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Sample records for advanced laser techniques

  1. Bioactive glass thin films synthesized by advanced pulsed laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailescu, N.; Stan, George E.; Ristoscu, C.; Sopronyi, M.; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive materials play an increasingly important role in the biomaterials industry, and are extensively used in a range of applications, including biodegradable metallic implants. We report on Bioactive Glasses (BG) films deposition by pulsed laser techniques onto biodegradable substrates. The BG coatings were obtained using a KrF* excimer laser source (λ= 248 nm, τFWHM ≤ 25 ns).Their thickness has been determined by Profilometry measurements, whilst their morphology has been analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The obtained coatings fairly preserved the targets composition and structure, as revealed by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy analyses.

  2. Antimicrobial nanospheres thin coatings prepared by advanced pulsed laser technique

    PubMed Central

    Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Valentina; Vasile, Bogdan Ştefan; Truşcă, Roxana; Cristescu, Rodica; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report on the fabrication of thin coatings based on polylactic acid-chitosan-magnetite-eugenol (PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG) nanospheres by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation proved that the homogenous Fe3O4@EUG nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 7 nm, while the PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG nanospheres diameter sizes range between 20 and 80 nm. These MAPLE-deposited coatings acted as bioactive nanosystems and exhibited a great antimicrobial effect by impairing the adherence and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteria strains. Moreover, the obtained nano-coatings showed a good biocompatibility and facilitated the normal development of human endothelial cells. These nanosystems may be used as efficient alternatives in treating and preventing bacterial infections. PMID:24991524

  3. Antimicrobial nanospheres thin coatings prepared by advanced pulsed laser technique.

    PubMed

    Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Valentina; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Vasile, Bogdan Ştefan; Truşcă, Roxana; Cristescu, Rodica; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin

    2014-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of thin coatings based on polylactic acid-chitosan-magnetite-eugenol (PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG) nanospheres by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation proved that the homogenous Fe3O4@EUG nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 7 nm, while the PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG nanospheres diameter sizes range between 20 and 80 nm. These MAPLE-deposited coatings acted as bioactive nanosystems and exhibited a great antimicrobial effect by impairing the adherence and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteria strains. Moreover, the obtained nano-coatings showed a good biocompatibility and facilitated the normal development of human endothelial cells. These nanosystems may be used as efficient alternatives in treating and preventing bacterial infections.

  4. Aerodynamic measurement techniques. [laser based diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Laser characteristics of intensity, monochromatic, spatial coherence, and temporal coherence were developed to advance laser based diagnostic techniques for aerodynamic related research. Two broad categories of visualization and optical measurements were considered, and three techniques received significant attention. These are holography, laser velocimetry, and Raman scattering. Examples of the quantitative laser velocimeter and Raman scattering measurements of velocity, temperature, and density indicated the potential of these nonintrusive techniques.

  5. Advanced Laser-Based Techniques for Gas-Phase Diagnostics in Combustion and Aerospace Engineering.

    PubMed

    Ehn, Andreas; Zhu, Jiajian; Li, Xuesong; Kiefer, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Gaining information of species, temperature, and velocity distributions in turbulent combustion and high-speed reactive flows is challenging, particularly for conducting measurements without influencing the experimental object itself. The use of optical and spectroscopic techniques, and in particular laser-based diagnostics, has shown outstanding abilities for performing non-intrusive in situ diagnostics. The development of instrumentation, such as robust lasers with high pulse energy, ultra-short pulse duration, and high repetition rate along with digitized cameras exhibiting high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and frame rates on the order of MHz, has opened up for temporally and spatially resolved volumetric measurements of extreme dynamics and complexities. The aim of this article is to present selected important laser-based techniques for gas-phase diagnostics focusing on their applications in combustion and aerospace engineering. Applicable laser-based techniques for investigations of turbulent flows and combustion such as planar laser-induced fluorescence, Raman and Rayleigh scattering, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, laser-induced grating scattering, particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler anemometry, and tomographic imaging are reviewed and described with some background physics. In addition, demands on instrumentation are further discussed to give insight in the possibilities that are offered by laser flow diagnostics.

  6. Optical diagnostics of gas-dynamic flows using advanced laser measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    Using laser-induced fluorescence to probe nitrogen flows seeded with small amounts of nitric oxide, simultaneous measurements of all three thermodynamic scalar quantities temperature, density, and pressure, were demonstrated in a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. Instrumental uncertainty is 1% for temperature and 2% for density and pressure, making the techniques suitable for measurements of turbulent fluctuations. This technology is currently being transferred to an experimental program designed to use these optical techniques in conjunction with traditional methods to make measurements in turbulent flowfields that were not possible before. A detailed descritpion of the research progress and pertinent results are presented.

  7. The SALUT Project: Study of Advanced Laser Techniques for the Uncovering of Polychromed Works of Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Snickt, G.; De Boeck, A.; Keutgens, K.; Anthierens, D.

    In order to find out whether the existing laser systems can be employed to remove superimposed layers of paint on secco wall paintings in a selective way, laser tests were carried out on three types of prepared samples simulating three stratigraphies that are frequently encountered in practice. OM, EPMA, colorimetry, μRaman, and FT-IR were used to evaluate the results. It was found that Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers emitting at 1,064nm could be employed to remove unwanted layers of oil paint and limewash, but the treatment of large areas requires implementation of a computer-controlled X-Y-Z station in order to control the parameters. However, the applicability of this technique will remain limited as ablation at the established optimum parameters implied a discoloration of the pigments cinnabar, yellow ochre, and burnt sienna. Moreover, it was observed that no ablation took place when the limewash thickness exceeds 25 μm. Unwanted layers of acrylic could be removed in an efficient way with an excimer laser emitting at 193 nm.

  8. Femtosecond And Picosecond Laser Ablation Of Intraocular Lenses: An Advanced Technique For Their Surface Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Makropoulou, M.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Barberoglou, M.; Englezis, A.; Kalpouzos, C.; Loukakos, P.; Pouli, P.

    2011-09-01

    Ophthalmology is entering a very interesting period with new diffractive multifocals, improved refractive multifocals, and accommodative lenses, all coming out at the same time. A new diffractive-refractive design for providing intermediated vision is apodization. In an apodized pattern, physical diffractive step heights are reduced in height, in an almost continuously varying manner. This study is aimed to investigate the use of ultrashort laser pulses to ablate the surface of intraocular lenses, and thus provide an alternative to conventional techniques. Ablation experiments were performed on hydrophilic and hydrophobic intraocular lenses (IOLs). The samples were irradiated with a Ti:Sapphire laser at λ = 0.785 μm, pulse duration 150 fs, repetition rate 1 kHz and with a Nd:YAG 4ω laser at λ = 0.266 μm, pulse duration 155 ps, repetition rate 10 Hz. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the surface modification with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The experimental results and the theoretical assumptions on the relevant ablation mechanism are discussed.

  9. Laser beam and tissue interactions: use of advanced therapeutic and diagnostic techniques: in-vitro experiments and in-vivo trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2001-04-01

    The mechanism of laser beam and tissue interaction is governed by the technical characteristics of the laser beam and the optical properties of the tissue. The therapeutic laser wavelength, pulse duration and beam quality, as well as the laser radiation delivery systems, the ablation mechanisms and the diagnostic techniques to monitor a surgical process are studied in this work. Advanced therapeutic and diagnostic techniques, such as integrating sphere, atomic force microscopy and beam profiling are used in the experimental study. In vitro experiments on tissue, laser ablation and diagnosis using laser induced fluorescence are performed. Finally, in vivo animal trials of an endoscopic/laparoscopic laser prototype are realized, in the framework of the appropriate protocols.

  10. Techniques for laser welding polymeric devices.

    PubMed

    Jones, I A

    2003-04-01

    Recent advances in laser techniques mean that lasers are now being considered as an alternative to vibration, ultrasonic, dielectric, hot plate or hot bar welding, and adhesive bonding of plastics. The techniques required to put laser welding methods into practice are described for medical devices, tubular systems, films and synthetic fabrics.

  11. Advanced echocardiographic techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Echocardiography has advanced significantly since its first clinical use. The move towards more accurate imaging and quantification has driven this advancement. In this review, we will briefly focus on three distinct but important recent advances, three‐dimensional (3D) echocardiography, contrast echocardiography and myocardial tissue imaging. The basic principles of these techniques will be discussed as well as current and future clinical applications. PMID:28191159

  12. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  13. Advanced mid-IR Solid-State Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art 2-micron solid-state laser developments. A world record one-Joule-per-pulse energy laser system and an advanced thermal management with fully conductive cooled laser technique are discussed

  14. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Avicola, K; Thompson, C A; Kartz, M W; Winters, S; Hartley, R; Wihelmsen, J; Dowla, F V; Carrano, C J; Bauman, B J; Pennington, D M; Lande, D; Sawvel, R M; Silva, D A; Cooke, J B; Brown, C G

    2001-02-21

    Programs at LLNL that involve large laser systems--ranging from the National Ignition Facility to new tactical laser weapons--depend on the maintenance of laser beam quality through precise control of the optical wavefront. This can be accomplished using adaptive optics, which compensate for time-varying aberrations that are often caused by heating in a high-power laser system. Over the past two decades, LLNL has developed a broad capability in adaptive optics technology for both laser beam control and high-resolution imaging. This adaptive optics capability has been based on thin deformable glass mirrors with individual ceramic actuators bonded to the back. In the case of high-power lasers, these adaptive optics systems have successfully improved beam quality. However, as we continue to extend our applications requirements, the existing technology base for wavefront control cannot satisfy them. To address this issue, this project studied improved modeling tools to increase our detailed understanding of the performance of these systems, and evaluated novel approaches to low-order wavefront control that offer the possibility of reduced cost and complexity. We also investigated improved beam control technology for high-resolution wavefront control. Many high-power laser systems suffer from high-spatial-frequency aberrations that require control of hundreds or thousands of phase points to provide adequate correction. However, the cost and size of current deformable mirrors can become prohibitive for applications requiring more than a few tens of phase control points. New phase control technologies are becoming available which offer control of many phase points with small low-cost devices. The goal of this project was to expand our wavefront control capabilities with improved modeling tools, new devices that reduce system cost and complexity, and extensions to high spatial and temporal frequencies using new adaptive optics technologies. In FY 99, the second year of

  15. Advanced laser remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.; Czuchlewski, S.; Karl, R.

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Remote measurement of wind velocities is critical to a wide variety of applications such as environmental studies, weather prediction, aircraft safety, the accuracy of projectiles, bombs, parachute drops, prediction of the dispersal of chemical and biological warfare agents, and the debris from nuclear explosions. Major programs to develop remote sensors for these applications currently exist in the DoD and NASA. At present, however, there are no real-time, three-dimensional wind measurement techniques that are practical for many of these applications and we report on two new promising techniques. The first new technique uses an elastic backscatter lidar to track aerosol patterns in the atmosphere and to calculate three dimensional wind velocities from changes in the positions of the aerosol patterns. This was first done by Professor Ed Eloranta of the University of Wisconsin using post processing techniques and we are adapting Professor Eloranta`s algorithms to a real-time data processor and installing it in an existing elastic backscatter lidar system at Los Alamos (the XM94 helicopter lidar), which has a compatible data processing and control system. The second novel wind sensing technique is based on radio-frequency (RF) modulation and spatial filtering of elastic backscatter lidars. Because of their compactness and reliability, solid state lasers are the lasers of choice for many remote sensing applications, including wind sensing.

  16. Apparatus for advancing a wellbore using high power laser energy

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

    2014-09-02

    Delivering high power laser energy to form a borehole deep into the earth using laser energy. Down hole laser tools, laser systems and laser delivery techniques for advancement, workover and completion activities. A laser bottom hole assembly (LBHA) for the delivery of high power laser energy to the surfaces of a borehole, which assembly may have laser optics, a fluid path for debris removal and a mechanical means to remove earth.

  17. Advances in high power semiconductor diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyu; Zhong, Li

    2008-03-01

    High power semiconductor lasers have broad applications in the fields of military and industry. Recent advances in high power semiconductor lasers are reviewed mainly in two aspects: improvements of diode lasers performance and optimization of packaging architectures of diode laser bars. Factors which determine the performance of diode lasers, such as power conversion efficiency, temperature of operation, reliability, wavelength stabilization etc., result from a combination of new semiconductor materials, new diode structures, careful material processing of bars. The latest progress of today's high-power diode lasers at home and abroad is briefly discussed and typical data are presented. The packaging process is of decisive importance for the applicability of high-power diode laser bars, not only technically but also economically. The packaging techniques include the material choosing and the structure optimizing of heat-sinks, the bonding between the array and the heat-sink, the cooling and the fiber coupling, etc. The status of packaging techniques is stressed. There are basically three different diode package architectural options according to the integration grade. Since the package design is dominated by the cooling aspect, different effective cooling techniques are promoted by different package architectures and specific demands. The benefit and utility of each package are strongly dependent upon the fundamental optoelectronic properties of the individual diode laser bars. Factors which influence these properties are outlined and comparisons of packaging approaches for these materials are made. Modularity of package for special application requirements is an important developing tendency for high power diode lasers.

  18. High brightness laser systems incorporating advanced laser bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmaier, Stephan; Vethake, Thilo; Gottdiener, Mark; Wunderlin, Jens; Negoita, Viorel; Li, Yufeng; Barnowski, Tobias; Gong, Tim; An, Haiyan; Treusch, Georg

    2013-02-01

    The performance of high power and high brightness systems has been developing and is developing fast. In the multi kW regime both very high spatial and spectral brightness systems are emerging. Also diode laser pumped and direct diode lasers are becoming the standard laser sources for many applications. The pump sources for thin Disk Laser systems at TRUMPF Photonics enabled by high power and efficiency laser bars are becoming a well established standard in the industry with over two thousand 8 kW Disk Laser pumps installed in TruDisk systems at the customer site. These systems have proven to be a robust and reliable industrial tool. A further increase in power and efficiency of the bar can be easily used to scale the TruDisk output power without major changes in the pump source design. This publication will highlight advanced laser systems in the multi kW range for both direct application and solid state laser pumping using specifically tailored diode laser bars for high spatial and/or high spectral brightness. Results using wavelength stabilization techniques suitable for high power CW laser system applications will be presented. These high power and high brightness diode laser systems, fiber coupled or in free space configuration, depending on application or customer need, typically operate in the range of 900 to 1070 nm wavelength.

  19. Laser techniques in conservation in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimbeni, Renzo

    2005-06-01

    The state of the art of laser techniques employed in conservation of cultural heritage is continuously growing in Europe. Many research projects organised at the European level have contributed to this achievement, being complementary to the development carried out at national level. The COST Action G7 is playing its unique role since the year 2000 in promoting the experimentation, comparing the experiences and disseminating best practices. This role has been particularly effective for monitoring of the results of many short-term research projects completed along the G7 Action lifetime. After that several laser cleaning techniques have been followed and evaluated it appears now clear an evolution of the systems, a specialization of the cleaning task, the achievement of side-effect free procedures. The validation of these advanced cleaning techniques has been extensive and diffused in many European countries, especially for stone and metals. Laser-based diagnostics have also specialised their tasks toward material analysis, defects detection and multidimensional documentation. Laser and optical methods successfully monitor deterioration effects. In many European countries interdisciplinary networks are managing the experimentation of these techniques giving them a sound scientific approach, but also a technology transfer to end-users. So doing the appreciation for these techniques is growing in all the conservation institutions involved at national level, disseminating a positive evaluation about the benefits provided by laser techniques in conservation. Several laser systems became products for the activity of professional restorers and their increasing sales demonstrate a growing utilisation throughout all Europe.

  20. Advances in femtosecond laser technology

    PubMed Central

    Callou, Thais Pinheiro; Garcia, Renato; Mukai, Adriana; Giacomin, Natalia T; de Souza, Rodrigo Guimarães; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser technology has become widely adopted by ophthalmic surgeons. The purpose of this study is to discuss applications and advantages of femtosecond lasers over traditional manual techniques, and related unique complications in cataract surgery and corneal refractive surgical procedures, including: LASIK flap creation, intracorneal ring segment implantation, presbyopic treatments, keratoplasty, astigmatic keratotomy, and intrastromal lenticule procedures. PMID:27143847

  1. Advancement on Visualization Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Aeroa and As ronautics Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 USA I !ii 1 I This AGARDograph was prepared at the request of the...the fields of science § and technology relating to aerospace for the following purposes: - Exchanging of scientific and technical information...Techniques for providing the pilot visualization have grown rapidly. Technology has developed fron mechanical gauges through electro-mechanical

  2. Advanced qualification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, P.S; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.

    1993-12-01

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML ``builds in`` the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structured-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish ``process capability`` is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co{sup 60} gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883D, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SSC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe`s Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  3. Advanced techniques for future observations from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, E. D.

    1980-01-01

    Advanced remote sensing techniques for the study of global meteorology and the chemistry of the atmosphere are considered. Remote sensing from Spacelab/Shuttle and free-flying satellites will provide the platforms for instrumentation based on advanced technology. Several laser systems are being developed for the measurement of tropospheric winds and pressure, and trace species in the troposphere and stratosphere. In addition, a high-resolution passive infrared sensor shows promise for measuring temperature from sea level up through the stratosphere. Advanced optical and microwave instruments are being developed for wind measurements in the stratosphere and mesosphere. Microwave techniques are also useful for the study of meteorological parameters at the air-sea interface.

  4. Development in laser peening of advanced ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Pratik; Smith, Graham C.; Waugh, David G.; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    Laser peening is a well-known process applicable to surface treat metals and alloys in various industrial sectors. Research in the area of laser peening of ceramics is still scarce and a complete laser-ceramic interaction is still unreported. This paper focuses on laser peening of SiC ceramics employed for cutting tools, armor plating, dental and biomedical implants, with a view to elucidate the unreported work. A detailed investigation was conducted with 1064nm Nd:YAG ns pulse laser to first understand the surface effects, namely: the topography, hardness, KIc and the microstructure of SiC advanced ceramics. The results showed changes in surface roughness and microstructural modification after laser peening. An increase in surface hardness was found by almost 2 folds, as the diamond footprints and its flaws sizes were considerably reduced, thus, enhancing the resistance of SiC to better withstand mechanical impact. This inherently led to an enhancement in the KIc by about 42%. This is attributed to an induction of compressive residual stress and phase transformation. This work is a first-step towards the development of a 3-dimensional laser peening technique to surface treat many advanced ceramic components. This work has shown that upon tailoring the laser peening parameters may directly control ceramic topography, microstructure, hardness and the KIc. This is useful for increasing the performance of ceramics used for demanding applications particularly where it matters such as in military. Upon successful peening of bullet proof vests could result to higher ballistic strength and resistance against higher sonic velocity, which would not only prevent serious injuries, but could also help to save lives of soldiers on the battle fields.

  5. Techniques in Advanced Language Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ager, D. E.

    1967-01-01

    For ease of presentation, advanced grammar teaching techniques are briefly considered under the headings of structuralism (belief in the effectiveness of presenting grammar rules) and contextualism (belief in the maximum use by students of what they know in the target language). The structuralist's problem of establishing a syllabus is discussed…

  6. Recent advances in antiguided diode laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawst, L. J.; Botez, D.; Jansen, M.; Roth, T. J.; Zmudzinski, C.; Tu, C.; Yun, J.

    1992-06-01

    The paper discusses features of advanced antiguided diode laser arrays optimized for single-spatial-mode operation to high output power. Twenty-element antiguided arrays have been fabricated to operate reproducibly to CW power levels of 0.5 W with 48-50 percent efficiency. These devices were also shown to exhibit thousands of hours of reliable operation. The paper gives special attention to modeling and optimization of multiclad antiguided arrays and presents experimental results on multiclad antiguided arrays fabricated by either of the two techniques, the conventional self-aligned stripe and the complementary self-aligned stripe.

  7. LHC Olympics: Advanced Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armour, Kyle; Larkoski, Andrew; Gray, Amanda; Ventura, Dan; Walsh, Jon; Schabinger, Rob

    2006-05-01

    The LHC Olympics is a series of workshop aimed at encouraging theorists and experimentalists to prepare for the soon-to-be-online Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland. One aspect of the LHC Olympics program consists of the study of simulated data sets which represent various possible new physics signals as they would be seen in LHC detectors. Through this exercise, LHC Olympians learn the phenomenology of possible new physics models and gain experience in analyzing LHC data. Additionally, the LHC Olympics encourages discussion between theorists and experimentalists, and through this collaboration new techniques could be developed. The University of Washington LHC Olympics group consists of several first-year graduate and senior undergraduate students, in both theoretical and experimental particle physics. Presented here is a discussion of some of the more advanced techniques used and the recent results of one such LHC Olympics study.

  8. Advances in drilling with fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Mohammed

    2015-07-01

    High brightness quasi- continuous wave (QCW) and continuous wave (CW) fiber lasers are routinely being used for cutting and welding for a range of industrial applications. However, to date very little work has been carried out or has been reported on laser drilling with these laser sources. This work describes laser drilling ((trepan and percussion) of nickel based superalloys (thermal barrier coated and uncoated) with a high power QCW fiber laser. This presentation will highlight some of the most significant aspect of laser drilling, i.e. SmartPierceTM, deep hole drilling and small hole drilling. These advances in processing also demonstrate the potential for fiber laser processing when an advanced interface between laser and an open architecture controller are used.

  9. Advanced Adaptive Optics Control Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    Optimal estimation and control methods for high energy laser adaptive optics systems are described. Three system types are examined: Active...the adaptive optics approaches and potential system implementations are recommended.

  10. One Micron Laser Technology Advancements at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the advancements made in one micron laser technology at Goddard Space Flight Center. It includes information about risk factors that are being addressed by GSFC, and overviews of the various programs that GSFC is currently managing that are using 1 micron laser technology.

  11. Advanced techniques for microwave reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.; Branas, B.; Luna, E. de la; Estrada, T.; Zhuravlev, V. |; Hartfuss, H.J.; Hirsch, M.; Geist, T.; Segovia, J.; Oramas, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    Microwave reflectometry has been applied during the last years as a plasma diagnostic of increasing interest, mainly due to its simplicity, no need for large access ports and low radiation damage of exposed components. Those characteristics make reflectometry an attractive diagnostic for the next generation devices. Systems used either for density profile or density fluctuations have also shown great development, from the original single channel heterodyne to the multichannel homodyne receivers. In the present work we discuss three different advanced reflectometer systems developed by CIEMAT members in collaboration with different institutions. The first one is the broadband heterodyne reflectometer installed on W7AS for density fluctuations measurements. The decoupling of the phase and amplitude of the reflected beam allows for quantitative analysis of the fluctuations. Recent results showing the behavior of the density turbulence during the L-H transition on W7AS are shown. The second system shows how the effect of the turbulence can be used for density profile measurements by reflectometry in situations where the complicated geometry of the waveguides cannot avoid many parasitic reflections. Experiments from the TJ-I tokamak will be shown. Finally, a reflectometer system based on the Amplitude Modulation (AM) technique for density profile measurements is discussed and experimental results from the TJ-I tokamak are shown. The AM system offers the advantage of being almost insensitive to the effect of fluctuations. It is able to take a direct measurement of the time delay of the microwave pulse which propagates to the reflecting layer and is reflected back. In order to achieve fast reconstruction for real time monitoring of the density profile application of Neural Networks algorithms will be presented the method can reduce the computing times by about three orders of magnitude. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Advances in Procedural Techniques - Antegrade

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, William; Spratt, James C.

    2014-01-01

    There have been many technological advances in antegrade CTO PCI, but perhaps most importantly has been the evolution of the “hybrid’ approach where ideally there exists a seamless interplay of antegrade wiring, antegrade dissection re-entry and retrograde approaches as dictated by procedural factors. Antegrade wire escalation with intimal tracking remains the preferred initial strategy in short CTOs without proximal cap ambiguity. More complex CTOs, however, usually require either a retrograde or an antegrade dissection re-entry approach, or both. Antegrade dissection re-entry is well suited to long occlusions where there is a healthy distal vessel and limited “interventional” collaterals. Early use of a dissection re-entry strategy will increase success rates, reduce complications, and minimise radiation exposure, contrast use as well as procedural times. Antegrade dissection can be achieved with a knuckle wire technique or the CrossBoss catheter whilst re-entry will be achieved in the most reproducible and reliable fashion by the Stingray balloon/wire. It should be avoided where there is potential for loss of large side branches. It remains to be seen whether use of newer dissection re-entry strategies will be associated with lower restenosis rates compared with the more uncontrolled subintimal tracking strategies such as STAR and whether stent insertion in the subintimal space is associated with higher rates of late stent malapposition and stent thrombosis. It is to be hoped that the algorithms, which have been developed to guide CTO operators, allow for a better transfer of knowledge and skills to increase uptake and acceptance of CTO PCI as a whole. PMID:24694104

  13. Laser Techniques in Photovoltaic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. T.; Wood, R. F.; Westbrook, R. D.; Narayan, J.; White, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    High-power laser pulses were used to replace the conventional high temperature furnace processing for the p-n junction formation step in high speed, low cost solar cell fabrication. Three different approaches to junction formation were tested: (1) laser annealing of ion-implanted Si in which laser radiation is used to remove the radiation damage and to recover the electrical activity in the implanted layer; (2) a process in which a thin film of dopant is first deposited on the substrate and then incorporated into the near-surface region by laser-induced diffusion; and (3) a process in which a heavily doped amorphous silicon layer is deposited on the Si substrate and epitaxially regrown from the melted substrate layer by laser radiation. All three methods were found to provide suitable candidates for high efficiency Si solar cells.

  14. Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

  15. Advances In Laser Imaging Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkinson, L. J.

    1980-08-01

    The technology of coatings is assessed in relation to the four main operating modes of lasers viz. u.v., high/medium power visible, near infra red and low power visible. It is assessed that though the majority of the systems in current commercial use are of the high power u.v. type because of the lack of availability of suitably sensitised coatings, great efforts are being made to provide coatings compatible with medium to low Dower lasers. A survey of the systems disclosed in the patent literature potentially able to achieve the objective is discussed.

  16. Delphi technique used in laser incident surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Krystyn R.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Neal, Thomas A.

    2004-07-01

    There are several data sources for collecting laser incidents. All reviewed sources collect information differently for varying purposes. An effort was undertaken to combine laser exposure reporting data into a single database so that trends in laser incidents could be identified. A review of available datasets revealed significant disparities in laser exposure reporting. As a result, utilizing the existing database to predict personnel at increased risk for laser exposure and injury is challenging if not impossible. For example, many of the data sources do not contain information about physical examinations, diagnosis, or medical follow-up, which are important for studying laser injury outcomes. This study proposes using the Delphi Technique to identify relevant fields that should be collected for a laser incident database based on the experiences of three groups of United States Air Force (USAF) professionals: (1) Engineers (Bioenvironmental Engineers), (2) Health Physicists, and (3) Physicians (Ophthalmologists and Flight Surgeons). In broad terms, these three professional groups coordinate laser incident analyses and investigations. Knowing what information is most important for studying laser incidents is the first step in establishing an effective database that will assist in identifying occupations that are at high-risk for laser injury. Robust data sets obtained for analysis by these healthcare professionals can be an effective tool for laser injury prevention and management.

  17. Advanced Spectroscopy Technique for Biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Zeng, Haishan

    This chapter presents an overview of the applications of optical spectroscopy in biomedicine. We focus on the optical design aspects of advanced biomedical spectroscopy systems, Raman spectroscopy system in particular. Detailed components and system integration are provided. As examples, two real-time in vivo Raman spectroscopy systems, one for skin cancer detection and the other for endoscopic lung cancer detection, and an in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy system for skin assessment are presented. The applications of Raman spectroscopy in cancer diagnosis of the skin, lung, colon, oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, breast, and cervix are summarized.

  18. Stitching Techniques Advance Optics Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Because NASA depends on the fabrication and testing of large, high-quality aspheric (nonspherical) optics for applications like the James Webb Space Telescope, it sought an improved method for measuring large aspheres. Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Goddard Space Flight Center, QED Technologies, of Rochester, New York, upgraded and enhanced its stitching technology for aspheres. QED developed the SSI-A, which earned the company an R&D 100 award, and also developed a breakthrough machine tool called the aspheric stitching interferometer. The equipment is applied to advanced optics in telescopes, microscopes, cameras, medical scopes, binoculars, and photolithography."

  19. Advanced Geophysical Environmental Simulation Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    cloud property retrieval algorithms for processing of large multiple-satellite data sets; development and application of improved cloud -phase and... cloud optical property retrieval algorithms; investigation of techniques potentially applicable for retrieval of cloud spatial properties from very...14. SUBJECT TERMS cirrus cloud retrieval satellite meteorology polar-orbiting geostationary 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY

  20. Advanced infrared laser modulator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheo, P. K.; Wagner, R.; Gilden, M.

    1984-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to develop an electrooptic waveguide modulator for generating continuous tunable sideband power from an infrared CO2 laser. Parameters included were the waveguide configurations, microstrip dimensions device impedance, and effective dielectric constants. An optimum infrared laser modulator was established and was fabricated. This modulator represents the state-of-the-art integrated optical device, which has a three-dimensional topology to accommodate three lambda/4 step transformers for microwave impedance matching at both the input and output terminals. A flat frequency response of the device over 20 HGz or = 3 dB) was achieved. Maximum single sideband to carrier power greater than 1.2% for 20 W microwave input power at optical carrier wavelength of 10.6 microns was obtained.

  1. Septoplasty: Basic and Advanced Techniques.

    PubMed

    Most, Sam P; Rudy, Shannon F

    2017-05-01

    Nasal septal deviation is a prevalent problem that can have significant quality of life ramifications. Septoplasty is commonly performed to provide qualitative and quantitative benefit to those with nasal obstruction owing to septal deviation. Although a standard, basic technique is often adequate for individuals with mild to moderate mid to posterior septal deviation, unique challenges arise with caudal septal deviation. Herein, multiple strategies that attempt to address anterior septal deviation are discussed. Anterior septal reconstruction has been shown to be a safe and effective means by which to address severe caudal septal deviation and long-term reduction in preoperative symptoms.

  2. Novel Nonlinear Laser Diagnostic Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-26

    possible. Measurement of ASE in a variety of flames demonstrate that the ASE signal intensity can be influenced by gas collisions. 14. SUBJECT TERMS...LASER B. MEASUREMENTS OF ATOMIC HYDROGEN IN LOW-PRESSURE FLAMES J40Dc IAccession For DT1i" TABRF .. . .. . .. . .. . ... 3L i ttr c Dis OBJECTIVES...beam splitter on, the beam path is evacuated. Light passing through the gas cell is collimated with a MgF2 lens and continues into a vacuum

  3. Diagnostics for advanced laser acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Misuri, Alessio

    2002-01-01

    The first proposal for plasma based accelerators was suggested by 1979 by Tajima and Dawson. Since then there has been a tremendous progress both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical progress is particularly due to the growing interest in the subject and to the development of more accurate numerical codes for the plasma simulations (especially particle-in-cell codes). The experimental progress follows from the development of multi-terawatt laser systems based on the chirped-pulse amplification technique. These efforts have produced results in several experiments world-wide, with the detection of accelerated electrons of tens of MeV. The peculiarity of these advanced accelerators is their ability to sustain extremely large acceleration gradients. In the conventional radio frequency linear accelerators (RF linacs) the acceleration gradients are limited roughly to 100 MV/m; this is partially due to breakdown which occurs on the walls of the structure. The electrical breakdown is originated by the emission of the electrons from the walls of the cavity. The electrons cause an avalanche breakdown when they reach other metal parts of the RF linacs structure.

  4. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T; Huang, Yong; Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie, Yubing; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2010-09-01

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location (+/-5 microm) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing.

  5. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing

    PubMed Central

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T; Huang, Yong; Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie, Yubing; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location (±5 μm) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing. PMID:20814088

  6. The Mercury Laser Advances Laser Technology for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbers, C A; Caird, J; Moses, E

    2009-01-21

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is on target to demonstrate 'breakeven' - creating as much fusion-energy output as laser-energy input. NIF will compress a tiny sphere of hydrogen isotopes with 1.8 MJ of laser light in a 20-ns pulse, packing the isotopes so tightly that they fuse together, producing helium nuclei and releasing energy in the form of energetic particles. The achievement of breakeven will culminate an enormous effort by thousands of scientists and engineers, not only at Livermore but around the world, during the past several decades. But what about the day after NIF achieves breakeven? NIF is a world-class engineering research facility, but if laser fusion is ever to generate power for civilian consumption, the laser will have to deliver pulses nearly 100,000 times faster than NIF - a rate of perhaps 10 shots per second as opposed to NIF's several shots a day. The Mercury laser (named after the Roman messenger god) is intended to lead the way to a 10-shots-per-second, electrically-efficient, driver laser for commercial laser fusion. While the Mercury laser will generate only a small fraction of the peak power of NIF (1/30,000), Mercury operates at higher average power. The design of Mercury takes full advantage of the technology advances manifest in its behemoth cousin (Table 1). One significant difference is that, unlike the flashlamp-pumped NIF, Mercury is pumped by highly efficient laser diodes. Mercury is a prototype laser capable of scaling in aperture and energy to a NIF-like beamline, with greater electrical efficiency, while still running at a repetition rate 100,000 times greater.

  7. Laser Doppler measurement techniques for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Gagliardi, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Two techniques are proposed for using laser links to measure the relative radial velocity of two spacecraft. The first technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on a transponded radio-frequency subcarrier. The subcarrier intensity-modulates reciprocating laser beams. The second technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on an optical frequency carrier which is transponded between spacecraft using optical Costas loops. The first technique might be used in conjunction with noncoherent optical communications, while the second technique is compatible with coherent optical communications. The first technique simultaneously exploits the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the maturity of radio-frequency phase-locked loop technology. The second technique exploits both the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the large Doppler effect at optical frequencies. The second technique has the potential for greater accuracy; unfortunately, it is more difficult to implement since it involves optical Costas loops.

  8. Advanced Laser Architecture for Two-Step Laser Tandem Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, Molly E.; Li, Steven X.; Yu, Anthony W.; Getty, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Future astrobiology missions will focus on planets with significant astrochemical or potential astrobiological features, such as small, primitive bodies and the icy moons of the outer planets that may host diverse organic compounds. These missions require advanced instrument techniques to fully and unambiguously characterize the composition of surface and dust materials. Laser desorptionionization mass spectrometry (LDMS) is an emerging instrument technology for in situ mass analysis of non-volatile sample composition. A recent Goddard LDMS advancement is the two-step laser tandem mass spectrometer (L2MS) instrument to address the need for future flight instrumentation to deconvolve complex organic signatures. The L2MS prototype uses a resonance enhanced multi-photon laser ionization mechanism to selectively detect aromatic species from a more complex sample. By neglecting the aliphatic and inorganic mineral signatures in the two-step mass spectrum, the L2MS approach can provide both mass assignments and clues to structural information for an in situ investigation of non-volatile sample composition. In this paper we will describe our development effort on a new laser architecture that is based on the previously flown Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) laser transmitter for the L2MS instrument. The laser provides two discrete midinfrared wavelengths (2.8 m and 3.4 m) using monolithic optical parametric oscillators and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength (266 nm) on a single laser bench with a straightforward development path toward flight readiness.

  9. Method and system for advancement of a borehole using a high power laser

    DOEpatents

    Moxley, Joel F.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2014-09-09

    There is provided a system, apparatus and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. There is further provided with in the systems a means for delivering high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates, a laser bottom hole assembly, and fluid directing techniques and assemblies for removing the displaced material from the borehole.

  10. Laser techniques in high-pressure geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Mao, H. K.

    1987-01-01

    Laser techniques in conjunction with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study high-pressure properties of materials important to a wide range of problems in earth and planetary science. Spontaneous Raman scattering of crystalline and amorphous solids at high pressure demonstrates that dramatic changes in structure and bonding occur on compression. High-pressure Brillouin scattering is sensitive to the pressure variations of single-crystal elastic moduli and acoustic velocities. Laser heating techniques with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study phase transitions, including melting, under deep-earth conditions. Finally, laser-induced ruby fluorescence has been essential for the development of techniques for generating the maximum pressures now possible with the diamond-anvil cell, and currently provides a calibrated in situ measure of pressure well above 100 gigapascals.

  11. Recent advances in coupled laser cavity design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, James R.; Chiang, Hung-Sheng; Nilsson, Johan; Ji, Junhau; Sahu, Jayanta

    2013-03-01

    External cavity coherent beam combining represents a path forward to higher fiber laser radiance, with several groups demonstrating scalable approaches. In this paper, we review recent advances in coupled laser cavity design. In particular, we compare various designs and describe the pros and cons of each with regard to sensitivity to path length errors. Experimental measurements using a specially designed dual-core fiber demonstrate the modal loss from a superposition architecture. A second area of investigation is concerned with Q-switch suppression in coupled laser cavities. The increased cavity loss that accompanies path length errors in the laser arms can suppress lasing, causing an energy build-up in the laser inversion. When the path length errors are removed and the cavity resumes its low loss state, the stored energy can be released in a manner analogous to Q-switching, creating a giant laser pulse. Since the peak power of this pulse can be many orders of magnitude larger than the cw power, the high instantaneous intensity can cause irreparable damage to optical components. We investigate passive systems that are designed to suppress this unwanted Q-switching by allowing alternative lasing paths to clamp the gain.

  12. Laser versus dissection technique of tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Ishlah, L Wan; Fahmi, A M; Srinovianti, N

    2005-03-01

    Tonsillectomy is the single most common operation performed in Ear Nose and Throat Department. Various methods of tonsillectomy have been practiced over the century aimed at reducing or eliminating intraoperative and postoperative morbidity. Due to various blood supplies received, intraoperative bleeding is the most difficult problem and securing it is time-consuming. The time taken to control the bleeding would invariably determine the length of operation. Common postoperative complications are bleeding and pain. This study evaluated the operative time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative pain and other postoperative complications of tonsillectomy performed by laser as compared to conventional dissection technique. This is a prospective randomized study whereby sixty patients were divided into two groups of equal number. In one group, the tonsillectomy performed by laser and in the other group the tonsillectomy performed by conventional dissection technique. Operative time and amount of blood loss is significantly reduced in the laser group. Total postoperative pain and post operative complications were not significantly different between the two groups. Tonsillectomy by using laser have shown less intraoperative bleeding and shortened the operative time. In the hospital where laser machine and expertise are available, it is justifiable to use this technique as effective method of performing tonsillectomy.

  13. Pulse Compression Techniques for Laser Generated Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, R. F.; Madaras, E. I.

    1999-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound for nondestructive evaluation has an optical power density limit due to rapid high heating that causes material damage. This damage threshold limits the generated ultrasound amplitude, which impacts nondestructive evaluation inspection capability. To increase ultrasound signal levels and improve the ultrasound signal-to-noise ratio without exceeding laser power limitations, it is possible to use pulse compression techniques. The approach illustrated here uses a 150mW laser-diode modulated with a pseudo-random sequence and signal correlation. Results demonstrate the successful generation of ultrasonic bulk waves in aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials using a modulated low-power laser diode and illustrate ultrasound bandwidth control.

  14. Advanced techniques in laser-ion acceleration: Conversion efficiency, beam distribution and energy scaling in the Break-Out Afterburner regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Daniel; Yin, Lin; Albright, Brian; Gautier, Donald; Hoerlein, Rainer; Johnson, Randall; Kiefer, Daniel; Letzring, Sam; Shah, Rahul; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Shimada, Tsutomu; Habs, Dietrich; Fernandez, Juan; Hegelich, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Recently, increasing laser intensities and contrast made acceleration mechanisms such as the radiation pressure acceleration or the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) accessible. These mechanisms efficiently couple laser energy into all target ion species, making them a competitive alternative to conventional accelerators. We here present experimental data addressing conversion efficiency and ion distribution scaling for both carbon C6+ and protons within the BOA regime and the transit into the TNSA regime. Unique high resolution measurements of angularly resolved carbon C6+ and proton energy spectra for targets ranging from 30nm to 25microns - recorded with a novel ion wide angle spectrometer - are presented and used to derive thickness scaling estimates. While the measured conversion efficiency for C6+ reaches up to ~6%, peak energies of 1GeV and 120MeV have been measured for C6+ and protons, respectively.

  15. Hybrid mesh generation using advancing reduction technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study presents an extension of the application of the advancing reduction technique to the hybrid mesh generation. The proposed algorithm is based on a pre-generated rectangle mesh (RM) with a certain orientation. The intersection points between the two sets of perpendicular mesh lines in RM an...

  16. Laser beam shaping for biomedical microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Kaiser, Peter; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2016-04-01

    Uniform illumination of a working field is very important in optical systems of confocal microscopy and various implementations of fluorescence microscopy like TIR, SSIM, STORM, PALM to enhance performance of these laser-based research techniques. Widely used TEM00 laser sources are characterized by essentially non-uniform Gaussian intensity profile which leads usually to non-uniform intensity distribution in a microscope working field or in a field of microlenses array of a confocal microscope optical system, this non-uniform illumination results in instability of measuring procedure and reducing precision of quantitative measurements. Therefore transformation of typical Gaussian distribution of a TEM00 laser to flat-top (top hat) profile is an actual technical task, it is solved by applying beam shaping optics. Due to high demands to optical image quality the mentioned techniques have specific requirements to a uniform laser beam: flatness of phase front and extended depth of field, - from this point of view the microscopy techniques are similar to holography and interferometry. There are different refractive and diffractive beam shaping approaches used in laser industrial and scientific applications, but only few of them are capable to fulfil the optimum conditions for beam quality required in discussed microscopy techniques. We suggest applying refractive field mapping beam shapers πShaper, which operational principle presumes almost lossless transformation of Gaussian to flat-top beam with flatness of output wavefront, conserving of beam consistency, providing collimated low divergent output beam, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with several lasers with different wavelengths simultaneously. The main function of a beam shaper is transformation of laser intensity profile, further beam transformation to provide optimum for a particular technique spot size and shape has to

  17. High Rate Laser Pitting Technique for Solar Cell Texturing

    SciTech Connect

    Hans J. Herfurth; Henrikki Pantsar

    2013-01-10

    High rate laser pitting technique for solar cell texturing Efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells can be improved by creating a texture on the surface to increase optical absorption. Different techniques have been developed for texturing, with the current state-of-the-art (SOA) being wet chemical etching. The process has poor optical performance, produces surfaces that are difficult to passivate or contact and is relatively expensive due to the use of hazardous chemicals. This project shall develop an alternative process for texturing mc-Si using laser micromachining. It will have the following features compared to the current SOA texturing process: -Superior optical surfaces for reduced front-surface reflection and enhanced optical absorption in thin mc-Si substrates -Improved surface passivation -More easily integrated into advanced back-contact cell concepts -Reduced use of hazardous chemicals and waste treatment -Similar or lower cost The process is based on laser pitting. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a high rate laser pitting process which will exceed the rate of former laser texturing processes by a factor of ten. The laser and scanning technologies will be demonstrated on a laboratory scale, but will use inherently technologies that can easily be scaled to production rates. The drastic increase in process velocity is required for the process to be implemented as an in-line process in PV manufacturing. The project includes laser process development, development of advanced optical systems for beam manipulation and cell reflectivity and efficiency testing. An improvement of over 0.5% absolute in efficiency is anticipated after laser-based texturing. The surface textures will be characterized optically, and solar cells will be fabricated with the new laser texturing to ensure that the new process is compatible with high-efficiency cell processing. The result will be demonstration of a prototype process that is suitable for scale-up to a

  18. Laser welding technique for titanium alloy sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Gobbi, S.L.; Zhang, L.; Norris, J.; Zolotovsky, S.; Richter, K.H.

    1994-12-31

    In order to achieve reliable welds with minimal distortion for the fabrication of aerospace industrial components, several techniques were carried out on Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al2Sn4Zr2Mo sheets of 1.6 mm and 2 mm thickness using a CO{sub 2} and a Nd-YAG laser. Test 1: A satisfactory weld can be obtained by using a CO{sub 2} CW laser with a filler wire. Test 2: Before laser welding the edges were shaped with a special relief defined incorporated filler, which allows it to avoid the classical filler wire. Test 3: A cosmetic butt weld without filler, obtained by defocusing the CO{sub 2} CW laser beam, enables it to eliminate the undercut and result in a smooth surface. Test 4: High power pulsed Nd-YAG laser equipped with fiber optics and f5{prime} focus lens was employed, which produces the autogenous butt welds with full penetration and regular bead profile. The undercut and slump could be controlled by pulse energy, pulse duration, frequency, waveform and overlapping rate.

  19. Advanced laser stratospheric monitoring systems analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the software support supplied by Systems and Applied Sciences Corporation for the study of Advanced Laser Stratospheric Monitoring Systems Analyses under contract No. NAS1-15806. This report discusses improvements to the Langley spectroscopic data base, development of LHS instrument control software and data analyses and validation software. The effect of diurnal variations on the retrieved concentrations of NO, NO2 and C L O from a space and balloon borne measurement platform are discussed along with the selection of optimum IF channels for sensing stratospheric species from space.

  20. Recent advances in CO2 laser catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, B. T.; Schryer, D. R.; Brown, K. G.; Kielin, E. J.; Hoflund, G. B.; Gardner, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses several recent advances in CO2 laser catalysts including comparisons of the activity of Au/MnO2 to Pt/SnO2 catalysts with possible explanations for observed differences. The catalysts are compared for the effect of test gas composition, pretreatment temperature, isotopic integrity, long term activity, and gold loading effects on the Au/MnO2 catalyst activity. Tests conducted to date include both long-term tests of up to six months continuous operation and short-term tests of one week or more that include isotopic integrity testing.

  1. Advanced Computational Techniques in Regional Wave Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-03

    the new GERESS data. The dissertation work emphasized the development and use of advanced computa- tional techniques for studying regional seismic...hand, the possibility of new data sources at regional distances permits using previously ignored signals. Unfortunately, these regional signals will...the Green’s function around this new reference point is containing the propagation effects, and V is the source Gnk(x,t;r,t) - (2) volume where fJk

  2. Advances in laser-based isotope ratio measurements: selected applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerstel, E.; Gianfrani, L.

    2008-09-01

    Small molecules exhibit characteristic ro-vibrational transitions in the near- and mid-infrared spectral regions, which are strongly influenced by isotopic substitution. This gift of nature has made it possible to use laser spectroscopy for the accurate analysis of the isotopic composition of gaseous samples. Nowadays, laser spectroscopy is clearly recognized as a valid alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Laser-based instruments are leaving the research laboratory stage and are being used by a growing number of isotope researchers for significant advances in their own field of research. In this review article, we discuss the current status and new frontiers of research on high-sensitivity and high-precision laser spectroscopy for isotope ratio analyses. Although many of our comments will be generally applicable to laser isotope ratio analyses in molecules of environmental importance, this paper concerns itself primarily with water and carbon dioxide, two molecules that were studied extensively in our respective laboratories. A complete coverage of the field is practically not feasible in the space constraints of this issue, and in any case doomed to fail, considering the large body of work that has appeared ever since the review by Kerstel in 2004 ( Handbook of Stable Isotope Analytical Techniques, Chapt. 34, pp. 759-787).

  3. Endoscopic laser palliation for advanced malignant dysphagia.

    PubMed Central

    Bown, S G; Hawes, R; Matthewson, K; Swain, C P; Barr, H; Boulos, P B; Clark, C G

    1987-01-01

    Palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia aims to optimise swallowing for the maximum time possible with the minimum of general distress to these seriously ill patients. Thirty four patients considered unsuitable for surgery because of advanced malignancy, other major pathology or in whom previous surgery had been unsuccessful were treated endoscopically with the Nd YAG laser. Significant improvement was achieved in 29 (85%). On a scale of 0-4 (0 = normal swallowing; 4 = dysphagia for all fluids), mean improvement was 1.7, with 25 patients (74%) able to swallow most, or all solids after treatment. With increasing experience, the average number of treatment sessions required for each patient became less; initial time in hospital became comparable to that needed for intubation. Failures were caused by inappropriate patient selection (3), or laser related perforation (2). The mean survival in the whole group was 19 weeks (range 2-44). Eighteen patients needed further treatment for recurrent dysphagia, a mean of six weeks (range 2-15) after initial therapy. Ten of these responded, but eight eventually required insertion of a prosthetic tube. The duration of good palliation was very variable after initial laser therapy. Images Fig. 3 PMID:2443431

  4. Advanced endoscopic ultrasound management techniques for preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hafiz Muhammad Sharjeel; Bharmal, Sheila; Duman, Deniz Guney; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Turner, Brian G

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions can be benign, premalignant or malignant. The recent increase in detection and tremendous clinical variability of pancreatic cysts has presented a significant therapeutic challenge to physicians. Mucinous cystic neoplasms are of particular interest given their known malignant potential. This review article provides a brief but comprehensive review of premalignant pancreatic cystic lesions with advanced endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) management approaches. A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Cochrane, OVID and EMBASE databases. Preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions include mucinous cystadenoma and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. The 2012 International Sendai Guidelines guide physicians in their management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Some of the advanced EUS management techniques include ethanol ablation, chemotherapeutic (paclitaxel) ablation, radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy. In future, EUS-guided injections of drug-eluting beads and neodymium:yttrium aluminum agent laser ablation is predicted to be an integral part of EUS-guided management techniques. In summary, International Sendai Consensus Guidelines should be used to make a decision regarding management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Advanced EUS techniques are proving extremely beneficial in management, especially in those patients who are at high surgical risk. PMID:27574295

  5. Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques in Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    2005-01-01

    This is the final technical report for grant number NAG-1-02101. The title of this grant was "Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques In Aerospace Systems". The principal investigator on this grant was Dr. John C. Knight of the Computer Science Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4740. This report summarizes activities under the grant during the period 7/01/2002 to 9/30/2004. This report is organized as follows. In section 2, the technical background of the grant is summarized. Section 3 lists accomplishments and section 4 lists students funded under the grant. In section 5, we present a list of presentations given at various academic and research institutions about the research conducted. Finally, a list of publications generated under this grant is included in section 6.

