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Sample records for advanced insar time

  1. Highway Subsidence Analysis Based on the Advanced InSAR Time Series Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingyun; Zhang, Jingfa; Liu, Guolin; Li, Yongsheng

    2016-08-01

    The synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements have the advantages of all-weather, wide range, high precision on the surface deformation monitoring. Highway as an important index of modern social and economic development, the quality and deformation changes in the process of using have a significant impact in the social development and people's life and property security. In practical applications the InSAR technology should do a variety of error correction analysis. By using a new analysis method – FRAM- SBAS time-series analysis method, to analyze the settlement of highway on Yanzhou area by the ALOS PALSAR datas. Use FRAM- SBAS timing analysis method to obtain the surface timing changes during 2008-09-21 to 2010-07-18 in the Jining area and obtained good results, the Jining area maximum timing settlement is 60mm, the maximum settlement rate reached 30mm/yr. The maximum settlement of the highway section is 53mm, the maximum settlement rate is 32mm/yr. And the settlement of highway worst sections were in severe ground subsidence, thus proving the mining and vehicle load effect on settlement of highway. And it is proved that the timing method on the ground and highway subsidence monitoring is feasible.

  2. Characterizing and estimating noise in InSAR and InSAR time series with MODIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhart, William D.; Lohman, Rowena B.

    2013-01-01

    InSAR time series analysis is increasingly used to image subcentimeter displacement rates of the ground surface. The precision of InSAR observations is often affected by several noise sources, including spatially correlated noise from the turbulent atmosphere. Under ideal scenarios, InSAR time series techniques can substantially mitigate these effects; however, in practice the temporal distribution of InSAR acquisitions over much of the world exhibit seasonal biases, long temporal gaps, and insufficient acquisitions to confidently obtain the precisions desired for tectonic research. Here, we introduce a technique for constraining the magnitude of errors expected from atmospheric phase delays on the ground displacement rates inferred from an InSAR time series using independent observations of precipitable water vapor from MODIS. We implement a Monte Carlo error estimation technique based on multiple (100+) MODIS-based time series that sample date ranges close to the acquisitions times of the available SAR imagery. This stochastic approach allows evaluation of the significance of signals present in the final time series product, in particular their correlation with topography and seasonality. We find that topographically correlated noise in individual interferograms is not spatially stationary, even over short-spatial scales (<10 km). Overall, MODIS-inferred displacements and velocities exhibit errors of similar magnitude to the variability within an InSAR time series. We examine the MODIS-based confidence bounds in regions with a range of inferred displacement rates, and find we are capable of resolving velocities as low as 1.5 mm/yr with uncertainties increasing to ∼6 mm/yr in regions with higher topographic relief.

  3. Time Series Analysis of Insar Data: Methods and Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Sunar, Filiz; Wdowinski, Shimon; Cano-Cabral, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Time series analysis of InSAR data has emerged as an important tool for monitoring and measuring the displacement of the Earth's surface. Changes in the Earth's surface can result from a wide range of phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, variations in ground water levels, and changes in wetland water levels. Time series analysis is applied to interferometric phase measurements, which wrap around when the observed motion is larger than one-half of the radar wavelength. Thus, the spatio-temporal ''unwrapping" of phase observations is necessary to obtain physically meaningful results. Several different algorithms have been developed for time series analysis of InSAR data to solve for this ambiguity. These algorithms may employ different models for time series analysis, but they all generate a first-order deformation rate, which can be compared to each other. However, there is no single algorithm that can provide optimal results in all cases. Since time series analyses of InSAR data are used in a variety of applications with different characteristics, each algorithm possesses inherently unique strengths and weaknesses. In this review article, following a brief overview of InSAR technology, we discuss several algorithms developed for time series analysis of InSAR data using an example set of results for measuring subsidence rates in Mexico City.

  4. The Advancement of Intraplate Tectonic Motion Detection by the Use of Atmospherically Corrected InSAR Time-series and its Decomposition into a 3D Field Vector in South-East Sicily, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, A.; Bekaert, D. P.; Bonforte, A.; Guglielmino, F.; Hooper, A. J.; Stramondo, S.; Zucca, F.

    2014-12-01

    This study provides insights into the advancements gained by applying a tropospheric correction to a time-series InSAR small baseline network processed using the StaMPS software for the Hyblean Plateau in south-east Sicily, Italy. The contribution of the atmosphere is one of the major error sources in repeat-pass InSAR in general. For time-series analysis spatial and temporal "filtering" of the interferometric phase can be used to address atmospheric signals. This however might be at the cost of smoothing and removal of the "tectonic deformation". We applied a tropospheric correction to each interferogram based on estimates of the ERA-Interim weather model, provided by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). This approach is part of the InSAR Atmospheric Correction Toolbox (Bekaert et al, in prep) and converts the tropospheric water vapor content into the phase-delay of the radar line-of-sight. For the analysis we used 49 descending and 58 ascending Envisat SAR images, which cover the time period from 2003 until 2010. In addition, we have processed 30 SAR images of RADARSAT-2 for the period between 2010-2012. Furthermore, we used the different viewing geometries and the integration of GPS data to decompose the single line-of-sight velocities into a 3-dimensional field vector by applying the SISTEM approach (Guglielmino et al. 2011). First results reveal that the atmospherically corrected data retain the deformation signal along geological structures like the Scicli-Ragusa fault whilst the standard filtering approach is canceling out these very slow deformation patterns. Simultaneously, the variability of the signal in space is diminished and thus gives more confidence on the deformation patterns observed by the SAR. Consequently, the decomposition of the line-of-sight velocities and the integration with the GPS data allows us to retrieve a more realistic deformation field.

  5. InSAR data for monitoring land subsidence: time to think big

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, A.; Colombo, D.; Fumagalli, A.; Novali, F.; Rucci, A.

    2015-11-01

    Satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data have proven effective and valuable in the analysis of urban subsidence phenomena based on multi-temporal radar images. Results obtained by processing data acquired by different radar sensors, have shown the potential of InSAR and highlighted the key points for an operational use of this technology, namely: (1) regular acquisition over large areas of interferometric data stacks; (2) use of advanced processing algorithms, capable of estimating and removing atmospheric disturbances; (3) access to significant processing power for a regular update of the information over large areas. In this paper, we show how the operational potential of InSAR has been realized thanks to the recent advances in InSAR processing algorithms, the advent of cloud computing and the launch of new satellite platforms, specifically designed for InSAR analyses (e.g. Sentinel-1a operated by the ESA and ALOS2 operated by JAXA). The processing of thousands of SAR scenes to cover an entire nation has been performed successfully in Italy in a project financed by the Italian Ministry of the Environment. The challenge for the future is to pass from the historical analysis of SAR scenes already acquired in digital archives to a near real-time monitoring program where up to date deformation data are routinely provided to final users and decision makers.

  6. A Multiscale Approach to InSAR Time Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetland, E. A.; Muse, P.; Simons, M.; Lin, N.; Dicaprio, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    We present a technique to constrain time-dependent deformation from repeated satellite-based InSAR observations of a given region. This approach, which we call MInTS (Multiscale InSAR Time Series analysis), relies on a spatial wavelet decomposition to permit the inclusion of distance based spatial correlations in the observations while maintaining computational tractability. As opposed to single pixel InSAR time series techniques, MInTS takes advantage of both spatial and temporal characteristics of the deformation field. We use a weighting scheme which accounts for the presence of localized holes due to decorrelation or unwrapping errors in any given interferogram. We represent time-dependent deformation using a dictionary of general basis functions, capable of detecting both steady and transient processes. The estimation is regularized using a model resolution based smoothing so as to be able to capture rapid deformation where there are temporally dense radar acquisitions and to avoid oscillations during time periods devoid of acquisitions. MInTS also has the flexibility to explicitly parametrize known time-dependent processes that are expected to contribute to a given set of observations (e.g., co-seismic steps and post-seismic transients, secular variations, seasonal oscillations, etc.). We use cross validation to choose the regularization penalty parameter in the inversion of for the time-dependent deformation field. We demonstrate MInTS using a set of 63 ERS-1/2 and 29 Envisat interferograms for Long Valley Caldera.

  7. A noise model for InSAR time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agram, P. S.; Simons, M.

    2015-04-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series methods estimate the spatiotemporal evolution of surface deformation by incorporating information from multiple SAR interferograms. While various models have been developed to describe the interferometric phase and correlation statistics in individual interferograms, efforts to model the generalized covariance matrix that is directly applicable to joint analysis of networks of interferograms have been limited in scope. In this work, we build on existing decorrelation and atmospheric phase screen models and develop a covariance model for interferometric phase noise over space and time. We present arguments to show that the exploitation of the full 3-D covariance structure within conventional time series inversion techniques is computationally challenging. However, the presented covariance model can aid in designing new inversion techniques that can at least mitigate the impact of spatial correlated nature of InSAR observations.

  8. Advanced InSAR imaging for dune mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havivi, Shiran; August, Yitzhak; Blumberg, Dan G.; Rotman, Stanley R.

    2015-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970's, remote sensing imagery both optical and radar, are used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of Aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two images or more. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This research aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation, or, coherence change detection, can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the Nitzanim coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of varying levels of stability and vegetation cover and have been monitored meteorologically, geomorphologically and

  9. Bridge Deformation Monitoring: Instight From InSAR Time-Series And Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshiri, Roghayeh; Motagh, Mahdi; Baes, Marzieh; Sharifi, Mohammad-Ali

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the capability of advanced InSAR time-series techniques such as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) for monitoring of civil engineering structures like bridge. Deformation monitoring of bridges are essential to mitigate not only the financial and human losses, but also ecological and environmental-related problems. Assessment of deformation during bridge lifespan can provide invaluable insight for better planning and management. The study area, Lake Urmia Causeway (LUC) in northwest Iran, consists of one bridge and two embankments on both sides of it. The difference between the deformation rate of the embankments on both sides of the bridge may seriously damage the bridge itself, so it is very important to accurately monitor them in space and time in order to assess the state of the bridge concerning deformations. In this study we apply the InSAR time-series technique of SBAS for 58 SAR images including 10 ALOS, 30 Envisat and 18 TerraSAR-X (TSX) to assess deflation of embankments of Urmia bridge during 2003-2013. The InSAR results are used in a 2D Finite Element Model (FEM) to assess structural stability of the embankments.

  10. A multiscale approach to InSAR time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, M.; Hetland, E. A.; Muse, P.; Lin, Y. N.; Dicaprio, C.; Rickerby, A.

    2008-12-01

    We describe a new technique to constrain time-dependent deformation from repeated satellite-based InSAR observations of a given region. This approach, which we call MInTS (Multiscale analysis of InSAR Time Series), relies on a spatial wavelet decomposition to permit the inclusion of distance based spatial correlations in the observations while maintaining computational tractability. This approach also permits a consistent treatment of all data independent of the presence of localized holes in any given interferogram. In essence, MInTS allows one to considers all data at the same time (as opposed to one pixel at a time), thereby taking advantage of both spatial and temporal characteristics of the deformation field. In terms of the temporal representation, we have the flexibility to explicitly parametrize known processes that are expected to contribute to a given set of observations (e.g., co-seismic steps and post-seismic transients, secular variations, seasonal oscillations, etc.). Our approach also allows for the temporal parametrization to includes a set of general functions (e.g., splines) in order to account for unexpected processes. We allow for various forms of model regularization using a cross-validation approach to select penalty parameters. The multiscale analysis allows us to consider various contributions (e.g., orbit errors) that may affect specific scales but not others. The methods described here are all embarrassingly parallel and suitable for implementation on a cluster computer. We demonstrate the use of MInTS using a large suite of ERS-1/2 and Envisat interferograms for Long Valley Caldera, and validate our results by comparing with ground-based observations.

  11. InSAR time series analysis for monitoring of natural and anthropogenic hazards with high temporal resolution (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, S. V.; d'Oreye, N.; Gonzalez, P. J.; Tiampo, K. F.

    2013-12-01

    Modern Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites and satellite constellations are capable of acquiring data at high spatial resolution and increasing temporal resolution allowing detection of ground deformation signals with a minimal delay. Advanced interferometric SAR (InSAR) processing techniques, such as Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) and Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset (MSBAS) are capable of producing time series of ground deformation with a very high sub-centimeter precision. Additionally MSBAS allows combination of various InSAR data into a single set of vertical and horizontal deformation time series further improving their temporal resolution and precision. Developed methodologies are ready for operational monitoring of natural and anthropogenic hazards, including landslides, volcanoes, earthquakes and tectonic motion and ground subsidence caused by mining and groundwater extraction. Here we present various case studies where an InSAR time series analysis was able to map ground deformation with superior resolution and precision, including mining subsidence in the Greater Luxembourg region and southern Saskatchewan, groundwater extraction related subsidence in the Greater Vancouver Region, volcanic deformation in the Virunga Volcanic Province, and tectonic deformation and landslide in northern California. Often, InSAR is the best cost-efficient solution with no restrictions on spatial coverage, weather or lighting condition and timing. It is anticipated that the use of SAR data for mapping hazards will increase in the future as data access improves.

  12. New Ground Truth Capability from InSAR Time Series Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, S; Vincent, P; Yang, D

    2005-07-13

    We demonstrate that next-generation interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) processing techniques applied to existing data provide rich InSAR ground truth content for exploitation in seismic source identification. InSAR time series analyses utilize tens of interferograms and can be implemented in different ways. In one such approach, conventional InSAR displacement maps are inverted in a final post-processing step. Alternatively, computationally intensive data reduction can be performed with specialized InSAR processing algorithms. The typical final result of these approaches is a synthesized set of cumulative displacement maps. Examples from our recent work demonstrate that these InSAR processing techniques can provide appealing new ground truth capabilities. We construct movies showing the areal and temporal evolution of deformation associated with previous nuclear tests. In other analyses, we extract time histories of centimeter-scale surface displacement associated with tunneling. The potential exists to identify millimeter per year surface movements when sufficient data exists for InSAR techniques to isolate and remove phase signatures associated with digital elevation model errors and the atmosphere.

  13. A Multiscale Approach to InSAR Time Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, M.; Hetland, E. A.; Muse, P.; Lin, Y.; Dicaprio, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    We describe progress in the development of MInTS (Multiscale analysis of InSAR Time Series), an approach to constructed self-consistent time-dependent deformation observations from repeated satellite-based InSAR images of a given region. MInTS relies on a spatial wavelet decomposition to permit the inclusion of distance based spatial correlations in the observations while maintaining computational tractability. In essence, MInTS allows one to considers all data at the same time as opposed to one pixel at a time, thereby taking advantage of both spatial and temporal characteristics of the deformation field. This approach also permits a consistent treatment of all data independent of the presence of localized holes due to unwrapping issues in any given interferogram. Specifically, the presence of holes is accounted for through a weighting scheme that accounts for the extent of actual data versus the area of holes associated with any given wavelet. In terms of the temporal representation, we have the flexibility to explicitly parametrize known processes that are expected to contribute to a given set of observations (e.g., co-seismic steps and post-seismic transients, secular variations, seasonal oscillations, etc.). Our approach also allows for the temporal parametrization to include a set of general functions in order to account for unexpected processes. We allow for various forms of model regularization using a cross-validation approach to select penalty parameters. We also experiment with the use of sparsity inducing regularization as a way to select from a large dictionary of time functions. The multiscale analysis allows us to consider various contributions (e.g., orbit errors) that may affect specific scales but not others. The methods described here are all embarrassingly parallel and suitable for implementation on a cluster computer. We demonstrate the use of MInTS using a large suite of ERS-1/2 and Envisat interferograms for Long Valley Caldera, and validate

  14. New perspectives and advanced approaches on effectively processing Big InSAR data: from long term ERS archives to new Sentinel-1 massive data flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casu, Francesco; De Luca, Claudio; Elefante, Stefano; Lanari, Riccardo; Manunta, Michele; Zinno, Ivana

    2015-04-01

    Advanced differential Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Interferometry (InSAR) usually identifies a set of algorithms, tools and methodologies for the generation of Earth's surface deformation maps and time series computed from a sequence of multi-temporal differential SAR interferograms. Such techniques found their success on the large availability of SAR data archives acquired over time by several satellite systems. Indeed, the current radar Earth Observation (EO) scenario takes advantage of the widely diffused long-term C-band ESA (e.g. ERS-1, ERS-2 and ENVISAT) and Canadian (RADARSAT-1/2) SAR data archives, which have been acquired during the last 20 years, as well as of data sequences provided by the X-band generation SAR sensors, such as the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) and TerraSAR-X (TSX) constellations. Moreover, a massive and ever increasing data flow will be further supplied by the recently launched (April 2014) Copernicus (European Union) SENTINEL-1A SAR satellite, which will also be paired during 2016 with the SENTINEL-1B twin system that will allow halving the constellation revisit time (from 12 to 6 days). In this context, the massive exploitation of these Big InSAR Data archives for the generation of advanced products will open new research perspectives to understand Earth's surface deformation dynamics at global scale. However, to reach this ambitious goal, Big InSAR Data has to be effectively exploited to generate accurate advanced products in short time frames. Therefore the need of new InSAR processing approaches, efficient algorithms and high performance computing facilities represents the basis for fully benefiting from such a Big Data. In this work we first present the recently proposed Parallel Small BAseline Subset (P-SBAS) InSAR algorithm that has been designed to process big volumes of InSAR data in short times and unsupervised manner by exploiting High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities. Then, we show how the P-SBAS approach is well suitable for

  15. Towards Insar Everywhere, all the Time, with SENTINEL-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhong; Wright, Tim; Hooper, Andrew; Crippa, Paola; Gonzalez, Pablo; Walters, Richard; Elliott, John; Ebmeier, Susanna; Hatton, Emma; Parsons, Barry

    2016-06-01

    Sentinel-1A was launched in April 2014, and has been collecting data routinely over more than one year. Sentinel-1B is set for launch on 22 April 2016. The Sentinel-1 constellation has several advantages over previous radar missions for InSAR applications: (1) Data are being acquired systematically for tectonic and volcanic areas, (2) Images cover a wide footprint, 250 km from near to far range in Interferometric Wide Swath (TOPS) mode, (3) Small perpendicular and temporal baselines greatly improve interferometric coherence at C-band, (4) Data are freely available to all users, (5) The mission is planned to be operational for 20 years, with 1C and 1D planned for future launches. These features enable us to map geological processes occurring in any place at anytime using InSAR. We will review progress within COMET towards our ultimate goal of building a fully-automated processing system that provides deformation results and derived products to the wide InSAR and Geophysics communities. In addition to high-resolution-ECMWFbased atmospheric correction model, we will show results of a systematic analysis of interferometric coherence in tectonic and volcanic areas, and discuss the future goals and timeline for the COMET InSAR automated processing system.

  16. Geodetic imaging with time series persistent scatterer InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebker, H. A.; Shanker, A. P.

    2008-12-01

    Measuring the temporal evolution of deformation is crucial for understanding geophysical processes. InSAR methods produce detailed, spatially dense geodetic images in areas with high correlation between scattered echoes on different radar passes. Decorrelation occurs when the surface changes at wavelength scale over time. Persistent scattering (PS) methods are one way to avoid much observed decorrelation, and have proven to be useful in extracting deformation signatures from some highly decorrelating natural terrains. For slowly varying deformation fields, such as fault creep, PS approaches can image the evolution of surface movements. For episodic events such as volcanic events or even variable subsidence applications, PS networks often underestimate the deformation. The limitations of the technique appear to be mainly related to the sparseness of the data in both space and time, and are directly related to the robustness of the phase unwrapping algorithm needed to connect deformation points spatially and temporally. While early PS implementations were most successful in examining urban areas with manmade structures, and hence many bright backscattering points, the development of phase-based persistent scatterer identification approaches has permitted the method to be applicable for geophysical research. We now use a maximum likelihood phase-based method for PS identification that can find even low-amplitude PS points, greatly improving the spatial density of reliable points over that of earlier phase coherence approaches. We have applied the new detection methods to several different terrain types for various applications and present here sample PS network interferograms. We have verified several of these using either GPS or leveling data and show that the PS solutions are sometimes overly smoothed temporally, especially where the data are still poorly sampled in time. The smoothing is an artifact of our inability to properly unwrap data in three dimensions. We

  17. Monitoring Landslides in Western Mountainous Areas of China Using Advanced Multi-Temporal InSAR Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jie; Liao, Mingsheng; Zhang, Lu; Gong, Jianya

    2016-08-01

    Disasters, caused by landslide, rock fall, debris flow, ground fissure, etc., are one of the significant natural catastrophes, threatening and influencing the socio-economic conditions around the world. China is one of the countries that suffer heavily from such geo-hazards. And most landslides take place in the mountainous valley areas of western China. With its wide coverage and sub-centimeter accuracy, radar remote sensing has already proven its potential for remotely measuring unstable slopes. Differential InSAR (D-InSAR) is used to recognize known landslides and find potential unstable slopes in a region scale. Then, for a specific landslide, advanced multi-temporal InSAR method is exploited to characterize its surface deformation by obtaining time-series displacement on coherent targets. Among them, the PSI technique exploits only PSs exhibiting high phase stability in a stack of interferograms, which generally exist in urban areas. But, in the case of rural environment characterized by vegetated or low reflectivity homogeneous regions, few PSs could be identified. As a complement of persistent scatterers, distributed scatterers widely existing in rural areas can be exploited. DSs decorrelate slowly and can be found from homogeneous ground, scattered outcrops, debris flows, non-cultivated lands and desert areas. In this poster, a distributed scatterers-based InSAR technique, making use of PSs and DSs, is proposed. At first, we will use D-InSAR technique to detect landslides. Then, both PSI and DS-InSAR will be implemented to monitor interested landslides. And a comparison study of these two methods are conducted.

  18. InSAR and GPS time series analysis: Crustal deformation in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C. W.; Plag, H.

    2010-12-01

    Several previous studies have successfully demonstrated that long time series (e.g. >5 years) of GPS measurements can be employed to detect tectonic signals with a vertical rate greater than 0.3 mm/yr (e.g. Hill and Blewitt, 2006; Bennett et al. 2009). However, GPS stations are often sparse, with spacing from a few kilometres to a few hundred kilometres. Interferometric SAR (InSAR) can complement GPS by providing high horizontal spatial resolution (e.g. meters to tens-of metres) over large regions (e.g. 100 km × 100 km). A major source of error for repeat-pass InSAR is the phase delay in radio signal propagation through the atmosphere. The portion of this attributable to tropospheric water vapour causes errors as large as 10-20 cm in deformation retrievals. InSAR Time Series analysis with Atmospheric Estimation Models (InSAR TS + AEM), developed at the University of Glasgow, is a robust time series analysis approach, which mainly uses interferograms with small geometric baselines to minimise the effects of decorrelation and inaccuracies in topographic data. In addition, InSAR TS + AEM can be used to separate deformation signals from atmospheric water vapour effects in order to map surface deformation as it evolves in time. The principal purposes of this study are to assess: (1) how consistent InSAR-derived deformation time series are with GPS; and (2) how precise InSAR-derived atmospheric path delays can be. The Yucca Mountain, Nevada region is chosen as the study site because of its excellent GPS network and extensive radar archives (>10 years of dense and high-quality GPS stations, and >17 years of ERS and ENVISAT radar acquisitions), and because of its arid environment. The latter results in coherence that is generally high, even for long periods that span the existing C-band radar archives of ERS and ENVISAT. Preliminary results show that our InSAR LOS deformation map agrees with GPS measurements to within 0.35 mm/yr RMS misfit at the stations which is the

  19. Multi Band Insar Analysis of Subsidence Development Based on the Long Period Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çomut, F. C.; Ustun, A.; Lazecky, M.; Aref, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    The SAR Interferometry (InSAR) application has shown great potential in monitoring of land terrain changes and in detection of land deformations such as subsidence. Longer time analysis can lead to understand longer trends and changes. Using different bands of SAR satellite (C- from ERS 1-2 and Envisat, L- from ALOS) over the study area, we achieve knowledge of movements in long-term and evaluation of its dynamic changes within observed period of time. Results from InSAR processing fit with the position changes in vertical direction based on GPS network established over the basin as an effective geodetic network. Time series (StaMPS PS+SB) of several points over Çumra County in eastern part of Konya City show a general trend of the deformation that is expected to be approximately between -13 to -17 mm/year. Northern part of Karaman is affected by faster subsidence, borders of the subsidence trough were identified from Envisat. Presenting InSAR results together with GIS information about locations and time of occurrence of sudden subsidence, urban/industrial growth in time and climate changes helps in better understanding of the situation. This way, the impact of natural and man-made changes will be shown for urban planning thanks to InSAR and GIS comparisons with hydrogeological modeling. In this study we present results of differential and multitemporal InSAR series using different bands and GIS conjunction associated with seasonal and temporal groundwater level changes in Konya Closed Basin.

  20. Multiscale InSAR Time Series (MInTS) analysis of surface deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetland, E. A.; Muse, P.; Simons, M.; Lin, Y. N.; Agram, P. S.; DiCaprio, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new approach to extracting spatially and temporally continuous ground deformation fields from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data. We focus on unwrapped interferograms from a single viewing geometry, estimating ground deformation along the line-of-sight. Our approach is based on a wavelet decomposition in space and a general parametrization in time. We refer to this approach as MInTS (Multiscale InSAR Time Series). The wavelet decomposition efficiently deals with commonly seen spatial covariances in repeat-pass InSAR measurements, such that coefficients of the wavelets are essentially spatially uncorrelated. Our time-dependent parametrization is capable of capturing both recognized and unrecognized processes, and is not arbitrarily tied to the times of the SAR acquisitions. We estimate deformation in the wavelet-domain, using a cross-validated, regularized least-squares inversion. We include a model-resolution-based regularization, in order to more heavily damp the model during periods of sparse SAR acquisitions, compared to during times of dense acquisitions. To illustrate the application of MInTS, we consider a catalog of 92 ERS and Envisat interferograms, spanning 16 years, in the Long Valley caldera, CA, region. MInTS analysis captures the ground deformation with high spatial density over the Long Valley region.

  1. Multiscale InSAR Time Series (MInTS) analysis of surface deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetland, E. A.; Musé, P.; Simons, M.; Lin, Y. N.; Agram, P. S.; Dicaprio, C. J.

    2012-02-01

    We present a new approach to extracting spatially and temporally continuous ground deformation fields from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data. We focus on unwrapped interferograms from a single viewing geometry, estimating ground deformation along the line-of-sight. Our approach is based on a wavelet decomposition in space and a general parametrization in time. We refer to this approach as MInTS (Multiscale InSAR Time Series). The wavelet decomposition efficiently deals with commonly seen spatial covariances in repeat-pass InSAR measurements, since the coefficients of the wavelets are essentially spatially uncorrelated. Our time-dependent parametrization is capable of capturing both recognized and unrecognized processes, and is not arbitrarily tied to the times of the SAR acquisitions. We estimate deformation in the wavelet-domain, using a cross-validated, regularized least squares inversion. We include a model-resolution-based regularization, in order to more heavily damp the model during periods of sparse SAR acquisitions, compared to during times of dense acquisitions. To illustrate the application of MInTS, we consider a catalog of 92 ERS and Envisat interferograms, spanning 16 years, in the Long Valley caldera, CA, region. MInTS analysis captures the ground deformation with high spatial density over the Long Valley region.

  2. Monitoring Structural Health of Different Types of Bridges Using Advanced Multi-Temporal InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiaoqiong; Liao, Mingsheng; Yang, Mengshi; Zhang, Lu; Balz, Timo

    2016-08-01

    Since the bridges paly a significance role in national economic development and transportation safety, the structure health and safety of bridges aroused a lot of concern in society and become a hotspot research in earth observation and civil engineering. However, the materials degradation and environmental stresses increase may destroy the structure of bridges and pose significant risks to public safety and quality of life. This highlighted the importance of developing effective structure health monitoring strategies to reflect the current status of bridges and identify structural problems. In this work, an advanced multi-temporal InSAR technique is introduced into deformation monitoring of bridges. We focus on analysis the distribution of PSs, distinction of stable and unstable parts and recognition temporal-spatial deformation characteristics at the scale of single bridge through the examples of different types of bridges in Tianjin and Shanghai.

  3. InSAR deformation time series for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. A.; Knight, R.; Zebker, H. A.; Schreüder, W. A.; Shanker, P.; Lauknes, T. R.

    2009-05-01

    The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. This valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators struggling to develop appropriate management policies for both the surface water and the ground water. In 1998 the state of Colorado commissioned the Rio Grande Decision Support System to refine the hydogeologic characterization of the system, including the development of a MODFLOW finite difference model of groundwater flow. The main challenge in the SLV is acquiring sufficient data to characterize the spatially heterogeneous, time-varying behavior of the groundwater system. Here we apply the small baseline subset analysis (SBAS) interferometric radar (InSAR) technique to provide such data. InSAR techniques yield the deformation of Earth's surface at fine spatial resolution occurring between two satellite overflights, and SBAS permits solution for a time series of deformation maps. The measured deformation can be related to changes in the water table in underlying confined aquifers. The ability to map these changes, over time, in the SLV will provide critical information about the groundwater system. Historically, InSAR measurements have been difficult to make in agricultural areas. The change in cm-scale crop structure with time leads to signal decorrelation and the loss of useful information about surface deformation. The recently-developed SBAS method allows stable deformation estimates at certain ground points in an otherwise decorrelated time series of data. We applied this approach to data collected by the European Space Agency's ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites over the western SLV from track 98 frame 2853 for the years 1992-2001. We used the Generic SAR (GSAR) SBAS software developed by Norut to produce time series deformation measurements for many positions across the entire SLV. We find that the 2000 km2 area captured in track 98 frame 2853 shows very high

  4. Advanced Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Imaging Radar (InSAR) for Dune Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havivi, Shiran; Amir, Doron; Schvartzman, Ilan; August, Yitzhak; Mamman, Shimrit; Rotman, Stanely R.; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available lose particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970s, remote sensing imagery, both optical and radar, have been used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two or more images. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR methods. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This work aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the coherence change detection method was used, in order to identify dune stability or instability and the dune activity level. The Nitzanim-Ashdod coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of

  5. On the Character and Mitigation of Atmospheric Noise in InSAR Time Series Analysis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, W. D.; Fielding, E. J.; Fishbein, E.

    2013-12-01

    Time series analysis of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data, with its broad spatial coverage and ability to image regions that are sometimes very difficult to access, is a powerful tool for characterizing continental surface deformation and its temporal variations. With the impending launch of dedicated SAR missions such as Sentinel-1, ALOS-2, and the planned NASA L-band SAR mission, large volume data sets will allow researchers to further probe ground displacement processes with increased fidelity. Unfortunately, the precision of measurements in individual interferograms is impacted by several sources of noise, notably spatially correlated signals caused by path delays through the stratified and turbulent atmosphere and ionosphere. Spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric water vapor often introduce several to tens of centimeters of apparent deformation in the radar line-of-sight, correlated over short spatial scales (<10 km). Signals resulting from atmospheric path delays are particularly problematic because, like the subsidence and uplift signals associated with tectonic deformation, they are often spatially correlated with topography. In this talk, we provide an overview of the effects of spatially correlated tropospheric noise in individual interferograms and InSAR time series analysis, and we highlight where common assumptions of the temporal and spatial characteristics of tropospheric noise fail. Next, we discuss two classes of methods for mitigating the effects of tropospheric water vapor noise in InSAR time series analysis and single interferograms: noise estimation and characterization with independent observations from multispectral sensors such as MODIS and MERIS; and noise estimation and removal with weather models, multispectral sensor observations, and GPS. Each of these techniques can provide independent assessments of the contribution of water vapor in interferograms, but each technique also suffers from several pitfalls

  6. Possible Time Dependent Deformation over Socorro Magma Body from GPS and InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havazli, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Amelug, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Socorro Magma Body (SMB) is one of the largest, currently active magma intrusions in the Earth's continental crust. The area of Socorro is a segment of the Rio Grande Rift that display a broad seismic anomaly and ground deformation. The seismic reflector is imaged at 19 km depth coinciding with the occurrence of numerous small earthquake swarms. Broad crustal uplift was also observed above this reflector and led to the hypothesis of the presence of a large mid-crustal sill-like magma body. Previous geodetic studies over the area reveal ground deformation at the rate of 2-3 mm/yr from 1992 to 2006. The magma body was modeled as a penny-shaped crack of 21 km radius at 19 km depth based on InSAR results [Finnegan et. al., 2009]. In this study we expand the uplift measurement period over the SMB to two decades by using additional InSAR and GPS observations. We extended the InSAR observation record by analyzing 27 Envisat scenes acquired during the years 2006-2010. Continuous GPS observation acquired by the SC01 station since 2001 and three more recent Plate Boundary Observatory stations, which were installed between 2005 and 2011, provide high temporal record of uplift over the past decade and a half. We analyzed the InSAR data using ROI_PAC software package and calculated the temporal evolution of the vertical displacement using time series analysis. Preliminary results of 2006-2010 Envisat data show no significant deformation above the 1-2 mm noise level, which disagree with the previous ERS-1/2 results; 2-3 mm/yr during 1992-2006. This disagreement suggests a time dependent uplift of the SMB, which is also supported by GPS observations. The average uplift rate of the SC01 station is 0.9±0.02 mm/yr for 2001-2015 and 0.6±0.08 mm/yr for 2006-2010. Furthermore the SC01 time series exhibits episodic uplift events. The observed time dependent uplift suggests that magma supply in the middle crust may also occur episodically, as in shallow magmatic systems.

  7. A time series deformation estimation in the NW Himalayas using SBAS InSAR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Venkataraman, G.

    2012-12-01

    A time series land deformation studies in north western Himalayan region has been presented in this study. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) is an important tool for measuring the land displacement caused by different geological processes [1]. Frequent spatial and temporal decorrelation in the Himalayan region is a strong impediment in precise deformation estimation using conventional interferometric SAR approach. In such cases, advanced DInSAR approaches PSInSAR as well as Small base line subset (SBAS) can be used to estimate earth surface deformation. The SBAS technique [2] is a DInSAR approach which uses a twelve or more number of repeat SAR acquisitions in different combinations of a properly chosen data (subsets) for generation of DInSAR interferograms using two pass interferometric approach. Finally it leads to the generation of mean deformation velocity maps and displacement time series. Herein, SBAS algorithm has been used for time series deformation estimation in the NW Himalayan region. ENVISAT ASAR IS2 swath data from 2003 to 2008 have been used for quantifying slow deformation. Himalayan region is a very active tectonic belt and active orogeny play a significant role in land deformation process [3]. Geomorphology in the region is unique and reacts to the climate change adversely bringing with land slides and subsidence. Settlements on the hill slopes are prone to land slides, landslips, rockslides and soil creep. These hazardous features have hampered the over all progress of the region as they obstruct the roads and flow of traffic, break communication, block flowing water in stream and create temporary reservoirs and also bring down lot of soil cover and thus add enormous silt and gravel to the streams. It has been observed that average deformation varies from -30.0 mm/year to 10 mm/year in the NW Himalayan region . References [1] Massonnet, D., Feigl, K.L.,Rossi, M. and Adragna, F. (1994) Radar interferometry mapping of

  8. Error estimation in multitemporal InSAR deformation time series, with application to Lanzarote, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GonzáLez, Pablo J.; FernáNdez, José

    2011-10-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a reliable technique for measuring crustal deformation. However, despite its long application in geophysical problems, its error estimation has been largely overlooked. Currently, the largest problem with InSAR is still the atmospheric propagation errors, which is why multitemporal interferometric techniques have been successfully developed using a series of interferograms. However, none of the standard multitemporal interferometric techniques, namely PS or SB (Persistent Scatterers and Small Baselines, respectively) provide an estimate of their precision. Here, we present a method to compute reliable estimates of the precision of the deformation time series. We implement it for the SB multitemporal interferometric technique (a favorable technique for natural terrains, the most usual target of geophysical applications). We describe the method that uses a properly weighted scheme that allows us to compute estimates for all interferogram pixels, enhanced by a Montecarlo resampling technique that properly propagates the interferogram errors (variance-covariances) into the unknown parameters (estimated errors for the displacements). We apply the multitemporal error estimation method to Lanzarote Island (Canary Islands), where no active magmatic activity has been reported in the last decades. We detect deformation around Timanfaya volcano (lengthening of line-of-sight ˜ subsidence), where the last eruption in 1730-1736 occurred. Deformation closely follows the surface temperature anomalies indicating that magma crystallization (cooling and contraction) of the 300-year shallow magmatic body under Timanfaya volcano is still ongoing.

  9. Time-scale and mechanism of subsidence at Lassen Volcanic Center, CA, from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Amy L.; Biggs, Juliet; Lu, Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Observations of volcanic subsidence have contributed to our understanding of the eruption cycle, hydrothermal systems and the formation of continental crust. Lassen Volcanic Center is one of two volcanoes in the southern Cascades known to have subsided in recent decades, but the onset, temporal evolution, and cause of subsidence remain unconstrained. Here we use multiple sets of InSAR data, each corrected using the North American Regional Reanalysis atmospheric model, to determine the temporal and spatial characteristics of deformation between 1992 and 2010. Throughout this period all datasets reveal subsidence of a broad, 30-40 km wide region at rates of 10 mm/yr. Evaluating past geodetic studies we suggest that subsidence may have been ongoing since the 1980s, before which it is unlikely that significant ground deformation occurred. By combining multiple tracks of InSAR data we find that the ratio of horizontal to vertical displacements is high (up to 3:1), and source inversions favour a point source located at 8 km depth. Time-series analysis suggests that the rate of volume change of this source may have varied over time. The source geometry and the temporal evolution of deformation contrasts to subsidence observed at nearby Medicine Lake Volcano since the 1950s. We evaluate possible causes of subsidence at Lassen Volcanic Center in light of tectonic setting and hydrothermal activity, and suggest that regional GPS measurements will be key to understanding the role of crustal extension plus other hydrothermal/magmatic processes in deformation during recent decades.

  10. Ground Deformation Mapping of Houston-Galveston, Texas Using InSAR Time-Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    QU, F.; Lu, Z.; Bawden, G. W.; Kim, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Houston-Galveston region in Texas has been subsiding due to the combined effects of groundwater withdrawal, hydrocarbon extraction, soil compaction, and active faulting. This human- and partially nature-induced ground deformation has gradually threatened the stability of urban infrastructure and caused the loss of wetland habitat along the Gulf of Mexico. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) exploiting multiple SAR images has the capability of obtaining ground motions in high spatial resolution over large coverage. In this study, ERS-1/2 (1993-2000), ENVISAT (2004-2010), and ALOS (2007-2011) datasets are used to unravel the characteristics of ground deformation from 1993 to 2011 over the Houston-Galveston area. The persistent scatterer InSAR (PSInSAR) time-series analysis technique is employed to estimate the spatial and temporal variations of ground motions during 20 years. The ERS-1/2 PSInSAR products have measured subsidence (up to 5 cm/yr) in the northwest Houston area as well as a slight uplift (1 cm/yr) in the southeast region from 1993 to 2000. The subsidence rate (up to 2 cm/yr) between 2004 and 2011 has been obtained from ENVISAT and ALOS data. Our results indicate that the pattern of ground deformation was nearly concentric around the location of intense groundwater withdrawal and the subsiding area has been shrinking and migrating toward the northeast after 2000. In addition, an approximately 2 cm of differential subsidence across faults are observed. Presence of faults can induce localized surface displacements, aggravate localized subsidence, discontinue the integrity of ground water flow, and limit the horizontal spread of subsidence funnels. Finally, our long-term measurement of ground deformation has also been validated by GPS observations in study area.

  11. Advanced InSAR techniques for the management and characterization of geothermal resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, F.; Falorni, G.; Morgan, J.; Rucci, A.; Ferretti, A.

    2012-04-01

    InSAR is a remote sensing tool that has applications in both geothermal exploitation and in the management of producing fields. The technique has developed rapidly in recent years and the most evolved algorithms, now capable of providing precise ground movement measurements with unprecedented spatial density over large areas, allow the monitoring of the effects of fluid injection and extraction on surface deformation and the detection of active faults. Multi-interferogram approaches have been used at several geothermal sites in different stages of development. SqueeSAR™, which represents the latest breakthrough in InSAR technology, provides a significant increase in the spatial density of measurement points by exploiting signal returns from both point-like and distributed scatterers. Furthermore, recent satellite radar sensors have a higher spatial resolution (down to 1 m), as well as a higher temporal frequency of image acquisitions (down to a few days). The coupling of the new algorithm with this new generation of satellites provides a valuable tool for monitoring the different phases of geothermal production and in support of the decision making process. Some examples from the US are presented here: the first case study involves the use of InSAR within a suite of tools for exploration of the San Emidio geothermal field in Nevada. This project aimed to develop geophysical techniques to identify and map large aperture fractures for the placement of new production/exploration wells. The second and third examples examine two zones in California: the Salton Sea area, where multi-interferogram InSAR provided an overview of surface deformation at a producing geothermal reservoir. Surface deformation in this area was complex, and the added detail provided insight into the interplay of tectonics and production activities. Additional InSAR studies have also been carried out at the Geysers field in order to evaluate the behavior of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) in

  12. Applications and development of new algorithms for displacement analysis using InSAR time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanoglu, Batuhan

    Time series analysis of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) data has become an important scientific tool for monitoring and measuring the displacement of Earth's surface due to a wide range of phenomena, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, changes in ground water levels, and wetlands. Time series analysis is a product of interferometric phase measurements, which become ambiguous when the observed motion is larger than half of the radar wavelength. Thus, phase observations must first be unwrapped in order to obtain physically meaningful results. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI), Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS), Short Baselines Interferometry (SBAS) and Small Temporal Baseline Subset (STBAS) algorithms solve for this ambiguity using a series of spatio-temporal unwrapping algorithms and filters. In this dissertation, I improve upon current phase unwrapping algorithms, and apply the PSI method to study subsidence in Mexico City. PSI was used to obtain unwrapped deformation rates in Mexico City (Chapter 3),where ground water withdrawal in excess of natural recharge causes subsurface, clay-rich sediments to compact. This study is based on 23 satellite SAR scenes acquired between January 2004 and July 2006. Time series analysis of the data reveals a maximum line-of-sight subsidence rate of 300mm/yr at a high enough resolution that individual subsidence rates for large buildings can be determined. Differential motion and related structural damage along an elevated metro rail was evident from the results. Comparison of PSI subsidence rates with data from permanent GPS stations indicate root mean square (RMS) agreement of 6.9 mm/yr, about the level expected based on joint data uncertainty. The Mexico City results suggest negligible recharge, implying continuing degradation and loss of the aquifer in the third largest metropolitan area in the world. Chapters 4 and 5 illustrate the link between time series analysis and three

  13. Estimating time-dependent magma source properties at the Long Valley caldera using InSAR and GPS time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riel, B. V.; Simons, M.; Agram, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    For the past few decades, the Long Valley caldera in California has experienced several inflation and deflation episodes leading to uplift and subsidence, respectively, of the resurgent dome. The abundance of geodetic measurements from leveling, microgravity, GPS, two-color electronic distance meter (EDM), and interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) time series has allowed the geodetic community to closely monitor surface deformation of the caldera. However, estimation of the source properties of the underlying magma chamber has led to a number of different models that often disagree over important features, such as chamber depth, chamber shape, influence of the south moat fault on the southern edge of the caldera, etc. These discrepancies can often be attributed to strong non-linearities of the different source models and trade-offs between various parameters. Furthermore, underestimation of the observation errors and uncertainties regarding the elastic structure can lead to biases and overconfidence of the inversion results. We address these issues by studying the 2002-2003 inflation episode due to the availability of GPS, EDM, and InSAR time series for that time period. We first use a transient detection approach that incorporates compressed sensing principles to compactly reconstruct temporally and spatially coherent transient signals for the GPS and EDM data. A similar approach is used to construct a continuous InSAR time series formed from over 200 ERS and Envisat interferograms over a 20-year time period. We compute static offsets for the 2002-2003 inflation event and perform a fully Bayesian analysis to estimate parameter values and uncertainties for various non-linear source models. Additionally, we also test a linear source model consisting of a grid of point volume-sources. By again using compressed sensing principles, we show that the linear model is largely consistent with the more compact non-linear analytical models. We use the linear model

  14. One year after the Abruzzo 2009 earthquake: pre-, co- and post-seismic surface deformation investigation through advanced InSAR analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    On 6 April 2009, at 01:33 UTC, a magnitude (Mw) 6.3 earthquake struck central Italy, partially destroying L'Aquila, several surrounding villages, and causing hundreds of casualties. Immediately, the Italian Civil Protection and the scientific community started the work to mitigate the effects and analyze the causes of the natural catastrophe. At the same time almost all the existing spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems imaged the L'Aquila area revealing, through InSAR analyses, the undeniable scar produced by the seismic event on the Earth's surface. Moreover, some of these sensors continued to image the area affected by the seismic displacements, including the advanced SAR sensors of the COSMO/Skymed constellation of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). We present in this study the results achieved by the InSAR group of the IREA-CNR institute, through an extended InSAR-based analysis carried out on the displacements of the area affected by the seismic event. We show first the results achieved by applying the Differential SAR Interferometry (InSAR) algorithm referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique (Berardino et al., 2002) to analyze the temporal evolution of the detected displacements retrieved through the data acquired, from ascending and descending orbits, by the C-band ENVISAT sensor of the European Space Agency (ESA) starting from 2002. This permitted us to investigate possible long term pre-seismic phenomena and provided several co-seismic deformation maps; the latter have been combined with the homologous co-seismic deformation maps retrieved by processing InSAR data pairs acquired by X-band (COSMO/Skymed and TERRASAR-X) and L-band (ALOS-PALSAR) SAR sensors. These co-seismic displacements have been jointly inverted in order to provide insights on the deformation source. The final results are focused on the exploitation of COSMO/SkyMed data acquired on both right ascending and descending orbits. The ascending dataset is composed by 32

  15. InSAR Time Series Analysis of Interseismic Deformation in Eastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Z.; Pathier, E.; Walpersdorf, A.; Lassere, C.; Tavakli, F.; Nankali, H.

    2012-04-01

    The high seismicity of Iran, with large and shallow destructive earthquakes, reflects its intense tectonic activity that takes place in the Alpine-Himalayan belt context. Active tectonics in the Iranian plateau is dominated by the convergence between the Arabian and Eurasian plates, taking place inside the political borders of the country. The part of the convergence that is not absorbed in Zagros at its SW border must be accommodated by shear deformation between Central Iran and the Helmand sub-plate to the east of Iran. Consequently, Eastern Iran has a crucial role in accommodating N-S right-lateral shear between Central Iran and Afghanistan. The tectonic deformation in eastern Iran is localized mainly on NS oriented right-lateral faults surrounding the aseismic Lut block, and EW left-lateral faults at the northern boundary of the Lut block. Previous studies on these major left-lateral faults in Eastern Iran show discrepancies especially between the GPS interseismic slip rate (less than 1 mm/yr on the Doruneh fault and geological slip rates (2.4±0.3 mm/yr). The spatial coverage, acceptable resolution and precision of space-borne radar interferometry (InSAR) make it a powerful technique to resolve some open questions of fault mechanisms and their role in the regional tectonics. Several InSAR studies have been already successful in measuring long-wavelength ground displacements related to interseismic fault deformation on similar continental strike-slip faults (like the North Anatolian fault or the Haiyuan fault). The most important difficulty of the present study is the slow slip rate of the targeted faults (1 to 3 mm/yr). Even if the East-West orientation of the Doruneh or Dasht-e-Bayaz strike-slip faults is favourable to the measurement from descending or ascending ENVISAT orbits, such low slip rate faults still require some methodological improvement with respect to conventional InSAR. In this study, we use ENVISAT ASAR images from 2003 to 2010, in descending

  16. InSAR time-series investigation of long-term ground displacement at Beijing Capital International Airport, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Mingliang; Gong, Huili; Chen, Beibei; Zhou, Chaofan; Chen, Wenfeng; Liang, Yue; Shi, Min; Si, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series analysis provides high spatial resolution and continuous temporal coverage for investigations of long-term ground displacement. Beijing, the capital city of China, has suffered from land subsidence since the 1950s, and extreme groundwater extraction has led to subsidence rates of > 100 mm/year. In this study, InSAR time-series analysis is performed on different data subsets to investigate the ground displacement at Capital International Airport, Beijing, between June 2003 and November 2013. The results show that the ground surface in the airport has deformed at different rates ranging from - 66.2 mm/year (sinking) to 8.2 mm/year (uplift) relative to the reference point. The projected vertical displacement rates agreed with measurements estimated from ground-leveling surveys, and the correlation coefficient of the fitting result is 0.96, with a standard deviation of 0.9 mm/year and a mean different of 2.0 mm/year. The runways and terminals have been affected by land subsidence to various degrees. Previous studies has indicated that long-term intense groundwater extraction is the main reason leading to land subsidence in this area. Other triggering factors, such as active faults, the quaternary compressible layers and urbanization, also have different degrees of contribution or impact on land subsidence in Beijing Plain. Furthermore, some interesting behaviors from groundwater (such as inter- and semi-annual variations) and subsidence, the relationship between them are also found in this study.

  17. Interseismic deformation and creep along the Sumatran fault, Indonesia from InSAR time-series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, X.; Sandwell, D. T.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The fast subduction (~60 mm/yr) of the Indo-Australia plate underneath the Sunda microplate in Southeast Asia causes major seismic and tsunami hazards to surrounding regions. Previous land-based GPS studies have revealed that the plate motion composes of ~45 mm/yr of subduction directed normal to the Sunda trench and ~23 mm/yr of right-lateral strike-slip along the 1000km long Sumatran fault. The decoupling of the forearc blocks from the overriding plate leads to slip partitioning at this highly oblique subduction zone. Geological and geodetic studies have suggested that the long-term fault slip rate along the Sumatran fault increases significantly from southern to northern Sumatra. We analyzed the SAR data from the L-band ALOS-1 satellite to image the interseismic deformation along the Sumatran fault. To extract the deformation signal from the interferometric phase observations, we have improved the conventional SBAS methodology by including the decorrelation information of the interferograms into the inverse problem. Instead of discarding the noisy data present in a fraction of the interferograms, we keep all the pixels in the processing chain and weight the observed phase data based on the correlation using the covariance matrix. This new InSAR technique is less prone to the unwrapping errors and it results in a spatially coherent signal with dense coverage and high precision. The InSAR time-series analysis has detected up to ~20 mm/yr of fault creep on the Aceh segment along the Northern Sumatran fault. The spatial extent of the aseismic creep reaches at least 100 km, measured from N5.2, E95.7 to N4.5, E96.5. The along-strike variation of the aseismic creep has an inverse "U" shape. We will present new line-of-sight interseismic velocity and along-strike variation of fault creep rate along the Northern Sumatran fault in Southeast Asia.

  18. Recent Advances on INSAR Temporal Decorrelation: Theory and Observations Using UAVSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavalle, M.; Hensley, S.; Simard, M.

    2011-01-01

    We review our recent advances in understanding the role of temporal decorrelation in SAR interferometry and polarimetric SAR interferometry. We developed a physical model of temporal decorrelation based on Gaussian-statistic motion that varies along the vertical direction in forest canopies. Temporal decorrelation depends on structural parameters such as forest height, is sensitive to polarization and affects coherence amplitude and phase. A model of temporal-volume decorrelation valid for arbitrary spatial baseline is discussed. We tested the inversion of this model to estimate forest height from model simulations supported by JPL/UAVSAR data and lidar LVIS data. We found a general good agreement between forest height estimated from radar data and forest height estimated from lidar data.

  19. Hydrothermal fluid flow models of Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy constrained by InSAR surface deformation time series observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, P.; Lanari, R.; Manzo, M.; Sansosti, E.; Tizzani, P.; Hutnak, M.; Hurwitz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy, located along the Bay of Naples, has a long history of significant vertical deformation, with the most recent large uplift (>1.5m) occurring in 1983-1984. Each episode of uplift has been followed by a period of subsidence that decreases in rate with time and may be punctuated by brief episodes of lesser uplift. The large amplitude of the major uplifts that occur without volcanic activity, and the subsequent subsidence has been argued as evidence for hydrothermal amplification of any magmatic source. The later subsidence and its temporal decay have been argued as due to diffusion of the pressurized caldera fill material into the less porous surrounding country rock. We present satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) time series analysis of ERS and Envisat data from the European Space Agency, based on exploiting the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) approach [Berardino et al., 2002]; this allows us to generate maps of relative surface deformation though time, beginning in 1992 through 2007, that are relevant to both ascending and descending satellite orbits. The general temporal behavior is one of subsidence punctuated by several lesser uplift episodes. The spatial pattern of deformation can be modeled through simple inflation/deflation sources in an elastic halfspace. Given the evidence to suggest that fluids may play a significant role in the temporal deformation of Campi Flegrei, rather than a purely magmatic or magma chamber-based interpretation, we model the temporal and spatial evolution of surface deformation as a hydrothermal fluid flow process. We use the TOUGH2-BIOT2 set of numerical codes [Preuss et al., 1999; Hsieh, 1996], which couple multi-phase (liquid-gas) and multi-component (H2O-CO2) fluid flow in a porous or fractured media with plane strain deformation and fluid flow in a linearly elastic porous medium. We explore parameters related to the depth and temporal history of fluid injection, fluid

  20. Deformation at Brady Hot Springs (Nevada) geothermal field measured by time series analysis of InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S. T.; Davatzes, N. C.; Feigl, K. L.; Wang, H. F.; Foxall, W.; Mellors, R. J.; Akerley, J.; Spielman, P.; Zemach, E.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data acquired between 1997 and 2014 (by the ERS, Envisat, ALOS and TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X satellite missions) to measure and characterize time-dependent deformation at the Brady Hot Springs geothermal field in Western Nevada due to net extraction of fluids. The long axis of the ~4 km by ~1.5 km oval shaped subsiding region coincides with the strike of the predominant normal fault system at Brady. Within this bowl of subsidence, the interference pattern shows several smaller features with length scales of the order of ~1 km. These smaller features are spatially associated with the intersections and overlaps of some of the mapped fault segments. This type of signature occurs consistently in all of the well-correlated interferometric pairs spanning several months. To model the deformation, we explore several different observable quantities, including the spatial derivative of the range change (dimensionless), and the (unwrapped) range change (in mm). The results from inverse modeling suggest that the deformation is a result of compaction associated with a decline in pore-fluid pressure. This phenomenon occurs in shallow lithologic units and/or highly damaged regions where fault segments mechanically interact. Such damaged zones are expected to be vertically extensive along the faults, providing a high permeability conduit to the deep reservoir tapped by production wells. Using time series analysis, we test the hypothesis that changes in the net rate of geothermal production drive the observed deformation.

  1. Magnitude and extent of land subsidence in central Mexico revealed by regional InSAR ALOS time-series survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussard, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Amelung, F.; Cabral-Cano, E.

    2013-05-01

    Massive groundwater extraction is very common in Mexico and is well known to result in land subsidence. However, most surveys dedicated to land subsidence focus on one single city, mainly Mexico City, and thus fail to provide a comprehensive picture of the problem. Here we use a space-based radar remote sensing technique, known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to detect land subsidence in the entire central Mexico area. We used data from the Japanese satellite ALOS, processed over 600 SAR images acquired between 2007-2011 and produced over 3000 interferograms to cover and area of 200,000 km2 in central Mexico. We identify land subsidence in twenty-one areas, including seventeen cities, namely from east to west, Puebla, Mexico city, Toluca de Lerdo, Queretaro, San Luis de la Paz, south of San Luis de la Paz, Celaya, south of Villa de Reyes, San Luis Potosi, west of Villa de Arista, Morelia, Salamanca, Irapuato, Silao, Leon, Aguascalientes, north of Aguascalientes, Zamora de Hidalgo, Guadalajara, Ahuacatlan, and Tepic. Subsidence rates of 30 cm/yr are observed in Mexico City, while in the other locations typical rates of 5-10 cm/yr are noticed. Regional surveys of this type are necessary for the development of hazard mitigation plans and efficient use of ground-based monitoring. We additionally correlate subsidence with land use, surface geology, and faults distribution and suggest that groundwater extraction for agricultural, urban, and industrial uses are the main causes of land subsidence. We also reveal that the limits of the subsiding areas often correlate with existing faults, motion on these faults being driven by water extraction rather than by tectonic activity. In all the subsiding locations we observe high ground velocity gradients emphasizing the significant risks associated with land subsidence in central Mexico. Averaged 2007-2011 ground velocity map from ALOS InSAR time-series in central Mexico, revealing land subsidence in 21

  2. Remote sensing measurements of thermokarst subsidence using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Chen, A. C.; Gusmeroli, A.; Zebker, H. A.; Zhang, T.

    2015-09-01

    Thawing of ice-rich permafrost followed by surface subsidence results in irregular, depressed landforms known as thermokarst. Many remote sensing studies have identified thermokarst landforms and mapped their changes. However, the intrinsic dynamic thermokarst process of surface subsidence remains a challenge to quantify and is seldom examined using remote sensing methods. In this study we used spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data to map surface subsidence trends at a thermokarst landform located near Deadhorse on the North Slope of Alaska. A pipeline access road constructed in the 1970s triggered the thawing of the permafrost, causing subsequent expansion of the thermokarst landform. Using Phased Array type L band Synthetic Aperture Radar images acquired by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-1, our InSAR analysis reveals localized thermokarst subsidence of 2-8 cm/yr between 2006 and 2010, equivalent to an ice volume loss of about 1.2 × 107 m3/yr. Comparisons between InSAR subsidence trends and lidar microtopography suggest a characteristic time of 8 years of thermokarst development. We also quantitatively explain the difficulty, uncertainties, and possible biases in separating thermokarst-induced, irreversible subsidence from cyclic seasonal deformation. Our study illustrates that InSAR is an effective tool for mapping and studying active thermokarst processes and quantifying ice loss.

  3. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrola, E. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Sacco, G.; Zebker, H. A.; Simons, M.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) is a software development effort in its second year within the NASA Advanced Information Systems and Technology program. The ISCE will provide a new computing environment for geodetic image processing for InSAR sensors that will enable scientists to reduce measurements directly from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products without first requiring them to develop detailed expertise in radar processing methods. The environment can serve as the core of a centralized processing center to bring Level-0 raw radar data up to Level-3 data products, but is adaptable to alternative processing approaches for science users interested in new and different ways to exploit mission data. The NRC Decadal Survey-recommended DESDynI mission will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystem. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment is planned to become a key element in processing DESDynI data into higher level data products and it is expected to enable a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data, than current approaches. At the core of ISCE is both legacy processing software from the JPL/Caltech ROI_PAC repeat-pass interferometry package as well as a new InSAR processing package containing more efficient and more accurate processing algorithms being developed at Stanford for this project that is based on experience gained in developing processors for missions such as SRTM and UAVSAR. Around the core InSAR processing programs we are building object-oriented wrappers to enable their incorporation into a more modern, flexible, extensible software package that is informed by modern programming methods, including rigorous componentization of processing codes, abstraction and generalization of data models, and a robust, intuitive user interface with

  4. Spatiotemporal distribution of strain field and hydraulic conductivity at the Phoenix valley basins, constrained using InSAR time series and time-dependent models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. M.; Shirzaei, M.

    2015-12-01

    Poroelastic theory suggests that long-term aquifer deformation is linearly proportional to changes in pore pressure. Land subsidence is the surface expression of deformation occurring at depth that is observed with dense, detailed, and high precision interferometric SAR data. In earlier work, Miller & Shirzaei [2015] identified zones of subsidence and uplift across the Phoenix valley caused by pumping and artificial recharge operations. we combined ascending and descending Envisat InSAR datasets to estimate vertical and horizontal displacement time series from 2003-2010. Next, wavelet decomposition was used to extract and compare the elastic components of vertical deformation and hydraulic head data to estimate aquifer storage coefficients. In the following, we present the results from elastic aquifer modeling using a 3D array of triangular dislocations, extending from depth of 0.5 to 3.5 km. We employ a time-dependent modeling scheme to invert the InSAR displacement time series, solving for the spatiotemporal distribution of the aquifer-aquitard compaction. Such models are used to calculate strain and stress fields and forecast the location of extensional cracks and earth fissures, useful for urban planning and management. Later, applying the framework suggested by Burbey [1999], the optimum compaction model is used to estimate the 3D distribution of hydraulic conductivities as a function of time. These estimates are verified using in-situ and laboratory observations and provide unique evidence to investigate the stress-dependence of the hydraulic conductivity and its variations due to pumping, recharge, and injection. The estimates will also be used in groundwater flow models, enhancing water management in the valley and elsewhere. References Burby, T. J. (1999), Effects of horizontal strain in estimating specific storage and compaction in confined and leaky aquifer systems, Hydrogeology Journal, 7(6), 521-532, doi:10.1007/s100400050225

  5. Sensing the bed-rock movement due to ice unloading from space using InSAR time-series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T. H.; Wdowinski, S.

    2014-12-01

    Ice-sheets in the Arctic region are retreating rapidly since late 1990s. Typical ice loss rates are 0.5 - 1 m/yr at the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, ~ 1 m/yr at the Icelandic ice sheets, and several meters per year at the edge of Greenland ice sheet. Such load decreasing causes measurable (several millimeter per year) deformation of the Earth's crust from Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR). Using small baseline time-series analysis, this signal is retrieved after noises such as orbit error, atmospheric delay and DEM error being removed. We present results from Vatnajokull ice cap, Petermann glacier and Barnes ice cap using ERS, Envisat and TerraSAR-X data. Up to 2 cm/yr relative radar line-of-sight displacement is detected. The pattern of deformation matches the shape of ice sheet very well. The result in Iceland was used to develop a new model for the ice mass balance estimation from 1995 to 2010. Other applications of this kind of technique include validation of ICESat or GRACE based ice sheet model, Earth's rheology (Young's modulus, viscosity and so on). Moreover, we find a narrow (~ 1km) uplift zone close to the periglacial area of Petermann glacier which may due to a special rheology under the ice stream.

  6. Subsidence monitoring in coal area using time-series InSAR combining persistent scatterers and distributed scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengjia; Wang, Chao; Tang, Yixian; Fu, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    In coal mining areas, ground subsidence persistently happens, which produces serious environmental issues and affects the development of cities. To monitor the ground deformation due to coal mining, a modified time-series InSAR technique combining persistent scatterers (PSs) and distributed scatterers (DSs) is presented in this paper. In particular, DSs are efficiently identified using classified information and statistical characteristics. Furthermore, a two-scale network is introduced into traditional PSI to deal with PSs and DSs in a multi-layer framework by taking the advantage of the robust of PSs and the widely distribution of DSs. The proposed method is performed to investigate the subsidence of Huainan City, Anhui province (China), during 2012-2013 using 14 scenes of Radarsat-2 images. Experimental results show that the proposed method can ease the estimation complexity and significantly increase the spatial density of measurement points, which can provide more detailed deformation information. Result shows that there are obvious subsidence areas detected in the test site with subsidence velocity larger than 5 cm/year. The proposed method brings practical applications for non-urban area deformation monitoring.

  7. Crustal deformation induced by volcanic activity measured by InSAR time series analysis (Volcan de Colima-Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunori, Carlo Alberto; Norini, Gianluca; Stramondo, Salvatore; Capra, Lucia; Zucca, Francesco; Groppelli, Gianluca; Bignami, Christian; Chini, Marco; Manea, Marina; Manea, Vlad

    2010-05-01

    The Volcán de Colima (CV) is currently the most active Mexican volcano. After the 1913 plinian activity the volcano presented several eruptive phases that lasted few years, but since 1991 its activity became more persistent with vulcanian eruptions, lava and dome extrusions. During the last 15 years the volcano suffered several eruptive episodes as in 1991, 1994, 1998-1999, 2001-2003, 2004 and 2005 with the emplacement of pyroclastic flows. During rain seasons lahars are frequent affecting several infrastructures such as bridges and electric towers. This work is focused on the detection of surface deformation with centimetre or sub-centimeter accuracy of the Volcán de Colima and surrounding areas. We try to assess the amount and the spatial extension of surface movements of the CV and to get insights into the causes of the surface deformation by using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), a powerful tool ensuring measurements at high-accuracy over large areas. The image dataset acquired by ESA ENVISAT ASAR (C band) sensor, has been processed using Advanced interferometric techniques (A-InSAR) to overcome the really challenging sources of decorrelation related to the setting context, mainly vegetation and atmosphere, in order to give us the opportunity to detect also very low rates of deformations. The main objectives of the interferometric analysis is the measurement of deformations in the CV in relation with active tectonics and gravity induced spreading, the identification of magma migration below the surface in the last decade, the detection of the incipient movements of volcanic landslides and large scale volcano instability, and the kinematics of the Colima rift. We present preliminary results of the A-InSAR processing, in the framework of the interdisciplinary Colima Deformation project (ColDef).

  8. The combined use of InSAR and GPS Time-Series to Infer the Deformation Signals at the Yellowstone Caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, A.; Tizzani, P.; Battaglia, M.; Castaldo, R.; Lanari, R.; Zeni, G.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the Yellowstone caldera geological unrest between 1977 and 2010 by analyzing temporal changes in differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), precise spirit leveling andgravity measurements. The analysis of the 1992-2010 displacement time series has been retrieved by applying an "improved" version of the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) InSAR technique which complements a novel multi-temporal noise filtering approach with a suitable identification of the network of small baseline pairs. As a result, we have identified three areas of deformation: (i) the Mallard Lake (ML) and Sour Creek (SC) resurgent domes, (ii) a region close to the Northern Caldera Rim (NCR), and (iii) the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP). While the eastern SRP shows a signal related to tectonic deformation, the other two regions are influenced by the caldera unrest. We removed the tectonic signal from the InSAR displacements, and we modeled the InSAR, leveling, and gravity measurements to retrieve the best fitting source parameters. Our findings confirmed the existence of different distinct sources, beneath the brittle-ductile transition zone, which have been intermittently active during the last three decades. Moreover, we interpreted our results in the light of existing seismic tomography studies. Concerning the SC dome, we highlighted the role of hydrothermal fluids as the driving force behind the 1977-1983 uplift; since 1983-1993 the deformation source transformed into a deeper one with a higher magmatic component. Furthermore, our results support the magmatic nature of the deformation source beneath ML dome for the overall investigated period. Finally, the uplift at NCR is interpreted as magma accumulation, while its subsidence could either be the result of fluids migration outside the caldera or the gravitational adjustment of the source from a spherical to a sill-like geometry.

  9. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Gurrola, E. M.; Sacco, G.; Zebker, H. A.; Simons, M.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2009-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) is a new development effort within the NASA Advanced Information Systems and Technology program, with the intent of recasting the JPL/Caltech ROI_PAC repeat-pass interferometry package into a modern, reconfigurable, open-source computing environment. The new capability initiates the next generation of geodetic imaging processing technology for InSAR sensors, providing flexibility and extensibility in reducing measurements from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products. The NRC Decadal Survey recommended DESDynI mission will deliver to the science community data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth’s ecosystem. DESDynI will provide time series and multi-image measurements that permit four-dimensional models of Earth surface processes so that, for example, climate-induced changes over time become apparent and quantifiable. In this paper, we describe the Environment, and illustrate how it can facility space-based geodesy from InSAR. The ISCE invokes object oriented scripts to control legacy and new codes, and abstracts and generalizes the data model for efficient manipulation of objects among modules. The module interfaces are suitable for command-line execution or GUI-programming. It exposes users gradually to its levels of capability, allowing novices to apply it readily for simple tasks and for experienced users to mine the data with great facility. The intent of the effort is to encourage user contributions to the code, creating an open source community that will extend its life and utility.

  10. Multidimensional Time Series Analysis Of Ground Deformation From Multiple InSAR Data Sets Applied To Virunga Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Oreye, N.; Samsonov, S. V.; Benoît, S.

