middle Eastern tectonics, facilitating the westwards 'escape' of the Anatolian block away from the Arabia-Eurasia continental collision. In order to understand the role that the NAF plays in regional tectonics it is important to accurately determine the slip rate across the fault. Many slip rate estimates for the NAF have been made over Quaternary and longer time-scales but few geodetic estimates currently exist, especially in eastern Turkey. Here we construct satellite radar interferograms using Envisat ASAR data to measure ground displacements around the NAF and hence estimate the slip rate across it. We make use of SAR data from two satellite tracks, one ascending and one descending, that overlap across the NAF, providing a check on the assumption of horizontal fault-parallel motion that has previously been used in interseismic modelling of the fault. We mitigate the effects of atmospheric errors by constructing multiple interferograms over the fault and summing them, effectively creating a longer timespan interferogram and improving the signal-to-noise ratio. We empirically correct for orbital errors by flattening the radar swaths on the Anatolian Plateau, an area with little expected deformation. Our measurements of rates of displacement are consistent with an interseismic model for the NAF where deformation occurs at depth on a narrow shear zone below a layer in which the fault is locked. We jointly invert data from both satellite tracks to solve for best fitting model parameters, estimating both the slip rate and the depth to which the fault is locked. Our best-fitting model gives a slip rate of 23 mm/yr and a locking depth of 19 km, which is in agreement with a previous estimate made from a single track of ERS SAR data (Wright et al., 2001, GRL 28, 2117-2120), and with existing GPS data. We also construct a velocity field using a combination of InSAR and GPS data for eastern Turkey.

  16. InSAR Measurements of Non-Tectonic Deformation Patterns in the Western Transverse Ranges, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. R., III; Marshall, S. T.; Funning, G.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from analysis of twenty-two scenes from the Envisat satellite dated between February 2005 and September 2010 along track 213 frames 2907 and 2925 in the Western Transverse Ranges, CA. Persistent Scatterer InSAR (PSI) analysis of interferograms was performed using the StaMPS software package resulting in approximately 2 million PSI points with their associated line-of-sight velocities and time series. These data outline several zones of anthropogenic motion likely due to groundwater usage and oil extraction. We identify two instances of highly localized subsidence due to oil extraction: one of up to 6 mm/yr across a 3x5 km wide oval-shaped zone along the Ventura Ave anticline and another of up to 12 mm/yr across a 3x15 km region near Maricopa. Both of these features are observed in regions of known oil extraction, and the subsidence zones parallel the local fold axes, suggesting that these observed features are real and not merely a product of noise. We also observe several features potentially related to groundwater extraction. The groundwater-related signals tend to be less localized than the oil extraction signals and typically are centered around urban or agricultural areas. The PSI data show a broad zone of subsidence in the greater Oxnard region (10 mm/yr maximum), and more localized zones of subsidence centered in the cities of Carpenteria (4 mm/yr), Ojai (4 mm/yr), and Santa Clarita (5 mm/yr). Several additional regions of potentially anthropogenic motion are also present in the PSI data to which the root cause is unclear. For example, we observe localized uplift of 5 mm/yr centered in the Stevenson Ranch housing development, 8 mm/yr of subsidence centered about 5 km NW of Moorpark near a large agricultural nursery, and a potentially tectonic broad pattern of 4 mm/yr of uplift in the mountains of Los Padres National Forest near Frasier Mountain.

  17. The Timing of Arctic Sea Ice Advance and Retreat as an Indicator of Ice-Dependent Marine Mammal Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, H. L.; Laidre, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic is widely recognized as the front line of climate change. Arctic air temperature is rising at twice the global average rate, and the sea-ice cover is shrinking and thinning, with total disappearance of summer sea ice projected to occur in a matter of decades. Arctic marine mammals such as polar bears, seals, walruses, belugas, narwhals, and bowhead whales depend on the sea-ice cover as an integral part of their existence. While the downward trend in sea-ice extent in a given month is an often-used metric for quantifying physical changes in the ice cover, it is not the most relevant measure for characterizing changes in the sea-ice habitat of marine mammals. Species that depend on sea ice are behaviorally tied to the annual retreat of sea ice in the spring and advance in the fall. Changes in the timing of the spring retreat and the fall advance are more relevant to Arctic marine species than changes in the areal sea-ice coverage in a particular month of the year. Many ecologically important regions of the Arctic are essentially ice-covered in winter and ice-free in summer, and will probably remain so for a long time into the future. But the dates of sea-ice retreat in spring and advance in fall are key indicators of climate change for ice-dependent marine mammals. We use daily sea-ice concentration data derived from satellite passive microwave sensors to calculate the dates of sea-ice retreat in spring and advance in fall in 12 regions of the Arctic for each year from 1979 through 2013. The regions include the peripheral seas around the Arctic Ocean (Beaufort, Chukchi, East Siberian, Laptev, Kara, Barents), the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, and the marginal seas (Okhotsk, Bering, East Greenland, Baffin Bay, Hudson Bay). We find that in 11 of the 12 regions (all except the Bering Sea), sea ice is retreating earlier in spring and advancing later in fall. Rates of spring retreat range from -5 to -8 days/decade, and rates of fall advance range from +5 to +9