  6. Advances in tunable powerful lasers: The advanced free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, S.; Sheffield, R.

    1993-12-31

    In the past several decades, remarkable progress in laser science and technology has made it possible to obtain laser light from the ultra-violet to the far infra-red from a variety of laser types, and at power levels from milliwatts to kilowatts (and, some day, megawatts). However, the availability of tunable lasers at ``high`` power (above a few tens of watts) is more limited. Figure 1, an assessment of the availability of tunable lasers, shows the covered range to be about 400 to 2000 nanometers. A variety of dye lasers cover the visible and near infra red, each one of which is tunable over approximately a 10% range. In the same region, the TI:saphire laser is adjustable over a 20 to 25% range. And finally, optical parametric oscillators can cover the range from about 400 nanometers out to about 2000 nm (even farther at reduced energy output). The typical output energy per pulse may vary from a few to one hundred millijoules, and since repetition rates of 10 to 100 Hertz are generally attainable, average output powers of tens of watts are possible. In recent years, a new approach to powerful tunable lasers -- the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) -- has emerged. In this paper we will discuss advances in FEL technology which not only enable tunability at high average power over a very broad range of wavelengths, but also make this device more usable. At present, that range is about one micron to the far infra red; with extensions of existing technology, it should be extendable to the vacuum ultra violet region.

  7. Advanced techniques in echocardiography in small animals.

    PubMed

    Chetboul, Valérie

    2010-07-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography has become a major imaging tool for the diagnosis and management of canine and feline cardiovascular diseases. During the last decade, more recent advances in ultrasound technology with the introduction of newer imaging modalities, such as tissue Doppler imaging, strain and strain rate imaging, and 2-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography, have provided new parameters to assess myocardial performance, including regional myocardial velocities and deformation, ventricular twist, and mechanical synchrony. An outline of these 4 recent ultrasound techniques, their impact on the understanding of right and left ventricular function in small animals, and their application in research and clinical settings are given in this article.

  8. Basic concepts of advanced MRI techniques.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Elisabetta; Bizzi, Alberto; Di Salle, Francesco; De Stefano, Nicola; Filippi, Massimo

    2008-10-01

    An overview is given of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques sensitized to diffusion, flow, magnetization transfer effect, and local field inhomogeneities induced by physiological changes, that can be viewed, in the clinical practice, as advanced because of their challenging implementation and interpretation. These techniques are known as diffusion-weighted, perfusion, magnetization transfer, functional MRI and MR spectroscopy. An important issue is that they can provide quantitative estimates of structural and functional characteristics that are below the voxel resolution. This review does not deal with the basic concepts of the MR physics and the description of the available acquisition and postprocessing methods, but hopefully provides an adequate background to readers and hence facilitate the understanding of the following clinical contributions.

  9. Challenge to advanced materials processing with lasers in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Isamu

    2003-02-01

    Japan is one of the most advanced countries in manufacturing technology, and lasers have been playing an important role for advancement of manufacturing technology in a variety of industrial fields. Contribution of laser materials processing to Japanese industry is significant for both macroprocessing and microprocessing. The present paper describes recent trend and topics of industrial applications in terms of the hardware and the software to show how Japanese industry challenges to advanced materials processing using lasers, and national products related to laser materials processing are also briefly introduced.

  10. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Markl, M; Schnell, S; Wu, C; Bollache, E; Jarvis, K; Barker, A J; Robinson, J D; Rigsby, C K

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented.

  11. Advanced Techniques for Improving Laser Optical Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    methanol and permitting drops of the suspensions to dry on cleaned glass slides. The slides were coated with .00 angstrom aluminum films and...surface to be replicated, improper coating of it. or nonuniform re- moval of the film can cause artifacts in the replica which are difficult to interpret...difficult to coat uniformly and so act as defect sites in thin film coatings on the etched pieces. A second series of damage experiments which was

  12. Cold laser technique for cell surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel V.; Ohad, Shoshanit; Lewis, Aaron; Laufer, Neri

    1992-08-01

    A new cell surgery technique has been developed to produce well-defined alterations in cells and tissues without detectable heating and/or other structural damage in the surroundings. The technique involves the use of a 193 nm argon fluoride excimer laser which is guided through a glass pipette filled with a positive air pressure. To demonstrate the method holes were drilled in the zona pellucida of mouse oocytes. The diameter of the drilled hole was determined by the pipette tip size, and its depth by an energy emitted per pulse and number of pulses. Scanning electron microscopy of the drilled mouse oocytes showed uniform, round, well circumscribed holes with sharp edges. Oocytes that had their zona pellucida drilled with this new method fertilized in vitro and developed to the blastocyst stage in a rate similar to that of control group. These results demonstrate the non-perturbing nature of this cold laser microsurgical procedure. In addition to the extension of our results for clinical in vitro fertilization purposes, such as enhancement of fertilization and embryo biopsy, there are wide ranging possible uses of our method in fundamental and applied investigations that require sub-micron accuracy in cellular alteration.

  13. Advanced Laser Chemical Processing For Microelectronics and Integrated Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-15

    Barbara, CA (June 25-27, 1990). 15. R.M. Osgood, Jr., " Laser - Fabrication for Integrated Electronics and Optics," OITDA Conference, Tokyo, Japan, (July 5...Society Meeting, Boston, MA, November 26 - December 3, 1990. 20. R.M. Osgood, Jr., "Advances in Laser Fabrication for Solid-State Electronics and...Thin, Excimer Laser-Deposited Cd Interlayers," J. Elec. Mat. 12, 1239 (July, 1990). 14. R.M. Osgood, Jr., " Laser - Fabrication for Solid State

  14. Advanced Synchrotron Techniques at High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, G.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Chow, P.; Kono, Y.; Meng, Y.; Park, C.; Popov, D.; Rod, E.; Smith, J.; Xiao, Y.; Mao, H.

    2012-12-01

    High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) is dedicated to advancing cutting-edge, multidisciplinary, high-pressure science and technology using synchrotron radiation at Sector 16 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne National Laboratory. At HPCAT an array of novel x-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques has been integrated with high pressure and extreme temperature instrumentation for studies of structure and materials properties at extreme conditions.. HPCAT consists of four active independent beamlines performing a large range of various experiments at extreme conditions. 16BM-B beamline is dedicated to energy dispersive and white Laue X-ray diffraction. The majority of experiments are performed with a Paris-Edinburgh large volume press (to 7GPa and 2500K) and include amorphous and liquid structure measurement, white beam radiography, elastic sound wave velocity measurement of amorphous solid materials, with viscosity and density measurement of liquid being under development. 16BM-D is a monochromatic diffraction beamline for powder and single crystal diffraction at high pressure and high (resistive heating) / low (cryostats) temperature. The additional capabilities include high-resolution powder diffraction and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The insertion device beamline of HPCAT has two undulators in canted mode (operating independently) and LN cooled Si monochromators capable of providing a large range of energies. 16IDB is a microdiffraction beamline mainly focusing on high-pressure powder and single crystal diffraction in DAC at high temperatures (double-sided laser heating and resistive heating) and low temperature (various cryostats). The modern instrumentation allows high-quality diffraction at megabar pressures from light element, fast experiments with pulsed laser heating, fast dynamic experiments with Pilatus detector, and so on. 16ID-D beamline is dedicated to x-ray scattering and spectroscopy research

  15. Laser-assisted advanced assembly for MEMS fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Yuriy Andreev

    Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are currently fabricated using methods originally designed for manufacturing semiconductor devices, using minimum if any assembly at all. The inherited limitations of this approach narrow the materials that can be employed and reduce the design complexity, imposing limitations on MEMS functionality. The proposed Laser-Assisted Advanced Assembly (LA3) method solves these problems by first fabricating components followed by assembly of a MEMS device. Components are micro-machined using a laser or by photolithography followed by wet/dry etching out of any material available in a thin sheet form. A wide range of materials can be utilized, including biocompatible metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, semiconductors, and materials with special properties such as memory shape alloys, thermoelectric, ferromagnetic, piezoelectric, and more. The approach proposed allows enhancing the structural and mechanical properties of the starting materials through heat treatment, tribological coatings, surface modifications, bio-functionalization, and more, a limited, even unavailable possibility with existing methods. Components are transferred to the substrate for assembly using the thermo-mechanical Selective Laser Assisted Die Transfer (tmSLADT) mechanism for microchips assembly, already demonstrated by our team. Therefore, the mechanical and electronic part of the MEMS can be fabricated using the same equipment/method. The viability of the Laser-Assisted Advanced Assembly technique for MEMS is demonstrated by fabricating magnetic switches for embedding in a conductive carbon-fiber metamaterial for use in an Electromagnetic-Responsive Mobile Cyber-Physical System (E-RMCPS), which is expected to improve the wireless communication system efficiency within a battery-powered device.

  16. Advanced techniques in current signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. F.; Castleberry, K. N.

    1992-02-01

    In general, both ac and dc motors can be characterized as weakly nonlinear systems, in which both linear and nonlinear effects occur simultaneously. Fortunately, the nonlinearities are generally well behaved and understood and can be handled via several standard mathematical techniques already well developed in the systems modeling area; examples are piecewise linear approximations and Volterra series representations. Field measurements of numerous motors and motor-driven systems confirm the rather complex nature of motor current spectra and illustrate both linear and nonlinear effects (including line harmonics and modulation components). Although previous current signature analysis (CSA) work at Oak Ridge and other sites has principally focused on the modulation mechanisms and detection methods (AM, PM, and FM), more recent studies have been conducted on linear spectral components (those appearing in the electric current at their actual frequencies and not as modulation sidebands). For example, large axial-flow compressors (approximately 3300 hp) in the US gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants exhibit running-speed (approximately 20 Hz) and high-frequency vibrational information (greater than 1 kHz) in their motor current spectra. Several signal-processing techniques developed to facilitate analysis of these components, including specialized filtering schemes, are presented. Finally, concepts for the designs of advanced digitally based CSA units are offered, which should serve to foster the development of much more computationally capable 'smart' CSA instrumentation in the next several years.

  17. Advances in fiber lasers for nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, F. W.; Ouzounov, D.; Kieu, K.; Renninger, W.; Chong, A.; Liu, H.

    2008-02-01

    In the past 30 years major advances in medical imaging have been made in areas such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound. These techniques have become quite effective for structural imaging at the organ or tissue level, but do not address the clear need for imaging technologies that exploit existing knowledge of the genetic and molecular bases of disease. Techniques that can provide similar information on the cellular and molecular scale would be very powerful, and ultimately the extension of such techniques to in vivo measurements will be desired. The availability of these imaging capabilities would allow monitoring of the early stages of disease or therapy, for example. Optical techniques provide excellent imaging capabilities, with sub-micron spatial resolution, and are noninvasive. An overall goal of biomedical imaging is to obtain diagnostic or functional information about biological structures. The difficulty of acquiring high-resolution images of structures deep in tissue presents a major challenge, however, owing to strong scattering of light. As a consequence, optical imaging has been limited to thin (typically ~0.5 mm) samples or superficial tissue. In contrast, techniques such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance provide images of structures centimeters deep in tissue, with ~100-micron resolution. It is desirable to develop techniques that offer the resolution of optics with the depth-penetration of other techniques. Since 1990, a variety of nonlinear microscopies have been demonstrated. These include 2- and 3-photon fluorescence microscopy, and 2nd- and 3rd-harmonic generation microscopies. These typically employ femtosecond-pulse excitation, for maximum peak power (and thus nonlinear excitation) for a given pulse energy. A relative newcomer to the group is CARS microscopy [1], which exploits resonant vibrational excitation of molecules or bonds. The CARS signal contrast arises from intrinsic elements of cells, and thus

  18. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  19. Sensitive Technique For Detecting Alignment Of Seed Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1994-01-01

    Frequency response near resonance measured. Improved technique for detection and quantification of alignment of injection-seeding laser with associated power-oscillator laser proposed. Particularly useful in indicating alignment at spectral purity greater than 98 percent because it becomes more sensitive as perfect alignment approached. In addition, implemented relatively easily, without turning on power-oscillator laser.

  20. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  1. Laser applications in advanced chip packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Dirk; Held, Andrew; Pätzel, Rainer; Clark, Dave; van Nunen, Joris

    2016-03-01

    While applications such as drilling μ-vias and laser direct imaging have been well established in the electronics industry, the mobile device industry's push for miniaturization is generating new demands for packaging technologies that allow for further reduction in feature size while reducing manufacturing cost. CO lasers have recently become available and their shorter wavelength allows for a smaller focus and drilling hole diameters down to 25μm whilst keeping the cost similar to CO2 lasers. Similarly, nanosecond UV lasers have gained significantly in power, become more reliable and lower in cost. On a separate front, the cost of ownership reduction for Excimer lasers has made this class of lasers attractive for structuring redistribution layers of IC substrates with feature sizes down to 2μm. Improvements in reliability and lower up-front cost for picosecond lasers is enabling applications that previously were only cost effective with mechanical means or long-pulsed lasers. We can now span the gamut from 100μm to 2μm for via drilling and can cost effectively structure redistribution layers with lasers instead of UV lamps or singulate packages with picosecond lasers.

  2. The frenectomy: a comparison of classic versus laser technique.

    PubMed

    Epstein, S R

    1991-08-01

    When an abnormal labial frenum causes certain complications, frenectomy should be considered. In this article, the indications for frenectomy are outlined, classical and laser frenectomy techniques are described, and the advantages and disadvantages of both techniques are discussed.

  3. Vestibuloplasty: a retrospective study on conventional and laser operation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neckel, Claus P.

    1999-05-01

    40 patients with edentulous maxillary jaws were referred to our private practice limited to maxillofacial surgery, due to atrophy of the alveolar ridge. Before prosthetic renewal of the upper removable prosthesis the restorative dentist requested a sufficient vestibule. After supraperiostal preparation, soft tissue advancement and fixation with absorbable sutures. The recipient site was covered with a free gingival graft. Group I was operated on traditionally using a scalpel. In group II incision and soft tissue preparation was performed using a diode laser. Wavelength: 810 nm; Continuous wave mode; 400 micron optic fiber; Output power 1.6 Watt. All operations were performed by one surgeon experienced in both operation techniques. Every patient was followed-up 1, 4, 8 weeks, 6 and 12 months. The vestibular height directly adjacent to the nasal cavity and 2cm distal to these first measuring locations were taken. Each patient was asked to evaluate their individual discomfort and postoperative pain level. Both groups showed no significant difference in vestibular height after 1, 4, 8 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. The postoperative height of 1.28 cm was reduced to 0.84 cm after 1 year. Furthermore both groups showed uneventful healing and take of the free gingival grafts. The assessment of the pain and discomfort level by the patients brought a significant difference between both groups in favor of the laser assisted operation technique.

  4. Laser cooling in solids: advances and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seletskiy, Denis V.; Epstein, Richard; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses the progress and ongoing efforts in optical refrigeration. Optical refrigeration is a process in which phonons are removed from a solid by anti-Stokes fluorescence. The review first summarizes the history of optical refrigeration, noting the success in cooling rare-earth-doped solids to cryogenic temperatures. It then examines in detail a four-level model of rare-earth-based optical refrigeration. This model elucidates the essential roles that the various material parameters, such as the spacing of the energy levels and the radiative quantum efficiency, play in the process of optical refrigeration. The review then describes the experimental techniques for cryogenic optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids employing non-resonant and resonant optical cavities. It then examines the work on laser cooling of semiconductors, emphasizing the differences between optical refrigeration of semiconductors and rare-earth-doped solids and the new challenges and advantages of semiconductors. It then describes the significant experimental results including the observed optical refrigeration of CdS nanostructures. The review concludes by discussing the engineering challenges to the development of practical optical refrigerators, and the potential advantages and uses of these refrigerators.

  5. High-power disk lasers: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, David; Ryba, Tracey; Holzer, Marco

    2012-03-01

    Though the genesis of the disk laser concept dates to the early 90's, the disk laser continues to demonstrate the flexibility and the certain future of a breakthrough technology. On-going increases in power per disk, and improvements in beam quality and efficiency continue to validate the genius of the disk laser concept. As of today, the disk principle has not reached any fundamental limits regarding output power per disk or beam quality, and offers numerous advantages over other high power resonator concepts, especially over monolithic architectures. With about 2,000 high power disk lasers installations, and a demand upwards of 1,000 lasers per year, the disk laser has proven to be a robust and reliable industrial tool. With advancements in running cost, investment cost and footprint, manufacturers continue to implement disk laser technology with more vigor than ever. This paper will explain recent advances in disk laser technology and process relevant features of the laser, like pump diode arrangement, resonator design and integrated beam guidance. In addition, advances in applications in the thick sheet area and very cost efficient high productivity applications like remote welding, remote cutting and cutting of thin sheets will be discussed.

  6. Advanced laser microfabrication of photonic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Peter R.; Chen, Kevin P.; Corkum, Paul B.; Naumov, Andrei; Ng, Sandy; Zhang, Jie

    2000-11-01

    The powerful transition from electronic to photonic systems in today's Internet-driven communication industry is driving the development of processes to miniaturize and integrate optical components. New processing and packaging technologies are now required that can precisely shape and assemble transparent optical components to sub-wavelength accuracy. Laser microfabrication technology is beginning to play a role here. Our groups are exploring two extremes in laser technology- ultrafast lasers and very short wavelength F2 lasers- to microstructure optical surfaces and to profile refractive-index structures inside transparent glasses. In this paper, we compare photosensitivity responses, spatial resolution, and processing windows for the deep-ultraviolet and ultrafast laser approaches, and discuss prospects for laser printing and trimming of optical waveguide components and circuits.

  7. Diode Laser Ear Piercing: A Novel Technique.

    PubMed

    Suseela, Bibilash Babu; Babu, Preethitha; Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Earlobe piercing is a common office room procedure done by a plastic surgeon. Various methods of ear piercing have been described. In this article, we describe a novel method of laser ear piercing using the diode laser. An 18-year-old female patient underwent an ear piercing using a diode laser with a power of 2.0 W in continuous mode after topical local anaesthetic and pre-cooling. The diode laser was fast, safe, easy to use and highly effective way of ear piercing. The advantages we noticed while using the diode laser over conventional methods were more precision, minimal trauma with less chances of hypertrophy and keloids, no bleeding with coagulation effect of laser, less time taken compared to conventional method and less chance of infection due to thermal heat effect of laser.

  8. Laser anemometry techniques for turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Oberle, Lawrence G.

    1987-01-01

    Laser anemometry offers a nonintrusive means for obtaining flow field information. Current research at NASA Lewis Research Center is focused on instrumenting a warm turbine facility with a laser anemometer system. In an effort to determine the laser anemometer system best qualified for the warm turbine environment, the performance of a conventional laser fringe anemometer and a two spot time of flight system were compared with a new, modified time of flight system, called a Four Spot laser anemometer. The comparison measurements were made in highly turbulent flows near walls. The Four Spot anemometer uses elliptical spots to increase the flow acceptance angle to be comparable to that of a Laser Fringe Anemometer. Also, the Four Spot uses an optical code that vastly simplifies the pulse detection processor. The results of the comparison measurements will exemplify which laser anemometer system is best suited to the hostile environment typically encountered in warm rotating turbomachinery.

  9. Diode Laser Ear Piercing: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Suseela, Bibilash Babu; Babu, Preethitha; Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Earlobe piercing is a common office room procedure done by a plastic surgeon. Various methods of ear piercing have been described. In this article, we describe a novel method of laser ear piercing using the diode laser. An 18-year-old female patient underwent an ear piercing using a diode laser with a power of 2.0 W in continuous mode after topical local anaesthetic and pre-cooling. The diode laser was fast, safe, easy to use and highly effective way of ear piercing. The advantages we noticed while using the diode laser over conventional methods were more precision, minimal trauma with less chances of hypertrophy and keloids, no bleeding with coagulation effect of laser, less time taken compared to conventional method and less chance of infection due to thermal heat effect of laser. PMID:28163460

  10. Advanced laser modeling with BLAZE multiphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Andrew D.; Carroll, David L.; Gray, Michael I.; Suzuki, Lui

    2017-01-01

    The BLAZE Multiphysics™ software simulation suite was specifically developed to model highly complex multiphysical systems in a computationally efficient and highly scalable manner. These capabilities are of particular use when applied to the complexities associated with high energy laser systems that combine subsonic/transonic/supersonic fluid dynamics, chemically reacting flows, laser electronics, heat transfer, optical physics, and in some cases plasma discharges. In this paper we present detailed cw and pulsed gas laser calculations using the BLAZE model with comparisons to data. Simulations of DPAL, XPAL, ElectricOIL (EOIL), and the optically pumped rare gas laser were found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  11. Lincoln Advanced Science and Engineering Reinforcement (LASER) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Willie E.

    1989-01-01

    Lincoln University, under the Lincoln Advanced Science and Engineering Reinforcement (LASER) Program, has identified and successfully recruited over 100 students for majors in technical fields. To date, over 70 percent of these students have completed or will complete technical degrees in engineering, physics, chemistry, and computer science. Of those completing the undergraduate degree, over 40 percent have gone on to graduate and professional schools. This success is attributable to well planned approaches to student recruitment, training, personal motivation, retention, and program staff. Very closely coupled to the above factors is a focus designed to achieve excellence in program services and student performance. Future contributions by the LASER Program to the pool of technical minority graduates will have a significant impact. This is already evident from the success of the students that began the first year of the program. With program plans to refine many of the already successful techniques, follow-on activities are expected to make even greater contributions to the availability of technically trained minorities. For example, undergraduate research exposure, broadened summer, and co-op work experiences will be enhanced.

  12. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  13. Advances in tunable diode laser technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, W.

    1980-01-01

    The improvement of long-term reliability, the purification of mode properties, and the achievement of higher-temperature operation were examined. In reliability studies a slow increase in contact resistance during room temperature storage for lasers fabricated with In-Au or In-Pt contacts was observed. This increase is actually caused by the diffusion of In into the surface layer of laser crystals. By using a three layered structure of In-Au-Pt or In-Pt-Au, this mode of degradation was reduced. In characterizing the mode properties, it was found that the lasers emit in a highly localized, filamentary manner. For widestripe lasers the emission occurs near the corners of the junction. In order to achieve single-mode operation, stripe widths on the order of 8-10 micrometers are needed. Also, it was found that room temperature electroluminescence is possible near 4.6 micrometers.

  14. The future of high power laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poprawe, Reinhart; Loosen, Peter; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-05-01

    High Power Lasers have been used for years in corresponding applications. Constantly new areas and new processes have been demonstrated, developed and transferred to fruitful use in industry. With the advent of diode pumped solid state lasers in the multi-kW-power regime at beam qualities not far away from the diffraction limit, a new area of applicability has opened. In welding applications speeds could be increased and systems could be developed with higher efficiently leading also to new perspectives for increased productivity, e.g. in combined processing. Quality control is increasingly demanded by the applying industries, however applications still are rare. Higher resolution of coaxial process control systems in time and space combined with new strategies in signal processing could give rise to new applications. The general approach described in this paper emphasizes the fact, that laser applications can be developed more efficiently, more precisely and with higher quality, if the laser radiation is tailored properly to the corresponding application. In applying laser sources, the parameter ranges applicable are by far wider and more flexible compared to heat, mechanical or even electrical energy. The time frame ranges from several fs to continuous wave and this spans approximately 15 orders of magnitude. Spacewise, the foci range from several µm to cm and the resulting intensities suitable for materials processing span eight orders of magnitude from 10 3 to 10 11 W/cm2. In addition to space (power, intensity) and time (pulse) the wavelength can be chosen as a further parameter of optimization. As a consequence, the resulting new applications are vast and can be utilized in almost every market segment of our global economy (Fig. 1). In the past and only partly today, however, this flexibility of laser technology is not exploited in full in materials processing, basically because in the high power regime the lasers with tailored beam properties are not

  15. Review of laser speckle contrast techniques for visualizing tissue perfusion.

    PubMed

    Draijer, Matthijs; Hondebrink, Erwin; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2009-07-01

    When a diffuse object is illuminated with coherent laser light, the backscattered light will form an interference pattern on the detector. This pattern of bright and dark areas is called a speckle pattern. When there is movement in the object, the speckle pattern will change over time. Laser speckle contrast techniques use this change in speckle pattern to visualize tissue perfusion. We present and review the contribution of laser speckle contrast techniques to the field of perfusion visualization and discuss the development of the techniques.

  16. Soot volume fraction fields in unsteady axis-symmetric flames by continuous laser extinction technique.

    PubMed

    Kashif, Muhammad; Bonnety, Jérôme; Guibert, Philippe; Morin, Céline; Legros, Guillaume

    2012-12-17

    A Laser Extinction Method has been set up to provide two-dimensional soot volume fraction field time history at a tunable frequency up to 70 Hz inside an axis-symmetric diffusion flame experiencing slow unsteady phenomena preserving the symmetry. The use of a continuous wave laser as the light source enables this repetition rate, which is an incremental advance in the laser extinction technique. The technique is shown to allow a fine description of the soot volume fraction field in a flickering flame exhibiting a 12.6 Hz flickering phenomenon. Within this range of repetition rate, the technique and its subsequent post-processing require neither any method for time-domain reconstruction nor any correction for energy intrusion. Possibly complemented by such a reconstruction method, the technique should support further soot volume fraction database in oscillating flames that exhibit characteristic times relevant to the current efforts in the validation of soot processes modeling.

  17. Laser Techniques in Conservation of Artworks:. Problems and Breakthroughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimbeni, Renzo; Siano, Salvatore

    2010-04-01

    After more than thirty years since the first experiment in Venice, only in the last decade laser techniques have been widely recognised as one of the most important innovation introduced in the conservation of artworks for diagnostics, restoration and monitoring aims. Especially the use of laser ablation for the delicate phase of cleaning has been debated for many years, because of the problems encountered in finding an appropriate setting of the laser parameters. Many experimentations carried out on stone, metals and pigments put in evidence unacceptable side effects such as discoloration and yellowing after the treatment, or scarce cleaning productivity in respect of other techniques. Many research projects organised at European level have contributed to find breakthroughs in laser techniques that could avoid such problems. The choices of specific laser parameters better suited for cleaning of stone, metals and pigments are described. A series of validation case studies is reported.

  18. Advanced Fibre Bragg Grating and Microfibre Bragg Grating Fabrication Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kit Man

    Fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) have become a very important technology for communication systems and fibre optic sensing. Typically, FBGs are less than 10-mm long and are fabricated using fused silica uniform phase masks which become more expensive for longer length or non-uniform pitch. Generally, interference UV laser beams are employed to make long or complex FBGs, and this technique introduces critical precision and control issues. In this work, we demonstrate an advanced FBG fabrication system that enables the writing of long and complex gratings in optical fibres with virtually any apodisation profile, local phase and Bragg wavelength using a novel optical design in which the incident angles of two UV beams onto an optical fibre can be adjusted simultaneously by moving just one optical component, instead of two optics employed in earlier configurations, to vary the grating pitch. The key advantage of the grating fabrication system is that complex gratings can be fabricated by controlling the linear movements of two translation stages. In addition to the study of advanced grating fabrication technique, we also focus on the inscription of FBGs written in optical fibres with a cladding diameter of several ten's of microns. Fabrication of microfibres was investigated using a sophisticated tapering method. We also proposed a simple but practical technique to filter out the higher order modes reflected from the FBG written in microfibres via a linear taper region while the fundamental mode re-couples to the core. By using this technique, reflection from the microfibre Bragg grating (MFBG) can be effectively single mode, simplifying the demultiplexing and demodulation processes. MFBG exhibits high sensitivity to contact force and an MFBG-based force sensor was also constructed and tested to investigate their suitability for use as an invasive surgery device. Performance of the contact force sensor packaged in a conforming elastomer material compares favourably to one

  19. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  20. Advanced laser sensing receiver concepts based on FPA technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, P. L.; Petrin, R. R.; Jolin, J. L.; Foy, B. R.; Lowrance, J. L.; Renda, G.

    2002-01-01

    The ultimate performance of any remote sensor is ideally governed by the hardware signal-to-noise capability and allowed signal-averaging time. In real-world scenarios, this may not be realizable and the limiting factors may suggest the need for more advanced capabilities. Moving from passive to active remote sensors offers the advantage of control over the illumination source, the laser. Added capabilities may include polarization discrimination, instantaneous imaging, range resolution, simultaneous multi-spectral measurement, or coherent detection. However, most advanced detection technology has been engineered heavily towards the straightforward passive sensor requirements, measuring an integrated photon flux. The need for focal plane array technology designed specifically for laser sensing has been recognized for some time, but advances have only recently made the engineering possible. This paper will present a few concepts for laser sensing receiver architectures, the driving specifications behind those concepts, and test/modeling results of such designs.

  1. Advances in laser diodes for pyrotechnic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Richard R.

    1993-01-01

    Background information concerning the use of laser diodes in pyrotechnic applications is provided in viewgraph form. The following topics are discussed: damage limits, temperature stability, fiber coupling issues, and small (100 micron) and large (400 micron) fiber results. The discussions concerning fiber results concentrate on the areas of package geometry and electro-optical properties.

  2. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuji; Sahay, Peeyush

    2009-01-01

    Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC) disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS). Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis. PMID:22408503

  3. Flow, spray and combustion analysis by laser techniques in the combustion chamber of a direct-injection diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, W.; Schindler, K.-P.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how the analysis of in -cylinder flow, fuel injection, and combustion by means of state-of-the-art optical techniques, as laser light-sheet, laser doppler anemometry and laser shadowgraphy, can help to support the understanding of the interaction of swirl flow development, spray formation, auto-ignition and combustion in near production-line direct-injection diesel engines and thus advances the development of engines with lower fuel consumption and emissions.

  4. New and Advanced Picosecond Lasers for Tattoo Removal.

    PubMed

    Adatto, Maurice A; Amir, Ruthie; Bhawalkar, Jayant; Sierra, Rafael; Bankowski, Richard; Rozen, Doran; Dierickx, Christine; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    Early methods of tattoo removal ultimately resulted in unacceptable cosmetic outcomes. While the introduction of laser technology was an improvement over the existing chemical, mechanical, and surgical procedures, the use of nonselective tattoo removal with carbon dioxide and argon lasers led to scarring. Q-switched lasers with nanosecond (10-9) pulse domains were considered to have revolutionized tattoo treatment, by selectively heating the tattoo particles, while reducing the adverse sequelae to adjacent normal skin. Theoretical considerations of restricting pulse duration, to heat tattoo particles to higher temperatures, proposed the use of sub-nanosecond pulses to target particles with thermal relaxation times lower than the nanosecond pulses in Q-switched lasers. Initial studies demonstrated that picosecond (10-12) pulses were more effective than nanosecond pulses in clearing black tattoos. Advances in picosecond technology led to the development of commercially available lasers, incorporating several different wavelengths, to further refine pigment targeting.

  5. A survey of laser lightning rod techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Arnold A., Jr.; Berthel, Robert O.

    1991-01-01

    The work done to create a laser lightning rod (LLR) is discussed. Some ongoing research which has the potential for achieving an operational laser lightning rod for use in the protection of missile launch sites, launch vehicles, and other property is discussed. Because of the ease with which a laser beam can be steered into any cloud overhead, an LLR could be used to ascertain if there exists enough charge in the clouds to discharge to the ground as triggered lightning. This leads to the possibility of using LLRs to test clouds prior to launching missiles through the clouds or prior to flying aircraft through the clouds. LLRs could also be used to probe and discharge clouds before or during any hazardous ground operations. Thus, an operational LLR may be able to both detect such sub-critical electrical fields and effectively neutralize them.

  6. Measurement of fuel spray vaporisation by laser techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Seng, C. A.; Felton, P. G.; Ungut, A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    Comparison of fuel spray structures in heated and in cold environments is made by using a new laser tomographic technique and laser anemometry. The tomography technique is shown to give accurate and rapid 'point' measurements of droplet sizes and concentrations. Experimental results show acceleration of droplets to the local gas velocity, preferential vaporisation of the smallest droplets and the dispersion of droplets by the turbulence.

  7. Laser induced fluorescence technique for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Felizardo, Rui; Gameiro, Carla; Matos, Ana R.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the development of laser induced fluorescence sensors and their application in the evaluation of water pollution and physiological status of higher plants and algae. The sensors were built on the basis of reliable and robust solid-state Nd:YAG lasers. They demonstrated good efficiency in: i) detecting and characterizing oil spills and dissolved organic matter; ii) evaluating the impact of stress on higher plants (cork oak, maritime pine, and genetically modified Arabidopsis); iii) tracking biomass changes in intertidal microphytobenthos; and iv) mapping macroalgal communities in the Tagus Estuary.

  8. Advanced crystallization techniques of 'solar grade' silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, M.; Calligarich, C.; Rava, P.; Sardi, L.; Alessandri, M.; Redaelli, F.; Pizzini, S.

    Microstructural, electrical and photo-voltaic characteristics of polycrystal line silicon solar cells fabricated with silicon ingots containing 5, 100 and 500 ppmw iron are reported and discussed. All silicon ingots were grown by the directional solidification technique in graphite or special quartz molds and doped intentionally with iron, in order to evaluate the potentiality of the D.S. technique when employed with solar silicon feedstocks. Results indicate that structural breakdown limits the amount of the ingot which is usable for solar cells fabrication, but also that efficiencies in excess of 10 percent are obtained using the 'good' region of the ingot.

  9. Advances in laparoscopic urologic surgery techniques

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Muhsin, Haidar M.; Humphreys, Mitchell R.

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades witnessed the inception and exponential implementation of key technological advancements in laparoscopic urology. While some of these technologies thrived and became part of daily practice, others are still hindered by major challenges. This review was conducted through a comprehensive literature search in order to highlight some of the most promising technologies in laparoscopic visualization, augmented reality, and insufflation. Additionally, this review will provide an update regarding the current status of single-site and natural orifice surgery in urology. PMID:27134743

  10. Los Alamos Advanced Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.C.D.; Kraus, R.H.; Ledford, J.; Meier, K.L.; Meyer, R.E.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sigler, F.L.; Young, L.M.; Wang, T.S.; Wilson, W.L.; Wood, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    At Los Alamos, we are building a free-electron laser (FEL) for industrial, medical, and research applications. This FEL, which will incorporate many of the new technologies developed over the last decade, will be compact in size, robust, and user-friendly. Electrons produced by a photocathode will be accelerated to 20 MeV by a high-brightness accelerator and transported using permanent-magnet quadrupoles and dipoles. They will form an electron beam with an excellent instantaneous beam quality of 10 {pi} mm mrad in transverse emittance and 0.3% in energy spread at a peak current up to 300 A. Including operation at higher harmonics, the laser wavelength extends form 3.7 {mu}m to 0.4 {mu}m. In this paper, we will describe the project and the programs to date. 10 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Laser alexandrite crystals grown by horizontal oriented crystallization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurov, V. V.; Tsvetkov, E. G.; Yurkin, A. M.

    2008-05-01

    Comparative studies were performed for alexandrite crystals, Al 2BeO 4:Cr 3+, employed in solid state lasers and grown by the horizontal oriented crystallization (HOC) technique and alexandrite crystals grown by the Czochralski (Cz) method. It was shown that the structural quality and possibilities of generation of stimulated emission HOC-crystals are similar to Cz-crystals, whereas their damage threshold is about three times higher. The obtained results and considerably lower cost price of HOC-alexandrite crystals prove their advantageous application in powerful laser systems, which require large laser rods with a higher resistance to laser beam. It is emphasized that application of HOC technique is promising for growth of laser crystals of other high-temperature oxide compounds.

  12. Laser Photoacoustic Technique Detects Photo-Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liange, R. H.; Coulter, D. R.; Gupta, A.

    1986-01-01

    Laser photoacoustic instrument detects small amounts of oxidation in polymers. Instrument used to evaluate resistance to oxidation in Sunlight of polymer encapsulants for solar-cell arrays. With instrument, researchers monitor samples for early stages of photooxidation and study primary mechanisms of oxidation and degradation. Effects of these mechanisms masked during later stages.

  13. Lidar: A laser technique for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, T. D.; Hickman, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental airborne lidar systems proved to be useful for shallow water bathymetric measurements, and detection and identification of oil slicks and algae. Dye fluorescence applications using organic dyes was studied. The possibility of remotely inducing dye flourescence by means of pulsed lasers opens up several hydrospheric applications for measuring water currents, water temperature, and salinity. Aerosol measurements by lidar are also discussed.

  14. Advanced Concepts in Closed-Cycle Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    Halide Vapors and Applications," IEEE J. Quant. Elec. QE-15, 579 (July 1979). 173 72. E. J. Schimutschek, J. E. Celto, and J. A. Trias, ’ Mercuric ...J. R. McDonald, S. P. McGlynn, C. H. Kendrow, J. L. Roebber, and K. Weiss, "Ultraviolet Absorption Spectra of Mercuric Halides ," J. Chem. Phys. 56...reption rate laser lifeime Urin otyarnit spar scor, Shonabortorpotiy zai phtexiation merur Air halide ih eonuia abrtre noveAL/annularo-eucnig

  15. Novel materials and beam delivery technique for ultrafast laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ju

    2002-01-01

    Ultrafast lasers offer significant advantages for novel laser materials processing, especially at small length scales. Their extremely high optical intensity results in nonlinear laser-material interaction and energy deposition, which provide unique, non-traditional material processing capabilities. In this work, a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser system is applied for both practical and fundamental investigations of ultrafast laser materials processing. For practical applications, experimental techniques are developed to characterize and process two novel materials: (1) silica aerogels, and (2) thermal-sprayed materials, both of which are difficult to micromachine using any conventional technique. The breakdown threshold as well as the low-level absorption coefficient of the aerogel material are measured, while the material removal rate is characterized as a function of the laser fluence and the number of laser shots. Thermal-sprayed line patterns are trimmed by synchronizing the femtosecond laser pulses with a three-dimensional motorized micro-positioning system. A trimmed line width ˜50 mum is obtained, from an original line width ˜500 mum. In addition to developing experimental techniques for practical ultrafast laser processing of novel materials, investigations on improving the machining quality and efficiency by characterizing the nonlinear interactions between the femtosecond laser pulses and the beam delivery gas medium are also conducted in this work. A theoretical model based on the nonlinear Schrodinger equation is applied to simulate the pulse propagation under the coupled effects of two nonlinear mechanisms. The model predictions show that the beam profile can be dramatically distorted due to the nonlinear changes in the refractive index in air, which can be minimized by delivering the beam using an inert gas, particularly helium, due to its unique physical properties. Machining of copper sample by delivering the femtosecond laser pulse in four

  16. Techniques for increasing output power from mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mar, A.; Vawter, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    Mode-locked semiconductor lasers have drawn considerable attention as compact, reliable, and relatively inexpensive sources of short optical pulses. Advances in the design of such lasers have resulted in vast improvements in pulsewidth and noise performance, at a very wide range of repetition rates. An attractive application for these lasers would be to serve as alternatives for large benchtop laser systems such as dye lasers and solid-state lasers. However, mode-locked semiconductor lasers have not yet approached the performance of such systems in terms of output power. Different techniques for overcoming the problem of low output power from mode-locked semiconductor lasers will be discussed. Flared and arrayed lasers have been used successfully to increase the pulse saturation energy limit by increasing the gain cross section. Further improvements have been achieved by use of the MOPA configuration, which utilizes a flared semiconductor amplifier s amplify pulses to energies of 120 pJ and peak powers of nearly 30W.

  17. Novel technique for mode selection in a multimode fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Daniel, J M O; Chan, J S P; Kim, J W; Sahu, J K; Ibsen, M; Clarkson, W A

    2011-06-20

    A simple technique for transverse mode selection in a large-mode-area (multimode) fiber laser is described. The technique exploits the different spectral responses of feedback elements based on a fiber Bragg grating and a volume Bragg grating to achieve wavelength-dependent mode filtering. This approach has been applied to a cladding-pumped thulium-doped fiber laser with a multimode core to achieve a single-spatial-mode output beam with a beam propagation factor (M2) of 1.05 at 1923 nm. Without mode selection the free-running fiber laser has a multimode output beam with an M2 parameter of 3.3. Selective excitation of higher order modes is also possible via the technique and preliminary results for laser oscillation on the LP11 mode are also discussed along with the prospects for scaling to higher power levels.

  18. Techniques for measurement of the thermal expansion of advanced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques available to measure small thermal displacements in flat laminates and structural tubular elements of advanced composite materials are described. Emphasis is placed on laser interferometry and the laser interferometric dilatometer system used at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. Thermal expansion data are presented for graphite-fiber reinforced 6061 and 2024 aluminum laminates and for graphite fiber reinforced AZ91 C and QH21 A magnesium laminates before and after processing to minimize or eliminate thermal strain hysteresis. Data are also presented on the effects of reinforcement volume content on thermal expansion of silicon-carbide whisker and particulate reinforced aluminum.

  19. CHRONICLE: International forum on advanced high-power lasers and applications (AHPLA '99)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanas'ev, Yurii V.; Zavestovskaya, I. N.; Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Senatsky, Yu V.; Starodub, Aleksandr N.

    2000-05-01

    A review of reports made on the International Forum on Advanced High-Power Lasers and Applications, which was held at the beginning of November 1999 in Osaka (Japan), is presented. Five conferences were held during the forum on High-Power Laser Ablation, High-Power Lasers in Energy Engineering, High-Power Lasers in Civil Engineering and Architecture, High-Power Lasers in Manufacturing, and Advanced High-Power Lasers. The following trends in the field of high-power lasers and their applications were presented: laser fusion, laser applications in space, laser-triggered lightning, laser ablation of materials by short and ultrashort pulses, application of high-power lasers in manufacturing, application of high-power lasers in mining, laser decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear reactors, high-power solid-state and gas lasers, x-ray and free-electron lasers. One can find complete information on the forum in SPIE, vols. 3885-3889.

  20. [Advanced online search techniques and dedicated search engines for physicians].

    PubMed

    Nahum, Yoav

    2008-02-01

    In recent years search engines have become an essential tool in the work of physicians. This article will review advanced search techniques from the world of information specialists, as well as some advanced search engine operators that may help physicians improve their online search capabilities, and maximize the yield of their searches. This article also reviews popular dedicated scientific and biomedical literature search engines.

  1. Techniques for enhancing laser ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J; Chinn, D; Huber, R; Spicer, J; Thomas, G

    1999-02-16

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is an extremely powerful tool for characterizing materials and detecting defects. A majority of the ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is performed with piezoelectric transducers that generate and detect high frequency acoustic energy. The liquid needed to couple the high frequency acoustic energy from the piezoelectric transducers restricts the applicability of ultrasonics. For example, traditional ultrasonics cannot evaluate parts at elevated temperatures or components that would be damaged by contact with a fluid. They are developing a technology that remotely generates and detects the ultrasonic pulses with lasers and consequently there is no requirement for liquids. Thus the research in laser-based ultrasound allows them to solve inspection problems with ultrasonics that could not be done before. This technology has wide application in many Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory programs, especially when remote and/or non-contact sensing is necessary.

  2. Development of Advanced Laser Diode Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, J. J.; Papen, G. C.

    1998-01-01

    The design and operation of InGaAs-GaAs-AlGaAs asymmetric cladding ridge waveguide distributed Bragg reflector lasers is presented. Targeted for the remote sensing of water vapor with absorption lines in the lambda approximately 930 nm region, these devices operate CW with threshold currents as low as 11 MA and slope efficiencies as high as 0.37 W/A. Tbey also operate with over 30-dB side-mode suppression, and the typical CW characteristic temperature, T(sub o), is 95 K.

  3. Advanced experiments with an erbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Paulo V. S.; Marques, Manuel B.; Rosa, Carla C.

    2014-07-01

    This communication describes an optical hands-on fiber laser experiment aimed at advanced college courses. Optical amplifiers and laser sources represent very important optical devices in numerous applications ranging from telecommunications to medicine. The study of advanced photonics experiments is particularly relevant at undergraduate and master level. This paper discusses the implementation of an optical fiber laser made with a cavity built with two tunable Bragg gratings. This scheme allows the students to understand the laser working principles as a function of the laser cavity set-up. One or both of the gratings can be finely tuned in wavelength through applied stress; therefore, the degree of spectral mismatch of the two gratings can be adjusted, effectively changing the cavity feedback. The impact of the cavity conditions on the laser threshold, spectrum and efficiency is analyzed. This experiment assumes that in a previous practice, the students should had already characterized the erbium doped fiber in terms of absorption and fluorescent spectra, and the spectral gain as a function of pump power.

  4. Advances in laser and tissue interactions: laser microbeams and optical trapping (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Makropoulou, Mersini; Papadopoulos, Dimitris; Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Pietreanu, D.

    2005-04-01

    The increasing use of lasers in biomedical research and clinical praxis leads to the development and application of new, non-invasive, therapeutic, surgical and diagnostic techniques. In laser surgery, the theory of ablation dictates that pulsed mid-infrared laser beams exhibit strong absorption by soft and hard tissues, restricting residual thermal damage to a minimum zone. Therefore, the development of high quality 3 μm lasers is considered to be an alternative for precise laser ablation of tissue. Among them are the high quality oscillator-two stages amplifier lasers developed, which will be described in this article. The beam quality delivered by these lasers to the biological tissue is of great importance in cutting and ablating operations. As the precision of the ablation is increased, the cutting laser interventions could well move to the microsurgery field. Recently, the combination of a laser scalpel with an optical trapping device, under microscopy control, is becoming increasingly important. Optical manipulation of microscopic particles by focused laser beams, is now widely used as a powerful tool for 'non-contact' micromanipulation of cells and organelles. Several laser sources are employed for trapping and varying laser powers are used in a broad range of applications of optical tweezers. For most of the lasers used, the focal spot of the trapping beam is of the order of a micron. As the trapped objects can vary in size from hundreds of nanometres to hundreds of microns, the technique has recently invaded in to the nanocosomos of genes and molecules. However, the use of optical trapping for quantitative research into biophysical processes requires accurate calculation of the optical forces and torques acting within the trap. The research and development efforts towards a mid-IR microbeam laser system, the design and realization efforts towards a visible laser trapping system and the first results obtained using a relatively new calibration method to

  5. Advanced analysis techniques for uranium assay

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, W. H.; Ensslin, Norbert; Carrillo, L. A.; Beard, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium has a negligible passive neutron emission rate making its assay practicable only with an active interrogation method. The active interrogation uses external neutron sources to induce fission events in the uranium in order to determine the mass. This technique requires careful calibration with standards that are representative of the items to be assayed. The samples to be measured are not always well represented by the available standards which often leads to large biases. A technique of active multiplicity counting is being developed to reduce some of these assay difficulties. Active multiplicity counting uses the measured doubles and triples count rates to determine the neutron multiplication (f4) and the product of the source-sample coupling ( C ) and the 235U mass (m). Since the 35U mass always appears in the multiplicity equations as the product of Cm, the coupling needs to be determined before the mass can be known. A relationship has been developed that relates the coupling to the neutron multiplication. The relationship is based on both an analytical derivation and also on empirical observations. To determine a scaling constant present in this relationship, known standards must be used. Evaluation of experimental data revealed an improvement over the traditional calibration curve analysis method of fitting the doubles count rate to the 235Um ass. Active multiplicity assay appears to relax the requirement that the calibration standards and unknown items have the same chemical form and geometry.

  6. Advanced Rock Drilling Technologies Using High Laser Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckstegge, Frederik; Michel, Theresa; Zimmermann, Maik; Roth, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael

    Drilling through hard rock formations causes high mechanical wear and most often environmental disturbance. For the realization of an Advanced Adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage (AA-CAES) power plant a new and efficient method for tunneling utilising laser technology to support mechanical ablation of rock formations will be developed. Laser irradiation of inhomogeneous rock surfaces causes irregular thermal expansion leading to the formation of cracks and splintering as well as melting and slag-formation. This study focuses on the interaction of laser irradiation with calcite, porphyrite and siderite rock formations. A high power disc laser system at 1030nm wavelength is used to investigate the specific energy necessary to remove a unit volume depending on interaction times and applied power. Specific energies have been measured and an increase of fragility and brittleness of the rock surface has been observed.

  7. Recent advances in laser-driven neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-11-01

    Due to the limited number and high cost of large-scale neutron facilities, there has been a growing interest in compact accelerator-driven sources. In this context, several potential schemes of laser-driven neutron sources are being intensively studied employing laser-accelerated electron and ion beams. In addition to the potential of delivering neutron beams with high brilliance, directionality and ultra-short burst duration, a laser-driven neutron source would offer further advantages in terms of cost-effectiveness, compactness and radiation confinement by closed-coupled experiments. Some of the recent advances in this field are discussed, showing improvements in the directionality and flux of the laser-driven neutron beams.

  8. Laser sources and techniques for spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, A.H.

    1993-12-01

    This program focuses on the development of novel laser and spectroscopic techniques in the IR, UV, and VUV regions for studying combustion related molecular dynamics at the microscopic level. Laser spectroscopic techniques have proven to be extremely powerful in the investigation of molecular processes which require very high sensitivity and selectivity. The authors approach is to use quantum electronic and non-linear optical techniques to extend the spectral coverage and to enhance the optical power of ultrahigh resolution laser sources so as to obtain and analyze photoionization, fluorescence, and photoelectron spectra of jet-cooled free radicals and of reaction products resulting from unimolecular and bimolecular dissociations. New spectroscopic techniques are developed with these sources for the detection of optically thin and often short-lived species. Recent activities center on regenerative amplification of high resolution solid-state lasers, development of tunable high power mid-IR lasers and short-pulse UV/VUV tunable lasers, and development of a multipurpose high-order suppressor crossed molecular beam apparatus for use with synchrotron radiation sources. This program also provides scientific and technical support within the Chemical Sciences Division to the development of LBL`s Combustion Dynamics Initiative.