    2012-12-01

    A novel, Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset (MSBAS), methodology is presented for integration of multiple InSAR data sets for computation of two or three dimensional time series of deformation (Samsonov and d'Oreye, Resubmitted). The approach allows combination of all possible air-borne and space-borne SAR data acquired with different acquisition parameters, temporal and spatial sampling and resolution, wave-band and polarization. The proposed method has four main advantages: 1) it achieves combined temporal coverage over an extended period of time when data from many different sensors with different temporal coverages are available; 2) temporal resolution of produced time series increases since it includes the combined sampling from all data sets, which helps to observe signal in more details and also to improve the quality of post-processing (i.e. filtering); 3) two or three components of ground deformation vector are computed, which helps in interpretation of observed ground deformation and further modeling and inversion; 4) various sources of noise (i.e. tropospheric, ionospheric, topographic, orbital, thermal, etc.) are averaged out during the processing improving a signal-to-noise ratio. We apply this technique to SAR data acquired by ERS-1/2, ENVISAT, Radarsat-2 and ALOS starting from March of 2003 until July 2010 over Virunga Volcanic Province (DR Congo) in order to produce time series of ground deformation. The horizontal and vertical time series of ground displacement clearly identify lava compaction areas, long-term deformation of Mt. Nyamulagira and deformations associated to 2004, 2006 and 2010 Nyamulagira eruptions. The method also reveals first unambiguous pre-eruptive deformations in the Virunga Volcanic Province. In particular, pre-eruptive signals are detected about 15 days prior the onset of Nyamulagira 2010 eruption by three successive satellite images acquired by three different sensors in different geometries while the seismic precursors

  11. Magnitude and extent of land subsidence in central Mexico revealed by regional InSAR ALOS time-series survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussard, Estelle; Amelung, Falk; Wdowinski, Shimon; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    The societal impacts of land subsidence are colossal, both in terms of decrease in water resources and in threat to human life due to buildings damages and increase in flood risk from rivers. Most subsidence surveys in Mexico focus on Mexico City, known to subside since the 1950s, while a few studies have documented the occurrence of land subsidence in other medium to large-seized cities of central Mexico. However, because most works target one single city, they fail to reveal the bigger picture. Here we use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) time-series analysis of ALOS L-band SAR data to resolve land subsidence in an area of 200,000 km2 in central Mexico. We processed over 600 SAR images acquired between 2007-2011 and produced over 3000 interferograms. The data reveal significant subsidence in seventeen cities, including sixteen with over 100, 000 inhabitants and allow mapping of subsidence with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Land subsidence is detected, from east to west, in Puebla (population of 2.5 million), Mexico city (population of 21 million), Toluca de Lerdo (population of 427K), Queretaro (population of 825K), San Luis de la Paz (population of 101K), Celaya (population of 266K), San Luis Potosi (population of 936K), Morelia (population of 537K), Salamanca (population of 144K), Irapuato (population of 317K), Silao (population of 147K), Leon (population of 1.4 million), Aguascalientes (population of 735K), Zamora de Hidalgo (population of 186K), Guadalajara (population of 3.8 million), Ahuacatlan (population of 6.5K), and Tepic (population of 261K). We additionally identify subsidence in 3 agricultural areas outside major urban centers: 20 km southwest of the city of San Luis de la Paz, south of Villa de Reyes (40 km south of San Luis Potosi), and west of villa de Arista (50 km north of San Luis Potosi). The time-series suggest nearly constant rates of subsidence at most the locations over the 2-years period spanned by the SAR

  12. Volcano deformation survey over the Northern and Central Andes with ALOS InSAR time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Rivera, Anieri M.; Amelung, Falk; Mothes, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    We use ALOS-1 Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data spanning the period of 2007-2011 to obtain time-dependent ground deformation data over all of the volcanoes in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. We detect deformation on or near the proximity of Galeras, Reventador, Tungurahua, Guagua Pichincha, Sangay, and Cerro Auquihuato volcanoes, uncovering previously undocumented deformation in the latter three. Deformation is attributed to changes in pressurization of the volcanic systems (Galeras, Tungurahua, Guagua Pichincha, and Cerro Auquihuato), subsidence associated with flow deposits (Reventador), and flank creep (Sangay). Our models suggest that the pressure sources are located at depths of ˜1-6 km from the surface, indicating that the measurable deformation within our data is restricted to shallow magma chambers and hydrothermal systems.

  13. Quantifying changes in land-surface height in bioenergy palm oil plantations (Sumatra) using InSAR time series.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Waldron, Susan; Li, Zhenhong

    2013-04-01

    Tropical peatlands in Southeast Asia cover ~ 439,238 km sq. and represent ~77 % of global tropical peatland carbon stores and ~11 % of global peatland area. These landscapes are substantial C stores accounting for ~17-19 % of the global peat C pool (Page et al., 2010). Within southeast Asia, Indonesian peatlands hold most C (57.4 Pg, 65 %), followed by Malaysia (9.1 Pg, 10 %). In recent decades the drive to use these soils for agriculture and often the palm oil biogenergy crop, has driven fire-clearing, deforestation and drainage of these carbon landscapes. The drainage can lead to respiration of the soil carbon store and subsidence of the peatland (Hooijer et al., 2012), reducing their strength as a current C store and their capacity for future soil C storage. Using field-based surveying to monitor changes in the past peatland surface height, and over the large areas typical of commercial agricultural palm oil plantations, is challenging such that measurements are more likely to describe a small area and be only a snapshot in time. Upscaling and understanding the rate of change in surface height through time may be overcome using remote sensing approaches. Here we present data on the change in peatland surface height in Indonesia palm oil plantations, detected using the Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) Small BAseline Set (SBAS) approach (Berardino et al., 2002). Using data from July 2007 to January 2011, we have generated a map of the rate of change of mean height, and time series of change in surface height for several plantation areas. To do this we used two independent ALOS L-band tracks SAR images, as there is a lack of ground data for validation, coherence in output provides confidence the results are representative. Our analysis to date shows that in drained and planted palm oil areas: 1) the rate of change in surface height (decrease) can vary; 2) the decrease in surface height can be up to 5 cm/year; 3) the largest decrease in surface height

  14. Monitoring Building Deformation with InSAR: Experiments and Validation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kui; Yan, Li; Huang, Guoman; Chen, Chu; Wu, Zhengpeng

    2016-12-20

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) techniques are increasingly applied for monitoring land subsidence. The advantages of InSAR include high accuracy and the ability to cover large areas; nevertheless, research validating the use of InSAR on building deformation is limited. In this paper, we test the monitoring capability of the InSAR in experiments using two landmark buildings; the Bohai Building and the China Theater, located in Tianjin, China. They were selected as real examples to compare InSAR and leveling approaches for building deformation. Ten TerraSAR-X images spanning half a year were used in Permanent Scatterer InSAR processing. These extracted InSAR results were processed considering the diversity in both direction and spatial distribution, and were compared with true leveling values in both Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression and measurement of error analyses. The detailed experimental results for the Bohai Building and the China Theater showed a high correlation between InSAR results and the leveling values. At the same time, the two Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) indexes had values of approximately 1 mm. These analyses show that a millimeter level of accuracy can be achieved by means of InSAR technique when measuring building deformation. We discuss the differences in accuracy between OLS regression and measurement of error analyses, and compare the accuracy index of leveling in order to propose InSAR accuracy levels appropriate for monitoring buildings deformation. After assessing the advantages and limitations of InSAR techniques in monitoring buildings, further applications are evaluated.

  15. Monitoring Building Deformation with InSAR: Experiments and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kui; Yan, Li; Huang, Guoman; Chen, Chu; Wu, Zhengpeng

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) techniques are increasingly applied for monitoring land subsidence. The advantages of InSAR include high accuracy and the ability to cover large areas; nevertheless, research validating the use of InSAR on building deformation is limited. In this paper, we test the monitoring capability of the InSAR in experiments using two landmark buildings; the Bohai Building and the China Theater, located in Tianjin, China. They were selected as real examples to compare InSAR and leveling approaches for building deformation. Ten TerraSAR-X images spanning half a year were used in Permanent Scatterer InSAR processing. These extracted InSAR results were processed considering the diversity in both direction and spatial distribution, and were compared with true leveling values in both Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression and measurement of error analyses. The detailed experimental results for the Bohai Building and the China Theater showed a high correlation between InSAR results and the leveling values. At the same time, the two Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) indexes had values of approximately 1 mm. These analyses show that a millimeter level of accuracy can be achieved by means of InSAR technique when measuring building deformation. We discuss the differences in accuracy between OLS regression and measurement of error analyses, and compare the accuracy index of leveling in order to propose InSAR accuracy levels appropriate for monitoring buildings deformation. After assessing the advantages and limitations of InSAR techniques in monitoring buildings, further applications are evaluated. PMID:27999403

  16. Deformation Mapping for Coal Mining Using Time-Series InSAR Combining Persistent Scatterer and Distributed Scatterer in Huainan City, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengjia; Tang, Yixian; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Hong

    2015-05-01

    A modified time-series InSAR technique combing Persistent Scatterers and Distributed scatterers is applied to obtain the deformation information at coal mining areas in Huainan city. In order to select DSs, a selecting strategy combining both classified information and statistical characteristics is used. To control error propagation and improve computational efficiency, a region growing-based strategy is applied to extract the deformation rate at DSs. A series of Radarsat-2 HH polarization images collected in Huainan over a period of approximately two years are processed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. The experimental results show that zones with obvious subsidence are detected in coal mining areas with a maximum deformation rate larger than 10.7 cm/year during the observation period.

  17. Evaluation of the potential of InSAR time series to study the spatio-temporal evolution of piezometric levels in the Madrid aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béjar-Pizarro, M.; Ezquerro Martín, P.; Herrera, G.; Tomás, R.; Guardiola-Albert, C.; Ruiz Hernández, J. M.; Marchamalo Sacristán, M.; Martínez Marín, R.

    2015-11-01

    The Tertiary detritic aquifer of Madrid (TDAM), with an average thickness of 1500 m and a heterogeneous, anisotropic structure, supplies water to Madrid, the most populated city of Spain (3.2 million inhabitants in the metropolitan area). Besides its complex structure, a previous work focused in the north-northwest of Madrid city showed that the aquifer behaves quasi elastically trough extraction/recovery cycles and ground uplifting during recovery periods compensates most of the ground subsidence measured during previous extraction periods (Ezquerro et al., 2014). Therefore, the relationship between ground deformation and groundwater level through time can be simulated using simple elastic models. In this work, we model the temporal evolution of the piezometric level in 19 wells of the TDAM in the period 1997-2010. Using InSAR and piezometric time series spanning the studied period, we first estimate the elastic storage coefficient (Ske) for every well. Both, the Ske of each well and the average Ske of all wells, are used to predict hydraulic heads at the different well locations during the study period and compared against the measured hydraulic heads, leading to very similar errors when using the Ske of each well and the average Ske of all wells: 14 and 16 % on average respectively. This result suggests that an average Ske can be used to estimate piezometric level variations in all the points where ground deformation has been measured by InSAR, thus allowing production of piezometric level maps for the different extraction/recovery cycles in the TDAM.

  18. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment - The Home Stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Gurrola, E. M.; Sacco, G.; Zebker, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) is a software development effort in its third and final year within the NASA Advanced Information Systems and Technology program. The ISCE is a new computing environment for geodetic image processing for InSAR sensors enabling scientists to reduce measurements directly from radar satellites to new geophysical products with relative ease. The environment can serve as the core of a centralized processing center to bring Level-0 raw radar data up to Level-3 data products, but is adaptable to alternative processing approaches for science users interested in new and different ways to exploit mission data. Upcoming international SAR missions will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystem. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment has the functionality to become a key element in processing data from NASA's proposed DESDynI mission into higher level data products, supporting a new class of analyses that take advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data. At the core of ISCE is a new set of efficient and accurate InSAR algorithms. These algorithms are placed into an object-oriented, flexible, extensible software package that is informed by modern programming methods, including rigorous componentization of processing codes, abstraction and generalization of data models. The environment is designed to easily allow user contributions, enabling an open source community to extend the framework into the indefinite future. ISCE supports data from nearly all of the available satellite platforms, including ERS, EnviSAT, Radarsat-1, Radarsat-2, ALOS, TerraSAR-X, and Cosmo-SkyMed. The code applies a number of parallelization techniques and sensible approximations for speed. It is configured to work on modern linux-based computers with gcc compilers and python

  19. ERS-ENVISAT InSAR deformation time-series: a powerful tool to investigate long term surface deformation of large areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    Satellite time series have already provided key measurements to retrieve information on the dynamic nature of Earth surface processes. We exploit in this work the availability of the large archives of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired by the ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT sensors of the European Space Agency (ESA) during the 1992-2009 time period, in order to investigate long term surface deformation of large areas. To achieve this result we take advantage of the Differential SAR Interferometry (InSAR) algorithm referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique (Berardino et al., 2002), which allows us to generate mean deformation velocity maps and corresponding time-series by exploiting temporally overlapping SAR dataset collected by the ERS and ENVISAT sensors (Pepe et al., 2005). In particular, we focus on the results obtained by retrieving ERS-ENVISAT deformation time-series from 1992 till today in selected case studies relevant to different scenarios. We start from the analysis of the Mt. Etna volcano (Italy) and the Napoli Bay area (Italy), the latter including three volcanic systems (the Campi Flegrei caldera, the Somma-Vesuvio volcanic complex and the Ischia island) and the city of Napoli. In addition, we present the results relevant to the cities of Istanbul (Turkey) and Roma (Italy). The overall analyses are carried out by using averaged (multilook) InSAR interferograms with a spatial resolution of about 100 x 100 m. Moreover, in selected zones we further investigate localized phenomena by zooming in the areas of interest and carrying out a InSAR analysis at full spatial resolution scale (Lanari et al., 2004). In these cases we also exploit the doppler centroid variations of the post-2000 acquisitions of the ERS-2 sensor and the carrier frequency difference between the ERS-1/2 and the ENVISAT systems in order to maximize the number of investigated SAR pixels and to improve their geocoding. The presented results demonstrate the unique

  20. Discrimination between magmatic and hydrothermal nature of the sources responsible for the unrest phenomena at Yellowstone caldera via integrated model of InSAR time series, leveling and gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizzani, Pietro; Battaglia, Maurizio; Castaldo, Raffaele; Pepe, Antonio; Zeni, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We studied the Yellowstone caldera geological unrest between 1977 and 2010 by investigating temporal changes in differential InSAR, precise spirit leveling and gravity measurements. In particular, we start by investigating the InSAR results obtained through the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) differential InSAR technique, applied to a data set of ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT SAR images spanning 18 years, from 1992 to 2010. Moreover, we analyze the leveling data, which cover an additional time period of about 19 years from 1976 to 1995, and the gravity measurements that span the interval from 1977 to 1993. Inverting InSAR, leveling and gravity measurements infer parameters of the caldera best-fitting deformation sources by using the dMODELS software package. Compared to previous work on Yellowstone caldera, (i) we present long-term deformation time series derived from InSAR and their comparison to GPS results, (ii) we identify and remove the tectonic signal from the retrieved time-series, (iii) we jointly exploit InSAR, leveling and gravity measurements to investigate the deformation sources geometric characteristics and their densities; to do this we search for the best fit deformation source identified by inverting more than one source geometry and we use statistical analysis to discriminate among different geometries. Our study indicates the existence of different distinct deformation sources within the caldera and we show that the detected sources have been intermittently active for the past three decades. We interpret the results of our inversions in view of the seismic tomography studies. This allows us to discriminate between the magmatic and the hydrothermal nature of the sources responsible for the unrest phenomena that affected the Sour Creek (SC) and Mallard (ML) Dome resurgent caldera domes during the last three decades. Our study indicates the existence of different distinct deformation sources within the caldera and we show that the detected sources have been

  1. Comparison between temperatures pattern from thermal IR time series analisys and deformational pattern from InSAR and GPS data at Campi Flegrei caldera (Naples, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansivero, F.; Vilardo, G.; Borgstrom, S.; De Martino, P.; Siniscalchi, V.; Minet, C.; Goel, K.

    2012-04-01

    Small Baseline Subset algorithm (SBAS) implemented on the DLR's operational InSAR software GENESIS, and data from continuous GPS stations operated by the INGV - Osservatorio Vesuviano. The comparison has shown similar patterns from InSAR and GPS time series and IR temperature time series, suggesting as ground deformations and surface temperatures of fumaroles fields likely represent comparable responses to volcanic processes of the Campi Flegrei area.

  2. Monitoring of Land Deformation Due to Oil Production by InSAR Time Series Analysis Using PALSAR Data in Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Tomonori; Narita, Tatsuhiko

    2015-05-01

    The target area of this study is the Maracaibo sedimentary basin located in the western part of Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela. The full-scale exploration and development for oil resources in Venezuela which was the greatest oil-producing country in South America had begun at the Maracaibo sedimentary basin in the 1910s, and it was a center of the oil product in Venezuela until the 1980s. But, in most of oil fields in the Maracaibo sedimentary basin, there is concern over the drain on recoverable reserves due to deterioration, and the production amount of petroleum in Venezuela has been diminishing these days. Leveling and GPS surveying were carried out in the past, and they revealed that the large-scale subsidence phenomenon of which cumulative subsidence amount was approximately 5 meter had occurred. The authors applied the vertical displacement measurement by InSAR time series analysis using PALSAR data obtained in the Fine-beam and ScanSAR observation mode. As a result, it could be confirmed clear ground deformation in the surrounding of three oil fields (Tia Juana, Lagunillas and Bachaquero) and easily recognized that the areas of phase anomalies detected by this analysis had expanded and the number of interference fringes had increased over time. The annual velocity of vertical ground surface displacement measured by InSAR time series analysis was -51 mm per year, -103 mm per year and -58 mm per year in Tia Juana, Lagunillas and Bachaquero oil field respectively. The tendency that an earth surface shifted towards the center of phase anomalies was detected from the result of the horizontal ground change measurement. It was interpreted from Google Earth and Landsat images that oil-related facilities (mainly bowling stations) were built intensively over the areas where phase anomalies were detected. Therefore, it was inferred that there was a high association between the operation activity of the oil field and ground deformation. In addition, the deterioration

  3. Using Envisat InSAR time-series to investigate the surface kinematics of an active salt extrusion near Qum, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolmaleki, Nastaran; Motagh, Mahdi; Bahroudi, Abbas; Sharifi, Mohammad Ali; Haghshenas Haghighi, Mahmud

    2014-11-01

    Lower Oligocene-Miocene rock salt is exposed in several diapirs in the central plateau of Iran along the northern margin of the Great Kavir basin. These include a small but mature salt extrusion known as Qum Kuh located near the city of Qum. We use small-baseline interferograms to study the surface displacements of Qum Kuh. The interferometric dataset consisted of 149 interferometric displacement maps derived from 35 C-band ASAR images collected by Envisat satellite in both descending and ascending orbits from 2003 through 2009.The results of the displacement time series analyses show significant long-term trend of horizontal motion toward gentle slopes of Qum Kuh, punctuated by seasonal variations during dry and wet seasons. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) time series results suggest that the salt near the spreading center, where the salt first surfaces from depth, is extruded to the more gentle flanks of Qum Kuh and that down-slope gravitational spreading of the extruded salt accelerates when it is wet.

  4. 4D map of the Kilauea summit shallow magmatic system constrained by InSAR time series and geometry-free inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, G.; Shirzaei, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Kilauea volcano, Hawaii Island, is one of the most active volcanoes worldwide. Its complex system, including magma reservoirs and rift zones, provides a unique opportunity to investigate the dynamics of magma transport and supply. The models explaining the system are yet limited to the first order analytical solutions with fixed geometry. To obtain a 4D map of the volume changes at the Kilauea summit magmatic system (KSMS), we implement a novel geometry-free time-dependent inverse modeling scheme, using a distribution of point center of dilatations (PCDs). The model is constrained using high resolution surface deformation data, which are obtained through InSAR time series analysis of well populated SAR data sets acquired at two overlapping tracks of Envisat satellite during 2003 and 2011. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the 4D maps of volume change identifies five major active reservoir beneath Kilauea caldera. The southern caldera reservoir (SCR) gains volume slowly till 2006 before its rapid inflation during 2006 - mid-2007, followed by deflation until the start of re-inflation in mid-2010. Other reservoirs show episodic temporal correlation and anti-correlation with SCR. We found that the top-down relation between reservoirs at the Kilauea summit is not necessarily valid at all time scales. Identifying statistically significant PCDs through Chi-square test, we develop and apply a boundary element modeling scheme to solve for the volume change time series and complex geometry of the summit magmatic system. Availability of such models allows realistic estimates of volume change and associated seismic hazard and enhance the forecast models.

  5. Wetland InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.

    2006-12-01

    Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of InSAR provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of InSAR for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by

  6. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Sacco, Gian Franco; Gurrola, Eric M.; Zabker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    This computing environment is the next generation of geodetic image processing technology for repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) sensors, identified by the community as a needed capability to provide flexibility and extensibility in reducing measurements from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products. This software allows users of interferometric radar data the flexibility to process from Level 0 to Level 4 products using a variety of algorithms and for a range of available sensors. There are many radar satellites in orbit today delivering to the science community data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible large-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and the Earth's ecosystem. The proposed DESDynI mission, now under consideration by NASA for launch later in this decade, would provide time series and multiimage measurements that permit 4D models of Earth surface processes so that, for example, climate-induced changes over time would become apparent and quantifiable. This advanced data processing technology, applied to a global data set such as from the proposed DESDynI mission, enables a new class of analyses at time and spatial scales unavailable using current approaches. This software implements an accurate, extensible, and modular processing system designed to realize the full potential of InSAR data from future missions such as the proposed DESDynI, existing radar satellite data, as well as data from the NASA UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar), and other airborne platforms. The processing approach has been re-thought in order to enable multi-scene analysis by adding new algorithms and data interfaces, to permit user-reconfigurable operation and extensibility, and to capitalize on codes already developed by NASA and the science community. The framework incorporates modern programming methods based on recent research, including object-oriented scripts controlling legacy and

  7. InSAR Used for Subsidence Monitoring of Mining Area OKR, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazecky, Milan

    2010-03-01

    The abilities of InSAR processing techniques to detect and monitor subsidence of mining areas were already proved in several works, e.g. of Dr. Perski that used them in Poland. As an ESA project of VSB-TU Ostrava using data from ERS 1,2 and Envisat ASAR, the InSAR has been applied also for the Northern Moravian OKR region in Czech Republic, a region with a long black coal mining history. Mining activities in this area have caused damages and destructions of many buildings, tramlines etc. The problem is still actual, even that only 4 mines are active, since 2007. Via the InSAR processing, an evolution of subsidence during last 10 years is monitored using the Doris software. Due to highly decorrelated interferograms created from newer data (since 2001), the actual state is hardly interpretable though. The critical subsiding objects were detected by pointwise multitemporal InSAR techniques (MT- InSAR) - the permanent scatterers and small baselines methods using the StaMPS software. The results were compared with the in-situ levelling revealing that the estimated rate of subsidence was underestimated. Only the ERS-2 data from period 1999-2000 were successfully used in these advanced InSAR techniques to achieve some reasonable results. Because of gyroscopes failure of ERS-2, the data since January 2001 couldn't be processed successfully by StaMPS due to big differences in the Doppler centroid frequencies of each images - an abortive result of a small baselines method attempt can be presented. Because of used long- wall mining method, that evokes spatial movement of subsidence epicenters in time, a longer time period of dataset usable in MT-InSAR would decrease the processing merit (the character of subsidence in the area is not pointwise in longer time period). This project will continue with a processing of newer datasets to achieve a complete overview of terrain changes in the mining area during the last decade.

  8. Aseismic events in Southern California: Detection with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.; Lundgren, P.

    2007-05-01

    Aseismic slow slip events are usually studied using data types that have a dense temporal sampling rate, such as continuous GPS or tremor analysis using seismic data. However, even the sparser temporal coverage of InSAR data can further our understanding of these events in three significant ways - First, in areas where aseismic transients have been detected on geodetic arrays, InSAR may be able to provide a spatially denser image of the extent and magnitude of deformation. Second, InSAR observations are complementary to GPS because of the differing sensitivities to horizontal and vertical motions. Thirdly, in areas with no ground-based geodetic instrumentation, InSAR can be used in survey mode to detect deformation signals that are not associated with any observed seismicity. The temporal constraints on such signals may not be tight enough to allow for dynamics models of how aseismic transients occur, but InSAR-only detections can improve our understanding of the spatial extent of these types of events and can also identify key areas for future instrumentation and observation. Here, I summarize some of the contributions of InSAR observations of slow slip events, including data spanning the 2005 Obsidian Buttes swam in the Salton Trough, CA, and InSAR time-series results for the Salton Trough using both traditional interferometry and the persistent scatterer method.

  9. Coseismic and Postseismic Deformation from the August 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa Earthquake Measured with InSAR Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, E. J.; Milillo, P.; Yun, S. H.; Burgmann, R.; Samsonov, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    The Mw 6.0 South Napa Earthquake struck Napa County of California on 24 August 2014 with extensive surface ruptures mapped in the field and with satellite and airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). The Italian Space Agency's (ASI) has been acquiring COSMO-SkyMed™ (CSK) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Napa area since June 2013 with two different look directions (satellite moving south looking west, and satellite moving north and looking east). The Canadian Space Agency and partner MDA have been acquiring RADARSAT-2 (RS2) SAR images over the San Francisco area for several years, with partial coverage of the southern part of Napa County. Preliminary time series analysis of the CSK and RS2 SAR image time series before the 2014 earthquake shows moderate rates of surface deformation likely related to variations in ground water levels. By the end of September 2014, there were 6 CSK scenes on the descending track (first on 27 August 02:08 UTC) and two scenes on the ascending track (first on 3 September 13:55 UTC) acquired after the earthquake. We use GIAnT to extend the time series analysis across the time of the earthquake and calculate a better estimate of the coseismic deformation as a step function in the time interval between the date of the last pre-quake scene and first post-quake scene, plus a postseismic deformation time function. With the 6 CSK descending track scenes, the time series estimate of the coseismic deformation has much less of the atmospheric effects that are present in single interferograms, but the 2 CSK ascending track scenes do not provide as much improvement. The postseismic single interferograms are useful for seeing the early postseismic deformation. We observe rapid afterslip on both the ascending and descending interferograms, concentrated at shallow depth on the southern part of the main coseismic rupture, extending about 4 km north of the epicenter. We also observe what appears to be poroelastic rebound in

  10. Post-seismic Deformation of Mojave Earthquakes using Full-Resolution InSAR Time-Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, M.; Peltzer, G.

    2015-12-01

    Surface deformation in the Mojave Desert in the last two decades has been dominated by the effects of the 1992 Landers and 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes. In the post-seismic periods following these events, broad scale patterns were interpreted as afterslip on deep parts of the faults or viscoelastic relaxation in the lower crust and upper mantle. In the near-field of the faults, smaller size features of the displacement field were interpreted as poro-elastic relaxation of crustal fluid pressure gradients produced by the co-seismic stress change. We reanalyze the entire archive of the European Space Agency ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT radar data to define the spatial and temporal characteristics of the near-field deformation following the two events, achieving coverage during the 1992-2010 time period. The raw data are processed into interferograms using the JPL ISCE software. The interferograms are corrected for the tropospheric phase delay using the ECMWF GCM and orbit errors are estimated in the data network over entire scenes. Time-series of surface displacement maps of sub-regions near the faults are then constructed using the full resolution of the radar images (~20 m). Deformation features within and near the earthquake faults are characterized by a fast LOS velocity exponentially decaying with time over 1-2 years, followed by a steady deformation corresponding to the long-term strain in the Mojave. Shorter relaxation times are generally observed in regions where the crust sustained extension during the preceding earthquakes suggesting that crustal tension increases the diffusivity of fluids in the shallow crust. In the Johnson Valley-Homestead Valley pull-apart we estimate a relaxation time of ~400 days. Along the northern section of the HME fault rupture, the narrow zone of subsidence has a relaxation time of ~240 days, which can be explained by intensely damaged rocks within the fault zone.

  11. Spatiotemporal characterization of land subsidence and uplift in Phoenix using InSAR time series and wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Megan Marie; Shirzaei, Manoochehr

    2015-08-01

    The effects of land subsidence pose a significant hazard to the environment and infrastructure in the arid, alluvial basins of Phoenix, Arizona. Improving our understanding of the source and mechanisms of subsidence is important for planning and risk management. Here we employ multitemporal interferometric analysis of large synthetic aperture radar data sets acquired by ERS and Envisat satellites to investigate ground deformation. The ERS data sets from 1992 to 1996 and Envisat, 2003-2010, are used to generate line of sight (LOS) time series and velocities in both the ascending and descending tracks. The general deformation pattern is consistent among data sets and is characterized by three zones of subsidence and a broad zone of uplift. The multitrack Envisat LOS time series of surface deformation are inverted to obtain spatiotemporal maps of the vertical and horizontal deformation fields. We use observation wells to provide an in situ, independent data set of hydraulic head levels. Then we analyze vertical interferometric synthetic aperture radar and hydraulic head level time series using continuous wavelet transform to separate periodic signal components and the long-term trend. The isolated signal components are used to estimate the elastic storage coefficient, the inelastic skeletal storage coefficient, and compaction time constants. Together these parameters describe the storage response of an aquifer system to changes in hydraulic head and surface elevation. Understanding aquifer parameters is useful for the ongoing management of groundwater resources.

  12. Separating Non-Linear Deformation And Atmospheric Phase Screen (APS) For INSAR Time Series Analysis Using Least-Square Collocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Hanssen, R. F.; Samiei-Esfahany, S.; Hooper, A.; Van Leijen, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method for separating ground defor- mation from atmospheric phase screen (APS) based on PSInSAR. By stochastic modeling of ground deformation and APS via their variance-covariance functions we can not only estimate the signals with the best accuracy but also assess the estimation accuracy using least-squares collocation[5]. We evaluate the APS estimated by our method and the APS obtained from a commonly used window-based filtering method [6] by comparing them to repeat-pass interferograms over ground surfaces outside the subsiding region of Mexico City. The comparison shows that our method results in a better estimation of APS than the filtering method which ignores the temporal variability of APS variance. Our method is desired when there are temporal gaps in a SAR time series. In such a case, the filtering method needs a large temporal window to suppress APS, which may lead to leakage from ground deformation to APS.

  13. Precursory deformation and depths of magma storage revealed by regional InSAR time series surveys: example of the Indonesian and Mexican volcanic arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussard, E.; Amelung, F.; Aoki, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Despite the threat posed to millions of people living in the vicinity of volcanoes, only a fraction of the worldwide ~800 potentially active arc volcanoes have geodetic monitoring. Indonesian and Mexican volcanoes are sparsely monitored with ground-based methods but especially dangerous, emphasizing the need for remote sensing monitoring. In this study we take advantage of over 1200 ALOS InSAR images to survey the entire west Sunda and Mexican volcanic arcs, covering a total of 500 000 km2. We use 2 years of data to monitor the background activity of the Indonesian arc, and 4 years of data at four volcanic edifices (Sinabung, Kerinci, Merapi, and Agung), as well as 4 years of data to survey the Mexican arc. We derive time-dependent ground deformation data using the Small Baseline technique with DEM error correction. We detect seven volcanoes with significant deformation in the west-Sunda arc: six inflating volcanoes (Sinabung, Kerinci, Slamet, Lawu, Lamongan, and Agung) and one deflating volcano (Anak Krakatau). Three of the six inflating centers erupted during or after the observation period. We detect inflation prior to Sinabung's first Holocene eruption in September 2010, followed by a small deflation of the summit area. A similar signal is observed at Kerinci before and after its April 2009 eruption. We also detect uplift prior to Slamet's eruption in April 2009. Agung, in Bali, whose last eruption was in 1964, has been inflating steadily between mid 2007 and early 2009, followed by a period with little deformation until mid-2011. Inflation not followed by eruption is also observed at Lamongan and Lawu, both historically active centers. The close relation between periods of activity and observed deformation suggests that edifice inflation is of magmatic origin and represents the pressurization of reservoirs caused by ascent of new magma. We model the observed deformation and show that the seven deforming Indonesian volcanoes have shallow magma reservoirs at ~1

  14. The 2009-2010 Guerrero Slow Slip Event Monitored by InSAR, Using Time Series Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacques, G.; Pathier, E.; Lasserre, C.; Cotton, F.; Radiguet, M.; Cycle Sismique et Déformations Transitoires

    2011-12-01

    Time Series approach. Time Series approach is useful for monitoring ground deformation evolution during the slow slip events and makes the slip propagation mapping upon the subduction plane a promising goal. Here we present our first results concerning the 2009-2010 slow slip events, particularly the distribution of the cumulative surface displacement in LOS (satellite Line Of Sight), the slip distribution associated on the fault plane and the ground deformation evolution obtained. Finally, we open the discussion with a first comparison between the 2009-2010 and the 2006 events that reveal some differences concerning the amplitude and the distribution of the ground deformation.

  15. Subsidence history of the city of Morelia, Mexico based on InSAR images processed as time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, S. H.; Suárez, G.; López-Quiroz, P.

    2012-04-01

    The city of Morelia in central Mexico sits on lacustrine and fluvio-lacustrine deposits. Subsidence due to the extraction of water from the subsoil is evidenced by the presence of differential soil compaction, causing faulting and cracking of the ground and adjacent constructions. In order to study the subsidence history of the past nine years, twenty-eight ENVISAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images acquired between May 2003 and September 2010 were processed using ROI_PAC. All scenes are descending orbit images. The resulting interferograms were filtered using an adaptive filter and, in order to increase coherence and signal-to-noise ratio, they were unwrapped using the "branch-cut" algorithm. A subset of the resulting interferograms was selected based on the following criteria. Only interferograms with spatial baseline of less than 400 m and a temporal baseline of less than 420 days were considered. The primary objective of our work was to determine the temporal evolution of the subsidence in different parts of the city. To this end, selected pixels are inverted in an independent manner from neighbouring pixels using a time series analysis. Preliminary results suggest that the central part of the basin, near the fault known as the "Central Camionera", the subsidence is almost constant with a value of 3 to 4 cm/yr until 2008. From this date on, the subsidence rates increase to values with an average of 7 to 8 cm/yr. This increase in the subsidence rate is clearly appreciated in the appearance of two clearly visible circular patterns from 2008 to 2010. Currently, an inversion is being conducted to obtain the overall subsidence history of the basin.

  16. Multiple Baseline SAR Tomography's Performance Analysis in Forest 3-D Structure Mapping with long term ALOS L band repeat pass InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q.; Zebker, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Acquiring accurate measurement of three-dimensional structure of forest globally , is key to improve quantitative understanding of the state and dynamics of ecosystems, particularly global carbon cycle. Moreover, forest contains a large portion of Earth's renewable natural resources. All these require an accurate, timely and cost-effective global forest vertical structure mapping. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) remote sensing is widely acknowledged as a powerful tool to accomplish this task. Within the last decade, a number of experimental demonstrations of 3-D InSAR techniques have suggested the possibility of remotely sensing global 3-D vegetation structure. Among all the 3-D InSAR techniques, Multiple Baseline SAR Tomography( MB Tomo-SAR) is a very promising one. Multiple baseline SAR tomography exploits InSAR images acquired from different baselines and form a synthetic aperture in the vertical direction in order to retrieval vertical structure. Though theoretical predictions and several laboratory experiments show great reconstruction results, applying the method in real world condition still face a lot of challenges, including low acquisition number, irregular sample distribution, atmospheric phase noise and time decorrelation effect. In this article, we use L band ALOS spaceborne SAR data in Hawaii area to test the performance of MB TomoSAR . In the process, advanced Fourier beamforming method, atmospheric phase screen removal algorithm and time decorrelation effect are all applied. In addition, we also utilize the Landsat vegetation index and the result with other 3-D reconstruction methods as comparison to validate its performance.

  17. Determination of Effects of Coastal Deformation Caused by Waves and Storms at Black Sea Coast of Turkey utilizing InSAR Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seker, D. Z.; Direk, S.; Musaoglu, N.; Gazioglu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many pressures are exerted on the coastal zones. Winds and waves effect the landscapes mainly on coastal areas. More dramatic deformation occurs with coastal storms like hurricanes which bring strong winds and waves to change the topography of coast. The coastal areas at Black Sea are under pressure of strong wind, waves and storms. Sometimes waves reaches to 10 m height, thus the landscapes of the coastal areas change very dramatically. Advances in Space geodesy have made it possible to determine variations on the Earth with high precision especially by using InSAR technique. InSAR technique is able to cover large areas and can be used in all weather conditions at high spatial resolution. With InSAR technique sub-cm level surface deformation can be determined. Recently, InSAR is the most often used technique to monitor crustal deformation, subsidence and landslides. The aim of this study is to make temporal and spatial analysis and determine the effects of strong wind and wave storms on the coast of Karasu in Black Sea Region of Turkey. By temporal analysis will be able to see the deformation on coast of Karasu in time domain where spatial analysis will show us the changes in landscapes.

  18. Lava Lake Level Drop and Related Ground Subsidence in the Nyiragongo Main Crater (D.R.Congo) Measured by Close-Range Photogrammetry and InSAR Time-Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, B.; d'Oreye, N.; Samsonov, S. V.; Nobile, A.; Geirsson, H.; Kervyn, F.

    2015-12-01

    Nyiragongo volcano is the most active African volcano and among the most active volcanoes on Earth. It is also among the infrequent volcanoes that host a long-lived lava lake. The morphology of the Nyiragongo main crater is characterized by 2 levels of remnant platforms partly preserved and attached to its inner flanks, which correspond to former lava lake levels, and by a bottom "active" platform, which delimits the current active lava lake. The elevation of the bottom platform increases through time, with successive lava lake overflows. After a period of low level between late 2010 and August 2011, the lava lake next came back to its highest level. However, on September 30, 2011, it started a long and progressive fall, reaching ~70 m below the bottom platform in July 2014. This recent evolution of the lava lake, which occurred at the same time period as eruptive events at the neighboring Nyamulagira volcano, was accompanied by a ground subsidence of the bottom platform, leading to the appearance of ring fissures. This ground deformation is restricted to the bottom platform and, hence, suggests a very shallow source for the observed movement. All these changes in the Nyiragongo main crater were recorded by time-series of photographs, allowing the 3D reconstruction of the crater using close-range photogrammetric techniques and, hence, a detailed measurement of the observed changes. The ground subsidence was also recorded by time-series of RADARSAT-2 and CosmoSky-Med SAR interferograms, providing more detailed information on the velocity of deformation. Based on field data and the photogrammetric and InSAR time-series measurements, several hypotheses on the cause(s) of these changes in the Nyiragongo crater are discussed. The present work also highlights the potential of close-range photogrammetry and high-resolution InSAR to study and monitor active volcanoes in Equatorial environment.

  19. Measuring Thermokarst Subsidence Using InSAR: Potential and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Chen, A. C.; Gusmeroli, A.; Zebker, H. A.; Zhang, T.

    2014-12-01

    Thawing of ice-rich permafrost results in irregular, depressed landforms known as thermokarst terrain. The significant subsidence leading to thermokarst features can expand lakes, drain lakes, accelerate thaw, disturb the soil column, and promote erosion. Consequently, it affects many permafrost-region processes including vegetation succession, hydrology, and carbon storage and cycling. Many remote sensing studies identify thermokarst landforms and catalog their ever-changing areas. Yet the intrinsic dynamic thermokarst process, namely surface subsidence, remains a challenge to map and is seldom examined using remote sensing methods. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a remote sensing technique that uses a time-series of satellite SAR images to measure cm-level land surface deformation. We demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of space-borne InSAR data to map thermokarst subsidence at a site located near Prudhoe Bay, on the North Slope of Alaska. A pipeline access road was constructed at this site in the 1970s, and is likely to have triggered the thawing of the region's permafrost, causing subsequent expansion of thermokarst-landform terrain. Our InSAR analysis using ALOS PALSAR images reveals that the thermokarst landforms in this region have undergone up to 10 cm of surface subsidence each summer from 2007 to 2010. This pilot study demonstrates the application of InSAR to map localized mass movement in permafrost terrain. We also illustrate how the effectiveness and accuracy of InSAR measurements are limited by several factors such as loss of interferometric coherence due to fast changes of ground surface conditions, spatial and temporal resolutions of InSAR data, and difficulty separating long-term and seasonal deformation signals.

  20. Evidence of ground subsidence at the Nice Côte d'Azur International airport from InSAR time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalié, Olivier; Sladen, Anthony; Kelner, Maelle

    2015-04-01

    Made-man lands are commonly used to increase surface for cities development. It is notably suitable to build flat and unobstructed airport runways. However, the stability of those constructions is a permanent concern. Nice côte d'Azur airport has been built in such reclaimed lands due to the lack of flat land in this area confined between the Mediterranean Sea to the south and the French Alps to the north. In 1979, a newly built extension to the runway platform gained over the sea collapsed, triggering a local tsunami and causing important damage. The project of land extension stopped, but the present airport platform is still located on reclaimed land. In this paper, we investigated the stability of the airport platform and the surrounding area using InSAR data for the period (2003-2011) from both ascending and descending tracks. We estimated the vertical deformation in combining the two lines of sights (LOS). Noise estimation on the InSAR measurements has been performed and shows a high signal-to-noise ratio. Actually, noise follows a gaussian distribution with a standard deviation of 0.26 mm/yr. This allows to have a very detailed image of the airport platform deformation and its surrounding. We found that the whole Var delta, that hosts the airport, subsides at very low rate (between 0.5 mm/yr and 1 mm/yr). This subsidence rate jumps to 2 mm/yr across the reclaimed land limit with the land and then still increases toward the sea to reach 3 mm/yr. In addition, significant areas along the edge of the airport move up to 10 mm/yr downward.

  1. Volcano-tectonic deformation in the Kivu Region, Central Africa: Results from multi-year InSAR time series analysis and continuous GNSS observations of the Kivu Geodetic Network (KivuGNet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geirsson, Halldor; D'Oreye, Nicolas; Smets, Benoît; Nobile, Adriano; Samsonov, Sergey; De Rauw, Dominique; Mashagiro, Niche; Kervyn, Francois

    2016-04-01

    The Kivu Region in Central Africa is a topographic dome cut by the depression of the western branch of the East African Rift, where the Nubia plate and the Victoria micro-plate are diverging by approximately 2-3 mm/yr (Stamps et al. 2008). Two closely spaced and frequently active volcanoes, Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira, are located at the plate boundary. Here, deformation signals from transient deformation events (i.e. earthquakes, eruptions, rifting episodes, intrusions or other subsurface mass movements) are intertwined with the more perpetual nature of inter-seismic strain accumulation and gradual magma accumulation. Here, we present deformation results from six years of operation of the 15- station KivuGNet (Kivu Geodetic Network) in the Kivu Region and multi-year InSAR time series of the region using the MSBAS approach (Samsonov & d'Oreye, 2012). Since 2009, KivuGNet has captured transient deformation from a) the 2010 eruption of Nyamulagira, b) the 2011-2012 eruption of Nyamulagira c) the Mw5.8 August 7, 2015 Katana earthquake at the western border of Lake Kivu. Importantly, the GPS data also show an ongoing deformation signal, which is most readily explained by long-term magma accumulation under the volcanic region. We use the GPS and InSAR deformation signals to constrain and compare source parameters of simplistic elastic models for the different time periods. Although not well constrained, most of the time periods indicate the presence of a deep (~15-30 km) magmatic source centered approximately under Nyamulagira or to the southeast of Nyamulagira, that inflates between eruptions and deflates during eruptions.

  2. InSAR observations of active volcanoes in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Rivera, A. M.; Chaussard, E.; Amelung, F.

    2012-12-01

    Over the last decade satellite-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has developed into a well-known technique to gauge the status of active volcanoes. The InSAR technique can detect the ascent of magma to shallow levels of the volcanic plumbing system because new arriving magma pressurizes the system. This is likely associated with the inflation of the volcanic edifice and the surroundings. Although the potential of InSAR to detect magma migration is well known, the principal limitation was that only for few volcanoes frequent observations were acquired. The ALOS-1 satellite of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) acquired a global L-band data set of 15-20 acquisitions during 2006-2011. Here we use ALOS InSAR and Small Baseline (SB) time-series methods for a ground deformation survey of Latin America with emphasis on the northern Andes. We present time-dependent ground deformation data for the volcanoes in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru and interpret the observations in terms of the dynamics of the volcanic systems.

  3. InSAR Time Series Analysis and Geophysical Modeling of City Uplift Associated with Geothermal Drillings in Staufen im Breisgau, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motagh, M.; Lubitz, C.

    2014-12-01

    Geothermal energy is of increasing importance as alternative, environmentally friendly technology for heat management. Direct interaction with the subsurface requires careful implementation, in particular in geological complex regions. The historical city Staufen im Breisgau, SW Germany, has attracted national attention as a case of implementation failure with severe consequences, causing debates on the applicability and security of this sustainable technique. Located at the eastern transition zone of the Upper Rhine Graben and the Schwarzwald massif, the geothermal potential is high at Staufen due to strong temperature gradients. In September 2007, seven boreholes for geothermal probes were drilled up to a depth of 140 m to provide a new heat management for the city hall. Within five years an uplift phenomenon has been observed in Staufen reaching more than 40 cm in places and 269 buildings were damaged. Hydro-chemical driven anhydrite-gypsum transformation in the subsurface was identified as the cause leading to volume increase that is observable as surface uplift. This process is associated with the geothermal drilling activities that have crossed several groundwater levels. In this work, we summarize and present the findings of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) analysis of the uplift in Staufen over the last five years from July 2008 through July 2013. By applying the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) method, we find a localized elliptical-shaped deformation field in NE-SW orientation. Area of maximum uplift is located 50 m NNE of the drilling zone. At this location, we observe a cumulative uplift of approx. 13.7 cm ± 0.34 cm (mean value within an area of 30 m by 30 m) from July 2008 to July 2009, which reduced to cumulative uplift of 3 cm ± 0.25 cm from July 2012 to July 2013. The deceleration can be related to applied countermeasures as borehole sealing and groundwater pumping. The observed ground surface response was compared to

  4. A dense medium electromagnetic scattering model for the InSAR correlation of snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yang; Siqueira, Paul; Treuhaft, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Snow characteristics, such as snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow grain size, are important characteristics for the monitoring of the global hydrological cycle and as indicators of climate change. This paper derives an interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) scattering model for dense media, such as snow, which takes into account multiple scattering effects through the Quasi-Crystalline Approximation. The result of this derivation is a simplified version of the InSAR correlation model derived for relating the InSAR correlation measurements to the snowpack characteristics of grain size, volume fraction, and layer depth as well as those aspects of the volume-ground interaction that affects the interferometric observation (i.e., the surface topography and the ratio of ground-to-volume scattering). Based on the model, the sensitivity of the InSAR correlation measurements to the snow characteristics is explored by simulation. Through this process, it is shown that Ka-band InSAR phase has a good sensitivity to snow grain size and volume fraction, while for lower frequency signals (Ku-band to L-band), the InSAR correlation magnitude and phase have a sensitivity to snow depth. Since the formulation depends, in part, on the pair distribution function, three functional forms of the pair distribution function are implemented and their effects on InSAR phase measurements compared. The InSAR scattering model described in this paper is intended to be an observational prototype for future Ka-band and L-band InSAR missions, such as NASA's Surface Water and Ocean Topography and NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar missions, planned for launch in the 2020-2021 time frame. This formulation also enables further investigation of the InSAR-based snow retrieval approaches.

  5. Advanced InSAR and GPS measurements for the detection of surface movements along the Alto Tiberina (Italy) normal fault system: data modeling and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlini, L.; Polcari, M.; Bignami, C.; Pepe, A.; Solaro, G.; Serpelloni, E.; Moro, M.; Albano, M.; Chiaraluce, L.; Stramondo, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Alto Tiberina fault (ATF) is a low-angle (east-dipping at 15°), 70 km long normal fault (LANF) located in the Umbria-Marche Apennines (central Italy), an area characterized by a SW-NE oriented extension occurring at rates of ~2 mm/yr. Active extension is precisely measured by a dense distribution of GPS stations belonging to several networks, thanks also to additional sites recently installed in the framework of the INGV national RING network and of the ATF observatory. Advanced Interferometry SAR (A-InSAR) techniques play today a key role in Earth Sciences thanks to their capability to detect and monitor slow surface movements over wide areas. A-InSAR techniques, along with in-situ ground measurements, can provide suitable information on the causes of interseismic (seismic, creep) movements. Large datasets of SAR images of European (ERS 1-2 and ENVISAT) and Italian (COSMO-SKyMed) satellites have been used to retrieve surface velocity maps and relevant time series from 1992 to 2014, along both ascending and descending orbits. A network of artificial Corner Reflectors has also been deployed in the proximity of some GPS sites in order to calibrate the processing results of the COSMO-SkyMed SAR data-set and to derive velocity maps. We use an elastic Block Modeling (BM) approach in order to model GPS data by considering the major fault systems as bounds of rotating blocks, while estimating geodetic fault slip-rates.,Thanks to the latest imaging of its deep structure obtained from seismic profiles, the ATF is represented as a complex rough surface with the goal of evaluating the distribution of interseismic fault coupling. The preliminary results obtained show firstly that the observed extension is partially accommodated by interseismic deformation on the ATF, highlighting the important role of this LANF inside an active tectonic contest. Secondarily, using the ATF surface "topography", we found for the resolved areas an interesting correlation between

  6. Atmospheric Effects on InSAR Measurements and Their Mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiao-li; Li, Zhi-wei; Zhu, Jian-jun; Feng, Guang-cai; Long, Jiang-ping

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a powerful technology for observing the Earth surface, especially for mapping the Earth's topography and deformations. InSAR measurements are however often significantly affected by the atmosphere as the radar signals propagate through the atmosphere whose state varies both in space and in time. Great efforts have been made in recent years to better understand the properties of the atmospheric effects and to develop methods for mitigating the effects. This paper provides a systematic review of the work carried out in this area. The basic principles of atmospheric effects on repeat-pass InSAR are first introduced. The studies on the properties of the atmospheric effects, including the magnitudes of the effects determined in the various parts of the world, the spectra of the atmospheric effects, the isotropic properties and the statistical distributions of the effects, are then discussed. The various methods developed for mitigating the atmospheric effects are then reviewed, including the methods that are based on PSInSAR processing, the methods that are based on interferogram modeling, and those that are based on external data such as GPS observations, ground meteorological data, and satellite data including those from the MODIS and MERIS. Two examples that use MODIS and MERIS data respectively to calibrate atmospheric effects on InSAR are also given. PMID:27873822

  7. Atmospheric Effects on InSAR Measurements and Their Mitigation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao-Li; Li, Zhi-Wei; Zhu, Jian-Jun; Feng, Guang-Cai; Long, Jiang-Ping

    2008-09-03

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a powerful technology for observing the Earth surface, especially for mapping the Earth's topography and deformations. InSAR measurements are however often significantly affected by the atmosphere as the radar signals propagate through the atmosphere whose state varies both in space and in time. Great efforts have been made in recent years to better understand the properties of the atmospheric effects and to develop methods for mitigating the effects. This paper provides a systematic review of the work carried out in this area. The basic principles of atmospheric effects on repeat-pass InSAR are first introduced. The studies on the properties of the atmospheric effects, including the magnitudes of the effects determined in the various parts of the world, the spectra of the atmospheric effects, the isotropic properties and the statistical distributions of the effects, are then discussed. The various methods developed for mitigating the atmospheric effects are then reviewed, including the methods that are based on PSInSAR processing, the methods that are based on interferogram modeling, and those that are based on external data such as GPS observations, ground meteorological data, and satellite data including those from the MODIS and MERIS. Two examples that use MODIS and MERIS data respectively to calibrate atmospheric effects on InSAR are also given.

  8. Confined aquifer head measurements and storage properties in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, from spaceborne InSAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyi; Knight, Rosemary; Zebker, Howard A.; Schreüder, Willem A.

    2016-05-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), a remote sensing technique for measuring centimeter-level surface deformation, is used to estimate hydraulic head in the confined aquifer of the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado. Reconstructing head measurements from InSAR in agricultural regions can be difficult, as InSAR phase data are often decorrelated due to vegetation growth. Analysis of 17 L-band ALOS PALSAR scenes, acquired between January 2007 and March 2011, demonstrates that comprehensive InSAR deformation measurements can be recovered over the vegetated groundwater basin with an improved processing strategy. Local skeletal storage coefficients and time delays between the head change and deformation are estimated through a joint InSAR-well data analysis. InSAR subsidence estimates are transformed to head changes with finer temporal and spatial resolution than is possible using existing well records alone. Both InSAR and well data suggest that little long-term water-storage loss occurred in the SLV over the study period and that inelastic compaction was negligible. The seasonal head variations derived from InSAR are consistent with the existing well data at most locations where confined aquifer pumping activity dominates. Our results demonstrate the advantages of InSAR measurements for basin-wide characterization of aquifer storage properties and groundwater levels over agricultural regions.

  9. Measuring Water Level Fluctuations of two Connected Wetlands in the Dominican Republic Using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo Marcano, M. D.; Liu, L.; Zebker, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Wetlands are ecosystems of high endemism and great biodiversity. Using the double-reflected radar waves off the water surface and trunks of inundated vegetation, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is capable of measuring water level fluctuations from space at a cm-level accuracy in these ecosystems with emergent vegetation. InSAR can provide a high spatial resolution over a large area that the more traditional terrestrial-based methods lack. In this study, we applied InSAR to study the seasonal variations in water level of the wetlands near two lakes in the southwest of the Dominican Republic: Lake Enriquillo, a highly saline lake designated as a Wetland of International Importance under the Ramsar Convention in 2002, and Laguna del Limon. Both lake-wetland systems are located in the Jaragua-Bahoruco-Enriquillo Biosphere Reserve. Since 2003 the water level of Lake Enriquillo has increased drastically and caused the evacuation of many farmers from nearby villages. Lake level changes also affected the habitats of several native and migratory species. We used the data acquired by the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) sensor on board of the Japanese Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) from October 2008 to January 2011. For the smaller lake, Laguna del Limon, we found a seasonal variation of 10-15 centimeters. This result was confirmed using two different satellite paths. For Lake Enriquillo we found a net decrease of about 20 centimeters in the water level from September 2009 to January 2011. This result agrees with an independent estimation based on lake hydrodynamics model predictions. In addition, our InSAR-based time series of lake level fluctuations revealed distinct behaviors of the two wetlands. For the Lake Enriquillo we found a continuous decrease in the water level throughout 2010 with a brief increase of the water level during the summer months, while for Laguna del Limon during the summer months the water level

  10. Multidimensional High Spatiotemporal Resolution InSAR Time Series Assist Interdisciplinary Space- And Ground-Based Monitoring To Reveal Pre-Eruptive Signals At Nyamulagira Volcano (North Kivu, D.R.C.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Oreye, N.; Smets, B.; Kervyn, F.; Kervyn, M.; Albino, F.; Arellano, S. R.; Arjona, A. A.; Carn, S. A.; Fernandez, J.; Galle, B.; Gonzalez, P. J.; Head, E.; Pallero, J.; Prieto, J. F.; Samsonov, S. V.; Tedesco, D.; Tiampo, K. F.; Wauthier, C.

    2013-12-01

    Interdisciplinary space- and ground-based monitoring systems allowed the quantitative and detailed study of the Nyamulagira 2010 eruption (Congo). Field observations revealed the event as 4 eruptive phases delimited by major changes in effusive activity. Signals from ground deformation, seismicity, SO2 emission and thermal flux correlate with these eruptive phases. Moreover, MSBAS InSAR time series combining data acquired under different geometries and with different satellites (Samsonov and d'Oreye, 2012) allowed the detection of pre-, co- and inter-eruptive deformation in the Nyamulagira volcanic field. Using 8 years of ENVISAT, RADARSAT2 and ALOS data, the MSBAS method reveals the first unambiguous pre-eruptive ground deformations in the Virunga Volcanic Province. Precursory ground deformations are detected up to 3 weeks prior the onset of the 2010 eruption by images acquired by 3 different sensors in different geometries. These deformations took place in the main crater and along the SE flank of the volcano, where eruptive fractures will ultimately opened. Deformations coincide with small, though clear, increase of the short period seismicity and SO2 emissions.These seismic and SO2 variations alone were too small, however, to raise attention. The pre-eruptive ground deformation signals revealed by InSAR are of about the same amplitude and spatial extent as atmospheric noise and therefore cannot be identified on individual differential interferograms. Conventional time-series methods based on single acquisition geometry do not have a sufficient time resolution to discriminate such a precursory signal from an atmospheric artifact. The 3-week precursors detected at Nyamulagira contrast with the only precursory signal previously recognized so far in the Virunga, namely the increase of tremors and long period seismicity no more than few hours or days before the eruption onset. In January 2010, such short-term seismic precursors were detected less than two hours

  11. Advances in time-of-flight PET

    PubMed Central

    Surti, Suleman; Karp, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review and an update on time-of-flight PET imaging with a focus on PET instrumentation, ranging from hardware design to software algorithms. We first present a short introduction to PET, followed by a description of TOF PET imaging and its history from the early days. Next, we introduce the current state-of-art in TOF PET technology and briefly summarize the benefits of TOF PET imaging. This is followed by a discussion of the various technological advancements in hardware (scintillators, photo-sensors, electronics) and software (image reconstruction) that have led to the current widespread use of TOF PET technology, and future developments that have the potential for further improvements in the TOF imaging performance. We conclude with a discussion of some new research areas that have opened up in PET imaging as a result of having good system timing resolution, ranging from new algorithms for attenuation correction, through efficient system calibration techniques, to potential for new PET system designs. PMID:26778577

  12. InSAR data produce specific storage estimates for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.; Schreuder, W.; Agram, P. S.; Lauknes, T.

    2010-12-01

    The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. This valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators struggling to develop appropriate management policies in order to sustain water levels in the confined aquifer system. The water level from 1970 - 2000 remains a key, but poorly known, component for characterization. Some relevant data, such as water levels measured in wells, were collected during this period and incorporated into a groundwater flow model. However, data with finer spatial and temporal resolution would be very valuable in understanding the behavior and therefore the management of the system. Spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide maps of the deformation of the Earth’s surface at a spatial resolution of 50 m; these data are acquired approximately once per month. The deformation measured by InSAR can be related to water levels in the confined aquifer system. However, changes in cm-scale crop structure in agricultural areas lead to signal decorrelation over long periods of time, resulting in low quality data. Here we apply the recently developed small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to InSAR data collected by the European Space Agency’s ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites over the western SLV for the years 1992-2001. The SBAS measurements show high levels of InSAR correlation, denoting high quality data, in areas between the center pivot irrigation circles, where the lack of water results in little surface vegetation. By using SBAS analysis, we are able to estimate the magnitude of the seasonal deformation and compare it with hydraulic head measurements in nearby wells. We directly compare, at three well locations, specific storage parameters estimated from InSAR data to those estimated using traditional pump test techniques. The InSAR and pump test estimated parameters are: 3.4 x10-5 ft-1 vs. 1.7 x 10-5 ft-1, 2.2 x 10

  13. A Network Inversion Filter combining GNSS and InSAR for tectonic slip modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, D. P. S.; Segall, P.; Wright, T. J.; Hooper, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    Studies of the earthquake cycle benefit from long-term time-dependent slip modeling, as it can be a powerful means to improve our understanding on the interaction of earthquake cycle processes such as interseismic, coseismic, post seismic, and aseismic slip. Observations from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) allow us to model slip at depth with a higher spatial resolution than when using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) alone. While the temporal resolution of InSAR has typically been limited, the recent fleet of SAR satellites including Sentinel-1, COSMO-SkyMED, and RADARSAT-2 permits the use of InSAR for time-dependent slip modeling at intervals of a few days when combined. With the vast amount of SAR data available, simultaneous data inversion of all epochs becomes challenging. Here we expanded the original network inversion filter to include InSAR observations of surface displacements in addition to GNSS. In the Network Inversion Filter (NIF) framework, geodetic observations are limited to those of a given epoch, with a stochastic model describing slip evolution over time. The combination of the Kalman forward filtering and backward smoothing allows all geodetic observations to constrain the complete observation period. Combining GNSS and InSAR allows modeling of time-dependent slip at unprecedented spatial resolution. We validate the approach with a simulation of the 2006 Guerrero slow slip event. We highlight the importance of including InSAR covariance information and demonstrate that InSAR provides an additional constraint on the spatial extent of the slow slip.

  14. Earth's surface loading study using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelung, F.; Zhao, W.; Doin, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Earth's surface loading/unloading such as glacier retreat, lake water level change, ocean tide, cause measurable (centimeter to millimeter) surface deformation from Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR). Such seasonal or decadal deformation signals are useful for the estimation of the amount of load and the parameterization of crust and upper mantle - typically under an elastic or a visco-elastic mechanism. Since 2010, we established a study of surface loading using small baseline InSAR time-series analysis. Four sites are included in this study, which are Vatnajokull ice cap, Lake Yamzho Yumco, Petermann glacier, and Barnes ice cap using different satellites such as ERS1/2, Envisat, Radarsat-2, TerraSAR-X. We present results that mainly answer three questions: 1) Is InSAR time-series capable for the detection of millimeter level deformation due to surface loading; 2) When the Earth's rheology is known, how much load change occured; 3) When the surface loading is known, what are the Earth's parameters such as Young's modulus, viscosity. For glacier retreat problem, we introduce a new model for the ice mass loss estimation considering the spatial distribution of ice loss. For lake unloading problem, modeled elastic parameters are useful for the comparison to other 1-D models, e.g. the model based on seismic data.

  15. Landslide-dammed lakes detection via ALOS/PALSAR InSAR DEM: A case study of the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Tomohito; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Iwashita, Keishi; Kudou, Katsuteru; Fujii, Hisao; Nishikawa, Hajime; Sensing Specialist Yukihiro Suzuoki, Remote

    On 14th June 2008, the Japan Meteorological Agency recorded a 7.2 magnitude (Richter scale) earthquake with an epicenter depth of 8 km in the southern Iwate prefecture of the Tohoku region of Japan. In the hardest hit prefectures of Iwate and Miyagi, the earthquake produced 15 new landslide-dammed lakes; a phenomenon common when the earthquake hypocenter is within inland areas. In our last study, we demonstrated that interferometric SAR (InSAR) technique can detect surface displacements within centimeter accuracy and create detailed three-dimensional terrain information. In this study, we developed a new methodology to detect landslide-dammed lakes using Digital Drainage Models (DDMs) generated from the DEM's cre-ated with InSAR data. Using our technique, small scale topographical change was detected by comparing pre-earthquake DEM's such as created from the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) data and post-earthquake DEM's created from the Advanced Land Observing System (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data. Pre-and post-earthquake changes in the drainage networks were detected by comparing DDM features derived from an existing DEM to DDM features derived from a post-earthquake DEM created from ALOS InSAR data. It was verified that landslide-dammed lakes were detected specifically in the area where drainage network with more than three of the river-order computed from DDM's shifted before and after the earthquake. Thus, InSAR DEM generated from ALOS/PALSAR can provide timely and useful spatial information for detecting landslide-dammed lakes.

  16. Helmand river hydrologic studies using ALOS PALSAR InSAR and ENVISAT altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Kim, J.-W.; Lee, H.; Shum, C.K.; Duan, J.; Ibaraki, M.; Akyilmaz, O.; Read, C.-H.

    2009-01-01

    The Helmand River wetland represents the only fresh-water resource in southern Afghanistan and one of the least mapped water basins in the world. The relatively narrow wetland consists of mostly marshes surrounded by dry lands. In this study, we demonstrate the use of the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) Interferometric SAR (InSAR) to detect the changes of the Helmand River wetland water level. InSAR images are combined with the geocentric water level measurements from the retracked high-rate (18-Hz) Environmental Satellite (Envisat) radar altimetry to construct absolute water level changes over the marshes. It is demonstrated that the integration of the altimeter and InSAR can provide spatio-temporal measurements of water level variation over the Helmand River marshes where in situ measurements are absent. ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  17. Methods of InSAR atmosphere correction for volcano activity monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    When a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal propagates through the atmosphere on its path to and from the sensor, it is inevitably affected by atmospheric effects. In particular, the applicability and accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques for volcano monitoring is limited by atmospheric path delays. Therefore, atmospheric correction of interferograms is required to improve the performance of InSAR for detecting volcanic activity, especially in order to advance its ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive changes in deformation dynamics. In this paper, we focus on InSAR tropospheric mitigation methods and their performance in volcano deformation monitoring. Our study areas include Okmok volcano and Unimak Island located in the eastern Aleutians, AK. We explore two methods to mitigate atmospheric artifacts, namely the numerical weather model simulation and the atmospheric filtering using Persistent Scatterer processing. We investigate the capability of the proposed methods, and investigate their limitations and advantages when applied to determine volcanic processes. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  18. Formation Flying for Distributed InSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel P.; Murray, Emmanuell A.; Ploen, Scott R.; Gromov, Konstantin G.; Chen, Curtis W.

    2006-01-01

    We consider two spacecraft flying in formation to create interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Several candidate orbits for such in InSar formation have been previously determined based on radar performance and Keplerian orbital dynamics. However, with out active control, disturbance-induced drift can degrade radar performance and (in the worst case) cause a collision. This study evaluates the feasibility of operating the InSAR spacecraft as a formation, that is, with inner-spacecraft sensing and control. We describe the candidate InSAR orbits, design formation guidance and control architectures and algorithms, and report the (Delta)(nu) and control acceleration requirements for the candidate orbits for several tracking performance levels. As part of determining formation requirements, a formation guidance algorithm called Command Virtual Structure is introduced that can reduce the (Delta)(nu) requirements compared to standard Leader/Follower formation approaches.

  19. Global Tropospheric Noise Maps for InSAR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S. H.; Hensley, S.; Agram, P. S.; Chaubell, M.; Fielding, E. J.; Pan, L.

    2014-12-01

    Radio wave's differential phase delay variation through the troposphere is the largest error sources in Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements, and water vapor variability in the troposphere is known to be the dominant factor. We use the precipitable water vapor (PWV) products from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors mounted on Terra and Aqua satellites to produce tropospheric noise maps of InSAR. We estimate the slope and y-intercept of power spectral density curve of MODIS PWV and calculate the structure function to estimate the expected tropospheric noise level as a function of distance. The results serve two purposes: 1) to provide guidance on the expected covariance matrix for geophysical modeling, 2) to provide quantitative basis for the science Level-1 requirements of the planned NASA-ISRO L-band SAR mission (NISAR mission). We populate lookup tables of such power spectrum parameters derived from each 1-by-1 degree tile of global coverage. The MODIS data were retrieved from OSCAR (Online Services for Correcting Atmosphere in Radar) server. Users will be able to use the lookup tables and calculate expected tropospheric noise level of any date of MODIS data at any distance scale. Such calculation results can be used for constructing covariance matrix for geophysical modeling, or building statistics to support InSAR missions' requirements. For example, about 74% of the world had InSAR tropospheric noise level (along a radar line-of-sight for an incidence angle of 40 degrees) of 2 cm or less at 50 km distance scale during the time period of 2010/01/01 - 2010/01/09.

  20. 10 CFR 75.44 - Timing of advance notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Timing of advance notification. 75.44 Section 75.44 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Advanced Notification and Expenses § 75.44 Timing of advance notification. (a) Except as...

  1. 10 CFR 75.44 - Timing of advance notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Timing of advance notification. 75.44 Section 75.44 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Advanced Notification and Expenses § 75.44 Timing of advance notification. (a) Except as...

  2. 10 CFR 75.44 - Timing of advance notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Timing of advance notification. 75.44 Section 75.44 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Advanced Notification and Expenses § 75.44 Timing of advance notification. (a) Except as...