  18. Comparison of elevation derived from insar data with dem from topography map in Son Dong, Bac Giang, Viet Nam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duy

    2012-07-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are used in many applications in the context of earth sciences such as in topographic mapping, environmental modeling, rainfall-runoff studies, landslide hazard zonation, seismic source modeling, etc. During the last years multitude of scientific applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) techniques have evolved. It has been shown that InSAR is an established technique of generating high quality DEMs from space borne and airborne data, and that it has advantages over other methods for the generation of large area DEM. However, the processing of InSAR data is still a challenging task. This paper describes InSAR operational steps and processing chain for DEM generation from Single Look Complex (SLC) SAR data and compare a satellite SAR estimate of surface elevation with a digital elevation model (DEM) from Topography map. The operational steps are performed in three major stages: Data Search, Data Processing, and product Validation. The Data processing stage is further divided into five steps of Data Pre-Processing, Co-registration, Interferogram generation, Phase unwrapping, and Geocoding. The Data processing steps have been tested with ERS 1/2 data using Delft Object-oriented Interferometric (DORIS) InSAR processing software. Results of the outcome of the application of the described processing steps to real data set are presented.

  19. Temporal trends of time to antiretroviral treatment initiation, interruption and modification: examination of patients diagnosed with advanced HIV in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Stephen T; Law, Matthew G; Cooper, David A; Keen, Phillip; McDonald, Ann; Middleton, Melanie; Woolley, Ian; Kelly, Mark; Petoumenos, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV prevention strategies are moving towards reducing plasma HIV RNA viral load in all HIV-positive persons, including those undiagnosed, treatment naïve, on or off antiretroviral therapy. A proxy population for those undiagnosed are patients that present late to care with advanced HIV. The objectives of this analysis are to examine factors associated with patients presenting with advanced HIV, and establish rates of treatment interruption and modification after initiating ART. Methods We deterministically linked records from the Australian HIV Observational Database to the Australian National HIV Registry to obtain information related to HIV diagnosis. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with advanced HIV diagnosis. We used survival methods to evaluate rates of ART initiation by diagnosis CD4 count strata and by calendar year of HIV diagnosis. Cox models were used to determine hazard of first ART treatment interruption (duration >30 days) and time to first major ART modification. Results Factors associated (p<0.05) with increased odds of advanced HIV diagnosis were sex, older age, heterosexual mode of HIV exposure, born overseas and rural–regional care setting. Earlier initiation of ART occurred at higher rates in later periods (2007–2012) in all diagnosis CD4 count groups. We found an 83% (69, 91%) reduction in the hazard of first treatment interruption comparing 2007–2012 versus 1996–2001 (p<0.001), and no difference in ART modification for patients diagnosed with advanced HIV. Conclusions Recent HIV diagnoses are initiating therapy earlier in all diagnosis CD4 cell count groups, potentially lowering community viral load compared to earlier time periods. We found a marked reduction in the hazard of first treatment interruption, and found no difference in rates of major modification to ART by HIV presentation status in recent periods. PMID:25865372

  20. Recent advances in 3D time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Riederer, Stephen J; Haider, Clifton R; Borisch, Eric A; Weavers, Paul T; Young, Phillip M

    2015-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) was first introduced for clinical studies approximately 20 years ago. Early work provided 3-4 mm spatial resolution with acquisition times in the 30-second range. Since that time there has been continuing effort to provide improved spatial resolution with reduced acquisition time, allowing high resolution 3D time-resolved studies. The purpose of this work is to describe how this has been accomplished. Specific technical enablers have been: improved gradients allowing reduced repetition times, improved k-space sampling and reconstruction methods, parallel acquisition, particularly in two directions, and improved and higher count receiver coil arrays. These have collectively made high-resolution time-resolved studies readily available for many anatomic regions. Depending on the application, ∼1 mm isotropic resolution is now possible with frame times of several seconds. Clinical applications of time-resolved CE-MRA are briefly reviewed. PMID:26032598

  1. Recent Advances in 3D Time-Resolved Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Riederer, Stephen J.; Haider, Clifton R.; Borisch, Eric A.; Weavers, Paul T.; Young, Phillip M.