  9. Recent advances in DNA sequencing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rama Shankar

    2013-06-01

    Successful mapping of the draft human genome in 2001 and more recent mapping of the human microbiome genome in 2012 have relied heavily on the parallel processing of the second generation/Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) DNA machines at a cost of several millions dollars and long computer processing times. These have been mainly biochemical approaches. Here a system analysis approach is used to review these techniques by identifying the requirements, specifications, test methods, error estimates, repeatability, reliability and trends in the cost reduction. The first generation, NGS and the Third Generation Single Molecule Real Time (SMART) detection sequencing methods are reviewed. Based on the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) data, the achieved cost reduction of 1.5 times per yr. from Sep. 2001 to July 2007; 7 times per yr., from Oct. 2007 to Apr. 2010; and 2.5 times per yr. from July 2010 to Jan 2012 are discussed.

  10. Evaluation of a satellite laser ranging technique using pseudonoise code modulated laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Carolyn Kay

    1987-01-01

    Several types of Satellite Laser Ranging systems exist, operating with pulsed, high-energy lasers. The distance between a ground point and an orbiting satellite can be determined to within a few centimeters. A new technique substitutes pseudonoise code modulated laser diodes, which are much more compact, reliable and less costly, for the lasers now used. Since laser diode technology is only now achieving sufficiently powerful lasers, the capabilities of the new technique are investigated. Also examined are the effects of using an avalanche photodiode detector instead of a photomultiplier tube. The influence of noise terms (including background radiation, detector dark and thermal noise and speckle) that limit the system range and performance is evaluated.

  11. Ground-to-orbit laser propulsion: Advanced applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    Laser propulsion uses a large fixed laser to supply energy to heat an inert propellant in a rocket thruster. Such a system has two potential advantages: extreme simplicity of the thruster, and potentially high performance -- particularly high exhaust velocity. By taking advantage of the simplicity of the thruster, it should be possible to launch small (10--1000 kg) payloads to orbit using roughly 1 MW of average laser power per kg of payload. The incremental cost of such launches would be of order $200/kg for the smallest systems, decreasing to essentially the cost of electricity to run the laser (a few times $10/kg) for large systems. Although the individual payload size would be small, a laser launch system would be inherently high-volume, with the capacity to launch tens of thousands of payloads per year. Also, with high exhaust velocity, a laser launch system could launch payloads to high velocities -- geosynchronous transfer, Earth escape, or beyond -- at a relatively small premium over launches to LEO. In this paper, we briefly review the status of pulsed laser propulsion, including proposals for advanced vehicles. We then discuss qualitatively several unique applications appropriate to the early part of the next century, and perhaps valuable well into the next millenium: space habitat supply, deep space mission supply, nuclear waste disposal, and manned vehicle launching.

  12. Ground-to-orbit laser propulsion: Advanced applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kare, Jordin T.

    1990-01-01

    Laser propulsion uses a large fixed laser to supply energy to heat an inert propellant in a rocket thruster. Such a system has two potential advantages: extreme simplicity of the thruster, and potentially high performance, particularly high exhaust velocity. By taking advantage of the simplicity of the thruster, it should be possible to launch small (10 to 1000 kg) payloads to orbit using roughly 1 MW of average laser power per kg of payload. The incremental cost of such launches would be of an order of $200/kg for the smallest systems, decreasing to essentially the cost of electricity to run the laser (a few times $10/kg) for larger systems. Although the individual payload size would be smaller, a laser launch system would be inherently high-volume, with the capacity to launch tens of thousands of payloads per year. Also, with high exhaust velocity, a laser launch system could launch payloads to high velocities - geosynchronous transfer, Earth escape, or beyond - at a relatively small premium over launches to LEO. The status of pulsed laser propulsion is briefly reviewed including proposals for advanced vehicles. Several applications appropriate to the early part of the next century and perhaps valuable well into the next millennium are discussed qualitatively: space habitat supply, deep space mission supply, nuclear waste disposal, and manned vehicle launching.

  13. Diagnostics of nonlocal plasmas: advanced techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafaev, Alexander; Grabovskiy, Artiom; Strakhova, Anastasiya; Soukhomlinov, Vladimir

    2014-10-01

    This talk generalizes our recent results, obtained in different directions of plasma diagnostics. First-method of flat single-sided probe, based on expansion of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in series of Legendre polynomials. It will be demonstrated, that flat probe, oriented under different angles with respect to the discharge axis, allow to determine full EVDF in nonlocal plasmas. It is also shown, that cylindrical probe is unable to determine full EVDF. We propose the solution of this problem by combined using the kinetic Boltzmann equation and experimental probe data. Second-magnetic diagnostics. This method is implemented in knudsen diode with surface ionization of atoms (KDSI) and based on measurements of the magnetic characteristics of the KDSI in presence of transverse magnetic field. Using magnetic diagnostics we can investigate the wide range of plasma processes: from scattering cross-sections of electrons to plasma-surface interactions. Third-noncontact diagnostics method for direct measurements of EVDF in remote plasma objects by combination of the flat single-sided probe technique and magnetic polarization Hanley method.

  14. Innovative Tools Advance Revolutionary Weld Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The iconic, orange external tank of the space shuttle launch system not only contains the fuel used by the shuttle s main engines during liftoff but also comprises the shuttle s backbone, supporting the space shuttle orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Given the tank s structural importance and the extreme forces (7.8 million pounds of thrust load) and temperatures it encounters during launch, the welds used to construct the tank must be highly reliable. Variable polarity plasma arc welding, developed for manufacturing the external tank and later employed for building the International Space Station, was until 1994 the best process for joining the aluminum alloys used during construction. That year, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers began experimenting with a relatively new welding technique called friction stir welding (FSW), developed in 1991 by The Welding Institute, of Cambridge, England. FSW differs from traditional fusion welding in that it is a solid-state welding technique, using frictional heat and motion to join structural components without actually melting any of the material. The weld is created by a shouldered pin tool that is plunged into the seam of the materials to be joined. The tool traverses the line while rotating at high speeds, generating friction that heats and softens but does not melt the metal. (The heat produced approaches about 80 percent of the metal s melting temperature.) The pin tool s rotation crushes and stirs the plasticized metal, extruding it along the seam as the tool moves forward. The material cools and consolidates, resulting in a weld with superior mechanical properties as compared to those weld properties of fusion welds. The innovative FSW technology promises a number of attractive benefits. Because the welded materials are not melted, many of the undesirables associated with fusion welding porosity, cracking, shrinkage, and distortion of the weld are minimized or avoided. The process is more energy efficient, safe

  15. Corona Preionization Technique for Carbon Dioxide TEA Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-30

    environment such as that projected for the M-1 tank. However, the most challenging requirement for this laser is long sealed- off operation (> 2 x 106...optimized laser performance and long sealed- off lifetime. Preionization is the necessary means of providing initiating elec- trons in the main electrode gap...gradient technique lends itself to long sealed- off lifetime for reasons which will be made clear later in this section. However, a complete understanding of

  16. Flame front tracking by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy and advanced image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Gharbieh, Rafeef; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Gustavsson, Thomas; Kaminski, Clemens

    2001-02-01

    This paper presents advanced image analysis methods for extracting information from high speed Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) data obtained from turbulent flames. The application of non-linear anisotropic diffusion filtering and of Active Contour Models (Snakes) is described to isolate flame boundaries. In a subsequent step, the detected flame boundaries are tracked in time using a frequency domain contour interpolation scheme. The implementations of the methods are described and possible applications of the techniques are discussed.

  17. Lessons Learned from the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Matt; Patel, Deepak; Bradshaw, Heather; Robinson, Frank; Neuberger, Dave

    2016-01-01

    The ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) instrument is an upcoming Earth Science mission focusing on the effects of climate change. The flight instrument passed all environmental testing at GSFC (Goddard Space Flight Center) and is now ready to be shipped to the spacecraft vendor for integration and testing. This presentation walks through the lessons learned from design, hardware, analysis and testing perspective. ATLAS lessons learned include general thermal design, analysis, hardware, and testing issues as well as lessons specific to laser systems, two-phase thermal control, and optical assemblies with precision alignment requirements.

  18. Development of Underwater Laser Cladding and Underwater Laser Seal Welding Techniques for Reactor Components (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Masataka Tamura; Shohei Kawano; Wataru Kouno; Yasushi Kanazawa

    2006-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the major reasons to reduce the reliability of aged reactor components. Toshiba has been developing underwater laser welding onto surface of the aged components as maintenance and repair techniques. Because most of the reactor internal components to apply this underwater laser welding technique have 3-dimensional shape, effect of welding positions and welded shapes are examined and presented in this report. (authors)

  19. Surface-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry techniques for application in forensics.

    PubMed

    Guinan, Taryn; Kirkbride, Paul; Pigou, Paul E; Ronci, Maurizio; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent analytical technique for the rapid and sensitive analysis of macromolecules (>700 Da), such as peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and synthetic polymers. However, the detection of smaller organic molecules with masses below 700 Da using MALDI-MS is challenging due to the appearance of matrix adducts and matrix fragment peaks in the same spectral range. Recently, nanostructured substrates have been developed that facilitate matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI), contributing to an emerging analytical paradigm referred to as surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) MS. Since SALDI enables the detection of small organic molecules, it is rapidly growing in popularity, including in the field of forensics. At the same time, SALDI also holds significant potential as a high throughput analytical tool in roadside, work place and athlete drug testing. In this review, we discuss recent advances in SALDI techniques such as desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS), nano-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) and nano assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI™) and compare their strengths and weaknesses with particular focus on forensic applications. These include the detection of illicit drug molecules and their metabolites in biological matrices and small molecule detection from forensic samples including banknotes and fingerprints. Finally, the review highlights recent advances in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using SALDI techniques.

  20. Novel phase measurement technique of the heterodyne laser interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyunseung; Park, Kyihwan; La, Jongpil

    2005-09-15

    This article describes a novel phase measurement technique to increase the measurement velocity compared to the previous arc-tangent method in the heterodyne laser interferometer. The proposed method can reduce the calculation load because the pulse width modulation signal has a linear relation between the phase difference, while the nonlinear function such as arc tangent is required to demodulate the sinusoidal interferent signal. The brief analysis and measurement scheme of the system, and the experimental result using a Zeeman-stabilized He-Ne laser are presented. They demonstrate that the proposed phase measurement technique is proven to be three times faster and more robust than previous arc-tangent method.

  1. Comparison of laser-based rapid prototyping techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Hugh; Wimpenny, David

    2002-04-01

    A diverse range of Rapid Prototyping, or layer manufacturing techniques have evolved since the introduction of the first process in the late 1980s. Many, although not all, rapid prototyping processes rely on lasers to provide a localised and controllable source of light for curing a liquid photopolymer or heat to fuse thermoplastic powders to form objects. This paper will provide an overview of laser based rapid prototyping methods and discuss the future direction of this technology in light of the threats posed by low cost 3D printing techniques and the opportunity for the direct manufacture of metal components.

  2. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Plato, J.G.; Russell, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 {mu}m) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented.

  3. Advances in gamma titanium aluminides and their manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Kunal; Radhakrishnan, Ramachandran; Wereley, Norman M.

    2012-11-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides display attractive properties for high temperature applications. For over a decade in the 1990s, the attractive properties of titanium aluminides were outweighed by difficulties encountered in processing and machining at room temperature. But advances in manufacturing technologies, deeper understanding of titanium aluminides microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and advances in micro-alloying, has led to the production of gamma titanium aluminide sheets. An in-depth review of key advances in gamma titanium aluminides is presented, including microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and alloy development. Traditional manufacturing techniques such as ingot metallurgy and investment casting are reviewed and advances via powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques are discussed. Finally, manufacturing challenges facing gamma titanium aluminides, as well as avenues to overcome them, are discussed.

  4. 75 FR 44015 - Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing... importation of certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques and products containing... certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques or products containing same...

  5. New test techniques and analytical procedures for understanding the behavior of advanced propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefko, G. L.; Bober, L. J.; Neumann, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical procedures and experimental techniques were developed to improve the capability to design advanced high speed propellers. Some results from the propeller lifting line and lifting surface aerodynamic analysis codes are compared with propeller force data, probe data and laser velocimeter data. In general, the code comparisons with data indicate good qualitative agreement. A rotating propeller force balance demonstrated good accuracy and reduced test time by 50 percent. Results from three propeller flow visualization techniques are shown which illustrate some of the physical phenomena occurring on these propellers.

  6. Advanced liner-cooling techniques for gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Component research for advanced small gas turbine engines is currently underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center. As part of this program, a basic reverse-flow combustor geometry was being maintained while different advanced liner wall cooling techniques were investigated. Performance and liner cooling effectiveness of the experimental combustor configuration featuring counter-flow film-cooled panels is presented and compared with two previously reported combustors featuring: splash film-cooled liner walls; and transpiration cooled liner walls (Lamilloy).

  7. Advanced Receiver/Converter Experiments for Laser Wireless Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Joe T.; ONeill, Mark; Fork, Richard

    2004-01-01

    For several years NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, UAH and ENTECH have been working on various aspects of space solar power systems. The current activity was just begun in January 2004 to further develop this new photovoltaic concentrator laser receiver/converter technology. During the next few months, an improved prototype will be designed, fabricated, and thoroughly tested under laser illumination. The final paper will describe the new concept, present its advantages over other laser receiver/converter approaches (including planar photovoltaic arrays), and provide the latest experiment results on prototype hardware (including the effects of laser irradiance level and cell temperature). With NASA's new human exploration plans to first return to the Moon, and then to proceed to Mars, the new photovoltaic concentrator laser receiver/converter technology could prove to be extremely useful in providing power to the landing sites and other phases of the missions. For example, to explore the scientifically interesting and likely resource-rich poles of the Moon (which may contain water) or the poles of Mars (which definitely contain water and carbon dioxide), laser power beaming could represent the simplest means of providing power to these regions, which receive little or no sunlight, making solar arrays useless there. In summary, the authors propose a paper on definition and experimental results of a novel photovoltaic concentrator approach for collecting and converting laser radiation to electrical power. The new advanced photovoltaic concentrator laser receiver/converter offers higher performance, lighter weight, and lower cost than competing concepts, and early experimental results are confirming the expected excellent Performance levels. After the small prototypes are successfully demonstrated, a larger array with even better performance is planned for the next phase experiments and demonstrations. Thereafter, a near-term flight experiment of the new technology

  8. New ceramic coating technique using laser spraying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Koichi; Yanagisawa, Takeshi; Uchiyama, Futodhi; Obara, Akira; Okutomi, Mamoru; Kimura, Shinji; Yamada, Akimasa; Shen, Hong L.; Wang, Zhongcheng; Shen, Qinwo; Chatterjee, Udit; Bhar, Gopal C.

    1998-08-01

    A new ceramic coating technique using a CO2 laser has been developed. A high power density laser beam passes near the substrate. Coating materials are supplied by an extra-high accuracy powder supply device and pass across the laser beam. The coating materials are melted in the laser beam and deposited on the substrate surface. A YSZ (Yttria Stabilized Zirconia) layer and a LaCoO3 layer are made for high temperature solid oxide fuel cells. The crystal structures of the coated layers are the same as that of the original coating materials. Superconducting BPSCCO ceramic films are also made with this process. The films show super-conductivity with Tc at 81 K. The Jc of the specimen is 440 A/cm2 at 77 K. We can easily handle and arrange not only metal but also refractory materials. By adopting a multi-axis robot and a surface treatment laser technique, the laser spraying method described here makes it possible to produce highly functional and three dimensional parts of devices directly from raw powder materials. Thus the proposed method will open the path to an unexplored field of key production technology.

  9. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with a relatively low intensity (3  ×  1016 W cm-2) allowed the enhancing of the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the ‘ultraclean’ proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as a target. A combination of the specific target composition and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed the enhancing of the yield of alpha particles up to 109 per steradian. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long-laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  10. Advanced targets, diagnostics and applications of laser-generated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.

    2015-04-01

    High-intensity sub-nanosecond-pulsed lasers irradiating thin targets in vacuum permit generation of electrons and ion acceleration and high photon yield emission in non-equilibrium plasmas. At intensities higher than 1015 W/cm2 thin foils can be irradiated in the target-normal sheath acceleration regime driving ion acceleration in the forward direction above 1 MeV per charge state. The distributions of emitted ions in terms of energy, charge state and angular emission are controlled by laser parameters, irradiation conditions, target geometry and composition. Advanced targets can be employed to increase the laser absorption in thin foils and to enhance the energy and the yield of the ion acceleration process. Semiconductor detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer and streak camera can be employed as online plasma diagnostics to monitor the plasma parameters, shot by shot. Some applications in the field of the multiple ion implantation, hadrontherapy and nuclear physics are reported.

  11. High volume fabrication of laser targets using MEMS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindloe, C.; Arthur, G.; Hall, F.; Tomlinson, S.; Potter, R.; Kar, S.; Green, J.; Higginbotham, A.; Booth, N.; Tolley, M. K.

    2016-04-01

    The latest techniques for the fabrication of high power laser targets, using processes developed for the manufacture of Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) devices are discussed. These laser targets are designed to meet the needs of the increased shot numbers that are available in the latest design of laser facilities. Traditionally laser targets have been fabricated using conventional machining or coarse etching processes and have been produced in quantities of 10s to low 100s. Such targets can be used for high complexity experiments such as Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) studies and can have many complex components that need assembling and characterisation with high precision. Using the techniques that are common to MEMS devices and integrating these with an existing target fabrication capability we are able to manufacture and deliver targets to these systems. It also enables us to manufacture novel targets that have not been possible using other techniques. In addition, developments in the positioning systems that are required to deliver these targets to the laser focus are also required and a system to deliver the target to a focus of an F2 beam at 0.1Hz is discussed.

  12. Biomolecular papain thin films growth by laser techniques.

    PubMed

    György, Enikö; Santiso, Jose; Figueras, Albert; Socol, Gabriel; Mihailescu, Ion N

    2007-08-01

    Papain thin films were synthesised by matrix assisted and conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques. The targets submitted to laser radiation consisted on a frozen composite obtained by dissolving the biomaterials in distilled water. For the deposition of the thin films by conventional PLD pressed biomaterial powder targets were submitted to laser irradiation. An UV KrF* excimer laser source was used in the experiments at 0.5 J/cm(2) incident fluence value, diminished one order of magnitude as compared to irradiation of inorganic materials. The surface morphology of the obtained thin films was studied by atomic force profilometry and atomic force microscopy. The investigations showed that the growth mode and surface quality of the deposited biomaterial thin films is strongly influenced by the target preparation procedure.

  13. Advanced laser diagnostics for diamond deposition research

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, C.H.; Owano, T.G.; Wahl, E.H.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using thermal plasmas is attractive for diamond synthesis applications due to the inherently high reactant densities and throughput, but the associated high gas-phase collision rates in the boundary layer above the substrate produce steep thermal and species gradients which can drive the complex plasma chemistry away from optimal conditions. To understand and control these environments, accurate measurements of temperature and species concentrations within the reacting boundary layer are needed. This is challenging in atmospheric pressure reactors due to the highly luminous environment, steep thermal and species gradients, and small spatial scales. The applicability of degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) as a spectroscopic probe of atmospheric pressure reacting plasmas has been investigated. This powerful, nonlinear technique has been applied to the measurement of temperature and radical species concentrations in the boundary layer of a diamond growth substrate immersed in a flowing atmospheric pressure plasma. In-situ measurements of CH and C{sub 2} radicals have been performed to determine spatially resolved profiles of vibrational temperature, rotational temperature, and species concentration. Results of these measurements are compared with the predictions of a detailed numerical simulation.

  14. Comparison of laser transit anemometry data analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Gartrell, Luther R.

    1991-01-01

    Two techniques for the extraction of two-dimensional flow information from laser transit anemometry (LTA) data sets are presented and compared via a simulation study and experimental investigation. The methods are a probability density function (PDF) estimation technique and a marginal distribution analysis technique. The simulation study builds on the results of previous work and provides a quantification of the accuracy of both techniques for various LTA data acquisition scenarios. The experimental comparison consists of using an LTA system to survey the flow downstream of a turbulence generator in a small low-speed wind tunnel. The collected data sets are analyzed and compared.

  15. Diode laser based water vapor DIAL using modulated pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Phong Le Hoai; Abo, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a diode laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for measuring lower-tropospheric water vapor profile using the modulated pulse technique. The transmitter is based on single-mode diode laser and tapered semiconductor optical amplifier with a peak power of 10W around 800nm absorption band, and the receiver telescope diameter is 35cm. The selected wavelengths are compared to referenced wavelengths in terms of random error and systematic errors. The key component of modulated pulse technique, a macropulse, is generated with a repetition rate of 10 kHz, and the modulation within the macropulse is coded according to a pseudorandom sequence with 100ns chip width. As a result, we evaluate both single pulse modulation and pseudorandom coded pulse modulation technique. The water vapor profiles conducted from these modulation techniques are compared to the real observation data in summer in Japan.

  16. Novel atmospheric extinction measurement techniques for aerospace laser system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Novel techniques for laser beam atmospheric extinction measurements, suitable for manned and unmanned aerospace vehicle applications, are presented in this paper. Extinction measurements are essential to support the engineering development and the operational employment of a variety of aerospace electro-optical sensor systems, allowing calculation of the range performance attainable with such systems in current and likely future applications. Such applications include ranging, weaponry, Earth remote sensing and possible planetary exploration missions performed by satellites and unmanned flight vehicles. Unlike traditional LIDAR methods, the proposed techniques are based on measurements of the laser energy (intensity and spatial distribution) incident on target surfaces of known geometric and reflective characteristics, by means of infrared detectors and/or infrared cameras calibrated for radiance. Various laser sources can be employed with wavelengths from the visible to the far infrared portions of the spectrum, allowing for data correlation and extended sensitivity. Errors affecting measurements performed using the proposed methods are discussed in the paper and algorithms are proposed that allow a direct determination of the atmospheric transmittance and spatial characteristics of the laser spot. These algorithms take into account a variety of linear and non-linear propagation effects. Finally, results are presented relative to some experimental activities performed to validate the proposed techniques. Particularly, data are presented relative to both ground and flight trials performed with laser systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) at λ = 1064 nm and λ = 1550 nm. This includes ground tests performed with 10 Hz and 20 kHz PRF NIR laser systems in a large variety of atmospheric conditions, and flight trials performed with a 10 Hz airborne NIR laser system installed on a TORNADO aircraft, flying up to altitudes of 22,000 ft.

  17. Advanced fiber lasers and related all-fiber devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Balaji

    2000-11-01

    :ZBLAN. The demonstration of substantial second order nonlinearities (~1 pm/V) at UNM using thermal- assisted poling in normally symmetry forbidden silica glass has inspired worldwide research efforts aimed at achieving similar nonlinearities in fibers. All-fiber electro-optic devices based on such poled fibers are anticipated to enhance the performance of various lasers, including modelocked and tunable fiber lasers. This dissertation presents the first demonstration of stable, electro-optically tunable fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) with a tuning range of 20 pm (2.5 GHz), which should enable applications such as reconfigurable add/drop filters and actively modelocked all-fiber lasers. Two key steps in the fabrication of the tunable FBGs viz. the fabrication of thermally stable FBGs, and a novel method for in-situ monitoring of fiber polishing are also demonstrated. Finally, this dissertation discusses issues related to the demonstration of all-fiber electro- optically tunable polarization rotators and their possible impact on future advanced fiber lasers.

  18. Wafer hot spot identification through advanced photomask characterization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yohan; Green, Michael; McMurran, Jeff; Ham, Young; Lin, Howard; Lan, Andy; Yang, Richer; Lung, Mike

    2016-10-01

    As device manufacturers progress through advanced technology nodes, limitations in standard 1-dimensional (1D) mask Critical Dimension (CD) metrics are becoming apparent. Historically, 1D metrics such as Mean to Target (MTT) and CD Uniformity (CDU) have been adequate for end users to evaluate and predict the mask impact on the wafer process. However, the wafer lithographer's process margin is shrinking at advanced nodes to a point that the classical mask CD metrics are no longer adequate to gauge the mask contribution to wafer process error. For example, wafer CDU error at advanced nodes is impacted by mask factors such as 3-dimensional (3D) effects and mask pattern fidelity on subresolution assist features (SRAFs) used in Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) models of ever-increasing complexity. These items are not quantifiable with the 1D metrology techniques of today. Likewise, the mask maker needs advanced characterization methods in order to optimize the mask process to meet the wafer lithographer's needs. These advanced characterization metrics are what is needed to harmonize mask and wafer processes for enhanced wafer hot spot analysis. In this paper, we study advanced mask pattern characterization techniques and their correlation with modeled wafer performance.

  19. Bringing The Web Down to Size: Advanced Search Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Joe; Miley, Donna

    1997-01-01

    Examines advanced Internet search techniques, focusing on six search engines. Includes a chart comparison of nine search features: "include two words,""exclude one of two words,""exclude mature audience content,""two adjacent words,""exact match,""contains first and neither of two following…

  20. Advanced Marketing Core Curriculum. Test Items and Assessment Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clifton L.; And Others

    This document contains duties and tasks, multiple-choice test items, and other assessment techniques for Missouri's advanced marketing core curriculum. The core curriculum begins with a list of 13 suggested textbook resources. Next, nine duties with their associated tasks are given. Under each task appears one or more citations to appropriate…

  1. Genioglossus muscle advancement: A modification of the conventional technique.

    PubMed

    García Vega, José Ramón; de la Plata, María Mancha; Galindo, Néstor; Navarro, Miriam; Díez, Daniel; Láncara, Fernando

    2014-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a pathophysiologic condition associated with fragmented sleep and arousals caused by nocturnal mechanical obstruction of the upper airway. This results in behavioural derangements, such as excessive daytime sleepiness and fatigue, and pathophysiologic derangements that cause morbidities and mortality including hypertension, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, stroke and sudden death. The genioglossus advancement is a proven technique for the treatment of mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome by relieving airway obstruction at the hypopharyngeal level. In this article, we report a modification of the conventional genioglossus advancement described by Riley and Powell. The modification we describe replaces the bone segment at the mandibular basal bone rather than at the mid area of the symphysis. This means a linear movement that allows a greater advancement and avoids the rotation of the genioglossus muscle. Through this article we will describe the advantages of the surgical technique such as greater effectiveness, stability, more pleasing aesthetic outcome and the reduction of potential complications.

  2. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-09-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  3. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  4. Laser techniques for cultural heritage research case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwiński, G.; Jasińska, M.; Bredal-Jørgensen, J.; Kamińska, A.; Komar, K.; Sawczak, M.

    2007-03-01

    Results of the recent application studies of laser-based techniques for conservation practice, carried out in the frames of research and conservation projects are presented and discussed. The Gotland Sandstone Project covers laser cleaning, spectroscopic techniques of the process monitoring and materials analysis. The post-processing effect is investigated by means of LIBS, colorimetry, SEM and XEDS in order to answer questions regarding encrustation removal, discoloration and alteration due to environmental pollution and laser interaction, respectively. The cleaning is monitored acoustically. Slight differences in stone yellowing are revealed when applying laser in air or pure N II environment which is ascribed to material oxidation and partial combustion of surface remnants due to presence of O II contributing to the final effect of laser cleaning. Results of microscopic observation are supported by the presence of elements S, Al, Ca, and C which prevail in crust. In case of restoration of the historical documents on paper the ablative cleaning and the nearly nondestructive identification and composition analysis of surface layers such as contaminants, substrate and pigments are performed. Spectra obtained by means of the LIPS technique for historical, originally contaminated and also artificially soiled model samples reveal reach structures. The emission lines of Ca, Na, K, Al and Fe are ascribed to contaminants because of intensities decreasing with prolonged surface irradiation during laser cleaning. Bands of Ti and Ba correspond to white pigments (TiO II and BaSO 4) in the paper and are confirmed by the Raman spectra as well. For identification of historical pigments the reference measurements on model substrates are performed, too.

  5. Active protein and calcium hydroxyapatite bilayers grown by laser techniques for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Motoc, M M; Axente, E; Popescu, C; Sima, L E; Petrescu, S M; Mihailescu, I N; Gyorgy, E

    2013-09-01

    Active protein and bioceramic calcium hydroxyapatite (HA) bilayers were grown by combining conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) techniques. A pulsed UV KrF* excimer laser was used for the irradiations. The HA layers were grown by PLD. Proteins with antimicrobial action were attached to the bioceramic layers using MAPLE. The composite MAPLE targets were obtained by dissolving the proteins powder in distilled water. The crystalline status and chemical composition of the obtained structures were studied by X-ray diffractometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The layers were grown for the design of advanced future metal implants coatings, ensuring both enhanced bone formation and localized antimicrobial therapy. Our results demonstrated that protein coatings improve bone cell proliferation in vitro. Immunofluorescence experiments show that actin filaments stretch throughout bone cells and sustain their optimal spreading.

  6. Novel mid-IR quantum cascade laser waveguide coupling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, David; Choa, Fow-Sen; Chen, Xing; Trivedi, Sudhir

    2011-02-01

    Signal modulations and coherent signal detections are important for both communications and remote sensing applications. Photonic integration reduces size, weight, cost, and improves the performance of these systems as demonstrated by integrated DFB-laser modulators, receivers and transceivers at near-IR wavelength regions. However, due to the difficulties of waveguide coupling, photonic integration in the mid-IR wavelength range is under-developed. We developed a technique that can monitor mid-IR coupling based on the negative photoconductivity in quantum cascaded (QC) materials that can simplify and optimize laser waveguide coupling in the mid-IR wavelength range.

  7. Advanced techniques in safeguarding a conditioning facility for spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf, K.; Weh, R. )

    1992-01-01

    Although reprocessing continues to be the main factor in the waste management of nuclear reactors, the alternative of direct final disposal is currently being developed to the level of industrial applications, based on an agreement between the heads of the federal government and the federal states of Germany. Thus, the Konrad and Gorleben sites are being studied as potential final repositories as is the pilot conditioning facility (PKA) under construction. Discussions on the application of safeguards measures have led to the drafting of an approach that will cover the entire back end of the fuel cycle. The conditioning of fuel prior to direct final disposal represents one element in the overall approach. A modern facility equipped with advanced technology, PKA is a pilot plant with regard to conditioning techniques as well as to safeguards. Therefore, the PKA safeguards approach is expected to facilitate future industrial applications of the conditioning procedure. This cannot be satisfactorily implemented without advanced safeguards techniques. The level of development of the safeguards techniques varies. While advanced camera and seal systems are basically available, the other techniques and methods still require research and development. Feasibility studies and equipment development are geared to providing applicable safeguards techniques in time for commissioning of the PKA.

  8. A vector scanning processing technique for pulsed laser velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Edwards, Robert V.

    1989-03-01

    Pulsed laser sheet velocimetry yields nonintrusive measurements of two-dimensional velocity vectors across an extended planar region of a flow. Current processing techniques offer high precision (1 pct) velocity estimates, but can require several hours of processing time on specialized array processors. Under some circumstances, a simple, fast, less accurate (approx. 5 pct), data reduction technique which also gives unambiguous velocity vector information is acceptable. A direct space domain processing technique was examined. The direct space domain processing technique was found to be far superior to any other techniques known, in achieving the objectives listed above. It employs a new data coding and reduction technique, where the particle time history information is used directly. Further, it has no 180 deg directional ambiguity. A complex convection vortex flow was recorded and completely processed in under 2 minutes on an 80386 based PC, producing a 2-D velocity vector map of the flow field. Hence, using this new space domain vector scanning (VS) technique, pulsed laser velocimetry data can be reduced quickly and reasonably accurately, without specialized array processing hardware.

  9. Creatinine biomaterial thin films grown by laser techniques.

    PubMed

    György, E; Axente, E; Mihailescu, I N; Predoi, D; Ciuca, S; Neamtu, J

    2008-03-01

    Creatinine thin films were synthesised by matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques for enzyme-based biosensor applications. An UV KrF* (lambda=248 nm, tau approximately 10 ns) excimer laser source was used for the irradiation of the targets at incident fluence values in the 0.3-0.5 J/cm2 range. For the matrix assisted PLD the targets consisted on a frozen composite obtained by dissolving the biomaterials in distilled water. The surface morphology, chemical composition and structure of the obtained biomaterial thin films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as a function of the target preparation procedure and incident laser fluence.

  10. Laser origami: a new technique for assembling 3D microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Birnbaum, Andrew J.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to manufacture and assemble complex three-dimensional (3D) systems via traditional photolithographic techniques has attracted increasing attention. However, most of the work to date still utilizes the traditional patterning and etching processes designed for the semiconductor industry where 2D structures are first fabricated, followed by some alternative technique for releasing these structures out-of-plane. Here we present a novel technique called Laser Origami, which has demonstrated the ability to generate 3D microstructures through the controlled out-of-plane folding of 2D patterns. This non-lithographic, and non silicon-based process is capable of microfabricating 3D structures of arbitrary shape and geometric complexity on a variety of substrates. The Laser Origami technique allows for the design and fabrication of arrays of 3D microstructures, where each microstructure can be made to fold independently of the others. Application of these folded micro-assemblies might make possible the development of highly complex and interconnected electrical, optical and mechanical 3D systems. This article will describe the unique advantages and capabilities of Laser Origami, discuss its applications and explore its role for the assembly and generation of 3D microstructures.

  11. Canine transurethral laser prostatectomy using a rotational technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromeens, Douglas M.; Johnson, Douglas E.

    1995-05-01

    Conventional radical prostatectomy in the dog has historically been attended by unacceptably high incidence of urinary incontinence (80 - 100%). Ablation of the prostate can be accomplished in the dog by transurethral irradiation of the prostate with the Nd:YAG laser and a laterally deflecting fiber. Exposure has ranged between 40 and 60 watts for 60 seconds at 4 fixed locations. Although prostatectomies performed with the above described technique offers significant advantage over conventional prostatectomies, the high power density at each location can result in small submucosal explosions (`popcorn effect') that increase the potential for bleeding and rupture of the prostatic capsule. We describe a new technique in which the energy is applied continuously by a laser fiber rotating around a central point. Delivering 40 watts of Nd:YAG energy for 4 minutes using a new angle-delivery device (UrotekTM), we produced results comparable to those of other previously reported techniques in the canine model with two added advantages: (1) a more even application of heat resulting in no `popcorn' effect and (2) a more reliably predictable area of coagulative necrosis within a given axial plane. This technique should provide additional safety for the veterinary surgeon performing visual laser ablation of the prostate in the dog.

  12. The new kid on the block for advanced imaging in Barrett's esophagus: a review of volumetric laser endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Arvind J; Smith, Michael S; Pleskow, Douglas K

    2016-05-01

    Advanced imaging techniques used in the management of Barrett's esophagus include electronic imaging enhancement (e.g. narrow band imaging, flexible spectral imaging color enhancement, and i-Scan), chromoendoscopy, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. Electronic imaging enhancement is used frequently in daily practice, but use of the other advanced technologies is not routine. High-definition white light endoscopy and random four quadrant biopsy remain the standard of care for evaluation of Barrett's esophagus; this is largely due to the value of advanced imaging technologies not having been validated in large studies or in everyday practice. A new advanced imaging technology called volumetric laser endomicroscopy is commercially available in the United States. Its ease of use and rapid acquisition of high-resolution images make this technology very promising for widespread application. In this article we review the technology and its potential for advanced imaging in Barrett's esophagus.

  13. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-05-14

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4cm{sup 3} have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development.

  14. Laser emission from diode-pumped Nd:YAG ceramic waveguide lasers realized by direct femtosecond-laser writing technique.

    PubMed

    Salamu, Gabriela; Jipa, Florin; Zamfirescu, Marian; Pavel, Nicolaie

    2014-03-10

    We report on realization of buried waveguides in Nd:YAG ceramic media by direct femtosecond-laser writing technique and investigate the waveguides laser emission characteristics under the pump with fiber-coupled diode lasers. Laser pulses at 1.06 μm with energy of 2.8 mJ for the pump with pulses of 13.1-mJ energy and continuous-wave output power of 0.49 W with overall optical efficiency of 0.13 were obtained from a 100-μm diameter circular cladding waveguide realized in a 0.7-at.% Nd:YAG ceramic. A circular waveguide of 50-μm diameter yielded laser pulses at 1.3 μm with 1.2-mJ energy.

  15. Measurement of high viscosity with laser induced surface deformation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshitake, Y.; Mitani, S.; Sakai, K.; Takagi, K.

    2005-01-15

    A technique for viscosity measurement was developed based on the principle of laser-induced surface deformation. Light incident into liquids increases its momentum due to the difference in refractive index and gives the surface an upward force as a reaction. The plane surface thus swells up and deforms, and the shape is determined so that the force is balanced with the surface tension and the gravity. On sudden laser irradiation, the deformation inevitably accompanies a viscous flow and exhibits a relaxational behavior with a delay time, which gives the viscosity. Theoretical prediction of the step-response function was given that takes surface tension waves excited by the laser into consideration. Nd-yttritium-aluminum-garnet laser with 0.6 W output was focused to {approx}200 {mu}m beam waist and used for the pumping. The deformation process was observed sensitively with another probe laser illuminating the activated area. This system was tested with the standard liquids for viscosity ranging from 1 to 10{sup 6} cSt. The results demonstrated the validity of this technique, though a correction for the inertia effect was needed in the range lower than 10 cSt. Further, effect of the thermal expansion by a slight optical absorption was discussed. This technique is especially useful at high viscosities since the measurement takes only a few seconds even in the specimen with 10{sup 6} cSt. Besides the rapidity, it has a great advantage of a noncontact feature and is appropriate for measuring the liquids that strongly dislike contamination. It has also potential applications in industries, measurement of liquids isolated in a production line, for instance.

  16. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronne, Antonio; Bloisi, Francesco; Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria; Depero, Laura E.; Fanelli, Esther; Federici, Stefania; Massoli, Patrizio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2015-05-01

    Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  17. Comparison of thermal management techniques for semiconductor disk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giet, S.; Kemp, A. J.; Burns, D.; Calvez, S.; Dawson, M. D.; Suomalainen, S.; Harkonen, A.; Guina, M.; Okhotnikov, O.; Pessa, M.

    2008-02-01

    Semiconductor Disk Lasers (SDLs) are compact lasers suitable for watt to multi-watt direct generation in the 670- 2350nm waveband and frequency-doubled operation in the ultraviolet and visible regions. This is, however, critically dependent on the thermal management strategy used as, in this type of laser, the pump is absorbed over micrometer lengths and the gain and loss are temperature sensitive. In this paper, we compare the two heat dissipation techniques that have been successfully deployed to-date: the "thin device" approach where the semiconductor active mirror is bonded onto a heatsink and its substrate subsequently removed, and the "heatspreader" technique where a high thermal conductivity platelet is directly bonded onto the active part of the unprocessed epilayer. We show that for SDLs emitting at 1060nm with pump spots of ~80µm diameter, the heatspreader approach outperforms the thin-device alternative, with the best results being obtained with a diamond heatspreader. Indeed, the thermal resistances are measured to be 4.9, 10.4 and 13.0 K/W for diamond-bonded, SiC-bonded and flip-chip devices respectively. It is also observed, as expected, that the thermal management strategy indirectly affects the optimum output coupling and thus the overall performance of these lasers.

  18. Advanced Packaging Materials and Techniques for High Power TR Module: Standard Flight vs. Advanced Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Del Castillo, Linda; Miller, Jennifer; Jenabi, Masud; Hunter, Donald; Birur, Gajanana

    2011-01-01

    The higher output power densities required of modern radar architectures, such as the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI) require increasingly dense high power electronics. To enable these higher power densities, while maintaining or even improving hardware reliability, requires advances in integrating advanced thermal packaging technologies into radar transmit/receive (TR) modules. New materials and techniques have been studied and compared to standard technologies.

  19. Technology development of fabrication techniques for advanced solar dynamic concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the advanced concentrator program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived space solar dynamic concentrators. The advanced concentrator program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. Fabrication techniques include methods of fabricating the substrates and coating substrate surfaces to produce high quality optical surfaces, acceptable for further coating with vapor deposited optical films. The selected materials to obtain a high quality optical surface include microsheet glass and Eccocoat EP-3 epoxy, with DC-93-500 selected as a candidate silicone adhesive and levelizing layer. The following procedures are defined: cutting, cleaning, forming, and bonding microsheet glass. Procedures are also defined for surface cleaning, and EP-3 epoxy application. The results and analyses from atomic oxygen and thermal cycling tests are used to determine the effects of orbital conditions in a space environment.

  20. Advances in CO2 laser fabrication for high power fibre laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Keiron; Rees, Simon; Simakov, Nikita; Daniel, Jae M. O.; Swain, Robert; Mies, Eric; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W. A.; Haub, John

    2016-03-01

    CO2 laser processing facilitates contamination free, rapid, precise and reproducible fabrication of devices for high power fibre laser applications. We present recent progress in fibre end-face preparation and cladding surface modification techniques. We demonstrate a fine feature CO2 laser process that yields topography significantly smaller than that achieved with typical mechanical cleaving processes. We also investigate the side processing of optical fibres for the fabrication of all-glass cladding light strippers and demonstrate extremely efficient cladding mode removal. We apply both techniques to fibres with complex designs containing multiple layers of doped and un-doped silica as well as shaped and circularly symmetric structures. Finally, we discuss the challenges and approaches to working with various fibre and glass-types.

  1. Advanced thermal management techniques for space power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Angel Samuel

    1992-01-01

    Modern electronic systems used in space must be reliable and efficient with thermal management unaffected by outer space constraints. Current thermal management techniques are not sufficient for the increasing waste heat dissipation of novel electronic technologies. Many advanced thermal management techniques have been developed in recent years that have application in high power electronic systems. The benefits and limitations of emerging cooling technologies are discussed. These technologies include: liquid pumped devices, mechanically pumped two-phase cooling, capillary pumped evaporative cooling, and thermoelectric devices. Currently, liquid pumped devices offer the most promising alternative for electronics thermal control.

  2. Data Compression Techniques for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, William G.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced space transportation systems, including vehicle state of health systems, will produce large amounts of data which must be stored on board the vehicle and or transmitted to the ground and stored. The cost of storage or transmission of the data could be reduced if the number of bits required to represent the data is reduced by the use of data compression techniques. Most of the work done in this study was rather generic and could apply to many data compression systems, but the first application area to be considered was launch vehicle state of health telemetry systems. Both lossless and lossy compression techniques were considered in this study.

  3. Advance techniques for monitoring human tolerance to positive Gz accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R.; Sandler, H.; Rositano, S.; Skrettingland, K.; Mancini, R.

    1973-01-01

    Tolerance to positive g accelerations was measured in ten normal male subjects using both standard and advanced techniques. In addition to routine electrocardiogram, heart rate, respiratory rate, and infrared television, monitoring techniques during acceleration exposure included measurement of peripheral vision loss, noninvasive temporal, brachial, and/or radial arterial blood flow, and automatic measurement of indirect systolic and diastolic blood pressure at 60-sec intervals. Although brachial and radial arterial flow measurements reflected significant cardiovascular changes during and after acceleration, they were inconsistent indices of the onset of grayout or blackout. Temporal arterial blood flow, however, showed a high correlation with subjective peripheral light loss.

  4. Three-dimensional hybrid grid generation using advancing front techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrenner, John P.; Noack, Ralph W.

    1995-01-01

    A new 3-dimensional hybrid grid generation technique has been developed, based on ideas of advancing fronts for both structured and unstructured grids. In this approach, structured grids are first generate independently around individual components of the geometry. Fronts are initialized on these structure grids, and advanced outward so that new cells are extracted directly from the structured grids. Employing typical advancing front techniques, cells are rejected if they intersect the existing front or fail other criteria When no more viable structured cells exist further cells are advanced in an unstructured manner to close off the overall domain, resulting in a grid of 'hybrid' form. There are two primary advantages to the hybrid formulation. First, generating blocks with limited regard to topology eliminates the bottleneck encountered when a multiple block system is used to fully encapsulate a domain. Individual blocks may be generated free of external constraints, which will significantly reduce the generation time. Secondly, grid points near the body (presumably with high aspect ratio) will still maintain a structured (non-triangular or tetrahedral) character, thereby maximizing grid quality and solution accuracy near the surface.

  5. Strategies and advanced techniques for marine pollution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Giam, C.S.; Dou, H.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Here is a review of strategies and techniques for evaluating marine pollution by hazardous organic compounds. Geo-chemical considerations such as the relationship between the inputs, atmospheric and estuarine transport, and the outputs, sedimentation and degradation, guide the decision on appropriate approaches to pollution monitoring in the marine environment. The latest instrumental methods and standard protocols for analysis of organic compounds are presented, as well as advances in interpretation and correlation of data made possible by the accessibility of commercial data bases.

  6. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of laser deposited advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistla, Harihar Rakshit

    Additive manufacturing in the form of laser deposition is a unique way to manufacture near net shape metallic components from advanced materials. Rapid solidification facilitates the extension of solid solubility, compositional flexibility and decrease in micro-segregation in the melt among other advantages. The current work investigates the employment of laser deposition to fabricate the following: 1. Functionally gradient materials: This allows grading dissimilar materials compositionally to tailor specific properties of both these materials into a single component. Specific compositions of the candidate materials (SS 316, Inconel 625 and Ti64) were blended and deposited to study the brittle intermetallics reported in these systems. 2. High entropy alloys: These are multi- component alloys with equiatomic compositions of 5 or more elements. The ratio of Al to Ni was decreased to observe the transition of solid solution from a BCC to an FCC crystal structure in the AlFeCoCrNi system. 3. Structurally amorphous alloys: Zr-based metallic glasses have been reported to have high glass forming ability. These alloys have been laser deposited so as to rapidly cool them from the melt into an amorphous state. Microstructural analysis and X-ray diffraction were used to study the phase formation, and hardness was measured to estimate the mechanical properties.

  7. Characterization of PTFE Using Advanced Thermal Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumm, J.; Lindemann, A.; Meyer, M.; Strasser, C.

    2010-10-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a synthetic fluoropolymer used in numerous industrial applications. It is often referred to by its trademark name, Teflon. Thermal characterization of a PTFE material was carried out using various thermal analysis and thermophysical properties test techniques. The transformation energetics and specific heat were measured employing differential scanning calorimetry. The thermal expansion and the density changes were determined employing pushrod dilatometry. The viscoelastic properties (storage and loss modulus) were analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis. The thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash technique. Combining thermal diffusivity data with specific heat and density allows calculation of the thermal conductivity of the polymer. Measurements were carried out from - 125 °C up to 150 °C. Additionally, measurements of the mechanical properties were carried out down to - 170 °C. The specific heat tests were conducted into the fully molten regions up to 370 °C.

  8. Measurement of interface strength by a laser spallation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V.; Argon, A. S.; Parks, D. M.; Cornie, J. A.

    A LASER spallation experiment has been developed to measure the strength of planar interfaces between a substrate and a thin coating (in the thickness range of 0.3-3 μm). In this technique a laser pulse of a high enough energy and a pre-determined duration is converted into a pressure pulse of a critical amplitude and width that is sent through the substrate toward the free surface with the coating. The reflected tensile wave from the free surface of the coating pries-off the coating. The critical stress amplitude that accomplishes the removal of the coating is determined from a computer simulation of the process. The simulation itself is verified by means of a piezo-electric crystal probe that is capable of mapping out the profile of the stress pulse generated by the laser pulse. Interface strength values ranging from 3.7 to 10.5 GPa were determined for the Si/SiC system. For the interfaces between pyrolytic graphite and SiC coatings an average strength of 7.2 GPA was measured, while the corresponding interface strength between a Pitch-55 type ribbon with a fiber-like morphology and SiC coatings was found to be 0.23 GPa. Intrinsic strengths of SiC coatings and Si crystal were also determined using this technique. These were, on the average, 8.6 GPa for Si crystals and 11.9 GPa for a SiC coating. Furthermore, the potential of the laser technique to determine the interface toughness was also demonstrated, provided well-characterizable flaws can be planted on the interface.

  9. Advances in laser technology for the atmospheric sciences; Proceedings of the Seminar, San Diego, Calif., August 25, 26, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, J. D. (Editor); Moore, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    These papers deal with recent research, developments, and applications in laser and electrooptics technology, particularly with regard to atmospheric effects in imaging and propagation, laser instrumentation and measurements, and particle measurement. Specific topics include advanced imaging techniques, image resolution through atmospheric turbulence over the ocean, an efficient method for calculating transmittance profiles, a comparison of a corner-cube reflector and a plane mirror in folded-path and direct transmission through atmospheric turbulence, line-spread instrumentation for propagation measurements, scaling laws for thermal fluctuations in the layer adjacent to ocean waves, particle sizing by laser photography, and an optical Fourier transform analysis of satellite cloud imagery. Other papers discuss a subnanosecond photomultiplier tube for laser application, holography of solid propellant combustion, diagnostics of turbulence by holography, a camera for in situ photography of cloud particles from a hail research aircraft, and field testing of a long-path laser transmissometer designed for atmospheric visibility measurements.