  3. 10 CFR 75.44 - Timing of advance notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Timing of advance notification. 75.44 Section 75.44 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Advanced Notification and Expenses § 75.44 Timing of advance notification. (a) Except as...

  4. 10 CFR 75.44 - Timing of advance notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Timing of advance notification. 75.44 Section 75.44 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Advanced Notification and Expenses § 75.44 Timing of advance notification. (a) Except as...

  5. Vegetation, smegetation: How InSAR research on tectonics and land surface change has expanded from the deserts to the rain forests and beyond.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The upcoming avalanche of openly available SAR imagery is expanding the horizons of what can and cannot be accomplished with InSAR. Historically, InSAR performed best in arid regions - an observation that became a bit of a self-fulfilling prophecy as satellite agencies acquired less data in regions with vegetation and agricultural activity. Here we present an overview of the development of InSAR research in tectonics and land surface change over the past 2+ decades, with a view towards some of the new advances in modeling and data management that will be necessary to fully take advantage of SAR data in the near future. One of the most basic breakthroughs will be that issues with decorrelation and the need for sophisticated time series analysis just to enable phase unwrapping will no longer be a major problem over many areas of the globe. New challenges will be the interpretation of coherent signal related to vegetation, soil moisture and time-variable phase scattering height in regions that previously would have just been flagged as "noise". We present results based on the ingestion of independent optical and radar observation types into SAR time series analysis, with applications to deformation sources in the Central and Eastern United States.The land surface properties in the Central and Eastern United States differ from those in the arid regions where InSAR has often been used, both in the presence of vegetation and the often very rapid changes in surface scattering characteristics that occur seasonally and during single events (snowfall, flooding, etc.). In the past, observations were so sparse that these changes resulted in decorrelation, rendering the data unusable. However, shorter acquisition times and a wider range of radar wavelengths allow the extraction of coherent signals from these areas, even spanning large snow storms. The resulting data contain signals that were often disregarded during InSAR time series analysis, but that must be either accounted

  6. A Community-Contributed InSAR Product Archive at UNAVCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S.; Crosby, C. J.; Meertens, C.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA-supported seamless synthetic aperture radar archive (SSARA) project at UNAVCO has implemented a distributed access system for SAR data and derived data products (i.e. interferograms) through the use of simple web services. Under the SSARA project, a user-contributed InSAR archive for interferograms, time series, and other derived data products was developed at UNAVCO. The InSAR archive is based on the hierarchical data format release 5 (HDF5) data format and provides storage, distribution, and sharing of research results within the geodesy community. HDF5 is the preferred format for InSAR data products because it provides a more robust set of features for storing InSAR data. HDF5 has been adopted by the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) and is also used in InSAR time series analysis software packages such as GIAnT from Caltech. Digital object identifiers (DOI) have been incorporated into the archive allowing users to assign a permanent location for their processed result and easily references the final data products. Further development has led to the adoption of the HDF-EOS5 specification that provides standards for data and metadata storage within HDF5. This provides easier integration with GIS software packages such as ArcGIS and GDAL and conversion to other data formats like NetCDF and GeoTIFF.

  7. Spatial-Temporal Evolution of Water Vapor during a Heavy Rain Detected by InSAR, GPS and Weather Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Y.; shimada, M.; Furuya, M.

    2011-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) phase signals are used to map the Earth's surface deformation, but are also affected by Earth's atmosphere. In particular, the heterogeneity of water vapor near the surface causes unpredictable phase changes in InSAR data. In the absence of deformation signals and other errors, InSAR can provide us with a spatial distribution of precipitable water vapor with unprecedented spatial resolution. On 2 September 2008, a torrential rain struck wide areas over central Japan, and Japan Aerospace exploration Agency (JAXA) carried out an emergent observation of the heavy rains by PALSAR, an L-band synthetic aperture radar sensor. On January 2010, JAXA has carried out another PALSAR measurement of the very areas, so that we could generate InSAR image of the area and examine the detailed snapshot of the regional troposphere; the weather on January 21 2010 was dry and stable. Near the Ibi River, we detected localized signals, whose amplitude reached 12.2 cm in radar line-of-sight over a spatial scale on the order of 8 km, and were unlikely to be an artifact of either ground deformation, DEM errors, or ionosphere. In our previous report (Kinoshita et al., 2010 AGU Fall Meeting), we validated this point, having shown other independent InSAR images as well as azimuth component of pixel-offset data. Then we concluded that the signal was due to the localized water vapor distribution associated with the heavy rain on September 2008. Now we compare the tropospheric delay in InSAR data with those derived from the GEONET data, the Japanese nationwide GPS network. The principle of atmospheric propagation delay in GPS is inherently the same as that of InSAR, and thus it is worth to compare the tropospheric delay data derived from GPS with those from InSAR. In this study, we generated GPS zenith total delay (ZTD) by using precise point positioning (PPP) processing. The ZTD time series of the GEONET station 950291 (Tarui) near the signal in InSAR

  8. Development of InSAR technology on deformation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Ming-lian; Jiang, Ting-chen; Zong, Yu-yu

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, application of InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture, Radar) to deformation monitoring has become a hotspot in research of geological hazards. This paper introduces the basic principles and data processing procedures of InSAR and summarizes main progresses made in InSAR technology and its application to deformation monitoring. Through actual examples of application and research at home and abroad, the article figures out existing problems and the future of application of InSAR.

  9. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Gurrola, Eric; Sacco, Gian Franco; Zebker, Howard

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a flexible and extensible Interferometric SAR (InSAR) Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) for geodetic image processing. ISCE was designed from the ground up as a geophysics community tool for generating stacks of interferograms that lend themselves to various forms of time-series analysis, with attention paid to accuracy, extensibility, and modularity. The framework is python-based, with code elements rigorously componentized by separating input/output operations from the processing engines. This allows greater flexibility and extensibility in the data models, and creates algorithmic code that is less susceptible to unnecessary modification when new data types and sensors are available. In addition, the components support provenance and checkpointing to facilitate reprocessing and algorithm exploration. The algorithms, based on legacy processing codes, have been adapted to assume a common reference track approach for all images acquired from nearby orbits, simplifying and systematizing the geometry for time-series analysis. The framework is designed to easily allow user contributions, and is distributed for free use by researchers. ISCE can process data from the ALOS, ERS, EnviSAT, Cosmo-SkyMed, RadarSAT-1, RadarSAT-2, and TerraSAR-X platforms, starting from Level-0 or Level 1 as provided from the data source, and going as far as Level 3 geocoded deformation products. With its flexible design, it can be extended with raw/meta data parsers to enable it to work with radar data from other platforms

  10. Monitoring delta subsidence with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, S.; Overeem, I.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Can subsidence in river deltas be monitored in near real-time at the spatial and temporal resolution needed for informing critical management decisions? Interferometric Synthetic Radar Aperture (InSAR) is a satellite-based technique that can map ground deformation with millimeter-scale vertical resolution over thousands of square kilometers. InSAR has enormous potential to shed light on the dynamics of actively subsiding deltas, but the technique is not commonly applied outside of major cities due to the difficulty of performing InSAR in wet, vegetated settings. Given these limitations, how can InSAR best serve the global effort to monitor sinking deltas? Here, an overview of InSAR processing is provided that addresses delta-specific challenges, including frequent cloud-cover in tropical areas; noisy signals in wetlands and flooded fields; dense forests that interact unpredictably with different radar wavelengths; flat landscapes that hinder image stacking algorithms; rapid urban development that can render Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) inaccurate; and a lack of in situ GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers for InSAR calibration. InSAR has unique value for monitoring subsidence in deltas, and some natural and anthropogenic drivers of subsidence can be resolved by InSAR. High-resolution InSAR measurements from the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) are then presented and validated against GPS data. Surface motion is shown to reflect subsurface stratigraphy, and sediment compaction is shown to be the most important factor in this delta on short (non-tectonic) timescales. Average compaction rates throughout the eastern delta range from 0 to > 18 mm/y, varying by more than an order of magnitude depending on the ages and grain sizes of surface and subsurface sediment layers. Fastest subsidence is observed in Holocene organic-rich mud, and slowest subsidence is observed along the Meghna River and in areas with surface or subsurface sand deposits. Although groundwater

  11. Earthquake Cycle Deformation at the Ballenas Transform, Gulf of California, Mexico, from InSAR and GPS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, Christina; Fattahi, Heresh; Malservisi, Rocco; Amelung, Falk; Verdecchia, Alessandro; Dixon, Timothy H.

    2015-05-01

    We study crustal deformation across the Ballenas marine channel, Gulf of California, Mexico using InSAR and campaign GPS data. Interseismic velocities are calculated by time-series analysis spanning five years of data. Displacements from the August 3rd 2009 Mw 6.9 earthquake are calculated by differencing the most recent observations before and after the event. To estimate the offset across the marine channel we calibrate the InSAR velocity and displacement fields using the corresponding GPS data. Unfortunately, the InSAR interseismic velocity field is affected by residual tropospheric delay. We interpret the GPS interseismic and the GPS and InSAR coseismic deformation data using dislocation modeling and compare the fault kinematics during these periods of the earthquake cycle.

  12. InSAR Observations and Finite Element Modeling of Crustal Deformation Around a Surging Glacier, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaans, K.; Auriac, A.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hooper, A. J.; Bjornsson, H.; Pálsson, F.; Pinel, V.; Feigl, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Icelandic ice caps, covering ~11% of the country, are known to be surging glaciers. Such process implies an important local crustal subsidence due to the large ice mass being transported to the ice edge during the surge in a few months only. In 1993-1995, a glacial surge occurred at four neighboring outlet glaciers in the southwestern part of Vatnajökull ice cap, the largest ice cap in Iceland. We estimated that ~16±1 km3 of ice have been moved during this event while the fronts of some of the outlet glaciers advanced by ~1 km.Surface deformation associated with this surge has been surveyed using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) acquisitions from 1992-2002, providing high resolution ground observations of the study area. The data show about 75 mm subsidence at the ice edge of the outlet glaciers following the transport of the large volume of ice during the surge (Fig. 1). The long time span covered by the InSAR images enabled us to remove ~12 mm/yr of uplift occurring in this area due to glacial isostatic adjustment from the retreat of Vatnajökull ice cap since the end of the Little Ice Age in Iceland. We then used finite element modeling to investigate the elastic Earth response to the surge, as well as confirm that no significant viscoelastic deformation occurred as a consequence of the surge. A statistical approach based on Bayes' rule was used to compare the models to the observations and obtain an estimate of the Young's modulus (E) and Poisson's ratio (v) in Iceland. The best-fitting models are those using a one-kilometer thick top layer with v=0.17 and E between 12.9-15.3 GPa underlain by a layer with v=0.25 and E from 67.3 to 81.9 GPa. Results demonstrate that InSAR data and finite element models can be used successfully to reproduce crustal deformation induced by ice mass variations at Icelandic ice caps.Fig. 1: Interferograms spanning 1993 July 31 to 1995 June 19, showing the surge at Tungnaárjökull (Tu.), Skaftárjökull (Sk.) and S

  13. Estimating subtle long-wavelength deformation with InSAR: Application to the Chaman Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, H.; Amelung, F.

    2012-12-01

    While it's difficult to discriminate the tectonic deformation from the effects of orbital error in the single interferogram due to their similar spatial pattern, but their different temporal behavior is an opportunity to measure the tectonic deformation from the InSAR time-series. Considering the fact that the long-wavelength tectonic signal is correlated in time (in most cases linearly) whereas orbital errors have random distribution, theoretically we should be able to extract tectonic deformation signal from the InSAR time-series results. However in practice, systematic errors from various sources, usually misinterpreted as the orbital error, are the main obstacles to use current SAR archives for estimating long-wavelength deformation. In this presentation we will introduce a temporal systematic error in Envisat-ASAR data limiting our ability in using these data for estimating long-wavelength deformation and propose a processing strategy to correct it's effects in the time-series results. We will show using simulated data that the linear velocity map calculated from the InSAR time-series is not affected by the random orbital error. However in practice the velocity map of InSAR time-series from Envisat ASAR data is always affected by an approximately 1.5 cm/yr ramp in the range direction. This constant ramp in the results from Envisat should not be misinterpreted as the random orbital error but it's a result of systematic temporal error with possible sources from the radar hardware, processing parameters or softwares. Being aware of this systematic effect in the Envisat data enables us to propose a new processing strategy to correct the error without removing the long-wavelength deformation. We have examined this strategy to estimate the velocity map over Southern San Andreas Fault. These results show that the obtained velocity map using only Envisat InSAR data is very well comparable with other recent studies attempting to use GPS to correct the InSAR orbital

  14. Long-range ground deformation monitoring by InSAR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokugawa, S.; Nakamura, T.

    2015-11-01

    InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) analysis is an effective technique to map 3-dimensional surface deformation with high spatial resolution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of InSAR analysis when applied to ground monitoring of an environmental disaster. We performed a time series InSAR analysis using ENVISAT/ASAR and ALOS/PALSAR data and commercial software to investigate subsidence around the Kanto District of Japan. We also investigated techniques for efficient early detection of landslides in Kyushu using time series analysis that incorporated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. ENVISAT/ASAR data acquired from 2003-2010 and ALOS/PALSAR data acquired from 2006-2011 were used to detect poorly expressed geomorphological deformation by conducting time series analyses of periodically acquired SAR data. In addition, to remove noise caused by geographical feature stripes or phase retardation, we applied median filtering, histogram extraction processing, and clarification of the displacement with a Laplacian filter. The main functions of the InSAR time series analysis are the calculation of phase differences between two images and the inversion with smoothness constraint for the estimation of deformation along the line of sight. The results enabled us to establish criteria for the selection of suitable InSAR data pairs, and provided the final error estimation of the derived surface deformation. The results of the analysis in the Kanto District suggested that localized areas of uplift and subsidence have occurred at irregular intervals in this area. Furthermore, the method offers the possibility of early warning of environmental disasters such as landslide and abrupt subsidence. Our results confirm the effectiveness of InSAR analysis for the monitoring of ground deformation over wide areas via the detection of localized subsidence and landslides.

  15. Retrieval of the Long Term Ground Settlement of the Ocean Reclaimed Land in Shanghai with Multi Platform Time-Series InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing; Pepe, Antonio; Bonano, Manuela; Gao, Wei; Li, Xiaofeng; Lu, Zhong; Calo, Fabiana; Manunta, Michele; Lanari, Riccardo

    2016-08-01

    n this study, we present a Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) analysis of the ground displacement that impacts the ocean-reclaimed areas of the Nanhui New City of Shanghai (China), based on jointly exploiting Persistent Scatterers (PS) and Small Baseline (SB) approaches. The mean deformation velocity maps and corresponding interferometric time-series of deformation were initially cross-compared. We also performed a joint C-/X- band DInSAR analysis through the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm over the ocean-reclaimed areas to better understand the long-lasting ground settlement process. The joint exploitation of different sets of SAR acquisitions collected at distinctive frequency bands and the knowledge of time-dependent models for the expected subsidence in ocean-reclaimed platforms is helpful to retrieve long-term displacement time series, thus allowing us to get new insights about the future evolution of the reclamation area settlements over the next years.

  16. Time series and MinTS analysis of strain accumulation along the Haiyuan fault (Gansu, China) over the 2003-2010 period, from ENVISAT InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, R.; Lasserre, C.; Lin, N.; Simons, M.; Doin, M.; Hetland, E. A.; Muse, P.; Peltzer, G.; Jianbao, S.; Dailu, R.

    2010-12-01

    We use SAR interferometry to measure the strain accumulation along the left-lateral Haiyuan fault system (hereafter HFS), that marks the north-eastern boundary of the tibetan plateau. The last major earthquakes that occured along the HFS are the M~8 1920 Haiyuan earthquake (strike-slip mechanism) and the Ml=8-8.3 1927 Gulang earthquake that ruptured a thrust fault system. There has been no known large earthquake on the central section of the HFS, the “Tianzhu seismic gap”, in the last ~1000 years. We first analyze the complete ENVISAT SAR data archive along three descending and two ascending tracks for the 2003-2009 period and construct an InSAR-based mean line-of-sight (LOS) velocity map around the HFS from the eastern end of the Qilian Shan (102° E), to the west, to the Liupan Shan (106° E), to the east. We empirically correct our interferograms for propagation delays associated with changes on the stratified atmospheric structure. We then estimate the mean LOS velocity for each track using a time series analysis which reveals the existence of a 40 km long creeping segment located at the western end of the 1920 rupture. Extending from the Jingtai pull-apart basin, which shows a 2-3 mm/yr subsidence rate, to the Mao Mao Shan, the creep rate is estimated to reach 8 mm/yr locally and is higher than the long term loading rate of the Haiyuan fault, estimated geodetically at 5±1 mm/yr. The surface extension of the creeping segment is colocated with strong micro- and moderate seismic activity. We also explore the possibility of transient creep during the 2003-2010 time period, using a SBAS style, smoothed, time series analysis and the Multiscale Interferometric Time Series method (MinTS, CalTech, see Hetland et al. 2010 AGU abstract). While classic time series methods are based on a pixel-by-pixel approach and do not consider spatial data covariances, due to residual atmospheric noise, the wavelet decomposition of each interferograms and the time inversion in the

  17. Studies of Grounding Line Migration Over Rutofrd Ice Stream Using 3D Short Repeat-Time Series From Multi-Track InSAR Acquisitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, P.; Minchew, B. M.; Riel, B. V.; Simons, M.; Gardner, A. S.; Agram, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been known that basal mechanics of ice streams are sensitive to short- timescale hourly to seasonal forcings, such as water pressure fluctuations and tidal loading as well as long-timescale (yearly to decadal) thinning. Designing SAR short repeat time observations to cover nearly an entire test-site in Antarctica from ascending and descending orbital directions, using every available SAR satellite is fundamental for understanding a new class of phenomena, underlying the physics of glaciers and ice streams. Understanding grounding-line dynamics is necessary for predictions of long-term ice-sheet stability. However, despite growing observations of the tidal influence on grounding-line migration, this short-timescale migration is poorly understood, with most modeling attempts assuming beam theory to calculate displacements. Knowing the position of the grounding line with accuracy is important for the global mass balance of ice sheets or for quantitatively modeling the mechanical interaction between ice shelves and ice sheets. Here we present a general method for retrieving three dimensional displacement vector given a set of multiple tracks, multiple geometry SAR acquisitions. The algorithm extends the single line of sight mathematical framework to the four spatial and temporal dimensions including both range and azimuth measurements. We designed COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) observations of Rutford Ice Stream to cover nearly the grounding zone from ascending and descending orbital directions using every available CSK satellite This spatially comprehensive observational scheme allowed us to derive time series of the 3-dimensional surface displacement for the grounding zone, facilitating studies of ice stream mechanics and tidally induced grounding line migrations with unprecedented spatial extent and temporal resolution. Having a constellation with occasional 1- day repeat time and an average 4-days repeat time is beneficial when looking at displacements of more than

  18. Advances in Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Beck, John G.; Gizon, Laurent; Kosovichev, Alexander F.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Time-distance helioseismology is a way to measure travel times between surface locations for waves traversing the solar interior. Coupling the travel with an extensive modeling effort has proven to be a powerful tool for measuring flows and other wave speed inhomogeneities in the solar interior. Problems receiving current attention include studying the time variation of the meridional circulation and torsional oscillation and active region emergence and evolution, current results on these topics will be presented.

  19. Measurement of Sinkhole Formation and Progression with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Blom, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Bayou Corne Sinkhole initially formed in August 2012 from sidewall collapse of a brine cavern within the Napoleonville Salt Dome in southeastern Louisiana. The sinkhole, initially ~1 hectare in size, has expanded to ~10 hectare surface coverage by July 2013, as material continued to fill the subterranean void. Here we show that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) could have reliably forecast the formation and location of the Bayou Corne Sinkhole at least a month in advance from the large precursory surface deformation that occurred in the area where the sinkhole later formed. The Mississippi delta region has been imaged since 2009 using the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), and radar data over the Napoleonville Salt Dome had been acquired on 2 July 2012, only a month before the sinkhole developed. Using radar interferometry, we show significant surface deformation of up to 250 mm occurred between 23 June 2011, and 2 July 2012, in an extended area encompassing the sinkhole site. The InSAR results show no measurable deformation prior to 23 June 2011. The measured precursory deformation pattern is consistent with compressive loading at the surface due to removal of support caused by a vertically oriented subsurface fracture. The measured strains relate directly to subsurface geology, salt rock properties, and internal stresses caused by the salt dome sidewall collapse. Measurements made with UAVSAR since the sinkhole formation, between August 2012 and July 2013, show progression of the surface deformation well beyond the limited extent of the sinkhole itself, with growth of the sinkhole following the direction of maximum surface deformation. These results show that even in radar-challenging environments such as the swamplands of Bayou Corne, L-band InSAR can be used to study the underlying geophysics of sinkhole formation and, furthermore, that InSAR data collected operationally for hazard monitoring could

  20. Coastal and Wetlands Applications for an InSAR Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, T.; Amelung, F.; Gourmelen, N.; Kim, S.; Osmanoglu, B.; Wdowinski, S.

    2006-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has found wide application in the study of Earth surface change, including earthquake and volcano deformation, motion of glaciers and ice sheets, and ground subsidence due to fluid extraction. In the last few years, InSAR may have significant application in studies of wetlands, coastal regions, and related environmental problems. These are becoming increasingly important as global warming contributes to sea level rise, with consequent modification or loss of coastal habitat, and increased storm frequency/intensity, with consequent increased hazard to coastal communities. Most of these applications would benefit from increased data availability and spatial resolution. A common problem for many InSAR studies in these areas is the influence of spatially and temporally variable tropospheric water vapor. Multiple interferograms can be used to average down tropospheric noise, or selectively edit image pairs where tropospheric noise is high. Alternately, the Permanent Scatterer (PSInSAR) technique can produce an average surface change rate over several months or years for coastal land applications where the assumption of steady state deformation is reasonable (e.g., some land subsidence applications). This technique also effectively identifies tropospheric noise. Common to both approaches is the need for large numbers of images, closely spaced in time. Wetland water levels also change on short time scales (days to weeks) implying the need for frequent coverage. Hence, such applications benefit from mission scenarios emphasizing repeat times shorter than 7 days. Assuming global coverage is desirable, the requirement for rapid re-survey suggests that multi-satellite constellations should be considered.

  1. Advances in coincidence time resolution for PET.

    PubMed

    Cates, Joshua W; Levin, Craig S

    2016-03-21

    Coincidence time resolution (CTR), an important parameter for time-of-flight (TOF) PET performance, is determined mainly by properties of the scintillation crystal and photodetector used. Stable production techniques for LGSO:Ce (Lu1.8Gd0.2SiO5:Ce) with decay times varying from ∼ 30-40 ns have been established over the past decade, and the decay time can be accurately controlled with varying cerium concentration (0.025-0.075 mol%). This material is promising for TOF-PET, as it has similar light output and equivalent stopping power for 511 keV annihilation photons compared to industry standard LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce, and the decay time is improved by more than 30% with proper Ce concentration. This work investigates the achievable CTR with LGSO:Ce (0.025 mol%) when coupled to new silicon photomultipliers. Crystal element dimension is another important parameter for achieving fast timing. 20 mm length crystal elements achieve higher 511 keV photon detection efficiency, but also introduce higher scintillation photon transit time variance. 3 mm length crystals are not practical for PET, but have reduced scintillation transit time spread. The CTR between pairs of 2.9 × 2.9 × 3 mm(3) and 2.9 × 2.9 × 20 mm(3) LGSO:Ce crystals was measured to be 80 ± 4 and 122 ± 4 ps FWHM, respectively. Measurements of light yield and intrinsic decay time are also presented for a thorough investigation into the timing performance with LGSO:Ce (0.025 mol%).

  2. Advanced spectral methods for climatic time series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ghil, M.; Allen, M.R.; Dettinger, M.D.; Ide, K.; Kondrashov, D.; Mann, M.E.; Robertson, A.W.; Saunders, A.; Tian, Y.; Varadi, F.; Yiou, P.

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of univariate or multivariate time series provides crucial information to describe, understand, and predict climatic variability. The discovery and implementation of a number of novel methods for extracting useful information from time series has recently revitalized this classical field of study. Considerable progress has also been made in interpreting the information so obtained in terms of dynamical systems theory. In this review we describe the connections between time series analysis and nonlinear dynamics, discuss signal- to-noise enhancement, and present some of the novel methods for spectral analysis. The various steps, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of these methods, are illustrated by their application to an important climatic time series, the Southern Oscillation Index. This index captures major features of interannual climate variability and is used extensively in its prediction. Regional and global sea surface temperature data sets are used to illustrate multivariate spectral methods. Open questions and further prospects conclude the review.

  3. Time series analysis of strain accumulation along the Haiyuan fault (Gansu, China) over the 1993-2009 period, from ERS and ENVISAT InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Romain; Lasserre, Cecile; Doin, Marie-Pierre; Guillaso, Stéphane; Cavalié, Olivier; Peltzer, Gilles; Sun, Jianbao; Rong, Dailu; Shen, Zheng-Kang; Xu, Xiwei

    2010-05-01

    We use SAR interferometry to measure the strain accumulation along the left-lateral Haiyuan fault system (HFS), that marks the north-eastern boundary of the tibetan plateau. The last major earthquakes that occured along the HFS are the M~8 1920 Haiyuan earthquake (strike-slip mechanism) and the Ml=8-8.3 1927 Gulang earthquake that ruptured a thrust fault system. No large earthquake is reported on the central section of the HFS, the "Tianzhu seismic gap", since ~1000 years. We first analyze the complete ENVISAT SAR data archive along 4 descending and 2 ascending tracks for the 2003-2009 period and construct an InSAR-based mean Line-Of-Sight (LOS) velocity map around the HFS from the eastern end of the Qilian shan (102° E), to the west, to the Liupan shan (106° E), to the east. Data are processed using a small baseline chain type. For each track, all radar images are coregistrated to a single master and interferograms are produced using a local adaptative range filtering. Residual orbital and atmospheric delays are jointly inverted and corrected for each unwrapped interferogram. Atmospheric corrections are validated using the ERA40 global atmospheric model (ECMWF). The interferograms series on each track are then inverted to obtain the increments of LOS radar delays between acquisition dates, adapting the Lopez-Quiroz et al. 2009 time series analysis. The obtained LOS mean velocity maps show a dominant left-lateral motion across the fault with along-strike variations: some fault sections are locked at shallow depth while others are creeping and local vertical movements are observed (subsidence in the "Jingtai" pull-apart basin). For various fault slip rates imposed below 20 km (4-10 mm/yr), we model the shallow velocity by inverting the mean LOS velocity maps for both strike-slip and dip-slip motion on vertical, 5km x 2.5km discretized patches, using a least-square method with an appropriate degree of smoothing. The fault geometry follows the surface trace of the

  4. Time series analysis of strain accumulation across the Haiyuan fault, Gansu, China, over the 2003-2009 period from ENVISAT InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, R.; Lasserre, C.; Doin, M.; Guillaso, S.; Cavalie, O.; Peltzer, G.; Sun, J.; Shen, Z.

    2009-12-01

    We use sar interferometry to characterize the present-day behaviour of the left-lateral Haiyuan fault system (HFS), one of the main geological structure at the north-eastern boundary of the tibetan plateau that accomodates the eastward movement of Tibet relative to the Gobi-Ala Shan platform. The last major earthquakes that occured along the HFS are the M~8 1920 Haiyuan earthquake (strike-slip mechanism) and the Ml=8-8.3 1927 Gulang earthquake that ruptured a nearby thrust fault system. A ~260 km-long seismic gap has been identified on the central part of the HFS, along which creep may occur. We propose to further investigate the relationships between the present day deformation processes observed along the HFS and its seismic history and segmentation. We construct an extended InSAR-based map of the deformation around the Haiyuan fault from the eastern end of the Qilian Shan (102° E), to the west, to the junction with the Liupan Shan (106° E), to the east. We use monthly ENVISAT acquisitions along 4 descending and 2 ascending tracks, spanning the 2003-2009 time period. Data are processed using a small baseline chain type. For each track, all radar images are coregistrated to a single master and interferograms are produced using a local adaptative range filtering. Residual orbital and atmospheric effects are jointly inverted and corrected for each unwrapped interferogram. Atmospheric corrections are validated “a posteriori” , using the most recent global atmospheric model. We also investigate the potential improvements of these models for “a priori” atmospheric corrections. The interferograms series on each track are then inverted to obtain the increments of Line Of Sight (LOS) radar delays between acquisition dates, adapting the Lopez-Quiroz et al. 2009 time series analysis. We derive LOS mean velocity maps, that show along-strike variations including local shallow creep and vertical movements (subsidence in the Jingtai pull-apart basin). These features

  5. InSAR Forensics: Tracing InSAR Scatterers in High Resolution Optical Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, XiaoXiang

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a step towards a better interpretation of the scattering mechanism of different objects and their deformation histories in SAR interferometry (InSAR). The proposed technique traces individual SAR scatterer in high resolution optical images where their geometries, materials, and other properties can be better analyzed and classified. And hence scatterers of a same object can be analyzed in group, which brings us to a new level of InSAR deformation monitoring.

  6. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment on the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Shams, K. S.; Gurrola, E. M.; George, B. A.; Knight, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    In response to the needs of the international scientific and operational Earth observation communities, spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems are being tasked to produce enormous volumes of raw data daily, with availability to scientists to increase substantially as more satellites come online and data becomes more accessible through more open data policies. The availability of these unprecedentedly dense and rich datasets has led to the development of sophisticated algorithms that can take advantage of them. In particular, interferometric time series analysis of SAR data provides insights into the changing earth and requires substantial computational power to process data across large regions and over large time periods. This poses challenges for existing infrastructure, software, and techniques required to process, store, and deliver the results to the global community of scientists. The current state-of-the-art solutions employ traditional data storage and processing applications that require download of data to the local repositories before processing. This approach is becoming untenable in light of the enormous volume of data that must be processed in an iterative and collaborative manner. We have analyzed and tested new cloud computing and virtualization approaches to address these challenges within the context of InSAR in the earth science community. Cloud computing is democratizing computational and storage capabilities for science users across the world. The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been an early adopter of this technology, successfully integrating cloud computing in a variety of production applications ranging from mission operations to downlink data processing. We have ported a new InSAR processing suite called ISCE (InSAR Scientific Computing Environment) to a scalable distributed system running in the Amazon GovCloud to demonstrate the efficacy of cloud computing for this application. We have integrated ISCE with Polyphony to

  7. [Intravaginal ejaculatory latency time: Advances in studies].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-rong; Xie, Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Although premature ejaculation (PE) is a common type of male sexual dysfunction, to date we lack a unified definition of PE. The multidimensional definition of PE has been accepted by more and more clinicians. Intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) is one of the three important dimensions (time to ejaculation, inability to control or delay ejaculation, and negative consequences) for defining PE. Rapid ejaculation is one of the core symptoms of PE and IELT is an objective measurement as well as an important tool for the evaluation of PE. This article reviews estimated IELT, stopwatch-measured IELT, the correlation between estimated and stopwatch-measured IELT, and the factors affecting IELT in the general male population, PE patients, and those complaining of PE.

  8. Advances in NIF Shock Timing Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, Harry

    2012-10-01

    Experiments are underway to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to multiple shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of all four shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). Experiments are now routinely conducted in a mirrored keyhole geometry, which allows for simultaneous diagnosis of the shock timing at both the hohlraum pole and equator. Further modifications are being made to improve the surrogacy to ignition hohlraums by replacing the standard liquid deuterium (D2) capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. These experiments will remove any possible surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporate the physics of shock release from the ice layer, which is absent in current experiments. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  9. Comparison of Ground Deformation Measurements and Atmospheric Artifacts Using Insar Cosmo-Skymed and GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbini, S.; Prati, C.; Errico, M.; Novali, F.; Santi, E.

    2012-12-01

    Integrating and exploiting the synergetic combination of the InSAR and GPS techniques allows overcoming the limitations inherent in the use of each technique alone. GPS-based estimates of tropospheric delays may contribute in obtaining better corrections of the wet tropospheric path delay in InSAR signals. This will enhance the coherence and will allow the application of InSAR in a wider range of applications. The test area chosen for the comparison between InSAR and GPS data is in northeastern Italy, in particular, in the city of Bologna (urbanized area) and in the surroundings of Medicina (agricultural area). In these sites, two permanent GPS stations (EUREF EPN sites) of the University of Bologna are operational since mid 1999 (BOLG) and 1996 (MSEL) respectively. The InSAR data used are the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) images made available by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The Permanent Scatterers (PS) technique was applied to a number of repeated CSK strip map SAR images acquired over a 40x40 square km area encompassing the two towns mentioned above. The results of this work demonstrate, on the one hand, the CSK capabilities to operate in a repeated interferometric survey mode for measuring ground deformation with millimeter accuracy in different environments. On the other, the comparison of the differential height between the two stations derived with the GPS and the InSAR data, using both acquisition geometries, is satisfactory. Elevation, ground deformation and atmospheric artifacts were estimated in correspondence of the identified PS and compared with the GPS measurements carried out at the same acquisition time by the permanent stations at Bologna and Medicina. The comparison of the differential height between the two stations shows the sensitivity of the GPS height solution to the length of the observation interval. The vertical dispersion achieved by GPS is higher than that achieved by PS InSAR, as expected; however, a similar linear trend appears in the

  10. Pre-2014 mudslides at Oso revealed by InSAR and multi-source DEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Lu, Z.; QU, F.

    2014-12-01

    The landslide is a process that results in the downward and outward movement of slope-reshaping materials including rocks and soils and annually causes the loss of approximately $3.5 billion and tens of casualties in the United States. The 2014 Oso mudslide was an extreme event costing nearly 40 deaths and damaging civilian properties. Landslides are often unpredictable, but in many cases, catastrophic events are repetitive. Historic record in the Oso mudslide site indicates that there have been serial events in decades, though the extent of sliding events varied from time to time. In our study, the combination of multi-source DEMs, InSAR, and time-series InSAR analysis has enabled to characterize the Oso mudslide. InSAR results from ALOS PALSAR show that there was no significant deformation between mid-2006 and 2011. The combination of time-series InSAR analysis and old-dated DEM indicated revealed topographic changes associated the 2006 sliding event, which is confirmed by the difference of multiple LiDAR DEMs. Precipitation and discharge measurements before the 2006 and 2014 landslide events did not exhibit extremely anomalous records, suggesting the precipitation is not the controlling factor in determining the sliding events at Oso. The lack of surface deformation during 2006-2011 and weak correlation between the precipitation and the sliding event, suggest other factors (such as porosity) might play a critical role on the run-away events at this Oso and other similar landslides.

  11. Spatial and temporal variations in creep rate along the El Pilar fault at the Caribbean-South American plate boundary (Venezuela), from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse Beltran, Léa.; Pathier, Erwan; Jouanne, François; Vassallo, Riccardo; Reinoza, Carlos; Audemard, Franck; Doin, Marie Pierre; Volat, Matthieu

    2016-11-01

    In eastern Venezuela, the Caribbean-South American plate boundary follows the El Pilar fault system. Previous studies based on three GPS campaigns (2003-2005-2013) demonstrated that the El Pilar fault accommodates the whole relative displacement between the two tectonic plates (20 mm/yr) and proposed that 50-60% of the slip is aseismic. In order to quantify the possible variations of the aseismic creep in time and space, we conducted an interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series analysis, using the (NSBAS) New Small BAseline Subset method, on 18 images from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS-1) satellite spanning the 2007-2011 period. During this 3.5 year period, InSAR observations show that aseismic slip decreases eastward along the fault: the creep rate of the western segment reaches 25.3 ± 9.4 mm/yr on average, compared to 13.4 ± 6.9 mm/yr on average for the eastern segment. This is interpreted, through slip distribution models, as being related to coupled and uncoupled areas between the surface and 20 km in depth. InSAR observations also show significant temporal creep rate variations (accelerations) during the considered time span along the western segment. The transient behavior of the creep is not consistent with typical postseismic afterslip following the 1997 Ms 6.8 earthquake. The creep is thus interpreted as persistent aseismic slip during an interseismic period, which has a pulse- or transient-like behavior.

  12. A persistent scatterer method for retrieving accurate InSAR ground deformation map over vegetation-decorrelated areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Zebker, H. A.; Knight, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    InSAR is commonly used to measure surface deformation between different radar passes at cm-scale accuracy and m-scale resolution. However, InSAR measurements are often decorrelated due to vegetation growth, which greatly limits high quality InSAR data coverage. Here we present an algorithm for retrieving InSAR deformation measurements over areas with significant vegetation decorrelation through the use of adaptive interpolation between persistent scatterer (PS) pixels, those points at which surface scattering properties do not change much over time and thus decorrelation artifacts are minimal. The interpolation filter restores phase continuity in space and greatly reduces errors in phase unwrapping. We apply this algorithm to process L-band ALOS interferograms acquired over the San Luis Valley, Colorado and the Tulare Basin, California. In both areas, groundwater extraction for irrigation results in land deformation that can be detected using InSAR. We show that the PS-based algorithm reduces the artifacts from vegetation decorrelation while preserving the deformation signature. The spatial sampling resolution achieved over agricultural fields is on the order of hundreds of meters, usually sufficient for groundwater studies. The improved InSAR data allow us further to reconstruct the SBAS ground deformation time series and transform the measured deformation to head levels using the skeletal storage coefficient and time delay constant inferred from a joint InSAR-well data analysis. The resulting InSAR-head and well-head measurements in the San Luis valley show good agreement with primary confined aquifer pumping activities. This case study demonstrates that high quality InSAR deformation data can be obtained over vegetation-decorrrelated region if processed correctly.

  13. Investigation of ionospheric effects on SAR Interferometry (InSAR): A case study of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wu; Ding, Xiao-Li; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Bo-Chen; Qu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has demonstrated its potential for high-density spatial mapping of ground displacement associated with earthquakes, volcanoes, and other geologic processes. However, this technique may be affected by the ionosphere, which can result in the distortions of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, phases, and polarization. Moreover, ionospheric effect has become and is becoming further significant with the increasing interest in low-frequency SAR systems, limiting the further development of InSAR technique. Although some research has been carried out, thorough analysis of ionospheric influence on true SAR imagery is still limited. Based on this background, this study performs a thorough investigation of ionospheric effect on InSAR through processing L-band ALOS-1/PALSAR-1 images and dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) data over Hong Kong, where the phenomenon of ionospheric irregularities often occurs. The result shows that the small-scale ionospheric irregularities can cause the azimuth pixel shifts and phase advance errors on interferograms. Meanwhile, it is found that these two effects result in the stripe-shaped features in InSAR images. The direction of the stripe-shaped effects keep approximately constant in space for our InSAR dataset. Moreover, the GPS-derived rate of total electron content change index (ROTI), an index to reflect the level of ionospheric disturbances, may be a useful indicator for predicting the ionospheric effect for SAR images. This finding can help us evaluate the quality of SAR images when considering the ionospheric effect.

  14. InSAR Tropospheric Correction Methods: A Statistical Comparison over Different Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, D. P.; Walters, R. J.; Wright, T. J.; Hooper, A. J.; Parker, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Observing small magnitude surface displacements through InSAR is highly challenging, and requires advanced correction techniques to reduce noise. In fact, one of the largest obstacles facing the InSAR community is related to tropospheric noise correction. Spatial and temporal variations in temperature, pressure, and relative humidity result in a spatially-variable InSAR tropospheric signal, which masks smaller surface displacements due to tectonic or volcanic deformation. Correction methods applied today include those relying on weather model data, GNSS and/or spectrometer data. Unfortunately, these methods are often limited by the spatial and temporal resolution of the auxiliary data. Alternatively a correction can be estimated from the high-resolution interferometric phase by assuming a linear or a power-law relationship between the phase and topography. For these methods, the challenge lies in separating deformation from tropospheric signals. We will present results of a statistical comparison of the state-of-the-art tropospheric corrections estimated from spectrometer products (MERIS and MODIS), a low and high spatial-resolution weather model (ERA-I and WRF), and both the conventional linear and power-law empirical methods. We evaluate the correction capability over Southern Mexico, Italy, and El Hierro, and investigate the impact of increasing cloud cover on the accuracy of the tropospheric delay estimation. We find that each method has its strengths and weaknesses, and suggest that further developments should aim to combine different correction methods. All the presented methods are included into our new open source software package called TRAIN - Toolbox for Reducing Atmospheric InSAR Noise (Bekaert et al., in review), which is available to the community Bekaert, D., R. Walters, T. Wright, A. Hooper, and D. Parker (in review), Statistical comparison of InSAR tropospheric correction techniques, Remote Sensing of Environment

  15. Towards Run-time Assurance of Advanced Propulsion Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Edmond; Schierman, John D.; Schlapkohl, Thomas; Chicatelli, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This paper covers the motivation and rationale for investigating the application of run-time assurance methods as a potential means of providing safety assurance for advanced propulsion control systems. Certification is becoming increasingly infeasible for such systems using current verification practices. Run-time assurance systems hold the promise of certifying these advanced systems by continuously monitoring the state of the feedback system during operation and reverting to a simpler, certified system if anomalous behavior is detected. The discussion will also cover initial efforts underway to apply a run-time assurance framework to NASA's model-based engine control approach. Preliminary experimental results are presented and discussed.

  16. InSAR detection of permafrost landform dynamics at Kapp Linné central Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rune Lauknes, Tom; Christiansen, Hanne; Eckerstorfer, Markus; Larsen, Yngvar

    2013-04-01

    Permafrost is one of six cryospheric indicators of global climate change. As permafrost contains various forms of ground ice, thawing, degradation and speed up of particularly ice-rich periglacial landforms can lead to substantial landscape change and development. This has geomorphological, biological and socio-economical impacts, with changes in the water balance, increase in greenhouse gas emissivity, changes in flora and fauna and impacts on infrastructure. The present scientific challenge is to combine detailed site/point scale geomorphological field process observations with remote sensing data covering at landscape scale. We apply a multi-temporal satellite radar interferometric (InSAR) method to data obtained using the TerraSAR-X satellite. TerraSAR-X has a high spatial resolution and with 11 days repeat cycle, it is well suited to detect seasonal permafrost deformation. To test the usability of X-band InSAR data, we compare hourly field measurements between 2008-2011 of solifluction ground deformation at Kapp Linné, central Svalbard, with InSAR deformation time-series. We show that InSAR is able to pick up the seasonal deformation patterns of frost heave, ground settlement and associated solifluction as well as the interannual downslope movement. These results are a promising first step towards successful upscaling periglacial field point measurements to landscape scale, enabling observations of periglacial processes in larger parts of the permafrost landscapes.

  17. Advanced propeller noise prediction in the time domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Dunn, M. H.; Spence, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    The time domain code ASSPIN gives acousticians a powerful technique of advanced propeller noise prediction. Except for nonlinear effects, the code uses exact solutions of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation with exact blade geometry and kinematics. By including nonaxial inflow, periodic loading noise, and adaptive time steps to accelerate computer execution, the development of this code becomes complete.

  18. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE): A Python Framework for Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Gurrola, E. M.; Agram, P. S.; Sacco, G. F.; Lavalle, M.

    2015-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE, funded by NASA ESTO) provides a modern computing framework for geodetic image processing of InSAR data from a diverse array of radar satellites and aircraft. ISCE is both a modular, flexible, and extensible framework for building software components and applications as well as a toolbox of applications for processing raw or focused InSAR and Polarimetric InSAR data. The ISCE framework contains object-oriented Python components layered to construct Python InSAR components that manage legacy Fortran/C InSAR programs. Components are independently configurable in a layered manner to provide maximum control. Polymorphism is used to define a workflow in terms of abstract facilities for each processing step that are realized by specific components at run-time. This enables a single workflow to work on either raw or focused data from all sensors. ISCE can serve as the core of a production center to process Level-0 radar data to Level-3 products, but is amenable to interactive processing approaches that allow scientists to experiment with data to explore new ways of doing science with InSAR data. The NASA-ISRO SAR (NISAR) Mission will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystems. ISCE is planned as the foundational element in processing NISAR data, enabling a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data. NISAR will be but one mission in a constellation of radar satellites in the future delivering such data. ISCE currently supports all publicly available strip map mode space-borne SAR data since ERS and is expected to include support for upcoming missions. ISCE has been incorporated into two prototype cloud-based systems that have demonstrated its elasticity in addressing larger data processing problems in a "production" context and its ability to be

  19. Handling the Diversity in the Coming Flood of InSAR Data with the InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Gurrola, E. M.; Sacco, G. F.; Agram, P. S.; Lavalle, M.; Zebker, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA ESTO-developed InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) provides acomputing framework for geodetic image processing for InSAR sensors that ismodular, flexible, and extensible, enabling scientists to reduce measurementsdirectly from a diverse array of radar satellites and aircraft to newgeophysical products. ISCE can serve as the core of a centralized processingcenter to bring Level-0 raw radar data up to Level-3 data products, but isadaptable to alternative processing approaches for science users interested innew and different ways to exploit mission data. This is accomplished throughrigorous componentization of processing codes, abstraction and generalization ofdata models, and a xml-based input interface with multi-level prioritizedcontrol of the component configurations depending on the science processingcontext. The proposed NASA-ISRO SAR (NISAR) Mission would deliver data ofunprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies inclimate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystems. ISCE is planned tobecome a key element in processing projected NISAR data into higher level dataproducts, enabling a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of thelong time and large spatial scales of these new data than current approaches.NISAR would be but one mission in a constellation of radar satellites in thefuture delivering such data. ISCE has been incorporated into two prototypecloud-based systems that have demonstrated its elasticity to addressing largerdata processing problems in a "production" context and its ability to becontrolled by individual science users on the cloud for large data problems.

  20. Combined DEM Extration Method from StereoSAR and InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Zhang, J. X.; Duan, M. Y.; Huang, G. M.; Yang, S. C.

    2015-06-01

    A pair of SAR images acquired from different positions can be used to generate digital elevation model (DEM). Two techniques exploiting this characteristic have been introduced: stereo SAR and interferometric SAR. They permit to recover the third dimension (topography) and, at the same time, to identify the absolute position (geolocation) of pixels included in the imaged area, thus allowing the generation of DEMs. In this paper, StereoSAR and InSAR combined adjustment model are constructed, and unify DEM extraction from InSAR and StereoSAR into the same coordinate system, and then improve three dimensional positioning accuracy of the target. We assume that there are four images 1, 2, 3 and 4. One pair of SAR images 1,2 meet the required conditions for InSAR technology, while the other pair of SAR images 3,4 can form stereo image pairs. The phase model is based on InSAR rigorous imaging geometric model. The master image 1 and the slave image 2 will be used in InSAR processing, but the slave image 2 is only used in the course of establishment, and the pixels of the slave image 2 are relevant to the corresponding pixels of the master image 1 through image coregistration coefficient, and it calculates the corresponding phase. It doesn't require the slave image in the construction of the phase model. In Range-Doppler (RD) model, the range equation and Doppler equation are a function of target geolocation, while in the phase equation, the phase is also a function of target geolocation. We exploit combined adjustment model to deviation of target geolocation, thus the problem of target solution is changed to solve three unkonwns through seven equations. The model was tested for DEM extraction under spaceborne InSAR and StereoSAR data and compared with InSAR and StereoSAR methods respectively. The results showed that the model delivered a better performance on experimental imagery and can be used for DEM extraction applications.

  1. Time parallelization of advanced operation scenario simulations of ITER plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Samaddar, D.; Casper, T. A.; Kim, S. H.; Berry, Lee A; Elwasif, Wael R; Batchelor, Donald B; Houlberg, Wayne A

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates that simulations of advanced burning plasma operation scenarios can be successfully parallelized in time using the parareal algorithm. CORSICA - an advanced operation scenario code for tokamak plasmas is used as a test case. This is a unique application since the parareal algorithm has so far been applied to relatively much simpler systems except for the case of turbulence. In the present application, a computational gain of an order of magnitude has been achieved which is extremely promising. A successful implementation of the Parareal algorithm to codes like CORSICA ushers in the possibility of time efficient simulations of ITER plasmas.

  2. Tropical Forest Biomass Estimation from Vertical Fourier Transforms of Lidar and InSAR Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Goncalves, F.; Drake, J.; Hensley, S.; Chapman, B. D.; Michel, T.; Dos Santos, J. R.; Dutra, L.; Graca, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Structural forest biomass estimation from lidar or interferometric SAR (InSAR) has demonstrated better performance than radar-power-based approaches for the higher biomasses (>150 Mg/ha) found in tropical forests. Structural biomass estimation frequently regresses field biomass to some function of forest height. With airborne, 25-m footprint lidar data and fixed-baseline C-band InSAR data over tropical wet forests of La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, we compare the use of Fourier transforms of vertical profiles at a few frequencies to the intrinsically low-frequency “average height”. RMS scatters of Fourier-estimated biomass about field-measured biomass improved by 40% and 20% over estimates base on average height from lidar and fixed-baseline InSAR, respectively. Vertical wavelengths between 14 and 100 m were found to best estimate biomass. The same airborne data acquisition over La Selva was used to generate many 10’s of repeat-track L-band InSAR baselines with time delays of 1-72 hours, and vertical wavelengths of 5-100 m. We will estimate biomass from the Fourier transforms of L-band radar power profiles (InSAR complex coherence). The effects of temporal decorrelation will be modeled in the Fourier domain to try to model and reduce their impact. Using L-band polarimetric interferometry, average heights will be estimated as well and biomass regression performance compared to the Fourier transform approach. The more traditional approach of using L-band radar polarimetry will also be compared to structural biomass estimation.

  3. The Use of InSAR Data to Map Hydraulic Head Levels in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    A measurement of hydraulic head in the aquifer is a critical metric needed for effective water management. Here we report on the use of InSAR data to inform groundwater management in the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado. We selected the SLV for study, as it is an important agricultural area struggling with groundwater management after a period of extreme drought. The techniques developed here can also be used to assist groundwater management in other agricultural areas, such as California's Central Valley. Reeves at al. (2013) analyzed 30 C-band ERS scenes over the SLV between 1992 and 2000 using the small baseline subset method (SBAS). They concluded that InSAR data can be used to calibrate the subsidence-to-head relationship and temporally extend hydraulic head measurements. To study the extent to which InSAR deformation time series can be used to interpolate spatial gaps in the well-based head measurements, we need to derive an InSAR ground deformation map due to groundwater extraction over the entire SLV. A major error source of InSAR data is highly variable temporal decorrelation over agricultural areas such as the SLV, which limits the number of InSAR pixels that can be selected for the SBAS analysis. Because L-band spaceborne radar systems such as ALOS PALSAR suffer less from temporal decorrelation than C-band and X-band spaceborne radar systems, we processed 92 small baseline interferograms using 17 ALOS scenes acquired between January 2007 and March 2011. We further employed an SBAS ground deformation model to represent surface subsidence due to groundwater extraction, which consists of a seasonal deformation superimposed on a linear trend. We observed that the long-term subsidence rate is smaller than 5 mm/year over the entire SLV and the magnitude of the seasonal subsidence can be up to 2 cm. Our results indicate that there is no severe long-term water storage loss in the confined aquifer at the SLV, consistent with previous C-band InSAR study (Reeves at

  4. GIAnT - Generic InSAR Analysis Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agram, P.; Jolivet, R.; Riel, B. V.; Simons, M.; Doin, M.; Lasserre, C.; Hetland, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a computing framework for studying the spatio-temporal evolution of ground deformation from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data. Several open-source tools including Repeat Orbit Interferometry PACkage (ROI-PAC) and InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) from NASA-JPL, and Delft Object-oriented Repeat Interferometric Software (DORIS), have enabled scientists to generate individual interferograms from raw radar data with relative ease. Numerous computational techniques and algorithms that reduce phase information from multiple interferograms to a deformation time-series have been developed and verified over the past decade. However, the sharing and direct comparison of products from multiple processing approaches has been hindered by - 1) absence of simple standards for sharing of estimated time-series products, 2) use of proprietary software tools with license restrictions and 3) the closed source nature of the exact implementation of many of these algorithms. We have developed this computing framework to address all of the above issues. We attempt to take the first steps towards creating a community software repository for InSAR time-series analysis. To date, we have implemented the short baseline subset algorithm (SBAS), NSBAS and multi-scale interferometric time-series (MInTS) in this framework and the associated source code is included in the GIAnT distribution. A number of the associated routines have been optimized for performance and scalability with large data sets. Some of the new features in our processing framework are - 1) the use of daily solutions from continuous GPS stations to correct for orbit errors, 2) the use of meteorological data sets to estimate the tropospheric delay screen and 3) a data-driven bootstrapping approach to estimate the uncertainties associated with estimated time-series products. We are currently working on incorporating tidal load corrections for individual interferograms and propagation of

  5. Deformation Detection of Potential Landslide with InSAR Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuzhou; Liao, Mingsheng; Shi, Xuguo; Zhang, Lu

    2016-08-01

    Influenced by geological and climate conditions, Guide County has been identified as a landslide prone area. Multi-temporal InSAR technique can implement continuous earth surface deformation detection with long time scale and wide geography coverage. In this research, we employ the SBAS method to survey potential landslide in Guide County. Two anomalous deformation regions have been detected by L-band PALSAR stacks. Preliminary correlation between the time series deformation and triggering factors is analyzed to explore the driving mechanism for landslide movement. As a consequence, L-band SAR has a good application potential in landslide monitoring and the results can be the basis for landslide recognizing and early warning.

  6. Contemporary subsidence of the Fraser River delta inferred from SqueeSAR™ type InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertolahti, L.; Clague, J. J.; Falorni, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Fraser River delta in southwestern British Columbia formed over the past 10 000 years and currently supports a population of about 250,000 people. Dyking, which began in the early 1900s, has prevented flooding and sediment deposition, with the result that the delta plain is subsiding at an average rate of 1-2 mm/yr due to the slow, natural consolidation of thick Holocene sediment. Localized higher rates of subsidence stem from anthropogenic sources, notably the application of loads in construction. Subsidence is a structural and engineering concern and is also important in the context of long-term sea-level rise, as much of the Fraser delta plain is at or below mean sea level. Holocene sediments underlying the delta are water-saturated, porous, Holocene fine sand, silty sand, and silt. They are compressible to considerable depth and can experience significant settlement when subjected to structural loads, dewatering, or seismic shaking. This research focuses on the urbanized and rapidly expanding Richmond area of the Fraser delta. We relate load induced settlement to the geology and to the spatial and temporal pattern of urbanization using InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) data, including ERS 1 and 2 data from 1992 to 1999, and RADARSAT-1 data from 2001 to 2008. Time series of deformation were obtained with the multi-image SqueeSAR algorithm, an advanced form of InSAR processing, for test sites with known subsurface geology based on Geological Survey of Canada boreholes and published site engineering reports. In most cases the boreholes do not penetrate to the base of the Holocene sequence. We compared the rates of change in SqueeSAR data to sediment lithologies in boreholes with cut-off depths of 20 m, 50 m, 75 m, and 100 m. as well as the base of those boreholes deeper than 100 m. Previous InSAR studies of the delta were limited to data acquired prior to 1999. For most sites that we have investigated, the average yearly rate of settlement has

  7. The InSAR Italy portal for open access to crustal deformation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano; Tolomei, Cristiano; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Lanari, Riccardo; Pepe, Antonio; Marchetti, Pier Giorgio; Della Vecchia, Andrea; Mantovani, Simone

    2014-05-01

    InSAR Italy is a web portal devised to provide open access services to crustal deformation data measured using multitemporal SAR Interferometry techniques over the Italian territory. It is an evolution of the VELISAR initiative, promoted in 2006 by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, and originally participated by IREA-CNR and TRE srl. InSAR Italy was developed tailoring the Multi-sensor Evolution Analysis (MEA) environment, an Earth Observation and geospatial data analysis tool empowered with OGC standard interfaces. The web interface allows an easy browsing of the ground deformation maps obtained for each satellite image dataset, leading to a clear picture and improved analysis of the displacement time series over single pixels or large areas. Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) are used to access and process the maps, respectively. The crustal deformation data are provided by INGV and IREA-CNR as products of publicly-funded research projects, and are disseminated in compliance with the national legislation on the Open Data Access; metadata associated to the products are published according to the INSPIRE specifications. The information provided through InSAR Italy is mainly based on InSAR data maintained in the ESA archives, in particular from the ERS satellites for the 1992-2000 period, and ENVISAT for the period 2003-2010, however, ground velocity maps obtained from COSMO-SkyMed data will also be released in the near future. The InSAR Italy deformation maps consist of time series of ground displacement at resolution varying between 5 and 80 m, and the relative mean velocity values. The data sets can be queried and mean velocities can be recalculated over user-defined time periods, to account for possible non-linear displacement trends. The MEA spatiotemporal data analysis capability allows to investigate deformation phenomena occurring at very different spatial scales, from single buildings to entire regions

  8. Single-Network Wide-Area Persistent Scatterer Interferometry: Algorithms with Application to Sentinel-1 InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, K.; Shau, R.; Adam, N.

    2015-12-01

    Advanced InSAR techniques, for example, Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI), allow long term deformation time series analysis with millimeter accuracy. ESA's Sentinel-1 SAR mission employs the TOPS mode as the standard mode for acquiring InSAR data. It provides a continuous and large coverage at conventional resolution. The idea is to have a wide-area PSI for mapping countries and continents. Although PSI has been successfully demonstrated and validated in the past for various applications, there are some limitations for processing a large-scale dataset. First, PSI is most effective in urban areas which have a large number of stable scatterers. For large-scale PSI, even non-urban areas need to be processed; and this requires robust algorithms for scatterer selection, network construction and inversion, and atmospheric phase removal. Second, the computational load can be very high, due to which, the processing is usually divided into overlapping blocks and merged later. This can however lead to spatial error propagation. This paper presents algorithms which have been developed for a robust PSI reference network estimation, while mitigating error propagation. Instead of dividing the scene into overlapping blocks, a single network (i.e. arcs connecting the scatterers) is created for the full scene. The relative deformation and residual DEM are estimated for the arcs using the LAMBDA estimator. The relative measurements of the network are finally integrated via least-squares inversion. Here, the sparsity of the system of linear equations is exploited to deal with big data (e.g. 10,000,000 arcs for 500,000 scatterers is a typical configuration for Sentinel-1). A QR or LU parallelizable solver is used for fast inversion. Also, variances of the estimates are calculated using a selected parallel inversion method based on LDL decomposition. Demonstration of the algorithms for large-scale deformation monitoring is provided using available Sentinel-1 data for Germany.

  9. Potential and limits of InSAR to characterize interseismic deformation independently of GPS data: Application to the southern San Andreas Fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussard, E.; Johnson, C. W.; Fattahi, H.; Bürgmann, R.

    2016-03-01

    The evaluation of long-wavelength deformation associated with interseismic strain accumulation traditionally relies on spatially sparse GPS measurements, or on high spatial-resolution InSAR velocity fields aligned to a GPS-based model. In this approach the InSAR contributes only short-wavelength deformation and the two data sets are dependent, thereby challenging the evaluation of the InSAR uncertainties and the justification of atmospheric corrections. Here we present an analysis using 7 years of Envisat InSAR data to characterize interseismic deformation along the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF) and the San Jacinto Fault (SJF) in southern California, where the SAF bifurcates onto the Mission Creek (MCF) and the Banning (BF) fault strands. We outline the processing steps for using InSAR alone to characterize both the short- and long-wavelength deformation, and evaluate the velocity field uncertainties with independent continuous GPS data. InSAR line-of-sight (LOS) and continuous GPS velocities agree within ˜1-2 mm/yr in the study area, suggesting that multiyear InSAR time series can be used to characterize interseismic deformation with a higher spatial resolution than GPS. We investigate with dislocation models the ability of this mean LOS velocity field to constrain fault slip rates and show that a single viewing geometry can help distinguish between different slip-rate scenarios on the SAF and SJF (˜35 km apart) but multiple viewing geometries are needed to differentiate slip on the MCF and BF (<12 km apart). Our results demonstrate that interseismic models of strain accumulation used for seismic hazards assessment would benefit from the consideration of InSAR mean velocity maps.

  10. Retrieving three-dimensional displacement fields of mining areas from a single InSAR pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi Wei; Yang, Ze Fa; Zhu, Jian Jun; Hu, Jun; Wang, Yun Jia; Li, Pei Xian; Chen, Guo Liang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for retrieving three-dimensional (3-D) displacement fields of mining areas from a single interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) pair. This method fully exploits the mechanism of mining subsidence, specifically the proportional relationship between the horizontal displacement and horizontal gradient of vertical displacements caused by underground mining. This method overcomes the limitations of conventional InSAR techniques that can only measure one-dimensional (1-D) deformation of mining area along the radar line-of-sight direction. The proposed method is first validated with simulated 3-D displacement fields, which are obtained by the FLAC software. The root mean square errors of the 3-D displacements retrieved by the proposed method are 13.7, 27.6 and 3.6 mm for the West-East, North-South, and Up-Down components, respectively. We then apply the proposed method to estimate the 3-D displacements of the Qianyingzi and the Xuzhou coal mines in China, respectively, each along with two Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array Type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar images. Results show that the estimated 3-D displacement is highly consistent with that of the field surveying. This demonstrates that the proposed method is an effective approach for retrieving 3-D mining displacement fields and will play an important role in mining-related hazard prevention and environment assessment under limited InSAR acquisitions.

  11. Salt Kinematics and InSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftabi, Pedarm; Talbot, hristopher; Fielding, Eric

    2005-01-01

    As part of a long-term attempt to learn how the climatic and tectonic signal interact to shape a steady state mountain monitored displacement of a markers in SE termination and also near the summit of a small viscous salt fountain extruding onto the Central plateau of Iran. The marker displacements relate to the first InSAR interferograms of salt extrusion (980913 to 990620) calculated Earth tides, winds, air pressures and temperatures. In the first documented staking exercise, hammered wooden stakes vertically through the surgical marl (c. 1 Ocm deep) onto the top of crystalline salt. These stakes installed in an irregular array elongate E-W along the c.50 m high cliff marking the effective SE terminus of the glacier at Qum Kuh(Centra1 Iran) ,just to the E of a NE trending river cliff about 40 m high. We merely measured the distances between pairs of stakes with known azimuth about 2 m apart to calculate sub horizontal strain in a small part of Qum Kuh. Stakes moved and micro strains for up to 46 pairs of stakes (p strain= ((lengthl-length2)/1engthl) x 10-1) was calculated for each seven stake epochs and plotted against their azimuth on simplified array maps. The data fit well the sine curves cxpected of the maximum and minimum strain ellipses. The first documented stakes located on the SE where the InSAR image show -1 1 to 0 mm pink to purple, 0 to lOmm purple to blue, and show high activity of salt in low activity area of the InSAR image (980913 to 990620).Short term micro strains of stake tie lines record anisotropic expansions due to heating and contraction due to cooling. All epochs changed between 7 to 1 17 days (990928 to000 1 16), showed 200 to 400 micro strain lengthening and shortening. The contraction and extension existed in each epoch, but the final strain was extension in E-W in Epoch land 6, contraction in E-W direction during epochs 2-3-4-5 and 7. The second pair of stakes hammered about 20 cm deep into the deep soils(more than 1 m) , near summit

  12. Web Service Infrastructure for Correcting InSAR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Allmen, P. A.; Fielding, E. J.; Xing, Z.; Pan, L.; Fishbein, E.

    2011-12-01

    InSAR images can be obtained from satellite radar data by combining signals acquired at two different times along the spacecraft's orbit, at geospatial locations nearly identical. Changes in the propagation of the radar signal from the first acquisition to the second, caused for example by changes in the tropospheric water vapor content, can lead to a deterioration of the quality of the interferometric data analysis. Other extraneous effects such as ocean tidal loading can also lead to errors that reduce the potential science return of InSAR missions. Data from Global Positioning Systems and infrared radiometers are current used on an ad hoc basis for the tropospheric corrections when available, and operational weather forecast was demonstrated to be able to fill in the remaining spatial and temporal gaps. We have developed a set of web services named OSCAR (Online Services for Correcting Atmosphere in Radar) that transparently to the user retrieves remote sensing and weather forecast data and delivers atmospheric radar delays on a latitude longitude grid that can be directly integrated with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data processing software. We will describe the common web service architecture, relying on RESTful, that we developed to streamline the development of OSCAR's capabilities. We will also discuss the Bayesian averaging process that we use for merging the radiometric data with numerical weather forecast results. Correcting for biases and estimating the error model will be discussed in detail and validation results will be presented. The success of the correction procedure will be demonstrated by using MODIS data and ECMWF model output. We will also outline the extension of our online correction system to include GPS data to automatically correct for biases in the radiometric data, and a model of ocean tidal loading to correct for long wavelength errors near coastal regions.

  13. InSAR Analysis of North American Periglacial Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, N.; Gomez, F. G.

    2010-12-01

    Periglacial processes of North America are climate-dependent, and as such serve as useful indicators of local climate change. This study focuses on surface deformations associated with arctic permafrost and alpine rock glacier flow. These phenomena produce surface displacements ranging from several to tens of centimeters, respectively. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is an effective tool to measure displacements of these magnitudes. In addition to its sensitivity to small motions, InSAR also offers the potential to image the spatial extents of ground motions. Arctic permafrost undergoes seasonal heaving and settlement of the surface that is generally associated with freezing and thawing of the active layer. Magnitudes of vertical motion should generally be proportional to the active layer’s thickness. Assuming soil properties are constant over short time scales, this thickness is a function of ambient air temperature. Analysis of L-Band PALSAR data of Prudhoe Bay, on the Alaskan North Slope, resulted in two six-month interferograms between December 2008 and December 2009. Preliminary results suggest amplitudes of oscillation on the order of eight to ten centimeters. At lower latitudes (e.g., the continental U.S.), periglacial features are limited to alpine regions. Rock glacier flow rates are partially controlled by ice content, and will be sensitive to changes in ambient air temperature. Historic and recent measurements of flow rates for rock glaciers in the Colorado Front Range (CFR) are well documented, and will provide a basis for comparison. Analysis of PALSAR data of the CFR produced eleven interferograms, providing coverage from June 2007 to January 2009. Preliminary results indicate peak movements of the Taylor rock glacier as approximately 12 cm/y, and 7 cm/yr of movement on the Arapaho rock glacier. Although comparing these results with historic measurements may suggest changes in climate, it is important to recognize these changes as

  14. Engaging students in geodesy: A quantitative InSAR module for undergraduate tectonics and geophysics classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, H.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Pritchard, M. E.; Lohman, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    In the last several decades, advances in geodetic technology have allowed us to significantly expand our knowledge of processes acting on and beneath the Earth's surface. Many of these advances have come as a result of EarthScope, a community of scientists conducting multidisciplinary Earth science research utilizing freely accessible data from a variety of instruments. The geodetic component of EarthScope includes the acquisition of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, which are archived at the UNAVCO facility. Interferometric SAR complements the spatial and temporal coverage of GPS and allows monitoring of ground deformation in remote areas worldwide. However, because of the complex software required for processing, InSAR data are not readily accessible to most students. Even with these challenges, exposure at the undergraduate level is important for showing how geodesy can be applied in various areas of the geosciences and for promoting geodesy as a future career path. Here we present a module focused on exploring the tectonics of the western United States using InSAR data for use in undergraduate tectonics and geophysics classes. The module has two major objectives: address topics concerning tectonics in the western U.S. including Basin and Range extension, Yellowstone hotspot activity, and creep in southern California, and familiarize students with how imperfect real-world data can be manipulated and interpreted. Module questions promote critical thinking skills and data literacy by prompting students to use the information given to confront and question assumptions (e.g. 'Is there a consistency between seismic rates and permanent earthquake deformation? What other factors might need to be considered besides seismicity?'). The module consists of an introduction to the basics of InSAR and three student exercises, each focused on one of the topics listed above. Students analyze pre-processed InSAR data using MATLAB, or an Excel equivalent, and draw on GPS and

  15. InSAR Analysis of Induced Seismicity: Examples From Southern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, W. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present interferormetric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) analysis of human-induced ground deformation in the Raton Basin of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico, including displacements from a wastewater injection-induced earthquake. Geodetic observations of both seismic and aseismic surface displacements provide an additional tool to further constrain spatially and temporally variable deformation within these basins. Using Envisat observations, we image co-seismic surface displacements of the 2011 Trinidad earthquake and find that the earthquake slipped within the crystalline basement underlying basin sedimentary rocks and in the vicinity of high-volume wastewater injection wells. The spatial and temporal separation between the earthquake and the wastewater wells suggests a pore pressure migration triggering mechanism is present. The finite slip distributions further highlight the location and orientation of previously unmapped, seismogenic faults. Lastly, the precise earthquake location afforded by InSAR observations provides a well-located earthquake source that can be used to calibrate other regional earthquakes locations. Additionally, we derive InSAR time series observations from ALOS imagery acquired from 2007-2011. These results highlight ongoing regions of surface subsidence within the basin, presumably caused by extraction of coal-bed methane and water that is later reinjected. While it is not clear if there is a causative relationship between regions of co-located surface subsidence and recorded earthquakes, the time series permits us to exclude several other hypotheses for the causes of increased seismicity in the Raton Basin, including volcanic activity related to the Rio Grande Rift. Furthermore, the InSAR time series analysis provides a calibration source for hydrological models that assess subsurface stress changes from the removal and injection of fluids. Forthcoming work will provide a detailed time series of surface deformation occurring

  16. InSAR captures rifting and volcanism in East Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    In the past decade, synthetic aperture radar interferometric (InSAR) has enjoyed increasing use as a tool for detecting and characterizing surface deformation associated with volcanoes, earthquakes, glaciers, and other geological processes. Though InSAR can only image deformation that occurs along the radar line-of-sight and is subject to atmospheric, orbital, and other errors that can be difficult to quantify, the method has the advantage of high spatial resolution (especially in arid, unvegetated environments) without requiring equipment on the ground. As a result, InSAR is extremely useful for mapping deformation in poorly accessible or unmonitored parts of the world.