    2015-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) was first introduced for clinical studies approximately 20 years ago. Early work provided 3 to 4 mm spatial resolution with acquisition times in the 30 sec range. Since that time there has been continuing effort to provide improved spatial resolution with reduced acquisition time, allowing high resolution three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved studies. The purpose of this work is to describe how this has been accomplished. Specific technical enablers have been: improved gradients allowing reduced repetition times, improved k-space sampling and reconstruction methods, parallel acquisition particularly in two directions, and improved and higher count receiver coil arrays. These have collectively made high resolution time-resolved studies readily available for many anatomic regions. Depending on the application, approximate 1 mm isotropic resolution is now possible with frame times of several seconds. Clinical applications of time-resolved CE-MRA are briefly reviewed. PMID:26032598

  2. 48 CFR 1552.215-74 - Advanced understanding-uncompensated time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Contractor's facilities and does not include non-exempt personnel or exempt personnel working at...: Adjustment equals estimated value of uncompensated time hours not provided. Target uncompensated time...

  3. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-01-20

    Proteomics, and the larger field of systems biology, have recently demonstrated utility in both the understanding of cellular processes on the molecular level and the identification of potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents a challenge in data processing, analysis and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics analysis and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed in order to interpret and display the large volumes of data produced.

  4. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  5. Advances in high repetition rate, ultra-short, gigawatt laser systems for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this article is to emphasize the current advances in the development of high-repetition rate amplifier pumps. Although this review highlights amplifier pump development, any recent data from achieved outputs via the tunable amplifier section is also discussed. The first section describes desirable parameters attributable to the pump amplifier while the rest of the article deals with specific examples for various options. The pump amplifiers can be characterized into two distinct classes; those achieving operation in the hundred hertz regime and those performing at repetition rates {ge}1kHz. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Advances in high repetition rate, ultra-short, gigawatt laser systems for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this article is to emphasize the current advances in the development of high-repetition rate amplifier pumps. Although this review highlights amplifier pump development, any recent data from achieved outputs via the tunable amplifier section is also discussed. The first section describes desirable parameters attributable to the pump amplifier while the rest of the article deals with specific examples for various options. The pump amplifiers can be characterized into two distinct classes; those achieving operation in the hundred hertz regime and those performing at repetition rates {ge}1kHz. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Study on Seismogenic Tectonic based on InSAR Measurement of Long-term fault Deformation and Co-seismic Deformation in Dangxiong, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Zhang, J.; Liu, B.; Hu, L.

    2010-12-01

    There are some earthquakes in Oct 2008 and May 2010 in Dangxiong, Tibet(Tab1); their epicenters were quite near and all located on Yadong-Gulou fault belt,which is a significant boundary between eastern and western geological structure and physiognomy of Tibet plates. The structural belt is normal strike-skip fault, and has experienced strong tectonic activity. The development of Yadong-Yangbajing-Gulou graben system is dominated by Yadong-Gulou fault belt, which is the main dominating boundary fault of graben system, and also is a famous extensional crustal structural system of Late Cenozoic. The Yadong-Gulou fault belt can be divided into three parts. The northern part is nearly SN striking. The middle part is NE striking, which is named Dangxiong-Yangbajing fault. And the southern part is nearly SN striking, which is named Yangbajing-Nimu fault. The epicenter of Ms6.6 earthquake is located on Yangbajing-Nimu fault, where an M8.0 strong earthquake took place in 1411. The two epicenters were just twenty kilometers away. So we can see the area is affected greatly by Yadong-Gulou fault belt. We have focused our InSAR study on this area ever since 2001 and ordered ENVISAT ASAR data continuously between 2003 and 2010 under Dragon Programme (ESA/NRSCC Cooperation Programme). Also we have begun to order TerraSAR-X spotlight and strimap model data since Mar. 2010. Acquisitions of ASAR differential modes are collected, including WS and IM(I2) of ascending and descending orbits. Though most of them have different track ,even polarization and long space baseline, time interval, there are many data for our InSAR process.We obtained time serial deformation before and after those earthquakes using PS and SBAS InSAR technique (data: IM model, track 176,nearly 50 scenes ), and Co-seismic Deformation of M6.6 earthquake(data: IM model,track 176/448;WS model, track 441). We have carried on field investigation separately at 2007,2009 and 2010. The movement mechanism of the fault is