  10. Recent advances in bioprinting techniques: approaches, applications and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Li, Jipeng; Chen, Mingjiao; Fan, Xianqun; Zhou, Huifang

    2016-09-20

    Bioprinting technology shows potential in tissue engineering for the fabrication of scaffolds, cells, tissues and organs reproducibly and with high accuracy. Bioprinting technologies are mainly divided into three categories, inkjet-based bioprinting, pressure-assisted bioprinting and laser-assisted bioprinting, based on their underlying printing principles. These various printing technologies have their advantages and limitations. Bioprinting utilizes biomaterials, cells or cell factors as a "bioink" to fabricate prospective tissue structures. Biomaterial parameters such as biocompatibility, cell viability and the cellular microenvironment strongly influence the printed product. Various printing technologies have been investigated, and great progress has been made in printing various types of tissue, including vasculature, heart, bone, cartilage, skin and liver. This review introduces basic principles and key aspects of some frequently used printing technologies. We focus on recent advances in three-dimensional printing applications, current challenges and future directions.

  11. Endovascular excimer laser atherectomy techniques to treat complex peripheral vascular disease: an orderly process.

    PubMed

    Garnic, J Daniel; Hurwitz, Andrew S

    2005-12-01

    Peripheral vascular disease represents the largest obstructive subsegment within the vascular system. Advances in equipment, techniques, biochemical treatments, and the influx of multiple specialties into this arena indicate a coming tidal wave of change to the standard treatment plan for patients with claudication and especially critical limb ischemia. Initial attempts in the 1980s to utilize the "laser" to treat peripheral vascular disease led to a clinical debacle: wavelengths and methods were not optimized; tissue heating was excessive, resulting in restenosis. Since then the "laser" has fallen from grace for endovascular treatment, although it has an infinite set of potential wavelengths, energy levels, and delivery methods. The xenon chloride, excimer laser, a pulsed 308-nm system, has overcome many of these early catastrophes. The long, ongoing success of this method of photoablating thrombus and plaque represents a true step forward in the endovascular treatment of occlusive disease. Although only a tool, the excimer laser provides a means to utilize electromagnetic energy instead of shearing mechanical force to resolve occlusions. With its active element at the tip, the excimer laser requires much less mechanical translation force to cross total occlusions, find the distal lumen, and thereby cause less plaque destabilization. In addition, removing the firm surface layer of plaque, decapping, and some of the plaque volume, debulking, exposes the softer subsegments of the plaque to balloon angioplasty. Utilizing this method, more complex lesions can be approached safely, with a high likelihood of successful revascularization and a low risk of potentially limb-threatening complication.

  12. Organic Lasers: Recent Developments on Materials, Device Geometries, and Fabrication Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kuehne, Alexander J C; Gather, Malte C

    2016-11-09

    Organic dyes have been used as gain medium for lasers since the 1960s, long before the advent of today's organic electronic devices. Organic gain materials are highly attractive for lasing due to their chemical tunability and large stimulated emission cross section. While the traditional dye laser has been largely replaced by solid-state lasers, a number of new and miniaturized organic lasers have emerged that hold great potential for lab-on-chip applications, biointegration, low-cost sensing and related areas, which benefit from the unique properties of organic gain materials. On the fundamental level, these include high exciton binding energy, low refractive index (compared to inorganic semiconductors), and ease of spectral and chemical tuning. On a technological level, mechanical flexibility and compatibility with simple processing techniques such as printing, roll-to-roll, self-assembly, and soft-lithography are most relevant. Here, the authors provide a comprehensive review of the developments in the field over the past decade, discussing recent advances in organic gain materials, which are today often based on solid-state organic semiconductors, as well as optical feedback structures, and device fabrication. Recent efforts toward continuous wave operation and electrical pumping of solid-state organic lasers are reviewed, and new device concepts and emerging applications are summarized.

  13. Pulse laser imaging amplifier for advanced ladar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khizhnyak, Anatoliy; Markov, Vladimir; Tomov, Ivan; Murrell, David

    2016-05-01

    Security measures sometimes require persistent surveillance of government, military and public areas Borders, bridges, sport arenas, airports and others are often surveilled with low-cost cameras. Their low-light performance can be enhanced with laser illuminators; however various operational scenarios may require a low-intensity laser illumination with the object-scattered light intensity lower than the sensitivity of the Ladar image detector. This paper discusses a novel type of high-gain optical image amplifier. The approach enables time-synchronization of the incoming and amplifying signals with accuracy <= 1 ns. The technique allows the incoming signal to be amplified without the need to match the input spectrum to the cavity modes. Instead, the incoming signal is accepted within the spectral band of the amplifier. We have gauged experimentally the performance of the amplifier with a 40 dB gain and an angle of view 20 mrad.

  14. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  15. Detection and characterisation of surface cracking using scanning laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R. S.; Clough, A. R.; Rosli, M. H.; Hernandez-Valle, J. F.; Dutton, B.

    2012-05-01

    The use of lasers for generating and detecting ultrasound is becoming more established in non-destructive testing. However, there is still scope in developing the techniques to fully realise the benefits of non-contact measurements. One application is the detection of surface defects in metals; for example, rolling contact fatigue in rails, and surface cracking on billets or plates. We present measurements using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to generate surface ultrasonic waves and an interferometer to detect the surface displacement on the sample, and investigate the interaction of Rayleigh or Lamb waves with surface defects. Signal enhancement in the near-field is observed for Rayleigh waves when either the generator or detector is close to a defect. For a scanned detector measurement, enhancement is observed due to constructive interference of the incident and reflected waves. For a scanned generator measurement, the change in generation conditions when the laser is over the defect also lead to an enhancement. In measurements of plate samples we observe similar enhancement effects whereby higher order modes are observed when the laser is above a defect. We discuss the implications of signal enhancements for detecting and characterising surface cracking.

  16. Advances in micro/nano scale materials processing by ultrafast lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotakis, Costas

    2009-03-01

    Materials processing by ultrafast lasers offers several attractive possibilities for micro/nano scale applications based on surface and in bulk laser induced modifications. The origin of these applications lies in the reduction of undesirable thermal effects, the non-equilibrium surface and volume structural modifications which may give rise to complex and unusual structures, the supression of photochemical effects in molecular substrates, the possibility of optimization of energy dissipation by temporal pulse shaping and the exploitation of filamentation effects. Diverse applications will be discussed, including the development and functionalization of laser engineered surfaces, the laser transfer of biomolecules and the functionalization of 3D structures constructed by multiphoton stereolithography. Two examples will be presented in this context: A new approach for the development of superhydrophobic, self-cleaning surfaces [1,2] and the fabrication of functional scaffolds for tissue engineering applications [3-5]. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] V. Zorba et al., ``Biomimetic artificial surfaces quantitatively reproduce the water repellency of a Lotus leaf'', Advanced Materials 20, 4049 (2008).[0pt] [2] V. Zorba et al., ``Tailoring the wetting response of silicon surfaces via fs laser structuring'', Applied Physics A 93, 819 (2008).[0pt] [3] V. Dinca et al., ``Quantification of the activity of biomolecules in microarrays obtained by direct laser transfer'', Biomedical Microdevices 10, 719 (2008).[0pt] [4] B. Hopp et al., ``Laser-based techniques for living cell pattern formation'', Applied Physics A 93, 45 (2008).[0pt] [5] V. Dinca et al., ``Directed three-dimensional patterning of self-assembled peptide fibrils'', Nano Letters 8, 538 (2008).

  17. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hsin, Tse-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  18. Mechanical characterization of thin film structures using a laser spallation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianxin

    The laser spallation technique has been developed to measure the interface strength between different materials, especially thin film structures. In this work, it is refined and applied to various material systems. With these advances, the laser spallation technique is now fully mature for applications not only to measurement of material interface strength, but also to the study of laser-material interaction, dynamic fracture mechanics, as well as to the measurement of material bulk properties. In the first part of this work, the laser spallation technique was examined quantitatively for signal processing and stress wavefield recovery. It is shown that the short time Fourier transformation is another appropriate means for recovering the free surface displacement from the acquired optical signal. Two methods have been chosen to recover the stress field inside the sample. When the displacement of the coating's free surface is recorded directly, it is convenient to use a special finite difference strategy. When the free surface displacement is recorded on the bare substrate surface, it is more convenient to use the finite element method to calculate the interface strength. The application work includes several topics. The first one was the evaluation of the effect of substrate orientation and deposition mode on the interface strength of Nb-sapphire interfaces. The interface strength is higher for the sapphire substrate with prismatic orientation, and RF deposition mode yields higher interface strength than the DC mode. The second application estimated the effect of substrate roughness on the interface strength of Nb-alumina system. The effect of chemical composition of thin films on the interface strength was also investigated. The final application investigated the dynamic fracture mechanics of thin film structures. The purpose of this chapter is to clarify the controversial topic regarding the limit speed of bimaterial interface crack propagation. We were successful

  19. Laser surface annealing technique of aged Inconel 718 by laser beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liufa; Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.

    2003-03-01

    Laser was employed to anneal a thin surface layer of aged Inconel 718 by dissolving the strengthening phase, γ". The HE (Hydrogen Embrittlement) resistance of the alloy was improved via such laser surface annealing (LSA) processes. To establish a general LSA technique for engineer applications, experimental LSA processes were conducted to study the effects of the laser process parameters on the formation of the annealed surface layers, and applicable process parameter ranges were obtained. Next, a numerical method was developed for predicting the formation of the laser annealed surface layers in the following steps. Because only the γ" phase was dissolved in the LSA process, the dissolution kinetics of this phase was studied via thermal cycling experiments, and it was proved to follow an Avrami equation. FEM (Finite Element Method) simulations were conducted to calculate the thermal distribution in each laser annealed surface layer, and thermal history data were extracted every certain depth. The volume fractions of the γ" phase at these depths were calculated using these thermal history data based on the deduced Avrami equation. Using a developed relationship between the hardness variation of the alloy and the volume fraction variation of the γ" phase, the hardness distribution in the annealed surface layer and this layer's thickness were calculated. The predicted applicable laser process parameter ranges were obtained. These calculated results were compared with their corresponding experimental results. The good agreements between the calculated and measured results suggested that this numerical prediction approach is feasible for engineer applications.

  20. Design and Development of Laser Doppler Velocimetry Based on DSP Technique for Blood Flow Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    the water to serve as scattering particles (mass concentration = 0.1 %), and a DC motor with a precise controller was also employed to pump the solution...advanced analysis could be taken. 203 Liquid Fg Laser diode ~~Photo-detector0= Pressure contr oler •Moto~r DC motor controlle, role•[_ 0-300ORPM Fig... DC motor 6. CONCLUSIONS We have developed a portable, real-time, and turn-key LDV system based on DSP techniques. Two most frequently used algoritluns

  1. Laser Shockwave Technique For Characterization Of Nuclear Fuel Plate Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Barry H. Rabin; Mathieu Perton; Daniel Lévesque; Jean-Pierre Monchalin; Martin Lord

    2012-07-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  2. Laser diode self-mixing technique for liquid velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrova, A.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-09-01

    Using the self-mixing technique, or optical feedback interferometry, fluid velocity measurements of water seeded with titanium dioxide have been performed using a laser diode to measure the effect of the seeding particle concentration and also the pump speed of the flow. The velocimeter utilises commercially available laser diodes with a built-in photodiode for detection of the self-mixing effect. The device has demonstrated an accuracy better than 10% for liquid flow velocities up to 1.5 m/s with a concentration of scattering particles in the range of 0.8-0.03%. This is an improvement of one order of magnitude compared to previous experiments. The proposed velocimeter is to be developed further for application in gas-jet measurements.

  3. Laser Alignment Techniques For Simultaneous Machine Tool Geometric Error Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, J.; Wu, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    An optical measurement system has been developed for the simultaneous detection of multiple geometric error components of machine tools. The system is designed based upon laser alignment techniques where laser beams are used as measurement reference datum. The system can measure simultaneously 5 error components for each moving axis of a machine tool or coordinate measuring machine. They are: two straightness error components, pitch, yaw, and roll errors. Through actual calibration and measurement, the accuracy of the current system is estimated to be 2 µm for straightness measurements and better than 0.05 arcsec for angular error measurements with a 0.5 m offset between a reflecting mirror and a receiving photo sensor.

  4. Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perton, M.; Levesque, D.; Monchalin, J.-P.; Lord, M.; Smith, J. A.; Rabin, B. H.

    2013-01-25

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  5. Advanced computer modeling techniques expand belt conveyor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Alspaugh, M.

    1998-07-01

    Increased mining production is continuing to challenge engineers and manufacturers to keep up. The pressure to produce larger and more versatile equipment is increasing. This paper will show some recent major projects in the belt conveyor industry that have pushed the limits of design and engineering technology. Also, it will discuss the systems engineering discipline and advanced computer modeling tools that have helped make these achievements possible. Several examples of technologically advanced designs will be reviewed. However, new technology can sometimes produce increased problems with equipment availability and reliability if not carefully developed. Computer modeling techniques that help one design larger equipment can also compound operational headaches if engineering processes and algorithms are not carefully analyzed every step of the way.

  6. Advanced aeroservoelastic stabilization techniques for hypersonic flight vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Samuel Y.; Cheng, Peter Y.; Myers, Thomas T.; Klyde, David H.; Magdaleno, Raymond E.; Mcruer, Duane T.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced high performance vehicles, including Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) hypersonic flight vehicles, that are statically unstable, require higher bandwidth flight control systems to compensate for the instability resulting in interactions between the flight control system, the engine/propulsion dynamics, and the low frequency structural modes. Military specifications, such as MIL-F-9490D and MIL-F-87242, tend to limit treatment of structural modes to conventional gain stabilization techniques. The conventional gain stabilization techniques, however, introduce low frequency effective time delays which can be troublesome from a flying qualities standpoint. These time delays can be alleviated by appropriate blending of gain and phase stabilization techniques (referred to as Hybrid Phase Stabilization or HPS) for the low frequency structural modes. The potential of using HPS for compensating structural mode interaction was previously explored. It was shown that effective time delay was significantly reduced with the use of HPS; however, the HPS design was seen to have greater residual response than a conventional gain stablized design. Additional work performed to advance and refine the HPS design procedure, to further develop residual response metrics as a basis for alternative structural stability specifications, and to develop strategies for validating HPS design and specification concepts in manned simulation is presented. Stabilization design sensitivity to structural uncertainties and aircraft-centered requirements are also assessed.

  7. Application of advanced laser diagnostics to hypersonic wind tunnels and combustion systems.

    SciTech Connect

    North, Simon W.; Hsu, Andrea G.; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2009-09-01

    This LDRD was a Sandia Fellowship that supported Andrea Hsu's PhD research at Texas A&M University and her work as a visitor at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility. The research project at Texas A&M University is concerned with the experimental characterization of hypersonic (Mach>5) flowfields using experimental diagnostics. This effort is part of a Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) and is a collaboration between the Chemistry and Aerospace Engineering departments. Hypersonic flight conditions often lead to a non-thermochemical equilibrium (NTE) state of air, where the timescale of reaching a single (equilibrium) Boltzmann temperature is much longer than the timescale of the flow. Certain molecular modes, such as vibrational modes, may be much more excited than the translational or rotational modes of the molecule, leading to thermal-nonequilibrium. A nontrivial amount of energy is therefore contained within the vibrational mode, and this energy cascades into the flow as thermal energy, affecting flow properties through vibrational-vibrational (V-V) and vibrational-translational (V-T) energy exchanges between the flow species. The research is a fundamental experimental study of these NTE systems and involves the application of advanced laser and optical diagnostics towards hypersonic flowfields. The research is broken down into two main categories: the application and adaptation of existing laser and optical techniques towards characterization of NTE, and the development of new molecular tagging velocimetry techniques which have been demonstrated in an underexpanded jet flowfield, but may be extended towards a variety of flowfields. In addition, Andrea's work at Sandia National Labs involved the application of advanced laser diagnostics to flames and turbulent non-reacting jets. These studies included quench-free planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide (NO) and mixture fraction measurements via Rayleigh scattering.

  8. Study of laser output power stabilization for a deuterium cyanide laser interferometer on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, N.; Gao, X.; Jie, Y. X.; Wang, E. H.

    2011-02-01

    A control system which can improve stabilization of laser power in long-term operation automatically is designed for a deuterium cyanide (DCN) far-infrared laser interferometer on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. It stabilizes the output power of the laser by a closed-loop control system aided by a programmable logic controller. The system has been applied to the DCN laser and it has been proven that it is effective in stabilizing the laser near the highest scope of the output power.

  9. Testing aspects of advanced coherent electron cooling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.; Jing, Y.; Pinayev, I.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Ratner, D.

    2015-05-03

    An advanced version of the Coherent-electron Cooling (CeC) based on the micro-bunching instability was proposed. This approach promises significant increase in the bandwidth of the CeC system and, therefore, significant shortening of cooling time in high-energy hadron colliders. In this paper we present our plans of simulating and testing the key aspects of this proposed technique using the set-up of the coherent-electron-cooling proof-of-principle experiment at BNL.

  10. Benign Spine Lesions: Advances in Techniques for Minimally Invasive Percutaneous Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tomasian, A; Wallace, A N; Jennings, J W

    2017-02-09

    Minimally invasive percutaneous imaging-guided techniques have been shown to be safe and effective for the treatment of benign tumors of the spine. Techniques available include a variety of tumor ablation technologies, including radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, alcohol ablation, and laser photocoagulation. Vertebral augmentation may be performed after ablation as part of the same procedure for fracture stabilization or prevention. Typically, the treatment goal in benign spine lesions is definitive cure. Painful benign spine lesions commonly encountered in daily practice include osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, vertebral hemangioma, aneurysmal bone cyst, Paget disease, and subacute/chronic Schmorl node. This review discusses the most recent advancement and use of minimally invasive percutaneous therapeutic options for the management of benign spine lesions.

  11. Laser Light Scattering, from an Advanced Technology Development Program to Experiments in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Tscharnuter, Walther W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Dautet, Henri; Deschamps, Pierre; Boucher, Francois; Zuh, Jixiang; Tin, Padetha; Rogers, Richard B.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in laser light scattering hardware are described. These include intelligent single card correlators; active quench/active reset avalanche photodiodes; laser diodes; and fiber optics which were used by or developed for a NASA advanced technology development program. A space shuttle experiment which will employ aspects of these hardware developments is previewed.

  12. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.

    1993-09-01

    The Los Alamos compact Advanced FEL has lased at 4.7 and 5.2 {mu}m with a 1-cm period wiggler and a high-brightness electron beam at 16.8 and 15.8 MeV, respectively. The measured electron beam normalized emittance is 1.7 {pi}{center_dot}mm{center_dot}mrad at a peak current of 100 A, corresponding to a beam brightness greater than 2 {times} 10{sup 12} A/m{sup 2}rad{sup 2}. Initial results indicate that the AFEL small signal gain is {approximately}8% at 0.3 nC (30 A peak). The maximum output energy is 7 mJ over a 2-{mu}s macropulse. The AFEL performance can be significantly enhanced by improvements in the rf and drive laser stability.

  13. Focus issue introduction: Advanced solid-state lasers (ASSL) 2014.

    PubMed

    Schepler, Kenneth L; Jeong, Yoonchan; Jiang, Shibin; Gallo, Katia; Taira, Takunori; Ilday, F Ömer

    2015-03-23

    The editors introduce the focus issue on "Advanced Solid-State Lasers (ASSL) 2014," which is based on the topics presented at a congress of the same name held in Shanghai, China, from October 27 to November 1, 2014. This focus issue, jointly prepared by Optics Express and Optical Materials Express, includes 28 contributed papers (21 for Optics Express and 7 for Optical Materials Express) selected from the voluntary submissions by attendees who presented at the congress and have extended their work into complete research articles. We hope this focus issue offers a useful snapshot of the variety of topical discussions held at the congress and will contribute to the further expansion of the associated research areas.

  14. Focus issue introduction: Advanced Solid-State Lasers (ASSL) 2013.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yoonchan; Jiang, Shibin; Gallo, Katia; Südmeyer, Thomas; Hehlen, Markus; Taira, Takunori

    2014-04-07

    The editors introduce the focus issue on "Advanced Solid-State Lasers (ASSL) 2013," which is based on the topics presented at a congress of the same name held in Paris, France, from October 27 to November 1, 2013. This focus issue, jointly prepared by Optics Express and Optical Materials Express, includes 21 contributed papers (18 for Optics Express and 3 for Optical Materials Express) selected from the voluntary submissions from attendees who presented at the congress and have extended their work into complete research articles. We hope this focus issue offers a good snapshot of a variety of topical discussions held at the congress and will contribute to the further expansion of the associated research areas.

  15. Laser Welding Process Monitoring Systems: Advanced Signal Analysis for Quality Assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Giuseppe

    Laser material processing today is widely used in industry. Especially laser welding became one of the key-technologies, e. g., for the automotive sector. This is due to the improvement and development of new laser sources and the increasing knowledge gained at countless scientific research projects. Nevertheless, it is still not possible to use the full potential of this technology. Therefore, the introduction and application of quality-assuring systems is required. For a long time, the statement "the best sensor is no sensor" was often heard. Today, a change of paradigm can be observed. On the one hand, ISO 9000 and other by law enforced regulations have led to the understanding that quality monitoring is an essential tool in modern manufacturing and necessary in order to keep production results in deterministic boundaries. On the other hand, rising quality requirements not only set higher and higher requirements for the process technology but also demand qualityassurance measures which ensure the reliable recognition of process faults. As a result, there is a need for reliable online detection and correction of welding faults by means of an in-process monitoring. The chapter describes an advanced signals analysis technique to extract information from signals detected, during the laser welding process, by optical sensors. The technique is based on the method of reassignment which was first applied to the spectrogram by Kodera, Gendrin and de Villedary22,23 and later generalized to any bilinear time-frequency representation by Auger and Flandrin.24 Key to the method is a nonlinear convolution where the value of the convolution is not placed at the center of the convolution kernel but rather reassigned to the center of mass of the function within the kernel. The resulting reassigned representation yields significantly improved components localization. We compare the proposed time-frequency distributions by analyzing signals detected during the laser welding of

  16. Characterization of a laser-beam spinning technique

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, E.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the beam spinning technique for bridging gaps in butt joints that are CO{sub 2} laser-welded. A device was designed and built to circularly oscillate a CO{sub 2} laser beam on the plant of a work surface. A series of welds was made using a continuous-wave output power of 805 watts, and the resultant weld bead profile was characterized as a function of three process parameters. From the experimental results, predictor equations were derived for laser-beam spinning speed and amplitude of the beam spinning pattern on the work surface. The data collected in this experiment indicate that the width of the weld bead is increased by oscillating the beam and that this increase may be made without significantly reducing the weld penetration. The increased width of the weld may offer a solution to variable gaps in weld joints, which has been a recurring production problem. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Recent Advances in Techniques for Hyperspectral Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza, Antonio; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Boardman, Joseph W.; Brazile, Jason; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Fauvel, Mathieu; Gamba, Paolo; Gualtieri, Anthony; Marconcini, Mattia; Tilton, James C.; Trianni, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than 30 years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspectral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal view on recent advances in techniques for hyperspectral image processing. Our main focus is on the design of techniques able to deal with the highdimensional nature of the data, and to integrate the spatial and spectral information. Performance of the discussed techniques is evaluated in different analysis scenarios. To satisfy time-critical constraints in specific applications, we also develop efficient parallel implementations of some of the discussed algorithms. Combined, these parts provide an excellent snapshot of the state-of-the-art in those areas, and offer a thoughtful perspective on future potentials and emerging challenges in the design of robust hyperspectral imaging algorithms

  18. Advances in lasers and optical micro-nano-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurell, F.; Fazio, E.

    2010-09-01

    Lasers represent a well consolidated technology: nevertheless, research in this field remains very active and productive, in both basic and applied directions. At the moment significant attention is given to those sources that bring together high power and compactness. Such high power lasers find important applications for material treatments and such applications are presented by Ehsani et al and Saiedeh Saghafi et al, in the treatment of dielectric thin films (Alteration of optical and morphological properties of polycarbonate illuminated by visible/IR laser beams) or of biological tissues like pistachio seeds (Investigating the effects of laser beams (532 and 660 nm) in annihilation of pistachio mould fungus using spectrophotometry analysis). In particular the latter paper show how laser sources can find very important applications in new domains, preserving goods and food without the need for preservatives or pesticides by simply sterilizing them using light. Optical Micro and Nano Systems presents a new domain for exploration. In this framework this special issue is very attractive, because it assembles papers reporting new results in three directions: new techniques for monitoring integrated micro- and nano-systems, new integrated systems and novel high performance metamaterial configurations. Integrated micro-components can be monitored and controlled using reflectance measurements as presented by Piombini et al (Toward the reflectance measurement of micro components). Speckle formation during laser beam reflection can also be a very sophisticated tool for detecting ultra-precise displacements, as presented by Filter et al (High resolution displacement detection with speckles : accuracy limits in linear displacement speckle metrology). Three dimensional integrated optical structures is indeed a big challenge and a peculiarity of photonics, they can be formed through traditional holography or using more sophisticated and novel ! technologies. Thus, special

  19. The Los Alamos Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop and beginning of the advanced accelerator concepts field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.

    2012-12-01

    The first Advanced Acceleration of Particles-AAC-Workshop (actually named Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop) was held at Los Alamos in January 1982. The workshop lasted a week and divided all the acceleration techniques into four categories: near field, far field, media, and vacuum. Basic theorems of particle acceleration were postulated (later proven) and specific experiments based on the four categories were formulated. This landmark workshop led to the formation of the advanced accelerator R&D program in the HEP office of the DOE that supports advanced accelerator research to this day. Two major new user facilities at Argonne and Brookhaven and several more directed experimental efforts were built to explore the advanced particle acceleration schemes. It is not an exaggeration to say that the intellectual breadth and excitement provided by the many groups who entered this new field provided the needed vitality to then recently formed APS Division of Beams and the new online journal Physical Review Special Topics-Accelerators and Beams. On this 30th anniversary of the AAC Workshops, it is worthwhile to look back at the legacy of the first Workshop at Los Alamos and the fine groundwork it laid for the field of advanced accelerator concepts that continues to flourish to this day.

  20. Advanced IMCW Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS CO2 Column Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel; lin, bing; nehrir, amin; harrison, fenton; obland, michael

    2015-04-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation.

  1. Aesthetic Lateral Canthoplasty Using Tarso-Conjunctival Advancement Technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jung; Lew, Dae Hyun; Song, Seung Han; Lee, Myung Chul

    2017-01-01

    Reduced horizontal length of the palpebral fissure is a distinctive characteristic of Asian eyelids, and aesthetic lateral canthal lengthening techniques have been performed for a refinement. The aim of this study is to describe a novel lateral canthoplasty using tarso-conjunctival advancement with a lid margin splitting procedure on the upper eyelids and to report the postoperative results. From December 2011 to June 2014, patients who underwent lateral canthoplasty using the tarso-conjunctival advancement procedure for aesthetic purposes were reviewed retrospectively. The predictor variables were grouped into demographic and operative categories. The primary outcome variables were the distances from the mid-pupillary line to the lateral canthus and the horizontal length of the palpebral aperture (distance from the medial to lateral canthus). Data analyses were performed using descriptive and univariate statistics. Patients who showed increment in objective measurements were considered significant. Aesthetic appearance was also evaluated based on pre- and postoperative clinical photographs. A total of 45 patients were enrolled in this study. Both the distance from the mid-pupil to the lateral canthus (ΔDpupil-lateral; 2.78 ± 0.54 mm, P <0.05) and the palpebral aperture horizontal length (ΔDmedial-lateral 2.93 ± 0.81 mm, P <0.05) increased significantly from pre- to postoperative state. All the patients demonstrated satisfactory results aesthetically during the follow-up. The tarso-conjunctival advancement technique for lateral canthoplasty produced satisfactory aesthetic results with an enlarged palpebral aperture. Future research is required to fully delineate the risk of possible complications, including injury to the eyelashes and meibomian glands.

  2. LLNL medical and industrial laser isotope separation: large volume, low cost production through advanced laser technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Scheibner, K. F.; Shaw, M.; Wilder, J.

    1998-09-02

    The goal of this LDRD project was to demonstrate the technical and economical feasibility of applying laser isotope separation technology to the commercial enrichment (>lkg/y) of stable isotopes. A successful demonstration would well position the laboratory to make a credible case for the creation of an ongoing medical and industrial isotope production and development program at LLNL. Such a program would establish LLNL as a center for advanced medical isotope production, successfully leveraging previous LLNL Research and Development hardware, facilities, and knowledge.

  3. Technique for cellular microsurgery using the 193-nm excimer laser.

    PubMed

    Palanker, D; Ohad, S; Lewis, A; Simon, A; Shenkar, J; Penchas, S; Laufer, N

    1991-01-01

    A new cell surgery technique has been developed to produce well-defined alterations in cells and tissue without detectable heating and/or other structural damage in the surroundings. The technique involves the use of an argon fluoride excimer laser, in the deep ultraviolet (UV) region of the spectrum at 193 nm, which is guided through a glass pipette filled with a positive air pressure. To demonstrate the method, holes were drilled in the zona pellucida of mouse oocytes. The diameter of the drilled hole was determined by the pipette tip size, and its depth by an energy emitted per pulse and number of pulses. Scanning electron microscopy of the drilled mouse oocytes showed uniform, round, well-circumscribed holes with sharp edges. Oocytes that had their zona pellucida drilled with this new method fertilized in vitro and developed to the blastocyst stage in a rate similar to that of control group. These results demonstrate the nonperturbing nature of this cold laser microsurgical procedure. In addition to the extension of our results for clinical in vitro fertilization purposes, such as enhancement of fertilization and embryo biopsy, there are wide-ranging possible uses of our method in fundamental and applied investigations that require submicron accuracy in cellular alteration.

  4. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the

  5. Advanced terahertz techniques for quality control and counterfeit detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahi, Kiarash; Anwar, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports our invented methods for detection of counterfeit electronic. These versatile techniques are also handy in quality control applications. Terahertz pulsed laser systems are capable of giving the material characteristics and thus make it possible to distinguish between the materials used in authentic components and their counterfeit clones. Components with material defects can also be distinguished in section in this manner. In this work different refractive indices and absorption coefficients were observed for counterfeit components compared to their authentic counterparts. Existence of unexpected ingredient materials was detected in counterfeit components by Fourier Transform analysis of the transmitted terahertz pulse. Thicknesses of different layers are obtainable by analyzing the reflected terahertz pulse. Existence of unexpected layers is also detectable in this manner. Recycled, sanded and blacktopped counterfeit electronic components were detected as a result of these analyses. Counterfeit ICs with die dislocations were detected by depicting the terahertz raster scanning data in a coordinate plane which gives terahertz images. In the same manner, raster scanning of the reflected pulse gives terahertz images of the surfaces of the components which were used to investigate contaminant materials and sanded points on the surfaces. The results of the later technique, reveals the recycled counterfeit components.

  6. Advancements in sensing and perception using structured lighting techniques :an LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, David Keith; Padilla, Denise D.; Davidson, Patrick A. Jr.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2005-09-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Advancements in Sensing and Perception using Structured Lighting Techniques''. There is an ever-increasing need for robust, autonomous ground vehicles for counterterrorism and defense missions. Although there has been nearly 30 years of government-sponsored research, it is undisputed that significant advancements in sensing and perception are necessary. We developed an innovative, advanced sensing technology for national security missions serving the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and other government agencies. The principal goal of this project was to develop an eye-safe, robust, low-cost, lightweight, 3D structured lighting sensor for use in broad daylight outdoor applications. The market for this technology is wide open due to the unavailability of such a sensor. Currently available laser scanners are slow, bulky and heavy, expensive, fragile, short-range, sensitive to vibration (highly problematic for moving platforms), and unreliable for outdoor use in bright sunlight conditions. Eye-safety issues are a primary concern for currently available laser-based sensors. Passive, stereo-imaging sensors are available for 3D sensing but suffer from several limitations : computationally intensive, require a lighted environment (natural or man-made light source), and don't work for many scenes or regions lacking texture or with ambiguous texture. Our approach leveraged from the advanced capabilities of modern CCD camera technology and Center 6600's expertise in 3D world modeling, mapping, and analysis, using structured lighting. We have a diverse customer base for indoor mapping applications and this research extends our current technology's lifecycle and opens a new market base for outdoor 3D mapping. Applications include precision mapping, autonomous navigation, dexterous manipulation, surveillance and

  7. Laser sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatenko, A. A.; Revina, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    The review is devoted to the major advances in laser sampling. The advantages and drawbacks of the technique are considered. Specific features of combinations of laser sampling with various instrumental analytical methods, primarily inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, are discussed. Examples of practical implementation of hybrid methods involving laser sampling as well as corresponding analytical characteristics are presented. The bibliography includes 78 references.

  8. Advanced Techniques for Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, Bogdan; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2012-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have proven valuable for the prevention of primary or recurrent pulmonary embolism in selected patients with or at high risk for venous thromboembolic disease. Their use has become commonplace, and the numbers implanted increase annually. During the last 3 years, in the United States, the percentage of annually placed optional filters, i.e., filters than can remain as permanent filters or potentially be retrieved, has consistently exceeded that of permanent filters. In parallel, the complications of long- or short-term filtration have become increasingly evident to physicians, regulatory agencies, and the public. Most filter removals are uneventful, with a high degree of success. When routine filter-retrieval techniques prove unsuccessful, progressively more advanced tools and skill sets must be used to enhance filter-retrieval success. These techniques should be used with caution to avoid damage to the filter or cava during IVC retrieval. This review describes the complex techniques for filter retrieval, including use of additional snares, guidewires, angioplasty balloons, and mechanical and thermal approaches as well as illustrates their specific application.

  9. Advanced solar energy conversion. [solar pumped gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    An atomic iodine laser, a candidate for the direct solar pumped lasers, was successfully excited with a 4 kW beam from a xenon arc solar simulator, thus proving the feasibility of the concept. The experimental set up and the laser output as functions of operating conditions are presented. The preliminary results of the iodine laser amplifier pumped with the HCP array to which a Q switch for giant pulse production was coupled are included. Two invention disclosures - a laser driven magnetohydrodynamic generator for conversion of laser energy to electricity and solar pumped gas lasers - are also included.

  10. Laser ultrasonic techniques for assessment of tooth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, David W.; Baldwin, Kevin C.

    2000-06-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. For example, there is a need to image the margins of a restoration for the detection of poor bonding or voids between the restorative material and the dentin. With conventional x-ray techniques, it is difficult to detect cracks and to visualize interfaces between hard media. This due to the x-ray providing only a 2 dimensional projection of the internal structure (i.e. a silhouette). In addition, a high resolution imaging modality is needed to detect tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated which can help the tooth to re-mineralize itself. Currently employed x-ray imaging is incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration with a synthetic material. Other clinical applications include the visualization of periodontal defects, the localization of intraosseous lesions, and determining the degree of osseointegration between a dental implant and the surrounding bone. A means of assessing the internal structure of the tooth based upon use of high frequency, highly localized ultrasound (acoustic waves) generated by a laser pulse is discussed. Optical interferometric detection of ultrasound provides a complementary technique with a very small detection footprint. Initial results using laser-based ultrasound for assessment of dental structures are presented. Discussion will center on the adaptability of this technique to clinical applications.

  11. Key techniques of laser direct writing patterns on spherical substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiao-guo; Zhao, Jing-li

    2007-12-01

    Comparing with the writing method of plane pattern, spherical pattern' has some remarkable different on several points. Firstly, it is difficult to spin-coated a uniform photoresist film on a spherical substrate, especially the ratio of spherical radius to caliber is smaller, and the spin-coated way must match the ratio of spherical radius to caliber. Secondly, if the sphere couldn't be regarded as a plane, a so-called concentric optical scan movement way must be applied for the generation of spherical pattern, because the reflex of substrate will affect the quantity of illumination. Commonly, an alignment technique is indispensable with pattern generation of spherical surface by the concentric optical scan in order to ensure the orthogonal intersection of focusing laser beam and writing surface. Thirdly, a uniform velocity control must be considered for the laser direct writing method on a spherical substrate. Otherwise, the exposure time of photoresist will be different, and the line widths of pattern will be also different at different areas. Fourthly, commonly, because the errors of concentric machine and substrate surface shape are bigger, so focusing servo-control technique is also needful for writing a pattern on a spherical substrate. Focusing servo-control may keep the focal spot on the spherical surface by a focus detection and control system in the course of writing pattern. Using these techniques, we fabricated a line width of 7μm and a period of 600μm isometric mesh on the concave of a spherical substrate.

  12. Theoretical modeling and experiments on a DBR waveguide laser fabricated by the femtosecond laser direct-write technique.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuwen; McKay, Aaron; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Ams, Martin; Marshall, Graham D; Steel, M J; Withford, Michael J

    2013-07-29

    We present a model for a Yb-doped distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) waveguide laser fabricated in phosphate glass using the femtosecond laser direct-write technique. The model gives emphasis to transverse integrals to investigate the energy distribution in a homogenously doped glass, which is an important feature of femtosecond laser inscribed waveguide lasers (WGLs). The model was validated with experiments comparing a DBR WGL and a fiber laser, and then used to study the influence of distributed rare earth dopants on the performance of such lasers. Approximately 15% of the pump power was absorbed by the doped "cladding" in the femtosecond laser inscribed Yb doped WGL case with the length of 9.8 mm. Finally, we used the model to determine the parameters that optimize the laser output such as the waveguide length, output coupler reflectivity and refractive index contrast.

  13. Application and development of advanced laser diagnostics for flame measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sukesh

    The application of hydrogen coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for temperature measurements in low-pressure diamond-forming flames and the development of new polarization spectroscopy (PS) diagnostic techniques are the subjects of this Ph.D. dissertation research. The objectives of the low-pressure diamond-forming flame experiments were to measure detailed temperature profiles for comparison with a numerical flame model and to investigate the presence and magnitude of the temperature jump at the deposition substrate surface. Temperature jumps of approximately 100 K were observed in these rich, premixed oxy-acetylene flames ranging from 30 Torr to 125 Torr. The presence of this discontinuity in diamond-forming flames may have a significant effect on surface chemical model development. In these low-pressure flames, the ability to resolve fully the near-substrate temperature profiles will be extremely useful for the validation and improvement of surface chemistry models. The use of PS in the mid-infrared using a single-mode optical parametric generator (OPG) for the detection of CO2 has been demonstrated. Numerical modeling of the CO2 PS signal generation process has also been performed for comparison with the experimental PS signals. The experimental PS line shapes agree very well with the numerical calculations. These results are promising for using PS in detecting hydrocarbon molecules as hydrocarbon molecules have strong absorption resonances in the infrared region of the spectrum. The objectives of the theoretical work on short-pulse PS were to obtain fundamental insight into the physics of the short-pulse PS signal generation process and to investigate the diagnostic potential of the short-pulse PS for species concentration measurements. Short-pulse laser significantly decreases the collision-rate dependence of the PS signal compared with the long-laser pulse-length regime. For a saturating pump beam, the short-pulse PS signal was found to be nearly

  14. Moire Ct technique and its application on laser flexible manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianze; Hou, Luan; Jiang, Chuan; Zhang, Xia

    2010-10-01

    In the paper, the main properties of Moire fringe, such as average effect, amplification effect, corresponding relation are elaborated, and the principle of Moire Ct technique is represented. On the basis of main features of Moire fringe, multidirectional Moire Ct deflection system is designed using high accuracy Ccd, grating, filter, lens, planar mirror and optical splitter. The system has simple light path, and can be easily made into the one that has large caliber.It can analyze multidirectional records of the probe at the same time, and can obtain clear interference patterns.The iterative technique combined with computer chromatography algorithms is used to achieve inversion of multidirectional clear interference patterns so that the required parameters can be acquired. Moire Ct technique is applied to laser flexible manufacture. Produced parts are delaminated on the paper, and are stratified manufactured until they are connected to forming. Cad/Cam system is adopted to construct Spatial three-dimensional geometric model, and the data files are formed. Then by using the Small triangle plane, the inner and outer surfaces of the data files are discretized. Discretized parts model is made chromatography with mathematical methods using Cam software. A series of parallel horizontal intersecting planes are generated. The problems of filtering arrangement tangent points are solved by recombining the shape and structure relationship among the triangular mesh. Several conclusions are presented.

  15. Synthesis of designed materials by laser-based direct metal deposition technique: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Huan

    Direct metal deposition (DMD), a laser-cladding based solid freeform fabrication technique, is capable of depositing multiple materials at desired composition which makes this technique a flexible method to fabricate heterogeneous components or functionally-graded structures. The inherently rapid cooling rate associated with the laser cladding process enables extended solid solubility in nonequilibrium phases, offering the possibility of tailoring new materials with advanced properties. This technical advantage opens the area of synthesizing a new class of materials designed by topology optimization method which have performance-based material properties. For better understanding of the fundamental phenomena occurring in multi-material laser cladding with coaxial powder injection, a self-consistent 3-D transient model was developed. Physical phenomena including laser-powder interaction, heat transfer, melting, solidification, mass addition, liquid metal flow, and species transportation were modeled and solved with a controlled-volume finite difference method. Level-set method was used to track the evolution of liquid free surface. The distribution of species concentration in cladding layer was obtained using a nonequilibrium partition coefficient model. Simulation results were compared with experimental observations and found to be reasonably matched. Multi-phase material microstructures which have negative coefficients of thermal expansion were studied for their DMD manufacturability. The pixel-based topology-optimal designs are boundary-smoothed by Bezier functions to facilitate toolpath design. It is found that the inevitable diffusion interface between different material-phases degrades the negative thermal expansion property of the whole microstructure. A new design method is proposed for DMD manufacturing. Experimental approaches include identification of laser beam characteristics during different laser-powder-substrate interaction conditions, an

  16. Mars laser altimeter based on a single photon ranging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel; Sopko, B.; Pershin, S.

    1993-01-01

    The Mars 94/96 Mission will carry, among others things, the balloon probe experiment. The balloon with the scientific cargo in the gondola underneath will drift in the Mars atmosphere, its altitude will range from zero, in the night, up to 5 km at noon. The accurate gondola altitude will be determined by an altimeter. As the Balloon gondola mass is strictly limited, the altimeter total mass and power consumption are critical; maximum allowed is a few hundred grams a few tens of mWatts of average power consumption. We did propose, design, and construct the laser altimeter based on the single photon ranging technique. Topics covered include the following: principle of operation, altimeter construction, and ground tests.

  17. An advanced optical system for laser ablation propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstue, Grant; Fork, Richard; Reardon, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel space-based ablation driven propulsion engine concept utilizing transmitted energy in the form of a series of ultra-short optical pulses. Key differences are generating the pulses at the transmitting spacecraft and the safe delivery of that energy to the receiving spacecraft for propulsion. By expanding the beam diameter during transmission in space, the energy can propagate at relatively low intensity and then be refocused and redistributed to create an array of ablation sites at the receiver. The ablation array strategy allows greater control over flight dynamics and eases thermal management. Research efforts for this transmission and reception of ultra-short optical pulses include: (1) optical system design; (2) electrical system requirements; (3) thermal management; (4) structured energy transmission safety. Research has also been focused on developing an optical switch concept for the multiplexing of the ultra-short pulses. This optical switch strategy implements multiple reflectors polished into a rotating momentum wheel device to combine the pulses from different laser sources. The optical system design must minimize the thermal load on any one optical element. Initial specifications and modeling for the optical system are being produced using geometrical ray-tracing software to give a better understanding of the optical requirements. In regards to safety, we have advanced the retro-reflective beam locking strategy to include look-ahead capabilities for long propagation distances. Additional applications and missions utilizing multiplexed pulse transmission are also presented. Because the research is in early development, it provides an opportunity for new and valuable advances in the area of transmitted energy for propulsion as well as encourages joint international efforts. Researchers from different countries can cooperate in order to find constructive and safe uses of ordered pulse transmission for propulsion in future space

  18. Advanced Cytologic Techniques for the Detection of Malignant Pancreatobiliary Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Luna, Laura E.; Kipp, Benjamin; Halling, Kevin C.; Sebo, Thomas J.; Kremers., Walter K.; Roberts, Lewis R.; Barr Fritcher, Emily G.; Levy, Michael J.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01

    Background & Aims Two advanced cytologic techniques for detecting aneuploidy, digital image analysis (DIA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) have recently been developed to help identify malignant pancreatobiliary strictures. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility of cytology, DIA, and FISH for the identification of malignant pancreatobiliary strictures. Methods Brush cytologic specimens from 233 consecutive patients undergoing ERCP for pancreatobiliary strictures were examined by all three techniques. Strictures were stratified as proximal (n=33) or distal (n=114) based on whether they occurred above or below the cystic duct, respectively. Strictures in patients with PSC (n=86) were analyzed separately. Results Despite the stratification, the performances of the tests were similar. Routine cytology has a low sensitivity (5–20%) but 100% specificity. Because of the high specificity for cytology, we assessed the performance of the other tests when routine cytology was negative. In this clinical context, FISH had an increased sensitivity (35–60%) when assessing for chromosomal gains (polysomy) while preserving the specificity of cytology. The sensitivity and specificity of DIA was intermediate as compared to routine cytology and FISH, but was additive to FISH values demonstrating only trisomy of chromosome 7 or chromosome 3. Conclusions These findings suggest that FISH and DIA increase the sensitivity for the diagnosis of malignant pancreatobiliary tract strictures over that obtained by conventional cytology while maintaining an acceptable specificity. PMID:17030177

  19. Recent Advances in Seismic Wavefront Tracking Techniques and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambridge, M.; Rawlinson, N.; Hauser, J.

    2007-12-01

    In observational seismology, wavefront tracking techniques are becoming increasingly popular as a means of predicting two point traveltimes and their associated paths. Possible applications include reflection migration, earthquake relocation and seismic tomography at a wide variety of scales. Compared with traditional ray based techniques such as shooting and bending, wavefront tracking has the advantage of locating traveltimes between the source and every point in the medium; in many cases, improved efficiency and robustness; and greater potential for tracking multiple arrivals. In this presentation, two wavefront tracking techniques will be considered: the so-called Fast Marching Method (FMM), and a wavefront construction (WFC) scheme. Over the last several years, FMM has become a mature technique in seismology, with a number of improvements to the underlying theory and the release of software tools that allow it to be used in a variety of applications. At its core, FMM is a grid based solver that implicitly tracks a propagating wavefront by seeking finite difference solutions to the eikonal equation along an evolving narrow band. Recent developments include the use of source grid refinement to improve accuracy, the introduction of a multi-stage scheme to allow reflections and refractions to be tracked in layered media, and extension to spherical coordinates. Implementation of these ideas has led to a number of different applications, including teleseismic tomography, wide-angle reflection and refraction tomography, earthquake relocation, and ambient noise imaging using surface waves. The WFC scheme represents the wavefront surface as a set of points in 6-D phase space; these points are advanced in time using local initial value ray tracing in order to form a sequence of wavefront surfaces that fill the model volume. Surface refinement and simplification techniques inspired by recent developments in computer graphics are used to maintain a fixed density of nodes

  20. Biotechnology apprenticeship for secondary-level students: teaching advanced cell culture techniques for research.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer R; Kotur, Mark S; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss small-group apprenticeships (SGAs) as a method to instruct cell culture techniques to high school participants. The study aimed to teach cell culture practices and to introduce advanced imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Participants designed and completed experiments using both flow cytometry and laser scanning cytometry during the 1-month summer apprenticeship. In addition to effectively and efficiently teaching cell biology laboratory techniques, this course design provided an opportunity for research training, career exploration, and mentoring. Students participated in active research projects, working with a skilled interdisciplinary team of researchers in a large research institution with access to state-of-the-art instrumentation. The instructors, composed of graduate students, laboratory managers, and principal investigators, worked well together to present a real and worthwhile research experience. The students enjoyed learning cell culture techniques while contributing to active research projects. The institution's researchers were equally enthusiastic to instruct and serve as mentors. In this article, we clarify and illuminate the value of small-group laboratory apprenticeships to the institution and the students by presenting the results and experiences of seven middle and high school participants and their instructors.

  1. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss small-group apprenticeships (SGAs) as a method to instruct cell culture techniques to high school participants. The study aimed to teach cell culture practices and to introduce advanced imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Participants designed and completed experiments using both flow cytometry and laser scanning cytometry during the 1-month summer apprenticeship. In addition to effectively and efficiently teaching cell biology laboratory techniques, this course design provided an opportunity for research training, career exploration, and mentoring. Students participated in active research projects, working with a skilled interdisciplinary team of researchers in a large research institution with access to state-of-the-art instrumentation. The instructors, composed of graduate students, laboratory managers, and principal investigators, worked well together to present a real and worthwhile research experience. The students enjoyed learning cell culture techniques while contributing to active research projects. The institution's researchers were equally enthusiastic to instruct and serve as mentors. In this article, we clarify and illuminate the value of small-group laboratory apprenticeships to the institution and the students by presenting the results and experiences of seven middle and high school participants and their instructors. PMID:12587031

  2. Safe Helium--Neon Lasers Advance Understanding of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, C. Harry

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data, Federal and State regulations, and user data are presented to assess the safety factors of low-power lasers. General safety precautions, basic laser theory, the place of the laser in the classroom, and some introductory exercises are also presented. (Author/TS)

  3. Investigation of PACVD protective coating processes using advanced diagnostics techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, W.C.

    1993-05-07

    Objective is to understand the mechanisms governing nonequilibrium plasma atomistic or molecular deposition of hard face coatings. Laser diagnostic methods include coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and laser-induced fluorescence. TiB[sub 2] and diamonds were used as the hard face coating materials. Diborane was used as precursor to TiB[sub 2].