  17. InSAR imaging of seasonal groundwater change in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.; Schreuder, W.

    2011-12-01

    The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. The valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators facing the challenge of developing appropriate management policies for both surface water and ground water supplies. Legislation passed in 2004 requires that hydraulic head levels within the confined aquifer system stay within the range experienced in the years 1978 - 2000. While some measurements of hydraulic head exist, greater spatial and temporal sampling would be very valuable in understanding the behavior of the confined aquifer system. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide spatially dense maps of deformation of Earth's surface, with one pixel representing the deformation of a 50 m by 50 m area on the ground. This deformation can be related to hydraulic head change in the confined aquifer system. The ability to map these changes, over time, in the SLV will provide critical information about the groundwater system. In this study we used data from the European Space Agency's ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites, which have 31 acquisitions archived from 1992 - 2001. We applied small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to create a time series of deformation for all pixels with high data quality. We find that the seasonal deformation measured by InSAR mimics hydraulic head measurements made in the confined aquifer system. We also find that the deformation occurring in the confined aquifer system is primarily elastic and recoverable in nature. At many well locations there are gaps in the hydraulic head record during the period relevant for the 2004 legislation. We find that high quality InSAR data exist during those time periods and can be used to fill historical gaps in hydraulic head data. We have processed the deformation time series for 2500 km2 of area on the ground at a spatial resolution of ~ 50 m. We find it useful to visualize the deformation

  18. Diverse deformation patterns of Aleutian volcanoes from InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Dzurisin, D.; Wicks, C.; Power, J.

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter-to-subcentimeter precision at a spatial resolution of tens of meters over an area of hundreds to thousands of square kilometers. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, InSAR has become an increasingly important measurement technique for constraining magma dynamics of volcanoes over remote regions such as the Aleutian Islands. The spatial pattern of surface deformation data derived from InSAR images enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic processes. This paper summarizes the diverse deformation patterns of the Aleutian volcanoes observed with InSAR and demonstrates that deformation patterns and associated magma supply mechanisms in the Aleutians are diverse and vary between volcanoes. These findings provide a basis for improved models and better understanding of magmatic plumbing systems.

  19. Using InSAR for Characterizing Pyroclastic Flow Deposits at Augustine Volcano Across Two Eruptive Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpin, D. B.; Meyer, F. J.; Lu, Z.; Beget, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Augustine Island is a small, 8x11 km island in South Central Alaska's lower Cook Inlet. It is approximately 280 km southwest of Anchorage, and occupied entirely by its namesake Augustine Volcano. At Augustine Volcano, SAR data suitable for interferometry is available from 1992 to 2005, from March 2006 to April 2007, and from July 2007 to October 2010. Its last two eruptive episodes, in 1986 and 2006, resulted in substantial pyroclastic flow deposits (PFDs) on the Volcano's north flank. Earlier InSAR analyses of the area, from 1992-1999, identified local subsidence, but no volcano-wide deformation indicative of magma-chamber evacuation. In contrast to previous studies, we use InSAR data to determine a range of geophysical parameters for PFDs emplaced during the Augustine's two most recent eruption cycles. Based on InSAR measurements between 1992 and 2010, we reconstruct the deformation behavior of PFDs emplaced during Augustine's last two eruption cycles. Using a combination of InSAR measurements and modeling, we determine the thickness and long-term deformation of overlaying pyroclastic flow deposits emplaced in 1986 and 2006. Consistent with previous observations of pyroclastic flows, we found that the PFDs on Augustine Island rapidly subsided after emplacement due to an initial compaction of the material. We determined the length of this initial settling period and measured the compaction rate. Subsequent to this initial rapid subsidence, we found that PFD deformation slowed to a more persistent, linear, long-term rate, related to cooling of the deposits. We established that the deposits' contraction rate is linearly related to their thickness and measured the contraction rate. Finally, a study of long term coherence properties of the Augustine PFDs showed remarkable stability of the surface over long time periods. This information provides clues on the structural properties and composition of the emplaced material.

  20. Monitoring and characterizing natural hazards with satellite InSAR imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Zhang, Jixian; Zhang, Yonghong; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) provides an all-weather imaging capability for measuring ground-surface deformation and inferring changes in land surface characteristics. InSAR enables scientists to monitor and characterize hazards posed by volcanic, seismic, and hydrogeologic processes, by landslides and wildfires, and by human activities such as mining and fluid extraction or injection. Measuring how a volcano’s surface deforms before, during, and after eruptions provides essential information about magma dynamics and a basis for mitigating volcanic hazards. Measuring spatial and temporal patterns of surface deformation in seismically active regions is extraordinarily useful for understanding rupture dynamics and estimating seismic risks. Measuring how landslides develop and activate is a prerequisite to minimizing associated hazards. Mapping surface subsidence or uplift related to extraction or injection of fluids during exploitation of groundwater aquifers or petroleum reservoirs provides fundamental data on aquifer or reservoir properties and improves our ability to mitigate undesired consequences. Monitoring dynamic water-level changes in wetlands improves hydrological modeling predictions and the assessment of future flood impacts. In addition, InSAR imagery can provide near-real-time estimates of fire scar extents and fire severity for wildfire management and control. All-weather satellite radar imagery is critical for studying various natural processes and is playing an increasingly important role in understanding and forecasting natural hazards.

  1. Design of the Advanced Light Source timing system

    SciTech Connect

    Fahmie, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third generation synchrotron radiation facility, and as such, has several unique timing requirements. Arbitrary Storage Ring filling patterns and high single bunch purity requirements demand a highly stable, low jitter timing system with the flexibility to reconfigure on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This modular system utilizes a highly linear Gauss Clock with ``on the fly`` programmable setpoints to track a free-running Booster ramping magnet and provides digitally programmable sequencing and delay for Electron Gun, Linac, Booster Ring, and Storage Ring RF, Pulsed Magnet, and Instrumentation systems. It has proven itself over the last year of accelerator operation to be reliable and rock solid.

  2. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and its applications to study volcanoes, part 1: Principles of InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Zhang, Jixian; Zhang, Yonghong

    2006-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar is an ability to measure the surface deformation of remote sensing technology, in a huge area, its deformation measurement with sub-centimeter accuracy, and spatial resolution in the tens of meters or less. In this paper, the basic theory of InSAR technology is reviewed, its working principle is clarified, and the related problems of surface deformation measurement using InSAR technology are discussed.

  3. High quality InSAR data linked to seasonal change in hydraulic head for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Jessica A.; Knight, Rosemary; Zebker, Howard A.; Schreüder, Willem A.; Shanker Agram, Piyush; Lauknes, Tom R.

    2011-12-01

    In the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado legislation passed in 2004 requires that hydraulic head levels in the confined aquifer system stay within the range experienced in the years 1978-2000. While some measurements of hydraulic head exist, greater spatial and temporal sampling would be very valuable in understanding the behavior of the system. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide fine spatial resolution measurements of Earth surface deformation, which can be related to hydraulic head change in the confined aquifer system. However, change in cm-scale crop structure with time leads to signal decorrelation, resulting in low quality data. Here we apply small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to InSAR data collected from 1992 to 2001. We are able to show high levels of correlation, denoting high quality data, in areas between the center pivot irrigation circles, where the lack of water results in little surface vegetation. At three well locations we see a seasonal variation in the InSAR data that mimics the hydraulic head data. We use measured values of the elastic skeletal storage coefficient to estimate hydraulic head from the InSAR data. In general the magnitude of estimated and measured head agree to within the calculated error. However, the errors are unacceptably large due to both errors in the InSAR data and uncertainty in the measured value of the elastic skeletal storage coefficient. We conclude that InSAR is capturing the seasonal head variation, but that further research is required to obtain accurate hydraulic head estimates from the InSAR deformation measurements.

  4. Hydraulic head levels and aquifer parameters inferred from a joint analysis of InSAR and well data in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater extraction is the primary source of irrigation water in many agricultural regions throughout the world. A set of spatially dense hydraulic head measurements adequately sampling the aquifer is a critical metric needed for effective water management. Because the total compaction due to pumping is nearly proportional to the change in hydraulic head, land subsidence measurements derived from InSAR data can be used to obtain head measurements in confined aquifers when well data are unavailable or insufficiently dense. Reeves at al. (2013) demonstrated that C-band ERS InSAR data acquired between 1992 and 2000 over the San Luis Valley of Colorado suffice to fill temporal gaps in the hydraulic head field dataset at 3 well locations. Here, we further analyze whether the InSAR deformation time series can be used to infer head levels over a larger region than Reeves et al. analyzed. We processed 17 L-band ALOS radar scenes over the San Luis Valley acquired between Jan., 2007 and Mar., 2011 and applied an adaptive interpolation filter between persistent scatterer pixels to reduce vegetation decorrelation artifacts. We estimated the InSAR deformation time series at each image point using a least-squares SBAS approach. We then jointly analyzed the InSAR and the well data to estimate the local skeletal storage coefficient and the time delay between the head change and deformation and converted the InSAR deformation time series to InSAR head levels. The resulting InSAR-head and well-head measurements in the San Luis valley show good agreement with all 18 well measurements in the region with confined aquifer pumping activities. Assuming that geologic parameters such as skeletal storage coefficients often vary slowly in space, we interpolate the obtained skeletal storage coefficients at each well spatially to relate InSAR subsidence measurements over the entire SLV to changes in head with improved spatial resolution over the well data. This demonstration shows that InSAR

  5. Flow excursion time scales in the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sulfredge, C.D.

    1995-04-01

    Flow excursion transients give rise to a key thermal limit for the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor because its core involves many parallel flow channels with a common pressure drop. Since one can envision certain accident scenarios in which the thermal limits set by flow excursion correlations might be exceeded for brief intervals, a key objective is to determine how long a flow excursion would take to bring about a system failure that could lead to fuel damage. The anticipated time scale for flow excursions has been examined by subdividing the process into its component phenomena: bubble nucleation and growth, deceleration of the resulting two-phase flow, and finally overcoming thermal inertia to heat up the reactor fuel plates. Models were developed to estimate the time required for each individual stage. Accident scenarios involving sudden reduction in core flow or core exit pressure have been examined, and the models compared with RELAP5 output for the ANS geometry. For a high-performance reactor like the ANS, flow excursion time scales were predicted to be in the millisecond range, so that even very brief transients might lead to fuel damage. These results should prove useful whenever one must determine the time involved in any portion of a flow excursion transient.

  6. Locally advanced rectal cancer: time for precision therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Martin R; Zhang, Zhen; Schrag, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The year 2015 marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of NSABP-R01, a landmark trial demonstrating the benefit of adding pelvic radiation to the treatment regimen for locally advanced rectal cancer with a resultant decrease in local recurrence from 25% to 16%. These results ushered in the era of multimodal therapy for rectal cancer, heralding modern treatment and changing the standard of care in the United States. We have seen many advances over the past 3 decades, including optimization of the administration and timing of radiation, widespread adoption of total mesorectal excision (TME), and the implementation of more effective systemic chemotherapy. The current standard is neoadjuvant chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and a radiosensitizer, TME, and adjuvant chemotherapy including 5-FU and oxaliplatin. The results of this regimen have been impressive, with a reported local recurrence rate of less than 10%. However, the rates of distant relapse remain 30% to 40%, indicating room for improvement. In addition, trimodality therapy is arduous and many patients are unable to complete the full course of treatment. In this article we discuss the current standard of care and alternative strategies that have evolved in an attempt to individualize therapy according to risk of recurrence.

  7. Uncertainty of InSAR velocity fields for measuring long-wavelength displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, H.; Amelung, F.

    2014-12-01

    Long-wavelength artifacts in InSAR data are the main limitation to measure long-wavelength displacement; they are traditionally attributed mainly to the inaccuracy of the satellite orbits (orbital errors). However, most satellites are precisely tracked resulting in uncertainties of orbits of 2-10 cm. Orbits of these satellites are thus precise enough to obtain precise velocity fields with uncertainties better than 1 mm/yr/100 km for older satellites (e.g. Envisat) and better than 0.2 mm/yr/100 km for modern satellites (e.g. TerraSAR-X and Sentinel-1) [Fattahi & Amelung, 2014]. Such accurate velocity fields are achievable if long-wavelength artifacts from sources other than orbital errors are identified and corrected for. We present a modified Small Baseline approach to measure long-wavelength deformation and evaluate the uncertainty of these measurements. We use a redundant network of interferograms for detection and correction of unwrapping errors to ensure the unbiased estimation of phase history. We distinguish between different sources of long-wavelength artifacts and correct those introduced by atmospheric delay, topographic residuals, timing errors, processing approximations and hardware issues. We evaluate the uncertainty of the velocity fields using a covariance matrix with the contributions from orbital errors and residual atmospheric delay. For contributions from the orbital errors we consider the standard deviation of velocity gradients in range and azimuth directions as a function of orbital uncertainty. For contributions from the residual atmospheric delay we use several approaches including the structure functions of InSAR time-series epochs, the predicted delay from numerical weather models and estimated wet delay from optical imagery. We validate this InSAR approach for measuring long-wavelength deformation by comparing InSAR velocity fields over ~500 km long swath across the southern San Andreas fault system with independent GPS velocities and

  8. Advanced X-Ray Timing Array (AXTAR) Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Randall C.; Thompson, Kevin S.

    2011-01-01

    The animation depicts NASA's concept for a next-generation Advanced X-ray Timing Mission. The models and their textures doe not necessarily represent the final iteration. Delivery specifications include launch with Taurus II or Falcon 9, mass of 2650 kg, with a circular low earth orbit at approximately 600 km. The inclination depends on the launch vehicle and spacecraft mass. AXTAR's prime instrument will probe the physics of neutron stars and black holes through X-ray timing and spectral measurements. The primary instrument will be the Large Area Timing Array (LATA). The Sky Monitor Clusters configuration consists of 27 Sky Monitor cameras th at are grouped in five clusters. This configuration will achieve approximately 85 percent all sky coverage. Spacecraft components include a science bus to house the LATA of supermodules; a spacecraft bus to house components such as propulsion tanks, avionics, and reaction wheels; solar arrays configured from space-qualified GaAs 3-junction cells; star trackers for attitude knowledge; a propulsion system of four pods, each containing one 100 lbf and two 5 lbf engines; a launch vehicle adaptor; and a radiation shield.

  9. Investigating subsidence at volcanoes in northern California using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A. L.; Biggs, J.; Annen, C.; Lu, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Both Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV) and Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC), northern CA, show signs of subsidence at rates of ~1 cm/yr. Leveling and campaign GPS measurements show that MLV has subsided at a constant rate for over 50 years, making the geodetic history of this volcano unique in both its duration and continuity. Here, we summarise and build upon the existing geodetic records at MLV and LVC, using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to extend the time-series of deformation measurements to 2011. We also use the improved spatial resolution of InSAR measurements to investigate causes of long-term subsidence, providing new insight into magmatic storage conditions at MLV and the timescales of deformation due to cooling and crystallization. A large InSAR dataset has been acquired for the volcanoes of northern CA, but application of the data has been limited by extensive noise and incoherence. We analyse multiple datasets from MLV and LVC and, with the use of multi-temporal InSAR analysis methods (noise-based stacking, π-RATE and StaMPS), demonstrate how InSAR may be used more successfully as a monitoring tool in this region. By comparing InSAR results for MLV to past geodetic studies, we demonstrate that subsidence is on going at ~1 cm/yr with no detectable change in rate. We find that the best fitting source geometry to InSAR data is a sill approximated by a horizontal penny-shaped crack, with radius 2 km and depth 11 km, undergoing volume loss at a rate of -0.0022 km3/yr. We discuss possible source mechanisms of long-term subsidence, investigating volume loss due to cooling and crystallization of an intrusion. We calculate the temperature, melt fraction and volume loss of an intrusion over time using petrological information and a numerical thermal model of heat loss by conduction. The geometry of the intrusion is based upon the depth and radius of the penny-shaped crack model. We run simulations for a range of thicknesses between that of a single

  10. Advances in Time Estimation Methods for Molecular Data.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Hedges, S Blair

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dating has become central to placing a temporal dimension on the tree of life. Methods for estimating divergence times have been developed for over 50 years, beginning with the proposal of molecular clock in 1962. We categorize the chronological development of these methods into four generations based on the timing of their origin. In the first generation approaches (1960s-1980s), a strict molecular clock was assumed to date divergences. In the second generation approaches (1990s), the equality of evolutionary rates between species was first tested and then a strict molecular clock applied to estimate divergence times. The third generation approaches (since ∼2000) account for differences in evolutionary rates across the tree by using a statistical model, obviating the need to assume a clock or to test the equality of evolutionary rates among species. Bayesian methods in the third generation require a specific or uniform prior on the speciation-process and enable the inclusion of uncertainty in clock calibrations. The fourth generation approaches (since 2012) allow rates to vary from branch to branch, but do not need prior selection of a statistical model to describe the rate variation or the specification of speciation model. With high accuracy, comparable to Bayesian approaches, and speeds that are orders of magnitude faster, fourth generation methods are able to produce reliable timetrees of thousands of species using genome scale data. We found that early time estimates from second generation studies are similar to those of third and fourth generation studies, indicating that methodological advances have not fundamentally altered the timetree of life, but rather have facilitated time estimation by enabling the inclusion of more species. Nonetheless, we feel an urgent need for testing the accuracy and precision of third and fourth generation methods, including their robustness to misspecification of priors in the analysis of large phylogenies and data

  11. High Resolution Rapid Revisits Insar Monitoring of Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhroy, V.; Li, J.; Charbonneau, F.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring surface deformation on strategic energy and transportation corridors requires high resolution spatial and temporal InSAR images for mitigation and safety purposes. High resolution air photos, lidar and other satellite images are very useful in areas where the landslides can be fatal. Recently, radar interferometry (InSAR) techniques using more rapid revisit images from several radar satellites are increasingly being used in active deformation monitoring. The Canadian RADARSAT Constellation (RCM) is a three-satellite mission that will provide rapid revisits of four days interferometric (InSAR) capabilities that will be very useful for complex deformation monitoring. For instance, the monitoring of surface deformation due to permafrost activity, complex rock slide motion and steam assisted oil extraction will benefit from this new rapid revisit capability. This paper provide examples of how the high resolution (1-3 m) rapid revisit InSAR capabilities will improve our monitoring of surface deformation and provide insights in understanding triggering mechanisms. We analysed over a hundred high resolution InSAR images over a two year period on three geologically different sites with various configurations of topography, geomorphology, and geology conditions. We show from our analysis that the more frequent InSAR acquisitions are providing more information in understanding the rates of movement and failure process of permafrost triggered retrogressive thaw flows; the complex motion of an asymmetrical wedge failure of an active rock slide and the identification of over pressure zones related to oil extraction using steam injection. Keywords: High resolution, InSAR, rapid revisits, triggering mechanisms, oil extraction.

  12. InSAR Monitoring of Landslides using RADARSAT and Alos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhroy, V.; Pierre-Jean, A.; Pavlic, G.

    2009-05-01

    We present the results of InSAR monitoring of several landslides using RADARDAT, and ALOS satellites. InSAR techniques are increasingly being used in slope stability assessment. Our research has shown that differential InSAR and coherent target monitoring techniques using field corner reflectors are useful to monitor landslide activity along strategic transportation and energy corridors. The Mackenzie Valley in northern Canada is experiencing one of the highest rates on mean annual air temperature for any region in Canada, thereby triggering melting in the permafrost, which results in active layer detachment slides. There are approximately 2000 landslides along the proposed Mackenzie Valley pipeline route. In addition, the Trans Canada Highway in the Canadian Rockies are affected by several rock avalanches and slow retrogressive slides. The ALOS PALSAR InSAR results show that we can observe deformation on both vegetated and exposed rock areas on the Little Smokey slide and the Frank Slide. RADARSAT-1 InSAR images indicate the different level of activity of the slopes (large and small) during different periods of the year. RADARSAT-2 is providing the high resolution rapid revisit capabilities needed to continuously monitor these active slopes along Canadian strategic energy and transportation corridors. The information produced by our InSAR activity maps on various landslides are used to realign the pipeline route in sensitive permafrost areas, and to install slope stability measures along the Trans-Canada and Provincial Highways. Using these different satellites we are able to develop guidelines for more reliable uses of these SAR missions Keywords: InSAR, landslides, RADARSAT, ALOS .

  13. Location and Source Characteristics of the January 6, 2016 North Korean Nuclear Test Constrained by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Meng

    2017-02-01

    The interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the JAXA ALOS-2 satellite show possible deformation associated with the January 6, 2016 North Korean nuclear test whereas the ESA Sentinel-1A data are decorrelated. This is the first time that deformation related to a nuclear test has been measured since 1992. Here, I present two interpretations of the observed deformation: First, the deformation can be explained by a triggered landslide on the western slope of Mt. Mantap, with a displacement of up to 10 cm across a patch of 1 km2. Second, the observation may be from uplift created by the nuclear explosion. In the second interpretation, the location, depth, and cavity size can be estimated from a topography-corrected homogenous half-space model (Mogi). The preferred location of the January 6, 2016 event is 41.2993°N 129.0715°E, with an uncertainty of 100 m. The estimated depth is 420-700 m, and the cavity radius is 23-27 m. Based on empirical data and the assumption of granite as the host rock, the yield is estimated to be 11.6-24.4 kilotons of TNT, which is consistent with previous results based on seismic data. With these two interpretations, I demonstrate that InSAR data provide an independent tool to locate and estimate source characteristics of nuclear tests in North Korea. The ambiguity of interpretation is mainly due to the limited InSAR data acquisition. Future frequent data collection by current and upcoming InSAR satellites will allow full use of InSAR for nuclear monitoring and characterization in North Korea and around the world.

  14. Curvelet-based compressive sensing for InSAR raw data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Marcello G.; da Silva Pinho, Marcelo; Fernandes, David

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the compression performance of SAR raw data for interferometry applications collected by airborne from BRADAR (Brazilian SAR System operating in X and P bands) using the new approach based on compressive sensing (CS) to achieve an effective recovery with a good phase preserving. For this framework is desirable a real-time capability, where the collected data can be compressed to reduce onboard storage and bandwidth required for transmission. In the CS theory, a sparse unknown signals can be recovered from a small number of random or pseudo-random measurements by sparsity-promoting nonlinear recovery algorithms. Therefore, the original signal can be significantly reduced. To achieve the sparse representation of SAR signal, was done a curvelet transform. The curvelets constitute a directional frame, which allows an optimal sparse representation of objects with discontinuities along smooth curves as observed in raw data and provides an advanced denoising optimization. For the tests were made available a scene of 8192 x 2048 samples in range and azimuth in X-band with 2 m of resolution. The sparse representation was compressed using low dimension measurements matrices in each curvelet subband. Thus, an iterative CS reconstruction method based on IST (iterative soft/shrinkage threshold) was adjusted to recover the curvelets coefficients and then the original signal. To evaluate the compression performance were computed the compression ratio (CR), signal to noise ratio (SNR), and because the interferometry applications require more reconstruction accuracy the phase parameters like the standard deviation of the phase (PSD) and the mean phase error (MPE) were also computed. Moreover, in the image domain, a single-look complex image was generated to evaluate the compression effects. All results were computed in terms of sparsity analysis to provides an efficient compression and quality recovering appropriated for inSAR applications

  15. Recent Advances and Future Advances in Time-of-Flight PET

    PubMed Central

    Moses, William W.

    2007-01-01

    Simple theory predicts that the statistical noise variance in PET can be reduced by an order of magnitude by using time-of-flight (TOF) information. This reduction can be obtained by improving the coincidence timing resolution, and so would be achievable in clinical, whole body studies using with PET systems that differ little from existing cameras. The potential impact of this development is large, especially for oncology studies in large patients, where it is sorely needed. TOF PET was extensively studied in the 1980’s but died away in the 1990’s, as it was impossible to reliably achieve sufficient timing resolution without sacrificing other important PET performance aspects, such as spatial resolution and efficiency. Recent advances in technology (scintillators, photodetectors, and high speed electronics) have renewed interest in TOF PET, which is experiencing a rebirth. However, there is still much to be done, both in instrumentation development and evaluating the true benefits of TOF in modern clinical PET. This paper looks at what has been accomplished and what needs to be done before time-of-flight PET can reach its full potential. PMID:18836513

  16. Detecting and monitoring UCG subsidence with InSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R J; Foxall, W; Yang, X

    2012-03-23

    The use of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to measure surface subsidence caused by Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is tested. InSAR is a remote sensing technique that uses Synthetic Aperture Radar images to make spatial images of surface deformation and may be deployed from satellite or an airplane. With current commercial satellite data, the technique works best in areas with little vegetation or farming activity. UCG subsidence is generally caused by roof collapse, which adversely affects UCG operations due to gas loss and is therefore important to monitor. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of InSAR in measuring surface subsidence related to coal mining and surface deformation caused by a coal mining roof collapse in Crandall Canyon, Utah is imaged as a proof-of-concept. InSAR data is collected and processed over three known UCG operations including two pilot plants (Majuba, South Africa and Wulanchabu, China) and an operational plant (Angren, Uzbekistan). A clear f eature showing approximately 7 cm of subsidence is observed in the UCG field in Angren. Subsidence is not observed in the other two areas, which produce from deeper coal seams and processed a smaller volume. The results show that in some cases, InSAR is a useful tool to image UCG related subsidence. Data from newer satellites and improved algorithms will improve effectiveness.

  17. An Advanced Real-Time Earthquake Information System in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, I.; Nakamura, H.; Suzuki, W.; Kunugi, T.; Aoi, S.; Fujiwara, H.

    2015-12-01

    J-RISQ (Japan Real-time Information System for earthquake) has been developing in NIED for appropriate first-actions to big earthquakes. When an earthquake occurs, seismic intensities (SI) are calculated first at each observation station and sent to the Data Management Center in different timing. The system begins the first estimation when the number of the stations observing the SI of 2.5 or larger exceeds the threshold amount. It estimates SI distribution, exposed population and earthquake damage on buildings by using basic data for estimation, such as subsurface amplification factors, population, and building information. It has been accumulated in J-SHIS (Japan Seismic Information Station) developed by NIED, a public portal for seismic hazard information across Japan. The series of the estimation is performed for each 250m square mesh and finally the estimated data is converted into information for each municipality. Since October 2013, we have opened estimated SI, exposed population etc. to the public through the website by making full use of maps and tables.In the previous system, we sometimes could not inspect the information of the surrounding areas out of the range suffered from strong motions, or the details of the focusing areas, and could not confirm whether the present information was the latest or not without accessing the website. J-RISQ has been advanced by introducing the following functions to settle those problems and promote utilization in local areas or in personal levels. In addition, the website in English has been released.・It has become possible to focus on the specific areas and inspect enlarged information.・The estimated information can be downloaded in the form of KML.・The estimated information can be updated automatically and be provided as the latest one.・The newest information can be inspected by using RSS readers or browsers corresponding to RSS.・Exclusive pages for smartphones have been prepared.The information estimated

  18. Visible Earthquakes: a web-based tool for visualizing and modeling InSAR earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funning, G. J.; Cockett, R.

    2012-12-01

    InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a technique for measuring the deformation of the ground using satellite radar data. One of the principal applications of this method is in the study of earthquakes; in the past 20 years over 70 earthquakes have been studied in this way, and forthcoming satellite missions promise to enable the routine and timely study of events in the future. Despite the utility of the technique and its widespread adoption by the research community, InSAR does not feature in the teaching curricula of most university geoscience departments. This is, we believe, due to a lack of accessibility to software and data. Existing tools for the visualization and modeling of interferograms are often research-oriented, command line-based and/or prohibitively expensive. Here we present a new web-based interactive tool for comparing real InSAR data with simple elastic models. The overall design of this tool was focused on ease of access and use. This tool should allow interested nonspecialists to gain a feel for the use of such data and greatly facilitate integration of InSAR into upper division geoscience courses, giving students practice in comparing actual data to modeled results. The tool, provisionally named 'Visible Earthquakes', uses web-based technologies to instantly render the displacement field that would be observable using InSAR for a given fault location, geometry, orientation, and slip. The user can adjust these 'source parameters' using a simple, clickable interface, and see how these affect the resulting model interferogram. By visually matching the model interferogram to a real earthquake interferogram (processed separately and included in the web tool) a user can produce their own estimates of the earthquake's source parameters. Once satisfied with the fit of their models, users can submit their results and see how they compare with the distribution of all other contributed earthquake models, as well as the mean and median

  19. Multi-scale InSAR analysis of aseismic creep across the San Andreas, Calevaras,and Hayward Fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agram, P. S.; Simons, M.

    2011-12-01

    We apply the Multi-scale Interferometric Time-series (MInTS) technique, developed at Caltech,to study spatial variations in aseismic creep across the San Andreas, Calaveras and Hayward Faultsystems in Central California.Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) Time-series methods estimate the spatio-temporal evolution of surface deformation using multiple SAR interferograms. Traditional time-series analysis techniques like persistent scatterers and short baseline methods assume the statistical independence of InSAR phase measurements over space and time when estimating deformation. However, existing atmospheric phase screen models clearly show that noise in InSAR phase observations is correlated over the spatial domain. MInTS is an approach designed to exploit the correlation of phase observations over space to significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the estimated deformation time-series compared to the traditional time-series InSAR techniques. The MInTS technique reduces the set of InSAR observations to a set of almost uncorrelated observations at various spatial scales using wavelets. Traditional inversion techniques can then be applied to the wavelet coefficients more effectively. Creep across the Central San Andreas Fault and the Hayward Fault has been studied previously using C-band (6 cm wavelength) ERS data, but detailed analysis of the transition zone between the San Andreas and Hayward Faults was not possible due to severe decorrelation. Improved coherence at L-band (24 cm wavelength) significantly improves the spatial coverage of the estimated deformation signal in our ALOS PALSAR data set. We analyze 450 ALOS PALSAR interferograms processed using 175 SAR images acquired between Dec 2006 and Dec 2010 that cover the area along the San Andreas Fault System from Richmond in the San Francisco Bay Area to Maricopa in the San Joaquin Valley.We invert the InSAR phase observations to estimate the constant Line-of-Sight (LOS) deformation

  20. Cascades of InSAR in the Cascades - outlook for the use of InSAR and space-based imaging catalogues in a Subduction Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has long demonstrated its utility to studies of subduction zone earthquakes, crustal events and volcanic processes, particularly in regions with very good temporal data coverage (e.g., Japan), or arid regions where the timescale of surface change is long compared to the repeat time of the available SAR imagery (e.g., portions of South America). Recently launched and future SAR missions with open data access will increase the temporal sampling rates further over many areas of the globe, resulting in a new ability to lower the detection threshold for earthquakes and, potentially, interseismic motion and transients associated with subduction zone settings. Here we describe some of the anticipated detection abilities for events ranging from earthquakes and slow slip along the subduction zone interface up to landslides, and examine the variations in land use around the circum-Pacific and how that and its changes over time will affect the use of InSAR. We will show the results of an effort to combine Landsat and other optical imagery with SAR data catalogues in the Pacific Northwest to improve the characterization of ground deformation signals, including the identification of "spurious" signals that are not related to true ground deformation. We also describe prospects for working with other communities that are interested in variations in soil moisture and vegetation structure over the same terrain.

  1. An efficient time advancing strategy for energy-preserving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, F.; Coppola, G.; de Luca, L.

    2015-08-01

    Energy-conserving numerical methods are widely employed within the broad area of convection-dominated systems. Semi-discrete conservation of energy is usually obtained by adopting the so-called skew-symmetric splitting of the non-linear convective term, defined as a suitable average of the divergence and advective forms. Although generally allowing global conservation of kinetic energy, it has the drawback of being roughly twice as expensive as standard divergence or advective forms alone. In this paper, a general theoretical framework has been developed to derive an efficient time-advancement strategy in the context of explicit Runge-Kutta schemes. The novel technique retains the conservation properties of skew-symmetric-based discretizations at a reduced computational cost. It is found that optimal energy conservation can be achieved by properly constructed Runge-Kutta methods in which only divergence and advective forms for the convective term are used. As a consequence, a considerable improvement in computational efficiency over existing practices is achieved. The overall procedure has proved to be able to produce new schemes with a specified order of accuracy on both solution and energy. The effectiveness of the method as well as the asymptotic behavior of the schemes is demonstrated by numerical simulation of Burgers' equation.

  2. Winning Strategies in Challenging Times for Advancing Small Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willmer, Wesley K., Ed.

    This volume contains nine papers on advancement issues and strategies for small colleges in the context of this decade's economic and social challenges. Chapter 1, "Setting the Stage" (Wesley K. Willmer), reports on a study of the advancement programs of smaller colleges in 1990-91, the third in a series of studies beginning in 1977-78. Chapter 2,…

  3. A Survey of Landslide Activity in the Columbia River Gorge from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, X.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Columbia River Gorge contains several large landslide complexes that have exhibited historical movement, both catastrophic and slow moving. Monitoring the kinematics of active movement helps to characterize the ongoing natural hazard. In this study, we document the status of several large landslide complexes along the Columbia River Gorge. We use synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from multiple satellites (ERS, ENVISAT and ALOS) to reveal the spatial-temporal movement of slow-moving landslides over two decades, 1992-2011. To increase the spatial extent of the signal we developed a new InSAR time-series method based on pixel coherence and derived the time series of the landslides. We also investigate the ability of Persistent Scatterer InSAR to better illuminate active movement. While many historical landslide complexes show minimal or non-existent movement, we measure significant creep on the Redbluff landslide, which is part of the Cascade Landslide Complex near the Bonneville Dam. The InSAR time-series data reveal approximately 25 cm of line-of-sight movement from 5 years of ALOS observations, which translates into greater than 60 cm of downslope movement. The Redbluff landslide is seasonally activated, with accelerated movement observed during the early winter of each year. However, the amplitude of the seasonal signal is variable from year-to-year. To assess the triggering mechanisms, we compared the deformation time series data with local precipitation data. The deformation correlates well with precipitation, implying the slow movement is controlled by rainfall that infiltrates to the base of the slide. A preliminary comparison with the bare earth 2m-resolution digital elevation model from LiDAR reveals that the overall deformation pattern and the active perimeter is highly correlated with the morphology of the landslide.

  4. Flood Mapping Using InSAR Coherence Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmi, S.; Ben Abdallah, W.; Abdelfatteh, R.

    2014-09-01

    Classic approaches for the detection of flooded areas are based on a static analysis of optical images and/or SAR data during and after the event. In this paper, we aim to extract the flooded zones by using the SAR image coupled with the InSAR coherence. A new formulation of the ratio approach for flood detection is given considering InSAR coherence. Our contribution is to take advantage from the coherence map provided using the InSAR pairs (one before and one after the event) to enhance the detection of flooded areas. We explore the fact that the coherence values during and after the flood are mainly differents on the flooded zones and we give a more suitable flood decision rule using this assumption. The proposed approach is tested and validated in the case of the flood taken place in 2005 in the region of Kef in Tunisia.

  5. Infrastructure stability surveillance with high resolution InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balz, Timo; Düring, Ralf

    2017-02-01

    The construction of new infrastructure in largely unknown and difficult environments, as it is necessary for the construction of the New Silk Road, can lead to a decreased stability along the construction site, leading to an increase in landslide risk and deformation caused by surface motion. This generally requires a thorough pre-analysis and consecutive surveillance of the deformation patterns to ensure the stability and safety of the infrastructure projects. Interferometric SAR (InSAR) and the derived techniques of multi-baseline InSAR are very powerful tools for a large area observation of surface deformation patterns. With InSAR and deriver techniques, the topographic height and the surface motion can be estimated for large areas, making it an ideal tool for supporting the planning, construction, and safety surveillance of new infrastructure elements in remote areas.

  6. InSAR analysis of the crustal deformation affecting the megacity of Istanbul: the results of the FP7 Marsite Project as a GEO Supersite Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solaro, Giuseppe; Bonano, Manuela; Manzo, Mariarosaria

    2016-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is one of the most active faults worldwide, extending approximately 1,200 km from Eastern Turkey to the Northern Aegean Sea. During the 20th century series of damaging earthquakes occurred along the NAF, generally propagated westward towards Istanbul; the last one occurred in 1999 at Izmit, a city 80 km away from Istanbul. Within this scenario, the FP7 MARsite project (New Directions in Seismic Hazard assessment through Focused Earth Observation in Marmara Supersite), supported by EU, intends to collect, share and integrate multidisciplinary data (seismologic, geochemical, surveying, satellite, etc.) in order to carry out assessment, mitigation and management of seismic risk in the region of the Sea of Marmara. In the framework of the MARsite project, we performed the analysis and monitoring of the surface deformation affecting the Istanbul mega city by exploiting the large archives of X-band satellite SAR data, made available through the Supersites Initiatives, and by processing them via the advanced multi-temporal and multi-scale InSAR technique, known as the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) approach. In particular, we applied the SBAS technique to a dataset of 101 SAR images acquired by the TerraSAR-X constellation of the German Space Agency (DLR) over descending orbits and spanning the November 2010 - August 2014 time interval. From,these images, we generated 312 differential interferograms with a maximum spatial separation (perpendicular baseline) between the acquisition orbits of about 500 m., that were used to generate, via the SBAS approach, mean deformation velocity map and corresponding ground time series of the investigated area. The performed InSAR analysis reveals a generalized stability over the Istanbul area, except for some localized displacements, related to subsidence and slope instability phenomena. In particular, we identified: (i) a displacement pattern related to the Istanbul airport, showing a mostly linear

  7. Advances in Reservoir Monitoring Using High Resolution Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasco, D. W.; Ferretti, A.; Novali, F.; Tamburini, A.; Fumagalli, A.; Rucci, A.; Falorni, G.

    2009-12-01

    Surface deformation monitoring provides unique data for observing and measuring the performance of producing hydrocarbon reservoirs, for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS). To this aim, radar interferometry (InSAR) and, in particular, multi-interferogram Permanent Scatterer (PS) techniques are innovative, valuable and cost-effective tools. Depending on reservoir characteristics and depth, oil or gas production can induce surface subsidence or, in the cases of EOR and CCS, ground heave, potentially triggering fault reactivation and in some cases threatening well integrity. Mapping the surface effects of fault reactivation, due to either fluid extraction or injection, usually requires the availability of hundreds of measurement points per square km with millimeter-level precision, which is time consuming and expensive to obtain using traditional monitoring techniques, but can be readily obtained with InSAR data. Moreover, more advanced InSAR techniques developed in the last decade are capable of providing millimeter precision, comparable to optical leveling, and a high spatial density of displacement measurements, over long periods of time without need of installing equipment or otherwise accessing the study area. Until recently, a limitation to the application of InSAR was the relatively long revisiting time (24 or 35 days) of the previous generation of C-band satellites (ERS1-2, Envisat, Radarsat). However, a new generation of X-band radar satellites (TerraSAR-X and the COSMO-SkyMed constellation), which have been operational since 2008, are providing significant improvements. TerraSAR-X has a repeat cycle of 11 days while the two sensors of the COSMO-SkyMed constellation have an effective repeat cycle of just 8 days (the third sensor has already been successfully launched and is presently in the calibration phase). With the launch of the fourth satellite of the constellation, COSMO-SkyMed will have a revisiting time of

  8. Accumulation Rates in the Dry Snow Zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet Inferred from L-band InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. C.; Zebker, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet contains about 2.9 million km3 of ice and would raise global sea levels by about 7.1 m if it melted completely. Two unusually large iceberg calving events at Petermann Glacier in the past several years, along with the unusually large extent of ice sheet melt this summer point to the relevance of understanding the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. In this study, we use data from the PALSAR instrument aboard the ALOS satellite to form L-band (23-centimeter carrier wavelength) InSAR images of the dry snow zone of the Greenland ice sheet. We form geocoded differential interferograms, using the ice sheet elevation model produced by Howat et.al. [1]. By applying phase and radiometric calibration, we can examine interferograms formed between any pair of transmit and receive polarization channels. In co-polarized interferograms, the InSAR correlation ranges from about 0.35 at the summit (38.7 deg W, 73.0 deg N) where accumulation is about 20 cm w.e./yr to about 0.70 at the north-eastern part of the dry snow zone (35.1 deg W, 77.1 deg N), where accumulation is about 11.7 cm w.e./yr. Cross-polarized interferograms show similar geographic variation with overall lower correlation. We compare our InSAR data with in-situ measurements published by Bales et.al. [2]. We examine the applicability of dense-medium radiative transfer electromagnetic scattering models for estimating accumulation rates from L-band InSAR data. The large number and broad coverage of ALOS scenes acquired between 2007 and 2009 with good InSAR coherence at 46-day repeat times and 21.5 degree incidence angles gives us the opportunity to examine the empirical relationship between in-situ accumulation rate observations and the polarimetric InSAR correlation and radar brightness at this particular imaging geometry. This helps us quantify the accuracy of accumulation rates estimated from InSAR data. In some regions, 46-day interferograms acquired in the winters of several consecutive

  9. Reconciling Earthquake Source Parameters from InSAR and Long-period Seismic Waveform Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakibay Senobari, N.; Funning, G.; Ferreira, A. M. G.; Weston, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Comparisons between earthquake source parameters as determined by InSAR and the global centroid moment tensor (GCMT) catalogue show discrepancies between locations derived using these independent methods (Ferreira et al., 2011; Weston et al., 2011, 2012). Earthquake centroid location determination using InSAR data (named the 'InSAR Centroid Moment Tensor', or 'ICMT' location) is more robust, since it is independent of Earth velocity structure errors that impact on longperiod surface wave inversions used in the GCMT method. Ferreira et al (2011) showed that these discrepancies cannot be resolved at present by applying more detailed 3D Earth velocity structures from mantle tomography models. Earthquake location determination is dependent on the assumed velocity structure, not only in the GCMT method, but also in all of the seismic based earthquake source parameter inversions. Velocity structures are typically produced by seismic tomography, which itself depends on seismic phase travel times. These travel times are a function of source location and origin time, plus the path between the source and receivers. Errors in source location can therefore be compounded as errors in the velocity structure. In a preliminary study we analyze longperiod seismic data for four shallow continental earthquakes studied with InSAR - Zarand Mw 6.5 (Iran, 2005), Eureka Valley Mw 6.1 (California, 1993), Aiquile Mw 6.5 (Bolivia, 1998) and Wells Mw 6.0 (Nevada, 2008). We use the spectral element wave propagation package, SPECFEM3D GLOBE, and Earth model S40RTS (Ritsema et al., 2010) to calculate Green's functions and synthetic seismograms for these events using their ICMT source locations. Using a cross-correlation method we were able to estimate phase shifts for each source-receiver pair between synthetic and observed long period waveforms. We believe these phase shifts may correspond to unmodeled heterogeneity in the S40RTS model, and if systematically documented could provide additional

  10. GPS Position Time Series @ JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Susan; Moore, Angelyn; Kedar, Sharon; Liu, Zhen; Webb, Frank; Heflin, Mike; Desai, Shailen

    2013-01-01

    Different flavors of GPS time series analysis at JPL - Use same GPS Precise Point Positioning Analysis raw time series - Variations in time series analysis/post-processing driven by different users. center dot JPL Global Time Series/Velocities - researchers studying reference frame, combining with VLBI/SLR/DORIS center dot JPL/SOPAC Combined Time Series/Velocities - crustal deformation for tectonic, volcanic, ground water studies center dot ARIA Time Series/Coseismic Data Products - Hazard monitoring and response focused center dot ARIA data system designed to integrate GPS and InSAR - GPS tropospheric delay used for correcting InSAR - Caltech's GIANT time series analysis uses GPS to correct orbital errors in InSAR - Zhen Liu's talking tomorrow on InSAR Time Series analysis

  11. Afar-wide Crustal Strain Field from Multiple InSAR Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagli, C.; Wright, T. J.; Wang, H.; Calais, E.; Bennati Rassion, L. S.; Ebinger, C. J.; Lewi, E.

    2010-12-01

    Onset of a rifting episode in the Dabbahu volcanic segment, Afar (Ethiopia), in 2005 renewed interest in crustal deformation studies in the area. As a consequence, an extensive geodetic data set, including InSAR and GPS measurements have been acquired over Afar and hold great potential towards improving our understanding of the extensional processes that operate during the final stages of continental rupture. The current geodetic observational and modelling strategy has focused on detailed, localised studies of dyke intrusions and eruptions mainly in the Dabbahu segment. However, an eruption in the Erta ‘Ale volcanic segment in 2008, and cluster of earthquakes observed in the Tat Ale segment, are testament to activity elsewhere in Afar. Here we make use of the vast geodetic dataset available to obtain strain information over the whole Afar depression. A systematic analysis of all the volcanic segments, including Dabbahu, Manda-Hararo, Alayta, Tat ‘Ale Erta Ale and the Djibouti deformation zone, is undertaken. We use InSAR data from multiple tracks together with available GPS measurements to obtain a velocity field model for Afar. We use over 300 radar images acquired by the Envisat satellite in both descending and ascending orbits, from 12 distinct tracks in image and wide swath modes, spanning the time period from October 2005 to present time. We obtain the line-of-sight deformation rates from each InSAR track using a network approach and then combine the InSAR velocities with the GPS observations, as suggested by Wright and Wang (2010) following the method of England and Molnar (1997). A mesh is constructed over the Afar area and then we solve for the horizontal and vertical velocities on each node. The resultant full 3D Afar-wide velocity field shows where current strains are being accumulated within the various volcanic segments of Afar, the width of the plate boundary deformation zone and possible connections between distinct volcanic segments on a

  12. Advancing Knowledge in Higher Education: Universities in Turbulent Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Tanya, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last three decades, higher education institutions have experienced massive changes. In particular, institutions of higher education have been positioned as a means to contribute to the knowledge economy and gain a level of competitive advantage in the global marketplace. "Advancing Knowledge in Higher Education: Universities in…

  13. Post-eruptive inflation of Okmok Volcano, Alaska, from InSAR, 2008–2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qu, Feifei; Lu, Zhong; Poland, Michael; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Zhang, Qin; Jung, Hyung-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Okmok, a ~10-km wide caldera that occupies most of the northeastern end of Umnak Island, is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc. The most recent eruption at Okmok during July-August 2008 was by far its largest and most explosive since at least the early 19th century. We investigate post-eruptive magma supply and storage at the volcano during 2008–2014 by analyzing all available synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of Okmok acquired during that time period using the multi-temporal InSAR technique. Data from the C-band Envisat and X-band TerraSAR-X satellites indicate that Okmok started inflating very soon after the end of 2008 eruption at a time-variable rate of 48-130 mm/y, consistent with GPS measurements. The “model-assisted” phase unwrapping method is applied to improve the phase unwrapping operation for long temporal baseline pairs. The InSAR time-series is used as input for deformation source modeling, which suggests magma accumulating at variable rates in a shallow storage zone at ~3.9 km below sea level beneath the summit caldera, consistent with previous studies. The modeled volume accumulation in the 6 years following the 2008 eruption is ~75% of the 1997 eruption volume and ~25% of the 2008 eruption volume.

  14. Novel Advancements in Internet-Based Real Time Data Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Gerry; Welch, Clara L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    AZ Technology has been working with MSFC Ground Systems Department to find ways to make it easier for remote experimenters (RPI's) to monitor their International Space Station (ISS) payloads in real-time from anywhere using standard/familiar devices. AZ Technology was awarded an SBIR Phase I grant to research the technologies behind and advancements of distributing live ISS data across the Internet. That research resulted in a product called "EZStream" which is in use on several ISS-related projects. Although the initial implementation is geared toward ISS, the architecture and lessons learned are applicable to other space-related programs. This paper presents the high-level architecture and components that make up EZStream. A combination of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) and custom components were used and their interaction will be discussed. The server is powered by Apache's Jakarta-Tomcat web server/servlet engine. User accounts are maintained in a My SQL database. Both Tomcat and MySQL are Open Source products. When used for ISS, EZStream pulls the live data directly from NASA's Telescience Resource Kit (TReK) API. TReK parses the ISS data stream into individual measurement parameters and performs on-the- fly engineering unit conversion and range checking before passing the data to EZStream for distribution. TReK is provided by NASA at no charge to ISS experimenters. By using a combination of well established Open Source, NASA-supplied. and AZ Technology-developed components, operations using EZStream are robust and economical. Security over the Internet is a major concern on most space programs. This paper describes how EZStream provides for secure connection to and transmission of space- related data over the public Internet. Display pages that show sensitive data can be placed under access control by EZStream. Users are required to login before being allowed to pull up those web pages. To enhance security, the EZStream client/server data transmissions can

  15. On the use of optical satellite data in atmospheric corrections for satellite InSAR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanorte, Antonio; Lasaponara, Rosa

    2014-05-01

    SAR interferometric (InSAR) techniques allow us to estimate displacements of the earth's surface with a centimeter to millimetric precision InSAR techniques date back to 1989 when L-band SEASAT SAR data was first exploited to this aim and in the last few years the capability of different interferometric techniques has been considerably improved . Moreover, the finer spatial resolution and the short revisit time of the most recent satellite SAR, such as TERRA and COSMO-SkyMed constellations appear very promising for further significant improvements. Nevertheless, even if radar are all weather sensors it is also important to improve the estimation and minimization of effects of atmospheric delays.. Atmospheric delay which may affects radar signal is mainly due to the spatial heterogeneity of tropospheric water vapor. Currently there are different methods to estimate and reduce the atmospheric effects in the InSAR applications. These approaches can be divided into four main types methods based on: 1 . Stacking SAR interferograms which degrade the temporal resolution of the DInSAR measures and tend to mix useful geophysical signals, in particular transient signals, making them undetectable. 2 . Analysis of correlation between interferograms or between the interferometric phases and elevations. These thecniques allow us to only model and reduce lower tropospheric noise which correlates different interferograms or with significant values in elevation. 3 . Techniques based on permanent scatterer (PS). PS techniques require a large number of images, and do not provide satisfactory results when atmospheric effects are similar (in the spatial or temporal domain) to geophysical signals. 4 . Techniques based on the use of external data, such as (i) meteorological data, (ii) GPS, (iii) high resolution meteorological models and (iv) satellite data, such as MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ) and/or MERIS (Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer). Among the

  16. DEM generated from InSAR in mountainous terrain and its accuracy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongbing; Zhan, Yulan

    2011-02-01

    Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived from survey data is accurate but it is very expensive and time-consuming. In recent years, remote sensing techniques including Synthetic Apenture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) had been developed as a powerful method to derive high precision DEM, especially in mountainous or deep forest areas. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the principle of InSAR and show the result of a case study in Gejiu city, Yunnan province, China. The accuracy of DEM derived from InSAR (abbreviation as InSAR-DEM) is also evaluated by comparing it with DEM generated from topographic map at the scale of 1:50000 (abbreviation as TOP-DEM). The result shows that: (1)The general precision of the whole selected area acquired by subtracting InSAR-DEM from TOP-DEM is that the maximum, the minimum, the RMSE, and the mean of difference of the two DEMs are 203m, -188m, 26.9m and 5.7m respectively. (2)The topographic trend represented by the two DEMs is coincident, even though TOP-DEM is finer than InSAR-DEM, especial at the valley. (3) Contour maps with the interval of 100m and 50m converted from InSAR-DEM and TOP-DEM respectively show accordant relief trend. Contour from TOP-DEM is smoother than that of from InSAR-DEM, while Contour from InSAR-DEM has more islands than that of from TOP-DEM.(4) Coherence has great influence on the precision of InSAR-DEM, the precision of low-coherence area approaches 100 m while that of high-coherence area can up to m level. (5) The relief trend of 6 profiles represented by InSAR-DEM and TOP-DEM is accordant with tiny difference in partial minutiae. InSAR-DEM displays hypsographies at relative flat areas including surface of water, which reflects the influence of flat earth on InSAR to a certain extent.

  17. Sparsity-driven tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric water vapor using GNSS and InSAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heublein, Marion; Alshawaf, Fadwa; Zhu, Xiao Xiang; Hinz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    An accurate knowledge of the 3D distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere is a key element for weather forecasting and climate research. On the other hand, as water vapor causes a delay in the microwave signal propagation within the atmosphere, a precise determination of water vapor is required for accurate positioning and deformation monitoring using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). However, due to its high variability in time and space, the atmospheric water vapor distribution is difficult to model. Since GNSS meteorology was introduced about twenty years ago, it has increasingly been used as a geodetic technique to generate maps of 2D Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV). Moreover, several approaches for 3D tomographic water vapor reconstruction from GNSS-based estimates using the simple least squares adjustment were presented. In this poster, we present an innovative and sophisticated Compressive Sensing (CS) concept for sparsity-driven tomographic reconstruction of 3D atmospheric wet refractivity fields using data from GNSS and InSAR. The 2D zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimates are obtained by a combination of point-wise estimates of the wet delay using GNSS observations and partial InSAR wet delay maps. These ZWD estimates are aggregated to derive realistic wet delay input data of 100 points as if corresponding to 100 GNSS sites within an area of 100 km × 100 km in the test region of the Upper Rhine Graben. The made-up ZWD values can be mapped into different elevation and azimuth angles. Using the Cosine transform, a sparse representation of the wet refractivity field is obtained. In contrast to existing tomographic approaches, we exploit sparsity as a prior for the regularization of the underdetermined inverse system. The new aspects of this work include both the combination of GNSS and InSAR data for water vapor tomography and the sophisticated CS estimation. The accuracy of the estimated 3D water

  18. Spatial scale of deformation constrained by combinations of InSAR and GPS observations in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.; Scott, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Efforts to understand the buildup and release of strain within the Earth's crust often rely on well-characterized observations of ground deformation, over time scales that include interseismic periods, earthquakes, and transient deformation episodes. Constraints on current rates of surface deformation in 1-, 2- or 3-dimensions can be obtained by examining sets of GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations, both alone and in combination. Contributions to the observed signal often include motion along faults, seasonal cycles of subsidence and recharge associated with aquifers, anthropogenic extraction of hydrocarbons, and variations in atmospheric water vapor and ionospheric properties. Here we examine methods for extracting time-varying ground deformation signals from combinations of InSAR and GPS data, real and synthetic, applied to Southern California. We show that two methods for combining the data through removal of a GPS-constrained function (a plane, and filtering) from the InSAR result in a clear tradeoff between the contribution from the two datatypes at diffferent spatial scales. We also show that the contribution to the secular rates at GPS sites from seasonal signals is large enough to be a significant error in this estimation process, and should be accounted for.

  19. Deformation of the Aniakchak Caldera, Alaska, mapped by InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Lu, Zhiming

    2004-01-01

    The deformation of Aniakchak volcano is investigated using 19 ERS-1 / 2 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from 1992 through 2002. InSAR images from the different time intervals reveal that the10-km-wide caldera has been subsiding during the time of investigation. The pattern of subsidence does not following the pyroclastic flows from the last eruption of the caldera in 1931. The maximum subsidence is near the center of the caldera, with a rate of up to 13 mm/yr. Deformation outside the caldera is insignificant. Least squares inversion of the multi-temporal deformation maps indicates that the subsidence rate has been relatively constant. Field observations have identified numerous fumaroles inside the caldera. In 1973, temperatures of 80??C were measured at a depth of 15 cm in loose volcanic rubble adjacent to the small cinder cone (about 1.5 km northeast of the vent of the 1931 eruption), whereas springs near a caldera lake had a temperature of 25??C in July 1993. Therefore, we suggest the observed subsidence at Aniakchak caldera is most likely caused by the reduction of pore fluid pressure of a hydrothermal system located a few kilometers beneath the caldera.

  20. InSAR Monitoring of Surface Deformation in Alberta's Oil Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearse, J.; Singhroy, V.; Li, J.; Samsonov, S. V.; Shipman, T.; Froese, C. R.

    2013-05-01

    Alberta's oil sands are among the world's largest deposits of crude oil, and more than 80% of it is too deep to mine, so unconventional in-situ methods are used for extraction. Most in situ extraction techniques, such as Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD), use steam injection to reduce the viscosity of the bitumen, allowing it to flow into wells to be pumped to the surface. As part of the oil sands safety and environmental monitoring program, the energy regulator uses satellite radar to monitor surface deformation associated with in-situ oil extraction. The dense vegetation and sparse infrastructure in the boreal forest of northern Alberta make InSAR monitoring a challenge; however, we have found that surface heave associated with steam injection can be detected using traditional differential InSAR. Infrastructure and installed corner reflectors also allow us to use persistent scatterer methods to obtain time histories of deformation at individual sites. We have collected and processed several tracks of RADARSAT-2 data over a broad area of the oil sands, and have detected surface deformation signals of approximately 2-3 cm per year, with time series that correlate strongly with monthly SAGD steam injection volumes.

  1. Application of InSAR and gravimetric surveys for developing construction codes in zones of land subsidence induced by groundwater extraction: case study of Aguascalientes, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Martínez, J.; Wdowinski, S.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Hernández-Marín, M.; Ortiz-Lozano, J. A.; Oliver-Cabrera, T.; Solano-Rojas, D.; Havazli, E.

    2015-11-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has become a valuable tool for surface deformation monitoring, including land subsidence associated with groundwater extraction. Another useful tools for studying Earth's surface processes are geophysical methods such as Gravimetry. In this work we present the application of InSAR analysis and gravimetric surveying to generate valuable information for risk management related to land subsidence and surface faulting. Subsidence of the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico is presented as study case. Aguascalientes local governments have addressed land subsidence issues by including new requirements for new constructions projects in the State Urban Construction Code. Nevertheless, the resulting zoning proposed in the code is still subjective and not clearly defined. Our work based on gravimetric and InSAR surveys is aimed for improving the subsidence hazard zoning proposed in the State Urban Code in a more comprehensive way. The study includes a 2007-2011 ALOS InSAR time-series analysis of the Aguascalientes valley, an interpretation of the compete Bouguer gravimetric anomaly of the Aguascalientes urban area, and the application of time series and gravimetric anomaly maps for improve the subsidence hazard zoning of Aguascalientes City.

  2. Advancing health equity to improve health: the time is now.

    PubMed

    Jackson, B; Huston, P

    2016-02-01

    Health inequities, or avoidable inequalities in health between groups of people, are increasingly recognized and tackled to improve public health. Canada's interest in health inequities goes back over 40 years, with the landmark 1974 Lalonde report, and continues with the 2011 Rio Political Declaration on Social Determinants of Health, which affirmed a global political commitment to implementing a social determinants of health approach to reducing health inequities. Research in this area includes documenting and tracking health inequalities, exploring their multidimensional causes, and developing and evaluating ways to address them. Inequalities can be observed in who is vulnerable to infectious and chronic diseases, the impact of health promotion and disease prevention efforts, how disease progresses, and the outcomes of treatment. Many programs, policies and projects with potential impacts on health equity and determinants of health have been implemented across Canada. Recent theoretical and methodological advances in the areas of implementation science and population health intervention research have strengthened our capacity to develop effective interventions. With the launch of a new health equity series this month, the journals Canada Communicable Disease Report and Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention in Canada will continue to reflect and foster analysis of social determinants of health and focus on intervention studies that advance health equity.

  3. InSAR imaging of volcanic deformation over cloud-prone areas - Aleutian islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter-tosubcentimeter precision and spatial resolution of tens-of meters over a relatively large region. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, INSAR is an important technique for measuring ground-surface deformation of volcanoes over cloud-prone and rainy regions such as the Aleutian Islands, where only less than 5 percent of optical imagery is usable due to inclement weather conditions. The spatial distribution of surface deformation data, derived from INSAR images, enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic processes. This paper reviews the basics of INSAR for volcanic deformation mapping and the INSAR studies of ten Aleutian volcanoes associated with both eruptive and noneruptive activity. These studies demonstrate that all-weather INSAR imaging can improve our understanding of how the Aleutian volcanoes work and enhance our capability to predict future eruptions and associated hazards.

  4. Surface Creep Along the 1999 Izmit Earthquake's Rupture (Turkey) from InSAR, GPS and Terrestrial LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, Z.; Aslan, G.; Dogan, U.; Kaya, S.; Ergintav, S.; Oz, D.; Celik, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies based on InSAR and GPS observations have shown that the Izmit-Akyazı segment of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) began slipping aseismically following the August 17, 1999 Izmit earthquake and continue for more than 13 years. To monitor this long-lasting afterslip, we use new SAR data, GPS and terrestrial LIDAR measurements along the fault. InSAR time series are calculated using 32 TerraSAR-X radar images acquired between 2011 and 2015 with the small baseline InSAR (SBAS) approach using the Supersites Istanbul archive provided by the German Aerospace Center, DLR (project HAZ2584_Marmara) (Hooper, 2008). The results show that the Izmit fault still creeps, but in an episodic manner. Two creep events are detected in the beginning and at end of 2013, each with an offset of ~20 mm between Izmit and Lake Sapanca. Campaign GPS measurements on a recently established network with 35 benchmarks and LIDAR measurements on three sites confirm the ongoing aseismic activity along the fault (TÜBİTAK project no: 113Y102).

  5. Using Regional GPS Network Atmospheric Models for Mitigating Errors in Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuveni, Y.; Bock, Y.; Tong, X.; Moore, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements provide valuable information for obtaining Earth surface deformation and topography at high spatial resolution for crustal deformation studies. Similar to Global Positioning System (GPS), InSAR phase measurements are affected by the Earth's ionospheric and tropospheric layers as the electromagnetic signals significantly refract while propagating through the different layers. While electromagnetic signals propagating through the neutral atmosphere are affected primarily by the pressure, temperature, and water vapor content of atmospheric gases, the propagation through the ionosphere is mainly affected by the number of free electrons along the signal path. Here, we present the use of dense regional GPS networks for extracting tropospheric zenith delays and ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) maps in order to reduce the noise levels in the phase measurement of the InSAR images. The results show significant reduction in the RMS values when simultaneously combining the two corrections, both at short time periods where no surface deformation is expected, and at longer periods, where imaging of crustal deformation, such as the ground subsidence and aseismic fault creep, is enhanced.

  6. Integrating ALOS-2 and Sentinel-1 InSAR data for systematic volcano deformation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, James; Biggs, Juliet; Ebmeier, Susanna; Parker, Amy

    2016-04-01

    The recent launches of the Sentinel-1 and ALOS-2 satellites provide a wealth of new Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data for Earth observation purposes. We exploit these data for volcano deformation monitoring with a particular focus on Latin America, which is nominated as a priority target area under the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites volcano pilot program. By conducting an integrated survey that employs both Sentinel-1 and ALOS-2 we are able to achieve previously unprecedented levels of spatial and temporal resolution and combat decorrelation arising from vegetation cover. Latin America is an ideal target region as it has a diversity of geographic volcano locations (e.g., dense rainforest to high-altitude deserts), as well as abundant and varied volcanic activity. The numerous local volcano observatories can also directly benefit from this additional InSAR data when integrating it alongside ground-based observations. To further facilitate this impact we are directing our data outputs to a global volcano deformation database in near-real-time to provide a first-order access point for observatory staff and research scientists in need of satellite-derived ground-deformation results. We will draw upon a selection of case studies within Latin America to demonstrate our approach and how it can enhance volcano monitoring and eruption forecasting efforts.

  7. Quiescent deformation of the Aniakchak Caldera, Alaska mapped by InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Lu, Zhong; Neal, Christina; Wicks, Charles W.

    2006-01-01

    The 10-km-wide caldera of the historically active Aniakchak volcano, Alaska, subsides ∼13 mm/yr, based on data from 19 European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1 and ERS-2) interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images from 1992 through 2002. The pattern of subsidence does not reflect the distribution of pyroclastic deposits from the last eruption in 1931 and therefore is not related to compaction of fragmental debris. Weighted least-squares inversion of the deformation maps indicates a relatively constant subsidence rate. Modeling the deformation with a Mogi point source locates the source of subsidence at ∼4 km below the central caldera floor, which is consistent with the inferred depth of magma storage before the 1931 eruption. Magmatic CO2 and He have been measured at a warm soda spring within the caldera, and several sub-boiling fumaroles persist elsewhere in the caldera. These observations suggest that recent subsidence can be explained by the cooling or degassing of a shallow magma body (∼4 km deep), and/or the reduction of the pore-fluid pressure of a cooling hydrothermal system. Ongoing deformation of the volcano detected by InSAR, in combination with magmatic gas output from at least one warm spring, and infrequent low-level bursts of seismicity below the caldera, indicate that the volcanic system is still active and requires close attention for the timely detection of possible hazards.

  8. A Survey of Volcanic Deformation on Java Using ALOS InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philibosian, B.; Simons, M.

    2008-12-01

    Of the hundreds of volcanic centers throughout the Indonesian archipelago, few are adequately monitored for pre-eruptive activity due to socioeconomic and logistical barriers, with the result that volcanic hazards in the region are not well quantified. The advent of satellite-borne L-band synthetic aperture radar, which due to its long wavelength is less sensitive to changes in vegetation, provides an opportunity for detection and measurement of volcanic deformation over broad regions in heavily vegetated tropical island arcs. We use data from the Japanese ALOS PALSAR instrument to conduct a comprehensive survey of volcanic deformation on the Indonesian island of Java, over a time period of 1-2 years. Consistent with previous results from other regions, our preliminary results suggest that volcanoes experiencing frequent, small eruptions are typically fed by magma bodies too small and/or too shallow or deep to produce a recognizable InSAR signal. However, we identified at least one deformation event on Java which is likely linked to a magmatic intrusion at 5-10 km depth. This initial test of a broad application of L-band data allowed us to better define the satellite imaging criteria required for successful observation, as well as necessary improvements to the InSAR processing algorithms originally designed for C-band data.