  8. Post-emplacement cooling and contraction of lava flows: InSAR observations and thermal model for lava fields at Hekla volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Werner; Dumont, Stephanie; Lavallee, Yan; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn

    2016-04-01

    Gradual post-emplacement subsidence of lava flows has been observed at various volcanoes, e.g. Okmok volcano in Alaska, Kilauea volcano on Hawaii and Etna volcano on Sicily. In Iceland, this effect has been observed at Krafla volcano and Hekla volcano. The latter was chosen as a case study for investigating subsidence mechanisms, specifically thermal contraction. Effects like gravitational loading, clast repacking or creeping of a hot and liquid core can contribute to subsidence of emplaced lava flows, but thermal contraction is considered being a crucial effect. The extent to which it contributes to lava flow subsidence is investigated by mapping the relative movement of emplaced lava flows and flow substrate, and modeling the observed signal. The slow vegetation in Iceland is advantageous for Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and offers great coherence over long periods after lava emplacement, expanding beyond the outlines of lava flows. Due to this reason, InSAR observations over volcanoes in Iceland have taken place for more than 20 years. By combining InSAR tracks from ERS, Envisat and Cosmo-SkyMed satellites we gain six time series with a total of 99 interferograms. Making use of the high spatial resolution, a temporal trend of vertical lava movements was investigated over a course of over 23 years over the 1991 lava flow of Hekla volcano, Iceland. From these time series, temporal trends of accumulated subsidence and subsidence velocities were determined in line of sight of the satellites. However, the deformation signal of lava fields after emplacement is vertically dominated. Subsidence on this lava field is still ongoing and subsidence rates vary from 14.8 mm/year in 1995 to about 1.0 mm/year in 2014. Fitting a simple exponential function suggests a exponential decay constant of 5.95 years. Additionally, a one-dimensional, semi-analytical model was fitted to these data. While subsidence due to phase change is calculated analytically

  9. Holographic interferometry applied to real-time dynamic modal analysis of an advanced exotic metal alloy airfoil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Howard

    1999-07-01

    Holographic Interferometry has been successfully employed to characterize the materials and behavior of diverse types of structures under stress. Specialized variations of this technology have also been applied to define dynamic and vibration related structural behavior. Such applications of holographic technique offer some of the most effective methods of modal and dynamic analysis available. Real-time dynamic testing of the structural behavior of aerodynamic control and airfoil structures for advanced aircraft and missile systems has traditionally required advanced instrumentation for data collection in either actual flight test or wind-tunnel simulations. Advanced optical holography techniques are alternate methods which result in full-field behavioral data on the ground in a nondestructive hardware- in-the-loop environment. These methods offer significant insight in both the development and subsequent operational test and modeling of advanced control and airfoil structures and their integration with total vehicle system dynamics. Aerodynamic control structures and components can be analyzed in place with very low amplitude excitation and the resultant data can be used to adjust the accuracy of mathematically derived structural and behavioral models as well actual performance.

  10. Advances in the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale--Developments and Integration with the Geologic Time Scale and Future Directions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We celebrate the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Vine-Matthews/Morley-Larochelle hypothesis (Vine and Matthews, Nature, 1963, v. 199, #4897, p. 947-949), which integrated marine magnetic anomaly data with a rapidly evolving terrestrial-based geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS). The five decades of research since 1963 have witnessed the expansion and refinement of the GPTS, to the point where ages of magnetochron boundaries, in particular in the Cenozoic, can be estimated with uncertainties better than 0.1%. This has come about by integrating high precision geochronology, cyclostratigraphy at different time scales, and magnetic polarity data of increased quality, allowing extension of the GPTS back into the Paleozoic. The definition of a high resolution GPTS across time intervals of major events in Earth history has been of particular interest, as a specific magnetochron boundary correlated across several localities represents a singular global datum. A prime example is the end Permian, when some 80 percent of genus-level extinctions and a range of 75 to 96 percent species- level extinctions took place in the marine environment, depending upon clade. Much our understanding of the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) is based on relatively slowly deposited marine sequences in Europe and Asia, yet a growing body of observations from continental sequences demonstrates a similar extinction event and new polarity data from some of these sequences are critical to refining the GPTS across the PTB and testing synchronicity of marine and terrestrial events. The data show that the end-Permian ecological crisis and the conodont calibrated biostratigraphic PTB both followed a key polarity reversal between a short interval (subchron) of reverse polarity to a considerably longer (chron) of normal polarity. Central European Basin strata (continental Permian and epicontinental Triassic) yield high-quality magnetic polarity stratigraphic records (Szurlies et al., 2003