  4. Laser Stimulated Genomic Exchange in Stem Cells. Laser Non-cloning Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2012-02-01

    I propose a novel technique for a pluripotent stem cell generation. Genomic exchange is stimulated by the beat-wave free electron laser, (B-W FEL), frequency matching with the frequencies of the DNAootnotetextJ.D. Watson and F. H. C. Crick, Nature, 171, 737-738 (1953). eigen-oscillations. B-W FEL-1ootnotetextV. Stefan, B.I.Cohen, C. Joshi Science, 243,4890, (Jan 27,1989); Stefan, et al., Bull. APS. 32, No. 9, 1713 (1987); Stefan, APS March-2011, #S1.143; APS- March-2009, #K1.276. scans entire stem cell; B-W FEL-2 probes the chromosomes. The scanning and probing lasers: 300-500nm and 100-300nm, respectively; irradiances: the order-of-10s mW/cm^2 (above the threshold value for a particular gene structure); repetition rate of few-100s Hz. A variety of genetic-matching conditions can be arranged. Genomic glitches, (the cell nucleus transferootnotetextScott Noggle et al. Nature, 478, 70-75 (06 October 2011).), can be hedged by the use of lasers.

  5. Advances in Poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline) Nanofibers Preparation by Electrospinning Technique.

    PubMed

    Della Pina, C; Busacca, C; Frontera, P; Antonucci, P L; Scarpino, L A; Sironi, A; Falletta, E

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers are drawing a great deal of interest from academia and industry due to their multiple applications, especially in biomedical field. PANI nanofibers were successfully electrospun for the first time by MacDiarmid and co-workers at the beginning of the millennium and since then many efforts have been addressed to improve their quality. However, traditional PANI prepared from aniline monomer shows some drawbacks, such as presence of toxic (i.e., benzidine) and inorganic (salts and metals) co-products, that complicate polymer post-treatment, and low solubility in common organic solvents, making hard its processing by electrospinning technique. Some industrial sectors, such as medical and biomedical, need to employ materials free from toxic and polluting species. In this regard, the oxidative polymerization of N-(4-aminophenyl)aniline, aniline dimer, to produce poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline), P4ADA, a kind of PANI, represents an innovative alternative to the traditional synthesis because the obtained polymer results free from carcinogenic and/or polluting co-products, and, moreover, more soluble than traditional PANI. This latter feature can be exploited to obtain P4ADA nanofibers by electrospinning technique. In this paper we report the advances obtained in the P4ADA nanofibers electrospinnig. A comparison among polyethylene oxide (PEO), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS), as the second polymer to facilitate the electrospinning process, is shown. In order to increase the conductivity of P4ADA nanofibers, two strategies were adopted and compared: selective insulating binder removal from electrospun nanofibers by a rinsing tratment, afterwards optimizing the minimum amount of binder necessary for the electrospinning process. Moreover, the effect of PEO/P4ADA weight ratio on the fibers morphology and conductivity was highlighted.

  6. A review of hemorheology: Measuring techniques and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Patrícia C.; Pinho, Fernando T.; Alves, Manuel A.; Oliveira, Mónica S. N.

    2016-02-01

    Significant progress has been made over the years on the topic of hemorheology, not only in terms of the development of more accurate and sophisticated techniques, but also in terms of understanding the phenomena associated with blood components, their interactions and impact upon blood properties. The rheological properties of blood are strongly dependent on the interactions and mechanical properties of red blood cells, and a variation of these properties can bring further insight into the human health state and can be an important parameter in clinical diagnosis. In this article, we provide both a reference for hemorheological research and a resource regarding the fundamental concepts in hemorheology. This review is aimed at those starting in the field of hemodynamics, where blood rheology plays a significant role, but also at those in search of the most up-to-date findings (both qualitative and quantitative) in hemorheological measurements and novel techniques used in this context, including technical advances under more extreme conditions such as in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow or under extensional flow, which impose large deformations comparable to those found in the microcirculatory system and in diseased vessels. Given the impressive rate of increase in the available knowledge on blood flow, this review is also intended to identify areas where current knowledge is still incomplete, and which have the potential for new, exciting and useful research. We also discuss the most important parameters that can lead to an alteration of blood rheology, and which as a consequence can have a significant impact on the normal physiological behavior of blood.

  7. Laser pediatric crowns performed without anesthesia: a contemporary technique.

    PubMed

    Jacboson, B; Berger, J; Kravitz, R; Patel, P

    2003-01-01

    Extensive caries resulting in the need for a stainless steel crown in primary teeth may now be prepared with the use of the WaterlaseTM YSGG Laser, (Biolase) hard and soft-tissue laser. The use of the laser eliminates the need for local anesthesia, thereby providing optimal patient comfort and compliance.

  8. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing

  9. Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Advances in Science, Techniques, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2009-01-01

    More than 25% of children survive to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrests, and 5% to 10% survive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. This review of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation addresses the epidemiology of pediatric cardiac arrests, mechanisms of coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the 4 phases of cardiac arrest resuscitation, appropriate interventions during each phase, special resuscitation circumstances, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The key elements of pathophysiology that impact and match the timing, intensity, duration, and variability of the hypoxic-ischemic insult to evidence-based interventions are reviewed. Exciting discoveries in basic and applied-science laboratories are now relevant for specific subpopulations of pediatric cardiac arrest victims and circumstances (eg, ventricular fibrillation, neonates, congenital heart disease, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Improving the quality of interventions is increasingly recognized as a key factor for improving outcomes. Evolving training strategies include simulation training, just-in-time and just-in-place training, and crisis-team training. The difficult issue of when to discontinue resuscitative efforts is addressed. Outcomes from pediatric cardiac arrests are improving. Advances in resuscitation science and state-of-the-art implementation techniques provide the opportunity for further improvement in outcomes among children after cardiac arrest. PMID:18977991

  10. Recommended advanced techniques for waterborne pathogen detection in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Alhamlan, Fatimah S; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N

    2015-02-19

    The effect of human activities on water resources has expanded dramatically during the past few decades, leading to the spread of waterborne microbial pathogens. The total global health impact of human infectious diseases associated with pathogenic microorganisms from land-based wastewater pollution was estimated to be approximately three million disability-adjusted life years (DALY), with an estimated economic loss of nearly 12 billion US dollars per year. Although clean water is essential for healthy living, it is not equally granted to all humans. Indeed, people who live in developing countries are challenged every day by an inadequate supply of clean water. Polluted water can lead to health crises that in turn spread waterborne pathogens. Taking measures to assess the water quality can prevent these potential risks. Thus, a pressing need has emerged in developing countries for comprehensive and accurate assessments of water quality. This review presents current and emerging advanced techniques for assessing water quality that can be adopted by authorities in developing countries.

  11. Dissecting cell adhesion architecture using advanced imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Penny E

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins or to other cells is essential for the control of embryonic development, tissue integrity, immune function and wound healing. Adhesions are tightly spatially regulated structures containing over one hundred different proteins that coordinate both dynamics and signaling events at these sites. Extensive biochemical and morphological analysis of adhesion types over the past three decades has greatly improved understanding of individual protein contributions to adhesion signaling and, in some cases, dynamics. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that these diverse macromolecular complexes contain a variety of protein sub-networks, as well as distinct sub-domains that likely play important roles in regulating adhesion behavior. Until recently, resolving these structures, which are often less than a micron in size, was hampered by the limitations of conventional light microscopy. However, recent advances in optical techniques and imaging methods have revealed exciting insight into the intricate control of adhesion structure and assembly. Here we provide an overview of the recent data arising from such studies of cell:matrix and cell:cell contact and an overview of the imaging strategies that have been applied to study the intricacies and hierarchy of proteins within adhesions. PMID:21785274

  12. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask ‘how are nanoshapes created?’, ‘how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?’, ‘how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?’. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed. PMID:25485133

  13. REVIEW ARTICLE: Emission measurement techniques for advanced powertrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Masayuki

    2000-10-01

    Recent developments in high-efficiency low-emission powertrains require the emission measurement technologies to be able to detect regulated and unregulated compounds with very high sensitivity and a fast response. For example, levels of a variety of nitrogen compounds and sulphur compounds should be analysed in real time in order to develop aftertreatment systems to decrease emission of NOx for the lean burning powertrains. Also, real-time information on the emission of particulate matter for the transient operation of diesel engines and direct injection gasoline engines is invaluable. The present paper reviews newly introduced instrumentation for such emission measurement that is demanded for the developments in advanced powertrain systems. They include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and fast response flame ionization detection. In addition, demands and applications of the fuel reformer developments for fuel cell electric vehicles are discussed. Besides the detection methodologies, sample handling techniques for the measurement of concentrations emitted from low emission vehicles for which the concentrations of the pollutants are significantly lower than the concentrations present in ambient air, are also described.

  14. Development of advanced strain diagnostic techniques for reactor environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Miller, Timothy J.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Urrea, David Anthony,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01

    The following research is operated as a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative at Sandia National Laboratories. The long-term goals of the program include sophisticated diagnostics of advanced fuels testing for nuclear reactors for the Department of Energy (DOE) Gen IV program, with the future capability to provide real-time measurement of strain in fuel rod cladding during operation in situ at any research or power reactor in the United States. By quantifying the stress and strain in fuel rods, it is possible to significantly improve fuel rod design, and consequently, to improve the performance and lifetime of the cladding. During the past year of this program, two sets of experiments were performed: small-scale tests to ensure reliability of the gages, and reactor pulse experiments involving the most viable samples in the Annulated Core Research Reactor (ACRR), located onsite at Sandia. Strain measurement techniques that can provide useful data in the extreme environment of a nuclear reactor core are needed to characterize nuclear fuel rods. This report documents the progression of solutions to this issue that were explored for feasibility in FY12 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.

  15. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-11-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask 'how are nanoshapes created?', 'how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', 'how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  16. Technique of laser confocal and Raman spectroscopy for living cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaochen; Zhu, Lianqing

    2013-10-01

    Because of the shortcomings of the main methods used to analysis single cell, the need of single living cell analysis with no damage, unmarked and in situ dynamic multi-parameter measurement is urgent in the life sciences and biomedical advanced research field. And the method of for living cells analysis is proposed. The spectral pretreatment technology of living cell is the key work of laser confocal Raman spectroscopy. To study the spectrum processing methods for Raman spectrum on single living cell and develop the pre-process techniques to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, sensitivity, and decrease the influence of fluorescence, elimination the cosmic rays was used to improve the spectrum. The classification, average and filtration of spectrum were applied to enhance signal-to-noise ratio. The fluorescence was depressed for quantity analysis or utilized for analysis by comparing the background and the spectrum. The results show that the proposed technique for laser confocal Raman spectrum of single cell can perform the sensitive and weak intensity peaks and reflect the information of molecules structures very well.

  17. Exchange Bias Realignment Using a Laser-based Direct-write Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthold, I.; Löschner, U.; Schille, J.; Ebert, R.; Exner, H.

    We report on selective realignment of the exchange biased magnetization direction in spintronic layer stacks using rapidly deflected focused laser radiation in a direct-write technique. Laser-based magnetic field cooling by applying either pulsed or continuous wave laser radiation was investigated. The magnetic properties of laser-based field cooled layer stacks were investigated by using magneto optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements. The dependencies of the processing parameters peak intensity and external magnetic field strength on the resulting exchange bias field strength were evaluated. In addition, temperature field simulations gain deeper insights into the mechanisms of laser-based field cooling. Our results show significant influence of the laser processing regime. Field cooling induced by continuous laser radiation caused higher exchange bias field strengths, compared to pulsed laser radiation. Moreover, the external magnetic field strength affected the resulting exchange bias field strength only by irradiating low-intensity laser beams.

  18. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Lasers do not require a vacuum (as do electron beam welders) and the welds they produce high depth-to-width ratios. Scoping with a small pulsed 50 J YAG laser indicated that lasers could produce successful welds in vanadium alloy (V-5%Cr-5%Ti) sheet (1 mm thick) when the fusion zone was isolated from air. The pulsed laser required an isolating chamber filled with inert gas to produce welds that did not contain cracks and showed only minor hardness increases. Following the initial scoping tests, a series of tests were preformed with a 6 kW continuous CO{sub 2} laser. Successful bead-on-plate welds were made on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys to depths of about 4 mm with this laser.

  19. New advanced surface modification technique: titanium oxide ceramic surface implants: long-term clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Gyorgy; Kovacs, Lajos; Barabas, Jozsef; Nemeth, Zsolt; Maironna, Carlo

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background to advanced surface modification technologies and to present a new technique, involving the formation of a titanium oxide ceramic coating, with relatively long-term results of its clinical utilization. Three general techniques are used to modify surfaces: the addition or removal of material and the change of material already present. Surface properties can also be changed without the addition or removal of material, through the laser or electron beam thermal treatment. The new technique outlined in this paper relates to the production of a corrosion-resistant 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure on the surface of titanium implants. The layer is grown electrochemically from the bulk of the metal and is modified by heat treatment. Such oxide ceramic-coated implants have a number of advantageous properties relative to implants covered with various other coatings: a higher external hardness, a greater force of adherence between the titanium and the oxide ceramic coating, a virtually perfect insulation between the organism and the metal (no possibility of metal allergy), etc. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical, electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for a qualitative characterization. Finally, these implants (plates, screws for maxillofacial osteosynthesis and dental root implants) were applied in surgical practice for a period of 10 years. Tests and the experience acquired demonstrated the good properties of the titanium oxide ceramic-coated implants.

  20. High-quality microcutting in silicon by advanced laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallus, E.; Castelli, Paolo

    2003-11-01

    This paper reports on the potentialities of innovative lasers in microcutting of silicon, one of the most important materials in the field of microelectronics. In recent years, novel laser based micromachining methods have played an increasingly important role in the ongoing miniaturization of consumer electronics. Here, high-quality microcutting in silicon using a "green" laser, whose wavelength is readily absorbed by silicon, is presented.

  1. Novel Polarization Techniques and Instrumentation for Glacial Melt Pond Laser Bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton-Grimley, R. A.; Gisler, A.; Thayer, J. P.; Stillwell, R. A.; Grigsby, S.; Crowley, G.

    2015-12-01

    Melt ponds contribute significantly to the feedback processes that serve to amplify the polar response to climate change. A substantial volume of melt water is found in shallow ponds during the Arctic summer on the Greenland Ice Sheet, which have consequences on glacial dynamics and ice loss, however, the water content and subsurface topography of the ponds has proven difficult to measure. The need for instrumentation to provide high-resolution depth measurements in shallow water is addressed by utilizing novel polarization discrimination techniques in a high repetition rate, low power, 532nm photon counting lidar system. Recent advances demonstrate the ability to achieve kHz acquisition rates with a depth precision of 1cm. Use of this technique eliminates the necessity for short laser pulses and high-bandwidth detectors and instead provides a less complex, smaller, and more economical solution to airborne lidar instrumentation. Recent deployment of the lidar system aboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft, during the 2015 NASA SARP campaign, provided critical engineering data and experience to facilitate further advancement of an airborne bathymetric lidar system for melt pond studies. Signal performance from flight indicates a 50 cm horizontal ground resolution at nominal altitudes below 1000 feet above ground level, and also indicates that maintaining a vertical precision of 1cm is achievable, though these results will be further examined. Results from the DC-8 aircraft deployment are promising, and the modest system size opens up the possibility for future integration into a UAS. This presentation will highlight the measurement capabilities of this novel lidar system, and explore polarization scattering properties of laser light with snow, ice, liquid water. System performance metrics will be evaluated for operating during summer periods in the Polar Regions and discuss the scientific contribution to Cryosphere research - most notably the depth and subsurface ice

  2. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

    2004-08-20

    Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore

  3. Study on detection techniques for laser fuze using pseudorandom code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaopeng; Li, Ping; Jia, Ruili; Chen, Huimin

    2008-03-01

    With the development of semiconductor laser technology, laser proximity fuzes have been widely used in various kinds of guided missiles and routine ammunitions. An approach to pulsed laser fuze based on pseudorandom code is presented in this paper. Based on the principle of laser fuze using pseudorandom code, the system has been divided into emitting module, receiving module, optical system and information processing module. The different modules have been analyzed in details and principles for selecting the parameters of the modules are given. The testing shows that laser fuze based on pseudorandom code has a better ability of detection and a higher resistance to interference. The theoretic foundation is provided for scientifically designing pulsed laser fuze of pseudorandom code.

  4. Weldability and joining techniques for advanced fossil energy system alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Liu, W.; Yang, D.; Zhou, G.; Morrison, M.

    1998-05-01

    The efforts represent the concerns for the basic understanding of the weldability and fabricability of the advanced high temperature alloys so necessary to affect increases in the efficiency of the next generation Fossil Energy Power Plants. The effort was divided into three tasks with the first effort dealing with the welding and fabrication behavior of 310HCbN (HR3C), the second task details the studies aimed at understanding the weldability of a newly developed 310TaN high temperature stainless (a modification of 310 stainless) and Task 3 addressed the cladding of austenitic tubing with Iron-Aluminide using the GTAW process. Task 1 consisted of microstructural studies on 310HCbN and the development of a Tube Weldability test which has applications to production welding techniques as well as laboratory weldability assessments. In addition, the evaluation of ex-service 310HCbN which showed fireside erosion and cracking at the attachment weld locations was conducted. Task 2 addressed the behavior of the newly developed 310 TaN modification of standard 310 stainless steel and showed that the weldability was excellent and that the sensitization potential was minimal for normal welding and fabrication conditions. The microstructural evolution during elevated temperature testing was characterized and the second phase particles evolved upon aging were identified. Task 3 details the investigation undertaken to clad 310HCbN tubing with Iron Aluminide and developed welding conditions necessary to provide a crack free cladding. The work showed that both a preheat and a post-heat was necessary for crack free deposits and the effect of a third element on the cracking potential was defined together with the effect of the aluminum level for optimum weldability.

  5. NASA Laser Light Scattering Advanced Technology Development Workshop, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The major objective of the workshop was to explore the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware and to assess user requirements and needs for a laser light scattering instrument in a reduced gravity environment. The workshop addressed experimental needs and stressed hardware development.

  6. AIRBORNE INERTIAL SURVEYING USING LASER TRACKING AND PROFILING TECHNIQUES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cyran, Edward J.; ,

    1986-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey through a contract with the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory has developed the Aerial Profiling of Terrain System. This is an airborne inertial surveying system designed to use a laser tracker to provide position and velocity updates, and a laser profiler to measure terrain elevations. The performance characteristics of the system are discussed with emphasis placed on the performance of the laser devices. The results of testing the system are summarized for both performance evaluation and applications.

  7. BESTIA - the next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    DOE PAGES

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; ...

    2015-12-02

    Over the last two decades, BNL’s ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. In addition, our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particlemore » acceleration of ions and electrons.« less

  8. BESTIA - The next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Skaritka, John; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.

    2016-09-01

    Over the last two decades, BNL's ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. Our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particle acceleration of ions and electrons.

  9. Analytical model for ring heater thermal compensation in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

    PubMed

    Ramette, Joshua; Kasprzack, Marie; Brooks, Aidan; Blair, Carl; Wang, Haoyu; Heintze, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Advanced laser interferometer gravitational-wave detectors use high laser power to achieve design sensitivity. A small part of this power is absorbed in the interferometer cavity mirrors where it creates thermal lenses, causing aberrations in the main laser beam that must be minimized by the actuation of "ring heaters," which are additional heater elements that are aimed to reduce the temperature gradients in the mirrors. In this article we derive the first, to the best of our knowledge, analytical model of the temperature field generated by an ideal ring heater. We express the resulting optical aberration contribution to the main laser beam in this axisymmetric case. Used in conjunction with wavefront measurements, our model provides a more complete understanding of the thermal state of the cavity mirrors and will allow a more efficient use of the ring heaters in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

  10. Investigation of joining techniques for advanced austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Kikuchi, Y.; Shi, C.; Gill, T.P.S.

    1991-05-01

    Modified Alloys 316 and 800H, designed for high temperature service, have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Assessment of the weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys has been conducted at the University of Tennessee. Four aspects of weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys were included in the investigation.

  11. Advances in 193 nm excimer lasers for mass spectrometry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph; Esser, Hans-Gerd; Bonati, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Ongoing progress in mass analysis applications such as laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry of solid samples and ultraviolet photoionization mediated sequencing of peptides and proteins is to a large extent driven by ultrashort wavelength excimer lasers at 193 nm. This paper will introduce the latest improvements achieved in the development of compact high repetition rate excimer lasers and elaborate on the impact on mass spectrometry instrumentation. Various performance and lifetime measurements obtained in a long-term endurance test over the course of 18 months will be shown and discussed in view of the laser source requirements of different mass spectrometry tasks. These sampling type applications are served by excimer lasers delivering pulsed 193 nm output of several mJ as well as fast repetition rates which are already approaching one Kilohertz. In order to open up the pathway from the laboratory to broader market industrial use, sufficient component lifetimes and long-term stable performance behavior have to be ensured. The obtained long-term results which will be presented are based on diverse 193 nm excimer laser tube improvements aiming at e.g. optimizing the gas flow dynamics and have extended the operational life the laser tube for the first time over several billion pulses even under high duty-cycle conditions.

  12. Study on the techniques of pulse laser fuze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huimin; Yan, Xiaopeng; Ma, Yi; Li, Kun; Sun, Jianqiang; Li, Ping

    2008-03-01

    With the development of semiconductor laser technology, laser proximity fuzes have been widely used in various kinds of guided missiles and routine ammunitions. Combined with the current situation, the digital laser fuzes system based on the FPGA has been proposed in this paper. Combined with the current situation, the system has been divided into emitting module, receiving module and signal processing module, the three modules have been analyzed in details. In the emitting module, the driven circuit based on the FPGA has been developed, the laser pulse with 20ns width and 10kHz repetition frequency have been obtained. Meanwhile, the emitting optical system and receiving optical system have been designed. In the receiving module, the receiving circuit with preamplifier and A/D sampling and convert circuit have been developed. In the signal processing module, anti-interference methods were proposed which can find applications in the laser proximity fuze research.

  13. The role of monolithic integration in advanced laser products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, John H.

    2006-02-01

    The design and performance of single-mode high-power (>100 mW) semiconductor lasers suitable for integration into large arrays are reported. In 830 nm lasers, quantum well intermixing (QWI) has been used to increase the bandgap of the waveguide in the facet region by 120 meV, and the catastrophic optical damage threshold of uncoated devices increased by a factor of >3 as a result. The passive waveguides are relatively cool, bringing high reliability, improving the single-mode waveguide stability and enabling high-temperature operation. Furthermore, the passive waveguides relax the cleaving and packaging alignment tolerances, giving a high yield process suitable for manufacture. A far-field reduction layer is included in the lasers giving a fast axis divergence of <20° FWHM. Arrays in which each emitter operates at several 100 mW, have excellent uniformity of laser parameters such as kink power, operating power and optical beam profile.

  14. Advances in fiber laser spectral beam combining for power scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honea, Eric; Afzal, Robert S.; Savage-Leuchs, Matthias; Henrie, Jason; Brar, Khush; Kurz, Nathan; Jander, Don; Gitkind, Neil; Hu, Dan; Robin, Craig; Jones, Andrew M.; Kasinadhuni, Ravi; Humphreys, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Spectral Beam Combining (SBC) of fiber lasers provides a simple, robust architecture for high brightness power scaling beyond the limit of a single fiber. We review recent progress in power scaling and describe what we believe is the highest power SBC fiber demonstration and largest number of fiber lasers combined to date. Here we report results on a fiber SBC system where we achieved > 30 kW by combining 96 individual fiber lasers into a single high brightness beam with a beam quality of M2 = 1.6 x 1.8. The potential for further power scaling at the system level is highlighted with examples of beam combinable fiber laser power scaling.

  15. Mid-IR laser system for advanced neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosner, M.; Wu, C.; Heller, D. F.

    2014-03-01

    We present work on a laser system operating in the near- and mid-IR spectral regions, having output characteristics designed to be optimal for cutting various tissue types. We provide a brief overview of laser-tissue interactions and the importance of controlling certain properties of the light beam. We describe the principle of operation of the laser system, which is generally based on a wavelength-tunable alexandrite laser oscillator/amplifier, and multiple Raman conversion stages. This configuration provides robust access to the mid-IR spectral region at wavelengths, pulse energies, pulse durations, and repetition rates that are attractive for neurosurgical applications. We summarize results for ultra-precise selective cutting of nerve sheaths and retinas with little collateral damage; this has applications in procedures such as optic-nerve-sheath fenestration and possible spinal repair. We also report results for cutting cornea, and dermal tissues.

  16. Thermal Conductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by a Steady-state Laser Heat-flux Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of low conductivity and high temperature capable thermal barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity under future high-performance and low-emission engine heat-flux conditions. In this paper, a unique steady-state CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 microns) heat-flux approach is described for determining the thermal conductivity and conductivity deduced cyclic durability of ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coating systems at very high temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. The thermal conductivity behavior of advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings for metallic and Si-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) component applications has also been investigated using the laser conductivity approach. The relationships between the lattice and radiation conductivities as a function of heat flux and thermal gradient at high temperatures have been examined for the ceramic coating systems. The steady-state laser heat-flux conductivity approach has been demonstrated as a viable means for the development and life prediction of advanced thermal barrier coatings for future turbine engine applications.

  17. Large aperture laser beam alignment system based on far field sampling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. C.; Liu, D. Z.; Ouyang, X. P.; Kang, J.; Xie, X. L.; Zhou, J.; Gong, L.; Zhu, B. Q.

    2016-11-01

    Laser beam alignment is very important for high-power laser facility. Long laser path and large-aperture lens for alignment are generally used, while the proposed alignment system with a wedge by far-field sampling technique reduces both space and cost requirements. General alignment system for large-aperture laser beam is long in distance and large in volum because of taking near-field sampling technique. With the development of laser fusion facilities, the space for alignment system is limited. A new alignment system for large-aperture laser beam is designed to save space and reduce operating costs. The new alignment for large-aperture laser beam with a wedge is based on far-field sampling technique. The wedge is placed behind the spatial filter to reflect some laser beam as signal light for alignment. Therefore, laser beam diameter in alignment system is small, which can save space for the laser facility. Comparing to general alignment system for large-aperture laser beam, large-aperture lenses for near-field and far-field sampling, long distance laser path are unnecessary for proposed alignment system, which saves cost and space greatly. This alignment system for large-aperture laser beam has been demonstrated well on the Muliti-PW Facility which uses the 7th beam of the SG-Ⅱ Facility as pump source. The experimental results indicate that the average near-field alignment error is less than 1% of reference, and the average far-filed alignment error is less than 5% of spatial filter pinhole diameter, which meet the alignment system requirements for laser beam of Multi-PW Facility.

  18. Electron acceleration with advanced injection methods at the ASTRA laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poder, Kristjan; Carreira-Lopes, Nelson; Wood, Jonathan; Cole, Jason; Dangor, Bucker; Foster, Peta; Gopal, Ram; Kamperidis, Christos; Kononenko, Olena; Mangles, Stuart; Olgun, Halil; Palmer, Charlotte; Symes, Daniel; Pattathil, Rajeev; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Imperial College London Team; Central Laser Facility Collaboration; Tata InsituteFundamental Research Collaboration; DESY Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Recent electron acceleration results from the ASTRA laser facility are presented. Experiments were performed using both the 40 TW ASTRA and the 350 TW ASTRA-Gemini laser. Fundamental electron beam properties relating to its quality were investigated both experimentally and with PIC simulations. For increased control over such parameters, various injection mechanisms such as self-injection and ionization injection were employed. Particular interest is given to the dynamics of ionization injected electrons in strongly driven wakes.

  19. Expanding applications for surface-contaminant sensing using the laser interrogation of surface agents (LISA) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick L.; Higdon, N. S.; Chyba, Thomas H.; Armstrong, Wayne T.; Sedlacek, Arthur J., III; Christesen, Steven D.; Wong, Anna

    2004-02-01

    Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents (LISA) is a UV-Raman technique that provides short-range standoff detection and identification of surface-deposited chemical agents. ITT Industries, Advanced Engineering and Sciences Division, is currently developing and expanding the LISA technology under several programs that span a variety of missions for homeland defense. We will present and discuss some of these applications, while putting in perspective the overall evolution undergone by the technique within the last years. These applications include LISA-Recon (now called the Joint Contaminated Surface Detector--JCSD) which was developed under a cost-sharing arrangement with the U.S. Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command (SBCCOM) for incorporation on the Army"s future reconnaissance vehicles, and designed to demonstrate single-shot on-the-move measurements of chemical contaminants at concentration levels below the Army's requirements. In parallel, LISA-Shipboard is being developed to optimize the sensor technique for detection of surface contaminants in the operational environment of a ship. The most recently started activity is LISA-Inspector that is being developed to provide a transportable sensor in a 'cart-like' configuration.

  20. Comparison of advanced optical imaging techniques with current otolaryngology diagnostics for improved middle ear assessment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Ryan M.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Spillman, Darold R.; Novak, Michael A.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otolaryngologists utilize a variety of diagnostic techniques to assess middle ear health. Tympanometry, audiometry, and otoacoustic emissions examine the mobility of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) and ossicles using ear canal pressure and auditory tone delivery and detection. Laser Doppler vibrometry provides non-contact vibrational measurement, and acoustic reflectometry is used to assess middle ear effusion using sonar. These technologies and techniques have advanced the field beyond the use of the standard otoscope, a simple tissue magnifier, yet the need for direct visualization of middle ear disease for superior detection, assessment, and management remains. In this study, we evaluated the use of portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) and pneumatic low-coherence interferometry (LCI) systems with handheld probe delivery to standard tympanometry, audiometry, otoacoustic emissions, laser Doppler vibrometry, and acoustic reflectometry. Comparison of these advanced optical imaging techniques and current diagnostics was conducted with a case study subject with a history of unilateral eardrum trauma. OCT and pneumatic LCI provide novel dynamic spatiotemporal structural data of the middle ear, such as the thickness of the eardrum and quantitative detection of underlying disease pathology, which could allow for more accurate diagnosis and more appropriate management than currently possible.

  1. Successful treatment of traumatic scars with combined nonablative fractional laser and pinpoint technique of standard CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shady M; Elsaie, Mohamed L; Kamel, Mohamed Ismail; Mohammed, Essam-Eldin

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the use of a pinpoint irradiation technique followed by nonablative fractional technique in treatment of traumatic scars. Thirteen patients with traumatic sacrs were treated with pinpoint technique of CO2 laser using traditional headpiece activating laser at a frequency (50 Hz) to deliver pulsed mode with power of 1 W using the focusing technique followed by 3-5 passes of the nonablative 1540 nm fractional Er:glass laser. An independent physician evaluator assessed the treatment outcomes using Vancouver scar scale (VSS) and 5-point grading scale (grade 0, no improvement; grade 1, 1-25%; grade 2, 26-50%; grade 3, 51-75%; grade 4, 76-100% improvement). After the final treatment, average percentage changes of VSS were 41.5%. Improvement was evident in terms of vascularity, pigmentation, and height, while insignificant in terms of Pliability. Based on physician's global assessment, mean grade of 2.5 was achieved. Patient's subjective satisfaction scores paralleled the physician's objective evaluation. Pinpoint irradiation technique by CO2 laser followed by nonablative fractional laser is a safe and effective modality in treatment of scars.

  2. Use of laser reflection technique for defect detection in CFRP-concrete systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Qiwen; Lau, Denvid

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a new laser reflection technique which can identify the near-surface defects in concrete structures bonded with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP). In this study, a laser beam is used to illuminate the surface of CFRP-concrete panel, and the pattern of the laser reflection is recorded by a high resolution digital camera. Under the laser illumination, the surface of the tested object is heated and expanded. The surface expansion can be identified through observing the expanding reflection pattern. Based on our experimental observation, the defect region exhibits much greater expansion of laser reflection pattern than that in intact region. Results also indicate that both the defect area and the defect depth can influence the change of reflection pattern. In view of the measurement principle of the laser reflection technique, it is expected that the application can be further extended to the areas like CFRP-wood structures, CFRP-masonry structures and CFRP-steel structures.

  3. An Analytic Technique for Investigating Mode-Locked Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Usechak, N.G.; Agrawal, G.P.

    2005-09-30

    We present an analytic theory capable of predicting pulse parameters in mode-locked lasers in the presence of dispersion and nonlinearity. Excellent agreement is obtained between this approach and full numerical solutions.

  4. Relative ability of laser fluorescence techniques to quantitate early mineral loss in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ando, M; Hall, A F; Eckert, G J; Schemehorn, B R; Analoui, M; Stookey, G K

    1997-01-01

    This in vitro investigation was undertaken to explore two different nondestructive methods to detect very early demineralization. These methods were based on the premise that the clinical detection of caries at a very early stage of formation might permit more efficient reversal of the caries process than may occur when lesions are detected at a more advanced stage, such as a so-called 'white spot'. The methods evaluated in this study were quantitative laser fluorescence (QLF) and an experimental dye-enhanced laser fluorescence (DELF) technique. Prepared and polished bovine enamel specimens were demineralized in a conventional lactic acid-Carbopol solution for varying periods of time between 0 and 24 h with an area of sound enamel retained on each specimen. The coded and randomized specimens were then analyzed for the presence and severity of enamel demineralization using QLF after which they were exposed to a selected dye (Pyrromethene 556) and similarly examined using DELF. The specimens were then sectioned and examined by conventional transverse microradiography and by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Results were analyzed statistically with sensitivity and specificity determined using sound enamel as the reference. The results indicated that QLF could detect demineralization which occurred as a result of 8 h exposure to the decalcification solution and was able to quantify changes in lesion severity associated with longer demineralization. While DELF was capable of detecting enamel demineralization after only 2 h exposure to the decalcification solution, it was unable to quantify increasing amounts of demineralization associated with longer periods of exposure to the decalcification solution. In summary, while DELF was able to detect very early demineralization, only QLF was capable of detecting and quantifying changes in the extent of the decalcification occurring with demineralization periods up to 24 h.

  5. Advanced micromachining combining nanosecond lasers with water jet-guided laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauchard, A.; Lee, K.; Vago, N.; Pavius, M.; Obi, S.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the first scribing results obtained by combining a short-pulse 10ns green laser with the water jet-guided laser technology. A number of high-potential applications are presented, from the grooving of low-k silicon wafers, the scribing of metallic and amorphous Si layers of thin film solar cells, the grooving of SiC wafers, and dot marking of Si wafers. The combination of a short pulse laser beam with the water jet-guided laser technology offers a new industry-proven alternative for grooving and scribing processes, providing superior speed and quality compared to legacy laser technologies.

  6. Laser-based techniques for living cell pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Béla; Smausz, Tomi; Papdi, Bence; Bor, Zsolt; Szabó, András; Kolozsvári, Lajos; Fotakis, Costas; Nógrádi, Antal

    2008-10-01

    In the production of biosensors or artificial tissues a basic step is the immobilization of living cells along the required pattern. In this paper the ability of some promising laser-based methods to influence the interaction between cells and various surfaces is presented. In the first set of experiments laser-induced patterned photochemical modification of polymer foils was used to achieve guided adherence and growth of cells to the modified areas: (a) Polytetrafluoroethylene was irradiated with ArF excimer laser ( λ=193 nm, FWHM=20 ns, F=9 mJ/cm2) in presence of triethylene tetramine liquid photoreagent; (b) a thin carbon layer was produced by KrF excimer laser ( λ=248 nm, FWHM=30 ns, F=35 mJ/cm2) irradiation on polyimide surface to influence the cell adherence. It was found that the incorporation of amine groups in the PTFE polymer chain instead of the fluorine atoms can both promote and prevent the adherence of living cells (depending on the applied cell types) on the treated surfaces, while the laser generated carbon layer on polyimide surface did not effectively improve adherence. Our attempts to influence the cell adherence by morphological modifications created by ArF laser irradiation onto polyethylene terephtalate surface showed a surface roughness dependence. This method was effective only when the Ra roughness parameter of the developed structure did not exceed the 0.1 micrometer value. Pulsed laser deposition with femtosecond KrF excimer lasers ( F=2.2 J/cm2) was effectively used to deposit structured thin films from biomaterials (endothelial cell growth supplement and collagen embedded in starch matrix) to promote the adherence and growth of cells. These results present evidence that some surface can be successfully altered to induce guided cell growth.

  7. Second Topical Meeting on Laser Techniques in the Extreme Ultraviolet.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-10

    lasers. Cenfined Plasma Column, S. Suckewer, C. Keane, H. .-Milchborg, C. H. Skinner , and D. Voorhees, Plasma Physics-- 1&.30 AM COFFEE BREAK...and Cr) and carbon (2d = 150 ,) from 80 to 350 eV. Spectrometer configurations composed of variable-line-space IT. J. Watson Research Center, IBM...EUV Une I (Poster Paper) Intensities in Co,.-Laser-Produced Plasmas, C. H. Skinner , C. lent Generation of Tunable Radiation below 100 nm In Keane, H

  8. Laser transmission welding of Clearweld-coated polyethylene glycol terephthalate by incremental scanning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Wang, A. H.; Weng, Z. K.; Xia, H. B.

    2016-06-01

    Transmission laser welding using Incremental Scanning Technique(TWIST) mode and conventional contour welding mode were adopted to investigate laser transmission welding of 0.5 mm thick PET plate. A 1064 nm fiber laser was used to weld PET at the (TWIST) mode, and an 808 nm diode laser was applied to conduct the conventional contour welding. The Clearweld coating was used as laser absorbing material. The influences of laser parameters (i.e. defocusing distance, distance between two circles) on the quality of weld seams were analyzed by optical microscopy. Moreover, geometry and shear strength of the weld zone were tested to optimize laser parameters. Additionally, the water vapor permeability (WVP) of weld seams was measured to test hermetical capacity. Results show that the shear strength and hermetic capacity of weld seam by TWIST mode are at the same level in comparison with that of the conventional contour welding.

  9. Stomach and duodenum ulcer: comparing the efficiency of three laser therapeutic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myslovich, L. V.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of how effective various therapeutic techniques are in treating stomach and duodenum ulcers. The investigation was made on 105 patients (70 patients were affected by duodenum ulcer and 25 patients suffered from stomach ulcer). Three different complex laser therapeutic techniques were compared with each other and with a generally accepted drug treatment. It was found that the most pronounced therapeutic effect was observed in patients administered a complex laser technique that included drug therapy, the intravenous laser irradiation of blood, and the focal-segmental laser therapy. This complex laser therapy enabled ulcer scarring within 8 to 15 days after the beginning of the treatment (with the average scarring term of 9 days).

  10. Advancement of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays For Space-based Laser Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, nathaniel R.; Baggott, Renee S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Space-based laser and lidar instruments play an important role in NASA s plans for meeting its objectives in both Earth Science and Space Exploration areas. Almost all the lidar instrument concepts being considered by NASA scientist utilize moderate to high power diode-pumped solid state lasers as their transmitter source. Perhaps the most critical component of any solid state laser system is its pump laser diode array which essentially dictates instrument efficiency, reliability and lifetime. For this reason, premature failures and rapid degradation of high power laser diode arrays that have been experienced by laser system designers are of major concern to NASA. This work addresses these reliability and lifetime issues by attempting to eliminate the causes of failures and developing methods for screening laser diode arrays and qualifying them for operation in space.

  11. The commissioning of the advanced radiographic capability laser system: experimental and modeling results at the main laser output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nicola, J. M.; Yang, S. T.; Boley, C. D.; Crane, J. K.; Heebner, J. E.; Spinka, T. M.; Arnold, P.; Barty, C. P. J.; Bowers, M. W.; Budge, T. S.; Christensen, K.; Dawson, J. W.; Erbert, G.; Feigenbaum, E.; Guss, G.; Haefner, C.; Hermann, M. R.; Homoelle, D.; Jarboe, J. A.; Lawson, J. K.; Lowe-Webb, R.; McCandless, K.; McHale, B.; Pelz, L. J.; Pham, P. P.; Prantil, M. A.; Rehak, M. L.; Rever, M. A.; Rushford, M. C.; Sacks, R. A.; Shaw, M.; Smauley, D.; Smith, L. K.; Speck, R.; Tietbohl, G.; Wegner, P. J.; Widmayer, C.

    2015-02-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the first of a kind megajoule-class laser with 192 beams capable of delivering over 1.8 MJ and 500TW of 351nm light [1], [2]. It has been commissioned and operated since 2009 to support a wide range of missions including the study of inertial confinement fusion, high energy density physics, material science, and laboratory astrophysics. In order to advance our understanding, and enable short-pulse multi-frame radiographic experiments of dense cores of cold material, the generation of very hard x-rays above 50 keV is necessary. X-rays with such characteristics can be efficiently generated with high intensity laser pulses above 1017 W/cm² [3]. The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) [4] which is currently being commissioned on the NIF will provide eight, 1 ps to 50 ps, adjustable pulses with up to 1.7 kJ each to create x-ray point sources enabling dynamic, multi-frame x-ray backlighting. This paper will provide an overview of the ARC system and report on the laser performance tests conducted with a stretched-pulse up to the main laser output and their comparison with the results of our laser propagation codes.

  12. Recent advances in sample preparation techniques for effective bioanalytical methods.

    PubMed

    Kole, Prashant Laxman; Venkatesh, Gantala; Kotecha, Jignesh; Sheshala, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent developments in bioanalysis sample preparation techniques and gives an update on basic principles, theory, applications and possibilities for automation, and a comparative discussion on the advantages and limitation of each technique. Conventional liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), protein precipitation (PP) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques are now been considered as methods of the past. The last decade has witnessed a rapid development of novel sample preparation techniques in bioanalysis. Developments in SPE techniques such as selective sorbents and in the overall approach to SPE, such as hybrid SPE and molecularly imprinted polymer SPE, have been addressed. Considerable literature has been published in the area of solid-phase micro-extraction and its different versions, e.g. stir bar sorptive extraction, and their application in the development of selective and sensitive bioanalytical methods. Techniques such as dispersive solid-phase extraction, disposable pipette extraction and micro-extraction by packed sorbent offer a variety of extraction phases and provide unique advantages to bioanalytical methods. On-line SPE utilizing column-switching techniques is rapidly gaining acceptance in bioanalytical applications. PP sample preparation techniques such as PP filter plates/tubes offer many advantages like removal of phospholipids and proteins in plasma/serum. Newer approaches to conventional LLE techniques (salting-out LLE) are also covered in this review article.

  13. Influence of polishing and coating techniques on laser induced damage on AR-coated ceramic Yb:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vido, Mariastefania; Phillips, P. J.; Hein, Joachim; Körner, Jörg; Smith, Jodie M.; Ertel, Klaus; Mason, Paul D.; Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Cheklov, Oleg; Butcher, Thomas J.; Tomlinson, Stephanie; Lintern, Andrew; Greenhalgh, Justin; Shaikh, Waseem; Hawkes, Steve J.; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Kaluza, Malte C.; Collier, John L.

    2014-10-01

    Yb3+ doped YAG is one of the most promising materials for high energy, high repetition rate laser systems producing nanosecond pulses. YAG as the host medium offers good thermo-mechanical and thermo-optical properties and, if it is used in ceramic form, it can be produced in large sizes with laser-grade optical properties. Large sized, laser-grade gain media are pivotal for the development of high energy kJ-class laser systems. Much effort has been devoted to the development of advanced polishing and coating techniques in order to produce optical materials able to withstand high fluence levels at different environmental conditions. In this paper, we present experimental results for 1 on 1 laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) tests in the nanosecond regime following ISO standards on anti-reflective coated ceramic Yb:YAG samples. Experimental results show that, generally, Ion Beam Sputtering (IBS) coatings perform better than Ion Assisted Deposition (IAD) coatings on low roughness substrates, while IAD and IBS coatings deposited on substrates characterised by higher surface roughness values offer a comparable performance. Performance of IBS coatings improves as substrate roughness decreases, whereas performance of IAD coatings improves as substrate roughness increases. No clear correlation has been observed between LIDT values and temperature or pressure. However, an inspection of damage sites allowed to conclude that both temperature and pressure have an impact on damage morphology.

  14. Advanced rehabilitation techniques for the multi-limb amputee.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Zach T; Loomis, Gregory A; Mitsch, Sarah; Murphy, Ian C; Griffin, Sarah C; Potter, Benjamin K; Pasquina, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Advances in combat casualty care have contributed to unprecedented survival rates of battlefield injuries, challenging the field of rehabilitation to help injured service members achieve maximal functional recovery and independence. Nowhere is this better illustrated than in the care of the multiple-limb amputee. Specialized medical, surgical, and rehabilitative interventions are needed to optimize the care of this unique patient population. This article describes lessons learned at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda in providing advanced therapy and prosthetics for combat casualties, but provides guidelines for all providers involved in the care of individuals with amputation.

  15. Advanced froth flotation techniques for fine coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1994-12-31

    Advanced column flotation cells offer many potential advantages for the treatment of fine coal. The most important of these is the ability to achieve high separation efficiencies using only a single stage of processing. Unfortunately, industrial flotation columns often suffer from poor recovery, low throughput and high maintenance requirements as compared to mechanically-agitated conventional cells. These problems can usually be attributed to poorly-designed air sparging systems. This article examines the problems of air sparging in greater detail and offers useful guidelines for designing bubble generators for industrial flotation columns. The application of these principles in the design of a successful advanced fine coal flotation circuit is also presented.

  16. Orofacial hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: high power diode laser in early and advanced lesion treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempesta, Angela; Franco, Simonetta; Miccoli, Simona; Suppressa, Patrizia; De Falco, Vincenzo; Crincoli, Vito; Lacaita, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Michele; Favia, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a muco-cutaneous inherited disease. Symptoms are epistaxis, visceral arterio-venous malformations, multiple muco-cutaneous telangiectasia with the risk of number increasing enlargement, bleeding, and super-infection. The aim of this work is to show the dual Diode Laser efficacy in preventive treatment of Early Lesions (EL < 2mm) and therapeutic treatment of Advanced Lesions (AL < 2mm). 21 patients affected by HHT with 822 muco-cutaneous telangiectatic nodules have been treated in several sessions with local anaesthesia and cooling of treated sites. EL preventive treatment consists of single Laser impulse (fibre 320) in ultrapulsed mode (2 mm single point spot). AL therapeutic treatment consists of repeated Laser impulses in pulsed mode (on 200ms / off 400ms). According to the results, Diode Laser used in pulsed and ultra-pulsed mode is very effective as noninvasive treatment both in early and advanced oral and perioral telangiectasia.

  17. Adaptability of laser diffraction measurement technique in soil physics methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Gyöngyi; Szabó, József; Rajkai, Kálmán; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Koós, Sándor; László, Péter; Hauk, Gabriella; Makó, András

    2016-04-01

    There are intentions all around the world to harmonize soils' particle size distribution (PSD) data by the laser diffractometer measurements (LDM) to that of the sedimentation techniques (pipette or hydrometer methods). Unfortunately, up to the applied methodology (e. g. type of pre-treatments, kind of dispersant etc.), PSDs of the sedimentation methods (due to different standards) are dissimilar and could be hardly harmonized with each other, as well. A need was arisen therefore to build up a database, containing PSD values measured by the pipette method according to the Hungarian standard (MSZ-08. 0205: 1978) and the LDM according to a widespread and widely used procedure. In our current publication the first results of statistical analysis of the new and growing PSD database are presented: 204 soil samples measured with pipette method and LDM (Malvern Mastersizer 2000, HydroG dispersion unit) were compared. Applying usual size limits at the LDM, clay fraction was highly under- and silt fraction was overestimated compared to the pipette method. Subsequently soil texture classes determined from the LDM measurements significantly differ from results of the pipette method. According to previous surveys and relating to each other the two dataset to optimizing, the clay/silt boundary at LDM was changed. Comparing the results of PSDs by pipette method to that of the LDM, in case of clay and silt fractions the modified size limits gave higher similarities. Extension of upper size limit of clay fraction from 0.002 to 0.0066 mm, and so change the lower size limit of silt fractions causes more easy comparability of pipette method and LDM. Higher correlations were found between clay content and water vapor adsorption, specific surface area in case of modified limit, as well. Texture classes were also found less dissimilar. The difference between the results of the two kind of PSD measurement methods could be further reduced knowing other routinely analyzed soil parameters

  18. Advanced Laser Processing of Materials--Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsohn, E.; Ryan, M.

    1995-01-01

    Preparation of amorphous thin films in semiconductors and their transition to the crystalline phase may apply to switching devices. Surfaces of single crystal samples of bulk In2Se3 and thin films of InSe were treated using an excimer laser, and microscopic examination showed the treated portions of the surface had become amorphous. Film samples of InSe were laser-treated like the bulk samples. Examination of these treated flims showed shifts in the optical transmittance spectra as well as surface morphology changes.

  19. Analytic Syntax: A Technique for Advanced Level Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Ruth

    1975-01-01

    The technique explained here can increase a foreign student's awareness of English grammatical and rhetorical structures. Structural paraphrase is a syntactic reformulation of difficult phrases with minimal vocabulary changes. The technique is illustrated and suggestions are given for class presentation. (CHK)

  20. Recent advances in the applications of pulsed lasers in the hydrosphere. [considering airborne bathymetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    Laboratory and field measurements have been performed on the transmission/scattering characteristics of a pulsed neon laser as a function of water turbidity. These results have been used to establish the criteria for an airborne laser bathymetry system. Extensive measurements have been made of laser induced fluorescence using a pulsed tunable dye laser. Feasibility has been demonstrated for remote detection and possible identification of various types of algae and oils. Similar measurements made on a wide variety of organic dyes have shown this technique to have applications in remote measurements of subsurface currents, temperature and salinity.

  1. Recent advances in microscopic techniques for visualizing leukocytes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rohit; Tikoo, Shweta; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Leukocytes are inherently motile and interactive cells. Recent advances in intravital microscopy approaches have enabled a new vista of their behavior within intact tissues in real time. This brief review summarizes the developments enabling the tracking of immune responses in vivo. PMID:27239292

  2. Bricklaying Curriculum: Advanced Bricklaying Techniques. Instructional Materials. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turcotte, Raymond J.; Hendrix, Laborn J.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist bricklaying instructors in providing performance-based instruction in advanced bricklaying. Included in the first section of the guide are units on customized or architectural masonry units; glass block; sills, lintels, and copings; and control (expansion) joints. The next two units deal with cut,…

  3. Advanced NDE techniques for quantitative characterization of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center and their applications that have resulted in quantitative assessment of material properties based on thermal and ultrasonic measurements are reviewed. Specific applications include ultrasonic determination of bolt tension, ultrasonic and thermal characterization of bonded layered structures, characterization of composite materials, and disbonds in aircraft skins.