  9. Operational, Multi-Satellite InSAR Deformation Monitoring For Enhanced Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henschel, Michael D.; Deschamps, Benjamin; Branson, Wendy

    2013-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a proven technology for monitoring surface movement over an oil field. The technology has been shown to provide robust estimates of surface heave and subsidence in a large number of environments and can be used reliably to calibrate coupled geome-chanical and reservoir models to increase the performance of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations. The increasing number of SAR sensors now available means that higher repeat coverage and independent measurements of motion can be achieved. The multiple beam modes of RADARSAT-2 and/or the multiple satellites of Cosmo-SkyMed or TerraSAR-X can be fused together to provide high repeat, independent measurements of the ground. The upcoming Sentinel-1 launch will only increase the robustness of the multi-track InSAR method described here. This paper will present a model of the effects of monitoring an Enhanced Oil Recovery field with multiple tracks from various satellites. The model helps to establish the best practice monitoring program for the recovery operation in use. The modelling presented will be validated by a demonstration of the long term monitoring of a steam-drive recovery site in Southern California. This analysis uses both RADARSAT-1 and RADARSAT-2 multi-tracks and multi-incidence angles to create a long time series analysis of deformation using C-band data.

  10. Recent advances to obtain real - Time displacements for engineering applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent developments and approaches (using GPS technology and real-time double-integration) to obtain displacements and, in turn, drift ratios, in real-time or near real-time to meet the needs of the engineering and user community in seismic monitoring and assessing the functionality and damage condition of structures. Drift ratios computed in near real-time allow technical assessment of the damage condition of a building. Relevant parameters, such as the type of connections and story structural characteristics (including geometry) are used in computing drifts corresponding to several pre-selected threshold stages of damage. Thus, drift ratios determined from real-time monitoring can be compared to pre-computed threshold drift ratios. The approaches described herein can be used for performance evaluation of structures and can be considered as building health-monitoring applications.

  11. Integrated analysis of PALSAR/Radarsat-1 InSAR and ENVISAT altimeter data for mapping of absolute water level changes in Louisiana wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, J.-W.; Lu, Zhiming; Lee, H.; Shum, C.K.; Swarzenski, C.M.; Doyle, T.W.; Baek, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has been used to detect relative water level changes in wetlands. We developed an innovative method to integrate InSAR and satellite radar altimetry for measuring absolute or geocentric water level changes and applied the methodology to remote areas of swamp forest in coastal Louisiana. Coherence analysis of InSAR pairs suggested that the HH polarization is preferred for this type of observation, and polarimetric analysis can help to identify double-bounce backscattering areas in the wetland. ENVISAT radar altimeter-measured 18-Hz (along-track sampling of 417 m) water level data processed with regional stackfile method have been used to provide vertical references for water bodies separated by levees. The high-resolution (~ 40 m) relative water changes measured from ALOS PALSAR L-band and Radarsat-1 C-band InSAR are then integrated with ENVISAT radar altimetry to obtain absolute water level. The resulting water level time series were validated with in situ gauge observations within the swamp forest. We anticipate that this new technique will allow retrospective reconstruction and concurrent monitoring of water conditions and flow dynamics in wetlands, especially those lacking gauge networks.

  12. Influence of Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-12-15

    The influence of Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance for the electron-ion collision is investigated in turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal method and the effective Dupree potential term associated with the plasma turbulence are employed to obtain the occurrence scattering time as a function of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, thermal energy, and Debye length. The result shows that the occurrence scattering time advance decreases with an increase of the Dupree diffusivity. Hence, we have found that the influence of plasma turbulence diminishes the occurrence time advance in forward electron-ion collisions in thermal turbulent plasmas. The occurrence time advance shows that the propensity of the occurrence time advance increases with increasing scattering angle. It is also found that the effect of turbulence due to the Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance decreases with an increase of the thermal energy. In addition, the variation of the plasma turbulence on the occurrence scattering time advance due to the plasma parameters is also discussed.

  13. Advancing critical care: time to kiss the right frog

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The greatest advances in critical care over the past two decades have been achieved through doing less to the patient. We have learnt through salutary experience that our burgeoning Master-of-the-Universe capabilities and the oh-so-obvious stratagems instilled in us from youth were often ineffective or even deleterious. This re-education process, however, is far from complete. We are now rightly agonizing over the need for better characterization of pathophysiology, earlier identification of disease processes and a more directed approach to therapeutic intervention. We need to delineate the point at which intrinsic and protective adaptation ends and true harmful pathology begins, and how our iatrogenic meddling either helps or hinders. We need to improve trial design in the heterogeneous populations we treat, and to move away from syndromic fixations that, while offering convenience, have generally proved counterproductive. Importantly, we need to discover a far more holistic approach to patient care, evolving from the prevailing overmedicalized, number-crunching perspective towards a true multidisciplinary effort that embraces psychological as well as physiological well-being, with appropriate pharmacological minimization or supplementation. Complacency, with an unfair apportion of blame on the patient for not getting better, is the biggest threat to continued improvement. PMID:23514321

  14. Sentinel-1 Constellation for nationwide deformation mapping with InSAR -- From science to operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehls, John; Larsen, Yngvar; Marinkovic, Petar

    2016-04-01

    For more than a decade, InSAR has been used in Norway study landslides and subsidence. Initial studies concentrated on understanding and validating the technique in various settings. During the last five years, however, we have moved towards using InSAR in operational settings. Of all the challenges we have faced, the largest has been regular access to SAR imagery. The Sentinel-1 constellation will bring a paradigm shift to the field with its operational characteristics: mission configuration, acquisition planning, and data distribution policy. For the first time, we will have nationwide acquisitions with an unprecedented temporal spacing. By the end of this year, we will have a sufficiently long time series of data to produce an initial version of a national deformation map. Within the ESA SEOM InSARap project, we have developed the necessary updates of interferometric processing tools necessary to handle the novel TOPS mode, and successfully demonstrated the performance of S1 InSAR in a number of scientific applications. However, to fully exploit the key advantages of the Sentinel-1 mission, we still face a number of scientific and operational challenges, due to the new and unique characteristics of the mission. Specifically, the large coverage and dense temporal sampling results in very large data sets with a vastly increased information content, which still needs new algorithmic development to extract. In the context of national mapping, optimal harmonization of deformation maps based on overlapping individual S1 stacks is the most prominent challenge. Urban areas in Norway face much the same problems as many other cities throughout the world; subsidence due to soil compaction and groundwater changes or excavation, and resulting damage to infrastructure. More unique to Norway is the threat to lives caused by large unstable rock slopes along the steep fjords. In the 20th century alone, catastrophic rock slope failures leading to tsunamis in fjords and large

  15. Effects of the troposphere on GPS and InSAR point target analysis for measurement of crustal deformation and vertical motion near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Plag, H.; Kreemer, C. W.; Li, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Precise measurement of vertical motions of the solid Earth with space based geodetic techniques such as GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is complicated by the presence of the atmosphere. A fundamental question is to what degree do GPS and InSAR provide similar information about the delays in signal propagation associated with the troposphere. Knowledge of this relationship can improve methods for using GPS to correct for the effects of atmosphere in InSAR, or vice versa. To isolate residual signals associated with the atmosphere in GPS using the GIPSY-OASIS II software, we apply a height-dependent dry delay, and solve for wet zenith delay and its two horizontal gradients every five minutes as a random walk process. We estimate the residual phase from InSAR as the difference between phase and the expected phase based on interferometric point target analysis performed with the Gamma IPTA software module. We will investigate correlations between 1) the GPS troposphere zenith delay estimates at the time of radar scene acquisition, 2) the GPS height estimate residual to the linear rate in height, and 3) the GAMMA IPTA derived atmospheric delays (including orbit errors). As a test case we will use the long running and stable GPS sites of the Basin and Range Geodetic Network (BARGEN) in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These sites have been shown to exhibit extremely clean time series, likely attributable to the very high quality monumentation, stability of GPS equipment, dry atmosphere over the Great Basin, and low rates of crustal deformation. This, in addition to the high density of stations (16 sites within a 50 km radius), makes the Yucca mountain regional network one of the best possible localities for the analysis of the relative contributions to noise in GPS vertical rates and atmospheric contributions to InSAR measurements.

  16. Combination of Insar and GPS to Measure Ground Motions and Atmospheric Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbini, S.; Prati, C.; Errico, M.; Ferri, S.; Novali, F.; Scirpoli, S.; Tiberi, L.

    2010-12-01

    The combination of different techniques such as InSAR and GPS is characterized by the added value of taking advantage of their complementary strengths and of minimizing their respective weaknesses, thus allowing for the full exploitation of the complementary aspects by overcoming the limitations inherent in the use of each technique alone. Another important aspect of the GPS/InSAR integration regards the fact that today’s application of interferometric SAR techniques is limited by the knowledge of the wet tropospheric path delay in microwave observations. GPS-based estimates of tropospheric delays may help in obtaining better corrections which will enhance the coherence and will allow the application of InSAR in a wider range of applications. The area selected for the InSAR/GPS comparison/integration is in northeastern Italy and includes the town of Bologna, and two nearby sites Medicina (agricultural area) and Loiano (a small city on the Apennines) where a small network of permanent GPS stations is operated by the University of Bologna. The InSAR data used are the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) images made available by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) in the framework of the research contract AO-1140. The Permanent Scatterers (PS) technique will be applied to a number of repeated CSK strip map SAR images acquired over a 40x40 square km area encompassing the towns mentioned above. Ultimately this work will contribute demonstrating the CSK capabilities to operate in a repeated interferometric survey mode for measuring ground deformation with millimeter accuracy in different environments. A PS is a target whose radar signature is stable with time. Such targets can be identified by means of multiple SAR observations and they can be exploited for jointly estimating their relative motion and the atmospheric artifacts on a grid that can be quite dense in space but not in time (depending on the SAR revisiting time interval). On the contrary the GPS can provide very frequent time

  17. INVESTIGATION OF CRUSTAL MOTION IN THE TIEN SHAN USING INSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R J

    2011-02-25

    The northern Tien Shan of Central Asia is an area of active mid-continent deformation. Although far from a plate boundary, this region has experienced 5 earthquakes larger than magnitude 7 in the past century and includes one event that may as be as large as Mw 8.0. Previous studies based on GPS measurements indicate on the order of 23 mm/yr of shortening across the entire Tien Shan and up to 15 mm/year in the northern Tien Shan (Figure 1). The seismic moment release rate appears comparable with the geodetic measured slip, at least to first order, suggesting that geodetic rates can be considered a proxy for accumulation rates of stress for seismic hazard estimation. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar may provide a means to make detailed spatial measurements and hence in identifying block boundaries and assisting in seismic hazard. Therefore, we hoped to define block boundaries by direct measurement and by identifying and resolving earthquake slip. Due to political instability in Kyrgzystan, the existing seismic network has not performed as well as required to precisely determine earthquake hypocenters in remote areas and hence InSAR is highly useful. In this paper we present the result of three earthquake studies and show that InSAR is useful for refining locations of teleseismically located earthquakes. ALOS PALSAR data is used to investigate crustal motion in the Tien Shan mountains of Central Asia. As part of the work, considerable software development was undertaken to process PALSAR data. This software has been made freely available. Two damaging earthquakes have been imaged in the Tien Shan and the locations provided by ALOS InSAR have helped to refine seismological velocity models. A third earthquake south of Kyrgyzstan was also imaged. The use of InSAR data and especially L band is therefore very useful in providing groundtruth for earthquake locations.

  18. Real-time PCR: Advanced technologies and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book brings together contributions from 20 experts in the field of PCR, providing a broad perspective of the applications of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The editors state in the preface that the aim is to provide detailed insight into underlying principles and methods of qPCR to provide ...

  19. Time Pressure and Phonological Advance Planning in Spoken Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damian, Markus F.; Dumay, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Current accounts of spoken production debate the extent to which speakers plan ahead. Here, we investigated whether the scope of phonological planning is influenced by changes in time pressure constraints. The first experiment used a picture-word interference task and showed that picture naming latencies were shorter when word distractors shared…

  20. Advances in time-dependent methods for multiphoton processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kulander, K.C.; Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.

    1990-09-01

    This paper discusses recent theoretical results on above threshold ionization harmonic generation and high-frequency, high intensity suppression of ionization. These studies of multiphoton processes in atoms and molecules for short, intense pulsed optical lasers have been carried out using techniques which involve the explicit solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. 43 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Precision Pulsar Timing and Gravity Waves: Recent Advances in Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demorest, P.; Ramachandran, R.; Backer, D.; Ferdman, R.; Stairs, I.; Nice, D.

    2004-12-01

    High-precision pulsar timing is a unique and useful tool for many different scientific applications, including studies of the interstellar medium, relativistic binary systems, and long period gravitational wave studies. Our group has designed and installed a new generation of pulsar instrumentation at several radio observatories over the past year: The Arecibo Signal Processor (ASP), the Green Bank Astronomical Signal Processor (GASP), and the Berkeley-Orleans-Nancay processor (BON). These machines perform real time coherent dedispersion of the pulsar signal on up to 64 MHz of bandwidth, and quasi-real time up to 128 MHz. They use high dynamic range voltage sampling (8 bits), which significantly reduces digitization artifacts. The processing is done in an array of personal computers, which makes the machines extremely flexible for future development. We present preliminary results from several different studies using this new instrumentation. At Green Bank, we have initiated a program of long-term precision timing of 15 pulsars using the 100m Green Bank Telescope. The data from this project will be used to study binary systems, and contribute to the ongoing multi-observatory effort to create a Pulsar Timing Array - a group of many pulsars distributed about the sky which can be used to detect gravitational radiation with a period of 1-10 years. We also have continuous use of a 85ft telescope at Green Bank which we have used to study dispersion measure fluctuations of PSR B1937+21 on timescales of 1 day to several years. These fluctuations are a potential systematic effect for the gravity wave study, and also help us learn more about the nature of interstellar weather.

  2. InSAR and Numeric Modeling for Land Subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulamu, A.; Grzovic, M.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring land subsidence due to coal mining is a function of several controlling factors, including: depth of the mine, stratigraphy, presence or absence of faults, thickness of mineral seam, mining method used, and hydrogeological conditions. Numerical modeling, e.g., finite element modeling (FEM), provides a comprehensive tool to simulate three-dimensional deformation at specific locations. The basis of the FEM is the representation of a body or a structure by an assemblage of subdivisions called finite elements, which requires the availability of site specific environmental and physical characteristics. The lack of availability of the necessary data leads to large uncertainties in subsidence estimates. With the use of InSAR, many of the needed controlling parameters for improving mine subsidence rate estimates can be identified. Coupling InSAR with FEM can further improve subsidence rate estimates through additional analysis yielding information on the relative importance of various controlling parameters contributing to the mine subsidence, the key mechanisms of failure associated with these parameters, and the surface expressions of these processes. In this contribution, we show that utilizing InSAR and FEM leads to an overall enhanced understanding of mine behavior, including the physical mechanisms that lead to mine subsidence through understanding the rheological behavior of the material over the mine in response to wide range of physical and environmental conditions.

  3. Long-term contraction of pyroclastic flow deposits at Augustine Volcano using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpin, D. B.; Meyer, F. J.; Lu, Z.; Beget, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Augustine Island is a small, 8x11 km island in South Central Alaska's lower Cook Inlet. It is approximately 280 km southwest of Anchorage, and occupied entirely by its namesake Augustine Volcano. The volcano's nearly symmetrical central cone reaches an altitude of 1260 m, and the surrounding island is composed almost entirely of volcanic deposits. It is the youngest and most frequently active volcano in the lower Cook Inlet, with at least seven known eruptions since the beginning of written records in 1812. Its two most recent eruptions occurred during March-August 1986, and January-March 2006 The 1986 and 2006 Augustine eruptions produced significant pyroclastic flow deposits (PFDs) on the island, both which have been well mapped by previous studies. Subsidence of material deposited by these pyroclastic flows has been measured by InSAR data, and can be attributed to at least four processes: (1) initial, granular settling; (2) thermal contraction; (3) loading of 1986 PFDs from overlying 2006 deposits; and (4) continuing subsidence of 1986 PFDs buried beneath 2006 flows. For this paper, SAR data for PFDs from Augustine Volcano were obtained from 1992 through 2005, from 2006-2007, and from 2007-2011. These time frames provided InSAR data for long-term periods after both 1986 and 2006 eruptions. From time-series analysis of these datasets, deformation rates of 1986 PFDs and 2006 PFDs were determined, and corrections applied where newer deposits were emplaced over old deposits. The combination of data sets analyzed in this study enabled, for the first time, an analysis of long and short term subsidence rates of volcanic deposits emplaced by the two eruptive episodes. The generated deformation time series provides insight into the significance and duration of the initial settling period and allows us to study the thermal regime and heat loss of the PFDs. To extract quantitative information about thermal properties and composition of the PFDs, we measured the thickness

  4. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and its applications to study volcanoes, part 2: InSAR imaging of Alaskan Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel; Wicks, Charles W.; Power, John A.

    2006-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a remote sensing technique which can measure ground surface deformation with sub-centimeter precision and spatial resolution in tens-of-meters over a large region. This paper summarizes our recent InSAR studies of Alaskan volcanoes, associated with both eruptive and non-eruptive activity. It shows that InSAR can improve our understanding of how the Alaskan volcanoes work and enhance our capability to predict future eruptions and the associated hazards. 

  5. Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis: 2. Coeruptive deflation, July-August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A hydrovolcanic eruption near Cone D on the floor of Okmok caldera, Alaska, began on 12 July 2008 and continued until late August 2008. The eruption was preceded by inflation of a magma reservoir located beneath the center of the caldera and ~3 km below sea level (bsl), which began immediately after Okmok's previous eruption in 1997. In this paper we use data from several radar satellites and advanced interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques to produce a suite of 2008 coeruption deformation maps. Most of the surface deformation that occurred during the eruption is explained by deflation of a Mogi-type source located beneath the center of the caldera and 2–3 km bsl, i.e., essentially the same source that inflated prior to the eruption. During the eruption the reservoir deflated at a rate that decreased exponentially with time with a 1/e time constant of ~13 days. We envision a sponge-like network of interconnected fractures and melt bodies that in aggregate constitute a complex magma storage zone beneath Okmok caldera. The rate at which the reservoir deflates during an eruption may be controlled by the diminishing pressure difference between the reservoir and surface. A similar mechanism might explain the tendency for reservoir inflation to slow as an eruption approaches until the pressure difference between a deep magma production zone and the reservoir is great enough to drive an intrusion or eruption along the caldera ring-fracture system.

  6. Integrating Remote Sensing Data, Hybrid-Cloud Computing, and Event Notifications for Advanced Rapid Imaging & Analysis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, H.; Owen, S. E.; Yun, S.; Lundgren, P.; Fielding, E. J.; Agram, P.; Manipon, G.; Stough, T. M.; Simons, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Wilson, B. D.; Poland, M. P.; Cervelli, P. F.; Cruz, J.

    2013-12-01

    Space-based geodetic measurement techniques such as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) are now important elements in our toolset for monitoring earthquake-generating faults, volcanic eruptions, hurricane damage, landslides, reservoir subsidence, and other natural and man-made hazards. Geodetic imaging's unique ability to capture surface deformation with high spatial and temporal resolution has revolutionized both earthquake science and volcanology. Continuous monitoring of surface deformation and surface change before, during, and after natural hazards improves decision-making from better forecasts, increased situational awareness, and more informed recovery. However, analyses of InSAR and GPS data sets are currently handcrafted following events and are not generated rapidly and reliably enough for use in operational response to natural disasters. Additionally, the sheer data volumes needed to handle a continuous stream of InSAR data sets also presents a bottleneck. It has been estimated that continuous processing of InSAR coverage of California alone over 3-years would reach PB-scale data volumes. Our Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis for Monitoring Hazards (ARIA-MH) science data system enables both science and decision-making communities to monitor areas of interest with derived geodetic data products via seamless data preparation, processing, discovery, and access. We will present our findings on the use of hybrid-cloud computing to improve the timely processing and delivery of geodetic data products, integrating event notifications from USGS to improve the timely processing for response, as well as providing browse results for quick looks with other tools for integrative analysis.

  7. Advances in time-dependent current-density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Arjan

    In this work we solve the problem of the gauge dependence of molecular magnetic properties (magnetizabilities, circular dichroism) using time-dependent current-density functional theory [1]. We also present a new functional that accurately describes the optical absorption spectra of insulators, semiconductors and metals [2] N. Raimbault, P.L. de Boeij, P. Romaniello, and J.A. Berger Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 066404 (2015) J.A. Berger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 137402 (2015) This study has been partially supported through the Grant NEXT No. ANR-10-LABX-0037 in the framework of the Programme des Investissements d'Avenir.

  8. Recent advances in phase shifted time averaging and stroboscopic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styk, Adam; Józwik, Michał

    2016-08-01

    Classical Time Averaging and Stroboscopic Interferometry are widely used for MEMS/MOEMS dynamic behavior investigations. Unfortunately both methods require an extensive measurement and data processing strategies in order to evaluate the information on maximum amplitude at a given load of vibrating object. In this paper the modified strategies of data processing in both techniques are introduced. These modifications allow for fast and reliable calculation of searched value, without additional complication of measurement systems. Through the paper the both approaches are discussed and experimentally verified.

  9. Advanced tools for astronomical time series and image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    The algorithms described here, which I have developed for applications in X-ray and γ-ray astronomy, will hopefully be of use in other ways, perhaps aiding in the exploration of modern astronomy's data cornucopia. The goal is to describe principled approaches to some ubiquitous problems, such as detection and characterization of periodic and aperiodic signals, estimation of time delays between multiple time series, and source detection in noisy images with noisy backgrounds. The latter problem is related to detection of clusters in data spaces of various dimensions. A goal of this work is to achieve a unifying view of several related topics: signal detection and characterization, cluster identification, classification, density estimation, and multivariate regression. In addition to being useful for analysis of data from space-based and ground-based missions, these algorithms may be a basis for a future automatic science discovery facility, and in turn provide analysis tools for the Virtual Observatory. This chapter has ties to those by Larry Bretthorst, Tom Loredo, Alanna Connors, Fionn Murtagh, Jim Berger, David van Dyk, Vicent Martinez & Enn Saar.

  10. InSAR measurements of compaction and subsidence in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Stephanie A.; Overeem, Irina; Steckler, Michael S.; Syvitski, James P. M.; Seeber, Leonardo; Akhter, S. Humayun

    2014-08-01

    Many of the world's largest river deltas are sinking due to sediment loading, compaction, and tectonics but also recently because of groundwater extraction, hydrocarbon extraction, and reduced aggradation. Little is known, however, about the full spatial variability of subsidence rates in complex delta systems. This study reconstructs subsidence rates in the eastern portion of the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD), Bangladesh, covering more than 10,000 km2 at a high spatial resolution of 100 m. The map was produced using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) covering the period 2007 to 2011. Eighteen Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased-Array L-band SAR scenes were used to generate 30 interferograms calibrated with GPS. Interferograms were stacked to yield average subsidence rates over the study period. Small Baseline Subset-InSAR was then applied to validate the results against an additional GPS record from Dhaka, Bangladesh. Land subsidence of 0 to > 10 mm/yr is seen in Dhaka, with variability likely related to local variations in shallow subsurface sediment properties. Outside of the city, rates vary from 0 to > 18 mm/yr, with the lowest rates appearing primarily in Pleistocene Madhupur Clay and the highest rates in Holocene organic-rich muds. Results demonstrate that subsidence in this delta is primarily controlled by local stratigraphy, with rates varying by more than an order of magnitude depending on lithology. The ability of L-band InSAR to differentiate between stratigraphic units in this humid, vegetated subtropical river delta demonstrates the power of interferometry as a tool for studying the subsurface in deltaic environments.

  11. Interglacial climate dynamics and advanced time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudelsee, Manfred; Bermejo, Miguel; Köhler, Peter; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    Studying the climate dynamics of past interglacials (IGs) helps to better assess the anthropogenically influenced dynamics of the current IG, the Holocene. We select the IG portions from the EPICA Dome C ice core archive, which covers the past 800 ka, to apply methods of statistical time series analysis (Mudelsee 2010). The analysed variables are deuterium/H (indicating temperature) (Jouzel et al. 2007), greenhouse gases (Siegenthaler et al. 2005, Loulergue et al. 2008, L¨ü thi et al. 2008) and a model-co-derived climate radiative forcing (Köhler et al. 2010). We select additionally high-resolution sea-surface-temperature records from the marine sedimentary archive. The first statistical method, persistence time estimation (Mudelsee 2002) lets us infer the 'climate memory' property of IGs. Second, linear regression informs about long-term climate trends during IGs. Third, ramp function regression (Mudelsee 2000) is adapted to look on abrupt climate changes during IGs. We compare the Holocene with previous IGs in terms of these mathematical approaches, interprete results in a climate context, assess uncertainties and the requirements to data from old IGs for yielding results of 'acceptable' accuracy. This work receives financial support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Project ClimSens within the DFG Research Priority Program INTERDYNAMIK) and the European Commission (Marie Curie Initial Training Network LINC, No. 289447, within the 7th Framework Programme). References Jouzel J, Masson-Delmotte V, Cattani O, Dreyfus G, Falourd S, Hoffmann G, Minster B, Nouet J, Barnola JM, Chappellaz J, Fischer H, Gallet JC, Johnsen S, Leuenberger M, Loulergue L, Luethi D, Oerter H, Parrenin F, Raisbeck G, Raynaud D, Schilt A, Schwander J, Selmo E, Souchez R, Spahni R, Stauffer B, Steffensen JP, Stenni B, Stocker TF, Tison JL, Werner M, Wolff EW (2007) Orbital and millennial Antarctic climate variability over the past 800,000 years. Science 317:793. Köhler P, Bintanja R

  12. The Sentinel-1 Constellation - A new era of operational InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. J.; Hooper, A. J.; Marinkovic, P.; González, P. J.; Walters, R.; Elliott, J. R.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Larsen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The launch of Sentinel-1A on 3 April 2014 by the European Space Agency will transform our ability to monitor our restless planet with InSAR. For the first time, radar data will be acquired systematically and frequently (every 6 days once Sentinel-1B is launched in 2016) over all the tectonic and volcanic areas of the planet; the data will be freely available to the whole community; the mission has a long duration, with future launches planned to extend the time series to at least 20 years. In this presentation, I will discuss some the processing challenges, present preliminary differential interferograms and time series, and speculatively look back from 2034 on what the mission has achieved. Sentinel-1 acquires radar data in a novel mode, known as Interferometric Wide Swath or TOPS (Terrain Observation with Progressive Scans in azimuth) mode. TOPS mode has some advantages, the most significant of which is that a 250 km wide image can be acquired without the scalloping effect that is seen in conventional ScanSAR amplitude images. However, because the Doppler centroid varies in azimuth, phase artefacts are introduced in TOPS-mode interferograms unless the images are co-registered with an azimuth accuracy of ~5 cm. This, and the bursted nature of TOPS data, introduces new challenges and opportunities to InSAR processing. We show how the required coregistration accuracy can be achieved with an end-to-end geometric approach, and by exploitation of the view angle diversity in burst and swath overlap regions. We also discuss different strategies for when and how to stitch the bursts, which depend on the application domain and processing methodology. The systematic acquisitions and free and open data policy provide new opportunities for routine analysis and operational applications of InSAR. COMET (* http://comet.nerc.ac.uk) aims to provide processed results for all the tectonic and volcanic regions of the planet, and we will present preliminary results of our processing

  13. Interseismic accumulation across the Khoy fault from InSAR measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni Aref, Mohammad; Çakir, Ziyadin; Karimzadeh, Sadra

    2016-04-01

    The Khoy fault is part of a long right lateral strike slip fault that runs in NW-SE direction between Çaldıran in eastern Turkey and Tabriz in northwest of Iran within the Turkish-Iranian plateau that accommodates the plate convergence between Eurasia and Arabia. It connects the North Tabriz Fault (NTF) with the Gailatu-Siah Chesmeh and Çaldiran faults, and thus is named here the Çaldiran-Tabriz fault (CTF). The CTF, unlike the North and East Anatolian faults to the west, does not have a clear morphological expression in the topography along much of it length. Active fault maps show a distributed deformation zone. Nevertheless, it has produced several devastating large earthquakes both recently (e.g., Ms 7.3, 1976 Çaldiran earthquake), and historical times (e.g., Ms > 7, 1721 and 1780 Tabriz earthquakes).The recent double earthquakes (Mw 6.5 and 6.2) of August 11th, 2012 in Ahar-Varzaghan area 40-45 km north of the NTF manifest the seismic activity of the region. Recent geodetic studies using GPS InSAR suggest 9±2 mm/yr of slip rate for the NTF, which is significantly higher than geologically determined slip rates (e.g., 2-4 mm/yr). In this study, we use InSAR data acquired from 2003 and 2010 on a descending orbit track of ENVISAT satellite, across the Khoy fault zone, which is the north-western continuation of the NTF north of the Urmia Lake. We use the Stanford method of persistent scatter interferometry (StaMPS) technique to overcome the decorelation problem with time and over large areas. The line of sight velocity field we obtained clearly delineates the shear zone that trends NW-SW aligning with the NTF. We project the mean line of sigh velocity field derived by InSAR time series onto fault parallel horizontal velocity field, assumed that vertical offset rate of the Khoy fault is negligible. Single screw dislocation models in elastic half-space model were applied along the fault zone to estimate slip rate, locking depth and fault location within 95

  14. [Advances of the Chinese Journal of Ophthalmology with the times].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-mei

    2005-08-01

    Since the first publication of the Chinese Journal of Ophthalmology on October 1st, 1950, following the establishment of the People's Republic of China, more than fifty years have already elapsed. The editors and publishers of the elder generation of this magazine have witnessed the hardships in starting publication, the disappointments of the discontinuation of publication during certain periods, as well as the great delight of restarting publication. Having entered the 21st century, editors and publishers of the new generation have made dramatic achievements by keeping up with the times and continuously seeking innovations. However all of these achievements have only turned out to be the past. There are even more challenges for moving ahead in the future. The Chinese Journal of Ophthalmology has noted its achievements on the one hand; while on the other hand, has analyzed the main existing problems of this magazine. Some feasible approaches to improve the magazine have been proposed and the direction in the following few years was ascertained. We will collaborate with Chinese ophthalmologists to work towards the continuous development of this magazine.

  15. Living Fully in the Shadow of Mortal Time: Psychosocial Assets in Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Meg; Marchand, Lucille

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize the strategies and psychosocial conditions that influence how resilient people live in the face of advanced cancer. Methods Grounded theory interviews and surveys of ten resilient people with advanced cancer were collected and analyzed. Findings Personal assets including positive relationships, purpose in life, faith, and a sense of mastery contributed to living fully in “mortal time.” Strategies included embracing paradox, reframing time, deepening connections, and aligning actions with priorities. Open-ended interviews yielded rich illness and life stories; many participants requested a copy of the transcript. Conclusions Resilient people use a range of strategies to thrive in the face of advanced cancer. PMID:23923470

  16. 48 CFR 1552.215-74 - Advanced understanding-uncompensated time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hours delivered during the contract. In the event there is a shortage of uncompensated time hours...-uncompensated time. 1552.215-74 Section 1552.215-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL... Clauses 1552.215-74 Advanced understanding—uncompensated time. As prescribed in 1515.408(b), insert...

  17. Semantic Interpretation of Insar Estimates Using Optical Images with Application to Urban Infrastructure Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhu, X. X.

    2015-08-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) has been an established method for long term large area monitoring. Since the launch of meter-resolution spaceborne SAR sensors, the InSAR community has shown that even individual buildings can be monitored in high level of detail. However, the current deformation analysis still remains at a primitive stage of pixel-wise motion parameter inversion and manual identification of the regions of interest. We are aiming at developing an automatic urban infrastructure monitoring approach by combining InSAR and the semantics derived from optical images, so that the deformation analysis can be done systematically in the semantic/object level. This paper explains how we transfer the semantic meaning derived from optical image to the InSAR point clouds, and hence different semantic classes in the InSAR point cloud can be automatically extracted and monitored. Examples on bridges and railway monitoring are demonstrated.

  18. Allan Variance Computed in Space Domain: Definition and Application to InSAR Data to Characterize Noise and Geophysical Signal.

    PubMed

    Cavalié, Olivier; Vernotte, François

    2016-04-01

    The Allan variance was introduced 50 years ago for analyzing the stability of frequency standards. In addition to its metrological interest, it may be also considered as an estimator of the large trends of the power spectral density (PSD) of frequency deviation. For instance, the Allan variance is able to discriminate different types of noise characterized by different power laws in the PSD. The Allan variance was also used in other fields than time and frequency metrology: for more than 20 years, it has been used in accelerometry, geophysics, geodesy, astrophysics, and even finances. However, it seems that up to now, it has been exclusively applied for time series analysis. We propose here to use the Allan variance on spatial data. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is used in geophysics to image ground displacements in space [over the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image spatial coverage] and in time thanks to the regular SAR image acquisitions by dedicated satellites. The main limitation of the technique is the atmospheric disturbances that affect the radar signal while traveling from the sensor to the ground and back. In this paper, we propose to use the Allan variance for analyzing spatial data from InSAR measurements. The Allan variance was computed in XY mode as well as in radial mode for detecting different types of behavior for different space-scales, in the same way as the different types of noise versus the integration time in the classical time and frequency application. We found that radial Allan variance is the more appropriate way to have an estimator insensitive to the spatial axis and we applied it on SAR data acquired over eastern Turkey for the period 2003-2011. Spatial Allan variance allowed us to well characterize noise features, classically found in InSAR such as phase decorrelation producing white noise or atmospheric delays, behaving like a random walk signal. We finally applied the spatial Allan variance to an InSAR time

  19. Repeat-pass InSAR processing for Vegetation Height Calculation: Theory and a validated example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, P.; Lei, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of the vegetation height for a forested region is often used as a proxy for stem volume, biomass, and for characterizing habitats of a variety of plant and animal species. For this reason, remote sensing measures available from stereography, lidar, and InSAR have been important tools for airborne and spaceborne platforms. Among these and other candidates for measuring vegetation heights, InSAR has the advantage of achieving wide coverage areas (on the order of 100 km in cross-track swath) over short time periods, thus making it practical for large-scale assessments of the global environment. The determination of forest stand height (FSH), which is an assessment made on the order of one to ten hectares of resolution, InSAR can provide measures that are proportional to FSH. These are: 1.) interferometric phase compared to a known DEM, preferably of the bald earth, 2.) interferometric correlation (polarimetric or otherwise), which is related to the volume scattering nature of the target, and 3.) interferometric correlation which is related to the temporal decorrelation of the target. Of these, while the volumetric aspect of interferometric correlation is of keen interest, because of the dominant error source of temporal decorrelation, it comes at the cost of the need to perform single-pass interferometry. While such satellite systems do exist (notably the TanDEM-X mission), for vegetation applications, lower frequency systems such as ALOS-1 and -2, and the future NASA radar mission at L-band, provides better signal returns from throughout the vegetation canopy. Hence, rather than relying on volumetric correlation to provide the desired FSH signature, repeat-pass observations of temporal decorrelation are coupled with a vegetation model for this decorrelation to determine the vegetation height. In order to demonstrate this technique, the University of Massachusetts has used 46-day repeat-pass ALOS data to estimate FSH over the US State of Maine, nearly a 10

  20. The wet refractivity tomography for improving the InSAR deformation measurements on Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinetti, Claudia; Aranzulla, Massimo; Guglielmino, Francesco; Cannavo', Flavio; Romaniello, Vito; Briole, Pierre; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In the frame of the EC FP7 MED-SUV project, we carried out a study to improve the accuracy of the ground deformation monitoring at Mt. Etna volcano (Italy) by modelling of the tropospheric delays. We use GPS and multispectral satellite data to reduce the atmospheric artefacts in the SAR interferometry. Among various effects affecting interferograms, atmospheric artefacts are among the most significant and the most difficult to model. Due to the orography of Mt. Etna and the space-time variability weather conditions, it has been shown that the atmospheric heterogeneities can affect GPS and InSAR measurements at a vey high level, with extreme values of anomalies with respect to a standard model that can reach 100 mm (or 4 C-band fringes) in some cases. For these reasons the estimation of Mt. Etna atmospheric anomalies is crucial to calibrate the InSAR measurements. Nowadays the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo (INGV-OE) monitors the ground deformations at Mt. Etna with a network of 42 GPS permanent stations spread over and around the entire volcano edifice. Data collected by the GPS monitoring network have been processed by the GAMIT software, by adopting the Vienna Mapping Functions (VMF1) to improve the modelling of the tropospheric delays. A specific software has been developed in order to derive the tomographic imagery of the troposphere over Etna volcano starting from the tropospheric delays calculated by GPS in all the stations of the network. The algorithm developed has been validated by using synthetic tests. They consist in assuming different structures of atmospheric anomalies in the input data and verifying that the algorithm is able to reproduce them. The test results confirmed the capability of the software to return the simulated anomalies faithfully. With the aim of applying the tomography algorithm to a real case, we introduce the water vapour content estimated by the MODIS instrument on board of the satellites Terra

  1. Combined GPS and InSAR Models of Postseismic Deformation from the Northridge Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnellan, A.; Parker, J. W.; Peltzer, G.

    Models of combined Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data collected in the region of the Northridge earthquake indicate that significant afterslip on the main fault occurred following the earthquake. Additional shallow deformation occurred to the west of the main rupture plane. Both data sets are consistent with logarithmic time-dependent behavior following the earthquake indicative of afterslip rather than postseismic relaxation. Aftershocks account for only about 10% of the postseismic motion. The two data sets are complimentary in determining the postseismic processes. Fault afterslip and shallow deformation dominate the deformation field in the two years following the earthquake. Lower crustal deformation may play an important role later in the earthquake cycle.

  2. Probing Mechanical Properties of Rock with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jónsson, S.

    2012-04-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations from satellites have revolutionized our crustal deformation measurement capabilities with its high spatial resolution, global coverage, and low cost. The high spatial resolution (typically 5-20 m) allows us to map many small-scale surface deformation phenomena in great detail. These include surface faulting, fissuring, fault creep, and other strain localization phenomena. Another advantage of the small-scale deformation mapping is that it can provide information about mechanical properties of near-surface rocks. Several studies have already been published on using InSAR to probe material properties of rock. Strain localizations at fault zones have been observed in co-seismic deformation fields near to large earthquakes and interpreted as expressions of weak fault zone materials that are a factor of two more compliant than the surrounding unbroken rock [Fialko et al., 2002]. Peltzer et al. [1999] argued that asymmetries in coseismic deformation patterns observed by InSAR showed evidence for non-linear elasticity, i.e. that the elastic moduli of shallow crustal material are different for compression and extension, due to small-scale cracks in the medium. This interpretation was later disputed by Funning et al. [2007], who provided an alternative explanation for observed deformation pattern based on along-strike variations in fault geometry and slip. In addition, observations and modeling of poro-elastic rebound after earthquakes have provided information about the difference in undrained and drained Poisson's ratio values of the near-surface rocks [Peltzer et al., 1996; Jónsson et al., 2003]. More recently we have used InSAR observations to put bounds on the tensional bulk strength of surface rocks. A dyke intrusion that took place in western Saudi Arabia in 2009 caused many moderate-sized earthquakes and extensive surface faulting. InSAR data of the area show that large-scale (40 km x 40 km) east

  3. A geometry-based image search engine for advanced RADARSAT-1/2 GIS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotamraju, Vinay; Rabus, Bernhard; Busler, Jennifer

    2012-06-01

    Space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors, such as RADARSAT-1 and -2, enable a multitude of defense and security applications owing to their unique capabilities of cloud penetration, day/night imaging and multi-polarization imaging. As a result, advanced SAR image time series exploitation techniques such as Interferometric SAR (InSAR) and Radargrammetry are now routinely used in applications such as underground tunnel monitoring, infrastructure monitoring and DEM generation. Imaging geometry, as determined by the satellite orbit and imaged terrain, plays a critical role in the success of such techniques. This paper describes the architecture and the current status of development of a geometry-based search engine that allows the search and visualization of archived and future RADARSAT-1 and -2 images appropriate for a variety of advanced SAR techniques and applications. Key features of the search engine's scalable architecture include (a) Interactive GIS-based visualization of the search results; (b) A client-server architecture for online access that produces up-to-date searches of the archive images and that can, in future, be extended to acquisition planning; (c) A techniquespecific search mode, wherein an expert user explicitly sets search parameters to find appropriate images for advanced SAR techniques such as InSAR and Radargrammetry; (d) A future application-specific search mode, wherein all search parameters implicitly default to preset values according to the application of choice such as tunnel monitoring, DEM generation and deformation mapping; (f) Accurate baseline calculations for InSAR searches, and, optimum beam configuration for Radargrammetric searches; (g) Simulated quick look images and technique-specific sensitivity maps in the future.

  4. Local interpolation of coseismic displacements measured by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, M.; Hamm, N. A. S.; Woldai, T.; Tolpekin, V. A.; Stein, A.

    2013-08-01

    Coseismic displacements play a significant role in characterizing earthquake causative faults and understanding earthquake dynamics. They are typically measured from InSAR using pre- and post-earthquake images. The displacement map produced by InSAR may contain missing coseismic values due to the decorrelation of ASAR images. This study focused on interpolating missing values in the coseismic displacement map of the 2003 Bam earthquake using geostatistics with the aim of running a slip distribution model. The gaps were grouped into 23 patches. Variograms of the patches showed that the displacement data were spatially correlated. The variogram prepared for ordinary kriging (OK) indicated the presence of a trend and thus justified the use of universal kriging (UK). Accuracy assessment was performed in 3 ways. First, 11 patches of equal size and with an equal number of missing values generated artificially, were kriged and validated. Second, the four selected patches results were validated after shifting them to new locations without missing values and comparing them with the observed values. Finally, cross validation was performed for both types of patch at the original and shifted locations. UK results were better than OK in terms of kriging variance, mean error (ME) and root mean square error (RMSE). For both OK and UK, only 4 out of 23 patches (1, 5, 11 and 21) showed ME and RMSE values that were substantially larger than for the other patches. The accuracy assessment results were found to be satisfactory with ME and RMSE values close to zero. InSAR data inversion demonstrated the usefulness of interpolation of the missing coseismic values by improving a slip distribution model. It is therefore concluded that kriging serves as an effective tool for interpolating the missing values on a coseismic displacement map.

  5. Fault creep rates of the Chaman fault (Afghanistan and Pakistan) inferred from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, William D.

    2017-01-01

    The Chaman fault is the major strike-slip structural boundary between the India and Eurasia plates. Despite sinistral slip rates similar to the North America-Pacific plate boundary, no major (>M7) earthquakes have been documented along the Chaman fault, indicating that the fault either creeps aseismically or is at a late stage in its seismic cycle. Recent work with remotely sensed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series documented a heterogeneous distribution of fault creep and interseismic coupling along the entire length of the Chaman fault, including an 125 km long creeping segment and an 95 km long locked segment within the region documented in this study. Here I present additional InSAR time series results from the Envisat and ALOS radar missions spanning the southern and central Chaman fault in an effort to constrain the locking depth, dip, and slip direction of the Chaman fault. I find that the fault deviates little from a vertical geometry and accommodates little to no fault-normal displacements. Peak-documented creep rates on the fault are 9-12 mm/yr, accounting for 25-33% of the total motion between India and Eurasia, and locking depths in creeping segments are commonly shallower than 500 m. The magnitude of the 1892 Chaman earthquake is well predicted by the total area of the 95 km long coupled segment. To a first order, the heterogeneous distribution of aseismic creep combined with consistently shallow locking depths suggests that the southern and central Chaman fault may only produce small to moderate earthquakes (

  6. Subsidence and associated shallow faulting hazard assessment in central Mexico using InSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Solano Rojas, D. E.; Oliver-Cabrera, T.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.; Wdowinski, S.; DeMets, C.; Pacheco, J.

    2014-12-01

    While subsidence has affected Mexico City for over a century, other cities in central Mexico have been subjected to subsidence since the '80, as a result of their large urban expansion, population increase and aggressive groundwater extraction rates. The continuous subsidence results in severe damage to urban infrastructure and civil structures. Unfortunately the damage cost assessment and vulnerability are difficult to evaluate, because of the variable geographic extent and the continuous nature of the process, which have different characteristics than localized, short duration hazards, as earthquakes or flood events.We have monitored land subsidence in 17 cities in central Mexico using both InSAR and GPS observations. InSAR provides an unsurpassed synoptic view of the earth's dynamic surface. However, different satellite sensors and sometimes widely spaced data availability make it difficult to derive long-term time series, rapid changes or nonlinear variations of subsidence velocities. To alleviate this situation, higher temporal resolution subsidence observations of associated fault motion has been pursued using continuously operating GPS stations. We have developed a GPS network that covers 6 urban centers to detect short duration variations using different processing schemes that include both real-time solutions using RTNet as well as daily solution using Gipsy-Oasis.Cartographic products based on these techniques have been merged with other population, hydrology and meteorology data sets. This approach allows a better hazard assessment and provides information for other purposes, such as vulnerability for shallow faulting, land use zonations, and other decision elements for water resource management agencies. We will provide examples of these hazard assessments for several cities, including Mexico City, Aguascalientes, Morelia, Irapuato and Celaya and the challenges encountered to integrate these results with other data sets from federal and state

  7. Subsidence in the Central Valley, California 2007 - present measured by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, T. G.; Liu, Z.; Jones, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Subsidence caused by groundwater pumping in the rich agricultural area of California's Central Valley has been a problem for decades. Over the last few years, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations from satellite and aircraft platforms have been used to produce maps of subsidence with ~cm accuracy. For this study, we have obtained and analyzed Japanese PALSAR data for 2006 - 2011, Canadian Radarsat-1 data for 2011 - 2013, Radarsat-2 data for 2012 - 2015, and ESA's Sentinel-1A for 2015 and produced maps of subsidence for those periods. High resolution InSAR data were also acquired along the California Aqueduct by the NASA UAVSAR from 2013 - 2015. Using multiple scenes acquired by these systems, we were able to produce the time histories of subsidence at selected locations and transects showing how subsidence varies both spatially and temporally. The maps show that subsidence is continuing in areas with a history of subsidence and that the rates and areas affected have increased due to increased groundwater extraction during the extended western US drought. The high resolution maps from UAVSAR were used to identify and quantify new, highly localized areas of accelerated subsidence along the California Aqueduct that occurred in 2014. The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) funded this work to provide the background and an update on subsidence in the Central Valley to support future policy. Geographic Information System (GIS) files are being furnished to DWR for further analysis of the 4 dimensional subsidence time-series maps. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA.

  8. An analysis of the uncertainty in InSAR deformation measurements for groundwater applications in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. A.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide spatially dense maps of the deformation of Earth's surface, where one pixel represents 50 m by 50 m. At a number of field sites it has been shown that the deformation measured by InSAR is related to changes in hydraulic head in underlying confined aquifer systems. In an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado, we have shown that InSAR deformation measurements exhibit seasonal trends similar to hydraulic head measurements made in wells. However, when we attempted to estimate hydraulic head from the InSAR deformation measurements we found that the estimate of the uncertainty in these measurements was not accurate enough to assess the agreement between the two datasets. Here we more accurately estimate the uncertainty in the InSAR deformation measurements and present a methodology that uses this uncertainty to optimally process the data for groundwater applications. In this study we used data from the ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites, which have 30 acquisitions archived from 1992 - 2001. Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) analysis was used to produce a time-series of the deformation for all pixels with data quality above a selected threshold. The deformation is derived from a change in the electromagnetic phase between two different acquisition times. Four major components contribute to uncertainty in the measurement of the phase ( ): integer phase ambiguities, incorrect orbital parameters, atmospheric phase effects and decorrelation of radar signals. We assumed that uncertainty due to integer phase ambiguities and incorrect orbital parameters is small in the SLV. We proceeded to address the two other components of uncertainty, atmospheric phase effects and decorrelation of radar signals. We first used the trends in the hydraulic head to help us identify acquisitions that may have been corrupted by atmospheric phase effects. We found that our technique works well with synthetic data. However, with real

  9. On InSAR Ambiguity Resolution For Deformation Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teunissen, P.

    2006-01-01

    Integer carrier phase ambiguity resolution is the key to fast and highprecision satellite positioning and navigation. It applies to a great variety of current and future models of GPS, modernized GPS and Galileo. It also applies to stacked radar interferometry for deformation monitoring, see e.g. [Hanssen, et al, 2001]. In this contribution we apply the integer least-squares' principle to the rank defect model of stacked InSAR carrier phase data. We discuss two ways of dealing with the rank defect for ambiguity resolution. One is based on the use of a priori data, the other is based on the use of an interval constraint on the deformation rate.

  10. Handbook II: Advanced Teaching Strategies for Adjunct and Part-Time Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greive, Donald E., Ed.

    This handbook is designed to help part-time and adjunct faculty who need professional enhancement but do not have the time for formal coursework. The focus is on the modern student, who differs in many ways from the traditional college student. The book provides more advanced strategies that those presented in the earlier "Handbook for…

  11. Interseismic Strain Accumulation at the Northern Costa Rica Seismogenic Zone From Integration of InSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, S. Y.; Xue, L.

    2012-12-01

    The presence of the Nicoya Peninsula directly above the seismogenic zone in northern Costa Rica has allowed detailed studies of its seismic and aseismic behavior. This segment of the Middle American Trench generates large earthquakes about every 50 years with the last event occurring in 1950. Abundant seismicity, multiple episodes of slow slip and tremor and years of surface deformation have been recorded here between 2000 and 2011, since the first GPS and seismic instruments were installed. Several models of interseismic strain accumulation have been produced using the GPS data. These models reveal different patterns of locking and variations in locking magnitude that range between 50% to 100% of the plate convergence rate. The GPS data provide excellent temporal coverage but relatively sparse spatial coverage and poor quality vertical measurements of ground deformation. To improve on this, we combine InSAR and GPS observations to produce the first interseismic deformation estimates obtained by InSAR at a subduction zone. We use 18 ALOS SAR acquisitions between 2007 and 2011 covering the Nicoya Peninsula and ROI_PAC software to construct 120 interferograms with perpendicular baselines under 1200m. GPS data are used to correct for orbital errors and corrected interferograms are stacked to produce a deformation rate map that strongly resembles a synthetic interferogram constructed using a GPS based interseismic deformation model. To detect accumulated interseismic deformation over a longer time period we use the small baseline subset (SBAS) method to construct InSAR time series. The resulting linear rate map agrees very well with the GPS measurements along two profiles perpendicular to the coast where GPS observations are the densest. Maximum displacements reach ~10-15 mm/yr near the coastline. Future work will integrate these results with GPS observations to obtain a high-resolution strain accumulation model for the Nicoya Peninsula.

  12. Generalized interpretation scheme for arbitrary HR InSAR image pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, Markus; Thiele, Antje; Schulz, Karsten

    2013-10-01

    Land cover classification of remote sensing imagery is an important topic of research. For example, different applications require precise and fast information about the land cover of the imaged scenery (e.g., disaster management and change detection). Focusing on high resolution (HR) spaceborne remote sensing imagery, the user has the choice between passive and active sensor systems. Passive systems, such as multispectral sensors, have the disadvantage of being dependent from weather influences (fog, dust, clouds, etc.) and time of day, since they work in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, active systems like Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provide improved capabilities. As an interactive method analyzing HR InSAR image pairs, the CovAmCohTM method was introduced in former studies. CovAmCoh represents the joint analysis of locality (coefficient of variation - Cov), backscatter (amplitude - Am) and temporal stability (coherence - Coh). It delivers information on physical backscatter characteristics of imaged scene objects or structures and provides the opportunity to detect different classes of land cover (e.g., urban, rural, infrastructure and activity areas). As example, railway tracks are easily distinguishable from other infrastructure due to their characteristic bluish coloring caused by the gravel between the sleepers. In consequence, imaged objects or structures have a characteristic appearance in CovAmCoh images which allows the development of classification rules. In this paper, a generalized interpretation scheme for arbitrary InSAR image pairs using the CovAmCoh method is proposed. This scheme bases on analyzing the information content of typical CovAmCoh imagery using the semisupervised k-means clustering. It is shown that eight classes model the main local information content of CovAmCoh images sufficiently and can be used as basis for a classification scheme.

  13. Antarctic mass budget from 1975-2015 using InSAR, Landsat and RACMO-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.; Rignot, E. J.; Li, X.

    2015-12-01

    Ice Sheet Mass balance is measured from the difference between the ice discharge along the coast and surface mass balance of the drainage basins of the glaciers. Precise estimation of the mass balance of each glacier needs an exact delineation of their drainage basin, which, ultimately, is defined by the flow of the ice. The precision of mapping is, however, limited by the precision of the actual maps of ice flow, mainly based on speckle tracking, which is not sufficient to fully capture the direction of flow in slow-moving parts of the ice sheets. Here we revisit prior drainage basins of Antarctica using a new precise velocity map based on the interferometric phase by combining InSAR tracks from ALOS/PALSAR-1, ENVISAT/ASAR, ERS-1/-2 and RADARSAT-1/-2. We map ice flow in the interior of the ice sheet at the meter/year level precision. We discuss differences observed between new divides and topographic divides. In addition, we combine this information with a new bed topography from the mass conservation approach and a time history of glacier velocity from Landsat 1975-2015 and InSAR 1992-2015 to calculate the continental discharge since 1975. The results are combined with RACMO2 output products to reconstruct the mass balance of the ice sheet for the past 40 years. The results indicate a significant increase in mass loss from Antarctica starting in the 1990s. This work was performed at UC Irvine and Caltech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with NASA.

  14. Use of multitemporal InSAR data to develop geohazard scenarios for Bandung, Western Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano; Tolomei, Cristiano; Duro, Javier; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Koudogbo, Fifamè

    2015-04-01

    The Greater Bandung metropolitan area is the second largest urban area in Indonesia, with a population of 8.6 million. It is subject to a variety of geohazards: volcanic hazards from seven active volcanoes within a radius of 50 km; high flood hazards, seismic hazard due to crustal active faults, the best known being the 30-km long Lembang fault, 10 km North of the city centre; subsidence hazards due to strong aquifer depletion; landslide hazard in the surrounding high country. In the framework of the FP7 RASOR project, multitemporal satellite SAR data have been processed over Bandung, Western Java. We used the SBAS InSAR technique (Berardino et al., 2002) to process two ALOS-1 datasets, to investigate the various sources of surface deformation acting in the area in the period 2008-2011. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) has also been applied to achieve ground motion measurements with millimetric precision and high accuracy. The PSI processing technique considers a system of points that reflect the radar signal from the satellite continuously through the time. It makes use of differential interferometric phase measurements to generate long term terrain deformation and digital surface model maps. The GlobalSARTM algorithms developed by Altamira Information are applied to COSMO-SkyMed data acquired to measure ground motion over the area of interest. Strong ground displacements (up to 7 cm/yr) due to groundwater abstraction have been measured in the Bandung basin. The identification of long wavelength signals from tectonic sources is difficult due to the limited InSAR coherence outside of the urban environment. Limited deformation is observed also in the Tangkuban Perahu volcano to the north. The spatial and temporal distribution of the ground motion is important supporting information for the generation of long term subsidence and flood hazard scenarios.

  15. Absolute Time Error Calibration of GPS Receivers Using Advanced GPS Simulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    29th Annual Precise Time a d Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting ABSOLUTE TIME ERROR CALIBRATION OF GPS RECEIVERS USING ADVANCED GPS SIMULATORS E.D...DC 20375 USA Abstract Preche time transfer eq)er&nen& using GPS with t h e stabd?v’s under ten nanoseconh are common& being reported willrbr the... time transfer communily. Relarive calibrations are done by naeasurhg the time error of one GPS receiver versus a “known master refmence receiver.” Z?t

  16. Persistent Scatterer InSAR monitoring of Bratislava urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakon, Matus; Perissin, Daniele; Papco, Juraj; Lazecky, Milan

    2014-05-01

    ) technique, covering the target area with 57 Envisat ASAR images from Ascending Track No. 229 (32) and Descending Track No. 265 (25) captured between years 2002 and 2010. Processing involves Sarproz (Copyright (c) 2009 Daniele Perissin) a powerful software solution for obtaining differential interferograms and performing PSInSAR methodology. The area of interest to investigate the deformation phenomena is covering approximately 16 by 16 kilometers (256 sqkm). For evaluation of PSInSAR potential to detect and monitor ground displacements, PS derived time series of deformation signal were compared to the field GNSS data from three GNSS stations coded PIL1, BRAT and GKU4. By the detailed look on the deformation maps the investigated urban area of Bratislava is relatively stable with the deformation rates within the few (±5) millimeters. The comparison of PSInSAR derived time series with GNSS data indicates good correlation and confirms achievable precision and applicability of InSAR measurements for ground stability monitoring purposes. Data for this work were provided by European Space Agency within the Category-1 project ID 9981: "Detection of ground deformation using radar interferometry techniques". The authors are grateful to the Tatrabanka Foundation and The National Scholarship Programme of the Slovak Republic for the opportunity to work together. Data have been processed by the Sarproz (Copyright (c) 2009 Daniele Perissin) and visualised in Google Earth. This paper is also the result of the implementation of the project: the National Centre of Earth's Surface Deformation Diagnostic in the area of Slovakia, ITMS 26220220108 supported by the Research and Development Operational Programme funded by the ERDF and the grant No. 1/0642/13 of the Slovak Grant Agency VEGA.

  17. Activity of Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira Volcanoes (Dem. Rep. of Congo) Revealed Using Geological, Geophysical and InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauthier, C.; Cayol, V.; Hooper, A.; Kervyn, F.; Marinkovic, P.; D'Oreye, N.; Poland, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    Ground-based monitoring of active volcanoes in Africa can be problematic due to political instabilities, safety issues and poor accessibility. Remote-sensing techniques such as Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR, more commonly InSAR), are therefore very useful and provide robust observational tools for natural hazard assessment, regardless of local conditions. Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira volcanoes (which experienced nine eruptions from December 1996 to January 2010) are located in the western branch of the East African Rift (Virunga Volcanic Province, North Kivu, Dem. Rep. of Congo). InSAR has recorded ground displacements related to most of the tectonic and volcanic events that have occurred since 1996 using SAR images from the JERS, ERS-1/2, ENVISAT, RADARSAT-1, RADARSAT-2 and ALOS satellites. This database provides excellent spatial and temporal resolution of deformation, leading to insights into tectonic and volcanic processes. Loss of coherence within the SAR signal due to rapid-changing equatorial vegetation hampers the use of InSAR as a volcano-tectonic monitoring tool. We partially overcome this limitation using 1) a large number of SAR images, including about 150 ENVISAT and more than 100 RADARSAT-1 images, 2) short repeat times of 24 and 35 days for RADARSAT-1 and ENVISAT, respectively, and 3) satellites with longer wavelengths, such as JERS and ALOS. Using a large dataset combining short revisit time SAR images significantly increases the chances of producing interferograms with good coherence. A longer wavelength radar signal better penetrates vegetation cover, also increasing coherence. Furthermore, useful data were retrieved in low-coherence areas by applying the “StaMPS” (Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers) method, which combines a small baseline and persistent scatterers approach, to our largest SAR datasets. Using several look angles from both ascending and descending orbital tracks, we were able to characterize

  18. Groundwater depletion in Central Mexico: Use of GRACE and InSAR to support water resources management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellazzi, Pascal; Martel, Richard; Rivera, Alfonso; Huang, Jianliang; Pavlic, Goran; Calderhead, Angus I.; Chaussard, Estelle; Garfias, Jaime; Salas, Javier

    2016-08-01

    Groundwater deficits occur in several areas of Central Mexico, where water resource assessment is limited by the availability and reliability of field data. In this context, GRACE and InSAR are used to remotely assess groundwater storage loss in one of Mexico's most important watersheds in terms of size and economic activity: the Lerma-Santiago-Pacifico (LSP). In situ data and Land Surface Models are used to subtract soil moisture and surface water storage changes from the total water storage change measured by GRACE satellites. As a result, groundwater mass change time-series are obtained for a 12 years period. ALOS-PALSAR images acquired from 2007 to 2011 were processed using the SBAS-InSAR algorithm to reveal areas subject to ground motion related to groundwater over-exploitation. In the perspective of providing guidance for groundwater management, GRACE and InSAR observations are compared with official water budgets and field observations. InSAR-derived subsidence mapping generally agrees well with official water budgets, and shows that deficits occur mainly in cities and irrigated agricultural areas. GRACE does not entirely detect the significant groundwater losses largely reported by official water budgets, literature and InSAR observations. The difference is interpreted as returns of wastewater to the groundwater flow systems, which limits the watershed scale groundwater depletion but suggests major impacts on groundwater quality. This phenomenon is enhanced by ground fracturing as noticed in the field. Studying the fate of the extracted groundwater is essential when comparing GRACE data with higher resolution observations, and particularly in the perspective of further InSAR/GRACE combination in hydrogeology.

  19. Analysis of PV Advanced Inverter Functions and Setpoints under Time Series Simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Seuss, John; Reno, Matthew J.; Broderick, Robert Joseph; Grijalva, Santiago

    2016-05-01

    Utilities are increasingly concerned about the potential negative impacts distributed PV may have on the operational integrity of their distribution feeders. Some have proposed novel methods for controlling a PV system's grid - tie inverter to mitigate poten tial PV - induced problems. This report investigates the effectiveness of several of these PV advanced inverter controls on improving distribution feeder operational metrics. The controls are simulated on a large PV system interconnected at several locations within two realistic distribution feeder models. Due to the time - domain nature of the advanced inverter controls, quasi - static time series simulations are performed under one week of representative variable irradiance and load data for each feeder. A para metric study is performed on each control type to determine how well certain measurable network metrics improve as a function of the control parameters. This methodology is used to determine appropriate advanced inverter settings for each location on the f eeder and overall for any interconnection location on the feeder.

  20. Imaging irregular magma reservoirs with InSAR and GPS observations: Application to Kilauea and Copahue volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, P.; Camacho, A.; Poland, M. P.; Miklius, A.; Samsonov, S. V.; Milillo, P.

    2013-12-01

    The availability of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) data has increased our awareness of the complexity of volcano deformation sources. InSAR's spatial completeness helps identify or clarify source process mechanisms at volcanoes (i.e. Mt. Etna east flank motion; Lazufre crustal magma body; Kilauea dike complexity) and also improves potential model realism. In recent years, Bayesian inference methods have gained widespread use because of their ability to constrain not only source model parameters, but also their uncertainties. They are computationally intensive, however, which tends to limit them to a few geometrically rather simple source representations (for example, spheres). An alternative approach involves solving for irregular pressure and/or density sources from a three-dimensional (3-D) grid of source/density cells. This method has the ability to solve for arbitrarily shaped bodies of constant absolute pressure/density difference. We compare results for both Bayesian (a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm) and the irregular source methods for two volcanoes: Kilauea, Hawaii, and Copahue, Argentina-Chile border. Kilauea has extensive InSAR and GPS databases from which to explore the results for the irregular method with respect to the Bayesian approach, prior models, and an extensive set of ancillary data. One caveat, however, is the current restriction in the irregular model inversion to volume-pressure sources (and at a single excess pressure change), which limits its application in cases where sources such as faults or dikes are present. Preliminary results for Kilauea summit deflation during the March 2011 Kamoamoa eruption suggests a northeast-elongated magma body lying roughly 1-1.5 km below the surface. Copahue is a southern Andes volcano that has been inflating since early 2012, with intermittent summit eruptive activity since late 2012. We have an extensive InSAR time series from RADARSAT-2 and COSMO-SkyMed data, although both are

  1. Electroencephalography when meditation advances: a case-based time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-Feng; Jou, Shaw-Hwa; Cho, WenChun; Lin, Chieh-Min

    2013-11-01

    Increased alpha and theta activities in electroencephalography (EEG) have been found during various forms of meditation. However, advanced stage of meditation drew less attention to date. We aimed at exploring EEG characteristics during advanced meditation. Bilateral absolute alpha and theta EEG powers were recorded when a single meditator at rest, exercising breath meditation, and reaching the advanced meditative stage in 10 sessions of meditation. Averaged time-series data were analyzed using simulation modeling analysis to compare the powers during different meditative phases. During breath meditation, significantly higher activities compared with baseline were found only in bilateral theta (P = 0.0406, 0.0158 for left and right sides, respectively), but not in alpha (P = 0.1412, 0.0978 for left and right sides, respectively) bands. When meditation advanced, significantly increased activities were found both in bilateral alpha (P = 0.0218, 0.0258 for left and right sides, respectively) and theta (P = 0.0308, 0.0260 for left and right sides, respectively) bands compared against breath meditation. When advanced meditation compared against baseline, bilateral alpha (P = 0.0001, 0.0001 for left and right sides, respectively) and theta (P = 0.0001, 0.0001 for left and right sides, respectively) bands revealed significantly increased activities. Our findings support that internalized attention manifested as theta activity continuingly enhances significantly in sequential phases of meditation, while relaxation manifested as alpha activity is significant only after the advanced meditative phase is reached.

  2. The 2010 slow slip event and secular motion at Kilauea, Hawai`i inferred from TerraSAR-X InSAR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Jingyi; Zebker, Howard A.; Segall, Paul; Miklius, Asta

    2014-01-01

    We present here an Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm to extract both transient and secular ground deformations on the order of millimeters in the presence of tropospheric noise on the order of centimeters, when the transient is of short duration and known time, and the background deformation is smooth in time. We applied this algorithm to study the 2010 slow slip event as well as the secular motion of Kīlauea's south flank using 49 TerraSAR-X images. We also estimate the tropospheric delay variation relative to a given reference pixel using an InSAR SBAS approach. We compare the InSAR SBAS solution for both ground deformation and tropospheric delays with existing GPS measurements and confirm that the ground deformation signal andtropospheric noise in InSAR data are successfully separated. We observe that the coastal region on the south side of the Hilina Pali moves at a higher background rate than the region north side of the Pali. We also conclude that the 2010 SSE displacement is mainly horizontal and the maximum magnitude of the 2010 SSE vertical component is less than 5 mm.

  3. The Role and Timing of Palliative Care in Supporting Persons with Intellectual Disability and Advanced Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, Mary; McCallion, Philip; Fahey-McCarthy, Elizabeth; Connaire, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To better describe the role and timing of palliative care in supporting persons with intellectual disabilities and advanced dementia (AD). Background: Specialist palliative care providers have focused mostly on people with cancers. Working with persons with intellectual disabilities and AD offers opportunities to expand such palliative care…

  4. 48 CFR 1552.215-74 - Advanced understanding-uncompensated time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Advanced understanding-uncompensated time. 1552.215-74 Section 1552.215-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions...

  5. Geolocation of LTE Subscriber Stations Based on the Timing Advance Ranging Parameter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    timing advance range rings (From [8]). ..................6 Figure 3. Functional commonality between SC- FDMA and OFDMA signal chains (From [14... FDMA Single Carrier Frequency Division Multiple Access SDU Service Data Unit SS Subscriber Station SVD Singular Value Decomposition TA...uplink and downlink. They are single-carrier frequency-division multiple access (SC- FDMA ) and orthogonal frequency-division multiple access (OFDMA

  6. Evolution of unrest at Laguna del Maule volcanic field (Chile) from InSAR and GPS measurements, 2003 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mével, Hélène; Feigl, Kurt L.; Córdova, Loreto; DeMets, Charles; Lundgren, Paul

    2015-08-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in the southern volcanic zone of the Chilean Andes exhibits a large volume of rhyolitic material erupted during postglacial times (20-2 ka). Since 2007, LdM has experienced an unrest episode characterized by high rates of deformation. Analysis of new GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data reveals uplift rates greater than 190 mm/yr between January 2013 and November 2014. The geodetic data are modeled as an inflating sill at depth. The results are used to calculate the temporal evolution of the vertical displacement. The best time function for modeling the InSAR data set is a double exponential model with rates increasing from 2007 through 2010 and decreasing slowly since 2010. We hypothesize that magma intruding into an existing silicic magma reservoir is driving the surface deformation. Modeling historical uplift at Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Three Sisters volcanic fields suggests a common temporal evolution of vertical displacement rates.