  11. Advanced instrument system for real-time and time-series microbial geochemical sampling of the deep (basaltic) crustal biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, James P.; Copson, David A.; Jolly, James; Hsieh, Chih-Chiang; Lin, Huei-Ting; Glazer, Brian T.; Wheat, C. Geoffrey

    2012-03-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program borehole CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories provide long-term access to hydrothermal fluids circulating within the basaltic crust (basement), providing invaluable opportunities to study the deep biosphere. We describe the design and application parameters of the GeoMICROBE instrumented sled, an autonomous sensor and fluid sampling system. The GeoMICROBE system couples with CORK fluid delivery lines to draw large volumes of fluids from crustal aquifers to the seafloor. These fluids pass a series of in-line sensors and an in situ filtration and collection system. GeoMICROBE's major components include a primary valve manifold system, a positive displacement primary pump, sensors (e.g., fluid flow rate, temperature, dissolved O2, electrochemistry-voltammetry analyzer), a 48-port in situ filtration and fluid collection system, computerized controller, seven 24 V-40 A batteries and wet-mateable (ODI) communications with submersibles. This constantly evolving system has been successfully connected to IODP Hole 1301A on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Also described here is a mobile pumping system (MPS), which possesses many of the same components as the GeoMICROBE (e.g., pump, sensors, controller), but is directly powered and controlled in real time via submersible operations; the MPS has been employed repeatedly to collect pristine basement fluids for a variety of geochemical and microbial studies.

  12. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  13. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  14. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  15. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  16. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  17. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  18. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  19. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  20. El Mayor-Cucapah (Mw 7.2) earthquake: Early near-field postseismic deformation from InSAR and GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ortega, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake occurred on 4 April 2010 in northeastern Baja California just south of the U.S.-Mexico border. The earthquake ruptured several previously mapped faults, as well as some unidentified ones, including the Pescadores, Borrego, Paso Inferior and Paso Superior faults in the Sierra Cucapah, and the Indiviso fault in the Mexicali Valley and Colorado River Delta.We conducted several Global Positioning System (GPS) campaign surveys of preexisting and newly established benchmarks within 30 km of the earthquake rupture. Most of the benchmarks were occupied within days after the earthquake, allowing us to capture the very early postseismic transient motions. The GPS data show postseismic displacements in the same direction as the coseismic displacements; time series indicate a gradual decay in postseismic velocities with characteristic time scales of 66 ± 9 days and 20 ± 3 days, assuming exponential and logarithmic decay, respectively. We also analyzed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the Envisat and ALOS satellites. The main deformation features seen in the line-of-sight displacement maps indicate subsidence concentrated in the southern and northern parts of the main rupture, in particular at the Indiviso fault, at the Laguna Salada basin, and at the Paso Superior fault. We show that the near-field GPS and InSAR observations over a time period of 5 months after the earthquake can be explained by a combination of afterslip, fault zone contraction, and a possible minor contribution of poroelastic rebound. Far-field data require an additional mechanism, most likely viscoelastic relaxation in the ductile substrate.

  1. Inventory of anthropogenic surface deformation measured by InSAR in the western U.S./Mexico and possible impacts on GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semple, A.; Pritchard, M. E.; Taylor, H.