  4. Precision laser range finder system design for Advanced Technology Laboratory applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, K. E.; Kohn, R. L.; Seib, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    Preliminary system design of a pulsed precision ruby laser rangefinder system is presented which has a potential range resolution of 0.4 cm when atmospheric effects are negligible. The system being proposed for flight testing on the advanced technology laboratory (ATL) consists of a modelocked ruby laser transmitter, course and vernier rangefinder receivers, optical beacon retroreflector tracking system, and a network of ATL tracking retroreflectors. Performance calculations indicate that spacecraft to ground ranging accuracies of 1 to 2 cm are possible.

  5. Phase generated carrier technique for fiber laser hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rizhong; Wang, Xinbing; Huang, Junbin; Gu, Hongcan

    2013-08-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser is compact, and is very suitable for using as a hydrophone to sense acoustic pressure. A DFB fiber laser hydrophone was researched. In the fiber laser hydrophone signal demodulating system, an unbalanced Michelson fiber interferometer and a Phase Generated Carrier (PGC) method were used. The PGC method can be used to demodulating the acoustic signal from the interference signal. Comparing with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) method and Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) method, the digitized PGC method requires a greater amount of computation because of the high signal sampling, but it demands only one interference signal which makes the less fiber connections of the fiber laser hydrophone array. So the fiber laser hydrophone array based on the PGC method has lower complexity and higher reliability than that based on the NRL method or NPS method. The experimental results approve that the PGC method can demodulate acoustic signal between 20~2000 Hz frequency range with good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when the PZT driving frequency is 20 kHz.

  6. Advanced excimer laser technologies enable green semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Hitomi; Yoo, Youngsun; Minegishi, Yuji; Hisanaga, Naoto; Enami, Tatsuo

    2014-03-01

    "Green" has fast become an important and pervasive topic throughout many industries worldwide. Many companies, especially in the manufacturing industries, have taken steps to integrate green initiatives into their high-level corporate strategies. Governments have also been active in implementing various initiatives designed to increase corporate responsibility and accountability towards environmental issues. In the semiconductor manufacturing industry, there are growing concerns over future environmental impact as enormous fabs expand and new generation of equipments become larger and more powerful. To address these concerns, Gigaphoton has implemented various green initiatives for many years under the EcoPhoton™ program. The objective of this program is to drive innovations in technology and services that enable manufacturers to significantly reduce both the financial and environmental "green cost" of laser operations in high-volume manufacturing environment (HVM) - primarily focusing on electricity, gas and heat management costs. One example of such innovation is Gigaphoton's Injection-Lock system, which reduces electricity and gas utilization costs of the laser by up to 50%. Furthermore, to support the industry's transition from 300mm to the next generation 450mm wafers, technologies are being developed to create lasers that offer double the output power from 60W to 120W, but reducing electricity and gas consumption by another 50%. This means that the efficiency of lasers can be improve by up to 4 times in 450mm wafer production environments. Other future innovations include the introduction of totally Heliumfree Excimer lasers that utilize Nitrogen gas as its replacement for optical module purging. This paper discusses these and other innovations by Gigaphoton to enable green manufacturing.

  7. Laser and acoustic Doppler techniques for the measurement of fluid velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of current laser and acoustic Doppler techniques is presented. Results obtained by Doppler anemometry and conventional sensors are compared. Comparisons include simultaneous velocity measurements by hot wire and a three-dimensional laser anemometer made in a gaseous pipe flow as well as direct comparisons of atmospheric velocities measured with propeller and cup anemometry. Scanning techniques are also discussed. Conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented.

  8. Combined laser calorimetry and photothermal technique for absorption measurement of optical coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bincheng; Blaschke, Holger; Ristau, Detlev

    2006-08-10

    To the best of our knowledge, a combined sensitive technique employing both laser calorimetry and a surface thermal lens scheme for measuring absorption values of optical coatings is presented for the first time. Laser calorimetric and pulsed surface thermal lens signals are simultaneously obtained with a highly reflecting UV coating sample irradiated at 193 nm. The advantages and potential applications of the combined technique and the experimental factors limiting the measurement sensitivity are discussed.

  9. Combined laser calorimetry and photothermal technique for absorption measurement of optical coatings.

    PubMed

    Li, Bincheng; Blaschke, Holger; Ristau, Detlev

    2006-08-10

    To the best of our knowledge, a combined sensitive technique employing both laser calorimetry and a surface thermal lens scheme for measuring absorption values of optical coatings is presented for the first time. Laser calorimetric and pulsed surface thermal lens signals are simultaneously obtained with a highly reflecting UV coating sample irradiated at 193 nm. The advantages and potential applications of the combined technique and the experimental factors limiting the measurement sensitivity are discussed.

  10. Challenges to Laser-Based Imaging Techniques in Gas Turbine Combustor Systems for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, Randy J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Zaller, Michelle M.; Hicks, Yolanda R.

    1998-01-01

    Increasingly severe constraints on emissions, noise and fuel efficiency must be met by the next generation of commercial aircraft powerplants. At NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) a cooperative research effort with industry is underway to design and test combustors that will meet these requirements. To accomplish these tasks, it is necessary to gain both a detailed understanding of the combustion processes and a precise knowledge of combustor and combustor sub-component performance at close to actual conditions. To that end, researchers at LeRC are engaged in a comprehensive diagnostic investigation of high pressure reacting flowfields that duplicate conditions expected within the actual engine combustors. Unique, optically accessible flame-tubes and sector rig combustors, designed especially for these tests. afford the opportunity to probe these flowfields with the most advanced, laser-based optical diagnostic techniques. However, these same techniques, tested and proven on comparatively simple bench-top gaseous flame burners, encounter numerous restrictions and challenges when applied in these facilities. These include high pressures and temperatures, large flow rates, liquid fuels, remote testing, and carbon or other material deposits on combustor windows. Results are shown that document the success and versatility of these nonintrusive optical diagnostics despite the challenges to their implementation in realistic systems.

  11. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-08-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process.

  12. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-01-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process. PMID:27484188

  13. Development of Advanced Seed Laser Modules for Lidar and Spectroscopy Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Rosiewicz, Alex; Coleman, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on recent progress made in the development of highly compact, single mode, distributed feedback laser (DFB) seed laser modules for lidar and spectroscopy applications from space based platforms. One of the intended application of this technology is in the NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The DFB laser modules operating at 1571 nm and 1262 nm have advanced current and temperature drivers built into them. A combination of temperature and current tuning allows coarse and fine adjustment of the diode wavelengths.

  14. Stabilized high-power laser system for the gravitational wave detector advanced LIGO.

    PubMed

    Kwee, P; Bogan, C; Danzmann, K; Frede, M; Kim, H; King, P; Pöld, J; Puncken, O; Savage, R L; Seifert, F; Wessels, P; Winkelmann, L; Willke, B

    2012-05-07

    An ultra-stable, high-power cw Nd:YAG laser system, developed for the ground-based gravitational wave detector Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory), was comprehensively characterized. Laser power, frequency, beam pointing and beam quality were simultaneously stabilized using different active and passive schemes. The output beam, the performance of the stabilization, and the cross-coupling between different stabilization feedback control loops were characterized and found to fulfill most design requirements. The employed stabilization schemes and the achieved performance are of relevance to many high-precision optical experiments.

  15. Backscattered Electron Microscopy as an Advanced Technique in Petrography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krinsley, David Henry; Manley, Curtis Robert

    1989-01-01

    Three uses of this method with sandstone, desert varnish, and granite weathering are described. Background information on this technique is provided. Advantages of this type of microscopy are stressed. (CW)

  16. A fiber-optic diagnostic technique for mechanical detection of the laser-metal interaction underwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, R. Q.; Chen, X.; Shen, Z. H.; Lu, J.; Ni, X. W.

    2004-03-01

    A new fiber-optic force sensor based on optical beam deflection for the investigation of the mechanical effects during laser-metal interaction underwater is developed. This sensor is applied to detect the laser-induced plasma ablation force and liquid-jet impact during the cavitation bubble collapse near a solid boundary when a Q-switched laser is focused on a metal in water. The experimental results indicate the liquid-jet effect outweighs the well-known laser-induced plasma ablation force. This technique has the advantages of high-frequency response, simple structure, and nondestructive examination.

  17. Advanced Statistical Signal Processing Techniques for Landmine Detection Using GPR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-12

    based ground penetrating radars for the detection of subsurface objects that are low in metal content and hard to detect. The derived techniques...penetrating radars for the detection of subsurface objects that are low in metal content and hard to detect. The derived techniques include the exploitation...5.00 4.00 3.00 9.00 T. Glenn, J. Wilson, D. Ho. A MULTIMODAL MATCHING PURSUITS DISSIMILARITY MEASURE APPLIED TO LANDMINE/CLUTTER DISCRIMINATION

  18. Electroextraction and electromembrane extraction: Advances in hyphenation to analytical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Oedit, Amar; Ramautar, Rawi; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Electroextraction (EE) and electromembrane extraction (EME) are sample preparation techniques that both require an electric field that is applied over a liquid‐liquid system, which enables the migration of charged analytes. Furthermore, both techniques are often used to pre‐concentrate analytes prior to analysis. In this review an overview is provided of the body of literature spanning April 2012–November 2015 concerning EE and EME, focused on hyphenation to analytical techniques. First, the theoretical aspects of concentration enhancement in EE and EME are discussed to explain extraction recovery and enrichment factor. Next, overviews are provided of the techniques based on their hyphenation to LC, GC, CE, and direct detection. These overviews cover the compounds and matrices, experimental aspects (i.e. donor volume, acceptor volume, extraction time, extraction voltage, and separation time) and the analytical aspects (i.e. limit of detection, enrichment factor, and extraction recovery). Techniques that were either hyphenated online to analytical techniques or show high potential with respect to online hyphenation are highlighted. Finally, the potential future directions of EE and EME are discussed. PMID:26864699

  19. Advanced millimeter-wave security portal imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-03-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance as a security tool to augment conventional metal detectors and baggage x-ray systems for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This acceptance indicates that the technology has matured; however, many potential improvements can yet be realized. The authors have developed a number of techniques over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, and high-frequency high-bandwidth techniques. All of these may improve the performance of new systems; however, some of these techniques will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. Reducing this cost may require the development of novel array designs. In particular, RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems. Highfrequency, high-bandwidth designs are difficult to achieve with conventional mm-wave electronic devices, and RF photonic devices may be a practical alternative. In this paper, the mm-wave imaging techniques developed at PNNL are reviewed and the potential for implementing RF photonic mm-wave array designs is explored.

  20. Coal and char studies by advanced EMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.; Odintsov, B.M.

    1999-03-31

    Advanced magnetic resonance (EMR) methods are used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. During this grant period, further progress was made on proton NMR and low-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to examine the interaction between fluids such as water and the surface of suspended char particles. Effects of char particle size and type on water nuclear spin relaxation, T2, were measured and modeled.

  1. Coal and char studies by advanced EMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.; Odintsov, B.M.

    1998-09-30

    Advanced magnetic resonance (EMR) methods are used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. During this grant period, further progress was made on proton NMR and low-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to examine the interaction between fluids such as water and the surface of suspended char particles. Effects of char particle size on water nuclear spin relaxation, T2, were measured.

  2. Improvement of the technique in treatment of internal hemorrhoids with Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiao-qing; Zhu, Jing; Shi, Hong-Min

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To observe and study the improvement of the technique in treatment of internal hemorrhoids with Nd:YAG laser and evaluate the effective rate. Methods: 60 patients of internal hemorrhoids were treated with Nd:YAG laser (10-15mw) irradiating on the mucosa of the lesions. Results: Among 60 patients, 57 patients were primarily cured with one treatment, 3 patients were primarily cured with two treatments. The effective rate was 95% with one treatment, and it reached to 100% with two treatments. Conclusions: the improvement of the technique in treatment of internal hemorrhoids with Nd:YAG laser is effective and easy to operate.

  3. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Bead-on-plate and butt welds were previously performed to depths of about 4 mm with a 6-kW CO{sub 2} laser on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys. These welds were made at a speed of 0.042 m/s using argon purging at a flow rate of 2.8 m{sup 3}/s. The purge was distributed with a diffuser nozzle aimed just behind the laser beam during the welding operation. The fusion zones of welds made under these conditions consisted of very fine, needle-shaped grains and were also harder than the bulk metal (230-270 dph, compared to {approx}180 dph for the bulk metal). A limited number of impact tests showed that the as-welded ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTT) was above room temperature, but heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h in vacuum reduced the DBTT to <{minus}25{degrees}C. Activities during this reporting period focused on improvements in the purging system and determination of the effect of welding speed on welds. A 2-kW continuous YAG laser at Lumonics Corp. in Livonia, MI, was used to make 34 test welds for this study.

  4. Laser-scanning techniques for rapid ballistics identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodburgy, R. C.; Nakich, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Two different laser-scanning methods may be utilized. In each case scanned cylindrical bullet surface is displayed ""unwrapped'' on oscilloscope screen. Bullets are compared by photographing each display and superimposing negatives of two images. With some modifications bullets can be scanned and compared by superimposing images on screen of dual-beam oscilloscope.

  5. Advanced Material Developments with Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn A.; Cooper, Ken; McGill, Preston; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS(Trademark)) process is a new technology to fabricate three-dimensional metallic components directly from CAD solid models. It directly fabricates metal hardware by injecting the metal powder of choice into the focal point of a 700W Nd:Yag laser as it traces the perimeter and fills of a part. The Rapid Prototype Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center is currently operating a OPTOMEC 750 LENS machine in evaluation experiments involving integration of this technology into various manufacturing processes associated with aerospace applications. This paper will cover our research finding about properties of samples created from Inconel 718 & SS316 using this process versus the same materials in cast & wrought conditions.

  6. MEMS pressure sensor fabricated by advanced bulk micromachining techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanko, Gabriel; Hudek, Peter; Zehetner, Johann; Dzuba, Jaroslav; Choleva, Pavlina; Vallo, Martin; Rýger, Ivan; Lalinský, Tibor

    2013-05-01

    We present the design and implementation of a MEMS pressure sensor with an operation potential under harsh conditions at high temperatures (T = 300 - 800°C). The sensor consists of a circular HEMT (C-HEMT) integrated on a circular AlGaN/GaN membrane. In order to realize MEMS for extreme conditions using AlGaN/GaN material system, two key issues should be solved: (a) realization of MEMS structures by etching of the substrate material and (b) formation of metallic contacts (both ohmic and Schottky) to be able to withstand high thermal loads. In this design concept the piezoresistive and piezoelectric effect of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is used to sense the pressure under static and/or dynamic conditions. The backside bulk micromachining of our SiC wafer in the first experiment started with FS-laser ablation down to ~200 -270μm deep holes of 500μm in diameter. Because no additional intermediate layer can stop the ablation process, the number of laser pulses has to be optimized in order to reach the required ablation depth. 2D structural-mechanical and piezoelectric analyses were performed to verify the mechanical and piezoelectric response of the circular membrane pressure sensor to static pressure load (in the range between 20 and 100kPa). We suggested that suppressing the residual stress in the membrane can improve the sensor response. The parameters of the same devices previously fabricated on bulk substrates and/or membranes were compared. The maxima of drain currents of our C-HEMT devices on SiC exhibit more than four times higher values compared to those measured on silicon substrates.

  7. Application of Advanced Laser Diagnostics to High Impact Technologies. Delivery Order 0001: Laser Diagnostics Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    Phantom v5.0 CMOS-based high-framing- rate digital camera provided by Photo-Sonics International Ltd. During this study, the camera was operated at......excite OH. The second PIV light sheet is produced by pumping a dye laser (employing DCM laser dye) with a second frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG

  8. Predictive modeling, simulation, and optimization of laser processing techniques: UV nanosecond-pulsed laser micromachining of polymers and selective laser melting of powder metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criales Escobar, Luis Ernesto

    One of the most frequently evolving areas of research is the utilization of lasers for micro-manufacturing and additive manufacturing purposes. The use of laser beam as a tool for manufacturing arises from the need for flexible and rapid manufacturing at a low-to-mid cost. Laser micro-machining provides an advantage over mechanical micro-machining due to the faster production times of large batch sizes and the high costs associated with specific tools. Laser based additive manufacturing enables processing of powder metals for direct and rapid fabrication of products. Therefore, laser processing can be viewed as a fast, flexible, and cost-effective approach compared to traditional manufacturing processes. Two types of laser processing techniques are studied: laser ablation of polymers for micro-channel fabrication and selective laser melting of metal powders. Initially, a feasibility study for laser-based micro-channel fabrication of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) via experimentation is presented. In particular, the effectiveness of utilizing a nanosecond-pulsed laser as the energy source for laser ablation is studied. The results are analyzed statistically and a relationship between process parameters and micro-channel dimensions is established. Additionally, a process model is introduced for predicting channel depth. Model outputs are compared and analyzed to experimental results. The second part of this research focuses on a physics-based FEM approach for predicting the temperature profile and melt pool geometry in selective laser melting (SLM) of metal powders. Temperature profiles are calculated for a moving laser heat source to understand the temperature rise due to heating during SLM. Based on the predicted temperature distributions, melt pool geometry, i.e. the locations at which melting of the powder material occurs, is determined. Simulation results are compared against data obtained from experimental Inconel 625 test coupons fabricated at the National

  9. Advances in laser driven accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim

    2004-08-23

    Current activities (last few years) at different laboratories, towards the development of a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) are reviewed, followed by a more in depth discussion of results obtained at the L'OASIS laboratory of LBNL. Recent results on laser guiding of relativistically intense beams in preformed plasma channels are discussed. The observation of mono-energetic beams in the 100 MeV energy range, produced by a channel guided LWFA at LBNL, is described and compared to results obtained in the unguided case at LOA, RAL and LBNL. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator has a very beneficial impact on the electron energy distribution. Progress on laser triggered injection is reviewed. Results are presented on measurements of bunch duration and emittance of the accelerated electron beams, that indicate the possibility of generating femtosecond duration electron bunches. Future challenges and plans towards the development of a 1 GeV LWFA module are discussed.

  10. Advances in endonasal low intensity laser irradiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jian-Ling; Liu, Timon C.; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Liu, Song-hao

    2005-07-01

    Endonasal low intensity laser therapy (ELILT) began in China in 1998. Now in China it is widely applied to treat hyperlipidemia and brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, insomnia, poststroke depression, intractable headache, ache in head or face, cerebral thrombosis, acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease, migraine, brain lesion and mild cognitive impairment. There are four pathways mediating EILILT, Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells. Two unhealth acupoints of Yangming channal inside nose might mediate the one as is low intensity laser acupuncture. Unbalance autonomic nervous systems might be modulated. Blood cells might mediate the one as is intravascular low intensity laser therapy. These three pathways are integrated in ELILT so that serum amyloid β protein, malformation rate of erythrocyte, CCK-8, the level of viscosity at lower shear rates and hematocrit, or serum lipid might decrease, and melanin production/SOD activity or β endorphin might increase after ELILT treatment. These results indicate ELILT might work, but it need to be verified by randomized placebo-controlled trial.

  11. Advanced wavefront measurement and analysis of laser system modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Auerback, J.M.

    1994-11-15

    High spatial resolution measurements of the reflected or transmitted wavefronts of large aperture optical components used in high peak power laser systems is now possible. These measurements are produced by phase shifting interferometry. The wavefront data is in the form of 3-D phase maps that reconstruct the wavefront shape. The emphasis of this work is on the characterization of wavefront features in the mid-spatial wavelength range (from 0.1 to 10.0 mm) and has been accomplished for the first time. Wavefront structure from optical components with spatial wavelengths in this range are of concern because their effects in high peak power laser systems. At high peak power, this phase modulation can convert to large magnitude intensity modulation by non-linear processes. This can lead to optical damage. We have developed software to input the measured phase map data into beam propagation codes in order to model this conversion process. We are analyzing this data to: (1) Characterize the wavefront structure produced by current optical components, (2) Refine our understanding of laser system performance, (3) Develop a database from which future optical component specifications can be derived.

  12. A simple technique for individual picosecond laser pulse duration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    We describe here a simple nonlinear optic technique for the measurement of the duration of individual picosecond pulses. The accuracy and relative simplicity of the technique increase with the number of pulses measured. An experimental test of the basis of the technique is described.

  13. Application of Active Learning Techniques to an Advanced Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knop, R. A.

    2004-05-01

    The New Faculty Workshop provided a wealth of techniques as well as an overriding philosophy for the teaching of undergraduate Physics and Astronomy courses. The focus of the workshop was active learning, summarized in ``Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching" by Slater & Adams: it's not what you do in class that matters, it's what the students do. Much of the specific focus of the New Faculty Workshop is on teaching the large, introductory Physics classes that many of the faculty present are sure to teach, both algebra-based and calculus-based. Many of these techniques apply directly and with little modification to introductory Astronomy courses. However, little direct attention is given to upper-division undergraduate, or even graduate, courses. In this presentation, I will share my experience in attempting to apply some of the techniques discussed at the New Faculty Workshop to an upper-division course in Galactic Astrophysics at Vanderbilt University during the Spring semester of 2004.

  14. The bumper technique for advancing a large profile microcatheter.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Christopher P; Chartrain, Alexander G; Schwegel, Claire; Oxley, Thomas J; Shoirah, Hazem; Mocco, J

    2017-03-09

    Operators commonly encounter difficulty maneuvering a microcatheter beyond the distal lip of wide neck aneurysms and aneurysms in challenging locations. Few techniques have been described to guide operators in these particular situations. In this case report of a 56-year-old woman with a 16 mm ophthalmic artery aneurysm, the microcatheter continually snagged the distal aneurysm lip, preventing delivery of a flow diverter into the distal parent vessel. In troubleshooting this obstacle, a second microguidewire was introduced alongside the microcatheter and was used to cover the distal lip of the aneurysm to prevent further snagging. The second guidewire successfully deflected the microcatheter into the distal vessel, a technique that we have aptly dubbed the 'bumper technique'.

  15. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thick Concrete Using Advanced Signal Processing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight A; Barker, Alan M; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Albright, Austin P; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years [1]. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations.

  16. Simple synchronization technique of a mode-locked laser for Laser-Compton scattering γ-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Michiaki; Kosuge, Atsushi; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Hajima, Ryoichi; Kondo, Kiminori

    2016-06-01

    We propose a simple and effective synchronization technique between a reference electrical oscillator and a mode-locked laser for a narrowband picosecond Laser-Compton scattering γ-ray source by using a commercial-based 1-chip frequency synthesizer, which is widely used in radio communication. The mode-locked laser has been successfully synchronized in time with a jitter of 180 fs RMS for 10 Hz-100 kHz bandwidth. A good stability of 640 μHz at 80 MHz repetition rate for 10 h operation has also been confirmed. We discuss in detail the design and performance of this technique (in terms of timing jitter, stability, and validity).

  17. Transcranial Doppler: Techniques and advanced applications: Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arvind K.; Bathala, Lokesh; Batra, Amit; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Sharma, Vijay K.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is the only diagnostic tool that can provide continuous information about cerebral hemodynamics in real time and over extended periods. In the previous paper (Part 1), we have already presented the basic ultrasound physics pertaining to TCD, insonation methods, and various flow patterns. This article describes various advanced applications of TCD such as detection of right-to-left shunt, emboli monitoring, vasomotor reactivity (VMR), monitoring of vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), monitoring of intracranial pressure, its role in stoke prevention in sickle cell disease, and as a supplementary test for confirmation of brain death. PMID:27011639

  18. Brain development in preterm infants assessed using advanced MRI techniques.

    PubMed

    Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Counsell, Serena J; Edwards, A David

    2014-03-01

    Infants who are born preterm have a high incidence of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral abnormalities, which may be associated with impaired brain development. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches, such as diffusion MRI (d-MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI), provide objective and reproducible measures of brain development. Indices derived from d-MRI can be used to provide quantitative measures of preterm brain injury. Although fMRI of the neonatal brain is currently a research tool, future studies combining d-MRI and fMRI have the potential to assess the structural and functional properties of the developing brain and its response to injury.

  19. Application of advanced coating techniques to rocket engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The materials problem in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) is reviewed. Potential coatings and the method of their application for improved life of SSME components are discussed. A number of advanced coatings for turbine blade components and disks are being developed and tested in a multispecimen thermal fatigue fluidized bed facility at IIT Research Institute. This facility is capable of producing severe strains of the degree present in blades and disk components of the SSME. The potential coating systems and current efforts at IITRI being taken for life extension of the SSME components are summarized.

  20. Advanced photoinjector laser and microwave technologies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F.V.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Talley, W.K.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of the design parameters of the compact, high gradient, high luminosity X-band (8.568 GHz) photoinjector facility currently being developed as a collaborative effort between LLNL and UC Davis, is followed by a more detailed description of each of its major subsystems : X-band rf gun, GHz repetition rate synchronously modelocked AlGaAs quantum well laser oscillator, and 8-pass Ti: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} chirped pulse laser amplifier. The photoinjector uses a high quantum efficiency ({approx}5%) Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode, and will be capable of producing high charge (> 1 nC), relativistic (5 MeV), ultrashort (< 1 ps) electron bunches at 2.142 GHz repetition rate in burst mode (100 photoelectron bunches). Design studies indicate that a normalized rms transverse emittance {epsilon}{sub n} = 0.75 {pi} mm-mrad is possible at 0.1 nC charge, while 2.5 {pi} mm-mrad can be obtained at 1 nC. A complete status report of our progress in the development and implementation of the design discussed herein is then given, together with initial experimental data concerning the performance of the 15 MW SLAC X-band klystron amplifier. Finally, the phase noise and jitter characteristics of the laser and rf systems of the high gradient X-band photoinjector have been measured experimentally. In this case, the laser oscillator is a self-modelocked Titanium:Sapphire system operating at the 108th subharmonic of the rf gun. The X-band signal is produced from the laser by a phase-locked dielectric resonance oscillator, and amplified by a pulsed TWT. A comparison between the TWT phase noise and the fields excited in the rf gun demonstrates the filtering effect of the high Q cavity resonant structure, thus indicating that the rf gun can be used as a master oscillator, and could be energized by either a magnetron or a cross-field amplifier.

  1. Residual stress determination of rail tread using a laser ultrasonic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Feng, Qibo

    2015-05-01

    A non-destructive method for measuring the residual stress on rail tread that uses a laser-generated ultrasonic technique is proposed. The residual stress distribution of different parts on both the new rail and used rail were examined. The surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are excited by a scanning line laser and detected by a laser ultrasonic detection system. A digital correlation method was used for calculating the changes in velocity of SAWs, which reflects the stress distribution. A wavelet de-noising technique and a least square fit were used for signal processing to improve the measurement accuracy. The effects of ultrasonic propagation distance and surface roughness on the determination of residual stress were analyzed and simulated. Results from the study demonstrate that the stress distribution results are accordant with the practical situation, and the laser-generated SAWs technique is a promising tool for the determination of residual stress in the railway inspection and other industrial testing fields.

  2. A study on laser-based ultrasonic technique by the use of guided wave tomographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Junpil Lim, Juyoung; Cho, Younho; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2015-03-31

    Guided wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and coarse surfaces or geometrically complicated features. A non-contact setup with a laser ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is the classic attractive for guided wave inspection. The present work was done to develop a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique by laser ultrasonic technique in a plate-like structure. A method for Lam wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulse laser ultrasonic transmitter and a Michelson interferometer receiver has been developed. In the images obtained by laser scanning, the defect shape and area showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact-based online inspection and monitoring technique.

  3. Benefits of advanced software techniques for mission planning systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasquet, A.; Parrod, Y.; Desaintvincent, A.

    1994-01-01

    The increasing complexity of modern spacecraft, and the stringent requirement for maximizing their mission return, call for a new generation of Mission Planning Systems (MPS). In this paper, we discuss the requirements for the Space Mission Planning and the benefits which can be expected from Artificial Intelligence techniques through examples of applications developed by Matra Marconi Space.

  4. Advances in reduction techniques for tire contact problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1995-01-01

    Some recent developments in reduction techniques, as applied to predicting the tire contact response and evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of the different response quantities, are reviewed. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the contact response to variations in the geometric and material parameters of the tire. The tire is modeled using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory with the effects of variation in geometric and material parameters, transverse shear deformation, and geometric nonlinearities included. The contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the stress resultants, the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with the contact conditions. The elemental arrays are obtained by using a modified two-field, mixed variational principle. For the application of reduction techniques, the tire finite element model is partitioned into two regions. The first region consists of the nodes that are likely to come in contact with the pavement, and the second region includes all the remaining nodes. The reduction technique is used to significantly reduce the degrees of freedom in the second region. The effectiveness of the computational procedure is demonstrated by a numerical example of the frictionless contact response of the space shuttle nose-gear tire, inflated and pressed against a rigid flat surface. Also, the research topics which have high potential for enhancing the effectiveness of reduction techniques are outlined.

  5. In Situ Techniques for Monitoring Electrochromism: An Advanced Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saricayir, Hakan; Uce, Musa; Koca, Atif

    2010-01-01

    This experiment employs current technology to enhance and extend existing lab content. The basic principles of spectroscopic and electroanalytical techniques and their use in determining material properties are covered in some detail in many undergraduate chemistry programs. However, there are limited examples of laboratory experiments with in…

  6. Advances in High-Fidelity Multi-Physics Simulation Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    fluid dynamics with other disciplines also yield a large and typically stiff equation set whose numerical solution mandates the development and...and Electromagnetics . . . . . 3 2.1 Governing Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.2 Numerical Technique...discrete equivalent of the governing equations . Thus, the values of the solution vector are localized in a pointwise sense at each node of the mesh. This

  7. Single Molecule Techniques for Advanced in situ Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hollars, C W; Stubbs, L; Carlson, K; Lu, X; Wehri, E

    2003-02-03

    One of the most significant achievements of modern science is completion of the human genome sequence, completed in the year 2000. Despite this monumental accomplishment, researchers have only begun to understand the relationships between this three-billion-nucleotide genetic code and the regulation and control of gene and protein expression within each of the millions of different types of highly specialized cells. Several methodologies have been developed for the analysis of gene and protein expression in situ, yet despite these advancements, the pace of such analyses is extremely limited. Because information regarding the precise timing and location of gene expression is a crucial component in the discovery of new pharmacological agents for the treatment of disease, there is an enormous incentive to develop technologies that accelerate the analytical process. Here we report on the use of plasmon resonant particles as advanced probes for in situ hybridization. These probes are used for the detection of low levels of gene-probe response and demonstrate a detection method that enables precise, simultaneous localization within a cell of the points of expression of multiple genes or proteins in a single sample.

  8. Advanced 2-micron Solid-state Laser for Wind and CO2 Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Significant advancements in the 2-micron laser development have been made recently. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. The world record 2-micron laser energy is demonstrated with an oscillator and two amplifiers system. It generates more than one joule per pulse energy with excellent beam quality. Based on the successful demonstration of a fully conductive cooled oscillator by using heat pipe technology, an improved fully conductively cooled 2-micron amplifier was designed, manufactured and integrated. It virtually eliminates the running coolant to increase the overall system efficiency and reliability. In addition to technology development and demonstration, a compact and engineering hardened 2-micron laser is under development. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser is expected to be integrated to a lidar system and take field measurements. The recent achievements push forward the readiness of such a laser system for space lidar applications. This paper will review the developments of the state-of-the-art solid-state 2-micron laser.

  9. Fast wavelength tuning techniques for external cavity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Wysocki, Gerard [Princeton, NJ; Tittel, Frank K [Houston, TX

    2011-01-11

    An apparatus comprising a laser source configured to emit a light beam along a first path, an optical beam steering component configured to steer the light beam from the first path to a second path at an angle to the first path, and a diffraction grating configured to reflect back at least a portion of the light beam along the second path, wherein the angle determines an external cavity length. Included is an apparatus comprising a laser source configured to emit a light beam along a first path, a beam steering component configured to redirect the light beam to a second path at an angle to the first path, wherein the optical beam steering component is configured to change the angle at a rate of at least about one Kilohertz, and a diffraction grating configured to reflect back at least a portion of the light beam along the second path.

  10. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy as a technique for combustion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshov, M. A.; Kuritsyn, Yu. A.; Romanovskii, Yu. V.

    2015-04-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has become a proven method of rapid gas diagnostics. In the present review an overview of the state of the art of TDL-based sensors and their applications for measurements of temperature, pressure, and species concentrations of gas components in harsh environments is given. In particular, the contemporary tunable diode laser systems, various methods of absorption detection (direct absorption measurements, wavelength modulation based phase sensitive detection), and relevant algorithms for data processing that improve accuracy and accelerate the diagnostics cycle are discussed in detail. The paper demonstrates how the recent developments of these methods and algorithms made it possible to extend the functionality of TDLAS in the tomographic imaging of combustion processes. Some prominent examples of applications of TDL-based sensors in a wide range of practical combustion aggregates, including scramjet engines and facilities, internal combustion engines, pulse detonation combustors, and coal gasifiers, are given in the final part of the review.

  11. Laser-Based Acousto-Optic Uplink Communications Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-18

    An apparatus for enabling acousto - optic communication comprising an in-water platform comprising means for emitting an acoustic signal to an acousto ...portion of the first interrogation beam and a second laser beam formed from the reflection of the first interrogation beam off of the acousto - optic interaction... optic interaction zone, an in-air platform comprising the ability for transmitting a first optical interrogation beam, the ability for receiving a

  12. Advanced optical techniques for monitoring dosimetric parameters in photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Buhong; Qiu, Zhihai; Huang, Zheng

    2012-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the generation of highly reactive singlet oxygen through interactions of photosensitizer, light and molecular oxygen. PDT has become a clinically approved, minimally invasive therapeutic modality for a wide variety of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The main dosimetric parameters for predicting the PDT efficacy include the delivered light dose, the quantification and photobleaching of the administrated photosensitizer, the tissue oxygen concentration, the amount of singlet oxygen generation and the resulting biological responses. This review article presents the emerging optical techniques that in use or under development for monitoring dosimetric parameters during PDT treatment. Moreover, the main challenges in developing real-time and noninvasive optical techniques for monitoring dosimetric parameters in PDT will be described.

  13. Advance techniques for monitoring human tolerance to +Gz accelerations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R.; Sandler, H.; Rositano, S.; Skrettingland, K.; Mancini, R.

    1972-01-01

    Standard techniques for monitoring the acceleration-stressed human subject have been augmented by measuring (1) temporal, brachial and/or radial arterial blood flow, and (2) indirect systolic and diastolic blood pressure at 60-sec intervals. Results show that the response of blood pressure to positive accelerations is complex and dependent on an interplay of hydrostatic forces, diminishing venous return, redistribution of blood, and other poorly defined compensatory reflexes.

  14. Advances in Laser/Lidar Technologies for NASA's Science and Exploration Mission's Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Laser Risk Reduction Program, begun in 2002, has achieved many technology advances in only 3.5 years. The recent selection of several lidar proposals for Science and Exploration applications indicates that the LRRP goal of enabling future space-based missions by lowering the technology risk has already begun to be met.

  15. Performance Measurements of the Injection Laser System Configured for Picosecond Scale Advanced Radiographic Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Haefner, L C; Heebner, J E; Dawson, J W; Fochs, S N; Shverdin, M Y; Crane, J K; Kanz, K V; Halpin, J M; Phan, H H; Sigurdsson, R J; Brewer, S W; Britten, J A; Brunton, G K; Clark, W J; Messerly, M J; Nissen, J D; Shaw, B H; Hackel, R P; Hermann, M R; Tietbohl, G L; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-10-23

    We have characterized the Advanced Radiographic Capability injection laser system and demonstrated that it meets performance requirements for upcoming National Ignition Facility fusion experiments. Pulse compression was achieved with a scaled down replica of the meter-scale grating ARC compressor and sub-ps pulse duration was demonstrated at the Joule-level.

  16. The Delphi Technique Used in Laser Incident Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Delphi method is a name that has been applied to a technique used for the elicitation of opinions with the object of obtaining a group response of a...lists and analyzing ranked responses. The Delphi technique was considered to be the optimal method for the limited amount of time available for data...are reported. In order to identify patterns of injuries, best evaluation methods , and successful techniques for protection, it is important to

  17. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; ...

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiationmore » effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.« less

  18. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; Kluth, Patrick; Tuomisto, Filip

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiation effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.

  19. Development of processing techniques for advanced thermal protection materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvaduray, Guna S.

    1994-01-01

    The effort, which was focused on the research and development of advanced materials for use in Thermal Protection Systems (TPS), has involved chemical and physical testing of refractory ceramic tiles, fabrics, threads and fibers. This testing has included determination of the optical properties, thermal shock resistance, high temperature dimensional stability, and tolerance to environmental stresses. Materials have also been tested in the Arc Jet 2 x 9 Turbulent Duct Facility (TDF), the 1 atmosphere Radiant Heat Cycler, and the Mini-Wind Tunnel Facility (MWTF). A significant part of the effort hitherto has gone towards modifying and upgrading the test facilities so that meaningful tests can be carried out. Another important effort during this period has been the creation of a materials database. Computer systems administration and support have also been provided. These are described in greater detail below.

  20. Advanced materials and techniques for fibre-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Philip J.

    2014-06-01

    Fibre-optic monitoring systems came of age in about 1999 upon the emergence of the world's first significant commercialising company - a spin-out from the UK's collaborative MAST project. By using embedded fibre-optic technology, the MAST project successfully measured transient strain within high-performance composite yacht masts. Since then, applications have extended from smart composites into civil engineering, energy, military, aerospace, medicine and other sectors. Fibre-optic sensors come in various forms, and may be subject to embedment, retrofitting, and remote interrogation. The unique challenges presented by each implementation require careful scrutiny before widespread adoption can take place. Accordingly, various aspects of design and reliability are discussed spanning a range of representative technologies that include resonant microsilicon structures, MEMS, Bragg gratings, advanced forms of spectroscopy, and modern trends in nanotechnology. Keywords: Fibre-optic sensors, fibre Bragg gratings, MEMS, MOEMS, nanotechnology, plasmon.

  1. Advanced Techniques for Constrained Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jeffrey R.; Balaraman, Gouthaman S.; Niesen, Michiel J. M.; Larsen, Adrien B.; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-01-01

    Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) methods provide a more natural description of a protein by using bond, angle and torsional coordinates instead of a Cartesian coordinate representation. Freezing high frequency bonds and angles in the ICMD model gives rise to constrained ICMD (CICMD) models. There are several theoretical aspects that need to be developed in order to make the CICMD method robust and widely usable. In this paper we have designed a new framework for 1) initializing velocities for non-independent CICMD coordinates, 2) efficient computation of center of mass velocity during CICMD simulations, 3) using advanced integrators such as Runge-Kutta, Lobatto and adaptive CVODE for CICMD simulations, and 4) cancelling out the “flying ice cube effect” that sometimes arises in Nosé-Hoover dynamics. The Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) method is an implementation of a CICMD method that we have developed to study protein dynamics. GNEIMO allows for a hierarchy of coarse-grained simulation models based on the ability to rigidly constrain any group of atoms. In this paper, we perform tests on the Lobatto and Runge-Kutta integrators to determine optimal simulation parameters. We also implement an adaptive coarse graining tool using the GNEIMO Python interface. This tool enables the secondary structure-guided “freezing and thawing” of degrees of freedom in the molecule on the fly during MD simulations, and is shown to fold four proteins to their native topologies. With these advancements we envision the use of the GNEIMO method in protein structure prediction, structure refinement, and in studying domain motion. PMID:23345138

  2. Advanced techniques for constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jeffrey R; Balaraman, Gouthaman S; Niesen, Michiel J M; Larsen, Adrien B; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-04-30

    Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) methods provide a more natural description of a protein by using bond, angle, and torsional coordinates instead of a Cartesian coordinate representation. Freezing high-frequency bonds and angles in the ICMD model gives rise to constrained ICMD (CICMD) models. There are several theoretical aspects that need to be developed to make the CICMD method robust and widely usable. In this article, we have designed a new framework for (1) initializing velocities for nonindependent CICMD coordinates, (2) efficient computation of center of mass velocity during CICMD simulations, (3) using advanced integrators such as Runge-Kutta, Lobatto, and adaptive CVODE for CICMD simulations, and (4) cancelling out the "flying ice cube effect" that sometimes arises in Nosé-Hoover dynamics. The Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) method is an implementation of a CICMD method that we have developed to study protein dynamics. GNEIMO allows for a hierarchy of coarse-grained simulation models based on the ability to rigidly constrain any group of atoms. In this article, we perform tests on the Lobatto and Runge-Kutta integrators to determine optimal simulation parameters. We also implement an adaptive coarse-graining tool using the GNEIMO Python interface. This tool enables the secondary structure-guided "freezing and thawing" of degrees of freedom in the molecule on the fly during molecular dynamics simulations and is shown to fold four proteins to their native topologies. With these advancements, we envision the use of the GNEIMO method in protein structure prediction, structure refinement, and in studying domain motion.

  3. Subtask 12B2: Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Keppler, E.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The development of techniques for joining vanadium alloys will be required for the construction of fusion devices utilizing the desirable properties of these alloys. The primary objective of this program is to develop of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys, particularly for the manufacture of welded materials testing specimens. Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material effected by the weld. Lasers do not require a vacuum (as does electron beam welders) and the welds they produce have large depth-to-width ratios. Results of scoping tests using a small, pulsed laser (50 joule, YAG laser) indicated that lasers could produce successful welds in vanadium alloy (V-5%Cr-5%Ti) sheet (1-mm thick) when the fusion zone was isolated from air. The pulsed laser required an isolating chamber filled with inert gas to produce welds that did not contain cracks and showed only minor hardness increases. Successful bead-on-plate welds have been made to depths of about 4-mm using a 6 kW continuous CO{sub 2} laser with argon purging. 2 figs.

  4. Analytic and interferometric techniques for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, Scott E.

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is being designed to detect and study in detail gravitational waves from sources throughout the Universe such as massive black holes. The conceptual formulation of the LISA space-borne gravitational wave detector is now well developed. The interferometric measurements between the sciencecraft remain one of the most important technological and scientific design areas for the mission. Our work has concentrated on developing the interferometric technologies to create a LISA-like optical signal and to measure the phase of that signal using commercially available instruments. One of the most important goals of this research is to demonstrate the LISA phase timing and phase reconstruction for a LISA-like fringe signal, in the case of a high fringe rate and a low signal level. To this end we have constructed a table-top interferometer which produces LISA-like fringe signals. Over the past few years questions have been raised concerning the use of laser communications links between sciencecraft to transmit phase information crucial to the reduction of laser frequency noise in the LISA science measurement. The concern is that applying medium frequency phase modulations to the laser carrier could compromise the phase stability of the LISA fringe signal. We have modified our table-top interferometer by applying a phase modulation to the laser beam in order to evaluate the effects of such modulations on the LISA science fringe signal. We have demonstrated that the phase resolution of the science signal is not degraded by the presence of medium frequency phase modulations. Each spacecraft in LISA houses a proof mass which follows a geodesic through space. Disturbances that change the proof mass position, momentum, and acceleration will appear in the LISA data stream as additive quadratic functions. These data disturbances inhibit signal extraction and must be removed. Much of our analytical work has been focused on discussing the

  5. Guiding of high intensity ultrashort laser pulses in plasma channels produced with the dual laser pulse ignitor-heater technique

    SciTech Connect

    Volfbeyn, P.; Leemans, W.P.

    1998-07-01

    The authors present results of experimental investigations of laser guiding in plasma channels. A new technique for plasma channel creation, the Ignitor-Heater scheme is proposed and experimentally tested in hydrogen and nitrogen. It makes use of two laser pulses. The Ignitor, an ultrashort (< 100 fs) laser pulse, is brought to a line focus using a cylindrical lens to ionize the gas. The Heater pulse (160 ps long) is used subsequently to heat the existing spark via inverse Bremsstrahlung. The hydrodynamic shock expansion creates a partially evacuated plasma channel with a density minimum on axis. Such a channel has properties of an optical waveguide. This technique allows creation of plasma channels in low atomic number gases, such as hydrogen, which is of importance for guiding of highly intense laser pulses. The channel density was diagnosed with time resolved longitudinal interferometry. From these measurements the plasma temperature was inferred. The guiding properties of the channels were tested by injecting a > 5 {times} 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, 75 fs laser pulse.

  6. Comparison of KTP, Thulium, and CO2 laser in stapedotomy using specialized visualization techniques: thermal effects.

    PubMed

    Kamalski, Digna M A; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M; de Boorder, Tjeerd; Vincent, Robert; Trabelzini, Franco; Grolman, Wilko

    2014-06-01

    High-speed thermal imaging enables visualization of heating of the vestibule during laser-assisted stapedotomy, comparing KTP, CO2, and Thulium laser light. Perforation of the stapes footplate with laser bears the risk of heating of the inner ear fluids. The amount of heating depends on absorption of the laser light and subsequent tissue ablation. The ablation of the footplate is driven by strong water absorption for the CO2 and Thulium laser. For the KTP laser wavelength, ablation is driven by carbonization of the footplate and it might penetrate deep into the inner ear without absorption in water. The thermal effects were visualized in an inner ear model, using two new techniques: (1) high-speed Schlieren imaging shows relative dynamic changes of temperatures up to 2 ms resolution in the perilymph. (2) Thermo imaging provides absolute temperature measurements around the footplate up to 40 ms resolution. The high-speed Schlieren imaging showed minimal heating using the KTP laser. Both CO2 and Thulium laser showed heating below the footplate. Thulium laser wavelength generated heating up to 0.6 mm depth. This was confirmed with thermal imaging, showing a rise of temperature of 4.7 (±3.5) °C for KTP and 9.4 (±6.9) for Thulium in the area of 2 mm below the footplate. For stapedotomy, the Thulium and CO2 laser show more extended thermal effects compared to KTP. High-speed Schlieren imaging and thermal imaging are complimentary techniques to study lasers thermal effects in tissue.

  7. Advanced Lyapunov control of a novel laser beam tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, Vladimir V.; Sofka, Jozef; Skormin, Victor A.

    2005-05-01

    Laser communication systems developed for mobile platforms, such as satellites, aircraft, and terrain vehicles, require fast wide-range beam-steering devices to establish and maintain a communication link. Conventionally, the low-bandwidth, high-steering-range part of the beam-positioning task is performed by gimbals that inherently constitutes the system bottleneck in terms of reliability, accuracy and dynamic performance. Omni-WristTM, a novel robotic sensor mount capable of carrying a payload of 5 lb and providing a full 180-deg hemisphere of azimuth/declination motion is known to be free of most of the deficiencies of gimbals. Provided with appropriate controls, it has the potential to become a new generation of gimbals systems. The approach we demonstrate describes an adaptive controller enabling Omni-WristTM to be utilized as a part of a laser beam positioning system. It is based on a Lyapunov function that ensures global asymptotic stability of the entire system while achieving high tracking accuracy. The proposed scheme is highly robust, does not require knowledge of complex system dynamics, and facilitates independent control of each channel by full decoupling of the Omni-WristTM dynamics. We summarize the basic algorithm and demonstrate the results obtained in the simulation environment.

  8. Advanced specialty fiber designs for high power fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Guancheng

    The output power of fiber lasers has increased rapidly over the last decade. There are two major limiting factors, namely nonlinear effects and transverse mode instability, prohibiting the power scaling capability of fiber lasers. The nonlinear effects, originating from high optical intensity, primarily limit the peak power scaling. The mode instability, on the other hand, arises from quantum-defect driven heating, causing undesired mode coupling once the power exceeds the threshold and degradation of beam quality. The mode instability has now become the bottleneck for average output power scaling of fiber lasers. Mode area scaling is the most effective way to mitigate nonlinear effects. However, the use of large mode area may increase the tendency to support multiple modes in the core, resulting in lower mode instability threshold. Therefore, it is critical to maintain single mode operation in a large mode area fiber. Sufficient higher order mode suppression can lead to effective single-transverse-mode propagation. In this dissertation, we explore the feasibility of using specialty fiber to construct high power fiber lasers with robust single-mode output. The first type of fiber discussed is the resonantly-enhanced leakage channel fiber. Coherent reflection at the fiber outer boundary can lead to additional confinement especially for highly leaky HOM, leading to lower HOM losses than what are predicted by conventional finite element mothod mode solver considering infinite cladding. In this work, we conducted careful measurements of HOM losses in two leakage channel fibers (LCF) with circular and rounded hexagonal boundary shapes respectively. Impact on HOM losses from coiling, fiber boundary shapes and coating indexes were studied in comparison to simulations. This work demonstrates the limit of the simulation method commonly used in the large-mode-area fiber designs and the need for an improved approach. More importantly, this work also demonstrates that a

  9. Realization of Desired Plasmonic Structures via a Direct Laser Writing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Quang Cong; Luong, Mai Hoang; Tran, Thi Mo; Remmel, Jacqueline; Do, Minh Thanh; Kieu, Duy Manh; Ghasemi, Rasta; Nguyen, Duc Tho; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2016-11-01

    We present a recent investigation of fabrication of desired plasmonic structures. First, the polymeric templates were realized by a simple and low-cost fabrication technique based on direct laser writing with a continuous-wave laser source. The plasmonic structures have been then realized by two methods, namely, a combination of gold evaporation and lift-off techniques, and a combination of gold sputtering and thermal annealing techniques. Each method presents its own advantages. Numerous metallic submicro- and nano-structures have been realized, which should be very interesting for different applications, such as high-transmission bandpass filters, plasmonic data storage, and plasmonic photonic devices.