  7. Source parameters of the 2008 Bukavu-Cyangugu earthquake estimated from InSAR and teleseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oreye, Nicolas; González, Pablo J.; Shuler, Ashley; Oth, Adrien; Bagalwa, Louis; Ekström, Göran; Kavotha, Déogratias; Kervyn, François; Lucas, Celia; Lukaya, François; Osodundu, Etoy; Wauthier, Christelle; Fernández, José

    2011-02-01

    the earthquake occurred in the shallow crust, at approximately 8 km depth. Inversions of ENVISAT (Environment Satellite) and ALOS (Advanced Land Observation Satellite) data place the earthquake at 9 km. A comparison of the scalar moment (9.43 ± 0.06 × 1017 Nm from seismology and 8.99 ± 0.010 × 1017 Nm from the joint InSAR solution) shows good agreement between the two data sets. Such an agreement is in contrast to the large discrepancies observed (up to an order of magnitude) in other places along the EAR where similar earthquake sequences are associated with magmatic intrusion. From this, we infer that the rupture was brittle and occurred with little aseismic deformation as might be expected from magma injection. Our results provide insights into the style of rifting occurring in the South Kivu Volcanic Province and hence will aid future studies on seismic risk in the context of Lake Kivu and underline the importance of systematic monitoring of the EAR area.

  8. Comparison of four moderate-size earthquakes in southern California using seismology and InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mellors, R.J.; Magistrale, H.; Earle, P.; Cogbill, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    Source parameters determined from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements and from seismic data are compared from four moderate-size (less than M 6) earthquakes in southern California. The goal is to verify approximate detection capabilities of InSAR, assess differences in the results, and test how the two results can be reconciled. First, we calculated the expected surface deformation from all earthquakes greater than magnitude 4 in areas with available InSAR data (347 events). A search for deformation from the events in the interferograms yielded four possible events with magnitudes less than 6. The search for deformation was based on a visual inspection as well as cross-correlation in two dimensions between the measured signal and the expected signal. A grid-search algorithm was then used to estimate focal mechanism and depth from the InSAR data. The results were compared with locations and focal mechanisms from published catalogs. An independent relocation using seismic data was also performed. The seismic locations fell within the area of the expected rupture zone for the three events that show clear surface deformation. Therefore, the technique shows the capability to resolve locations with high accuracy and is applicable worldwide. The depths determined by InSAR agree with well-constrained seismic locations determined in a 3D velocity model. Depth control for well-imaged shallow events using InSAR data is good, and better than the seismic constraints in some cases. A major difficulty for InSAR analysis is the poor temporal coverage of InSAR data, which may make it impossible to distinguish deformation due to different earthquakes at the same location.

  9. Distributed fault rupture in the Yuha Desert, California, associated with the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, and the contribution of InSAR imagery to its documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, J. A.; Kendrick, K. J.; Rymer, M. J.; Fielding, E. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Mw7.2 April 4, 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake and its aftershocks caused primary and secondary rupture on a broad array of more than two dozen faults in the Yuha Desert, just north of the United States-Mexico border. Field mapping documented maximum displacements of 4-6 cm on branches of the northwest-trending Laguna Salada Fault and on the newly identified and named, northeast-trending Yuha Fault. Lesser displacements, including left-lateral, right-lateral and/or extensional components were mapped on at least twenty other faults, a majority of which are newly identified. Minor triggered slip (~1 cm) was also found on the southeastern-most Elsinore Fault, likely in response to the June aftershock sequence. Although the principal faults were readily identified and mapped in the field, many of the faults with lower coseismic displacement might not have been mapped had we not had interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery to alert us to their presence. InSAR images were from data derived from the high resolution airborne NASA/JPL UAVSAR instrument. Fault displacements were discernable from both the primary rupture and the aftershock sequence. Faults with surface displacements as small as a couple of millimeters or less were located and mapped. Several InSAR lineaments are interpreted as faults which had more distributed displacement that was not expressed as brittle surface rupture. InSAR imagery spanning the appropriate time intervals proved invaluable to obtaining a more complete picture of faulting in the Yuha Desert.

  10. Magma and fluid migration at Yellowstone Caldera in the last three decades inferred from InSAR, leveling, and gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizzani, P.; Battaglia, M.; Castaldo, R.; Pepe, A.; Zeni, G.; Lanari, R.

    2015-04-01

    We studied the Yellowstone caldera geological unrest between 1977 and 2010 by investigating temporal changes in differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), precise spirit leveling and gravity measurements. The analysis of the 1992-2010 displacement time series, retrieved by applying the SBAS InSAR technique, allowed the identification of three areas of deformation: (i) the Mallard Lake (ML) and Sour Creek (SC) resurgent domes, (ii) a region close to the Northern Caldera Rim (NCR), and (iii) the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP). While the eastern SRP shows a signal related to tectonic deformation, the other two regions are influenced by the caldera unrest. We removed the tectonic signal from the InSAR displacements, and we modeled the InSAR, leveling, and gravity measurements to retrieve the best fitting source parameters. Our findings confirmed the existence of different distinct sources, beneath the brittle-ductile transition zone, which have been intermittently active during the last three decades. Moreover, we interpreted our results in the light of existing seismic tomography studies. Concerning the SC dome, we highlighted the role of hydrothermal fluids as the driving force behind the 1977-1983 uplift; since 1983-1993 the deformation source transformed into a deeper one with a higher magmatic component. Furthermore, our results support the magmatic nature of the deformation source beneath ML dome for the overall investigated period. Finally, the uplift at NCR is interpreted as magma accumulation, while its subsidence could either be the result of fluids migration outside the caldera or the gravitational adjustment of the source from a spherical to a sill-like geometry.

  11. Slope instability and post-emplacement lava flow deformation revealed using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, L. N.; Lu, Z.; Oommen, T.

    2014-12-01

    Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala, is a dominantly basaltic complex that has been continually active since the 1960's, with over 250 lava flows, intermittent strombolian activity, and ash and fumerolic plumes. Sometime between 0.6 and 1.6 ka B.P., the SW sector of the initial cone failed in a major edifice collapse. This event left a large arcuate scarp, within which the modern cone was constructed from historical times up to the present. Two collapses on the upper flanks of the cone near the main vent in 1962 and 2010, and uneven loading of lava flows on the SW flank are a cause for concern about the stability of this young edifice. For this study, ALOS PALSAR L-band Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data was analyzed at Pacaya from February 2007 - February 2011. Interferograms reveal several applications of InSAR for understanding and monitoring activity at Pacaya, including: (1) lava cooling-related compaction during effusive activity, (2) inflation on the northern side of the cone prior to a large eruption on May 27th, 2010, and (3) movement of the edifice to the SW during this large eruption, suggesting large-scale flank instability. With the implementation of InSAR technology at Pacaya in the future, we may be able to provide insights into the post-emplacement behavior of lava flows and shed light on edifice stability, leading to improved volcano hazard assessments.

  12. Source mechanism analysis of strong mining induced seismic event and its influence on ground deformation observed by InSAR technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzinski, Lukasz; Mirek, Katarzyna; Mirek, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    On April 17th, 2015 a strong shallow seismic event M4.0 struck a mining panel in the Wujek-Slask coal mine, southern Poland. The event was widely felt, followed with rockburst and caused a strong damages inside mining corridors. Unfortunately two miners are trapped by tunnels collapse. Full Moment Tensor (MT) estimated with regional broad-band signals shows that the event was characterized with very high isotropic (implosive) part. Mining inspections verified the occurrence of a rockfall and floor uplift. Very shallow foci depth (less than 1000m) and collapse - like MT solution suggest that event could be responsible for surface deformation in the vicinity of epicenter. To verified this issue we used the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar technique (InSAR). The InSAR relies on measuring phase differences between two SAR images (radarograms). The measured differences may be computed into a single interferometric image. i.e. an interferogram. Interferogram computed from two radarograms of the same terrain taken at different time allows detecting changes in elevation of the terrain. Two SAR scenes acquired by Sentinel-1 satellite (European Space Agency) were processed to obtain the interferogram covered study area (12.04.2015 and 24.04.2015). 12 days interval differential interferogram shows distinctive concentric feature which indicate subsidence trough. Subsidence pattern shows 1 cycle of deformation corresponding with about 2.5 cm subsidence. The InSAR solution support the reliability of very strong implosive MT part.

  13. INSAR Assessment Of Pipelines Stability Using Compact Active Transponders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, Jessica K.; Holley, Rachel J.; Giunta, Giuseppe; De Lorenzo, Gianpietro; Thomas, Adam M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the use of a network of 7 prototype Compact Active Transponders (CATs) to measure ground and pipeline motion in an area subject to landslides in northern Italy. The results showed that two of the CATs, located at the center of the study area, experienced higher rates of line-of-sight (LOS) motion than the others. The spatial variation in the LOS motion rates could indicate that the central section of the slope moved at a higher rate, most likely in a westward and down-slope direction during the study. In addition to the InSAR measurements, GPS campaigns provided four epochs of motion measurements. Despite technical and environmental challenges, the study demonstrated the potential use of CATs to remotely map and monitor ground and structure motion.

  14. On InSAR ambiguity resolution for deformation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teunissen, P. J. T.

    Integer carrier phase ambiguity resolution is the key to fast and high-precision satellite positioning and navigation. It applies to a great variety of current and future models of GPS, modernized GPS and Galileo. It also applies to stacked radar interferometry for deformation monitoring, see e.g. [Hanssen, et al., 2001]. In this contribution we apply the integer least-squares' principle to the rank defect model of stacked InSAR carrier phase data. We discuss two ways of dealing with the rank defect for ambiguity resolution. One is based on the use of a priori data, the other is based on the use of an interval constraint on the deformation rate.

  15. Reconditioning fault slip inversions via InSAR data discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziv, Alon

    2016-10-01

    A major difficulty in inverting geodetic data for fault slip distribution is that measurement errors are mapped from the data space onto the solution space. The amplitude of this mapping is sensitive to the condition number of the inverse problem, i.e., the ratio between the largest and smallest singular value of the forward matrix. Thus, unless the problem is well-conditioned, slip inversions cannot reveal the actual fault slip distribution. In this study, we describe a new iterative algorithm that optimizes the condition of the slip inversion through discretization of InSAR data. We present a numerical example that demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach. We show that the condition number of the reconditioned data sets are not only much smaller than those of uniformly spaced data sets with the same dimension but are also much smaller than non-uniformly spaced data sets, with data density that increases towards the model fault.

  16. Simplex GPS and InSAR Inversion Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay W.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Pierce, Marlon E.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the shape of the Earth's surface can be routinely measured with precisions better than centimeters. Processes below the surface often drive these changes and as a result, investigators require models with inversion methods to characterize the sources. Simplex inverts any combination of GPS (global positioning system), UAVSAR (uninhabited aerial vehicle synthetic aperture radar), and InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar) data simultaneously for elastic response from fault and fluid motions. It can be used to solve for multiple faults and parameters, all of which can be specified or allowed to vary. The software can be used to study long-term tectonic motions and the faults responsible for those motions, or can be used to invert for co-seismic slip from earthquakes. Solutions involving estimation of fault motion and changes in fluid reservoirs such as magma or water are possible. Any arbitrary number of faults or parameters can be considered. Simplex specifically solves for any of location, geometry, fault slip, and expansion/contraction of a single or multiple faults. It inverts GPS and InSAR data for elastic dislocations in a half-space. Slip parameters include strike slip, dip slip, and tensile dislocations. It includes a map interface for both setting up the models and viewing the results. Results, including faults, and observed, computed, and residual displacements, are output in text format, a map interface, and can be exported to KML. The software interfaces with the QuakeTables database allowing a user to select existing fault parameters or data. Simplex can be accessed through the QuakeSim portal graphical user interface or run from a UNIX command line.

  17. InSAR observations of the 2009 Racha earthquake, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Elena; Walter, Thomas R.

    2016-09-01

    Central Georgia is an area strongly affected by earthquake and landslide hazards. On 29 April 1991 a major earthquake (Mw  =  7.0) struck the Racha region in Georgia, followed by aftershocks and significant afterslip. The same region was hit by another major event (Mw  =  6.0) on 7 September 2009. The aim of the study reported here was to utilize interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data to improve knowledge about the spatial pattern of deformation due to the 2009 earthquake. There were no actual earthquake observations by InSAR in Georgia. We considered all available SAR data images from different space agencies. However, due to the long wavelength and the frequent acquisitions, only the multi-temporal ALOS L-band SAR data allowed us to produce interferograms spanning the 2009 earthquake. We detected a local uplift around 10 cm (along the line-of-sight propagation) in the interferogram near the earthquake's epicenter, whereas evidence of surface ruptures could not be found in the field along the active thrust fault. We simulated a deformation signal which could be created by the 2009 Racha earthquake on the basis of local seismic records and by using an elastic dislocation model. We compared our modeled fault surface of the September 2009 with the April 1991 Racha earthquake fault surfaces and identify the same fault or a sub-parallel fault of the same system as the origin. The patch that was active in 2009 is just adjacent to the 1991 patch, indicating a possible mainly westward propagation direction, with important implications for future earthquake hazards.

  18. InSAR observations of aseismic slip associated with an earthquake swarm in the Columbia River flood basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicks, C.; Thelen, W.; Weaver, C.; Gomberg, J.; Rohay, A.; Bodin, P.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009 a swarm of small shallow earthquakes occurred within the basalt flows of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The swarm occurred within a dense seismic network in the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site. Data from the seismic network along with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the European Space Agencys (ESA) ENVISAT satellite provide insight into the nature of the swarm. By modeling the InSAR deformation data we constructed a model that consists of a shallow thrust fault and a near horizontal fault. We suggest that the near horizontal lying fault is a bedding-plane fault located between basalt flows. The geodetic moment of the modeled fault system is about eight times the cumulative seismic moment of the swarm. Precise location estimates of the swarm earthquakes indicate that the area of highest slip on the thrust fault, ???70mm of slip less than ???0.5km depth, was not located within the swarm cluster. Most of the slip on the faults appears to have progressed aseismically and we suggest that interbed sediments play a central role in the slip process. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. InSAR and GPS measurements of crustal deformation due to seasonal loading of Tehri reservoir in Garhwal Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahalaut, V. K.; Yadav, Rajeev K.; Sreejith, K. M.; Gahalaut, Kalpna; Bürgmann, Roland; Agrawal, Ritesh; Sati, S. P.; Kumar, Amit

    2017-01-01

    We report unique observations of crustal deformation caused by the seasonal water level changes of Tehri reservoir in the Garhwal region of NW Himalaya from GPS measurements and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) analysis. All GPS sites along the Himalaya are strongly influenced by seasonal hydrological and atmospheric loading. However, the GPS site KUNR located near the reservoir additionally exhibits anomalous variations due to seasonal water loading and unloading by the reservoir. Our InSAR analysis confirms that the seasonal filling of the reservoir causes measurable subsidence in its neighbourhood. In addition to the elastic deformation caused by the seasonal reservoir loading and the negligible poroelastic deformation caused by associated fluid pressure changes, there is an unaccounted for biannual deformation in the east component of the GPS time series which we suspect to be caused by altered hydrological conditions due to the reservoir operations. Understanding crustal deformation processes due to such anthropogenic sources helps in separating deformation caused by tectonic, hydrological and atmospheric effects from that caused by these activities.

  20. Performance of High Resolution Satellite InSAR in Detection of Dangerous Subsidence in Case of Brno Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazecky, Milan; Rapant, Petr; Blaha, Pavel; Perissin, Daniele

    2016-08-01

    For the work, we have achieved 20 Radarsat-2 acquisitions in fine beam mode within ESA project C1P.21629 - Evaluation of Potential Threats to Stability of Linear Structures using InSAR Technology. These acquisitions show deformations in Brno city between August 2014 and October 2015 with a regular step of 24 days temporal difference. Also, we have additionally achieved a series of 75 Cosmo SkyMed images with temporal step every 16 days in average, for dates between June 2011 and July 2014. The Cosmo SkyMed dataset partially overlaps with the reference measurements of tilt and height changes. After the end of the intensive measurements, the PS InSAR time series can deliver knowledge about continuation of movement and depict the date of final stabilization of the area. The accuracy can be validated using the limited number of the continuing warranty levelling mission. We have realized that the available dataset can be used also for monitoring of other events. We provide an example of potential detection of a cavity under a house in Brno-Bystrc.

  1. Adaptive optics real time processing design for the advanced technology solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Kit

    2012-07-01

    The four meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) adaptive optics (AO) system will require at least twenty-four times the real time processing power as the Dunn Solar Telescope AO system. An FPGA solution for ATST AO real time processing is being pursued instead of the parallel DSP approach used for the Dunn AO76 system. An analysis shows FPGAs will have lower latency and lower hardware cost than an equivalent DSP solution. Interfacing to the proposed high speed camera and the deformable mirror will be simpler and have lower latency than with DSPs. This paper will discuss the current design and progress toward implementing the FPGA solution.

  2. Advanced X-Ray Timing Array Mission: Conceptual Spacecraft Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. C.; Johnson, L.; Thomas, H. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Baysinger, M.; Maples, C. D.; Fabisinski, L.L.; Hornsby, L.; Thompson, K. S.; Miernik, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced X-Ray Timing Array (AXTAR) is a mission concept for submillisecond timing of bright galactic x-ray sources. The two science instruments are the Large Area Timing Array (LATA) (a collimated instrument with 2-50-keV coverage and over 3 square meters of effective area) and a Sky Monitor (SM), which acts as a trigger for pointed observations of x-ray transients. The spacecraft conceptual design team developed two spacecraft concepts that will enable the AXTAR mission: A minimal configuration to be launched on a Taurus II and a larger configuration to be launched on a Falcon 9 or similar vehicle.

  3. Study of the deformation in Central Afar using InSAR NSBAS chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deprez, A.; Doubre, C.; Grandin, R.; Saad, I.; Masson, F.; Socquet, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Afar Depression (East Africa) connects all three continental plates of Arabia, Somalia and Nubia plates. For over 20 Ma, the divergent motion of these plates has led to the formation of large normal faults building tall scarps between the high plateaus and the depression, and the development of large basins and an incipient seafloor spreading along a series of active volcano-tectonic rift segments within the depression. The space-time evolution of the active surface deformation over the whole Afar region remains uncertain. Previous tectonic and geodetic studies confirm that a large part of the current deformation is concentrated along these segments. However, the amount of extension accommodated by other non-volcanic basins and normal faulting remains unclear, despite significant micro-seismic activity. Due to the active volcanism, large transient displacements related to dyking sequence, notably in the Manda Hararo rift (2005-2010), increase the difficulty to characterize the deformation field over simple time and space scales. In this study, we attempt to obtain a complete inventory of the deformation within the whole Afar Depression and to understand the associated phenomena, which occurred in this singular tectonic environment. We study in particular, the behavior of the structures activated during the post-dyking stage of the rift segments. For this purpose, we conduct a careful processing of a large set of SAR ENVISAT images over the 2004-2010 period, we also use previous InSAR results and GPS data from permanent stations and from campaigns conducted in 1999, 2003, 2010, 2012 within a GPS network particularly dense along the Asal-Ghoubbet segment. In one hand, in the western part of Afar, the far-field response of the 2005-2010 dyke sequence appears to be the dominant surface motion on the mean velocity field. In an other hand, more eastward across the Asal-Ghoubbet rift, strong gradients of deformation are observed. The time series analysis of both InSAR

  4. InSAR detection of aquifer recovery: Case studies of Koehn Lake (central California) and Lone Tree Gold Mine (Basin and Range)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Greene, F.; Amelung, F.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic intervention in groundwater flow and aquifer storage often results in vertical movements of Earth's surface, which are well detected by InSAR observations. Most anthropogenic intervention occurs due to groundwater extraction for both agriculture and human consumption and results in land subsidence. However in some cases, ending anthropogenic intervention can lead to aquifer recovery and, consequently, surface uplift. In this study we present two such cases of aquifer recovery. The first case is the aquifer beneath Koehn Lake in Central California, which was overused to meet agricultural demands until the 1990's. The second case is the Lone Tree Gold Mine in Nevada that during active mining in the 1991-2006 groundwater pumping disrupted the aquifer and cause subsidence. But after mining ceased, groundwater flow was recovered and resulted in uplift. In both cases we studied the surface uplift using InSAR time series observations. We conduct an ERS and Envisat InSAR survey over Koehn Lake in California and Lone Tree Gold Mine in Nevada between 1992 and 2010. We followed the SBAS algorithm to generate a time-series of ground displacements and average velocities of pixels, which remain coherent through time in the SAR dataset. A total of 100 and 80 combined ERS and Envisat SAR dates are inverted for Koehn Lake and Lone Tree Gold Mine respectively. Results for the Koehn Lake area indicate a rapid uplift of about 3.5 mm/yr between 1992-2000 and a slower uplift rate of 1.6 mm/yr between 2000-2004, suggesting a decrease in the recovery process. The observed uplift correlates well with groundwater level increase in the Koehn Lake area. Results for the Lone Tree Gold Mine show a constant subsidence (~ 1 cm/yr) due to groundwater extraction between 1992-2006, but uplift of ~1 cm/yr since the beginning of 2007. In both case studies, InSAR observations reveal that the aquifer recovery is accompanied by surface uplift. We plan to use the InSAR observations and the

  5. Low Latency Sensor Web Integration of Seismic Tomography, InSAR, and Deformation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Masterlark, T.; Lees, J. M.; Lundgren, P.; Song, W.

    2011-12-01

    In the volcanic environment, seismometers are sensitive to high-frequency, brittle failure earthquakes (tectonic-shear and dike intrusion events) and volcanic tremor. Real-time seismic analysis provides epicenter location, fault parameters, and, given enough data, the geometry of magmatic intrusion with short latency. Due to the limits of the seismic frequency response, however, seismic data analysis can only infer magma movement and volume change through their manifestation on changes in the elastic properties of the volcano obtained from tomography, and when possible from tracking earthquake hypocenters. Geodetic measurements (GPS, leveling, InSAR) on the other hand, measure volume changes and surface strain more directly by tracking surface deformation. Geodetic observations, however, lack the sensitivity to distinguish between various sources of surface deformation. In particular, the separation of deformation due to magma migration from all other extraneous sources is a key limitation of geodetic data inversion. We will present a framework in which high-resolution, real-time seismic tomography, calculated by a distributed network of seismic sensor nodes, can be coupled with low-latency InSAR acquisition and processing to constrain three-dimensional(3D) finite element model (FEM) solutions for the volcano deformation sources. The FEM simulates pressurized magma chambers (a deformation source) embedded in domains having a distribution of material properties, determined from seismic tomography models, and the irregular relief of a volcano, according to available digital elevation models (DEMs). The mass and volume estimates thus calculated, are then re-incorporated into the next iteration of the seismic tomography. This is done by first delineating subsurface regions where magma injection is required by the deformation models. Model parameters within these 3D structures are constrained by restricting the range of velocity (or Q) those voxels (model elemets) can

  6. Monitoring of Three Case Studies of Creeping Landslides in Ecuador using L-band SAR Interferometry (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorga Torres, T. M.; Mohseni Aref, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tannia Mayorga Torres1,21 Universidad Central del Ecuador. Faculty of Geology, Mining, Oil, and Environment 2 Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship 2015-16 IntroductionLandslides lead to human and economic losses across the country, mainly in the winter season. On the other hand, satellite radar data has cost-effective benefits due to open-source software and free availability of data. With the purpose of establishing an early warning system of landslide-related surface deformation, three case studies were designed in the Coast, Sierra (Andean), and Oriente (jungle) regions. The objective of this work was to assess the capability of L-band InSAR to get phase information. For the calculation of the interferograms in Repeat Orbit Interferometry PACkage, the displacement was detected as the error and was corrected. The coherence images (Figure 1) determined that L-band is suitable for InSAR processing. Under this frame, as a first approach, the stacking DInSAR technique [1] was applied in the case studies [2]; however, due to lush vegetation and steep topography, it is necessary to apply advanced InSAR techniques [3]. The purpose of the research is to determine a pattern of data acquisition and successful results to understand the spatial and temporal ground movements associated with landslides. The further work consists of establishing landslide inventories to combine phases of SAR images to generate maps of surface deformation in Tumba-San Francisco and Guarumales to compare the results with ground-based measurements to determine the maps' accuracy. References[1] Sandwell D., Price E. (1998). Phase gradient approach to stacking interferograms. Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 103, N. B12, pp. 30,183-30,204. [2] Mayorga T., Platzeck G. (2014). Using DInSAR as a tool to detect unstable terrain areas in an Andes region in Ecuador. NH3.5-Blue Poster B298, Vol. 16, EGU2014-16203. Austria. [3] Wasowski J., Bovenga F. (2014). Investigating landslides and unstable slopes with

  7. UTILIZING RESULTS FROM INSAR TO DEVELOP SEISMIC LOCATION BENCHMARKS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SEISMIC SOURCE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    M. BEGNAUD; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    Obtaining accurate seismic event locations is one of the most important goals for monitoring detonations of underground nuclear teats. This is a particular challenge at small magnitudes where the number of recording stations may be less than 20. Although many different procedures are being developed to improve seismic location, most procedures suffer from inadequate testing against accurate information about a seismic event. Events with well-defined attributes, such as latitude, longitude, depth and origin time, are commonly referred to as ground truth (GT). Ground truth comes in many forms and with many different levels of accuracy. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) can provide independent and accurate information (ground truth) regarding ground surface deformation and/or rupture. Relating surface deformation to seismic events is trivial when events are large and create a significant surface rupture, such as for the M{sub w} = 7.5 event that occurred in the remote northern region of the Tibetan plateau in 1997. The event, which was a vertical strike slip even appeared anomalous in nature due to the lack of large aftershocks and had an associated surface rupture of over 180 km that was identified and modeled using InSAR. The east-west orientation of the fault rupture provides excellent ground truth for latitude, but is of limited use for longitude. However, a secondary rupture occurred 50 km south of the main shock rupture trace that can provide ground truth with accuracy within 5 km. The smaller, 5-km-long secondary rupture presents a challenge for relating the deformation to a seismic event. The rupture is believed to have a thrust mechanism; the dip of the fimdt allows for some separation between the secondary rupture trace and its associated event epicenter, although not as much as is currently observed from catalog locations. Few events within the time period of the InSAR analysis are candidates for the secondary rupture. Of these, we have

  8. Towards a high resolution inventory of anthropogenic deformation in North America using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Lohman, R. B.; Taylor, H.; Semple, A.; Valentino, B.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic surface deformation is important to measure for several reasons -- 1) it could be a hazard to infrastructure; 2) it could contaminate precise measurements of other types of deformation (e.g., magmatic or tectonic); and 3) the deformation can provide otherwise inaccessible information about the subsurface as we measure the Earth's response to known pumping, surface change, or mining activity. While there are studies at individual sites in North America that demonstrate these three types of studies, we lack a continental synoptic view of anthropogenic deformation and its significance. To fill this gap, we use satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to image ground deformation across the continent with a spatial resolution of 1 km/pixel or better using results from the literature as well as new analysis of more than 5000 interferograms from the ERS, Envisat, and ALOS satellites, which collectively span 1992-2011. Our compilation is not complete in terms of spatially or temporal coverage nor is it uniform in quality over the region -- certainly we have missed some areas of deformation. Most of the data analyzed is in the western US, but ALOS observations east of the Rocky Mountains are of good quality even in vegetated and snowy areas and we document mining subsidence greater than several cm per year in NY, PA, and WV. We catalog more than 200 anthropogenic deformation signals, including about 45 that are not previously reported. The majority of these deformation sources can be attributed to groundwater extraction (66%), 8% to geothermal activity, 13% to hydrocarbon extraction, 11% to mining activity, and 2% to other sources such as lake loading. In a few areas, the source of deformation is not yet determined. As expected, most deformation is time dependent and so continuous monitoring is needed. In some areas, comparisonbetween pumping records and surface deformation reveals some suprises. For example, at the East Mesa Geothermal

  9. Shallow Fault-zone Dilatancy Recovery after the 2003 Bam, Iran Earthquake from Eight Years of InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, E. J.; Burgmann, R.; Lundgren, P.; Funning, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    The December 2003 Mw 6.6 earthquake that devastated Bam, Iran involved several meters of slip on a previously unknown fault beneath the city, but surface ruptures showed a maximum of 25 cm of offset. At shallow depths, the earthquake strain was distributed over a zone roughly 500-2000 m wide in a thick alluvial layer. The outstanding surface conditions for InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar) and frequent coverage by Envisat ASAR provide an opportunity to map the coseismic and postseismic ground deformation and study the time history in the eight years since the earthquake using InSAR time series analysis. Postseismic deformation in the first three and a half years showed a clear pattern of subsidence over the main fault rupture, reflecting compaction of the fault zone material after the earthquake. Another pattern of postseismic deformation is consistent with afterslip on deeper parts of the fault zone. Compaction in the area of a compressional step-over in the fault may be due to poroelastic rebound, but the compaction in the straight fault segments is interpreted to be due to recovery of coseismic dilatancy. Simple modeling of the surface subsidence signal with volume changes in an elastic half space suggest that the compaction with a volume decrease of about 105 m3 occurred in the upper km of the fault zone over a length of about 4 km during the first 3.5 years after the earthquake, with a time function that can be approximated as log(t) where t is the time since the earthquake. The compaction of the shallow fault-zone is directly above the area of largest coseismic slip at depth. We infer that this part of the fault zone absorbed the upward-propagating coseismic rupture by distributed shear and damage in the unlithified or poorly lithified alluvial material that generated significant dilatancy. After the earthquake, compaction processes recovered this dilatancy. Distributed shearing of the shallow fault zone may resolve the paradox of shallow slip

  10. Advanced filter banks and time interleaving for analog and digital conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Scott R.

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents a comparison of Advanced Filter Banks (AFB) and Time-Interleaving for high-speed, high-resolution conversion between analog and digital signals using a parallel array of converters. The AFB is an unconventional class of filter bank that employs both analog and digital signal processing. The AFB improves the speed and resolution of the conversion compared to the standard Time-Interleaved array conversion technique. Gain and phase mismatch errors are analyzed for both the AFB and Time-Interleaving architectures. The filters in the AFB isolate the converters in the array from each other and attenuate the effects of mismatches. In four-channel example systems analyzed in this paper, gain and phase errors are attenuated by 21 dB more in the AFB (with 30 dB stopband attenuation) than in the Time- Interleaved system. The AFB is capable of analog-to-digital conversion with 14-bit resolution and 400 MHz sample rate.

  11. InSAR Observation of Ground Surface Deformations Associated to Aquifer Storage and Recovery: A Case study for Future CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, J.; Heggy, E.; Bonneville, A.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage in subsurface has been suggested as a potential method to reduce the steep increase of exogenic CO2 in the atmosphere resulting from man-made industrial activities. Our site of Pendleton, OR is used as an analog to understand reservoirs' dynamic response for future CO2 sequestration. The CO2 sequestration simulation is carried out by injecting drainage water in the permeable basalt confined aquifer during winter and recovering it in summer. However, an extensive monitoring is necessary to measure the potential dilatation and subsidence of the ground during the injection and recovery. Two Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques; Differential inSAR associated with the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) Time Series approach and Permanent Scatterer inSAR (PSinSAR), are performed herein to assess the potential ground deformation associated to these injections and recoveries. The two inSAR techniques are applied on three different radar frequencies; ALOS PALSAR L-Band, Radarsat-2 C-Band and TerraSAR-X X-Band, which allow us to select the most adequate inSAR technique and Radar frequency for monitoring urban and semi-vegetated areas. The potential for sub-wavelength deformations in such type of terrains due to fluid recovery and injections, is explored through this study. Our discontinuous four-years of Line Of Sight (LOS) displacement observations, in areas with low decorrelation near the injection points, suggest that surface deformation associated with water injection and recovery follows an uplift and subsidence cycle with an amplitude of ~4 mm. While observed displacements are geographically correlated to injections and recoveries, they are temporally out-phased with these events due to the subsurface hydraulic conductivity. The sub-centimetric LOS displacements observed with Radar inSAR techniques in Pendleton after water injection in this basaltic confined aquifer suggest that the potential for CO2 sequestration is

  12. Combination of Light and Melatonin Time Cues for Phase Advancing the Human Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Tina M.; Markwald, Rachel R.; Chinoy, Evan D.; Snider, Jesse A.; Bessman, Sara C.; Jung, Christopher M.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Photic and non-photic stimuli have been shown to shift the phase of the human circadian clock. We examined how photic and non-photic time cues may be combined by the human circadian system by assessing the phase advancing effects of one evening dose of exogenous melatonin, alone and in combination with one session of morning bright light exposure. Design: Randomized placebo-controlled double-blind circadian protocol. The effects of four conditions, dim light (∼1.9 lux, ∼0.6 Watts/m2)-placebo, dim light-melatonin (5 mg), bright light (∼3000 lux, ∼7 Watts/m2)-placebo, and bright light-melatonin on circadian phase was assessed by the change in the salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) prior to and following treatment under constant routine conditions. Melatonin or placebo was administered 5.75 h prior to habitual bedtime and 3 h of bright light exposure started 1 h prior to habitual wake time. Setting: Sleep and chronobiology laboratory environment free of time cues. Participants: Thirty-six healthy participants (18 females) aged 22 ± 4 y (mean ± SD). Results: Morning bright light combined with early evening exogenous melatonin induced a greater phase advance of the DLMO than either treatment alone. Bright light alone and melatonin alone induced similar phase advances. Conclusion: Information from light and melatonin appear to be combined by the human circadian clock. The ability to combine circadian time cues has important implications for understanding fundamental physiological principles of the human circadian timing system. Knowledge of such principles is important for designing effective countermeasures for phase-shifting the human circadian clock to adapt to jet lag, shift work, and for designing effective treatments for circadian sleep-wakefulness disorders. Citation: Burke TM; Markwald RR; Chinoy ED; Snider JA; Bessman SC; Jung CM; Wright Jr KP. Combination of light and melatonin time cues for phase advancing the human circadian

  13. Gulf Coast Subsidence: Crustal Loading, Geodesy, and Recent InSAR and UAVSAR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, R. G.; Dokka, R. K.; Fielding, E. J.; Hawkins, B. P.; Hensley, S.; Ivins, E. R.; Jones, C. E.; Lohman, R. B.; Zheng, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of the Gulf Coast has received increasing attention in the years since hurricanes Katrina and Rita. A quantitative geophysical basis for measuring, predicting, and understanding subsidence rates, their geographic distribution, and temporal variability, is necessary for long term protection of lives and property in addition to being a challenging scientific problem. Analysis of historical and continuing geodetic measurements identifies a surprising degree of complexity in subsidence, including regions that are subsiding at rates faster than those considered during planning for hurricane protection of New Orleans and other population centers (http://www.mvn.usace.army.mil/pdf/hps_verticalsettlement.pdf), and for coastal restoration planning for coastal Louisiana (http://www.coast2050.gov/2050reports.htm) (Dokka, 2011, J. Geophys. Res., 116, B06403, doi:10.1029/2010JB008008). Meanwhile, traditional geodetic data provide precise information at single points, InSAR observations provide geographically dense constraints on surface deformation. Available radar data sources include C and L band satellite, and NASA/JPL airborne UAVSAR L band data. The Gulf Coast environment is very challenging for InSAR techniques, especially with systems not designed for interferometry. The shorter wavelength C band data decorrelates over short time periods necessitating more elaborate analysis techniques. We have early results from new persistent scatterer methods and masking techniques to eliminate areas affected by water level changes, all applied to C-band satellite radar data. Limited L-Band ALOS/PALSAR satellite data are available for analysis using conventional interferometry, unfortunately this Japanese satellite system recently failed. Most importantly, we now have airborne UAVSAR repeat pass interferometry data sets spanning a total interval of 514 days (http://uavsar.jpl.nasa.gov/). These data can constrain geophysical models of crustal behavior, leading to

  14. Advanced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy Techniques for the Investigation of Peptide Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Neil R.

    The ubiquitous cross beta sheet peptide motif is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative diseases while at the same time offers remarkable potential for constructing isomorphic high-performance bionanomaterials. Despite an emerging understanding of the complex folding landscape of cross beta structures in determining disease etiology and final structure, we lack knowledge of the critical initial stages of nucleation and growth. In this dissertation, I advance our understanding of these key stages in the cross-beta nucleation and growth pathways using cutting-edge microscopy techniques. In addition, I present a new combined time-resolved fluorescence analysis technique with the potential to advance our current understanding of subtle molecular level interactions that play a pivotal role in peptide self-assembly. Using the central nucleating core of Alzheimer's Amyloid-beta protein, Abeta(16 22), as a model system, utilizing electron, time-resolved, and non-linear microscopy, I capture the initial and transient nucleation stages of peptide assembly into the cross beta motif. In addition, I have characterized the nucleation pathway, from monomer to paracrystalline nanotubes in terms of morphology and fluorescence lifetime, corroborating the predicted desolvation process that occurs prior to cross-beta nucleation. Concurrently, I have identified unique heterogeneous cross beta domains contained within individual nanotube structures, which have potential bionanomaterials applications. Finally, I describe a combined fluorescence theory and analysis technique that dramatically increases the sensitivity of current time-resolved techniques. Together these studies demonstrate the potential for advanced microscopy techniques in the identification and characterization of the cross-beta folding pathway, which will further our understanding of both amyloidogenesis and bionanomaterials.

  15. Precursory Slope Deformation around Landslide Area Detected by Insar Throughout Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, T.; Wada, K.; Yamanaka, M.; Kamiya, I.; Nakajima, H.

    2016-06-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique is able to detect a slope deformation around landslide (e.g., Singhroy et al., 2004; Une et al., 2008; Riedel and Walther, 2008; Sato et al., 2014). Geospatial Information Authority (GSI) of Japan has been performing the InSAR analysis regularly by using ALOS/PALSAR data and ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 data throughout Japan. There are a lot of small phase change sites except for crustal deformation with earthquake or volcano activity in the InSAR imagery. Most of the phase change sites are located in landslide area. We conducted field survey at the 10 sites of those phase change sites. As a result, we identified deformation of artificial structures or linear depressions caused by mass movement at the 9 sites. This result indicates that InSAR technique can detect on the continual deformation of landslide block for several years. GSI of Japan will continue to perform the InSAR analysis throughout Japan. Therefore, we will be able to observe and monitor precursory slope deformation around landslide areas throughout Japan.

  16. ICESat GLAS Elevation Changes and ALOS PALSAR InSAR Line-Of-Sight Changes on the Continuous Permafrost Zone of the North Slope, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muskett, Reginald

    2016-04-01

    Measuring centimeter-scale and smaller surface changes by satellite-based systems on the periglacial terrains and permafrost zones of the northern hemisphere is an ongoing challenge. We are investigating this challenge by using data from the NASA Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (ICESat GLAS) and the JAXA Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (ALOS PALSAR) on the continuous permafrost zone of the North Slope, Alaska. Using the ICESat GLAS exact-repeat profiles in the analysis of ALOS PALSAR InSAR Line-Of-Sight (LOS) changes we find evidence of volume scattering over much of the tundra vegetation covered active-layer and surface scattering from river channel/banks (deposition and erosion), from rock outcropping bluffs and ridges. Pingos, ice-cored mounds common to permafrost terrains can be used as benchmarks for assessment of LOS changes. For successful InSAR processing, topographic and tropospheric phase cannot be assumed negligible and must be removed. The presence of significant troposphere phase in short-period repeat interferograms renders stacking ill suited for the task of deriving verifiable centimeter-scale surface deformation phase and reliable LOS changes. Ref.: Muskett, R.R. (2015), ICESat GLAS Elevation Changes and ALOS PALSAR InSAR Line-Of-Sight Changes on the Continuous Permafrost Zone of the North Slope, Alaska. International Journal of Geosciences, 6 (10), 1101-1115. doi:10.4236/ijg.2015.610086 http://www.scirp.org/Journal/PaperDownload.aspx?paperID=60406

  17. Improvement of the Accuracy of InSAR Image Co-Registration Based On Tie Points – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Weibao; Li, Yan; Li, Zhilin; Ding, Xiaoli

    2009-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a new measurement technology, making use of the phase information contained in the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. InSAR has been recognized as a potential tool for the generation of digital elevation models (DEMs) and the measurement of ground surface deformations. However, many critical factors affect the quality of InSAR data and limit its applications. One of the factors is InSAR data processing, which consists of image co-registration, interferogram generation, phase unwrapping and geocoding. The co-registration of InSAR images is the first step and dramatically influences the accuracy of InSAR products. In this paper, the principle and processing procedures of InSAR techniques are reviewed. One of important factors, tie points, to be considered in the improvement of the accuracy of InSAR image co-registration are emphatically reviewed, such as interval of tie points, extraction of feature points, window size for tie point matching and the measurement for the quality of an interferogram. PMID:22399966

  18. The Chimera II Real-Time Operating System for advanced sensor-based control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David B.; Schmitz, Donald E.; Khosla, Pradeep K.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to the Chimera II Real-Time Operating System, which has been developed for advanced sensor-based control applications. The Chimera II provides a high-performance real-time kernel and a variety of IPC features. The hardware platform required to run Chimera II consists of commercially available hardware, and allows custom hardware to be easily integrated. The design allows it to be used with almost any type of VMEbus-based processors and devices. It allows radially differing hardware to be programmed using a common system, thus providing a first and necessary step towards the standardization of reconfigurable systems that results in a reduction of development time and cost.

  19. A Proposal for an Advanced Drilling System with Real-Time Diagnostics (Diagnostics-While-Drilling)

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, J.T.; Mansure, A.J.; Prairie, M.R.

    1999-07-12

    In this paper, we summarize the rationale for an advanced system called Diagnostics-While-Drilling (DWD) and describe its benefits, preliminary configuration, and essential characteristics. The central concept is a closed data circuit in which downhole sensors collect information and send it to the surface via a high-speed data link, where it is combined with surface measurements and processed through drilling advisory software. The driller then uses this information to adjust the drilling process, sending control signals back downhole with real-time knowledge of their effects on performance. We outline a Program Plan for DOE, university, and industry to cooperate in the development of DWD technology.

  20. Development plan for an advanced drilling system with real-time diagnostics (Diagnostics-While-Drilling)

    SciTech Connect

    FINGER,JOHN T.; MANSURE,ARTHUR J.; PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.; GLOWKA,D.A.

    2000-02-01

    This proposal provides the rationale for an advanced system called Diagnostics-while-drilling (DWD) and describes its benefits, preliminary configuration, and essential characteristics. The central concept is a closed data circuit in which downhole sensors collect information and send it to the surface via a high-speed data link, where it is combined with surface measurements and processed through drilling advisory software. The driller then uses this information to adjust the drilling process, sending control signals back downhole with real-time knowledge of their effects on performance. The report presents background of related previous work, and defines a Program Plan for US Department of Energy (DOE), university, and industry cooperation.

  1. Toward Integrated Operator Interface for Advanced Teleoperation under Time-Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, Antal K.; Fiorini, Paolo; Kim, Won Soo; Schenker, Paul

    1994-01-01

    This paper briefly describes an Advanced Teleoperator (ATOP) system and its control station where a variety of computer-based operator interface devices and techniques are integrated into a functional setting, accommodating a primary operator and secondary operators. Computer graphics is a key operator interface component in the control station where new types of manual interface devices also are employed. The results of some generic and applications task experiments are summarized, including the performance of a simulated remote satellite servicing task, carried out under four to eight seconds communications time delay, using satellite TV and Internet computer communication links. In conclusion, the paper highlights the lessons learned so far,.

  2. Developing an Error Model for Ionospheric Phase Distortions in L-Band SAR and InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Agram, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    Many of the recent and upcoming spaceborne SAR systems are operating in the L-band frequency range. The choice of L-band has a number of advantages especially for InSAR applications. These include deeper penetration into vegetation, higher coherence, and higher sensitivity to soil moisture. While L-band SARs are undoubtedly beneficial for a number of earth science disciplines, their signals are susceptive to path delay effects in the ionosphere. Many recent publications indicate that the ionosphere can have detrimental effects on InSAR coherence and phase. It has also been shown that the magnitude of these effects strongly depends on the time of day and geographic location of the image acquisition as well as on the coincident solar activity. Hence, in order to provide realistic error estimates for geodetic measurements derived from L-band InSAR, an error model needs to be developed that is capable of describing ionospheric noise. With this paper, we present a global ionospheric error model that is currently being developed in support of NASA's future L-band SAR mission NISAR. The system is based on a combination of empirical data analysis and modeling input from the ionospheric model WBMOD, and is capable of predicting ionosphere-induced phase noise as a function of space and time. The error model parameterizes ionospheric noise using a power spectrum model and provides the parameters of this model in a global 1x1 degree raster. From the power law model, ionospheric errors in deformation estimates can be calculated. In Polar Regions, our error model relies on a statistical analysis of ionospheric-phase noise in a large number of SAR data from previous L-band SAR missions such as ALOS PALSAR and JERS-1. The focus on empirical analyses is due to limitations of WBMOD in high latitude areas. Outside of the Polar Regions, the ionospheric model WBMOD is used to derive ionospheric structure parameters for as a function of solar activity. The structure parameters are

  3. Assessing the productivity of advanced practice providers using a time and motion study.

    PubMed

    Ogunfiditimi, Folusho; Takis, Lisa; Paige, Virginia J; Wyman, Janet F; Marlow, Elissa

    2013-01-01

    The Resource-Based Relative Value Scale is widely used to measure healthcare provider productivity and to set payment standards. The scale, however, is limited in its assessment of pre- and postservice work and other potentially non-revenue-generating healthcare services, what we have termed service-valued activity (SVA). In an attempt to quantify SVA, we conducted a time and motion study of providers to assess their productivity in inpatient and outpatient settings. Using the Standard Time and Motion Procedures checklist as a methodological guide, we provided personal digital assistants (PDAs) that were prepopulated with 2010 Current Procedural Terminology codes to 19 advanced practice providers (APPs). The APPs were instructed to identify their location and activity each time the PDA randomly alarmed. The providers collected data for 3 to 5 workdays, and those data were separated into revenue-generating services (RGSs) and SVAs. Multiple inpatient and outpatient departments were assessed. The inpatient APPs spent 61.6 percent of their time on RGSs and 35.1 percent on SVAs. Providers in the outpatient settings spent 59.0 percent of their time on RGSs and 38.2 percent on SVAs. This time and motion study demonstrated an innovative method and tool for the quantification and analysis of time spent on revenue- and non-revenue-generating services provided by healthcare professionals. The new information derived from this study can be used to accurately document productivity, determine clinical practice patterns, and improve deployment strategies of healthcare providers.

  4. Surface Deformation of Alpine Terrain Derived By PS-INSAR Technique On The Siachen Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junchao; Chang, Ling

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation gain is essential for mass balance of valley glaciers in the Karakoram Himalayas. The higher eleva- tion of this area received snowfall(>1000 cm · yr-1) annually, while the snowfall occupies 95% of total pre- cipitation (75-150 cm · yr-1). Meanwhile, the air tem- perature ranging from -20 to -40 °C, during December- February, is also very suitable for accumulation of glacier mass. We choose ALOS/PALSAR L-band data from April, 2007, to September, 2009, in the Siachen glacier to generate the interferograms and calculate their dis- placements spatially and temporally. In this study, the surface deformation of upper part of the Siachen glacier located in central Karakoram is estimated by using PS- InSAR technique. Here, we implement the PS method, which uses spatial correlation of interferogram phase to find pixels with low-phase variance in the terrain. Prior knowledge of temporal variations in the deformation rate is not required for their identification. Through times se- ries analysis of the interferograms we were able to reduce the impact of digital elevation model errors and extract the real surface change signal.

  5. Surface Deformation of Los Humeros Caldera, Mexico, Estimated by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos Basurto, R.; Lopez Quiroz, P.; Carrasco Nuñez, G.; Doin, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Los Humeros caldera is located in the eastern part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, to the north of the state of Puebla and bordering the west side of the state of Veracruz. The study of the caldera, is of great interest because there is a geothermal field currently working inside of it. In fact, Los Humeros, is the third more important geothermal field in Mexico. In this work, we used InSAR to estimate the surface deformation on the caldera, aiming to contribute to its modeling and to help preventing subsidence related hazards on the geothermal field and surroundings. On this study, we calculated 34 interferograms from 21 SAR images of the ENVISAT European Space Agency Mission. The analysis of the interferograms, allow us to detect, decorrelation of the interferometric signal increased, when time spans were greater than 70 days. Also, for those with good signal correlation, the atmospheric signal dominated the interferogram, masking completely the deformation. Moreover, residual orbital ramps were detected, in some of the calculated interferograms. An algorithm capable to remove all the interferogram signal contributions but the deformation related, has been implemented. Resulting deformation and its correlation with several variables like the geology, the hydrogeology and the seismic records, were analysed through its integration in a Geographic Information System.

  6. Long Term, Operational Monitoring Of Enhanced Oil Recovery In Harsh Environments With INSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, S.; Henschel, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, MDA GSI has provided ground deformation measurements for an oil field in northern Alberta, Canada using InSAR technology. During this period, the monitoring has reliably shown the slow rise of the oil field due to enhanced oil recovery operations. The InSAR monitoring solution is essentially based on the observation of point and point-like targets in the field. Ground conditions in the area are almost continuously changing (in their reflectivity characteristics) making it difficult to ob- serve coherent patterns from the ground. The extended duration of the oil operations has allowed us to continue InSAR monitoring and transition from RADARSAT-1 to RADARSAT-2. With RADARSAT-2 and the enhancement of the satellite resolution capability has provided more targets of opportunity as identified by a differential coherence method. This poster provides an overview of the long term monitoring of the oil field in northern Alberta, Canada.

  7. Time-temperature-stress capabilities of composite materials for advanced supersonic technology application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, James R.; Haskins, James F.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced composites will play a key role in the development of the technology for the design and fabrication of future supersonic vehicles. However, incorporating the material into vehicle usage is contingent on accelerating the demonstration of service capacity and design technology. Because of the added material complexity and lack of extensive data, laboratory replication of the flight service will provide the most rapid method to document the airworthiness of advanced composite systems. Consequently, a laboratory program was conducted to determine the time-temperature-stress capabilities of several high temperature composites. Tests included were thermal aging, environmental aging, fatigue, creep, fracture, tensile, and real-time flight simulation exposure. The program had two phases. The first included all the material property determinations and aging and simulation exposures up through 10,000 hours. The second continued these tests up to 50,000 cumulative hours. This report presents the results of the Phase 1 baseline and 10,000-hr aging and flight simulation studies, the Phase 2 50,000-hr aging studies, and the Phase 2 flight simulation tests, some of which extended to almost 40,000 hours.

  8. Identification and Characterization of Dynamic Alpine Subglacial Lakes Using InSAR, Radio- Echo Sounding, and Crevasse Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, D. L.; Rabus, B. T.; Clague, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    We use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), radio-echo sounding (RES), and crevasse interpretation to identify and characterize two dynamic alpine subglacial lakes in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska. Although significant literature exists on large subglacial lakes in Antarctica, little research has been done on alpine subglacial lakes. Subglacial and subaerial glacier-dammed lakes and the catastrophic floods (jokulhlaups) that release are a hazard in glacierized mountain regions around the world. Many glacier-dammed lakes form subglacially during periods of glacier retreat and downwasting, but are not identified until they become subaerially exposed or release a jokulhlaup. The two lakes discussed here are dammed by Brady Glacier in southeast Alaska, 120 km west of Juneau. Initially, a conspicuous, 3-km-long crevasse in the glacier drew our attention to Hinge Lake, so named because of its hinge-like appearance. For the InSAR analysis, we utilized 20 ascending and descending ERS-1 and -2 tandem radar images provided by the European Space Agency. We obtained a DEM from Glacier Bay National Park that was based on data from the SRTM mission, with gaps filled using photogrammetry data. We co-registered and processed raw SAR signal data into complex, single-look images, created interferograms, and unwrapped the phase. To simplify the analysis, we assumed zero horizontal glacier movement. This assumption is valid because ice is flowing into a closed depression and all interferograms analyzed in this study show very little or zero horizontal motion. To further characterize the lakes, we conducted a RES survey to determine ice depths and substrate. We deduced principle stresses by interpreting crevasses patterns in combination with vertical displacement data derived from interferograms. A time series of interferograms shows vertical motion over large areas of the two lakes. A hydraulic connection between the two lakes is inferred from contemporaneous vertical

  9. Advanced Engine Health Management Applications of the SSME Real-Time Vibration Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorucci, Tony R.; Lakin, David R., II; Reynolds, Tracy D.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Real Time Vibration Monitoring System (RTVMS) is a 32-channel high speed vibration data acquisition and processing system developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). It Delivers sample rates as high as 51,200 samples/second per channel and performs Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) processing via on-board digital signal processing (DSP) chips in a real-time format. Advanced engine health assessment is achieved by utilizing the vibration spectra to provide accurate sensor validation and enhanced engine vibration redlines. Discrete spectral signatures (such as synchronous) that are indicators of imminent failure can be assessed and utilized to mitigate catastrophic engine failures- a first in rocket engine health assessment. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  10. Role of the advanced practice physiotherapist in decreasing surgical wait times.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Alice B; Harrison, Mark M; Hope, John

    2009-01-01

    The role of the advanced practice physiotherapist (APP) in outpatient orthopedic clinics has been present in Ontario for over five years. These professionals have additional duties beyond those of a regular physiotherapist in order to screen patients pre- and post-operatively, triage patients for surgery, prescribe conservative management and monitor patients on an ongoing basis. The purpose of this role is to improve patient access to timely surgical care by reducing wait times for hip and knee replacement surgeries. Several positive outcomes have been reported in the literature. It has been established that an APP can effectively manage over 30% of the patients referred to a surgeon for hip or knee replacement surgery because these patients do not require surgery; rather, they require conservative management.

  11. Time-temperature-stress capabilities of composite materials for advanced supersonic technology application, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, J. R.; Haskins, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Implementation of metal and resin matrix composites into supersonic vehicle usage is contingent upon accelerating the demonstration of service capacity and design technology. Because of the added material complexity and lack of extensive service data, laboratory replication of the flight service will provide the most rapid method of documenting the airworthiness of advanced composite systems. A program in progress to determine the time temperature stress capabilities of several high temperature composite materials includes thermal aging, environmental aging, fatigue, creep, fracture, and tensile tests as well as real time flight simulation exposure. The program has two parts. The first includes all the material property determinations and aging and simulation exposures up through 10,000 hours. The second continues these tests up to 50,000 cumulative hours. Results are presented of the 10,000 hour phase, which has now been completed.

  12. [Spatial-temporal evolution characterization of land subsidence by multi-temporal InSAR method and GIS technology].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bei-Bei; Gong, Hui-Li; Li, Xiao-Juan; Lei, Kun-Chao; Duan, Guang-Yao; Xie, Jin-Rong

    2014-04-01

    Long-term over-exploitation of underground resources, and static and dynamic load increase year by year influence the occurrence and development of regional land subsidence to a certain extent. Choosing 29 scenes Envisat ASAR images covering plain area of Beijing, China, the present paper used the multi-temporal InSAR method incorporating both persistent scatterer and small baseline approaches, and obtained monitoring information of regional land subsidence. Under different situation of space development and utilization, the authors chose five typical settlement areas; With classified information of land-use, multi-spectral remote sensing image, and geological data, and adopting GIS spatial analysis methods, the authors analyzed the time series evolution characteristics of uneven settlement. The comprehensive analysis results suggests that the complex situations of space development and utilization affect the trend of uneven settlement; the easier the situation of space development and utilization, the smaller the settlement gradient, and the less the uneven settlement trend.

  13. InSAR observations of strain accumulation and fault creep along the Chaman Fault system, Pakistan and Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, Heresh; Amelung, Falk

    2016-08-01

    We use 2004-2011 Envisat synthetic aperture radar imagery and InSAR time series methods to estimate the contemporary rates of strain accumulation in the Chaman Fault system in Pakistan and Afghanistan. At 29 N we find long-term slip rates of 16 ± 2.3 mm/yr for the Ghazaband Fault and of 8 ± 3.1 mm/yr for the Chaman Fault. This makes the Ghazaband Fault one of the most hazardous faults of the plate boundary zone. We further identify a 340 km long segment displaying aseismic surface creep along the Chaman Fault, with maximum surface creep rate of 8.1 ± 2 mm/yr. The observation that the Chaman Fault accommodates only 30% of the relative plate motion between India and Eurasia implies that the remainder is accommodated south and east of the Katawaz block microplate.

  14. MPACT FY2011 Advanced Time-Correlated Measurement Research at INL

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; S. M. Watson

    2011-09-01

    Simulations and experiments have been carried out to investigate advanced time-correlated measurement methods for characterizing and assaying nuclear material for safeguarding the nuclear fuel cycle. These activities are part of a project studying advanced instrumentation techniques in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development program and its Materials Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies (MPACT) program. For fiscal year 2011 work focused on examining the practical experimental aspects of using a time-tagged, associated-particle electronic neutron generator for interrogating low-enrichment uranium in combination with steady-state interrogation using a moderated 241Am-Li neutron source. Simulation work for the project involved the use of the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo simulation tool to determine the relative strength and the time-of-flight energy spectra of different sample materials under irradiation. Work also took place to develop a post-processor parser code to extract comparable data from the MCNP5&6 codes. Experiments took place using a commercial deuterium-tritium associated-particle electronic neutron generator to irradiate a number of uranium-bearing material samples. Time-correlated measurements of neutron and photon signatures of these measurements were made using five liquid scintillator detectors in a novel array, using high-speed waveform digitizers for data collection. This report summarizes the experiments that took place in FY2011, presents preliminary analyses that have been carried out to date for a subpart of these experiments, and describes future activities planned in this area. The report also describes support Idaho National Laboratory gave to Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2011 to facilitate 2-dimensional imagery of mixed-oxide fuel pins for safeguards applications as a part of the MPACT program.

  15. Mitigation of tropospheric InSAR phase artifacts through differential multisquint processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis W.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a technique for mitigating tropospheric phase errors in repeat-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). The mitigation technique is based upon the acquisition of multisquint InSAR data. On each satellite pass over a target area, the radar instrument will acquire images from multiple squint (azimuth) angles, from which multiple interferograms can be formed. The diversity of viewing angles associated with the multisquint acquisition can be used to solve for two components of the 3-D surface displacement vector as well as for the differential tropospheric phase. We describe a model for the performance of the multisquint technique, and we present an assessment of the performance expected.

  16. The INSAR technique: its principle and applications to mapping the deformation field of earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Xin-Jian; Ye, Hong

    1998-11-01

    The development, state-of-art and prospects of application of the radar remote sensing technique are presented. The principle of the INSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) technique is expounded in more details. Some applications of this technique in measuring seismic dislocations are given. Finally, it is pointed out that INSAR has a non-replaceable application potential in observing ground surface vertical deformations; it would provide an entirely new means and method for monitoring the dynamic field of earthquakes and give an extremely great impetus to the future earthquake prediction work.

  17. Advanced Kalman Filter for Real-Time Responsiveness in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Gregory Francis

    2014-06-10

    Complex engineering systems pose fundamental challenges in real-time operations and control because they are highly dynamic systems consisting of a large number of elements with severe nonlinearities and discontinuities. Today’s tools for real-time complex system operations are mostly based on steady state models, unable to capture the dynamic nature and too slow to prevent system failures. We developed advanced Kalman filtering techniques and the formulation of dynamic state estimation using Kalman filtering techniques to capture complex system dynamics in aiding real-time operations and control. In this work, we looked at complex system issues including severe nonlinearity of system equations, discontinuities caused by system controls and network switches, sparse measurements in space and time, and real-time requirements of power grid operations. We sought to bridge the disciplinary boundaries between Computer Science and Power Systems Engineering, by introducing methods that leverage both existing and new techniques. While our methods were developed in the context of electrical power systems, they should generalize to other large-scale scientific and engineering applications.

  18. UAVSAR: InSAR and PolSAR Test Bed for the Proposed NI-SAR Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Hensley, S.; Lou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    UAVSAR, which first became operational in 2009, has served as an operational testbed for the NI-SAR L-band radar concept and a unique instrument in its own right. UAVSAR supports a broad array of basic and applied geoscience, covering on smaller scale all the disciplines NI-SAR would be able to address on a global scale. Although designed specifically to provide high accuracy repeated flight tracks and precise imaging geometry for InSAR-based solid earth studies, its fully polarimetric operation, low noise, and consistent calibration accuracy has made it a premier instrument for PolSAR-based studies also. Since 2009 it has successfully imaged more than 16 million km2 and >4300 quad-polarimetric data products are now publicly available online. Upgrades made in the last year to automate the repeat track processing serve as a model for generating large volumes of InSAR products: Since January 2014 more than 700 interferometric products have been released, exceeding the output of all previous years combined. Standardly available products now include browse images of all InSAR acquisitions and coregistered single-look complex image stacks suitable for standard time series analysis. Here we present an overview of the wide range of studies utilizing UAVSAR data including those based on polarimetry and pair-wise and times series interferometry, highlighting both the unique capabilities of UAVSAR and the ways in which NI-SAR would be able to dramatically extend the capabilities. This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. Recent advancements to study flowering time in almond and other Prunus species.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pérez, Raquel; Del Cueto, Jorge; Dicenta, Federico; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Flowering time is an important agronomic trait in almond since it is decisive to avoid the late frosts that affect production in early flowering cultivars. Evaluation of this complex trait is a long process because of the prolonged juvenile period of trees and the influence of environmental conditions affecting gene expression year by year. Consequently, flowering time has to be studied for several years to have statistical significant results. This trait is the result of the interaction between chilling and heat requirements. Flowering time is a polygenic trait with high heritability, although a major gene Late blooming (Lb) was described in "Tardy Nonpareil." Molecular studies at DNA level confirmed this polygenic nature identifying several genome regions (Quantitative Trait Loci, QTL) involved. Studies about regulation of gene expression are scarcer although several transcription factors have been described as responsible for flowering time. From the metabolomic point of view, the integrated analysis of the mechanisms of accumulation of cyanogenic glucosides and flowering regulation through transcription factors open new possibilities in the analysis of this complex trait in almond and in other Prunus species (apricot, cherry, peach, plum). New opportunities are arising from the integration of recent advancements including phenotypic, genetic, genomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomics studies from the beginning of dormancy until flowering.

  20. Recent advancements to study flowering time in almond and other Prunus species

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Pérez, Raquel; Del Cueto, Jorge; Dicenta, Federico; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Flowering time is an important agronomic trait in almond since it is decisive to avoid the late frosts that affect production in early flowering cultivars. Evaluation of this complex trait is a long process because of the prolonged juvenile period of trees and the influence of environmental conditions affecting gene expression year by year. Consequently, flowering time has to be studied for several years to have statistical significant results. This trait is the result of the interaction between chilling and heat requirements. Flowering time is a polygenic trait with high heritability, although a major gene Late blooming (Lb) was described in “Tardy Nonpareil.” Molecular studies at DNA level confirmed this polygenic nature identifying several genome regions (Quantitative Trait Loci, QTL) involved. Studies about regulation of gene expression are scarcer although several transcription factors have been described as responsible for flowering time. From the metabolomic point of view, the integrated analysis of the mechanisms of accumulation of cyanogenic glucosides and flowering regulation through transcription factors open new possibilities in the analysis of this complex trait in almond and in other Prunus species (apricot, cherry, peach, plum). New opportunities are arising from the integration of recent advancements including phenotypic, genetic, genomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomics studies from the beginning of dormancy until flowering. PMID:25071812

  1. Time controlled descent guidance algorithm for simulation of advanced ATC systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. Q.; Erzberger, H.

    1983-01-01

    Concepts and computer algorithms for generating time controlled four dimensional descent trajectories are described. The algorithms were implemented in the air traffic control simulator and used by experienced controllers in studies of advanced air traffic flow management procedures. A time controlled descent trajectory comprises a vector function of time, including position, altitude, and heading, that starts at the initial position of the aircraft and ends at touchdown. The trajectory provides a four dimensional reference path which will cause an aircraft tracking it to touchdown at a predetermined time with a minimum of fuel consumption. The problem of constructing such trajectories is divided into three subproblems involving synthesis of horizontal, vertical, and speed profiles. The horizontal profile is constructed as a sequence of turns and straight lines passing through a specified set of waypoints. The vertical profile consists of a sequence of level flight and constant descent angle segments defined by altitude waypoints. The speed profile is synthesized as a sequence of constant Mach number, constant indicated airspeed, and acceleration/deceleration legs. It is generated by integrating point mass differential equations of motion, which include the thrust and drag models of the aircraft.

  2. Advanced Automation for Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry-New Opportunities for Real-Time Autonomous Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Wong, C. M.; Salmonson, J. D.; Yost, R. A.; Griffin, T. P.; Yates, N. A.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The utility of MS/MS for both target compound analysis and the structure elucidation of unknowns has been described in a number of references. A broader acceptance of this technique has not yet been realized as it requires large, complex, and costly instrumentation which has not been competitive with more conventional techniques. Recent advancements in ion trap mass spectrometry promise to change this situation. Although the ion trap's small size, sensitivity, and ability to perform multiple stages of mass spectrometry have made it eminently suitable for on-line, real-time monitoring applications, advance automation techniques are required to make these capabilities more accessible to non-experts. Towards this end we have developed custom software for the design and implementation of MS/MS experiments. This software allows the user to take full advantage of the ion trap's versatility with respect to ionization techniques, scan proxies, and ion accumulation/ejection methods. Additionally, expert system software has been developed for autonomous target compound analysis. This software has been linked to ion trap control software and a commercial data system to bring all of the steps in the analysis cycle under control of the expert system. These software development efforts and their utilization for a number of trace analysis applications will be described.