    2014-12-01

    The western US and Mexico are deforming at several spatial scales that can be measured by ground and satellite observations like GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). Many GPS stations have been installed throughout this area to monitor ground deformation caused by large scale tectonic processes; however, several studies have noted that the data recorded at a GPS station can be contaminated by local, non-tectonic ground deformation. In this study, we use InSAR to examine deformation from various sources in the western US and Mexico. We chose this method due to the spatially large study area and the availability and temporal coverage of SAR imagery. We use SAR images acquired by the satellites Envisat, ERS-1 and ERS-2 over a time period from 1992-2010 to create several time series. Data from the ALOS satellite between 2006-2011 are also used in some areas. We use these time series analysis along with previously published results to observe and catalogue various sources of surface deformation in the western US and Mexico - from groundwater pumping, geothermal activity, mining, hydrocarbon production, and other sources. We then use these results to identify GPS stations that have potentially been contaminated by non-tectonic deformation signals. We document more than 150 distinct regions of non-tectonic and likely anthropogenic deformation. We have located 82 GPS stations within 20km of the center of at least one of the non-tectonic deformation signals we have identified. It is likely that the data from these 82 GPS stations have been contaminated by local anthropogenic deformation. Some examples of previously unpublished non-tectonic deformation we have seen in this study include but are not limited to, subsidence due to groundwater extraction in Jesus Garcia, Mexico, both uplift and subsidence due to natural gas extraction at Jonah Field in Sublette County, WY, and uplift due to a water recharge project in Tonopah, AZ.

  2. El Mayor-Cucapah (Mw 7.2) earthquake: Early near-field postseismic deformation from InSAR and GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ortega, Alejandro; Fialko, Yuri; Sandwell, David; Alejandro Nava-Pichardo, F.; Fletcher, John; Gonzalez-Garcia, Javier; Lipovsky, Brad; Floyd, Michael; Funning, Gareth

    2014-02-01

    El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake occurred on 4 April 2010 in northeastern Baja California just south of the U.S.-Mexico border. The earthquake ruptured several previously mapped faults, as well as some unidentified ones, including the Pescadores, Borrego, Paso Inferior and Paso Superior faults in the Sierra Cucapah, and the Indiviso fault in the Mexicali Valley and Colorado River Delta. We conducted several Global Positioning System (GPS) campaign surveys of preexisting and newly established benchmarks within 30 km of the earthquake rupture. Most of the benchmarks were occupied within days after the earthquake, allowing us to capture the very early postseismic transient motions. The GPS data show postseismic displacements in the same direction as the coseismic displacements; time series indicate a gradual decay in postseismic velocities with characteristic time scales of 66 ± 9 days and 20 ± 3 days, assuming exponential and logarithmic decay, respectively. We also analyzed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the Envisat and ALOS satellites. The main deformation features seen in the line-of-sight displacement maps indicate subsidence concentrated in the southern and northern parts of the main rupture, in particular at the Indiviso fault, at the Laguna Salada basin, and at the Paso Superior fault. We show that the near-field GPS and InSAR observations over a time period of 5 months after the earthquake can be explained by a combination of afterslip, fault zone contraction, and a possible minor contribution of poroelastic rebound. Far-field data require an additional mechanism, most likely viscoelastic relaxation in the ductile substrate.

  3. Advanced time integration algorithms for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sills, Ryan B.; Aghaei, Amin; Cai, Wei

    2016-04-25

    Efficient time integration is a necessity for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening to achieve experimentally relevant strains. In this work, an efficient time integration scheme using a high order explicit method with time step subcycling and a newly-developed collision detection algorithm are evaluated. First, time integrator performance is examined for an annihilating Frank–Read source, showing the effects of dislocation line collision. The integrator with subcycling is found to significantly out-perform other integration schemes. The performance of the time integration and collision detection algorithms is then tested in a work hardening simulation. The new algorithms show a 100-fold speed-up relativemore » to traditional schemes. As a result, subcycling is shown to improve efficiency significantly while maintaining an accurate solution, and the new collision algorithm allows an arbitrarily large time step size without missing collisions.« less

  4. Advanced time integration algorithms for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, Ryan B.; Aghaei, Amin; Cai, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Efficient time integration is a necessity for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening to achieve experimentally relevant strains. In this work, an efficient time integration scheme using a high order explicit method with time step subcycling and a newly-developed collision detection algorithm are evaluated. First, time integrator performance is examined for an annihilating Frank–Read source, showing the effects of dislocation line collision. The integrator with subcycling is found to significantly out-perform other integration schemes. The performance of the time integration and collision detection algorithms is then tested in a work hardening simulation. The new algorithms show a 100-fold speed-up relative to traditional schemes. Subcycling is shown to improve efficiency significantly while maintaining an accurate solution, and the new collision algorithm allows an arbitrarily large time step size without missing collisions.