  10. Advances in parameter estimation techniques applied to flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maben, Egbert; Zimmerman, David C.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, various parameter estimation techniques are investigated in the context of structural system identification utilizing distributed parameter models and 'measured' time-domain data. Distributed parameter models are formulated using the PDEMOD software developed by Taylor. Enhancements made to PDEMOD for this work include the following: (1) a Wittrick-Williams based root solving algorithm; (2) a time simulation capability; and (3) various parameter estimation algorithms. The parameter estimations schemes will be contrasted using the NASA Mini-Mast as the focus structure.

  11. Advances in dental veneers: materials, applications, and techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Núbia Pavesi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Lovadino, José Roberto; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    Laminate veneers are a conservative treatment of unaesthetic anterior teeth. The continued development of dental ceramics offers clinicians many options for creating highly aesthetic and functional porcelain veneers. This evolution of materials, ceramics, and adhesive systems permits improvement of the aesthetic of the smile and the self-esteem of the patient. Clinicians should understand the latest ceramic materials in order to be able to recommend them and their applications and techniques, and to ensure the success of the clinical case. The current literature was reviewed to search for the most important parameters determining the long-term success, correct application, and clinical limitations of porcelain veneers. PMID:23674920

  12. Generation of high-quality electron beams from a laser-based advanced accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. M. Elsied; Nasr, A. M. Hafz; Li, Song; Mohammad, Mirzaie; Thomas, Sokollik; Zhang, Jie

    2015-06-01

    At Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) we have established a research laboratory for advanced acceleration research based on high-power lasers and plasma technologies. In a primary experiment based on the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) scheme, multi-hundred MeV electron beams of reasonable quality are generated using 20-40 TW, 30 femtosecond laser pulses interacting independently with helium, neon, nitrogen and argon gas jet targets. The laser-plasma interaction conditions are optimized for stabilizing the electron beam generation from each type of gas. The electron beam pointing angle stability and divergence angle as well as the energy spectra from each gas jet are measured and compared. Supported by 973 National Basic Research Program of China (2013CBA01504) and Natural Science Foundation of China NSFC (11121504, 11334013, 11175119, 11374209)

  13. Laser solder repair technique for nerve anastomosis: temperatures required for optimal tensile strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Dawes, Judith M.; Lauto, Antonio; Parker, Anthony E.; Owen, Earl R.; Piper, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Laser-assisted repair of nerves is often unsatisfactory and has a high failure rate. Two disadvantages of laser assisted procedures are low initial strength of the resulting anastomosis and thermal damage of tissue by laser heating. Temporary or permanent stay sutures are used and fluid solders have been proposed to increase the strength of the repair. These techniques, however, have their own disadvantages including foreign body reaction and difficulty of application. To address these problems solid protein solder strips have been developed for use in conjunction with a diode laser for nerve anastomosis. The protein helps to supplement the bond, especially in the acute healing phase up to five days post- operative. Indocyanine green dye is added to the protein solder to absorb a laser wavelength (approximately 800 nm) that is poorly absorbed by water and other bodily tissues. This reduces the collateral thermal damage typically associated with other laser techniques. An investigation of the feasibility of the laser-solder repair technique in terms of required laser irradiance, tensile strength of the repair, and solder and tissue temperature is reported here. The tensile strength of repaired nerves rose steadily with laser irradiance reaching a maximum of 105 plus or minus 10 N.cm-2 at 12.7 W.cm-2. When higher laser irradiances were used the tensile strength of the resulting bonds dropped. Histopathological analysis of the laser- soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, showed the solder to have adhered well to the perineurial membrane, with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerve. The maximum temperature reached at the solder surface and at the solder/nerve interface, measured using a non-contact fiber optic radiometer and thermocouple respectively, also rose steadily with laser irradiance. At 12.7 W.cm-2, the temperatures reached at the surface and at the interface were 85 plus or minus 4 and 68 plus or minus 4 degrees Celsius respectively

  14. EPS in Environmental Microbial Biofilms as Examined by Advanced Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, T. R.; Lawrence, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Biofilm communities are highly structured associations of cellular and polymeric components which are involved in biogenic and geogenic environmental processes. Furthermore, biofilms are also important in medical (infection), industrial (biofouling) and technological (biofilm engineering) processes. The interfacial microbial communities in a specific habitat are highly dynamic and change according to the environmental parameters affecting not only the cellular but also the polymeric constituents of the system. Through their EPS biofilms interact with dissolved, colloidal and particulate compounds from the bulk water phase. For a long time the focus in biofilm research was on the cellular constituents in biofilms and the polymer matrix in biofilms has been rather neglected. The polymer matrix is produced not only by different bacteria and archaea but also by eukaryotic micro-organisms such as algae and fungi. The mostly unidentified mixture of EPS compounds is responsible for many biofilm properties and is involved in biofilm functionality. The chemistry of the EPS matrix represents a mixture of polymers including polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids, neutral polymers, charged polymers, amphiphilic polymers and refractory microbial polymers. The analysis of the EPS may be done destructively by means of extraction and subsequent chemical analysis or in situ by means of specific probes in combination with advanced imaging. In the last 15 years laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has been established as an indispensable technique for studying microbial communities. LSM with 1-photon and 2-photon excitation in combination with fluorescence techniques allows 3-dimensional investigation of fully hydrated, living biofilm systems. This approach is able to reveal data on biofilm structural features as well as biofilm processes and interactions. The fluorescent probes available allow the quantitative assessment of cellular as well as polymer distribution. For this purpose

  15. Advanced techniques in reliability model representation and solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    The current tendency of flight control system designs is towards increased integration of applications and increased distribution of computational elements. The reliability analysis of such systems is difficult because subsystem interactions are increasingly interdependent. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have been working for several years to extend the capability of Markov modeling techniques to address these problems. This effort has been focused in the areas of increased model abstraction and increased computational capability. The reliability model generator (RMG) is a software tool that uses as input a graphical object-oriented block diagram of the system. RMG uses a failure-effects algorithm to produce the reliability model from the graphical description. The ASSURE software tool is a parallel processing program that uses the semi-Markov unreliability range evaluator (SURE) solution technique and the abstract semi-Markov specification interface to the SURE tool (ASSIST) modeling language. A failure modes-effects simulation is used by ASSURE. These tools were used to analyze a significant portion of a complex flight control system. The successful combination of the power of graphical representation, automated model generation, and parallel computation leads to the conclusion that distributed fault-tolerant system architectures can now be analyzed.

  16. Comparison of three advanced chromatographic techniques for cannabis identification.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, D; Albessard, F; Bigot, M C; Moulin, M

    1994-01-01

    The development of chromatography technology, with the increasing availability of easier-to-use mass spectrometers combined with gas chromatography (GC), the use of diode-array or programmable variable-wavelength ultraviolet absorption detectors in conjunction with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the availability of scanners capable of reading thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates in the ultraviolet and visible regions, has made for easier, quicker and more positive identification of cannabis samples that standard analytical laboratories are occasionally required to undertake in the effort to combat drug addiction. At laboratories that do not possess the technique of GC combined with mass spectrometry, which provides an irrefutable identification, the following procedure involving HPLC or TLC techniques may be used: identification of the chromatographic peaks corresponding to each of the three main cannabis constituents-cannabidiol (CBD), delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabinol (CBN)-by comparison with published data in conjunction with a specific absorption spectrum for each of those constituents obtained between 200 and 300 nm. The collection of the fractions corresponding to the three major cannabinoids at the HPLC system outlet and the cross-checking of their identity in the GC process with flame ionization detection can further corroborate the identification and minimize possible errors due to interference.

  17. New technique using laser ablation blasts into geochemical labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvester, Paul J.

    Geochemists have long sought a low-cost, reliable instrument for analyzing trace elements in situ. After a quiet start in the mid-1980s, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) has steadily captured the imagination of geochemists all over the world and is now becoming “standard equipment” in the modern geochemical laboratory. In recognition of this phenomenon, a special session on “Analytical methodologies and geochemical applications of LA-ICPMS” was held at the Fall AGU meeting in San Francisco.

  18. XII Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speer, Thomas; Carminati, Federico; Werlen, Monique

    November 2008 will be a few months after the official start of LHC when the highest quantum energy ever produced by mankind will be observed by the most complex piece of scientific equipment ever built. LHC will open a new era in physics research and push further the frontier of Knowledge This achievement has been made possible by new technological developments in many fields, but computing is certainly the technology that has made possible this whole enterprise. Accelerator and detector design, construction management, data acquisition, detectors monitoring, data analysis, event simulation and theoretical interpretation are all computing based HEP activities but also occurring many other research fields. Computing is everywhere and forms the common link between all involved scientists and engineers. The ACAT workshop series, created back in 1990 as AIHENP (Artificial Intelligence in High Energy and Nuclear Research) has been covering the tremendous evolution of computing in its most advanced topics, trying to setup bridges between computer science, experimental and theoretical physics. Conference web-site: http://acat2008.cern.ch/ Programme and presentations: http://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=34666

  19. Coal and Coal Constituent Studies by Advanced EMR Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Alex I. Smirnov; Mark J. Nilges; R. Linn Belford; Robert B. Clarkson

    1998-03-31

    Advanced electronic magnetic resonance (EMR) methods are used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. We have achieved substantial progress on upgrading the high field (HF) EMR (W-band, 95 GHz) spectrometers that are especially advantageous for such studies. Particularly, we have built a new second W-band instrument (Mark II) in addition to our Mark I. Briefly, Mark II features: (i) an Oxford custom-built 7 T superconducting magnet which is scannable from 0 to 7 T at up to 0.5 T/min; (ii) water-cooled coaxial solenoid with up to ±550 G scan under digital (15 bits resolution) computer control; (iii) custom-engineered precision feed-back circuit, which is used to drive this solenoid, is based on an Ultrastab 860R sensor that has linearity better than 5 ppm and resolution of 0.05 ppm; (iv) an Oxford CF 1200 cryostat for variable temperature studies from 1.8 to 340 K. During this grant period we have completed several key upgrades of both Mark I and II, particularly microwave bridge, W-band probehead, and computer interfaces. We utilize these improved instruments for HF EMR studies of spin-spin interaction and existence of different paramagnetic species in carbonaceous solids.

  20. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, Kyle

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  1. Introductory lecture. Advanced laser spectroscopy in combustion chemistry: from elementary steps to practical devices.

    PubMed

    Wolfrum, J

    2001-01-01

    In recent years a large number of linear and nonlinear laser-based diagnostic techniques for nonintrusive measurements of species concentrations, temperatures, and gas velocities in a wide pressure and temperature range with high temporal and spatial resolution have been developed and have become extremely valuable tools to study many aspects of combustion. Beside the nonintrusive diagnostics of technical combustion devices the kinetics and microscopic dynamics of elementary chemical combustion reactions can be investigated in great detail by laser spectroscopy. These investigations show, that a small number of relatively simple elementary steps like H + O2-->OH + O, H2O2-->2OH, O + N2-->NO + N, NH2 + NO-->H2O + N2, OH + N2H control a large variety of combustion phenomena and pollutant formation processes. Laminar flames are ideal objects to develop the application of laser spectroscopic methods for practical combustion systems and to test and improve the gas-phase reaction mechanism in combustion models. Nonintrusive laser point and field measurements are of basic importance in the validation and further development of turbulent combustion models. Nonlinear laser spectroscopic techniques using infrared-visible sum-frequency generation can now bridge the pressure and materials gap to provide kinetic data for catalytic combustion. Finally, the potential of laser techniques for active combustion control in municipal waste incinerators is illustrated.

  2. Numerical analysis of radiation propagation in innovative volumetric receivers based on selective laser melting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Fabrizio; Santiago, Sergio; Roccabruna, Mattia; Luque, Salvador; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose; Crema, Luigi; Romero, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Volumetric absorbers constitute one of the key elements in order to achieve high thermal conversion efficiencies in concentrating solar power plants. Regardless of the working fluid or thermodynamic cycle employed, design trends towards higher absorber output temperatures are widespread, which lead to the general need of components of high solar absorptance, high conduction within the receiver material, high internal convection, low radiative and convective heat losses and high mechanical durability. In this context, the use of advanced manufacturing techniques, such as selective laser melting, has allowed for the fabrication of intricate geometries that are capable of fulfilling the previous requirements. This paper presents a parametric design and analysis of the optical performance of volumetric absorbers of variable porosity conducted by means of detailed numerical ray tracing simulations. Sections of variable macroscopic porosity along the absorber depth were constructed by the fractal growth of single-cell structures. Measures of performance analyzed include optical reflection losses from the absorber front and rear faces, penetration of radiation inside the absorber volume, and radiation absorption as a function of absorber depth. The effects of engineering design parameters such as absorber length and wall thickness, material reflectance and porosity distribution on the optical performance of absorbers are discussed, and general design guidelines are given.

  3. An Automatic Algorithm for Minimizing Anomalies and Discrepancies in Point Clouds Acquired by Laser Scanning Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordin, Fabiane; Gonzaga, Luiz, Jr.; Galhardo Muller, Fabricio; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Scaioni, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Laser scanning technique from airborne and land platforms has been largely used for collecting 3D data in large volumes in the field of geosciences. Furthermore, the laser pulse intensity has been widely exploited to analyze and classify rocks and biomass, and for carbon storage estimation. In general, a laser beam is emitted, collides with targets and only a percentage of emitted beam returns according to intrinsic properties of each target. Also, due interferences and partial collisions, the laser return intensity can be incorrect, introducing serious errors in classification and/or estimation processes. To address this problem and avoid misclassification and estimation errors, we have proposed a new algorithm to correct return intensity for laser scanning sensors. Different case studies have been used to evaluate and validated proposed approach.

  4. Advanced Techniques in Musculoskeletal Oncology: Perfusion, Diffusion, and Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Pedro A Gondim; Beaumont, Marine; Gabriela, Hossu; Bailiang, Chen; Verhaeghe, Jean-luc; Sirveaux, François; Blum, Alain

    2015-12-01

    The imaging characterization of musculoskeletal tumors can be challenging, and a significant number of lesions remain indeterminate when conventional imaging protocols are used. In recent years, clinical availability of functional imaging methods has increased. Functional imaging has the potential to improve tumor detection, characterization, and follow-up. The most frequently used functional methods are perfusion imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and MR proton spectroscopy (MRS). Each of these techniques has specific protocol requirements and diagnostic pitfalls that need to be acknowledged to avoid misdiagnoses. Additionally, the application of functional methods in the MSK system has various technical issues that need to be addressed to ensure data quality and comparability. In this article, the application of contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging, DWI, and MRS for the evaluation of bone and soft tissue tumors is discussed, with emphasis on acquisition protocols, technical difficulties, and current clinical indications.

  5. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.; Arefian, V. V.; Warren, H. A.; Vuigner, A. A.; Pohlman, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  6. Advances in techniques for assessment of microalgal lipids.

    PubMed

    Challagulla, Vineela; Nayar, Sasi; Walsh, Kerry; Fabbro, Larelle

    2016-07-15

    Microalgae are a varied group of organisms with considerable commercial potential as sources of various biochemicals, storage molecules and metabolites such as lipids, sugars, amino acids, pigments and toxins. Algal lipids can be processed to bio-oils and biodiesel. The conventional method to estimate algal lipids is based on extraction using solvents and quantification by gravimetry or chromatography. Such methods are time consuming, use hazardous chemicals and are labor intensive. For rapid screening of prospective algae or for management decisions (e.g. decision on timing of harvest), a rapid, high throughput, reliable, accurate, cost effective and preferably nondestructive analytical technique is desirable. This manuscript reviews the application of fluorescent lipid soluble dyes (Nile Red and BODIPY 505/515), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Raman, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for the assessment of lipids in microalgae.

  7. A unified planar measurement technique for compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1992-01-01

    A unified laser-induced fluorescence technique for conducting planar measurements of temperature, pressure and velocity in nonreacting, highly compressible flows has been developed, validated and demonstrated. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, was induced by an argon-ion laser and collected using a liquid-nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In the measurement technique, temperature is determined from the fluorescence induced with the laser operated broad band. Pressure and velocity are determined from the shape and position of the fluorescence excitation spectrum which is measured with the laser operated narrow band. The measurement approach described herein provides a means of obtaining accurate, spatially-complete maps of the primary flow field parameters in a wide variety of cold supersonic and transonic flows.

  8. Application of Satellite Laser Ranging Techniques for Space Situational Awareness Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappirio, M.; McGarry, J. F.; Bufton, J.; Cheek, J. W.; Coyle, D. B.; Hull, S. M.; Stysley, P. R.; Sun, X.; Young, R. P.; Zagwodzki, T.

    2016-09-01

    With the numbers of conjunction avoidance maneuvers for the International Space Station and other Low Earth Orbit satellites rising and likely to continue to increase, the need to develop methods to produce accurate 72+ hour orbital predictions is becoming critical. One emerging solution is to utilize satellite laser ranging techniques to range to debris and refine the initial positions to improve the orbital predictions for objects predicted to experience a close approach. Some stations in Europe have already demonstrated that this technique is possible, but it has not been employed to refine the likelihood of collision. We will present a notional architecture for laser ranging to debris utilizing existing satellite laser ranging or visual tracking facilities. We will also discuss the capabilities of laser ranging for Space Situational Awareness and provide a direct comparison to current visual and radar tracking methods.

  9. The evaluation of retinal circulation in advanced diabetic retinopathy before and after panretinal laser photocoagulation by scanning laser opthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Tadashi

    2005-07-01

    I investigated the effects of panretinal laser photocoagulation (PRP) on the velocity of retinal circulation in diabetic retinopathy. The retinal circulation was evaluated by means of rapid serial fluorescein angiography (FAG), employing scanning laser ophthalmoscope. FAG was conducted at the rate of 30 frames per seconds in video-tape. Disc-to-macula transit time (DMTT) was defined as the parameter to evaluate the retinal circulation. Diabetic 28 eyes with advanced diabetic retinopathy were examined to measure the DMTT before and after PRP. Normal 30 eyes used as control. Mean DMTT decreased from 9.8+/-1.5 seconds before PRP to 8.2+/-1.5 seconds after PRP in 28 diabetic eyes. The value with improvement after PRP was significantly shorter than the value before PRP ( p < 0.05 ). These values before and after PRP were significantly longer than that (3.7+/-0.7 seconds ) in normal 30 eyes ( p < 0.01 ). Retinal circulation is retarded in diabetic retinopathy. The retardation of retinal circulation in diabetic retinopathy improves after PRP, but the value after PRP can not recover until the control level. This study was performed to reveal therapeutic effect to panretinal laser photocoagulation (PRP) for the retardation of retinal circulation in diabetic retinopathy. I investigated the effects of PRP on the velocity of retinal circulation in patients with advanced diabetic retinopathy.

  10. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: Scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.; Jansen, M.; Fuente, G. F. de la

    2012-04-15

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 deg. C.

  11. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method.

    PubMed

    Fischer, D; de la Fuente, G F; Jansen, M

    2012-04-01

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 °C.

  12. Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: surgical technique and clinical follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Stephen J.; Miller, Drew V.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Kelly, Anne M.

    1991-05-01

    Fifteen patients were studied prospectively as a pilot study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the contact Neodynium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser in performing arthroscopic meniscal resection in a saline medium, (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malverne, PA). All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing, and post-operative swelling. Although there was increased time involved with setting up and calibrating the laser, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. In addition, the decreased need for secondary trimming and increased accessibility to the posterior horns of the menisci represent advantages over conventional instruments. Based on the findings, arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser surgery is a safe and effective clinical tool for meniscal resection which may, with increased technological advancements and cost reduction, replace standard instrumentation.

  13. Solid-State 2-Micron Laser Transmitter Advancement for Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements From Ground, Airborne, and Space-Based Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Ismail, Syed

    2008-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing 2-micron lidar technologies over a decade for wind measurements, utilizing coherent Doppler wind lidar technique and carbon dioxide measurements, utilizing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique. Significant advancements have been made towards developing state-of-the-art technologies towards laser transmitters, detectors, and receiver systems. These efforts have led to the development of solid-state lasers with high pulse energy, tunablility, wavelength-stability, and double-pulsed operation. This paper will present a review of these technological developments along with examples of high resolution wind and high precision CO2 DIAL measurements in the atmosphere. Plans for the development of compact high power lasers for applications in airborne and future space platforms for wind and regional to global scale measurement of atmospheric CO2 will also be discussed.

  14. Generation of thorium ions by laser ablation and inductively coupled plasma techniques for optical nuclear spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyan, V. I.; Borisyuk, P. V.; Khalitov, R. R.; Krasavin, A. V.; Lebedinskii, Yu Yu; Palchikov, V. G.; Poteshin, S. S.; Sysoev, A. A.; Yakovlev, V. P.

    2013-10-01

    Single- and double-charged 232Th and 229Th ions were produced by laser ablation of solid-state thorium compounds and by inductively coupled plasma techniques with mass-spectrometry analysis from liquid solutions of thorium. The latter method was found to be more applicable for producing ions of radioactive 229Th for laser experiments when searching for the energy value of the isomeric nuclear transition.

  15. Technique for Reducing Laser Beam Divergence of Intra-Cavity Nonlinear Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Alan D.

    During the past few years the Monoblock laser has become the laser-of-choice for laser range-finders. It's eye-safe 1570 nm emission, high pulse energy, simple construction, and high efficiency, when pumped by a laser-diode stack, provide advantages that are not available with other laser types. Although the relative divergence of the Monoblock output beam is large, it can be reduced to the required <1 mR using a telescope with a large magnification. This solution, however, is not acceptable for applications where the laser and telescope size must be kept to a minimum. A simple and compact technique for achieving significant reduction in the Monoblock beam divergence using a partial reflector that is placed a short distance from the optical parametric oscillator (OPO) has been developed. Using an ultra-compact 38 mm Monoblock with a 10 mm long KTP OPO, we achieved a beam divergence of <4 mR, corresponding to a >2.5 X reduction from the unmodified laser. Modeling and experimental results are presented detailing the theory and performance for this novel technique.

  16. Advanced Infusion Techniques with 3-D Printed Tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttall, David; Elliott, Amy; Post, Brian K.; Love, Lonnie J.

    2016-05-10

    The manufacturing of tooling for large, contoured surfaces for fiber-layup applications requires significant effort to understand the geometry and then to subtractively manufacture the tool. Traditional methods for the auto industry use clay that is hand sculpted. In the marine pleasure craft industry, the exterior of the model is formed from a foam lay-up that is either hand cut or machined to create smooth lines. Engineers and researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (ORNL MDF) collaborated with Magnum Venus Products (MVP) in the development of a process for reproducing legacy whitewater adventure craft via digital scanning and large scale 3-D printed layup molds. The process entailed 3D scanning a legacy canoe form, converting that form to a CAD model, additively manufacturing (3-D Print) the mold tool, and subtractively finishing the mold s transfer surfaces. Future work will include applying a gelcoat to the mold transfer surface and infusing using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, or VARTM principles, to create a watertight vessel. The outlined steps were performed on a specific canoe geometry found by MVP s principal participant. The intent of utilizing this geometry is to develop an energy efficient and marketable process for replicating complex shapes, specifically focusing on this particular watercraft, and provide a finished product for demonstration to the composites industry. The culminating part produced through this agreement has been slated for public presentation and potential demonstration at the 2016 CAMX (Composites and Advanced Materials eXpo) exposition in Anaheim, CA. Phase I of this collaborative research and development agreement (MDF-15-68) was conducted under CRADA NFE-15-05575 and was initiated on May 7, 2015, with an introduction to the MVP product line, and concluded in March of 2016 with the printing of and processing of a canoe mold. The project partner Magnum Venous Products (MVP) is

  17. Recent advances in techniques for tsetse-fly control*

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, K. J. R.

    1967-01-01

    With the advent of modern persistent insecticides, it has become possible to utilize some of the knowledge that has accumulated on the ecology and bionomics of Glossina and to devise more effective techniques for the control and eventual extermination of these species. The present article, based on experience of the tsetse fly problem in Northern Nigeria, points out that the disadvantages of control techniques—heavy expenditure of money and manpower and undue damage to the biosystem—can now largely be overcome by basing the application of insecticides on knowledge of the habits of the particular species of Glossina in a particular environment. Two factors are essential to the success of a control project: the proper selection of sites for spraying (the concept of restricted application) and the degree of persistence of the insecticide used. Reinfestation from within or outside the project area must also be taken into account. These and other aspects are discussed in relation to experience gained from a successful extermination project carried out in the Sudan vegetation zone and from present control activities in the Northern Guinea vegetation zone. PMID:5301739

  18. Advances in Current Rating Techniques for Flexible Printed Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Twist Capsule Assemblies are power transfer devices commonly used in spacecraft mechanisms that require electrical signals to be passed across a rotating interface. Flexible printed circuits (flex tapes, see Figure 2) are used to carry the electrical signals in these devices. Determining the current rating for a given trace (conductor) size can be challenging. Because of the thermal conditions present in this environment the most appropriate approach is to assume that the only means by which heat is removed from the trace is thru the conductor itself, so that when the flex tape is long the temperature rise in the trace can be extreme. While this technique represents a worst-case thermal situation that yields conservative current ratings, this conservatism may lead to overly cautious designs when not all traces are used at their full rated capacity. A better understanding of how individual traces behave when they are not all in use is the goal of this research. In the testing done in support of this paper, a representative flex tape used for a flight Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) application was tested by energizing individual traces (conductors in the tape) in a vacuum chamber and the temperatures of the tape measured using both fine-gauge thermocouples and infrared thermographic imaging. We find that traditional derating schemes used for bundles of wires do not apply for the configuration tested. We also determine that single active traces located in the center of a flex tape operate at lower temperatures than those on the outside edges.

  19. Advanced Manufacturing Techniques Demonstrated for Fabricating Developmental Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Chip

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center's Engineering Development Division has been working in support of innovative gas turbine engine systems under development by Glenn's Combustion Branch. These one-of-a-kind components require operation under extreme conditions. High-temperature ceramics were chosen for fabrication was because of the hostile operating environment. During the designing process, it became apparent that traditional machining techniques would not be adequate to produce the small, intricate features for the conceptual design, which was to be produced by stacking over a dozen thin layers with many small features that would then be aligned and bonded together into a one-piece unit. Instead of using traditional machining, we produced computer models in Pro/ENGINEER (Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC), Needham, MA) to the specifications of the research engineer. The computer models were exported in stereolithography standard (STL) format and used to produce full-size rapid prototype polymer models. These semi-opaque plastic models were used for visualization and design verification. The computer models also were exported in International Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) format and sent to Glenn's Thermal/Fluids Design & Analysis Branch and Applied Structural Mechanics Branch for profiling heat transfer and mechanical strength analysis.

  20. Simulation of an advanced techniques of ion propulsion Rocket system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkiyaraj, R.

    2016-07-01

    The ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of Deuterium,Argon gas and Hexagonal shape Magneto hydrodynamic(MHD) techniques because of the stimulation indirectly generated the power from ionization chamber,design of thrust range is 1.2 N with 40 KW of electric power and high efficiency.The proposed work is the study of MHD power generation through ionization level of Deuterium gas and combination of two gaseous ions(Deuterium gas ions + Argon gas ions) at acceleration stage.IPR consists of three parts 1.Hexagonal shape MHD based power generator through ionization chamber 2.ion accelerator 3.Exhaust of Nozzle.Initially the required energy around 1312 KJ/mol is carrying out the purpose of deuterium gas which is changed to ionization level.The ionized Deuterium gas comes out from RF ionization chamber to nozzle through MHD generator with enhanced velocity then after voltage is generated across the two pairs of electrode in MHD.it will produce thrust value with the help of mixing of Deuterium ion and Argon ion at acceleration position.The simulation of the IPR system has been carried out by MATLAB.By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results,if reaches that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with 40KW power for simulating the IPR system.

  1. Advances in low energy neutral atom imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, E.E.; Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Moore, K.R. ); Gruntman, M. . Space Sciences Center)

    1993-01-01

    Recently proposed low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging techniques use a collisional process to convert the low energy neutrals into ions before detection. At low energies, collisional processes limit the angular resolution and conversion efficiencies of these devices. However, if the intense ultraviolet light background can be suppressed, direct LENA detection is possible. We present results from a series of experiments designed to develop a novel filtering structure based on free-standing transmission gratings. If the grating period is sufficiently small, free standing transmission gratings can be employed to substantially polarize ultraviolet (UV) light in the wavelength range 300 [Angstrom] to 1500 [Angstrom]. If a second grating is placed behind the first grating with its axis of polarization oriented at a right angle to the first's, a substantial attenuation of UV radiation is achievable. ne neutrals will pass through the remaining open area of two gratings and be detected without UV background complications. We have obtained nominal 2000 [Angstrom] period (1000 [Angstrom] bars with 1000 [Angstrom] slits) free standing, gold transmission gratings and measured their UV and atomic transmission characteristics. The geometric factor of a LENA imager based on this technology is comparable to that of other proposed LENA imagers. In addition, this of imager does not distort the neutral trajectories, allowing for high angular resolution.

  2. Advanced signal processing technique for damage detection in steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel Kumar; Dao, Cac Minh; Dao, Kiet; Kundu, Tribikram

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, ultrasonic guided waves gained attention for reliable testing and characterization of metals and composites. Guided wave modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers either in transmission or reflection mode. In this study guided waves are excited and detected in the transmission mode and the phase change of the propagating wave modes are recorded. In most of the other studies reported in the literature, the change in the received signal strength (amplitude) is investigated with varying degrees of damage while in this study the change in phase is correlated with the extent of damage. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that the bonding condition between the transducer and the specimen does not affect the phase while it can affect the strength of recorded signal. Therefore, if the specimen is not damaged but the transducer-specimen bonding is deteriorated then the received signal strength is altered but the phase remains same and thus false positive predictions for damage can be avoided.

  3. Advanced techniques for determining long term compatibility of materials with propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. L.; Stebbins, J. P.; Smith, A. W.; Pullen, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method for the prediction of propellant-material compatibility for periods of time up to ten years is presented. Advanced sensitive measurement techniques used in the prediction method are described. These include: neutron activation analysis, radioactive tracer technique, and atomic absorption spectroscopy with a graphite tube furnace sampler. The results of laboratory tests performed to verify the prediction method are presented.

  4. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss "small-group apprenticeships (SGAs)" as a method to instruct cell culture techniques to high school participants. The study aimed to teach cell culture practices and to introduce advanced imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Participants designed and completed experiments…

  5. Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Durlofsky, Louis J.

    2000-08-28

    This project targets the development of (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling non-conventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and well index (for use in simulation models), including the effects of wellbore flow; and (3) accurate approaches to account for heterogeneity in the near-well region.

  6. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    Discusses small-group apprenticeships (SGAs) as a method for introducing cell culture techniques to high school participants. Teaches cell culture practices and introduces advance imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Clarifies and illuminates the value of small-group laboratory apprenticeships. (Author/KHR)

  7. Standardization of Laser Methods and Techniques for Vibration Measurements and Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Hans-Juergen von

    2010-05-28

    The realization and dissemination of the SI units of motion quantities (vibration and shock) have been based on laser interferometer methods specified in international documentary standards. New and refined laser methods and techniques developed by national metrology institutes and by leading manufacturers in the past two decades have been swiftly specified as standard methods for inclusion into in the series ISO 16063 of international documentary standards. A survey of ISO Standards for the calibration of vibration and shock transducers demonstrates the extended ranges and improved accuracy (measurement uncertainty) of laser methods and techniques for vibration and shock measurements and calibrations. The first standard for the calibration of laser vibrometers by laser interferometry or by a reference accelerometer calibrated by laser interferometry (ISO 16063-41) is on the stage of a Draft International Standard (DIS) and may be issued by the end of 2010. The standard methods with refined techniques proved to achieve wider measurement ranges and smaller measurement uncertainties than that specified in the ISO Standards. The applicability of different standardized interferometer methods to vibrations at high frequencies was recently demonstrated up to 347 kHz (acceleration amplitudes up to 350 km/s{sup 2}). The relative deviations between the amplitude measurement results of the different interferometer methods that were applied simultaneously, differed by less than 1% in all cases.

  8. Hypersonic Wake Diagnostics Using Laser Induced Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Jack L.; Sukenik, Charles I.; Balla, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    A review of recent research performed in iodine that involves a two photon absorption of light at 193 nm will be discussed, and it's potential application to velocimetry measurements in a hypersonic flow field will be described. An alternative seed atom, Krypton, will be presented as a good candidate for performing nonintrusive hypersonic flow diagnostics. Krypton has a metastable state with a lifetime of approximately 43 s which would prove useful for time of flight measurement (TOF) and a sensitivity to collisions that can be utilized for density measurements. Calculations using modest laser energies and experimental values show an efficiency of excited state production to be on the order of 10(exp -6) for a two photon absorption at 193 nm.

  9. Recent advances in efficient long-life, eye-safe solid state and CO2 lasers for laser radar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Buoncristiani, A. M.; Brockman, P.; Bair, C. H.; Schryer, D. R.; Upchurch, B. T.; Wood, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    The key problems in the development of eye-safe solid-state lasers are discussed, taking into account the energy transfer mechanisms between the complicated energy level manifolds of the Tm, Ho, Er ion dopants in hosts with decreasing crystal fields such as YAG or YLF. Optimization of energy transfer for efficient lasing through choice of dopant concentration, power density, crystal field and temperature is addressed. The tailoring of energy transfer times to provide efficient energy extraction for short pulses used in DIAL and Doppler lidar is considered. Recent advances in Pt/SnO2 oxide catalysts and other noble metal/metal oxide combinations for CO2 lasers are discussed. Emphasis is given to the dramatic effects of small quantities of H2O vapor for increasing the activity and lifetime of Pt/SnO2 catalysts and to increased lifetime operation with rare isotope (C-12)(O-18)2 lasing mixtures.

  10. Fabrication of synthetic diffractive elements using advanced matrix laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereň, M.; Svoboda, J.; Květoň, M.; Fiala, P.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a matrix laser writing device based on a demagnified projection of a micro-structure from a computer driven spatial light modulator. The device is capable of writing completely aperiodic micro-structures with resolution higher than 200 000 DPI. An optical system is combined with ultra high precision piezoelectric stages with an elementary step ~ 4 nm. The device operates in a normal environment, which significantly decreases the costs compared to competitive technologies. Simultaneously, large areas can be exposed up to 100 cm2. The capabilities of the constructed device will be demonstrated on particular elements fabricated for real applications. The optical document security is the first interesting field, where the synthetic image holograms are often combined with sophisticated aperiodic micro-structures. The proposed technology can easily write simple micro-gratings creating the color and kinetic visual effects, but also the diffractive cryptograms, waveguide couplers, and other structures recently used in the field of optical security. A general beam shaping elements and special photonic micro-structures are another important applications which will be discussed in this paper.

  11. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  12. Research Techniques Made Simple: Laser Capture Microdissection in Cutaneous Research.

    PubMed

    Chen Gonzalez, Estela; McGee, Jean Suh

    2016-10-01

    In cutaneous research, we aim to study the molecular signature of a diseased tissue. However, such a study is met with obstacles due to the inherent heterogeneous nature of tissues because multiple cell types reside within a tissue. Furthermore, there is cellular communication between the tissue and the neighboring extracellular matrix. Laser capture microdissection is a powerful technique that allows researchers to isolate cells of interest from any tissue using a laser source under microscopic visualization, thereby circumventing the issue of tissue heterogeneity. Target cells from fixed preparations can be extracted and examined without disturbing the tissue structure. In live cultures, a subpopulation of cells can be extracted in real time with minimal disturbance of cellular communication and molecular signatures. Here we describe the basic principles of the technique, the different types of laser capture microdissection, and the subsequent downstream analyses. This article will also discuss how the technique has been employed in cutaneous research, as well as future directions.

  13. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  14. Marker and pen graffiti cleaning on diverse calcareous stones by different laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriani, S. E.; Catalano, I. M.; Daurelio, G.; Albanese, A.

    2007-05-01

    Industries nowadays continuously produce new types of inks for markers and pens, so new different graffiti appear . In this paper laser cleaning tests on 41 new marker and pen types ( fluorescent, permanent, water-based, acrylic tempera, metallic paint, waterproof inks ), applied into laboratory on different litho- type samples (Chianca, Travertino di Roma, Tufo Carparo fine grain, Sabbie), typical stones employed in much more monuments in Puglia and Italian architectures were carried out. The same ones, were exposed for twelve months to outdoor ageing, subject to sunshine, rain, wind, IR and UV solar radiations. Ablation experiments and tests by using different cleaning techniques, each one in Dry and Wet condition (classic technique, Daurelio technique 1 and Daurelio technique 2 and others new techniques) and two different Nd:YAG laser systems (Palladio by QUANTA SYSTEM and SMART CLEAN II by EL.EN.), were adopted. The experimental modes, N-Mode (1064nm - 150, 300 and 500 μs pulse duration), Q-Switch (1064nm - 8 ns pulse duration) and SFR (Short Free Running - 1064 nm - 40 to 110μs pulse duration) were tested on each marked stones. It was found that according to the different ink types and stone substrate, Q-Switch laser cleaning ablation with optimized laser technique are the best solution to marker an pen graffiti removal. The work is still in progress.

  15. Hybrid nuclear light bulb-nuclear-pumped laser propulsion for advanced missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, G. H.

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid ``nuclear light bulb'' gaseous core reactor that can radiantly transfer energy to a propellant or alternately activate laser action is proposed for advanced space missions. The propellant mode would be employed in the phases of the mission requiring a higher thrust. However, for the bulk of the travel, the propellant would be turned off and the ultrahigh specific impulse laser mode of operation would be employed. The concept is reviewed, research and development issues are identified, and steps necessary for a feasibility demonstration are discussed.

  16. Advances in Diode-Laser-Based Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, Scott; Repasky, Kevin; Morley, Bruce; Moen, Drew; Weckwerth, Tammy; Hayman, Matt; Nehrir, Amin

    2016-06-01

    An advanced diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (WV-DIAL) has been developed. The next generation design was built on the success of previous diode-laser-based prototypes and enables accurate measurement of water vapor closer to the ground surface, in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions, and in daytime cloudy conditions up to cloud base. The lidar provides up to 1 min resolution, 150 m range resolved measurements of water vapor in a broad range of atmospheric conditions. A description of the instrument and results from its initial field test in 2014 are discussed.

  17. Generalized high-spectral-resolution lidar technique with a multimode laser for aerosol remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhongtao; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Chong; Bai, Jian; Wang, Dan; Wang, Nanchao; Zhou, Yudi; Luo, Jing; Yang, Yongying; Shen, Yibing; Su, Lin; Yang, Liming

    2017-01-23

    High-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL) is a powerful tool for atmospheric aerosol remote sensing. The current HSRL technique often requires a single longitudinal mode laser as the transmitter to accomplish the spectral discrimination of the aerosol and molecular scattering conveniently. However, single-mode laser is cumbersome and has very strict requirements for ambient stability, making the HSRL instrument not so robust in many cases. In this paper, a new HSRL concept, called generalized HSRL technique with a multimode laser (MML-gHSRL), is proposed, which can work using a multimode laser. The MML-gHSRL takes advantage of the period characteristic of the spectral function of the interferometric spectral discrimination filter (ISDF) thoroughly. By matching the free spectral range of the ISDF with the mode interval of the multimode laser, fine spectral discrimination for the lidar return from each longitudinal mode can be realized. Two common ISDFs, i.e., the Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) and field-widened Michelson interferometer (FWMI), are introduced to develop the MML-gHSRL, and their performance is quantitatively analyzed and compared. The MML-gHSRL is a natural but significant generalization for the current HSRL technique based on the IDSF. It is potential that this technique would be a good entrance to future HSRL developments, especially in airborne and satellite-borne aerosol remote sensing applications.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF ULTRATRACE LASER SPECTROMETRY TECHNIQUES FOR MEASUREMENTS OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory


    Development of Arsenic Speciation Techniques Based on High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry

    J.B. Simeonsson, H.D. Beach and D.J. Thomas
    US EPA, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Resear...

  19. Optical diagnostics of vascular reactions triggered by weak allergens using laser speckle-contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Yu L; Kalchenko, V V; Astaf'eva, N G; Meglinski, I V

    2014-08-31

    The capability of using the laser speckle contrast imaging technique with a long exposure time for visualisation of primary acute skin vascular reactions caused by a topical application of a weak contact allergen is considered. The method is shown to provide efficient and accurate detection of irritant-induced primary acute vascular reactions of skin. The presented technique possesses a high potential in everyday diagnostic practice, preclinical studies, as well as in the prognosis of skin reactions to the interaction with potentially allergenic materials. (laser biophotonics)

  20. Design and implementation of a system for laser assisted milling of advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuefeng; Feng, Gaocheng; Liu, Xianli

    2016-09-01

    Laser assisted machining is an effective method to machine advanced materials with the added benefits of longer tool life and increased material removal rates. While extensive studies have investigated the machining properties for laser assisted milling(LAML), few attempts have been made to extend LAML to machining parts with complex geometric features. A methodology for continuous path machining for LAML is developed by integration of a rotary and movable table into an ordinary milling machine with a laser beam system. The machining strategy and processing path are investigated to determine alignment of the machining path with the laser spot. In order to keep the material removal temperatures above the softening temperature of silicon nitride, the transformation is coordinated and the temperature interpolated, establishing a transient thermal model. The temperatures of the laser center and cutting zone are also carefully controlled to achieve optimal machining results and avoid thermal damage. These experiments indicate that the system results in no surface damage as well as good surface roughness, validating the application of this machining strategy and thermal model in the development of a new LAML system for continuous path processing of silicon nitride. The proposed approach can be easily applied in LAML system to achieve continuous processing and improve efficiency in laser assisted machining.

  1. Recent Advances in Synthesis and Characterization of SWCNTs produced by laser oven process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Results from the parametric study of the two-laser oven process indicated possible improvements with flow conditions and laser characteristics (ref. 1). Higher flow rates, lower operating pressures coupled with changes in flow tube material are found to improve the nanotube yields. The collected nanotube material is analyzed using a combination of characterization techniques including SEM, TEM, TGA, Raman and UV-VIS-NIR to estimate the purity of the samples. Insitu diagnostics of the laser oven process is now extended to include the surface temperature of the target material. Spectral emission from the target surface is compared with black body type emission to estimate the temperature. The surface temperature seemed to correlate well with the ablation rate as well as the quality of the SWCNTs. Recent changes in improving the production rate by rastering the target and using cw laser will be presented.

  2. Recent Advances in Synthesis and Characterization of SWCNTs Produced by Laser Oven Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Results from the parametric study of the two-laser oven process indicated possible improvements with flow conditions and laser characteristics. Higher flow rates, lower operating pressures coupled with changes in flow tube material are found to improve the nanotube yields. The collected nanotube material is analyzed using a combination of characterization techniques including SEM, TEM, TGA, Raman and UV-VIS-NIR to estimate the purity of the samples. In-situ diagnostics of the laser oven process is now extended to include the surface temperature of the target material. Spectral emission from the target surface is compared with black body type emission to estimate the temperature. The surface temperature seemed to correlate well with the ablation rate as well as the quality of the SWCNTs. Recent changes in improving the production rate by rastering the target and using cw laser will be presented.

  3. An Overview of High Energy Short Pulse Technology for Advanced Radiography of Laser Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J; Key, M; Britten, J; Beach, R; Beer, G; Brown, C; Bryan, S; Caird, J; Carlson, T; Crane, J; Dawson, J; Erlandson, A C; Fittinghoff, D; Hermann, M; Hoaglan, C; Iyer, A; Jones, L; Jovanovic, I; Komashko, A; Landen, O; Liao, Z; Molander, W; Mitchell, A; Moses, E; Nielsen, N; Nguyen, H; Nissen, J; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Risinger, L; Rushford, M; Skulina, K; Spaeth, M; Stuart, B; Tietbohl, G; Wattellier, B

    2004-06-18

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with NIF-class, Nd:glass laser systems are reviewed. High energy short pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on the NIF. Development of meter-scale, high efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of HEPW pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fiber-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for high energy petawatt pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion.

  4. Impurity diagnosis of a KSTAR graphite divertor tile using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minju; Cho, Min Sang; Cho, Byoung Ick

    2017-04-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been tested to diagnose impurity elements on a Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) divertor tile. Spectral lines of various impurity elements such as iron, chromium, and nickel were detected from the divertor surface. The variation of spectra with consecutive laser pulses demonstrates the potential for depth profiling analysis for the deposited impurity layer. The LIBS plasma parameters have been qualitatively determined from analysis of the relative line intensities and linewidths for each element. The validity of this analysis has been checked with atomic spectral simulations.

  5. Diode laser absorption tomography using data compression techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, Chad; Tam, Chung-Jen; Givens, Ryan; Davis, Doug; Williams, Skip

    2008-02-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) shows promise for in situ monitoring in high-speed flows. However, the dynamic nature of typical flows of supersonic combustors, gas turbine engines and augmenters can also lead to inhomogenities that cannot be captured by a single line-of-sight TDLAS measurement. Instead, multiple measurements varied over several spatial locations need to be made. In the current study, shock train structure in the isolator section of the Research Cell 18 supersonic combustion facility at Wright-Patterson AFB is measured. Although only two view angles are available for measurement, multiple absorption features along with a priori computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations enable estimates of two dimensional flow features to be formed. Vector quantization/kmeans data clustering is used to identify key flow features from the temporal history of the raw sinograms. Through the use of multiple absorption features that are measured nearly simultaneously, an approximate two-dimensional image can be formed. This image can be further refined through the use of an optimal set of basis functions that can be derived from a set of CFD simulations that describes the flow shapes.

  6. Science Investigations with Laser Ranging to the Moon and Mars/Phobos: Recent Advances, Technology Demonstrations, and New Ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Williams, James G.; Folkner, William M.

    2010-05-01

    Since it's initiation by the Apollo 11 astronauts in 1969, LLR has strongly contributed to our understanding of the Moon's internal structure and the dynamics of the Earth-Moon system. The data provide for unique, multi-disciplinary results in the areas of lunar science, gravitational physics, Earth sciences, geodesy and geodynamics, solar system ephemerides, and terrestrial and celestial reference frames. However, the current distribution of the retroreflectors is not optimal, other weaknesses exist. A geographic distribution of new instruments on the lunar surface wider than the current distribution would be a great benefit; the accuracy of the lunar science parameters would increase several times. We are developing the next-generation of the LLR experiment. This work includes development of new retroreflector arrays and laser transponders to be deployed on the lunar surface by a series of proposed missions to the moon. The new laser instruments will enable strong advancements in LLR-derived science. Anticipated science impact includes lunar science, gravitational physics, geophysics, and geodesy. Thus, properties of the lunar interior, including tidal properties, liquid core and solid inner core can be determined from lunar rotation, orientation, and tidal response. Anticipated improvements in Earth geophysics and geodesy would include the positions and rates for the Earth stations, Earth rotation, precession rate, nutation, and tidal influences on the orbit. Strong improvements are also expected in several tests of general relativity. We address the science return enabled by the new laser retroreflectors. We also discuss deployment of pulsed laser transponders with future landers on Mars/Phobos. The development of active laser techniques would extend the accuracies characteristic of passive laser tracking to interplanetary distances. Highly-accurate time-series of the round-trip travel times of laser pulses between an observatory on the Earth and an optical

  7. Joint Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Laser Designation Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing...collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1 . REPORT DATE 28 MAY 1999 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 PREFACE i 1 . Scope This publication provides joint tactics, techniques

  8. Autonomous structural health monitoring technique for interplanetary drilling applications using laser Doppler velocimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statham, Shannon M.

    The research work presented in this thesis is devoted to the formulation and field testing of a dynamics-based structural health monitoring system for an interplanetary subsurface exploration drill system. Structural health monitoring is the process of detecting damage or other types of defects in structural and mechanical systems that have the potential to adversely affect the current or future performance of these systems. Interplanetary exploration missions, specifically to Mars, involve operations to search for water and other signs of extant or past life. Such missions require advanced robotic systems that are more susceptible to structural and mechanical failures, which motivates a need for structural health monitoring techniques relevant to interplanetary exploration systems. Strict design requirements for interplanetary exploration missions create unique research problems and challenges compared with structural health monitoring procedures and techniques developed to date. These challenges include implementing sensors and devices that will not interfere with the drilling operation, producing "real-time" diagnostics of the drilling condition, and developing an automation procedure for complete autonomous operations. The first research area involves modal analysis experiments to understand the dynamic characteristics of interplanetary drill structural systems in operation. These experiments also validate the use of Laser Doppler Velocimeter sensors in real-time structural health monitoring and prove the drill motor system adequately excites the drill for dynamic measurements and modal analysis while the drill is in operation. The second research area involves the development of modal analysis procedures for rotating structures using a Chebyshev signal filter to remove harmonic component and other noise from the rotating drill signal. This filter is necessary to accurately analyze the condition of the rotating drill auger tube while in operation. The third

  9. Advances in solid state laser technology for space and medical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in laser technology and their potential for medical applications are discussed. Gas discharge lasers, dye lasers, excimer lasers, Nd:YAG lasers, HF and DF lasers, and other commonly used lasers are briefly addressed. Emerging laser technology is examined, including diode-pumped lasers and other solid state lasers.