  3. A day at a time: caregiving on the edge in advanced COPD

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, A Catherine; Young, Joanne; Donahue, Margaret; Rocker, Graeme

    2010-01-01

    The human cost of advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) for informal caregivers in Canada is mostly unknown. Formal care is episodic, and informal caregivers provide the bulk of care between exacerbations. While patients fear becoming burdensome to family, we lack relevant data against which to assess the validity of this fear. The purpose of our qualitative study was to better understand the extent and nature of ‘burden’ experienced by informal caregivers in advanced COPD. The analysis of 14 informal caregivers interviews yielded the global theme ‘a day at a time,’ reflecting caregivers’ approach to the process of adjusting/coping. Subthemes were: loss of intimate relationship/identity, disease-related demands, and coping-related factors. Caregivers experiencing most distress described greater negative impact on relational dynamics and identity, effects they associated with increasing illness demands especially care recipients’ difficult, emotionally controlling attitudes/behaviors. Our findings reflect substantial caregiver vulnerability in terms of an imbalance between burden and coping capacity. Informal caregivers provide necessary, cost-effective care for those living with COPD and/or other chronic illness. Improved understanding of the physical, emotional, spiritual, and relational factors contributing to their vulnerability can inform new chronic care models better able to support their efforts. PMID:20631814

  4. ANTIGEN-SPECIFIC T LYMPHOCYTE PROLIFERATION DECREASES OVER TIME IN ADVANCED CHRONIC HEPATITIS C

    PubMed Central

    Morishima, Chihiro; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Rothman, Alan L.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Lindsay, Karen L.; Lee, William M.; Koziel, Margaret James; Fontana, Robert J.; Kim, Hae-Young; Wright, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate T cell immunity in advanced liver disease, antigen-specific lymphoproliferative responses were prospectively studied in the context of the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) trial. Peripheral blood responses to HCV, tetanus and Candida protein antigens were measured at baseline, Month 12 (M12), M24, M36 and M48 in 186 patients randomized to either low-dose PEG-IFN only or observation. Liver histology was evaluated at baseline, M24 and M48. Patients with cirrhosis (Ishak 5–6) were less likely to have positive lymphoproliferative responses to HCV at baseline than patients with fibrosis (15% vs 29%, p=0.03) and had lower levels of HCV c100 responses at baseline, M24 and M48 (p=0.11, p=0.05, p=0.02, respectively). For 97 patients with complete longitudinal data, the frequency of positive lymphoproliferative responses to HCV, tetanus and Candida antigens declined over time (p<0.003) and the slope of this decline was greater in the PEG-IFN treatment group than the observation group (p < 0.02). Lower levels of tetanus lymphoproliferative responses were associated with fibrosis progression and clinical outcomes (p=0.009). Poorer CD4+ T cell proliferative function is associated with more advanced liver disease in chronic hepatitis C, and may be further affected by long-term PEG-IFN treatment. PMID:22571902

  5. Improving the timing of middle Holocene retreat and late Holocene advance of Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briner, J. P.; Stewart, H. A.; Young, N. E.; Csatho, B.; Axford, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet is undergoing dramatic change. How the ice sheet continues to respond to climate change has important ramifications for global climate and sea level rise, but the observation-based record of ice sheet change is extremely short. We use glacial-geologic techniques to determine the behavior of the Greenland Ice Sheet over longer timescales. In particular, we focus on the Holocene history of Jakobshavn Isbrae, one of the key ice streams on Greenland that is responsible for disproportionate mass loss of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Radiocarbon ages from basal lake sediments and 10Be exposure ages of bedrock spanning from the present ice margin to Disko Bugt, ~50 km west, reveal rapid deglaciation between ~8 and ~7 ka. After ~7 ka, the ice margin continued to retreat inland behind its present position. Although it is difficult to reconstruct how far inland the ice margin retreated, the Little Ice Age advance reworked marine bivalves that date from 2.2 to 6.1 ka (Weidick and Bennike, 2007). The bivalve ages indicate that the ice margin was behind its Little Ice Age position between ~6 and ~2 ka, and that its Neoglacial advance post-dates ~2 ka. We improve the timing of the Neoglacial advance of Jakobshavn Isbrae by collecting sediment cores from lakes that are beyond the Little Ice Age margin but close enough to receive ice sheet meltwater during the Little Ice Age advance. The sediments in these "threshold" lakes contain distinct units of varved sediments (representing a proglacial environment) that sharply overlie gyttja (representing a non-glacial environment). Four radiocarbon ages of the sedimentary contacts from three different lake sites range from 530±10 to 370±60 cal yr BP (1410-1640 AD), and reveal when Jakobshavn Isbrae neared its maximum Little Ice Age margin. Furthermore, the lake sediments reveal that between early Holocene deglaciation and the Little Ice Age, Jakobshavn Isbrae never spilled into these lake basins, indicating that the

  6. Damage Proxy Map from InSAR Coherence Applied to February 2011 M6.3 Christchurch Earthquake, 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-oki Earthquake, and 2011 Kirishima Volcano Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S.; Agram, P. S.; Fielding, E. J.; Simons, M.; Webb, F.; Tanaka, A.; Lundgren, P.; Owen, S. E.; Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.

    2011-12-01

    Under ARIA (Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis) project at JPL and Caltech, we developed a prototype algorithm to detect surface property change caused by natural or man-made damage using InSAR coherence change. The algorithm was tested on building demolition and construction sites in downtown Pasadena, California. The developed algorithm performed significantly better, producing 150 % higher signal-to-noise ratio, than a standard coherence change detection method. We applied the algorithm to February 2011 M6.3 Christchurch earthquake in New Zealand, 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake in Japan, and 2011 Kirishima volcano eruption in Kyushu, Japan, using ALOS PALSAR data. In Christchurch area we detected three different types of damage: liquefaction, building collapse, and landslide. The detected liquefaction damage is extensive in the eastern suburbs of Christchurch, showing Bexley as one of the most significantly affected areas as was reported in the media. Some places show sharp boundaries of liquefaction damage, indicating different type of ground materials that might have been formed by the meandering Avon River in the past. Well reported damaged buildings such as Christchurch Cathedral, Canterbury TV building, Pyne Gould building, and Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament were detected by the algorithm. A landslide in Redcliffs was also clearly detected. These detected damage sites were confirmed with Google earth images provided by GeoEye. Larger-scale damage pattern also agrees well with the ground truth damage assessment map indicated with polygonal zones of 3 different damage levels, compiled by the government of New Zealand. The damage proxy map of Sendai area in Japan shows man-made structure damage due to the tsunami caused by the M9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake. Long temporal baseline (~2.7 years) and volume scattering caused significant decorrelation in the farmlands and bush forest along the coastline. The 2011 Kirishima volcano eruption caused a lot of ash

  7. Sustained Water Changes in California during Drought and Heavy Precipitation Inferred from GPS, InSAR, and GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argus, D. F.; Fu, Y.; Landerer, F. W.; Wiese, D. N.; Farr, T. G.; Liu, Z.; Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    About 1200 GPS sites in the westernmost United States are used to weigh changes in surface water as a function of location from 2006 to 2015. The effect of known changes in water in artificial reservoirs is removed, allowing changes in the total of snow, soil moisture, and mountain fracture groundwater to be inferred from GPS. In this study water changes inferred from GPS are placed into the context of complementary InSAR and GRACE data. The southern Central Valley (the San Joaquin Valley and Tulare Basin) is subsiding at spectacular rates of 0.01 m/yr to 0.2 m/yr in response to groundwater management. We construct an elastic model of groundwater change of the southern Central Valley, using GRACE as the basis of total groundwater loss and InSAR to infer the lateral distribution of that groundwater loss. This elastic model of Central Valley groundwater loss is removed from the GPS displacements. Because snow in California is insignificant in October, and because changes in soil moisture between successive autumns are small, we can infer changes in Sierra Nevada mountain fracture groundwater to be: -19 km3 during drought from 2006 to 2009, +35 km3 during heavy precipitation from 2009 to 2011, and -38 km3 during drought from 2011 to 2014 (start and end times are all in October). We infer changes in Sierra Nevada mountain groundwater to be playing an important role in modulating Central Valley groundwater loss. Total water in the Sierra Nevada recovered by 16 km3 from October 2014 to April 2015, but water is being lost again in summer 2015.

  8. Using InSAR to Evaluate Pumping-Related Aquifer-System Response Between 1992 and 2007 in Ground-Water Basins of Eastern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D. J.; Arai, R.; Bell, J.

    2008-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has become a commonly used tool to detect and measure the magnitude and spatial variation of aquifer-system response, specifically subsidence, in groundwater basins in Nevada. Previous work has included InSAR studies of Las Vegas, which has a well-documented history of water-level changes and subsidence. The purpose of this study was to extend InSAR studies from Las Vegas to the north to Ely, Nevada in order to evaluate on a reconnaissance level the present groundwater system response to pumping in 35 hydrographic basins. These data will form a baseline for the proposed Southern Nevada Water Authority's In-state Groundwater Project which is designed to provide as much as 202 hm3/yr (164,000 acre-ft/yr) from 6 of these basins to the Las Vegas metropolitan area. We have processed more than 100 interferometric pairs using ERS and Envisat data from the WInSAR and GeoEarthscope archives covering the time period 1992-2007. Results were analyzed in time series in order to identify potential atmospheric and topographic artifacts, and to verify the occurrence of the groundwater signal. The preliminary results show that some principal groundwater basins currently undergoing moderate levels of groundwater pumping exhibit small, localized subsidence signals of a few centimeters for one or more years. These basins include Lake, Patterson, Butte, and White River Valleys, where annual pumping rates are on the order of 2.5-16.0 hm3/yr (2000-13,000 acre-ft/yr). Spring and Cave Valleys have localized subsidence signals away from known pumping centers. Localized signals are also located near the towns of McGill and Ely, Nevada in Steptoe Valley. These small amplitude signals are consistent with the low to moderate levels of pumping presently occurring in these valleys. The InSAR results also showed that some other basins undergoing moderate levels of pumping do not exhibit any visible evidence of aquifer-system impact. Due to the

  9. Institutional Advancement Strategies in Hard Times. AAHE-ERIC/Higher Education Research Report No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Michael D.; Sherratt, Gerald R.

    The historical role of institutional advancement and the specific activities and trends currently affecting it are reviewed, and four strategies for advancement programs are suggested. Institutional advancement includes alumni relations, fund-raising, public relations, internal and external communications, and government relations, and its…

  10. Recent advances in real-time analysis of ionograms and ionospheric drift measurements with digisondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, B. W.; Huang, X.; Galkin, I. A.; Paznukhov, V.; Kozlov, A.

    2005-08-01

    Reliable long distance RF communication and transionospheric radio links depend critically on space weather, and specifically ionospheric conditions. Modern ground-based ionosondes provide space weather parameters in real-time including the vertical electron density distribution up to ˜1000 km and the velocity components of the ionospheric F region drift. A global network of digisondes distributes this information in real-time via internet connections. The quality of the automatic scaling of the echo traces in ionograms was a continuous concern ever since first attempts have been reported. The modern low-power ionosonde with ˜100 W transmitters (compared to several kilowatt for the older ionosondes) relies on more sophisticated signal processing to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and to retrieve the essential ionospheric characteristics. Recent advances in the automatic scaling algorithm ARTIST have significantly increased the reliability of the autoscaled data, making the data, in combination with models, more useful for ionospheric now-casting. Vertical and horizontal F region drift velocities are a new real-time output of the digisondes. The “ionosonde drift” is derived from the measured Doppler frequency shift and angle of arrival of ionospherically reflected HF echoes, a method similar to that used by coherent VHF and incoherent scatter radars.

  11. A system for advanced real-time visualization and monitoring of MR-guided thermal ablations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothgang, Eva; Gilson, Wesley D.; Hornegger, Joachim; Lorenz, Christine H.

    2010-02-01

    In modern oncology, thermal ablations are increasingly used as a regional treatment option to supplement systemic treatment strategies such as chemotherapy and immunotherapy. The goal of all thermal ablation procedures is to cause cell death of disease tissue while sparing adjacent healthy tissue. Real-time assessment of thermal damage is the key to therapeutic efficiency and safety of such procedures. Magnetic resonance thermometry is capable of monitoring the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of temperature changes during thermal ablations. In this work, we present an advanced monitoring system for MR-guided thermal ablations that includes multiplanar visualization, specialized overlay visualization methods, and additional methods for correcting errors resulting from magnetic field shifts and motion. To ensure the reliability of the displayed thermal data, systematic quality control of thermal maps is carried out on-line. The primary purpose of this work is to provide clinicians with an intuitive tool for accurately visualizing the progress of thermal treatment at the time of the procedure. Importantly, the system is designed to be independent of the heating source. The presented system is expected to be of great value not only to guide thermal procedures but also to further explore the relationship between temperature-time exposure and tissue damage. The software application was implemented within the eXtensible Imaging Platform (XIP) and has been validated with clinical data.

  12. On the use of InSAR technology to assess land subsidence in Jakarta coastal flood plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudogbo, Fifame; Duro, Javier; Garcia Robles, Javier; Arnaud, Alain; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.

    2014-05-01

    Jakarta is the capital of Indonesia and is home to approximately 10 million people on the coast of the Java Sea. It is situated on the northern coastal alluvial plane of Java which shares boundaries with West Java Province in the south and in the east, and with Banten Province in the west. The Capital District of Jakarta (DKI) sits in the lowest lying areas of the basin. Its topography varies, with the northern part just meters above current sea level and lying on a flood plain. Subsequently, this portion of the city frequently floods. The southern part of the city is hilly. Thirteen major rivers flow through Jakarta to the Java Sea. The Ciliwung River is the most significant river and divides the city West to East. In the last three decades, urban growing of Jakarta has been very fast in sectors as industry, trade, transportation, real estate, among others. This exponential development has caused several environmental issues; land subsidence is one of them. Subsidence in Jakarta has been known since the early part of the 20th century. It is mainly due to groundwater extraction, the fast development (construction load), soil natural consolidation and tectonics. Evidence of land subsidence exists through monitoring with GPS, level surveys and InSAR investigations. InSAR states for "Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar". Its principle is based on comparing the distance between the satellite and the ground in consecutive satellite passes over the same area on the Earth's surface. Radar satellites images record, with very high precision, the distance travelled by the radar signal that is emitted by the satellite is registered. When this distance is compared through time, InSAR technology can provide highly accurate ground deformation measurements. ALTAMIRA INFORMATION, company specialized in ground motion monitoring, has developed GlobalSARTM, which combines several processing techniques and algorithms based on InSAR technology, to achieve ground motion

  13. Thickness distribution of a cooling pyroclastic flow deposit on Augustine Volcano, Alaska: Optimization using InSAR, FEMs, and an adaptive mesh algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterlark, Timothy; Lu, Zhong; Rykhus, Russell P.

    2006-01-01

    nterferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery documents the consistent subsidence, during the interval 1992–1999, of a pyroclastic flow deposit (PFD) emplaced during the 1986 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska. We construct finite element models (FEMs) that simulate thermoelastic contraction of the PFD to account for the observed subsidence. Three-dimensional problem domains of the FEMs include a thermoelastic PFD embedded in an elastic substrate. The thickness of the PFD is initially determined from the difference between post- and pre-eruption digital elevation models (DEMs). The initial excess temperature of the PFD at the time of deposition, 640°C, is estimated from FEM predictions and an InSAR image via standard least-squares inverse methods. Although the FEM predicts the major features of the observed transient deformation, systematic prediction errors (RMSE = 2.2 cm) are most likely associated with errors in the a priori PFD thickness distribution estimated from the DEM differences. We combine an InSAR image, FEMs, and an adaptive mesh algorithm to iteratively optimize the geometry of the PFD with respect to a minimized misfit between the predicted thermoelastic deformation and observed deformation. Prediction errors from an FEM, which includes an optimized PFD geometry and the initial excess PFD temperature estimated from the least-squares analysis, are sub-millimeter (RMSE = 0.3 mm). The average thickness (9.3 m), maximum thickness (126 m), and volume (2.1×107m3) of the PFD, estimated using the adaptive mesh algorithm, are about twice as large as the respective estimations for the a priori PFD geometry. Sensitivity analyses suggest unrealistic PFD thickness distributions are required for initial excess PFD temperatures outside of the range 500–800°C.

  14. Insar and Finite Element Analysis of Ground Deformation at Lake Urmia Causeway (luc), Northwest Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshiri, R.; Motagh, M.; Baes, M.; Sharifi, M. A.

    2013-09-01

    Precise long-term deformation monitoring of causeways and bridges is of vital task for maintenance and management work related to transportation safety. In this study, we analyse the settlement of Lake Urmia Causeway (LUC), northwest Iran, using observations from InSAR and Finite Element Model (FEM) simulation. For InSAR processing, we analyse 58 SAR images of ENVISAT, ALOS and TerraSAR-X (TSX) using the SBAS technique to assess the settlement of embankments in the years 2003-2013. The InSAR results show deflation on both embankments with a peak velocity of > 5 cm/year in the satellite Line Of Sight (LOS) direction. The InSAR observations are then used to construct a settlement compaction model for the cross section at the distance of 4 km from the most western edge of the causeway, using a 2D Finite Element Model. Our FEM results suggest that settlement of the embankments will continue in the future due to consolidation phenomenon.

  15. Characterizing 6 August 2007 Crandall Canyon mine collapse from ALOS PALSAR InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Wicks, Charles

    2010-01-01

    same as the moment of the collapse source, with each larger than the seismically computed moment. Our InSAR results, including the location of the event, the extent of the collapsed area, and constraints on the shearing component of the deformation source, all confirm and extend recent seismic studies of the 6 August 2007 event.

  16. Numerical weather prediction models and SAR interferometry: synergic use for meteorological and INSAR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Rocca, Fabio; Perissin, Daniele; Ferretti, Rossella; Pichelli, Emanuela; Rommen, Bjorn; Cimini, Nico

    2011-11-01

    Spaceborne Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a well established technique useful in many land applications, such as landslide monitoring and digital elevation model extraction. One of its major limitation is the atmospheric effect, and in particular the high water vapour spatial and temporal variability which introduces an unknown delay in the signal propagation. However, the sensitivity of SAR interferometric phase to atmospheric conditions could in principle be exploited and InSAR could become in certain conditions a tool to monitor the atmosphere, as it happens with GPS receiver networks. This paper describes a novel attempt to assimilate InSAR derived information on the atmosphere, based on the Permanent Scatterer multipass technique, into a numerical weather forecast model. The methodology is summarised and the very preliminary results regarding the forecast of a precipitation event in Central Italy are analysed. The work was done in the framework of an ESA funded project devoted to the mapping of the water vapour with the aim to mitigate its effect for InSAR applications.

  17. Quantifying sub-pixel urban impervious surface through fusion of optical and inSAR imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, L.; Jiang, L.; Lin, H.; Liao, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we explored the potential to improve urban impervious surface modeling and mapping with the synergistic use of optical and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) imagery. We used a Classification and Regression Tree (CART)-based approach to test the feasibility and accuracy of quantifying Impervious Surface Percentage (ISP) using four spectral bands of SPOT 5 high-resolution geometric (HRG) imagery and three parameters derived from the European Remote Sensing (ERS)-2 Single Look Complex (SLC) SAR image pair. Validated by an independent ISP reference dataset derived from the 33 cm-resolution digital aerial photographs, results show that the addition of InSAR data reduced the ISP modeling error rate from 15.5% to 12.9% and increased the correlation coefficient from 0.71 to 0.77. Spatially, the improvement is especially noted in areas of vacant land and bare ground, which were incorrectly mapped as urban impervious surfaces when using the optical remote sensing data. In addition, the accuracy of ISP prediction using InSAR images alone is only marginally less than that obtained by using SPOT imagery. The finding indicates the potential of using InSAR data for frequent monitoring of urban settings located in cloud-prone areas.

  18. Investigating long-term subsidence at Medicine Lake Volcano, CA, using multitemporal InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Amy L.; Biggs, Juliet; Lu, Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Long-term volcanic subsidence provides insight into intereruptive processes, which comprise the longest portion of the eruptive cycle. Ground-based geodetic surveys of Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV), northern CA, document subsidence at rates of ˜-10 mm yr-1 between 1954 and 2004. The long observation period plus the duration and stable magnitude of this signal presents an ideal opportunity to study long-term volcanic deformation, but this first requires accurate knowledge of the geometry and magnitude of the source. Best-fitting analytical source models to past levelling and GPS data sets show conflicting source parameters-primarily the model depth. To overcome this, we combine multiple tracks of InSAR data, each with a different look angle, to improve upon the spatial resolution of ground-based measurements. We compare the results from InSAR to those of past geodetic studies, extending the geodetic record to 2011 and demonstrating that subsidence at MLV continues at ˜-10 mm yr-1. Using geophysical inversions, we obtain the best-fitting analytical source model-a sill located at 9-10 km depth beneath the caldera. This model geometry is similar to those of past studies, providing a good fit to the high spatial density of InSAR measurements, while accounting for the high ratio of vertical to horizontal deformation derived from InSAR and recorded by existing levelling and GPS data sets. We discuss possible causes of subsidence and show that this model supports the hypothesis that deformation at MLV is driven by tectonic extension, gravitational loading, plus a component of volume loss at depth, most likely due to cooling and crystallization within the intrusive complex that underlies the edifice. Past InSAR surveys at MLV, and throughout the Cascades, are of variable success due to dense vegetation, snow cover and atmospheric artefacts. In this study, we demonstrate how InSAR may be successfully used in this setting by applying a suite of multitemporal analysis methods

  19. GPS and InSAR constraints on vertical tectonic motion improve the estimate of slip rate of the San Andreas Fault in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, William; Johnson, Kaj; Blewitt, Geoff; Kreemer, Corné; Weldon, Ray; Burgette, Reed

    2014-05-01

    The San Andreas fault (SAF) is the fastest slipping member of a complex plate boundary system that poses a looming earthquake hazard to millions of people in southern California. Seismic hazard analysis products rely on accurate estimates of fault slip rate in order to best forecast the shaking from future damaging earthquakes. Data from geodetic GPS networks such as the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory, SCIGN, and other municipal networks place strong constraints on faults slip rates. However, models based geodetic measurements in the eastern Transverse Ranges suffer from uncertainties in fault dip, slip history, and viscoelastic Earth structure. Part of the problem is that data are commonly limited to horizontal interseismic rates of motion at GPS stations. Here we present results of integrated analysis of GPS and space-based InSAR data that together provide a high-resolution three-component estimation of the interseismic velocity field around the SAF. Aligning the InSAR to GPS mitigates long wavelength errors in InSAR while increasing the density of measurements between geographically sparse GPS stations. We use solutions from our GPS mega-network analysis of over 12,000 globally distributed stations processed using the GIPSY-OASIS software. Solutions are aligned to our new North America fixed reference frame (NA12), which provides strong vertical reference to compare rates across the plate boundary. Vertical data are considered if the station has at least 4 years of data, have time series that are fit well by a linear plus seasonal terms plus steps from known equipment changes and earthquakes. We use over 750 ERS and ENVISAT radar scenes from between 1992 and 2009 obtained from the WinSAR archive, including 4 frames from 5 tracks to form over 10,000 interferograms, providing line-of-sight (LOS) velocities for overlapping domains. To separate the contributions from vertical and horizontal signals, we align the InSAR LOS rates to the GPS LOS rates and

  20. InSAR measurements around active faults: creeping Philippine Fault and un-creeping Alpine Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series analyses have been frequently applied to measure the time-series of small and quasi-steady displacements in wide areas. Large efforts in the methodological developments have been made to pursue higher temporal and spatial resolutions by using frequently acquired SAR images and detecting more pixels that exhibit phase stability. While such a high resolution is indispensable for tracking displacements of man-made and other small-scale structures, it is not necessarily needed and can be unnecessarily computer-intensive for measuring the crustal deformation associated with active faults and volcanic activities. I apply a simple and efficient method to measure the deformation around the Alpine Fault in the South Island of New Zealand, and the Philippine Fault in the Leyte Island. I use a small-baseline subset (SBAS) analysis approach (Berardino, et al., 2002). Generally, the more we average the pixel values, the more coherent the signals are. Considering that, for the deformation around active faults, the spatial resolution can be as coarse as a few hundred meters, we can severely 'multi-look' the interferograms. The two applied cases in this study benefited from this approach; I could obtain the mean velocity maps on practically the entire area without discarding decorrelated areas. The signals could have been only partially obtained by standard persistent scatterer or single-look small-baseline approaches that are much more computer-intensive. In order to further increase the signal detection capability, it is sometimes effective to introduce a processing algorithm adapted to the signal of interest. In an InSAR time-series processing, one usually needs to set the reference point because interferograms are all relative measurements. It is difficult, however, to fix the reference point when one aims to measure long-wavelength deformation signals that span the whole analysis area. This problem can be

  1. The 2014 Napa valley earthquake constrained by InSAR and GNSS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polcari, Marco; Fernández, José; Palano, Mimmo; Albano, Matteo; Samsonov, Sergey; Stramondo, Salvatore; Zerbini, Susanna

    2015-04-01

    In this work InSAR and GNSS data have been exploited to evaluate the 3D displacement field produced by the Mw 6.0 earthquake occurred on August 24th, 2014, southwest of Napa Valley, California. The earthquake epicenter is located within the San Andreas Fault system, which forms the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. As the Pacific plate moves to the northwest, relative to North America, deformation occurs between the major faults in the System. The InSAR data are those of the Sentinel-1 satellite recently launched on April 3rd, 2014. This satellite is capable of acquiring data in several modes such as Interferometric Wide (IW), Extra Wide (EW) swath mode or the Stripmap mode, thus varying area coverage and pixel resolution. Here a pair of SAR images, acquired in Stripmap mode with an incidence angle of about 23° and a pixel resolution of about 4 meters in both directions, covering an area of 70x180 Km have been used. The pre- and post-earthquake images have been acquired on August 7th and August 31st, 2014 respectively. They are characterized by a perpendicular baseline of 2 meters and have been cut around the epicenter and multi-looked by a factor of 15x15 in range and azimuth to obtain a pixel size of about 60x60 m. The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) provided by the SRTM mission has been used to remove the topographic phase. Moreover, the Goldstein filtering and the Minimum Cost Flow (MCF) phase unwrapping algorithm were also applied. The analyzed GNSS dataset, spanning the 1st August 2014 - 2nd September 2014 period, includes 32 stations belonging to the Bay Area Regional Deformation Network and 301 additional continuous stations available from the UNAVCO and the CDDIS archives. The whole network of stations has been organized into seven sub-networks of about 50 sites each. The sub-networks were processed sharing a number of common sites to provide the necessary ties between them. The results of this processing step are daily estimates of

  2. InSAR analysis of surface deformation over permafrost to estimate active layer thickness based on one-dimensional heat transfer model of soils

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Zhao, Rong; Hu, Jun; Wen, Lianxing; Feng, Guangcai; Zhang, Zeyu; Wang, Qijie

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to estimate active layer thickness (ALT) over permafrost based on InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) observation and the heat transfer model of soils. The time lags between the periodic feature of InSAR-observed surface deformation over permafrost and the meteorologically recorded temperatures are assumed to be the time intervals that the temperature maximum to diffuse from the ground surface downward to the bottom of the active layer. By exploiting the time lags and the one-dimensional heat transfer model of soils, we estimate the ALTs. Using the frozen soil region in southern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) as examples, we provided a conceptual demonstration of the estimation of the InSAR pixel-wise ALTs. In the case study, the ALTs are ranging from 1.02 to 3.14 m and with an average of 1.95 m. The results are compatible with those sparse ALT observations/estimations by traditional methods, while with extraordinary high spatial resolution at pixel level (~40 meter). The presented method is simple, and can potentially be used for deriving high-resolution ALTs in other remote areas similar to QTP, where only sparse observations are available now. PMID:26480892

  3. Influence of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue Behavior of an Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Carroll; Laura Carroll

    2011-09-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened), is a candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS provides improved creep resistance through a composition based on 316 stainless steel (SS) with additions of Ti and Nb to form nano-scale MC precipitates in the austenitic matrix. The low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of a HT-UPS alloy has been investigated at 650 C, 1.0% total strain, and an R ratio of -1 with hold times as long as 9000 sec at peak tensile strain. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is compared to that of 316 SS. The cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and the deformed microstructures. Cracking in both alloys is transgranular (initiation and propagation) in the case of continuous cycle fatigue, while the primary cracks also propagate transgranularly during creep-fatigue cycling. Internal grain boundary damage as a result of the tensile hold is present in the form of fine cracks for hold times of 3600 sec and longer and substantially more internal cracks are visible in 316 SS than HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material are different. An equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas tangles of dislocations are present at the nanoscale MC precipitates in HT-UPS and no cellular substructure is observed.

  4. Advances in Breeding Management and Use of Ovulation Induction for Fixed-time AI.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, R N; Kauffold, J

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the breeding herd is the predictable and consistent production of high quality pigs. To achieve this objective, an appropriate number of females need to be mated in each breeding week and they should maintain their pregnancy and deliver large litters. Many factors can impact achievement of optimal sow productivity, particularly breeding management. Most matings will involve artificial insemination (AI), and successful AI requires deposition into the cervix (or beyond) of sufficient viable high quality sperm at an appropriate time relative to ovulation. This is facilitated by improved knowledge of the sow's ovarian function prior to and during her oestrous period. Realization of the importance of establishing an adequate sperm reservoir in the oviduct at an appropriate time relative to ovulation has led to advances in the management of AI. The future of AI will likely involve insemination of single doses of high genetic merit semen, potentially having a reduced sperm concentration which is made possible by knowledge of the effect of site of sperm deposition on sow fertility. In particular, knowledge of when a sow is likely to ovulate during a natural or induced oestrous period will prove invaluable in the maintenance of herd productivity. This review will examine options for breeding management, including the control of oestrus and ovulation, on sow herd reproductive performance.

  5. Quantifying INSAR Temporal Decorrelation and its impact on estimation of vegetation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, B. D.; Siqueira, P.; Hensley, S.; Ahmed, R.

    2007-12-01

    The National Research Council was commissioned by NASA to conduct a decadal survey to assess the strategy NASA should take for Earth science and applications from Space. One of the recommendations of this report is for a mission called 'DESDynI', consisting of an L-band SAR and a laser altimeter, to measure surface and ice sheet deformation, and to measure vegetation structure for ecosystem health. Measuring vegetation structure with an L-band repeat-pass InSAR mission requires that temporal decorrelation between the SAR observations be well understood. In the worst case, temporal decorrelation would exceed the volumetric decorrelation (which may be modeled as a function of the vegetation structure), making accurate vegetation height inversion impossible from the InSAR data. In the best case, non-negligible temporal decorrelation would bias the estimation. In order to quantify InSAR temporal decorrelation over forested areas, the NASA/JPL AIRSAR SAR conducted a comprehensive series of InSAR flightlines in 2004 over the La Selva Biological Reserve, Costa Rica (a mature, well-characterized tropical rainforest), collecting both single-pass and repeat-pass InSAR data at a variety of baselines and temporal separations (0 meters to 200 meters, 20 minutes to 2 weeks). Results of this analysis will be presented. The L-band ALOS PALSAR SAR, launched in 2006, and currently collecting data sets globally, has a 46 day repeat orbit and baselines less than 1km. Data from this mission, as well as from the 1978 Seasat SAR (which had a 3 day repeat for much of the mission) should likewise provide important characterizations of temporal decorrelation over forested regions. Possible observation strategies for DESDynI may have to accommodate temporal decorrelation effects through more frequent observations of areas subject to weather-induced decorrelation, similar to global observation strategies for optical sensors.

  6. Finding a Balance: Fifteen Institutional Case Studies on the Relationship between Part-Time Work and Advanced Level Study. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Ann, Ed.; Spours, Ken, Ed.

    This document presents and discusses case studies that examined the relationship between part-time employment and advanced level study at 15 schools in Essex, England. "Foreword" (David Jones) provides a brief overview of the project. "Finding a Balance--Fifteen Institutional Case Studies on the Relationship between Part-time Work…

  7. Active faults in Lebanon : kinematics and interseismic behavior measured from radar interferometry (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasserre, C.; Pinel-Puysségur, B.; Vergnolle, M.; Klinger, Y.; Pathier, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Levant fault system, more than 1000 km-long, marks the limit between the Arabian and Sinaï tectonic plates, extending from the Aqaba gulf in the Red Sea to Turkey. Mostly left-lateral, it forms a transpression zone in Lebanon, associating strike-slip faults such as the Yammouneh fault and thrust faults such as the Mount Lebanon thrust. This fault system in Lebanon is at the origin of large historical earthquakes during the past two thousand years (551 AD on the thrust offshore and 1837 along the Roum fault inland, 1759 along the Rashaia and Sergaya faults). We aim at characterizing the present-day behavior of active faults in Lebanon, in particular the Yammouneh fault which did not break since 1202, to contribute to a better assessment of the seismic hazard in this region. Space geodesy techniques (GPS, InSAR) allow to quantify the present-day displacements across faults (a few mm/yr during the interseismic period), and to model stress loading and relaxation processes during the seismic cycle, at the fault scale and at the regional scale. GPS campaign measurements have been made along profiles perpendicular to the Yammouneh fault. In addition, an important archive of radar images covering Lebanon (acquired by the ERS and Envisat satellites, along descending and ascending orbits) is also available. We process ERS and Envisat radar data to obtain the average interseismic velocity field across faults over the past 15-20 years. Techniques of interferograms networks processing (MuLSAR), atmospheric phase delays correction from global atmospherical models, DEM correction and time series inversion (NSBAS) are used to overcome the main remaining limitations in the measurements accuracy (low coherence, strong atmospheric delays, long wavelength deformation signal). The final goal is to propose a modelling of the surface displacement field to quantify the present-day kinematics of active fauts in Lebanon, taking into account GPS data as well as tectonic and

  8. Ground Surface Deformation Around Tehran due to Groundwater Recharge: InSAR Monitoring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourmelen, N.; Peyret, M.; Chery, J.; Ritz, J.

    2002-12-01

    Tehran is located on an active tectonic and seismic zone. The surface deformation monitoring provides a powerful tool for getting a better understanding of faults kinematics and mechanisms. Used in conjunction with GPS networks, InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) provides dense and precise deformation measurements which are essential for mapping complex heterogeneous deformation fields. Moreover, urban and arid areas preserve interferometric phase coherence. The archived acquisitions of ERS that span 9 months between September 1998 and June 1999 reveal wide areas of surface uplift (by as much as 9 cm). This vertical deformation (gradual in time) has probably no tectonic meaning but is rather the ground response to ground water recharge. These zones are all located dowstream of large alluvial fans like the one of Karaj. The variation of effective stress caused by intersticial water draining could explain such surface deformation. It can also be noticed that some faults act as boundary for these deformation zones and fluid motion. The understanding of this deformation is relevant for groundwater monitoring and urban developement management. It is also necessary for discriminating it from tectonic deformation that also occurs on this zone. Due to the lack of attitude control of satellite ERS-2 since February 2001, the last images acquired could not be combined with the former acquisitions. Nevertheless, we expect to be able to enrich our set of images in order to map tectonic deformation on a longer period and to monitor in a more continuous way the deformation due to groundwater evolution. This would allow to quantify the permanent and reversible part of this signal.

  9. Ground Surface Deformation around Tehran due to Groundwater Recharge: InSAR Monitoring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourmelen, N.; Peyret, M.; Fritz, J. F.; Cherry, J.

    2003-04-01

    Tehran is located on an active tectonic and seismic zone. The surface deformation monitoring provides a powerful tool for getting a better understanding of faults kinematics and mechanisms. Used in conjunction with GPS networks, InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) provides dense and precise deformation measurements which are essential for mapping complex heterogeneous deformation fields. Moreover, urban and arid areas preserve interferometric phase coherence. The archived acquisitions of ERS that span 9 months between September 1998 and June 1999 reveal wide areas of surface uplift (by as much as 9 cm). This vertical deformation (gradual in time) has probably no tectonic meaning but is rather the ground response to ground water recharge. These zones are all located dowstream of large alluvial fans like the one of Karaj. The variation of effective stress caused by intersticial water draining could explain such surface deformation. It can also be noticed that some faults act as boundary for these deformation zones and fluid motion. The understanding of this deformation is relevant for groundwater monitoring and urban developement management. It is also necessary for discriminating it from tectonic deformation that also occurs on this zone. Due to the lack of attitude control of satellite ERS-2 since February 2001, the last images acquired could not be combined with the former acquisitions. Nevertheless, we expect to be able to enrich our set of images in order to map tectonic deformation on a longer period and to monitor in a more continuous way the deformation due to groundwater evolution. This would allow to quantify the permanent and reversible part of this signal.

  10. Integration of InSAR and GIS in the Study of Surface Faults Caused by Subsidence-Creep-Fault Processes in Celaya, Guanajuato, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Avila-Olivera, Jorge A.; Farina, Paolo; Garduno-Monroy, Victor H.

    2008-05-07

    In Celaya city, Subsidence-Creep-Fault Processes (SCFP) began to become visible at the beginning of the 1980s with the sprouting of the crackings that gave rise to the surface faults 'Oriente' and 'Poniente'. At the present time, the city is being affected by five surface faults that display a preferential NNW-SSE direction, parallel to the regional faulting system 'Taxco-San Miguel de Allende'. In order to study the SCFP in the city, the first step was to obtain a map of surface faults, by integrating in a GIS field survey and an urban city plan. The following step was to create a map of the current phreatic level decline in city with the information of deep wells and using the 'kriging' method in order to obtain a continuous surface. Finally the interferograms maps resulted of an InSAR analysis of 9 SAR images covering the time interval between July 12 of 2003 and May 27 of 2006 were integrated to a GIS. All the maps generated, show how the surface faults divide the city from North to South, in two zones that behave in a different way. The difference of the phreatic level decline between these two zones is 60 m; and the InSAR study revealed that the Western zone practically remains stable, while sinkings between the surface faults 'Oriente' and 'Universidad Pedagogica' are present, as well as in portions NE and SE of the city, all of these sinkings between 7 and 10 cm/year.

  11. A low-cost RK time advancing strategy for energy-preserving turbulent simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Francesco; Coppola, Gennaro; de Luca, Luigi; Balarac, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    Energy-conserving numerical methods are widely employed in direct and large eddy simulation of turbulent flows. Semi-discrete conservation of energy is usually obtained by adopting the so-called skew-symmetric splitting of the non-linear term, defined as a suitable average of the divergence and advective forms. Although generally allowing global conservation of kinetic energy by convection, it has the drawback of being roughly twice as expensive as standard divergence or advective forms alone. A novel time-advancement strategy that retains the conservation properties of skew-symmetric-based schemes at a reduced computational cost has been developed in the framework of explicit Runge-Kutta schemes. It is found that optimal energy-conservation can be achieved by properly constructed Runge-Kutta methods in which only divergence and advective forms for the convective term are adopted. The new schemes can be considerably faster than skew-symmetric-based techniques. A general framework for the construction of optimized Runge-Kutta coefficients is developed, which has proven to be able to produce new methods with a specified order of accuracy on both solution and energy. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by numerical simulation of homogeneous isotropic turbulence.

  12. Advancement of Solidification Processing Technology Through Real Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy: Sample Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of samples were prepared for the real time X-ray transmission microscopy (XTM) characterization. In the first series directional solidification experiments were carried out to evaluate the critical velocity of engulfment of zirconia particles in the Al and Al-Ni eutectic matrix under ground (l-g) conditions. The particle distribution in the samples was recorded on video before and after the samples were directionally solidified. In the second series samples of the above two type of composites were prepared for directional solidification runs to be carried out on the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) aboard the space shuttle during the LMS mission in June 1996. X-ray microscopy proved to be an invaluable tool for characterizing the particle distribution in the metal matrix samples. This kind of analysis helped in determining accurately the critical velocity of engulfment of ceramic particles by the melt interface in the opaque metal matrix composites. The quality of the cast samples with respect to porosity and instrumented thermocouple sheath breakage or shift could be easily viewed and thus helped in selecting samples for the space shuttle experiments. Summarizing the merits of this technique it can be stated that this technique enabled the use of cast metal matrix composite samples since the particle location was known prior to the experiment.

  13. Advanced mobile multimedia applications: using MPEG-21 and time-dependent metadata.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sutter, Robbie; Lerouge, Sam; De Neve, Wesley; Lambert, Peter; Van de Walle, Rik

    2003-11-01

    While the price of mobile devices is dropping quickly, the set of features and capabilities of these devices is advancing very dramatically. Because of this, new mobile multimedia applications are conceivable, also thanks to the availability of high speed mobile networks like UMTS and Wireless LAN. However, creating such applications is still difficult due to the huge diversity of features and capabilities of mobile devices. Software developers also have to take into account the rigorous limitation on processing capabilities, display possibilities, and the limited battery life of these devices. On top of that, the availability of the device resources fluctuates strongly during execution of an application, directly and violently influencing the user experience, whereas equivalent fluctuations on traditional desktop PC's are far less prominent. Using new technology like MPEG-4, -7 and -21 can help application developers to overcome these problems. We have created an MPEG-21-based Video-on-Demand application optimized for mobile devices that is aware of the usage environment (i.e., user preference, device capabilities, device conditions, network status, etc.) of the client and adapts the MPEG-4 videos to it. The application is compliant with the Universal Multimedia Access framework, supports Time-Dependent Metadata, and relies on both MPEG-4 and MPEG-21 technology.

  14. Full-Time Instructional Staffing and Outcomes of Advanced Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Margaret Becker

    2016-01-01

    Two core adult education outcomes for advanced adult learners in U.S. states under the National Reporting System are learning gains in adult secondary education and entry into postsecondary education (PSE). Advanced learner outcomes are associated with key functions in an adult education programming framework, as well as with adequate…

  15. Interaction of Porosity with an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: a Real-Time Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kaukler, W.; Catalina, A.; Stefanescu, D.; Curreri, P.

    1999-01-01

    Problems associated with formation of porosity during solidification continue to have a daily impact on the metal forming industry. Several past investigations have dealt with the nucleation and growth aspects of porosity. However, investigations related to the interaction of porosity with that of a solidification front has been limited mostly to organic analogues. In this paper we report on real time experimental observations of such interactions in metal alloys. Using a state of the art X-Ray Transmission Microscope (XTM) we have been able to observe and record the dynamics of the interaction. This includes distortion of the solid/liquid interface near a poro.sity, solute segr,egation patterns surrounding a porosity and the change in shape of the porosity during interaction with an advancing solid/liquid interface. Results will be presented for different Al alloys and growth conditions. The experimental data will be compared to theory using a recently developed 2D numerical model. The model employs a finite difference approach where the solid/liquid interface is defined through the points at which the interface intersects the grid lines. The transport variables are calculated at these points and the motion of the solidification front is determined by the magnitude of the transport variables. The model accounts for the interplay of the thermal and solutal field and the influence of capilarity to predict the shape of the solid/liquid interface with time in the vicinity of porosity. One can further calculate the perturbation of the solutal field by the presence of porosity in the melt.

  16. GPS and Satellite InSAR Observations of Landslide Activity at the Sinking Canyon in South Central Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, M. H.; Glenn, N. F.; Thackray, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Multiple rotational, transitional, and lateral spread landslides have occurred in south central Idaho where basalt lava flows overly unconsolidated lake and fluvial sediments at the Sinking Canyon. The canyon is about 0.1 km deep and 0.25-1 km wide along a 4-km segment of the Salmon Falls Creek (SFC). Local topography and hydrological conditions are most likely the major triggering factors that have initiated landslides by increasing the gravitational stresses and weakening the canyon wall materials. Landslide activity has created natural dams of SFC, which in turn has resulted in forming large lakes with a potential flooding hazard to life and property downstream. In this study, we use campaign Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of 2003-2004 and Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric (InSAR) data acquired during 1992-2007 by the European radar satellites (ERS-1 and ERS-2) to identify, monitor, and analyze recent landslide activity at SFC. Results show that three main landslides have been active during the period of observation: the Salmon Falls landslide (SFL) that has been first reported in 1999, the historical 1937 landslide, and a third unnamed landslide to the north of the 1937 slide. InSAR measurements indicate that the SFL has been active during the period of our earliest interferogram (1992-1993) whereas the slide head has detached and has moved away from the eastern canyon wall about 3 cm. Over the years, the SFL body and toe have been pushed westward repetitively at rates of about 3-7 cm/yr. The toe is confined by the western canyon wall and thus is pushed upward in some years causing slight uplift (2-3 cm). Our field observations reveal many transverse and radial cracks associated with the deformation pattern caused by recurring motions. The historic 1937 slide is the largest mass wasting and is the least active landslide in the study area. The unnamed slide shows episodic activity with varying rates (0-4 cm/yr) of line-of-sight motions. This

  17. Coseismic Faults and Crust Deformation Accompanied the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake, China by Field Investigation and InSAR Interferogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, K.; Si, H.; Fujiwara, H.; Ozawa, T.

    2008-12-01

    The devastated Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake occurred along the steep eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau in Sichuan, China, on 12 May 2008. Over 86,592 people were dead or missing, 374159 injured, and more than 4.8 million homeless. The ruptures possibly occurred over a length of 285 km along the northeast striking Longmen Shan (LMS) thrust belt. In order to study the oversized fault ruptures, existing active faults related and relationships with the damages caused, we conducted field investigations during 4-15 June and 3-9 October 2008, covered about 140km length of LMS faults, including Beichuan(BC), Anxian(AC), Mianzhu, Shifang, Pengzhou, Dujiangyan, Yingxiu (YX) and Wenchuan. On the field investigation we found coseismic surface faults along several profiles perpendicular to the LMS faults. The coseismic surface faults we discovered were at Leigu(L), Hanwang(H), Yinghua(Y), Bailu(BL), Xiaoyudong(X), and Baiyunding (BYD). Of them the maximum vertical displacement reached 4.6m at L, Beichuan County. The uplifting displacements dominated in the southwestern section of the rupture. Moreover, the northwest-striking left-lateral fault was found with horizontal displacement of 2.8m, and vertical of 1.5m as well, at X, Pengzhou City. The left-lateral fault, inversely under-controlled movement of right- lateral fault in the area, showed the complexity of the fault movements. The field results showed the coseismic surface ruptures locally while the overall faults movements and Crust deformation could be understood by the Interferometric SAR(InSAR) technique (NIED, 2008) using data from the Phased Array L-band SAR sensor (PALSAR) equipped on Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). The larger deformation zones detected by InSAR interferogram occurred with a width of ~30 km in southwestern section, and of ~10km in northeastern section of LMS faults. In the southwestern section, the deformation zone occurred mostly within the existing active faults zones: Guanxian

  18. Integration of GPS and InSAR Measurements for Kinematic Analysis of Crustal Deformation in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W. L.; Wang, C. C.; Liu, T. Y.; Chiu, C. Y.; Chang, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    GPS (Global Positioning System) and InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) observations have their own characteristic: GPS can measure three-dimensional (East, North, Up) ground motion in high accuracy but has relatively sparse station coverage, while InSAR can provide densely spatial measurements of surface displacement but only in one dimension (LOS direction). In this study we adapt a velocity field method to combine InSAR measurements of LOS velocities with available GPS data. This allows us to form a velocity field in the GPS reference frame with higher spatial resolution than is available from the sparse GPS data alone. We first divide study areas into triangular meshes, and assume that the velocity varies linearly with latitude and longitude (i.e., homogeneous strain) within each triangle. Therefore, the geodetic observations within each triangle are related to the velocities of its vertices by an interpolation shape function. Given observed GPS ENU and InSAR LOS velocities, we can solve a system of linear equations for unknown velocities of the triangular vertices. With this velocity field model, we can get a continuous velocity field by interpolation of the vertex velocities and further calculate the strain rate of each triangular mesh. An additional advantage of this method is that it can provide ground motion (and their uncertainties) even in areas of InSAR incoherence. We apply this method to the Taipei area and the northern Longitudinal Valley (LV) of Taiwan by combining continuous GPS data and PSInSAR (Permanent Scatter InSAR) measurements observed by Envisat and ALOS satellites. Results show that the vertical motion in the Taipei basin is episodic, with the largest strain-rate magnitude shown along the hanging-wall of the Sanchiao normal fault and the south of the Tatun volcano area. In the northern LV, ground subsidence of ~5 mm/yr is revealed, with the largest strain-rate magnitude near 23.4°~23.6°N that is consistent with an area of

  19. An Integrated Analysis of Seismic and InSAR data from the June 2012 Koa'e Fault System Earthquake Sequence, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, S.; Lin, G.; Amelung, F.; Okubo, P.; Poland, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Koa'e fault system is a prominent but poorly understood structural element of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i. The ~E-W-trending normal faults that make up the Koa'e system are located about 5 km south of the summit caldera and extend between the East and Southwest Rift Zones, providing a means of accommodating both magma transport between the rifts and extension due to seaward motion of the volcano's south flank. On 5 June 2012, a sequence of shallow earthquakes with magnitudes up to M3.6 occurred within the central part of the Koa'e fault system. InSAR data from multiple satellites spanning the time of the earthquakes indicates a maximum of about 10 cm of down-to-the-north displacement on a known Koa'e fault. Field visits to the fault after the earthquakes found abundant ground cracking. Here, we combine the InSAR data acquired by the COSMO-SkyMed, TSX and RSAT2 systems and seismic data recorded by the Hawaiian Volcanology Observatory to analyze the characteristics of fault rupture. High-precision earthquake locations of the 2012 sequence together with the background seismicity that extends back to 1986 are obtained by applying three-dimensional ray-tracing, similar-event cluster analysis, and waveform cross-correlation methods. The integrated analysis is helpful to better constrain the geometry of the fault, its depth extent, and its role in the structural evolution of Kilauea.

  20. Fault and anthropogenic processes in central California constrained by satellite and airborne InSAR and in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Lundgren, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) system is the primary plate boundary in California, with the central SAF (CSAF) lying adjacent to the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), a vast structural trough that accounts for about one-sixth of the United Sates' irrigated land and one-fifth of its extracted groundwater. The CSAF displays a range of fault slip behavior with creeping in its central segment that decreases towards its northwest and southeast ends, where the fault transitions to being fully locked. At least six Mw ~6.0 events since 1857 have occurred near the Parkfield transition, most recently in 2004. Large earthquakes also occurred on secondary faults parallel to the SAF, the result of distributed deformation across the plate boundary zone. Recent studies have revealed the complex interaction between anthropogenic related groundwater depletion and the seismic activity on adjacent faults through stress interaction. Despite recent progress, many questions regarding fault and anthropogenic processes in the region still remain. For example, how is the relative plate motion accommodated between the CSAF and off-fault deformation? What is the distribution of fault creep and slip deficit at shallow depths? What are the spatiotemporal variations of fault slip? What are the spatiotemporal characteristics of anthropogenic and lithospheric processes and how do they interact with each other? To address these, we combine satellite InSAR and NASA airborne UAVSAR data to image on and off-fault deformation. The UAVSAR data cover fault perpendicular swaths imaged from opposing look directions and fault parallel swaths since 2009. The much finer spatial resolution and optimized viewing geometry provide important constraints on near fault deformation and fault slip at very shallow depth. We performed a synoptic InSAR time series analysis using ERS-1/2, Envisat, ALOS and UAVSAR interferograms. The combined C-band ERS-1/2 and Envisat data provide a long time interval of SAR data over the region

  1. Advanced Fire Information System - A real time fire information system for Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, P. E.; Roy, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) lead by the Meraka Institute and supported by the South African National Space Agency (SANSA) developed the Advanced Fire Information System (AFIS) to provide near real time fire information to a variety of operational and science fire users including disaster managers, fire fighters, farmers and forest managers located across Southern and Eastern Africa. The AFIS combines satellite data with ground based observations and statistics and distributes the information via mobile phone technology. The system was launched in 2004, and Eskom (South Africa' and Africa's largest power utility) quickly became the biggest user and today more than 300 Eskom line managers and support staff receive cell phone and email fire alert messages whenever a wildfire is within 2km of any of the 28 000km of Eskom electricity transmission lines. The AFIS uses Earth observation satellites from NASA and Europe to detect possible actively burning fires and their fire radiative power (FRP). The polar orbiting MODIS Terra and Aqua satellites provide data at around 10am, 15pm, 22am and 3am daily, while the European Geostationary MSG satellite provides 15 minute updates at lower spatial resolution. The AFIS processing system ingests the raw satellite data and within minutes of the satellite overpass generates fire location and FRP based fire intensity information. The AFIS and new functionality are presented including an incident report and permiting system that can be used to differentiate between prescribed burns and uncontrolled wild fires, and the provision of other information including 5-day fire danger forecasts, vegetation curing information and historical burned area maps. A new AFIS mobile application for IOS and Android devices as well as a fire reporting tool are showcased that enable both the dissemination and alerting of fire information and enable user upload of geo tagged photographs and on the fly creation of fire reports

  2. High-throughput real-time x-ray microtomography at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Carlo, Francesco; Albee, Paul B.; Chu, Yong S.; Mancini, Derrick C.; Tieman, Brian; Wang, Steve Y.

    2002-01-01

    It is now possible for large volumes of synchrotron- radiation-generated micro-tomography data to be produced at gigabyte-per-minute rates, especially when using currently available CCD cameras at a high-brightness source, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Recent improvements in the speed of our detectors and stages, combined with increased photon flux supplied by a newly installed double multilayer monochromator, allow us to achieve these data rates on a bending magnet beamline. Previously, most x-ray microtomography experiments have produced data at comparatively lower rates, and often the data were analyzed after the experiment. The time needed to generate complete data sets meant putting off analysis to the completion of a run, thus preventing the user from evaluating the usefulness of a data set and consequently impairing decision making during data acquisition as to how to proceed. Thus, the ability to provide to a tomography user a fully reconstructed data set in few minutes is one of the major problems to be solved when dealing with high-throughput x- ray tomography. This is due to the complexity of the data analysis that involves data preprocessing, sinogram generation, 3D reconstruction, and rendering. At the APS, we have developed systems and techniques to address this issue. We present a method that uses a cluster-based, parallel- computing system based on the Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. Among the advantages of this approach are the portability, ease-of-use, and low cost of the system. The combination of high-speed, online analysis with high- throughput acquisition allows us to acquire and reconstruct a 512x512x512-voxel sample with a few microns resolution in less than ten minutes.

  3. Research and development program for the development of advanced time-temperature dependent constitutive relationships. Volume 2: Programming manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassenti, B. N.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a 10-month research and development program for nonlinear structural modeling with advanced time-temperature constitutive relationships are presented. The implementation of the theory in the MARC nonlinear finite element code is discussed, and instructions for the computational application of the theory are provided.

  4. Response Times of Children and Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome on an "Advanced" Test of Theory of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaland, Nils; Smith, Lars; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2007-01-01

    In the present study the response times of 10- to 20-year-old participants with Asperger syndrome (AS) (N = 21) of normal intelligence and a control group of typically developing individuals (N = 20) were recorded on a new "advanced" test of theory of mind. This test taps the ability to make mental-state inferences versus physical-state inferences…

  5. A prototype of an automated high resolution InSAR volcano-monitoring system in the MED-SUV project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Tanvir A.; Minet, Christian; Fritz, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic processes which produce a variety of geological and hydrological hazards are difficult to predict and capable of triggering natural disasters on regional to global scales. Therefore it is important to monitor volcano continuously and with a high spatial and temporal sampling rate. The monitoring of active volcanoes requires the reliable measurement of surface deformation before, during and after volcanic activities and it helps for the better understanding and modelling of the involved geophysical processes. Space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR), persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI) and small baseline subset algorithm (SBAS) provide a powerful tool for observing the eruptive activities and measuring the surface changes of millimetre accuracy. All the mentioned techniques with deformation time series extraction address the challenges by exploiting medium to large SAR image stacks. The process of selecting, ordering, downloading, storing, logging, extracting and preparing the data for processing is very time consuming has to be done manually for every single data-stack. In many cases it is even an iterative process which has to be done regularly and continuously. Therefore, data processing becomes slow which causes significant delays in data delivery. The SAR Satellite based High Resolution Data Acquisition System, which will be developed at DLR, will automate this entire time consuming tasks and allows an operational volcano monitoring system. Every 24 hours the system runs for searching new acquired scene over the volcanoes and keeps track of the data orders, log the status and download the provided data via ftp-transfer including E-Mail alert. Furthermore, the system will deliver specified reports and maps to a database for review and use by specialists. The user interaction will be minimized and iterative processes will be totally avoided. In this presentation, a prototype of SAR Satellite based High Resolution Data

  6. Urban Infrastructure Monitoring with a Spatially Adaptive Multi-Looking InSAR Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Jayanti; Eppler, Jayson; Busler, Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    Surface displacements for urban infrastructure monitoring are derived using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). The analysis uses a novel InSAR method, Homogenous Distributed Scatterer (HDS)-InSAR, that exploits both persistent point and coherent distributed scatterers using adaptive multi-looking of statistically homogenous pixel neighbourhoods. An unwrapped phase model incorporating meteorological data enables separation of temperature-correlated displacement from potentially hazardous long-term trends. Results are presented over the Canadian cities of Regina, Winnipeg and Montreal using RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X data. The new combination of HDS-InSAR and the extended phase model permits large areas of infrastructure to be remotely monitored on a regular basis and enables a more targeted monitoring process to help identify infrastructure at greatest risk for damage.

  7. InSAR detects increase in surface subsidence caused by an Arctic tundra fire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Lin; Jafarov, Elchin E.; Schaefer, Kevin M.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Zebker, Howard A.; Williams, Christopher A.; Rogan, John; Zhang, Tingjun

    2014-01-01

    Wildfire is a major disturbance in the Arctic tundra and boreal forests, having a significant impact on soil hydrology, carbon cycling, and permafrost dynamics. This study explores the use of the microwave Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique to map and quantify ground surface subsidence caused by the Anaktuvuk River fire on the North Slope of Alaska. We detected an increase of up to 8 cm of thaw-season ground subsidence after the fire, which is due to a combination of thickened active layer and permafrost thaw subsidence. Our results illustrate the effectiveness and potential of using InSAR to quantify fire impacts on the Arctic tundra, especially in regions underlain by ice-rich permafrost. Our study also suggests that surface subsidence is a more comprehensive indicator of fire impacts on ice-rich permafrost terrain than changes in active layer thickness alone.

  8. Tropospheric Correction for InSAR Using Interpolated ECMWF Data and GPS Zenith Total Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Frank H.; Fishbein, Evan F.; Moore, Angelyn W.; Owen, Susan E.; Fielding, Eric J.; Granger, Stephanie L.; Bjorndahl, Fredrik; Lofgren Johan

    2011-01-01

    To mitigate atmospheric errors caused by the troposphere, which is a limiting error source for spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imaging, a tropospheric correction method has been developed using data from the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and the Global Positioning System (GPS). The ECMWF data was interpolated using a Stretched Boundary Layer Model (SBLM), and ground-based GPS estimates of the tropospheric delay from the Southern California Integrated GPS Network were interpolated using modified Gaussian and inverse distance weighted interpolations. The resulting Zenith Total Delay (ZTD) correction maps have been evaluated, both separately and using a combination of the two data sets, for three short-interval InSAR pairs from Envisat during 2006 on an area stretching from northeast from the Los Angeles basin towards Death Valley. Results show that the root mean square (rms) in the InSAR images was greatly reduced, meaning a significant reduction in the atmospheric noise of up to 32 percent. However, for some of the images, the rms increased and large errors remained after applying the tropospheric correction. The residuals showed a constant gradient over the area, suggesting that a remaining orbit error from Envisat was present. The orbit reprocessing in ROI_pac and the plane fitting both require that the only remaining error in the InSAR image be the orbit error. If this is not fulfilled, the correction can be made anyway, but it will be done using all remaining errors assuming them to be orbit errors. By correcting for tropospheric noise, the biggest error source is removed, and the orbit error becomes apparent and can be corrected for

  9. Improving Atmospheric Corrections to InSAR Path Delays Using Operational Weather Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishbein, E.; Fielding, E. J.; Moore, A. W.; von Allmen, P. A.; Xing, Z.; Li, Z.; Pan, L.

    2010-12-01

    Using InSAR to measure surface displacements immediately following earthquakes is difficult. Tropospheric radar propagation delays can be a large source of error, especially for moderate-sized events at low altitudes and latitudes, and it cannot be reduced by averaging several overpasses. We evaluate tropospheric delays from several operational global and regional weather forecast models and compare these with delays from fixed GPS receivers and Envisat’s InSAR. Although dry airmass (surface pressure) and liquid water burden both contribute to the delay, water vapor burden dominates the delay. Accurate representations of near surface atmospheric water vapor are the single most important criteria for using one weather model over another. Several weather model characteristics are key for good estimates of atmospheric water vapor distribution. One is modeling of water vapor transport, which is improved by increased spatial resolution and topography. A second aspect is accurate inputs of water vapor sources and sinks. These will improve with better assimilations of satellite and in situ observations in weather forecast models. We present an estimate of the model-dependent error by deriving delays from several weather models, using identical processing algorithms. In this study we use products from the 0.125° ECMWF global deterministic forecast, the 1° NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS) and the 12km NCEP North America Mesoscale (NAM) model. Additionally, delays from weather forecasts must be interpolated to the higher spatial resolution of InSAR imagery. We have evaluated delays using simple interpolation and contour-following adjustments and have compare these to the GFS observations sorted by distance from the model grid points and amount of elevation correction. We are developing Online Services for Correcting Atmosphere in Radar (OSCAR), which should aid rapid use of InSAR measurements. These analyses will be used to optimize the correction algorithms within

  10. Inverse modeling of InSAR and ground leveling data for 3D volumetric strain distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, L. A.; Glowacka, E.; Sarychikhina, O.

    2015-12-01

    Wide availability of modern Interferometric Synthetic aperture Radar (InSAR) data have made possible the extensive observation of differential surface displacements and are becoming an efficient tool for the detailed monitoring of terrain subsidence associated to reservoir dynamics, volcanic deformation and active tectonism. Unfortunately, this increasing popularity has not been matched by the availability of automated codes to estimate underground deformation, since many of them still rely on trial-error subsurface model building strategies. We posit that an efficient algorithm for the volumetric modeling of differential surface displacements should match the availability of current leveling and InSAR data and have developed an algorithm for the joint inversion of ground leveling and dInSAR data in 3D. We assume the ground displacements are originated by a stress free-volume strain distribution in a homogeneous elastic media and determined the displacement field associated to an ensemble of rectangular prisms. This formulation is then used to develop a 3D conjugate gradient inversion code that searches for the three-dimensional distribution of the volumetric strains that predict InSAR and leveling surface displacements simultaneously. The algorithm is regularized applying discontinuos first and zero order Thikonov constraints. For efficiency, the resulting computational code takes advantage of the resulting convolution integral associated to the deformation field and some basic tools for multithreading parallelization. We extensively test our algorithm on leveling and InSAR test and field data of the Northwest of Mexico and compare to some feasible geological scenarios of underground deformation.

  11. A computer program for estimating the power-density spectrum of advanced continuous simulation language generated time histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program for performing frequency analysis of time history data is presented. The program uses circular convolution and the fast Fourier transform to calculate power density spectrum (PDS) of time history data. The program interfaces with the advanced continuous simulation language (ACSL) so that a frequency analysis may be performed on ACSL generated simulation variables. An example of the calculation of the PDS of a Van de Pol oscillator is presented.

  12. Crustal Rebound due to Lake Mass Changes Measured by InSAR: Constraints on Lithosphere Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, M. P.; Twardzik, C.; Cavalié, O.; Lasserre, C.

    2015-12-01

    SAR interferometry has proven to be a reliable method for detecting small displacements due to ground subsidence. Here, we relate ground motion around the lake Mead (Nevada, USA) and lake Siling Co (Tibet, China) measured by InSAR to water loading in order to constrain the rheology of the lithosphere.Lake Mead, an artificial reservoir, has been filled with water in 1935. We analyzed ~500 interferograms based on 62 ERS images and on 40 ENVISAT images acquired between 1992 and 2010. Interferograms are inverted to solve for the time series of ground motion in the lake Mead area. Temporal smoothing allows to reduce the turbulent atmospheric delays. Spatio-temporal series of the deformation from 1992 to 2010 show a broad subsidence pattern correlated with lake level from 1992 to 2010. We model the deformation, taking into account the water and sediment loading history of the lake since 1935. The two-layer visco-elastic model proposed by Kaufmann and Amelung (2000), with a mantle viscosity of 1018 Pa s, adjusts well the data up to 2001, but overpredicts the deformation after 2001. We will discuss the models that could explain the deformation evolution. The Siling Co lake is the largest endorheic lake in Central Tibet. In 1972-1999 its water level remained stable, while it increased by about 1.0~m/yr in the period 2000-2006. The increased rate gradually stepped down to 0.2~m/yr in 2007-2011. We analysed 107 ERS and Envisat SAR images during the period 1992-2011. The deformation amplitude closely follows the lake level temporal evolution, except that subsidence continues in 2008-2011, while the lake level stagnated. This temporal evolution suggests a non elastic relaxation process taking place at a decade time-scale. Phase delay maps are used to constrain possible layered visco-elastic rheological models. An elastic model could partly explain the observed subsidence rate if elastic moduli are about twice lower than those extracted from Vp/Vs profiles. The surface

  13. Robust corrections for topographically-correlated atmospheric noise in InSAR data from large deforming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, D. P.; Hooper, A. J.; Wright, T. J.; Walters, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    For Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) the atmosphere forms one of the biggest challenges when it comes to the extraction of small-magnitude long-wavelength tectonics signals. Spatio-temporal variation of water vapour, pressure and temperature in the lower 15 km of the troposphere is the main cause of these signals, introducing apparent differential path delays in interferograms of up to 15 cm. Several correction techniques have been applied in the past that rely on external data from weather models, GPS or spectrometer data, but these are typically limited by the lower spatial resolution of the auxiliary data. Alternatively, time-series InSAR techniques and filtering of the interferometric phase in space and time can be applied, but separating atmospheric delays from non-linear deformation is challenging. Another method, which can be applied to individual interferograms, is to estimate the correlation between interferometric phase and topography, either in a non-deforming area or using a frequency band insensitive to deformation. While this method can be successful for small areas, it does not account for spatial variation of atmospheric properties, which can be significant across regions larger than 100 km. While the slope relating phase and topography can be reliably estimated for subregions, the intercept cannot, as it is biased by the presence of unrelated signals. The intercept cannot however be neglected, as the mean height of each subregion typically varies, leading to a different intercept for each window. Here we present a new power law representation of the topographically-correlated phase delay that can be applied locally and which is able to account for these spatial variations in atmospheric properties. We estimate the power law from sounding data to fit altitudes of up to 4 km, as this includes most of the topography range in our/most regions of interest. We also constrain the power law by specifying the height above which the relative

  14. Robust corrections for topographically-correlated atmospheric noise in InSAR data from large deforming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, David; Walters, Richard; Hooper, Andrew; Wright, Tim; Parker, Doug

    2014-05-01

    For Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) the atmosphere forms one of the biggest challenges when it comes to the extraction of small-magnitude long-wavelength tectonic signals. Spatio-temporal variation of water vapour, pressure and temperature in the troposphere is the main cause of these signals, introducing apparent differential path delays in interferograms of up to 15 cm. Several correction techniques have been applied in the past that rely on external data from weather models, GPS or spectrometer data, but these are typically limited by the lower spatial resolution of the auxiliary data. Alternatively, time-series InSAR techniques and filtering of the interferometric phase in space and time can be applied, but separating atmospheric delays from non-linear deformation is challenging. Another method, which can be applied to individual interferograms, is to estimate the correlation between interferometric phase and topography, either in a non-deforming area or using a frequency band insensitive to deformation. While this method can be successful for small areas, it does not account for spatial variation of atmospheric properties, which can be significant across regions larger than 100 km. While the slope relating phase and topography can be reliably estimated for subregions, the intercept cannot, as it is biased by the presence of unrelated signals. The intercept cannot however be neglected, as the mean height of each subregion typically varies, leading to a different intercept for each window. Here we present a new power-law representation of the topographically-correlated phase delay that can be applied locally and which is able to account for these spatial variations in atmospheric properties. We estimate the power-law from sounding data to fit altitudes of up to 4 km, as this includes the topography range in most regions of interest. We also constrain the power-law by specifying the height above which the relative tropospheric delays are

  15. The potential of more accurate InSAR covariance matrix estimation for land cover mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mi; Yong, Bin; Tian, Xin; Malhotra, Rakesh; Hu, Rui; Li, Zhiwei; Yu, Zhongbo; Zhang, Xinxin

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and Interferometric SAR (InSAR) provide both structural and electromagnetic information for the ground surface and therefore have been widely used for land cover classification. However, relatively few studies have developed analyses that investigate SAR datasets over richly textured areas where heterogeneous land covers exist and intermingle over short distances. One of main difficulties is that the shapes of the structures in a SAR image cannot be represented in detail as mixed pixels are likely to occur when conventional InSAR parameter estimation methods are used. To solve this problem and further extend previous research into remote monitoring of urban environments, we address the use of accurate InSAR covariance matrix estimation to improve the accuracy of land cover mapping. The standard and updated methods were tested using the HH-polarization TerraSAR-X dataset and compared with each other using the random forest classifier. A detailed accuracy assessment complied for six types of surfaces shows that the updated method outperforms the standard approach by around 9%, with an overall accuracy of 82.46% over areas with rich texture in Zhuhai, China. This paper demonstrates that the accuracy of land cover mapping can benefit from the 3 enhancement of the quality of the observations in addition to classifiers selection and multi-source data ingratiation reported in previous studies.

  16. Monitoring CO2 sequestration with a network inversion InSAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabus, B.; Ghuman, P.; MacDonald, B.

    2009-05-01

    The capture, containment and long-term storage of CO2 is increasingly discussed as an important means to counter climate change resulting from the ongoing release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. This CO2 sequestration often requires the pumping of the gas into deep saline aquifers. However, before sequestration can be regarded as a longterm solution it is necessary to investigate under which conditions permanent and leakless capture of the CO2 is achieved in the substrate. We demonstrate that a combination of spaceborne synthetic aperture interferometry (InSAR) and ground based measurements of ground uplift caused by the underground release and spreading of the CO2 can be forged into a powerful tool to monitor sequsetration. We use a novel InSAR approach, which combines the benefits of a point-based persistent scatterer algorithm with a network inversion approach, and an additional temporal filter to remove atmospheric disturbances also at smaller scales down to 1 km and less. Using case studies from several injection wells we show that InSAR and ground based data in conjunction with geological and structural information above the aquifer, as well as detailed injection logs, allow to monitor the volumetric spread of CO2 at the mm per year level. For the majority of the studied wells CO2 appears to approach a stable sequestration state, however, in at least one case our results suggest leakage outside the aquifer.

  17. Assessing groundwater depletion and dynamics using GRACE and InSAR: Potential and limitations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castellazzi, Pascal; Martel, Richard; Galloway, Devin L.; Longuevergne, Laurent; Rivera, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing of the temporal variation of ground level and gravity has improved our understanding of groundwater dynamics and storage. Mass changes are measured by GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites, whereas ground deformation is measured by processing synthetic aperture radar satellites data using the InSAR (Interferometry of Synthetic Aperture Radar) techniques. Both methods are complementary and offer different sensitivities to aquifer system processes. GRACE is sensitive to mass changes over large spatial scales (more than 100,000 km2). As such, it fails in providing groundwater storage change estimates at local or regional scales relevant to most aquifer systems, and at which most groundwater management schemes are applied. However, InSAR measures ground displacement due to aquifer response to fluid-pressure changes. InSAR applications to groundwater depletion assessments are limited to aquifer systems susceptible to measurable deformation. Furthermore, the inversion of InSAR-derived displacement maps into volume of depleted groundwater storage (both reversible and largely irreversible) is confounded by vertical and horizontal variability of sediment compressibility. During the last decade, both techniques have shown increasing interest in the scientific community to complement available in situ observations where they are insufficient. In this review, we present the theoretical and conceptual bases of each method, and present idealized scenarios to highlight the potential benefits and challenges of combining these techniques to remotely assess groundwater storage changes and other aspects of the dynamics of aquifer systems.

  18. Simulation Studies of the Effect of Forest Spatial Structure on InSAR Signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guoqing; Liu, Dawei; Ranson, K. Jon; Koetz, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    The height of scattering phase retrieved from InSAR data is considered being correlated with the tree height and the spatial structure of the forest stand. Though some researchers have used simple backscattering models to estimate tree height from the height of scattering center, the effect of forest spatial structure on InSAR data is not well understood yet. A three-dimensional coherent radar backscattering model for forest canopies based on realistic three-dimensional scene was used to investigate the effect in this paper. The realistic spatial structure of forest canopies was established either by field measurements (stem map) or through use of forest growth model. Field measurements or a forest growth model parameterized using local environmental parameters provides information of forest species composition and tree sizes in certain growth phases. A fractal tree model (L-system) was used to simulate individual 3- D tree structure of different ages or heights. Trees were positioned in a stand in certain patterns resulting in a 3-D medium of discrete scatterers. The radar coherent backscatter model took the 3-D forest scene as input and simulates the coherent radar backscattering signature. Interferometric SAR images of 3D scenes were simulated and heights of scattering phase centers were estimated from the simulated InSAR data. The effects of tree height, crown cover, crown depth, and the spatial distribution patterns of trees on the scattering phase center were analyzed. The results will be presented in the paper.

  19. InSAR and GPS Analysis of Ground Subsidence in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Dixon, T. H.; Sánchez, O.

    2002-12-01

    We describe the recent subsidence of Mexico City due to ground water withdrawal using a combination of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) for high spatial resolution and Global Positioning System (GPS) data for calibration and improved temporal information. Groundwater extraction in the basin of Mexico exceeds recharge, lowering the water table by 0.1-1.5 m/yr, reducing pore fluid pressure in the aquifer and overlying acquitard, and leading to compaction of lacustrine shales and surface subsidence. We used ERS-2 data for Interferometric SAR analysis. Results indicate land subsidence in Mexico City between February 1996 and January 2000 at rates as high as 378 mm/yr in the eastern metropolitan area. The downtown region shows rates up to 115 mm/yr. GPS data suggests that these rates have been steady at least since 1995 and are due to steady declines in the water table. Available well data indicate consistent water level drops over the last decade, concurrent to the near-constant subsidence rate measured by both GPS and INSAR. Static groundwater level define an approximate linear relation between water level drop and surface subsidence: Correlation of the InSAR fringe pattern with mapped stratigraphic units indicates that maximum subsidence is primarily controlled by unconsolidated Quaternary lacustrine clays and silts in the shallow sub-surface, marking ancient Lake Texcoco, now obscured by urban construction on the old lake bed.

  20. Nyamulagira’s magma plumbing system inferred from 15 years of InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wauthier, Christelle; Cayol, Valérie; Poland, Michael; Kervyn, François; D'Oreye, Nicolas; Hooper, Andrew; Samsonov, Sergei; Tiampo, Kristy; Smets, Benoit; Pyle, D. M.; Mather, T.A.; Biggs, J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyamulagira, located in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo on the western branch of the East African rift, is Africa’s most active volcano, with an average of one eruption every 3 years since 1938. Owing to the socio-economical context of that region, the volcano lacks ground-based geodetic measurements but has been monitored by interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) since 1996. A combination of 3D Mixed Boundary Element Method and inverse modelling, taking into account topography and source interactions, is used to interpret InSAR ground displacements associated with eruptive activity in 1996, 2002, 2004, 2006 and 2010. These eruptions can be fitted by models incorporating dyke intrusions, and some (namely the 2006 and 2010 eruptions) require a magma reservoir beneath the summit caldera. We investigate inter-eruptive deformation with a multi-temporal InSAR approach. We propose the following magma plumbing system at Nyamulagira by integrating numerical deformation models with other available data: a deep reservoir (c. 25 km depth) feeds a shallower reservoir (c. 4 km depth); proximal eruptions are fed from the shallow reservoir through dykes while distal eruptions can be fed directly from the deep reservoir. A dyke-like conduit is also present beneath the upper southeastern flank of Nyamulagira.

  1. Assessing Groundwater Depletion and Dynamics Using GRACE and InSAR: Potential and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Castellazzi, Pascal; Martel, Richard; Galloway, Devin L; Longuevergne, Laurent; Rivera, Alfonso

    2016-11-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing of the temporal variation of ground level and gravity has improved our understanding of groundwater dynamics and storage. Mass changes are measured by GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites, whereas ground deformation is measured by processing synthetic aperture radar satellites data using the InSAR (Interferometry of Synthetic Aperture Radar) techniques. Both methods are complementary and offer different sensitivities to aquifer system processes. GRACE is sensitive to mass changes over large spatial scales (more than 100,000 km(2) ). As such, it fails in providing groundwater storage change estimates at local or regional scales relevant to most aquifer systems, and at which most groundwater management schemes are applied. However, InSAR measures ground displacement due to aquifer response to fluid-pressure changes. InSAR applications to groundwater depletion assessments are limited to aquifer systems susceptible to measurable deformation. Furthermore, the inversion of InSAR-derived displacement maps into volume of depleted groundwater storage (both reversible and largely irreversible) is confounded by vertical and horizontal variability of sediment compressibility. During the last decade, both techniques have shown increasing interest in the scientific community to complement available in situ observations where they are insufficient. In this review, we present the theoretical and conceptual bases of each method, and present idealized scenarios to highlight the potential benefits and challenges of combining these techniques to remotely assess groundwater storage changes and other aspects of the dynamics of aquifer systems.

  2. InSAR detects possible thaw settlement in the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rykhus, Russell P.; Lu, Zhong

    2008-01-01

    Satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has proven to be an effective tool for monitoring surface deformation from volcanoes, earthquakes, landslides, and groundwater withdrawal. This paper seeks to expand the list of applications of InSAR data to include monitoring subsidence possibly associated with thaw settlement over the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain. To test our hypothesis that InSAR data are sufficiently sensitive to detect subsidence associated with thaw settlement, we acquired all Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1 (JERS-1) L-band data available for the summers of 1996, 1997, and 1998 over two sites on the Alaska North Slope. The least amount of subsidence for both study sites was detected in the interferograms covering the summer of 1996 (2-3 cm), interferograms from 1997 and 1998 revealed that about 3 cm of subsidence occurred at the northern Cache One Lake site, and about 5 cm of subsidence was detected at the southern Kaparuk River site. These preliminary results illustrate the capacity of the L-band (24 cm) wavelength JERS-1 radar data to penetrate the short Arctic vegetation to monitor subsidence possibly associated with thaw settlement of the active layer and (or) other hydrologic changes over relatively large areas.

  3. Plasma models for real-time control of advanced tokamak scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, D.; Mazon, D.; Walker, M. L.; Ferron, J. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Flanagan, S. M.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R. J.; Hyatt, A. W.; La Haye, R. J.; Lohr, J.; Turco, F.; Schuster, E.; Ou, Y.; Xu, C.; Takase, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Ide, S.; Suzuki, T.; ITPA-IOS Group members; experts

    2011-06-01

    An integrated plasma profile control strategy, ARTAEMIS, is being developed for extrapolating present-day advanced tokamak (AT) scenarios to steady-state operation. The approach is based on semi-empirical modelling and was initially explored on JET (Moreau et al 2008 Nucl. Fusion 48 106001). This paper deals with the general applicability of this strategy for simultaneous magnetic and kinetic control on various tokamaks. The determination of the device-specific, control-oriented models that are needed to compute optimal controller matrices for a given operation scenario is discussed. The methodology is generic and can be applied to any device, with different sets of heating and current drive actuators, controlled variables and profiles. The system identification algorithms take advantage of the large ratio between the magnetic and thermal diffusion time scales and have been recently applied to both JT-60U and DIII-D data. On JT-60U, an existing series of high bootstrap current (~70%), 0.9 MA non-inductive AT discharges was used. The actuators consisted of four groups of neutral beam injectors aimed at perpendicular injection (on-axis and off-axis), and co-current tangential injection (also on-axis and off-axis). On DIII-D, dedicated system identification experiments were carried out in the loop voltage (Vext) control mode (as opposed to current control) to avoid feedback in the response data from the primary circuit. The reference plasma state was that of a 0.9 MA AT scenario which had been optimized to combine non-inductive current fractions near unity with 3.5 < βN < 3.9, bootstrap current fractions larger than 65% and H98(y,2) = 1.5. Actuators other than Vext were co-current, counter-current and balanced neutral beam injection, and electron cyclotron current drive. Power and loop voltage modulations resulted in dynamic variations of the plasma current between 0.7 and 1.2 MA. It is concluded that the response of essential plasma parameter profiles to specific

  4. Mapping Slumgullion Landslide in Colorado, USA Using Airborne Repeat-Pass InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.; Glennie, C. L.; Wang, G.; Lu, Z.; Fernandez-Diaz, J. C.; Cao, N.; Zaugg, E.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) uses two or more SAR images over the same area to determine landscape topography or ground deformation. An interferogram, generated by the phase components of two coherent SAR images, depicts range changes between the radar and the ground resolution elements, and can be used to derive both landscape topography and subtle changes in surface elevation. However, spaceborne repeat-pass interferometry has two main drawbacks: effects due to differences in atmospheric temperature, pressure, and water vapour at two observation times, and loss of coherence due to long spatial and temporal baselines between observations. Airborne repeat-pass interferometry does not suffer from these drawbacks. The atmospheric effect in case of airborne DInSAR becomes negligible due to smaller swath coverage, and the coherence can be maintained by using smaller spatial and temporal baselines. However, the main technical limitation concerning airborne DInSAR is the need of precise motion compensation with an accurate navigation system to correct for the significant phase errors due to typical flight instability from air turbulence. Here, we present results from a pilot study conducted on July 2015 using both X-band and L-band SlimSAR airborne system over the Slumgullion landslide in Colorado in order to (1) acquire the differential interferograms from the airborne platform, (2) understand their source of errors, and (3) pave a way to improve the precision of the derived surface deformation. The landslide movement estimated from airborne DInSAR is also compared with coincident GPS, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), airborne LiDAR, and spaceborne DInSAR measurements using COSMO-SkyMed images. The airborne DInSAR system has a potential to provide time-transient variability in land surface topography with high-precision and high-resolution, and provide researchers with greater flexibility in selecting the temporal and spatial baselines of the data

  5. Newly discovered subsidence at Lassen Peak, southern Cascade Range, California, from InSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, M.; Bawden, G.; Lisowski, M.; Dzurisin, D.

    2004-12-01

    ERS interferograms spanning the 1996-2000 time interval indicate up to 1 cm/yr of subsidence over a ~40 km-diameter area centered about 5 km southeast of Lassen Peak, California. Dry tilt and EDM measurements of the volcanic region completed in 1981, 1982, and 1984 showed no significant deformation, but this interval is too short to accumulate detectible deformation at the 1996 to 2000 rates. Since it is unclear based on InSAR results alone whether the subsidence is a recent or more long-lived process, we resurveyed one dry tilt array and measured five EDM line lengths with GPS in July 2004. Results from the three-station dry tilt array were inconclusive, likely due to an unstable benchmark in the array. Line lengths, however, shortened by up to 14 cm suggesting that the subsidence has been ongoing since at least 1981. Four mechanisms may account for the deformation observed near Lassen Peak: 1) magma withdrawal from a shallow chamber into a deeper crustal reservoir, 2) cooling and/or crystallization of a subsurface magma body, 3) loss of hydrothermal fluids and subsequent cooling, and 4) tectonic motion that is creating a pull-apart basin or other similar structure. The possible sources are similar to those invoked to explain subsidence at Medicine Lake volcano, located 100 km to the north. Geophysical and petrologic studies have found no evidence for a large magma reservoir (> 5 km diameter) in the upper crust beneath the Lassen Peak area; therefore, the first two mechanisms are unlikely. The area surrounding Lassen Peak is known for numerous hydrothermal features, but the relatively shallow depth of the hydrothermal system is not consistent with the spatial extent of the subsidence. In contrast, geologic studies confirm that Basin and Range extension is occurring in the region and the Walker Lane zone of dextral shear passes through the subsiding area. Interaction between these tectonic regimes may result in the formation of a pull-apart basin or other structure

  6. Identification of mine collapses, explosions and earthquakes using INSAR: a preliminary investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall, B; Sweeney, J J; Walter, W R

    1998-07-07

    Interferograms constmcted from satellite-borne synthetic aperture radar images have the capability of mapping sub-cm ground surface deformation over areas on the order of 100 x 100 km with a spatial resolution on the order of 10 meters. We investigate the utility of synthetic aperture radar interferomehy (InSAR) used in conjunction with regional seismic methods in detecting and discriminating different types of seismic events in the context of special event analysis for the CTBT. For this initial study, we carried out elastic dislocation modeling of underground explosions, mine collapses and small (M<5.5) shallow earthquakes to produce synthetic interferograms and then analyzed satellite radar data for a large mine collapse. The synthetic modeling shows that, for a given magnitude each type of event produces a distinctive pattern of ground deformation that can be recognized in, and recovered from, the corresponding interferogram. These diagnostic characteristics include not only differences in the polarities of surface displacements but also differences in displacement amplitudes from the different sources. The technique is especially sensitive to source depth, a parameter that is crucial in discriminating earthquakes from the other event types but is often very poorly constrained by regional seismic data alone. The ERS radar data analyzed is from a ML 5.2 seismic event that occurred in southwestern Wyoming on February 3,1995. Although seismic data from the event have some characteristics of an underground explosion, based on seismological and geodetic data it has been identified as being caused by a large underground collapse in the Solvay Mine. Several pairs of before-collapse and after-collapse radar images were phase processed to obtain interferograms. The minimum time separation for a before-collapse and after-collapse pair was 548 days. Even with this long time separation, phase coherence between the image pairs was acceptable and a deformation map

  7. The rise of the FGFR inhibitor in advanced biliary cancer: the next cover of time magazine?

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sumera; Borad, Mitesh J

    2016-10-01

    Cholangiocarcinomas (CCAs) are heterogeneous tumors arising from the biliary tract with features of cholangiocyte differentiation. CCAs are aggressive tumors with limited treatment options and poor overall survival. Only a subset of CCA patients with early stage disease can avail potentially curative treatment options. For advanced biliary tract tumors, currently there are limited effective treatment modalities. Recent advances have provided greater insight into the genomic landscape of CCAs. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathway is involved in key cellular processes essential to survival and differentiation. Accordingly, aberrant FGFR signaling has significant oncogenic potential. Recent discovery of FGFR2 gene fusions in CCA has heightened interest in FGFR inhibition in advanced biliary tract cancer. These findings have served as a catalyst for ongoing clinical investigation of FGFR inhibition in CCA patients with various FGFR signaling abnormalities. Herein, we review FGFR aberrations in CCA and their prognostic implications, FGFR targeting as a viable therapeutic option in advanced biliary tract malignancies, and future directions for development of combination approaches utilizing FGFR inhibition.

  8. Just-in-Time Teaching: A Tool for Enhancing Student Engagement in Advanced Foreign Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abreu, Laurel; Knouse, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have indicated a need for further research on effective pedagogical strategies designed for advanced foreign language courses in the postsecondary setting, especially in light of decreased enrollments at this level and the elimination of foreign language programs altogether in some institutions (Paesani & Allen, 2012). This article…

  9. Real-time application of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques for research aircraft simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Steven B.

    1990-01-01

    Visual aids are valuable assets to engineers for design, demonstration, and evaluation. Discussed here are a variety of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques used to enhance the displays of test aircraft dynamics. The new software's capabilities are examined and possible future uses are considered.

  10. The rise of the FGFR inhibitor in advanced biliary cancer: the next cover of time magazine?

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Sumera

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinomas (CCAs) are heterogeneous tumors arising from the biliary tract with features of cholangiocyte differentiation. CCAs are aggressive tumors with limited treatment options and poor overall survival. Only a subset of CCA patients with early stage disease can avail potentially curative treatment options. For advanced biliary tract tumors, currently there are limited effective treatment modalities. Recent advances have provided greater insight into the genomic landscape of CCAs. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathway is involved in key cellular processes essential to survival and differentiation. Accordingly, aberrant FGFR signaling has significant oncogenic potential. Recent discovery of FGFR2 gene fusions in CCA has heightened interest in FGFR inhibition in advanced biliary tract cancer. These findings have served as a catalyst for ongoing clinical investigation of FGFR inhibition in CCA patients with various FGFR signaling abnormalities. Herein, we review FGFR aberrations in CCA and their prognostic implications, FGFR targeting as a viable therapeutic option in advanced biliary tract malignancies, and future directions for development of combination approaches utilizing FGFR inhibition. PMID:27747092

  11. Advanced karst hydrological and contaminant monitoring techniques for real-time and high resolution applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In telogenetic and soil-mantled karst aquifers, the movement of autogenic recharge through the epikarstic zone and into the regional aquifer can be a complex process and have implications for flooding, groundwater contamination, and other difficult to capture processes. Recent advances in instrument...

  12. Predicting SAT Performance from Advanced Course Content and Timing of Matriculation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Jonathan Sparks

    2012-01-01

    As record numbers of students are applying to selective colleges and universities, students are attempting to set themselves apart from their peers by taking rigorous advanced courses in high school. The race for improving a student's academic record has resulted in more and more students taking these courses earlier and earlier in their high…

  13. Science and Mathematics Advanced Placement Exams: Growth and Achievement over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judson, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of Advanced Placement (AP) exams in the last 2 decades has been paralleled by national enthusiasm to promote availability and rigor of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Trends were examined in STEM AP to evaluate and compare growth and achievement. Analysis included individual STEM subjects and disaggregation…

  14. Using InSAR to investigate long term caldera unrest: case studies from Yellowstone and Long Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    battaglia, maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Interpreting geodetic measurements can be particularly difficult in the case of slow, years-to-decades deformation, such as that commonly observed at large Quaternary silicic calderas. For example, Yellowstone caldera has shown a complex behavior over recent decades: uplift of resurgent domes within the caldera started sometime after 1923, reaching a total of 90 cm, but in 1984 the deformation reversed to subsidence at a rate of 1-2 cm/yr until 1992. Starting in 1992, the deformation began migrating from one resurgent dome to the other, and deformation was also detected along the caldera boundary - the so-called Northern Caldera Rim - starting in the mid-1990s. Evidence from geodetic surveys suggests that magma intrusion and/or pressurization of hydrothermal fluids may both drive uplift at Yellowstone. Geodetic measurements at Long Valley caldera have also revealed multiple episodes of caldera uplift, but in contrast to Yellowstone, deformation is largely restricted to the caldera's single resurgent dome. The fact that the energy released during the resurgent dome uplift is much larger than that which can be explained by seismic activity within and around the caldera, together with the observation that the onset of accelerated deformation precedes increases in earthquake activity by several weeks, suggests that the major source of caldera unrest is probably magma intrusion beneath the resurgent dome. Here we present time series of surface deformation for Yellowstone and Long Valley retrieved by applying the SBAS InSAR technique. We estimate the average regional deformation signal by using the mean velocity values derived from coherent SAR pixels belonging to areas outside the caldera. This tectonic signal is removed from the InSAR displacement and we modeled the InSAR, leveling, and gravity measurements to retrieve the best fitting source parameters. For Yellowstone caldera, different distinct sources, either hydrothermal or magmatic, have been intermittently

  15. Atmospheric delay analysis from GPS meteorology and InSAR APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shilai; Perissin, Daniele; Lin, Hui; Chen, Fulong

    2012-09-01

    Radar atmospheric decorrelation due to inhomogeneity of atmospheric refractivity is a critical limitation of satellite SAR interferometry (InSAR) in the high accuracy retrieving of geophysical parameters. With mm precision, a water vapor tracing technique based on GPS meteorology was widely employed to mitigate InSAR atmospheric errors. However, a reliable comparison of atmospheric delay between GPS and InSAR is rarely touched, mainly due to the scarcity of stable and accurate InSAR atmospheric phases. In the paper we propose a comparison methodology between GPS Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) and SAR Atmospheric Phase Screen (APS) in both differential and pseudo-absolute modes. In the experiment, ENVISAT ASAR APS maps and synchronous GPS campaign measurements in Como, Italy were collected for consistency analysis. Furthermore, the stratification effect of atmospheric delay, in a form of delay-to-elevation ratios, was particularly analyzed for the purpose of separating different components within APSs. Finally, with the above stratification analysis, terms of stratification and assumed turbulence from SAR APS and GPS were compared in differential mode. Presented results show that the stratified ratios from GPS delays and SAR APS maps are in agreement with a std of 7.7 mm/km and a bias of 3.4 mm/km. Correlation coefficients of stratified ratios are higher than 0.7 in ascending case. In differential mode, the atmospheric total delays coincide with STandard Deviations (STDs) smaller than 4 mm (∼0.65 mm PWV) and with correlation coefficients higher than 0.6. The comparison of total delays in ‘pseudo-absolute’ mode is provided as an alternative vision of the agreement between GPS and InSAR. The agreement in this mode was slightly worse than that in differential mode. STDs of the difference are smaller than 6 mm (∼1 mm PWV), and the correlation coefficients are about 0.5 for different implementation approaches. Above comparison results in the work provide a

  16. Realistic Error Modelling for InSAR: Determination of Uncertainties in Earthquake Slip Distributions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. J.; Clarke, P.; Funning, G. J.

    2002-12-01

    The major source of error in InSAR measurements results from changes in tropospheric water vapour concentrations, creating phase delays that are unrelated to ground motion. These can be distributed over distances of tens of kilometres and, if interpreted as surface deformation, can cause errors in measurement as large as 10 cm. Here we present a simple modified Monte Carlo (MC) method for determining the impact of these errors on the accuracy of model parameters derived from InSAR data. In particular, we examine the reliability of InSAR-derived earthquake slip distributions. Conventional MC bootstrap methods are often used for determining errors in model parameters derived from InSAR data. An ensemble of best-fit parameter estimates is found using different input data sets. Each of these data sets is derived from the original, but has its individual phase measurements randomly perturbed in a normal distribution about their original value using an a priori standard deviation. Errors in model parameter estimates are found from the distribution of best-fit solutions to each perturbed data set. For InSAR data, however, conventional MC fails to account for the spatial correlation of atmospheric errors between multiple sampled phase measurements. When the interferogram is sampled densely compared to the wavelength of atmospheric errors, conventional MC can grossly underestimate the errors of model parameter estimates. To produce realistic error bars for parameter estimates, the interferogram's variance-covariance matrix (VCM) must first be determined. A practical approach for this is to determine the mean covariance vs distance function (autocorrelation function), either spatially or from the interferogram's power spectrum using the Wiener-Khinchine theorem (e.g. Hanssen, 2001). This must be done using a part of the interferogram away from the deformation, or, where this is not possible, after a first-pass model has been removed. Using the covariance vs distance function

  17. Detection of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake-induced landslide surface deformation in Kathmandu using InSAR images from PALSAR-2 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroshi P.; Une, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies reported that the 2015 Gorkha earthquake (Mw 7.8), which occurred in Nepal, triggered landslides in mountainous areas. In Kathmandu, earthquake-induced land subsidence was identified by interpreting local phase changes in interferograms produced from Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2/Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 data. However, the associated ground deformation was not discussed in detail. We studied line-of-sight (LoS) changes from InSAR images in the SE area of Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu. To obtain the change in LoS caused only by local, short-wavelength surface deformation, we subtracted the change in LoS attributed to coseismic deformation from the original change in LoS. The resulting change in LoS showed that the river terrace was driven to the bottom of the river valley. We also studied the changes in LoS in both ascending and descending InSAR images of the area along the Bishnumati River and performed 2.5D analysis. Removing the effect of coseismic deformation revealed east-west and up-down components of local surface deformation, indicating that the river terrace deformed eastward and subsided on the western riverbank of the river. On the east riverbank, the river terrace deformed westward and subsided. However, in the southern part of the river basin, the river terrace deformed westward and was uplifted. The deformation data and field survey results indicate that local surface deformation in these two areas was not caused by land subsidence but by a landslide (specifically, lateral spread).

  18. Multi-temporal InSAR monitoring of landslides in a tropical urban environment: focus on Bukavu (DR Congo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Adriano; Monsieurs, Elise; Dewitte, Olivier; d'Oreyes, Nicolas; Kervyn, Francois

    2016-04-01

    The western branch of the East African Rift System, in Central Africa, is characterized by the presence of several geohazards: earthquakes, volcanoes, and landslides. Every year, landslides cause fatalities, structural and functional damage to infrastructure and private properties with serious disruptions of the organization of societies and severe impact on the populations. These impacts are particularly important in the city of Bukavu (DR Congo) located within the Rift, on the southern shore of Lake Kivu. Large slow-moving landslides continuously affect highly populated slopes in the city. However little is known about their actual kinematics and the processes at play. Here we use multi-temporal InSAR technique to monitor these ground deformations. Using 50 Cosmo-SkyMed SAR images, acquired between March - October 2015 with a revisiting time of 8 days (ascending and descending orbits), we produce displacement-rate maps and ground deformation time series using the PS technique. Movements with a velocity >5cm/yr are detected, which is consistent with field observations. DGPS measurements, taken at 21 benchmarks in the area during the same period, allow validating the results. Similar ground deformation rates are found for the period 2002-2008 using Envisat ASAR images. Furthermore, comparison with rainfall monitoring data acquire on site should help us to understand the influence of water and the tropical seasonality in the slide mechanisms.

  19. ENVISAT SAR and InSAR Observations of Deformation and Crater Floor Elevation Change of Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, C.; Yarai, H.; Lu, Z.; Helz, R.

    2005-12-01

    Anatahan Volcano is a strato-volcano situated on a small 9 km by 3 km island in the Mariana Islands of the west Pacific Ocean. The volcano came to life with its first historical eruption in May 2003 ejecting a column of ash from the east crater up to 10 km into the atmosphere. The east crater is one of several craters that coalesce into a larger 5 km by 2 km caldera, the largest caldera in the volcanoes of the Mariana Islands. We will show results of a nascent InSAR study of Mariana volcanoes using European Space Agency (ESA) ENVISAT data. ESA began acquiring SAR data (IS2 and IS6 modes for both ascending and descending passes) over the Marianas Islands in November of 2004 at our request. Interferograms constructed from IS6 mode data display better coherence than those constructed from IS2 data. This coherence is reasonably well maintained from one acquisition to the next, and fairly well maintained over several months from Nov, 2004 to April, 2005. Limited explosive activity in late January and early February apparently did not destroy InSAR coherence through April 5. The largest of the eruptions, to date, occurred on April 5 (UT) about 12 hours after ESA acquired data over the island. Interferograms constructed using the April 5 image display a deformation field that is consistent with an inflating dike that trends SW from the east caldera to the south shore of the island. Since the April 5, 2005 eruption, there has been too much ash deposition and erosion to expect coherent interferograms for at least the near future. Because the inner walls of the east crater are steeper than the IS6 mode incident radar beams, which are incident about 40 degrees from vertical, we have used the change in radar shadow length to estimate the change in elevation of the crater floor. We found that the crater floor rose over 40 m between January 25 and March 1, 2005, and stayed at that level through the April 5 acquisition time. From this shadow length decrease, we have estimated a

  20. InSAR Measurements of Non-Tectonic Deformation Patterns in the Western Transverse Ranges, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. R., III; Marshall, S. T.; Funning, G.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from analysis of twenty-two scenes from the Envisat satellite dated between February 2005 and September 2010 along track 213 frames 2907 and 2925 in the Western Transverse Ranges, CA. Persistent Scatterer InSAR (PSI) analysis of interferograms was performed using the StaMPS software package resulting in approximately 2 million PSI points with their associated line-of-sight velocities and time series. These data outline several zones of anthropogenic motion likely due to groundwater usage and oil extraction. We identify two instances of highly localized subsidence due to oil extraction: one of up to 6 mm/yr across a 3x5 km wide oval-shaped zone along the Ventura Ave anticline and another of up to 12 mm/yr across a 3x15 km region near Maricopa. Both of these features are observed in regions of known oil extraction, and the subsidence zones parallel the local fold axes, suggesting that these observed features are real and not merely a product of noise. We also observe several features potentially related to groundwater extraction. The groundwater-related signals tend to be less localized than the oil extraction signals and typically are centered around urban or agricultural areas. The PSI data show a broad zone of subsidence in the greater Oxnard region (10 mm/yr maximum), and more localized zones of subsidence centered in the cities of Carpenteria (4 mm/yr), Ojai (4 mm/yr), and Santa Clarita (5 mm/yr). Several additional regions of potentially anthropogenic motion are also present in the PSI data to which the root cause is unclear. For example, we observe localized uplift of 5 mm/yr centered in the Stevenson Ranch housing development, 8 mm/yr of subsidence centered about 5 km NW of Moorpark near a large agricultural nursery, and a potentially tectonic broad pattern of 4 mm/yr of uplift in the mountains of Los Padres National Forest near Frasier Mountain.

  1. Comparison of elevation derived from insar data with dem from topography map in Son Dong, Bac Giang, Viet Nam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duy

    2012-07-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are used in many applications in the context of earth sciences such as in topographic mapping, environmental modeling, rainfall-runoff studies, landslide hazard zonation, seismic source modeling, etc. During the last years multitude of scientific applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) techniques have evolved. It has been shown that InSAR is an established technique of generating high quality DEMs from space borne and airborne data, and that it has advantages over other methods for the generation of large area DEM. However, the processing of InSAR data is still a challenging task. This paper describes InSAR operational steps and processing chain for DEM generation from Single Look Complex (SLC) SAR data and compare a satellite SAR estimate of surface elevation with a digital elevation model (DEM) from Topography map. The operational steps are performed in three major stages: Data Search, Data Processing, and product Validation. The Data processing stage is further divided into five steps of Data Pre-Processing, Co-registration, Interferogram generation, Phase unwrapping, and Geocoding. The Data processing steps have been tested with ERS 1/2 data using Delft Object-oriented Interferometric (DORIS) InSAR processing software. Results of the outcome of the application of the described processing steps to real data set are presented.

  2. About Time: A Metacognitive View of Time and Workload Created by Technological Advancements in an Odl Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gous, Ignatius G. P.; Roberts, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Management of time and workload is influenced by the quality of awareness of impacting factors. Faculty has to attend to many responsibilities, with technology in teaching a recent but game-changing impacting factor. This article is a case study which explores the metacognitive awareness of the impact of technology on teaching, learning and…

  3. Feasibility and Timing of Cytoreduction Surgery in Advanced (Metastatic or Recurrent) Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors During the Era of Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Chun; Liao, Chien-Hung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Yen-Yang; MA, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was dramatically improved in the era of imatinib. Cytoreduction surgery was advocated as an additional treatment for advanced GISTs, especially when patients having poor response to imatinib or developing resistance to it. However, the efficacy and benefit of cytoreduction were still controversial. Likewise, the sequence between cytoreduction surgery and imatinib still need evaluation. In this study, we tried to assess the feasibility and efficiency of cytoreduction in advanced GISTs. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of timing of the cytoreduction surgery on the prognosis of advanced GISTs. We conducted a prospective collecting retrospective review of patients with advanced GISTs (metastatic, unresectable, and recurrent GISTs) treated in Chang Gung memorial hospital (CGMH) since 2001 to 2013. We analyzed the impact of cytoreduction surgery to response to imatinib, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced GISTs. Moreover, by the timing of cytoreduction to imatinib, we divided the surgical patients who had surgery before imatinib use into early group and those who had surgery after imatinib into late. We compared the clinical response to imatinib, PFS and OS between early and late cytoreduction surgical groups. Totally, 182 patients were enrolled into this study. Seventy-six patients underwent cytoreduction surgery. The demographic characteristics and tumor presentation were similar between surgical and non-surgical groups. The surgical group showed better complete response rate (P < 0.001) and partial response rate (P = 0.008) than non-surgical group. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year PFS were significantly superior in surgical group (P = 0.003). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year OS were superior in surgical group, but without statistical significance (P = 0.088). Dividing by cytoreduction surgical timing, the demographic

  4. The Timing of Arctic Sea Ice Advance and Retreat as an Indicator of Ice-Dependent Marine Mammal Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, H. L.; Laidre, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic is widely recognized as the front line of climate change. Arctic air temperature is rising at twice the global average rate, and the sea-ice cover is shrinking and thinning, with total disappearance of summer sea ice projected to occur in a matter of decades. Arctic marine mammals such as polar bears, seals, walruses, belugas, narwhals, and bowhead whales depend on the sea-ice cover as an integral part of their existence. While the downward trend in sea-ice extent in a given month is an often-used metric for quantifying physical changes in the ice cover, it is not the most relevant measure for characterizing changes in the sea-ice habitat of marine mammals. Species that depend on sea ice are behaviorally tied to the annual retreat of sea ice in the spring and advance in the fall. Changes in the timing of the spring retreat and the fall advance are more relevant to Arctic marine species than changes in the areal sea-ice coverage in a particular month of the year. Many ecologically important regions of the Arctic are essentially ice-covered in winter and ice-free in summer, and will probably remain so for a long time into the future. But the dates of sea-ice retreat in spring and advance in fall are key indicators of climate change for ice-dependent marine mammals. We use daily sea-ice concentration data derived from satellite passive microwave sensors to calculate the dates of sea-ice retreat in spring and advance in fall in 12 regions of the Arctic for each year from 1979 through 2013. The regions include the peripheral seas around the Arctic Ocean (Beaufort, Chukchi, East Siberian, Laptev, Kara, Barents), the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, and the marginal seas (Okhotsk, Bering, East Greenland, Baffin Bay, Hudson Bay). We find that in 11 of the 12 regions (all except the Bering Sea), sea ice is retreating earlier in spring and advancing later in fall. Rates of spring retreat range from -5 to -8 days/decade, and rates of fall advance range from +5 to +9

  5. Temporal trends of time to antiretroviral treatment initiation, interruption and modification: examination of patients diagnosed with advanced HIV in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Stephen T; Law, Matthew G; Cooper, David A; Keen, Phillip; McDonald, Ann; Middleton, Melanie; Woolley, Ian; Kelly, Mark; Petoumenos, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV prevention strategies are moving towards reducing plasma HIV RNA viral load in all HIV-positive persons, including those undiagnosed, treatment naïve, on or off antiretroviral therapy. A proxy population for those undiagnosed are patients that present late to care with advanced HIV. The objectives of this analysis are to examine factors associated with patients presenting with advanced HIV, and establish rates of treatment interruption and modification after initiating ART. Methods We deterministically linked records from the Australian HIV Observational Database to the Australian National HIV Registry to obtain information related to HIV diagnosis. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with advanced HIV diagnosis. We used survival methods to evaluate rates of ART initiation by diagnosis CD4 count strata and by calendar year of HIV diagnosis. Cox models were used to determine hazard of first ART treatment interruption (duration >30 days) and time to first major ART modification. Results Factors associated (p<0.05) with increased odds of advanced HIV diagnosis were sex, older age, heterosexual mode of HIV exposure, born overseas and rural–regional care setting. Earlier initiation of ART occurred at higher rates in later periods (2007–2012) in all diagnosis CD4 count groups. We found an 83% (69, 91%) reduction in the hazard of first treatment interruption comparing 2007–2012 versus 1996–2001 (p<0.001), and no difference in ART modification for patients diagnosed with advanced HIV. Conclusions Recent HIV diagnoses are initiating therapy earlier in all diagnosis CD4 cell count groups, potentially lowering community viral load compared to earlier time periods. We found a marked reduction in the hazard of first treatment interruption, and found no difference in rates of major modification to ART by HIV presentation status in recent periods. PMID:25865372

  6. Post-emplacement cooling and contraction of lava flows: InSAR observations and thermal model for lava fields at Hekla volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Werner; Dumont, Stephanie; Lavallee, Yan; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn

    2016-04-01

    Gradual post-emplacement subsidence of lava flows has been observed at various volcanoes, e.g. Okmok volcano in Alaska, Kilauea volcano on Hawaii and Etna volcano on Sicily. In Iceland, this effect has been observed at Krafla volcano and Hekla volcano. The latter was chosen as a case study for investigating subsidence mechanisms, specifically thermal contraction. Effects like gravitational loading, clast repacking or creeping of a hot and liquid core can contribute to subsidence of emplaced lava flows, but thermal contraction is considered being a crucial effect. The extent to which it contributes to lava flow subsidence is investigated by mapping the relative movement of emplaced lava flows and flow substrate, and modeling the observed signal. The slow vegetation in Iceland is advantageous for Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and offers great coherence over long periods after lava emplacement, expanding beyond the outlines of lava flows. Due to this reason, InSAR observations over volcanoes in Iceland have taken place for more than 20 years. By combining InSAR tracks from ERS, Envisat and Cosmo-SkyMed satellites we gain six time series with a total of 99 interferograms. Making use of the high spatial resolution, a temporal trend of vertical lava movements was investigated over a course of over 23 years over the 1991 lava flow of Hekla volcano, Iceland. From these time series, temporal trends of accumulated subsidence and subsidence velocities were determined in line of sight of the satellites. However, the deformation signal of lava fields after emplacement is vertically dominated. Subsidence on this lava field is still ongoing and subsidence rates vary from 14.8 mm/year in 1995 to about 1.0 mm/year in 2014. Fitting a simple exponential function suggests a exponential decay constant of 5.95 years. Additionally, a one-dimensional, semi-analytical model was fitted to these data. While subsidence due to phase change is calculated analytically

  7. Geohazards affecting UNESCO WHL sites in the UK observed from geological data and satellite InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigna, Francesca; Tapete, Deodato; Lee, Kathryn

    2016-08-01

    Geohazards pose significant threats to cultural and natural heritage worldwide. In the UK, only 1 out of 29 UNESCO World Heritage List (WHL) sites has been inscribed on the list of World Heritage in Danger, whilst it is widely accepted that many more could be affected by geohazards. In this paper we set out the foundations of a methodological approach to analyse geological, geohazard and remote sensing data available at the British Geological Survey to retrieve an overview of geohazards affecting the UK WHL sites. The Castles and Town Walls (constructed in the time of King Edward I) in Gwynedd in north Wales are used as test sites to showcase the methodology for geohazard assessment at the scale of individual property also to account for situations of varied geology and local topography across multiproperty WHL sites. How such baseline geohazard assessment can be combined with space-borne radar interferometry (InSAR) data is showcased for the four UNESCO WHL sites located in Greater London. Our analysis feeds into the innovative contribution that the JPI-CH project PROTHEGO `PROTection of European cultural HEritage from GeOhazards' (www.prothego.eu) is making towards mapping geohazards in the 400+ WHL sites of Europe by exploiting non-invasive remote sensing methods and surveying technologies.

  8. Weekend-weekday advances in sleep timing are associated with altered reward-related brain function in healthy adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hasler, Brant P.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Holm, Stephanie M.; Jakubcak, Jennifer L.; Ryan, Neal D.; Silk, Jennifer S.; Phillips, Mary L.; Forbes, Erika E.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep timing shifts later during adolescence, thus conflicting with early school start times. This can lead to irregular weekday-weekend schedules and circadian misalignment, which have been linked to depression and substance abuse, consistent with disruptions in the processing of rewards. We tested associations between weekend-weekday shifts in sleep timing and the neural response to monetary reward in healthy adolescents, using actigraphy and a functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm. Region-of-interest analyses focused on the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and striatum, both of which are implicated in reward function. Analyses adjusted for pubertal stage, sex, and total sleep time. Greater weekend-weekday advances in midsleep were associated with decreased mPFC and striatal reactivity to reward, which could reflect reduced regulatory response and reward sensitivity. We speculate that circadian misalignment associated with weekend shifts in sleep timing may contribute to reward-related problems such as depression and substance abuse. PMID:22960270

  9. A perfect time to harness advanced molecular technologies to explore the fundamental biology of Toxocara species.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Robin B

    2013-04-15

    Toxocarosis is of major canine health and socioeconomic importance worldwide. Although many studies have given insights into toxocarosis, to date, there has been limited exploration of the molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics, epidemiology and ecology of Toxocara species as well as parasite-host interactions using '-omic' technologies. The present article gives a background on Toxocara species and toxocarosis, describes molecular tools for specific identification and genetic analysis, and provides a prospective view of the benefits that advanced molecular technologies will have towards better understanding the parasites and disease. Tackling key biological questions employing a 'systems biology' approach should lead to new and improved strategies for the treatment, diagnosis and control of toxocarosis.

  10. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  11. Advances in high repetition rate, ultra-short, gigawatt laser systems for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this article is to emphasize the current advances in the development of high-repetition rate amplifier pumps. Although this review highlights amplifier pump development, any recent data from achieved outputs via the tunable amplifier section is also discussed. The first section describes desirable parameters attributable to the pump amplifier while the rest of the article deals with specific examples for various options. The pump amplifiers can be characterized into two distinct classes; those achieving operation in the hundred hertz regime and those performing at repetition rates {ge}1kHz. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Advances in high repetition rate, ultra-short, gigawatt laser systems for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this article is to emphasize the current advances in the development of high-repetition rate amplifier pumps. Although this review highlights amplifier pump development, any recent data from achieved outputs via the tunable amplifier section is also discussed. The first section describes desirable parameters attributable to the pump amplifier while the rest of the article deals with specific examples for various options. The pump amplifiers can be characterized into two distinct classes; those achieving operation in the hundred hertz regime and those performing at repetition rates {ge}1kHz. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Recent Advances in 3D Time-Resolved Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Riederer, Stephen J.; Haider, Clifton R.; Borisch, Eric A.; Weavers, Paul T.; Young, Phillip M.

    2015-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) was first introduced for clinical studies approximately 20 years ago. Early work provided 3 to 4 mm spatial resolution with acquisition times in the 30 sec range. Since that time there has been continuing effort to provide improved spatial resolution with reduced acquisition time, allowing high resolution three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved studies. The purpose of this work is to describe how this has been accomplished. Specific technical enablers have been: improved gradients allowing reduced repetition times, improved k-space sampling and reconstruction methods, parallel acquisition particularly in two directions, and improved and higher count receiver coil arrays. These have collectively made high resolution time-resolved studies readily available for many anatomic regions. Depending on the application, approximate 1 mm isotropic resolution is now possible with frame times of several seconds. Clinical applications of time-resolved CE-MRA are briefly reviewed. PMID:26032598

  14. Constant versus variable response signal delays in speed--accuracy trade-offs: effects of advance preparation for processing time.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeff; Sproesser, Gudrun; Ulrich, Rolf

    2008-07-01

    In two experiments, we used response signals (RSs) to control processing time and trace out speed--accuracy trade-off(SAT) functions in a difficult perceptual discrimination task. Each experiment compared performance in blocks of trials with constant and, hence, temporally predictable RS lags against performance in blocks with variable, unpredictable RS lags. In both experiments, essentially equivalent SAT functions were observed with constant and variable RS lags. We conclude that there is little effect of advance preparation for a given processing time, suggesting that the discrimination mechanisms underlying SAT functions are driven solely by bottom-up information processing in perceptual discrimination tasks.

  15. Forest Information Extraction from Airborne P-Band PolSAR and X-Band InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Tian, Xin; Feng, Qi; Zhao, Lei; Li, Lan; Hong, Wen; Pottier, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The key research progress of forest information extraction from high resolution PolSAR/InSAR data acquired by one China airborne system were summarized. Firstly, the airborne campaign activities carried out in 2012, 2013, in China were introduced. Secondly, the key SAR/InSAR data processing steps, such as, InSAR processing, SAR image geocoding terrain correction (GTC),the methods used to derive forest height, forest above ground biomass (AGB)from LiDAR, CCD and ground plots data were described. Finally, we introduced the forest information extraction methods and preliminary validation results from P-band PolSAR data and single baseline X-band InSAR data: (1)Forest height inversion using high resolution X-band InSAR data;(2) Forest AGB estimation using P-band PolSAR data; (3) Forest land cover types classification using PolSAR data.

  16. Forest Information Extraction from Airborne P-Band PolSAR and X-Band InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Tian, Xin; Feng, Qi; Zhao, Lei; Li, Lan; Hong, Wen; Pottier, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The key research progress of forest information extraction from high resolution PolSAR/InSAR data acquired by one China airborne system were summarized. Firstly, the airborne campaign activities carried out in 2012, 2013, in China were introduced. Secondly, the key SAR/InSAR data processing steps, such as, InSAR processing, SAR image geocoding terrain correction (GTC), the methods used to derive forest height, forest above ground biomass (AGB) from LiDAR, CCD and ground plots data were described. Finally, we introduced the forest information extraction methods and preliminary validation results from P-band PolSAR data and single baseline X-band InSAR data: (1) Forest height inversion using high resolution X-band InSAR data; (2) Forest AGB estimation using P-band PolSAR data; (3) Forest land cover types classification using PolSAR data.

  17. Advanced GPS-Based Time Link Calibration with PTB’s New GPS Calibration Setup

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    and O. Koudelka, 2008, “Time transfer with nanosecond accuracy for the realization of International Atomic Time,” Metrologia , 45, 185- 198. [4] H...Observatory, Washington, D.C.), pp. 63-88. [14] P. Defraigne and G. Petit, 2004, “Time Transfer to TAI using geodetic receivers,” Metrologia , 40, 184-188

  18. El Mayor-Cucapah (Mw 7.2) earthquake: Early near-field postseismic deformation from InSAR and GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ortega, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake occurred on 4 April 2010 in northeastern Baja California just south of the U.S.-Mexico border. The earthquake ruptured several previously mapped faults, as well as some unidentified ones, including the Pescadores, Borrego, Paso Inferior and Paso Superior faults in the Sierra Cucapah, and the Indiviso fault in the Mexicali Valley and Colorado River Delta.We conducted several Global Positioning System (GPS) campaign surveys of preexisting and newly established benchmarks within 30 km of the earthquake rupture. Most of the benchmarks were occupied within days after the earthquake, allowing us to capture the very early postseismic transient motions. The GPS data show postseismic displacements in the same direction as the coseismic displacements; time series indicate a gradual decay in postseismic velocities with characteristic time scales of 66 ± 9 days and 20 ± 3 days, assuming exponential and logarithmic decay, respectively. We also analyzed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the Envisat and ALOS satellites. The main deformation features seen in the line-of-sight displacement maps indicate subsidence concentrated in the southern and northern parts of the main rupture, in particular at the Indiviso fault, at the Laguna Salada basin, and at the Paso Superior fault. We show that the near-field GPS and InSAR observations over a time period of 5 months after the earthquake can be explained by a combination of afterslip, fault zone contraction, and a possible minor contribution of poroelastic rebound. Far-field data require an additional mechanism, most likely viscoelastic relaxation in the ductile substrate.

  19. El Mayor-Cucapah (Mw 7.2) earthquake: Early near-field postseismic deformation from InSAR and GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ortega, Alejandro; Fialko, Yuri; Sandwell, David; Alejandro Nava-Pichardo, F.; Fletcher, John; Gonzalez-Garcia, Javier; Lipovsky, Brad; Floyd, Michael; Funning, Gareth

    2014-02-01

    El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake occurred on 4 April 2010 in northeastern Baja California just south of the U.S.-Mexico border. The earthquake ruptured several previously mapped faults, as well as some unidentified ones, including the Pescadores, Borrego, Paso Inferior and Paso Superior faults in the Sierra Cucapah, and the Indiviso fault in the Mexicali Valley and Colorado River Delta. We conducted several Global Positioning System (GPS) campaign surveys of preexisting and newly established benchmarks within 30 km of the earthquake rupture. Most of the benchmarks were occupied within days after the earthquake, allowing us to capture the very early postseismic transient motions. The GPS data show postseismic displacements in the same direction as the coseismic displacements; time series indicate a gradual decay in postseismic velocities with characteristic time scales of 66 ± 9 days and 20 ± 3 days, assuming exponential and logarithmic decay, respectively. We also analyzed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the Envisat and ALOS satellites. The main deformation features seen in the line-of-sight displacement maps indicate subsidence concentrated in the southern and northern parts of the main rupture, in particular at the Indiviso fault, at the Laguna Salada basin, and at the Paso Superior fault. We show that the near-field GPS and InSAR observations over a time period of 5 months after the earthquake can be explained by a combination of afterslip, fault zone contraction, and a possible minor contribution of poroelastic rebound. Far-field data require an additional mechanism, most likely viscoelastic relaxation in the ductile substrate.

  20. Inventory of anthropogenic surface deformation measured by InSAR in the western U.S./Mexico and possible impacts on GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semple, A.; Pritchard, M. E.; Taylor, H.

    2014-12-01

    The western US and Mexico are deforming at several spatial scales that can be measured by ground and satellite observations like GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). Many GPS stations have been installed throughout this area to monitor ground deformation caused by large scale tectonic processes; however, several studies have noted that the data recorded at a GPS station can be contaminated by local, non-tectonic ground deformation. In this study, we use InSAR to examine deformation from various sources in the western US and Mexico. We chose this method due to the spatially large study area and the availability and temporal coverage of SAR imagery. We use SAR images acquired by the satellites Envisat, ERS-1 and ERS-2 over a time period from 1992-2010 to create several time series. Data from the ALOS satellite between 2006-2011 are also used in some areas. We use these time series analysis along with previously published results to observe and catalogue various sources of surface deformation in the western US and Mexico - from groundwater pumping, geothermal activity, mining, hydrocarbon production, and other sources. We then use these results to identify GPS stations that have potentially been contaminated by non-tectonic deformation signals. We document more than 150 distinct regions of non-tectonic and likely anthropogenic deformation. We have located 82 GPS stations within 20km of the center of at least one of the non-tectonic deformation signals we have identified. It is likely that the data from these 82 GPS stations have been contaminated by local anthropogenic deformation. Some examples of previously unpublished non-tectonic deformation we have seen in this study include but are not limited to, subsidence due to groundwater extraction in Jesus Garcia, Mexico, both uplift and subsidence due to natural gas extraction at Jonah Field in Sublette County, WY, and uplift due to a water recharge project in Tonopah, AZ.

  1. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  2. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  3. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  4. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  5. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  6. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  7. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  8. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  9. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  10. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  11. A new Persistent Scatterer InSAR method based on phase decomposition, with application to subsidence in greater Houston area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, N.; Lee, H.; Jung, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    A Phase-Decomposition-based Persistent Scatterer InSAR (PD-PSInSAR) method is developed in this study to improve the coherence and spatial density of targets. The general idea of conventional PSInSAR is to find and analyze pointwise stable persistent scatterers (PS). In order to improve the PS network density, distributed scatterers (DS) has also been utilized in several advanced PSInSAR techniques. Unlike these techniques which assumes that a DS involves many independent small scatterers sharing the same scatterering mechanism, this study considers additional two general cases: (1) a DS that contains many small scatterers sharing two or more different scatterering mechanisms, (2) two or more dominant scatterers with different scatterering mechanisms that exist within the same resolution pixel. DSs with multiple scatterering mechanisms can occur in rural areas and some urban areas, especially with low spatial resolution. Extracting information from DSs with multiple scatterering mechanisms is difficult for the existing DS algorithms because of the interference between different scatterering mechanisms. The new PD-PSInSAR method is developed to overcome this limit by using Eigen-decomposition to estimate the phases corresponding to the different scatterering mechanisms, and then implement these estimated phases in conventional PSInSAR process. Therefore, the interference between different scatterering mechanisms becomes mitigated and the obtained phases are expected to have better coherence. This PD-PSInSAR technique is used to estimate the land deformation over the greater Houston area using 25 ENVISAT ASAR data spanning from July 2004 to June 2010. The deformation map reveals significant subsidence up to approximately 2 cm/year over north and northwestern part of greater Houston. Comparison between the conventional PSInSAR and PD-PSInSAR method verifies that the proposed method can detect more PSs and provide better coherences.

  12. Detection surface deformation of the Volcán de Colima (Mexico) and surrounding areas using InSAR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunori, C.; Norini, G.; Stramondo, S.; Capra, L.; Zucca, F.; Groppelli, G.; Bignami, C.; Chini, M.; Mahar, L.; Manea, M.; Manea, V.

    2009-12-01

    The Volcán de Colima (CV) is currently the most active Mexican volcano. After the 1913 plinian activity the volcano presented several eruptive phases that lasted few years, but since 1991 its activity became more persistent with vulcanian eruptions, lava and dome extrusions. During the last 15 years the volcano suffered several eruptive episodes as in 1991, 1994, 1998-1999, 2001-2003, 2004 and 2005 with the emplacement of pyroclastic flows. During rain seasons lahars are frequent affecting several infrastructures such as bridges and electric towers. This work is focused on the detection of surface deformation with centimetre or sub-centimeter accuracy of the Volcán de Colima and surrounding areas. We try to assess the amount and the spatial extension of surface movements of the CV and to get insights into the causes of the surface deformation by using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), a powerful tool ensuring measurements at high-accuracy over large areas. The image dataset acquired by ESA ENVISAT ASAR (C band) and ALOS PALSAR (L Band) sensors, has been processed using Advanced interferometric techniques (A-InSAR) to overcome the really challenging sources of decorrelation related to the setting context, mainly vegetation and atmosphere, in order to give us the opportunity to detect also very low rates of deformations. The main objectives of the interferometric analysis is the measurement of deformations in the CV in relation with active tectonics and gravity induced spreading, the identification of magma migration below the surface in the last decade, the detection of the incipient movements of volcanic landslides and large scale volcano instability, and the kinematics of the Colima rift. We present preliminary results of the A-InSAR processing, in the framework of the interdisciplinary Colima Deformation project (ColDef).

  13. Advances in the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale--Developments and Integration with the Geologic Time Scale and Future Directions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We celebrate the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Vine-Matthews/Morley-Larochelle hypothesis (Vine and Matthews, Nature, 1963, v. 199, #4897, p. 947-949), which integrated marine magnetic anomaly data with a rapidly evolving terrestrial-based geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS). The five decades of research since 1963 have witnessed the expansion and refinement of the GPTS, to the point where ages of magnetochron boundaries, in particular in the Cenozoic, can be estimated with uncertainties better than 0.1%. This has come about by integrating high precision geochronology, cyclostratigraphy at different time scales, and magnetic polarity data of increased quality, allowing extension of the GPTS back into the Paleozoic. The definition of a high resolution GPTS across time intervals of major events in Earth history has been of particular interest, as a specific magnetochron boundary correlated across several localities represents a singular global datum. A prime example is the end Permian, when some 80 percent of genus-level extinctions and a range of 75 to 96 percent species- level extinctions took place in the marine environment, depending upon clade. Much our understanding of the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) is based on relatively slowly deposited marine sequences in Europe and Asia, yet a growing body of observations from continental sequences demonstrates a similar extinction event and new polarity data from some of these sequences are critical to refining the GPTS across the PTB and testing synchronicity of marine and terrestrial events. The data show that the end-Permian ecological crisis and the conodont calibrated biostratigraphic PTB both followed a key polarity reversal between a short interval (subchron) of reverse polarity to a considerably longer (chron) of normal polarity. Central European Basin strata (continental Permian and epicontinental Triassic) yield high-quality magnetic polarity stratigraphic records (Szurlies et al., 2003

  14. Contribution of SAR interferometry (InSAR) to the study of alpine glaciers. The example of Forni Glacier (Central Alps, Italy): preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterzai, P.; Mancini, F.; Corazzato, C.; D Agata, C.; Diolaiuti, G.

    2003-04-01

    Aiming at reconstructing superficial velocity and volumetric variations of alpine glaciers, SAR interferometry (InSAR) technique is, for the first time in Italy, applied jointly with the glaciological classic field methods. This methodology with its quantitative results provides, together with other space geodesy techniques like GPS, some fundamental elements for the estimation of the climate forcing and the evaluation of the future glacier trend. InSAR is usually applied to antarctic glaciers and to other wide extralpine glaciers, detectable by the SAR orbits; in the Italian Alps, the limited surface area of the glaciers and the deformation of radar images due to strong relief effect, reduce the applicability of this tecnique. The chosen glacier is suitable for this kind of study both for its large size and for the many field data collected and available for the interferometric results validation. Forni Glacier is the largest valley glacier in the Italian Alps and represents a good example of long term monitoring of a valley glacier in the Central Alps. It is a north facing valley glacier formed by 3 ice streams, located in Italian Lombardy Alps (46 23 50 N, 10 35 00 E). In 2002 its area was approximately 13 km2, extending from 2500 to 3684 m a.s.l., with a maximum width of approximately 7500 m and a maximum length of about 5000 m. Available data include mass-balance measurements on the glacier tongue (from the hydrological year 1992-1993 up to now), frontal variations data from 1925 up to now, topographical profiling by means of GPS techniques and profiles of the glacier bed by geoelectrical surveys (VES) (Guglielmin et alii, 1995) and by seismic surveys (Merlanti et alii, 2001). In order to apply radar interferometry on this glacier eight ERS SAR RAW images have been purchased, in addition to the Digital Elevation Model from IGM (Geographic Military Institute), and repeat pass interferometry used. Combining the different passes, differential interferograms are

  15. Advanced instrument system for real-time and time-series microbial geochemical sampling of the deep (basaltic) crustal biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, James P.; Copson, David A.; Jolly, James; Hsieh, Chih-Chiang; Lin, Huei-Ting; Glazer, Brian T.; Wheat, C. Geoffrey

    2012-03-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program borehole CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories provide long-term access to hydrothermal fluids circulating within the basaltic crust (basement), providing invaluable opportunities to study the deep biosphere. We describe the design and application parameters of the GeoMICROBE instrumented sled, an autonomous sensor and fluid sampling system. The GeoMICROBE system couples with CORK fluid delivery lines to draw large volumes of fluids from crustal aquifers to the seafloor. These fluids pass a series of in-line sensors and an in situ filtration and collection system. GeoMICROBE's major components include a primary valve manifold system, a positive displacement primary pump, sensors (e.g., fluid flow rate, temperature, dissolved O2, electrochemistry-voltammetry analyzer), a 48-port in situ filtration and fluid collection system, computerized controller, seven 24 V-40 A batteries and wet-mateable (ODI) communications with submersibles. This constantly evolving system has been successfully connected to IODP Hole 1301A on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Also described here is a mobile pumping system (MPS), which possesses many of the same components as the GeoMICROBE (e.g., pump, sensors, controller), but is directly powered and controlled in real time via submersible operations; the MPS has been employed repeatedly to collect pristine basement fluids for a variety of geochemical and microbial studies.

  16. Mapping and characterization of land subsidence in Beijing Plain caused by groundwater pumping using the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) InSAR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, M. L.; Gong, H. L.; Chen, B. B.; Zhou, C. F.; Liu, K. S.; Shi, M.

    2015-11-01

    InSAR time series analysis is widely used for detection and monitoring of slow surface deformation. In this paper, 15 TerraSAR-X radar images acquired in stripmap mode between 2012 and 2013 are processed for land subsidence monitoring with the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) approach in Beijing Plain in China. Mapping results produced by SBAS show that the subsidence rates in the area of Beijing Plain range from -97.5 (subsidence) and to +23.8 mm yr-1 (uplift), relative to a presumably stable benchmark. The mapping result also reveals that there are the five subsidence centers formed by surface deformation spreading north to south east of the downtown. An uneven subsidence patten was detected near the Beijing Capital International Airpor, which may be related to loading of buildings and the aircraft.

  17. Estimating tropical forest structure using LIDAR AND X-BAND INSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palace, M. W.; Treuhaft, R. N.; Keller, M. M.; Sullivan, F.; Roberto dos Santos, J.; Goncalves, F. G.; Shimbo, J.; Neumann, M.; Madsen, S. N.; Hensley, S.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical forests are considered the most structurally complex of all forests and are experiencing rapid change due to anthropogenic and climatic factors. The high carbon stocks and fluxes make understanding tropical forests highly important to both regional and global studies involving ecosystems and climate. Large and remote areas in the tropics are prime targets for the use of remotely sensed data. Radar and lidar have previously been used to estimate forest structure, with an emphasis on biomass. These two remote sensing methods have the potential to yield much more information about forest structure, specifically through the use of X-band radar and waveform lidar data. We examined forest structure using both field-based and remotely sensed data in the Tapajos National Forest, Para, Brazil. We measured multiple structural parameters for about 70 plots in the field within a 25 x 15 km area that have TanDEM-X single-pass horizontally and vertically polarized radar interferometric data. High resolution airborne lidar were collected over a 22 sq km portion of the same area, within which 33 plots were co-located. Preliminary analyses suggest that X-band interferometric coherence decreases by about a factor of 2 (from 0.95 to 0.45) with increasing field-measured vertical extent (average heights of 7-25 m) and biomass (10-430 Mg/ha) for a vertical wavelength of 39 m, further suggesting, as has been observed at C-band, that interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is substantially more sensitive to forest structure/biomass than SAR. Unlike InSAR coherence versus biomass, SAR power at X-band versus biomass shows no trend. Moreover, airborne lidar coherence at the same vertical wavenumbers as InSAR is also shown to decrease as a function of biomass, as well. Although the lidar coherence decrease is about 15% more than the InSAR, implying that lidar penetrates more than InSAR, these preliminary results suggest that X-band InSAR may be useful for structure and

  18. Advanced time integration algorithms for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, Ryan B.; Aghaei, Amin; Cai, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Efficient time integration is a necessity for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening to achieve experimentally relevant strains. In this work, an efficient time integration scheme using a high order explicit method with time step subcycling and a newly-developed collision detection algorithm are evaluated. First, time integrator performance is examined for an annihilating Frank-Read source, showing the effects of dislocation line collision. The integrator with subcycling is found to significantly out-perform other integration schemes. The performance of the time integration and collision detection algorithms is then tested in a work hardening simulation. The new algorithms show a 100-fold speed-up relative to traditional schemes. Subcycling is shown to improve efficiency significantly while maintaining an accurate solution, and the new collision algorithm allows an arbitrarily large time step size without missing collisions.

  19. Advanced time integration algorithms for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening

    DOE PAGES

    Sills, Ryan B.; Aghaei, Amin; Cai, Wei

    2016-04-25

    Efficient time integration is a necessity for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening to achieve experimentally relevant strains. In this work, an efficient time integration scheme using a high order explicit method with time step subcycling and a newly-developed collision detection algorithm are evaluated. First, time integrator performance is examined for an annihilating Frank–Read source, showing the effects of dislocation line collision. The integrator with subcycling is found to significantly out-perform other integration schemes. The performance of the time integration and collision detection algorithms is then tested in a work hardening simulation. The new algorithms show a 100-fold speed-up relativemore » to traditional schemes. As a result, subcycling is shown to improve efficiency significantly while maintaining an accurate solution, and the new collision algorithm allows an arbitrarily large time step size without missing collisions.« less

  20. Advanced time integration algorithms for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Sills, Ryan B.; Aghaei, Amin; Cai, Wei

    2016-04-25

    Efficient time integration is a necessity for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening to achieve experimentally relevant strains. In this work, an efficient time integration scheme using a high order explicit method with time step subcycling and a newly-developed collision detection algorithm are evaluated. First, time integrator performance is examined for an annihilating Frank–Read source, showing the effects of dislocation line collision. The integrator with subcycling is found to significantly out-perform other integration schemes. The performance of the time integration and collision detection algorithms is then tested in a work hardening simulation. The new algorithms show a 100-fold speed-up relative to traditional schemes. As a result, subcycling is shown to improve efficiency significantly while maintaining an accurate solution, and the new collision algorithm allows an arbitrarily large time step size without missing collisions.

  1. Advanced in Visualization of 3D Time-Dependent CFD Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, David A.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulations of complex 3D time-dependent (unsteady) flows are becoming increasingly feasible because of the progress in computing systems. Unfortunately, many existing flow visualization systems were developed for time-independent (steady) solutions and do not adequately depict solutions from unsteady flow simulations. Furthermore, most systems only handle one time step of the solutions individually and do not consider the time-dependent nature of the solutions. For example, instantaneous streamlines are computed by tracking the particles using one time step of the solution. However, for streaklines and timelines, particles need to be tracked through all time steps. Streaklines can reveal quite different information about the flow than those revealed by instantaneous streamlines. Comparisons of instantaneous streamlines with dynamic streaklines are shown. For a complex 3D flow simulation, it is common to generate a grid system with several millions of grid points and to have tens of thousands of time steps. The disk requirement for storing the flow data can easily be tens of gigabytes. Visualizing solutions of this magnitude is a challenging problem with today's computer hardware technology. Even interactive visualization of one time step of the flow data can be a problem for some existing flow visualization systems because of the size of the grid. Current approaches for visualizing complex 3D time-dependent CFD solutions are described. The flow visualization system developed at NASA Ames Research Center to compute time-dependent particle traces from unsteady CFD solutions is described. The system computes particle traces (streaklines) by integrating through the time steps. This system has been used by several NASA scientists to visualize their CFD time-dependent solutions. The flow visualization capabilities of this system are described, and visualization results are shown.

  2. Near Real-Time Nondestructive Active Inspection Technologies Utilizing Delayed γ-Rays and Neutrons for Advanced Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Alan; Reedy, E. T.E.; Mozin, V.; Tobin, S. J.

    2015-02-12

    In this two year project, the research team investigated how delayed γ-rays from short-lived fission fragm