  10. Fuel Injector Patternation Evaluation in Advanced Liquid-Fueled, High Pressure, Gas Turbine Combustors, Using Nonintrusive Optical Diagnostic Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, R. J.; Hicks, Y. R.; Anderson, R. C.; Zaller, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging and planar Mie scattering are used to examine the fuel distribution pattern (patternation) for advanced fuel injector concepts in kerosene burning, high pressure gas turbine combustors. Three diverse fuel injector concepts for aerospace applications were investigated under a broad range of operating conditions. Fuel PLIF patternation results are contrasted with those obtained by planar Mie scattering. Further comparison is also made for one injector with data obtained through phase Doppler measurements. Differences in spray patterns for diverse conditions and fuel injector configurations are readily discernible. An examination of the data has shown that a direct determination of the fuel spray angle at realistic conditions is also possible. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the applicability and usefulness of these nonintrusive optical techniques for investigating fuel spray patternation under actual combustor conditions.

  11. Advanced Laser Based Measurements in Porous Media Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements using dual-pump dual-broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (DP-DBB-CARS) inside a porous media burner. This work continues our previous measurements in such combustion systems. The existing setup was significantly modified with the aim of providing improved data quality and data rate, reduction of interferences and additional species information. These changes are presented and discussed in detail. The CARS technique was expanded to a dual-pump dual-broadband CARS system which in principle enables acquisition of temperatures together with relative H2/N2- and O2/N2- species concentrations. Experimental complexity was reduced by the use of a modified spectrometer enabling the detection of both signals, vibrational and rotational CARS, with only one detection system.

  12. Advances in high-power 9XXnm laser diodes for pumping fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, Jay; Peters, Matthew; Rossin, Victor; Guo, James; Xiao, Yan; Cheng, Jane; Shieh, Allen; Srinivasan, Raman; Singh, Jaspreet; Wei, Cailin; Duesterberg, Richard; Morehead, James J.; Zucker, Erik

    2016-03-01

    A multi-mode 9XXnm-wavelength laser diode was developed to optimize the divergence angle and reliable ex-facet power. Lasers diodes were assembled into a multi-emitter pump package that is fiber coupled via spatial and polarization multiplexing. The pump package has a 135μm diameter output fiber that leverages the same optical train and mechanical design qualified previously. Up to ~ 270W CW power at 22A is achieved at a case temperature ~ 30ºC. Power conversion efficiency is 60% (peak) that drops to 53% at 22A with little thermal roll over. Greater than 90% of the light is collected at < 0.12NA at 16A drive current that produces 3.0W/(mm-mr)2 radiance from the output fiber.

  13. Advancing radiation balanced lasers (RBLs) in rare-earth (RE)-doped solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hehlen, Markus Peter

    2016-11-21

    These slides cover the following topics: Mid-IR lasers in crystals using two-tone RBL (Single-dopant two-tone RBLs: Tm3+, Er3+, and Co-doped two-tone RBLs: (Yb3+, Nd3+) and (Ho3+, Tm3+); Advanced approaches to RBL crystals (Precursor purification, Micro-pulling-down crystal growth, and Bridgman crystal growth); Advanced approaches to RBL fibers (Materials for RBL glass fibers, Micro-structured fibers for RBL, and Fiber preform synthesis); and finally objectives.

  14. Laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials: Reference position dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, D.; Escartín, A.; Cases, R.; Peña, J. I.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we present the effect produced by modifying the reference position as well as the method of machining on the results obtained when advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials are machined by laser ablation. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulsewidths in the nanosecond range has been used. Morphology, depth and volume obtained by means of pulse bursts and grooves have been studied. Working within the same laser conditions, it has been shown that these values depend on the thermal, optical and mechanical features of the material processed. We have also studied the variation in the ablation yield when the position of the surface to be machined is modified. Material properties and work conditions are related to the results obtained. We have described and discussed the morphology, composition, microstructure and hardness of the materials processed.

  15. Final Report - ADVANCED LASER-BASED SENSORS FOR INDUSTRIAL PROCESS CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this work is to capture the potential of real-time monitoring and overcome the challenges of harsh industrial environments, Los Gatos Research (LGR) is fabricating, deploying, and commercializing advanced laser-based gas sensors for process control monitoring in industrial furnaces (e.g. electric arc furnaces). These sensors can achieve improvements in process control, leading to enhanced productivity, improved product quality, and reduced energy consumption and emissions. The first sensor will utilize both mid-infrared and near-infrared lasers to make rapid in-situ measurements of industrial gases and associated temperatures in the furnace off-gas. The second sensor will make extractive measurements of process gases. During the course of this DOE project, Los Gatos Research (LGR) fabricated, tested, and deployed both in-situ tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry (TDLAS) analyzers and extractive Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (Off-Axis ICOS) analyzers.

  16. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven proton-boron fusion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Morrissey, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-02-01

    A low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with relatively low intensity (3 × 1016 W cm-2) was used to enhance the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the "ultraclean" proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha-particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as target. The combination of the specific target geometry and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed enhancing the yield of alpha-particles up to 109 per steradian, i.e 100 times higher than previous experimental achievements. Moreover the alpha particle stream presented a clearly peaked angular and energy distribution, which make this secondary source attractive for potential applications. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  17. Laser irradiations of advanced targets promoting absorption resonance for ion acceleration in TNSA regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Calcagno, L.; Giulietti, D.; Cutroneo, M.; Zimbone, M.; Skala, J.

    2015-07-01

    Advanced targets based on Au nanoparticles embedded in polymers films show high absorption coefficient in the UV-visible and infrared region. They can be employed to enhance the proton and ion acceleration from the laser-generated plasma in TNSA regime. In conditions of "p" polarized laser irradiations at 1015 W/cm2 intensity, in these films can be induced resonant absorption due to plasma wave excitation. Plasma on-line diagnostics is based on SiC detectors, Thomson spectrometry and X-ray streak camera imaging. Measurements of kinetic energy of accelerated ions indicate a significant increment using polymer targets containing gold nanoparticles and "p" polarized laser light with respect to pure polymers and unpolarized light irradiation.

  18. A Novel Microcharacterization Technique in the Measurement of Strain and Orientation Gradient in Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmestai, H.; Harris, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-01-01

    Representation of morphology and evolution of the microstructure during processing and their relation to properties requires proper experimental techniques. Residual strains, lattice distortion, and texture (micro-texture) at the interface and the matrix of a layered structure or a functionally gradient material and their variation are among parameters important in materials characterization but hard to measure with present experimental techniques. Current techniques available to measure changes in interred material parameters (residual stress, micro-texture, microplasticity) produce results which are either qualitative or unreliable. This problem becomes even more complicated in the case of a temperature variation. These parameters affect many of the mechanical properties of advanced materials including stress-strain relation, ductility, creep, and fatigue. A review of some novel experimental techniques using recent advances in electron microscopy is presented here to measure internal stress, (micro)texture, interracial strength and (sub)grain formation and realignment. Two of these techniques are combined in the chamber of an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope to measure strain and orientation gradients in advanced materials. These techniques which include Backscattered Kikuchi Diffractometry (BKD) and Microscopic Strain Field Analysis are used to characterize metallic and intermetallic matrix composites and superplastic materials. These techniques are compared with the more conventional x-ray diffraction and indentation techniques.

  19. Laser assisted microdissection, an efficient technique to understand tissue specific gene expression patterns and functional genomics in plants.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Vibhav; Sarkar, Ananda K

    2015-04-01

    Laser assisted microdissection (LAM) is an advanced technology used to perform tissue or cell-specific expression profiling of genes and proteins, owing to its ability to isolate the desired tissue or cell type from a heterogeneous population. Due to the specificity and high efficiency acquired during its pioneering use in medical science, the LAM technique has quickly been adopted for use in many biological researches. Today, it has become a potent tool to address a wide range of questions in diverse field of plant biology. Beginning with comparative transcriptome analysis of different tissues such as reproductive parts, meristems, lateral organs, roots etc., LAM has also been extensively used in plant-pathogen interaction studies, proteomics, and metabolomics. In combination with next generation sequencing and proteomics analysis, LAM has opened up promising opportunities in the area of large scale functional studies in plants. Ever since the advent of this technique, significant improvements have been achieved in term of its instrumentation and method, which has made LAM a more efficient tool applicable in wider research areas. Here, we discuss the advancement of LAM technique with special emphasis on its methodology and highlight its scope in modern research areas of plant biology. Although we put emphasis on use of LAM in transcriptome studies, which is mostly used, we also discuss its recent application and scope in proteome and metabolome studies.

  20. Evaluation of the effects of conventional versus laser bleaching techniques on enamel microroughness.

    PubMed

    Anaraki, Saeid Nemati; Shahabi, Sima; Chiniforush, Nasim; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, Hanieh; Assadian, Hadi; Yousefi, Bahareh

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, bleaching of the teeth within the dental office is one of the most widespread techniques to correct tooth discoloration. Variability of the materials and techniques accompanied with the trend toward esthetic restorations with minimally invasive approaches are increasing. The use of laser in this regard has also been taken into consideration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of in-office versus laser bleaching on surface roughness of enamel. Fifteen freshly extracted human molars were sectioned mesiodistally to produce 30 lingual and buccal enamel blocks. Samples were mounted in transparent acrylic resin blocks and polished before treatment. Samples were randomly assigned to laser bleaching (LB) and office bleaching (OB) groups (n = 15 each). Pretreatment evaluation of microroughness was carried out for all samples using profilometer. Samples were treated twice in the OB group with Opalescent Xtra Boost and in the LB group using a laser-activated gel. Microroughness was evaluated after bleaching in both groups. Data were analyzed using repeated measure ANOVA. Both methods increased enamel surface roughness. Microroughness changes were significantly different between the two groups (p < 0.05). Microroughness significantly increased in the OB group (p > 0.05), but there was no significant difference in pre- and post-treatment roughness evaluation in the LB group (p < 0.05). Laser was considered a safer technique because it demonstrated a less surface roughness increase in comparison with the conventional office bleaching procedure.

  1. Capture and Transport of Laser Accelerated Protons by Pulsed Magnetic Fields: Advancements Toward Laser-Based Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris-Mog, Trevor J.

    might look like. A theoretical beam transport system is presented at the end of this dissertation. It shows us that pulse power magnetic optics generating reasonable field strengths can transport a large bandwidth, high kinetic energy proton beam around and into a patient. This gives us insight into the spectrum available per laser pulse at the exit-port of the gantry as well as what types of dose deposition routines and spectral shaping techniques will need to be developed to contour a given dose to a given tumor volume.

  2. Development of Laser Marking as a Mass Marking Technique : Annual Report FY 1993.

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, H.Lee; Thompson, Dan; United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife

    1993-11-01

    The first year of work with development of lasers as a mass marking technique provided both disappointing and encouraging results. A Coumarin Dye 480 laser was used to mark coho salmon in a variety of body locations and with varying energy levels. A ``bleached`` white mark was made void of any pigment. Areas marked included the nape area behind the head and in front of the dorsal fin, slightly above the anal fin, the upper lobe of the caudal fin, the dorsal fin and on the operculum. The mark appeared immediately after being lasered but started to gradually fade after one month and was fairly completely re-pigmented after three months. Complete removal and notching of the adipose fin was also attempted with a Carbon Dioxide laser. This surgical method of fin removal appears to have advantages over scissor excision (no bleeding or regeneration), and has possible application as part of a device or system which could be employed for mass marking.

  3. Micro-Structures of Hard Coatings Deposited on Titanium Alloys by Laser Alloying Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Yu, Huijun; Chen, Chuanzhong; Wang, Diangang; Weng, Fei

    2013-01-01

    This work is based on micro-structural performance of the Ti-B4C-C laser alloying coatings on Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. The test results indicated that laser alloying of the Ti-B4C-C pre-placed powders on the Ti-6Al-4V alloy substrate can form the ceramics reinforced hard alloying coatings, which increased the micro-hardness and wear resistance of substrate. The test result also indicated that the TiB phase was produced in alloying coating, which corresponded to its (101) crystal plane. In addition, yttria has a refining effect on micro-structures of the laser alloying coating, and its refinement mechanism was analyzed. This research provided essential experimental and theoretical basis to promote the applications of the laser alloying technique in manufacturing and repairing of the aerospace parts.

  4. Laser vaporization and excisional techniques in the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, J M

    1995-03-01

    The CO2 laser proved to be a vital tool in the development of conservative therapy for the treatment of CIN in the 1980s. In conjunction with colposcopy, the laser has allowed many women to achieve the security of identified and treated CIN with the freedom to live their lives normally, including the achievement of pregnancies. The laser may be used either in the ablative (vaporization) or the cutting mode. This flexibility allows patients with unsatisfactory as well as satisfactory colposcopy to be managed. The results of treatment are universally excellent, with clearance rates of 96% being reported. Complications are rare both in the short and long term, most patients returning fully to normal activities within 4 weeks of therapy. Although the laser is being superceded to some extent by the advent of the loop diathermy technique, it will for years to come represent a valuable and useful tool in the treatment of CIN.

  5. Test Mass Temperature Field and Laser Aberration Modeling in Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramette, Joshua; Kasprzack, Marie; Gonzalez, Gabriela; Brooks, Aidan; Blair, Carl; Kandhasamy, Shivaraj; Wang, Haoyu; LIGO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Advanced LIGO uses high laser power in the main interferometer arm cavities to achieve design sensitivity. A small part of this power is absorbed in the interferometer cavity mirrors where it creates thermal lenses. Actuation by ``ring heaters,'' additional heater elements aimed to reduce the temperature gradients in the mirrors, minimizes aberrations in the main laser beam due to thermal lensing. We derive the first analytical model of the temperature field contribution in the mirrors generated by an ideal ring heater. In addition, we simulate the test mass temperature field using finite element analysis software and find agreement with the prediction of our ring heater analytical model and existing models for self-heating of the test mass by the main laser beam. From our ring heater temperature field models, we then express the resulting optical aberration contribution in the main laser and compare to Hartmann wavefront sensor measurements of the aberration. Used in conjunction with wavefront measurements, our model provides a more complete understanding of the thermal state of the cavity mirrors and will allow a more efficient use of the ring heaters in Advanced LIGO. We thank the National Science Foundation for supporting this work (NSF grant #1262890 and #1205882).

  6. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1-10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2 is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He-Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm-2 and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2. The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  7. Computer Aided Measurement Laser (CAML): technique to quantify post-mastectomy lymphoedema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trombetta, Chiara; Abundo, Paolo; Felici, Antonella; Ljoka, Concetta; Di Cori, Sandro; Rosato, Nicola; Foti, Calogero

    2012-10-01

    Lymphoedema can be a side effect of cancer treatment. Eventhough several methods for assessing lymphoedema are used in clinical practice, an objective quantification of lymphoedema has been problematic. The aim of the study was to determine the objectivity, reliability and repeatability of the computer aided measurement laser (CAML) technique. CAML technique is based on computer aided design (CAD) methods and requires an infrared laser scanner. Measurements are scanned and the information describing size and shape of the limb allows to design the model by using the CAD software. The objectivity and repeatability was established in the beginning using a phantom. Consequently a group of subjects presenting post-breast cancer lymphoedema was evaluated using as a control the contralateral limb. Results confirmed that in clinical settings CAML technique is easy to perform, rapid and provides meaningful data for assessing lymphoedema. Future research will include a comparison of upper limb CAML technique between healthy subjects and patients with known lymphoedema.

  8. New techniques for laser beam atmospheric extinction measurements from manned and unmanned aerospace vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Novel techniques for laser beam atmospheric extinction measurements, suitable for several air and space platform applications, are presented in this paper. Extinction measurements are essential to support the engineering development and the operational employment of a variety of aerospace electro-optical sensor systems, allowing calculation of the range performance attainable with such systems in current and likely future applications. Such applications include ranging, weaponry, Earth remote sensing and possible planetary exploration missions performed by satellites and unmanned flight vehicles. Unlike traditional LIDAR methods, the proposed techniques are based on measurements of the laser energy (intensity and spatial distribution) incident on target surfaces of known geometric and reflective characteristics, by means of infrared detectors and/or infrared cameras calibrated for radiance. Various laser sources can be employed with wavelengths from the visible to the far infrared portions of the spectrum, allowing for data correlation and extended sensitivity. Errors affecting measurements performed using the proposed methods are discussed in the paper and algorithms are proposed that allow a direct determination of the atmospheric transmittance and spatial characteristics of the laser spot. These algorithms take into account a variety of linear and non-linear propagation effects. Finally, results are presented relative to some experimental activities performed to validate the proposed techniques. Particularly, data are presented relative to both ground and flight trials performed with laser systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) at λ= 1064 nm and λ= 1550 nm. This includes ground tests performed with 10 Hz and 20 KHz PRF NIR laser systems in a large variety of atmospheric conditions, and flight trials performed with a 10 Hz airborne NIR laser system installed on a TORNADO aircraft, flying up to altitudes of 22,000 ft.

  9. Vibration measurement based on the optical cross-correlation technique with femtosecond pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jibo; Wu, Tengfei; Zhao, Chunbo; Li, Shuyi

    2016-10-01

    Two vibration measurement methods with femtosecond pulsed laser based on the optical cross-correlation technique are presented independently in this paper. The balanced optical cross-correlation technique can reflect the time jitter between the reference pluses and measurement pluses by detecting second harmonic signals using type II phase-matched nonlinear crystal and balanced amplified photo-detectors. In the first method, with the purpose of attaining the vibration displacement, the time difference of the reference pulses relative to the measurement pluses can be measured using single femtosecond pulsed laser. In the second method, there are a couple of femtosecond pulsed lasers with high pulse repetition frequency. Vibration displacement associated with cavity length can be calculated by means of precisely measuring the pulse repetition frequency. The results show that the range of measurement attains ±150μm for a 500fs pulse. These methods will be suited for vibration displacement measurement, including laboratory use, field testing and industrial application.

  10. Laser damage threshold of SiO{sub 2} films by the photoacoustic mirage technique

    SciTech Connect

    Alvisi, M.; Vasanelli, L.; De Nunzio, G.; Diso, D.; Perrone, M. R.; Protopapa, L.; Rizzo, A.; Scaglione, S.

    1999-03-15

    SiO{sub 2} thin films of 240 nm thickness have been deposited by a dual-ion-beam sputtering technique using argon or xenon ions mixed with oxygen ions in the assisting ion beam and the role of the assisting ion beam and of the substrate temperature on the laser damage threshold at 308 nm (XeCl excimer laser) has been investigated by the photo acoustic mirage technique. It has been found that the laser damage threshold was quite dependent on the film deposition conditions. The sample grown at a substrate temperature of 300 deg. C and with the argon ion assisting beam was characterized by the highest damage threshold ( congruent with 10 J/cm{sup 2})

  11. Laser photoacoustic technique for ultrasonic surface acoustic wave velocity evaluation on porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, K.; Tu, S. J.; Gao, L.; Xu, J.; Li, S. D.; Yu, W. C.; Liao, H. H.

    2016-10-01

    A laser photoacoustic technique has been developed to evaluate the surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity of porcelain. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm was focused by a cylindrical lens to initiate broadband SAW impulses, which were detected by an optical fiber interferometer with high spatial resolution. Multiple near-field surface acoustic waves were observed on the sample surface at various locations along the axis perpendicular to the laser line source as the detector moved away from the source in the same increments. The frequency spectrum and dispersion curves were obtained by operating on the recorded waveforms with cross-correlation and FFT. The SAW phase velocities of the porcelain of the same source are similar while they are different from those of different sources. The marked differences of Rayleigh phase velocities in our experiment suggest that this technique has the potential for porcelain identification.

  12. Analysis of Pulsed Laser-Generated Impulse in AN Advanced Airbreathing Thruster.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Jacques Constant

    This thesis describes the study of an advanced beam-powered propulsion system, called an External Radiation -Heated (ERH) thruster. The repetitively-pulsed, airbreathing engine develops thrust by expanding high pressure, radiation -heated gas over an annular shroud surface. The blast waves are generated by laser radiation heating of air using Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) waves. The phenomenology of LSD waves will be described in detail, as will the blast waves and resultant impulse they produce. Analytical simulation of the ERH thruster is accomplished with a one-dimensional model of blast waves propagating uniformly and radially outward from a laser -generated "line source" of high pressure, high temperature gas. Cylindrical blast wave scaling relationships developed by Sedov are employed in this model. The possibility of including other physical phenomena (e.g., viscosity, radiation, conduction or real gas effects) in the analysis will be reviewed. The analyses for the ERH thruster model are performed for a sample vehicle point design. This vehicle, known as the "Lightcraft Technology Demonstrator" (LTD), may be constructed within the next five years to illustrate the potential of Earth-to-Orbit laser propulsion. The external flow over the LTD vehicle was analyzed to determine basic drag characteristics, inlet total pressure recovery and captured air mass flow rate--all projected as functions of flight Mach number and altitude. The ERH thruster performance analysis indicates that the optimum LTD inlet air gap is about 3 cm around the 100 cm diameter centerbody, for transonic "refresh" air flow over the impulse surface. In this analysis, the principal indicator used to predict engine performance was the "impulse coupling coefficient (CC)"; i.e., the thrust developed per unit laser power input. Coupling coefficients up to 600-700 Newtons/Megawatt were found to be feasible, which are an order of magnitude larger than those for laser-heated rockets. For maximum

  13. A New Femtosecond Laser-Based Three-Dimensional Tomography Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echlin, McLean P.

    2011-12-01

    Tomographic imaging has dramatically changed science, most notably in the fields of medicine and biology, by producing 3D views of structures which are too complex to understand in any other way. Current tomographic techniques require extensive time both for post-processing and data collection. Femtosecond laser based tomographic techniques have been developed in both standard atmosphere (femtosecond laser-based serial sectioning technique - FSLSS) and in vacuum (Tri-Beam System) for the fast collection (10 5mum3/s) of mm3 sized 3D datasets. Both techniques use femtosecond laser pulses to selectively remove layer-by-layer areas of material with low collateral damage and a negligible heat affected zone. To the authors knowledge, femtosecond lasers have never been used to serial section and these techniques have been entirely and uniquely developed by the author and his collaborators at the University of Michigan and University of California Santa Barbara. The FSLSS was applied to measure the 3D distribution of TiN particles in a 4330 steel. Single pulse ablation morphologies and rates were measured and collected from literature. Simultaneous two-phase ablation of TiN and steel matrix was shown to occur at fluences of 0.9-2 J/cm2. Laser scanning protocols were developed minimizing surface roughness to 0.1-0.4 mum for laser-based sectioning. The FSLSS technique was used to section and 3D reconstruct titanium nitride (TiN) containing 4330 steel. Statistical analysis of 3D TiN particle sizes, distribution parameters, and particle density were measured. A methodology was developed to use the 3D datasets to produce statistical volume elements (SVEs) for toughness modeling. Six FSLSS TiN datasets were sub-sampled into 48 SVEs for statistical analysis and toughness modeling using the Rice-Tracey and Garrison-Moody models. A two-parameter Weibull analysis was performed and variability in the toughness data agreed well with Ruggieri et al. bulk toughness measurements. The Tri

  14. LASER BIOLOGY: Laser spectroscopy technique for estimating the efficiency of photosensitisers in biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabova, A. V.; Stratonnikov, Aleksandr A.; Loshchenov, V. B.

    2006-06-01

    A fast and highly informative method is presented for estimating the photodynamic activity of photosensitisers. The method makes it possible to determine the rate of photodegradation in erythrocyte-containing biological media in nearly in vivo conditions, estimate the degree of irreversible binding of oxygen dissolved in the medium during laser irradiation in the presence of photosensitisers, and determine the nature of degradation of photosensitisers exposed to light (photobleaching).

  15. Adaptive resonator control techniques for high-power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R.H.; Spinhirne, J.M.; Anafi, D.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental results and interpretations for correcting tilt and astigmatism aberrations using intracavity adaptive optics versus extracavity adaptive optics are presented, along with control algorithm and resonator design considerations when utilizing a multidither COAT control system for astigmatism and tilt correction. It is shown that in a high-power device, PIB (Power-in-the-Bucket) optimization, with the possible added requirement of extracavity beam clean-up to achieve good beam quality, would be a more desirable control algorithm than BQ (beam quality) optimization. Zonal multidither hill-climbing servo COAT techniques applied to tilt correction fail to achieve good correction for large tilt amplitudes when the control loop is closed after tilt is introduced. Therefore, it is suggested that a separate tilt sensor be used to provide error signal for correction of tilt and let the multidither system COAT correct for higher order aberrations

  16. Modulation/demodulation techniques for satellite communications. Part 2: Advanced techniques. The linear channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, J. K.; Simon, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory is presented for deducing and predicting the performance of transmitter/receivers for bandwidth efficient modulations suitable for use on the linear satellite channel. The underlying principle used is the development of receiver structures based on the maximum-likelihood decision rule. The application of the performance prediction tools, e.g., channel cutoff rate and bit error probability transfer function bounds to these modulation/demodulation techniques.

  17. New techniques for reducing the thermochemical damage in the course of laser surgery.

    PubMed

    Armon, E; Laufer, G

    1987-01-01

    New techniques were proposed for reducing the damage incurred to living tissues owing to temperature rise induced by surgical lasers. Precooling of the tissue and spatial filtering were evaluated numerically and were shown to be most effective in most surgical procedures. Application of pulse trains was also evaluated numerically and optimal operating conditions were identified.

  18. A laser induced fluorescence technique for quantifying transient liquid fuel films utilising total internal reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Mario; Kay, Peter J.; Bowen, Phil J.; Gilchrist, Robert; Sapsford, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique to quantify the thickness and spatial distribution of transient liquid fuel films formed as a result of spray-wall interaction. The LIF technique relies on the principle that upon excitation by laser radiation the intensity of the fluorescent signal from a tracer like 3-pentanone is proportional to the film thickness. A binary solution of 10% (v/v) of 3-pentanone in iso-octane is used as a test fuel with a Nd:YAG laser as the excitation light source (utilising the fourth harmonic at wavelength 266 nm) and an intensified CCD camera is used to record the results as fluorescent images. The propagation of the excitation laser beam through the optical piston is carefully controlled by total internal reflection so that only the fuel film is excited and not the airborne droplets above the film, which had been previously shown to induce significant error. Other known sources of error are also carefully minimised. Calibrated temporally resolved benchmark results of a transient spray from a gasoline direct injector impinging on a flat quartz crown under atmospheric conditions are presented, with observations and discussion of the transient development of the fuel film. The calibrated measurements are consistent with previous studies of this event and demonstrate the applicability of the technique particularly for appraisal of CFD predictions. The potential utilisation of the technique under typical elevated ambient conditions is commented upon.

  19. Detection of fecal residue on poultry carcasses by laser induced fluorescence imaging techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential use of laser-induced fluorescence imaging techniques was investigated for the detection of diluted fecal matters from various parts of the digestive tract, including colon, ceca, small intestine, and duodenum, on poultry carcasses. One of the challenges for using fluorescence imaging f...

  20. Coincidence laser spectroscopy: A new ultrasensitive technique for fast ionic or atomic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastham, D. A.; Walker, P. M.; Smith, J. R. H.; Griffith, J. A. R.; Evans, D. E.; Wells, S. A.; Fawcett, M. J.; Grant, I. S.

    1986-12-01

    A new technique for laser spectroscopy of fast ionic or atomic beams is described. This involves measuring coincidences between resonantly scattered photons and ions (or atoms) in the fast beam. Measurements on strontium ions have shown that Doppler-free spectroscopy is possible with fewer than 100 ions s -1.

  1. Development of the laser absorption radiation thermometry technique to measure thermal diffusivity in addition to temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levick, Andrew; Lobato, Killian; Edwards, Gordon

    2003-01-01

    A comparative technique based on photothermal radiometry has been developed to measure thermal diffusivity of semi-infinite targets with arbitrary geometry. The technique exploits the principle that the frequency response of the temperature modulation induced by a periodic modulated heating source (in this case a laser spot) scales with thermal diffusivity. To demonstrate this technique, a photothermal radiometer has been developed, which detects modulated thermal radiance at a wavelength of 2 μm due to a small temperature modulation induced on the target surface by a modulated erbium fiber laser of power 1 W. Two frequency responses were measured for platinum and oxidized Inconel 600 targets (the frequency response is a scan of the amplitude of the modulated thermal radiance over laser modulation frequency). Scaling the two responses with respect to frequency gives a ratio of thermal diffusivities Dplatinum/DInconel of 4.45(33) which compares with a literature value of 4.46(50). The aim is to combine this technique with laser absorption radiation thermometry to produce multithermal property instrument for measuring "industrial" targets.

  2. Advanced combustion techniques for controlling NO sub x emissions of high altitude cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.; Reck, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    An array of experiments designed to explore the potential of advanced combustion techniques for controlling the emissions of aircraft into the upper atmosphere was discussed. Of particular concern are the oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions into the stratosphere. The experiments utilize a wide variety of approaches varying from advanced combustor concepts to fundamental flame tube experiments. Results are presented which indicate that substantial reductions in cruise NOx emissions should be achievable in future aircraft engines. A major NASA program is described which focuses the many fundamental experiments into a planned evolution and demonstration of the prevaporized-premixed combustion technique in a full-scale engine.

  3. POC-Scale Testing of an Advanced Fine Coal Dewatering Equipment/Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Karekh, B K; Tao, D; Groppo, J G

    1998-08-28

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 mm) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy's program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20% or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 45 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from January 1 - March 31, 1998.

  4. Research of the conical cavity high-energy laser energy meter energy loss compensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xun; Li, Qian; Nie, Liang; Shang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Baoyuan

    2008-09-01

    Because absolute quantity thermal laser energy meter based on conical cavity has some features, for example, wavelength adaptation range is wide and laser damage threshold value is high. It is used for the standard of the high-energy laser energy meter and extensively in the domain of the high energy laser measurement. However, laser energy will lose because of the heat exchange and the back scattering of the conical absorption cavity. Therefore, only after compensating and amending the loss, the exact measurement of the laser energy can be achieved. Aimed to the energy loss compensation problem of the conical cavity high-energy laser energy meter, firstly, according to the heat transfer theory, this paper analyzes the heat energy loss of the conical cavity due to the heat emission, the heat convection and the heat exchange, and construct the mathematical model of the heat energy loss, based on which measuring result is curved fit using the least squares technique, and is compensated and amended utilizing the fitting curve, whose measurement repetitiveness is 0.7%, from which we can know that measuring repetitiveness is increased consumedly. Secondly, according to the optics principles of reciprocity of the conical cavity inner face and the incident laser and utilizing complexification Simpson numerical method, the mathematical model of conical cavity jaw opening optical power density distribution and back scattering gross power is established, based on which measuring result is compensated and amended, the back scattering energy loss is about 0.5% to 2.5%, high-energy laser energy measuring accuracy is improved availably.

  5. Liquid-assisted laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Giron, A.; Sola, D.; Peña, J. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, results obtained by laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials assisted by liquids are reported. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse-width in the nanosecond range was used to machine the materials, which were immersed in water and ethylene glycol. Variation in geometrical parameters, morphology, and ablation yields were studied by using the same laser working conditions. It was observed that machined depth and removed volume depended on the thermal, optical, and mechanical features of the processed materials as well as on the properties of the surrounding medium in which the laser processing was carried out. Variation in ablation yields was studied in function of the liquid used to assist the laser process and related to refractive index and viscosity. Material features and working conditions were also related to the obtained results in order to correlate ablation parameters with respect to the hardness of the processed materials.

  6. Corner-Cube Retroreflector Instrument for Advanced Lunar Laser Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Folkner, William M.; Gutt, Gary M.; Williams, James G.; Somawardhana, Ruwan P.; Baran, Richard T.

    2012-01-01

    A paper describes how, based on a structural-thermal-optical-performance analysis, it has been determined that a single, large, hollow corner cube (170- mm outer diameter) with custom dihedral angles offers a return signal comparable to the Apollo 11 and 14 solid-corner-cube arrays (each consisting of 100 small, solid corner cubes), with negligible pulse spread and much lower mass. The design of the corner cube, and its surrounding mounting and casing, is driven by the thermal environment on the lunar surface, which is subject to significant temperature variations (in the range between 70 and 390 K). Therefore, the corner cube is enclosed in an insulated container open at one end; a narrow-bandpass solar filter is used to reduce the solar energy that enters the open end during the lunar day, achieving a nearly uniform temperature inside the container. Also, the materials and adhesive techniques that will be used for this corner-cube reflector must have appropriate thermal and mechanical characteristics (e.g., silica or beryllium for the cube and aluminum for the casing) to further reduce the impact of the thermal environment on the instrument's performance. The instrument would consist of a single, open corner cube protected by a separate solar filter, and mounted in a cylindrical or spherical case. A major goal in the design of a new lunar ranging system is a measurement accuracy improvement to better than 1 mm by reducing the pulse spread due to orientation. While achieving this goal, it was desired to keep the intensity of the return beam at least as bright as the Apollo 100-corner-cube arrays. These goals are met in this design by increasing the optical aperture of a single corner cube to approximately 170 mm outer diameter. This use of an "open" corner cube allows the selection of corner cube materials to be based primarily on thermal considerations, with no requirements on optical transparency. Such a corner cube also allows for easier pointing requirements

  7. Modulation/demodulation techniques for satellite communications. Part 3: Advanced techniques. The nonlinear channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, J. K.; Simon, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory for deducing and predicting the performance of transmitter/receivers for bandwidth efficient modulations suitable for use on the nonlinear satellite channel is presented. The underlying principle used throughout is the development of receiver structures based on the maximum likelihood decision rule and aproximations to it. The bit error probability transfer function bounds developed in great detail in Part 4 is applied to these modulation/demodulation techniques. The effects of the various degrees of receiver mismatch are considered both theoretically and by numerous illustrative examples.

  8. Characterization of hydroxyapatite coating by pulse laser deposition technique on stainless steel 316 L by varying laser energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Himanshu; Singh, Gurbhinder; Agrawal, Khelendra; Prakash, Satya; Agarwal, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite is an attractive biomaterial mainly used in bone and tooth implants because it closely resembles human tooth and bone mineral and has proven to be biologically compatible with these tissues. In spite of this advantage of hydroxyapatite it has also certain limitation like inferior mechanical properties which do not make it suitable for long term load bearing applications; hence a lot of research is going on in the development of hydroxyapatite coating over various metallic implants. These metallic implants have good biocompatibility and mechanical properties. The aim of the present work is to deposit hydroxyapatite coating over stainless steel grade 316 L by pulse laser deposition technique by varying laser energy. To know the effect of this variation, the coatings were than characterized in detail by X-ray diffraction, finite emission-scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  9. Application of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Evaluation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Hillary J.; Dragoo, Jason L.; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Levenston, Marc E.; Gold, Garry E.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews current magnetic resonance imaging techniques for imaging the lower extremity, focusing on imaging of the knee, ankle, and hip joints. Recent advancements in MRI include imaging at 7 Tesla, using multiple receiver channels, T2* imaging, and metal suppression techniques, allowing more detailed visualization of complex anatomy, evaluation of morphological changes within articular cartilage, and imaging around orthopedic hardware. PMID:23622097

  10. Advances in neutron radiographic techniques and applications: a method for nondestructive testing.

    PubMed

    Berger, Harold

    2004-10-01

    A brief history of neutron radiography is presented to set the stage for a discussion of significant neutron radiographic developments and an assessment of future directions for neutron radiography. Specific advances are seen in the use of modern, high dynamic range imaging methods (image plates and flat panels) and for high contrast techniques such as phase contrast, and phase-sensitive imaging. Competition for neutron radiographic inspection may develop as these techniques offer application prospects for X-ray methods.

  11. Production of submicrometre fused silica gratings using laser-induced backside dry etching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Vass, Cs; Smausz, T.; Bor, Zs

    2006-11-01

    Laser micromachining of transparent materials is a promising technique for producing micro-optical elements. Several types of both direct (e.g. ablation) and indirect (e.g. laser-induced backside wet etching: LIBWE) procedures have already been developed and presented in the last two decades. Here we present a new method (laser-induced backside dry etching (LIBDE)) in the analogy of LIBWE for the micro and nanoprocessing of transparent materials. In our experiments 1 mm thick fused silica plates were used as transparent work pieces. The plates were covered with 100 nm thick silver layers. The metal absorbing films were irradiated through the fused silica by a KrF excimer laser beam (λ = 248 nm, FWHM = 30 ns). The illuminated area was 1.05 mm2 and the fluence on the silver-quartz interface varied in the range 0-1800 mJ cm-2. We have provided evidence that LIBDE is more effective and simple than LIBWE, its etch rate being much higher at a given laser fluence. Our interference experiments proved that the LIBDE etching technique is suitable to fabricate gratings displaying submicrometre periods in transparent materials. On the basis of all these, it is suggested that this method may be useful to produce other nano and microoptical elements, too.

  12. Intermode beating mode-locking technique for O-band mixed-cascaded Raman fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhengqian; Zhong, Min; Xiong, Fengfu; Wu, Duanduan; Huang, Yizhong; Li, Yingyue; Le, Lili; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping

    2015-02-15

    A novel intermode beating mode-locking (IBML) technique combined with a cascaded Raman process is proposed to mode-lock an O-band two-cascaded Raman fiber laser. Using a 980-m-long phosphosilicate fiber pumped by a 1064 nm laser, the second-order Raman oscillation at 1319 nm is generated by the mixed-cascaded Raman shifts of P2O5 and SiO2. By precisely matching the intermode beating frequencies of the 1064 nm pump laser and the second-order Raman cavity frequency, harmonic mode-locking at 1319 nm is initiated. The dynamic process of the IBML operation in the cascaded Raman laser is experimentally investigated. The 131st-order harmonic mode-locking with a repetition rate of 27.247 MHz is very stable with the radio-frequency (RF) signal-to-noise ratio of >56  dB and the RF supermode-suppression ratio of >43  dB. The mode-locked pulses with the square profile are confirmed as the noise-like pulses by an autocorrelator. The IBML technique, in combination with the cascaded Raman process, could offer an exciting new prospect for obtaining simple, compact, and arbitrary-wavelength mode-locked laser sources.

  13. Laser optoacoustic technique for real-time measurement of thermal damage in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Larina, Irina V.; Larin, Kirill V.; Motamedi, Massoud; Karabutov, Alexander A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    1999-05-01

    Optoacoustic monitoring of thermally-induced damage in tissues in real time is proposed as a mean for controlling the extent of tissue coagulation in human organs, such as liver, prostate, myocardium, breast, and brain. This technique can potentially provide fast and accurate feedback information during tumor thermal coagulation by interstitial delivery of laser, ultrasonic, radiofrequency, and microwave radiation or conductive and convective heating. Amplitude and temporal characteristics of optoacoustic signals are dependent on optical and thermophysical properties of tissues. Changes in tissue optical properties during coagulation can be detected by measuring and analyzing the amplitude and temporal characteristics of the optoacoustic signals. We performed studies on optoacoustic monitoring of coagulation by CW Nd:YAG laser interstitial irradiation and conductive heating. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulses were used as a probing radiation to obtain optoacoustic pressure profiles and images. Our preliminary studies suggest that the laser optoacoustic technique is capable of detecting thermally-induced changes in optical properties of liver, myocardium, and prostate. The major merits of the laser optoacoustic monitoring of tissue coagulation include high contrast provided by changes in tissue optical properties, capability to perform real-time measurements, and high spatial resolution.

  14. Laser direct imaging of transparent indium tin oxide electrodes using high speed stitching techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pi-Ying; Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Chung, Chien-Kai; Tseng, Shih-Feng; Liao, Ien-Chang

    2014-09-01

    To accomplish an electrode patterning in large area, we present a high speed stitching technique used in an ultraviolet laser processing system and investigate the interaction between laser beams and indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films deposited on glass substrates. After optimizing the process parameters of the laser direct imaging (LDI) for the large-area electrode patterning, the ablated lines looked like regularly fish-scale marks of about a 40 μm diameter and a 120 nm depth around the processing path. The parameters includes the laser power of 1W, the scanning speed of galvanometers of 800 mm/s, and the laser pulse repetition frequency of 50 kHz. Moreover, the resistance value of the ablated ITO thin film is larger than 200MΩ that is electrically insulated from the other regions of electrode structure. LDI technology with UV laser beam has great potential applications in patterning on wafer or sapphire substrates and patterning a conductive layer deposited on the touch panels for semiconductor and optoelectric industries, respectively.

  15. Measurement of xenon plasma properties in an ion thruster using laser Thomson scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, N.; Tomita, K.; Sugita, K.; Kurita, T.; Nakashima, H.; Uchino, K.

    2012-07-15

    This paper reports on the development of a method for measuring xenon plasma properties using the laser Thomson scattering technique, for application to ion engine system design. The thresholds of photo-ionization of xenon plasma were investigated and the number density of metastable atoms, which are photo-ionized by a probe laser, was measured using laser absorption spectroscopy, for several conditions. The measured threshold energy of the probe laser using a plano-convex lens with a focal length of 200 mm was 150 mJ for a xenon mass flow rate of 20 {mu}g/s and incident microwave power of 6 W; the probe laser energy was therefore set as 80 mJ. Electron number density was found to be (6.2 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} m{sup -3} and electron temperature was found to be 2.2 {+-} 0.4 eV at a xenon mass flow rate of 20 {mu}g/s and incident microwave power of 6 W. The threshold of the probe laser intensity against photo-ionization in a miniature xenon ion thruster is almost constant for various mass flow rates, since the ratio of population of the metastable atoms to the electron number density is little changed.

  16. Sandwich concept: enhancement for direct absorption measurements by laser-induced deflection (LID) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Ch.; Bublitz, S.; Paa, W.

    2012-11-01

    The new sandwich concept for absolute photo-thermal absorption measurements using the laser induced deflection (LID) technique is introduced and tested in comparison to the standard LID concept. The sandwich concept's idea is the decoupling of the optical materials for the pump and probe beams by placing a sample of investigation in between two optical (sandwich) plates. The pump beam is guided through the sample whereas the probe beams are deflected within the sandwich plates by the thermal lens that is generated by heat transfer from the irradiated sample. Electrical simulation and laser experiments reveal that using appropriate optical materials for the sandwich plates, the absorption detection limit for photo-thermally insensitive materials can be lowered by up to two orders of magnitude. Another advantage of the sandwich concept, the shrinking of the currently required minimum sample size, was used to investigate the laser induced absorption change in a Nd:YVO4 crystal at 1030nm. It was found that the absorption in Nd:YVO4 lowers due to the laser irradiation but partially recovers during irradiation breaks. Furthermore, absorption spectroscopy has been performed at two LBO crystals in the wavelength range 410...600nm to study the absorption structure around the SHG wavelengths of common high power lasers based on Neodymium doped laser crystals.

  17. Ten years of laser treatment of congenital vascular disorders: techniques and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Carsten M.; Berlien, Hans-Peter; Poetke, Margitta; Waldschmidt, Juergen

    1994-12-01

    During the period of January 1984 - July 1993, we have treated 611 children with more than 2000 lesions of congenital vascular disorders (CVD) such as hemangiomas and vascular malformations. This number does not include the patients with port wine stains, which also have been treated by means of laser. Most of the CVD patients (n equals 467) presented hemangiomas of the face, the anogenital region, and the extremities, some were located in the trachea or mouth or in the urogenital tract. All of these hemangiomas were growing prior to intervention or showed complications such as bleeding, ulceration, superinfection, or obstruction. Nearly a quarter (n equals 144) of the patients presented vascular malformations, either of singular vessel type involvement or of mixed vascular genesis (venous, arterio- venous, veno-lymphatic or lymphatic) with various complications like tracheal obstruction or recurrent thrombophlebitis. According to our step program, which is based on a clinical classification, the hemangiomas were treated as early as possible, while the vascular malformations were only treated with laser when no other therapeutic technique (embolization, resection) was suitable. All patients were referred for laser treatment from other centers. The lasers used were Nd:YAG and Argon lasers with transcutaneous application with or without continuous ice-cube surface cooling or interstitial laser application. The treatments were performed either on in- or outpatient basis according to age, localization and with good to excellent results in most cases and a complication rate of less than 2%.

  18. LATEST LASER AND LIGHT-BASED ADVANCES FOR ETHNIC SKIN REJUVENATION

    PubMed Central

    Elsaie, Mohamed Lotfy; Lloyd, Heather Woolery

    2008-01-01

    Background: Advances in nonablative skin rejuvenation technologies have sparked a renewed interest in the cosmetic treatment of aging skin. More options exist now than ever before to reverse cutaneous changes caused by long-term exposure to sunlight. Although Caucasian skin is more prone to ultraviolet light injury, ethnic skin (typically classified as types IV to VI) also exhibits characteristic photoaging changes. Widespread belief that inevitable or irreversible textural changes or dyspigmentation occurs following laser- or light-based treatments, has been challenged in recent years by new classes of devices capable of protecting the epidermis from injury during treatment. Objective: The purpose of this article is to review recent clinical advances in the treatment of photoaging changes in ethnic skin. This article provides a basis for the classification of current advances in nonablative management of ethnic skin. PMID:19881986

  19. Laser Pulpotomy–An Effective Alternative to Conventional Techniques: A 12 Months Clinicoradiographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Vivek; Srivastava, Nikhil; Chandna, Preetika

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Vital pulpotomy is a single-stage procedure of surgical amputation of the coronal portion of exposed vital pulp, usually as a means of preserving the vitality and function of the remaining radicular portion. Aims and objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and radiographic success rates for ferric sulfate (FS), electrosurgery (ES) and laser pulpotomy in human primary molars. Materials and methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 30 primary molars indicated for pulpotomy in children aged 4 to 10 years were treated using either a FS (10 teeth), ES technique (10 teeth) and laser (10 teeth). Following the pulpotomy, the teeth were evaluated for clinical and radiographic success at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months on the basis of the presence of pain, sinus, mobility, internal and external resorption, periapical radiolucency, calcification in the canal and bone loss. Statistical analysis: The data were assessed with Chi-square test. Results: After 12 months of follow-up, both clinical and radiographic success rates were 100% in the laser group but only 80% in both ES and FS groups. There was statistically significant difference between the success rates of three groups (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Laser pulpotomy showed better clinical as well as radiographical results than ES and FS pulpotomy. Laser pulpotomy was also found superior in terms of operating time, patient cooperation, ease of use and pain. Although results of the study showed the failure rates for electrosurgical pulpotomy to be equal to those for FS pulpotomy, electrosurgical pulpotomy being a nonpharmacological technique considered more favorable. Further studies using larger sample size and longer evaluation periods are suggested. How to cite this article: Gupta G, Rana V, Srivastava N, Chandna P. Laser Pulpotomy–An Effective Alternative to Conventional Techniques: A 12 Months Clinicoradiographic Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):18-21. PMID:26124576

  20. Thermal Conductivity Change Kinetics of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by the Steady-State Laser Heat Flux Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    A steady-state laser heat flux technique has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to obtain critical thermal conductivity data of ceramic thermal barrier coatings under the temperature and thermal gradients that are realistically expected to be encountered in advanced engine systems. In this study, thermal conductivity change kinetics of a plasma-sprayed, 254-mm-thick ZrO2-8 wt % Y2O3 ceramic coating were obtained at high temperatures. During the testing, the temperature gradients across the coating system were carefully measured by the surface and back pyrometers and an embedded miniature thermocouple in the substrate. The actual heat flux passing through the coating system was determined from the metal substrate temperature drop (measured by the embedded miniature thermocouple and the back pyrometer) combined with one-dimensional heat transfer models.

  1. A laser GC-IRMS technique for in situ stable isotope analyses of carbonates and phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Z. D.; Cerling, T. E.

    1996-08-01

    A technique is described whereby in situ carbon and oxygen isotope analyses of carbonates and organic phosphates can be made with the use of a CO 2 laser. The CO 2 gas generated by thermal decarbonation from the laser is entrained in a helium carrier gas, passes through a chromatographic column (GC), and is admitted directly into the isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). No vacuum systems, pumps, or cryogenic traps are used. All carbonates and biogenic phosphates can be analyzed, no special sample preparation is required and analyses can be made every 3 minutes. The use of a helium carrier gas allows for extremely small samples to be analyzed and the GC column effectively separates CO 2 from any other potential contaminating gases (e.g., SO 2 which is a particular problem in organic apatite). The average reproducibility of calcite, dolomite, magnesite, rhodochrosite, siderite, and smithsonite (ZnCO 3) is 0.29‰ for oxygen and 0.1‰ for carbon (1σ); the most "homogeneous" samples are reproducible to better than 0.1‰ for carbon and 0.2‰ for oxygen. The difference between the laser and conventional values for carbon isotope ratios [Δ 13C (laser-conv)] is 0.05 ± 0.30‰ for all carbonates (excluding siderite). The Δ 18O(laser-conv) value varies from carbonate to carbonate and may be related to the electronegativities of the cations, grain size (or crystallinity), formation of CO and O 2, and reaction with included organic matter. For calcite and rhodochrosite, the Δ 18O(laser-conv) value is 0.3 ± 0.4‰; for siderite, magnesite, and dolomite, the Δ 18O(laser-conv) value is 1.7 ± 0.3‰. The δ 13C values of tooth enamel are the same as those obtained by conventional acid digestion. The laser δ 18O values are equal to the δ 18O values of the phosphate, and approx. 7‰ lighter than the "carbonate" oxygen. The carbonate group in the apatite (equiv. 7.6% oxygen) exchanges with the (PO 4=)-bound oxygen to produce CO 2 with a δ 18O equal to the phosphate

  2. Comparison of a novel surface laser scanning anthropometric technique to traditional methods for facial parameter measurements.

    PubMed

    Joe, Paula S; Ito, Yasushi; Shih, Alan M; Oestenstad, Riedar K; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning techniques could be used to collect accurate anthropometric measurements, compared with traditional methods. The use of an alternative 3D method would allow for quick collection of data that could be used to change the parameters used for facepiece design, improving fit and protection for a wider variety of faces. In our study, 10 facial dimensions were collected using both the traditional calipers and tape method and a Konica-Minolta Vivid9i laser scanner. Scans were combined using RapidForm XOR software to create a single complete facial geometry of the subject as a triangulated surface with an associated texture image from which to obtain measurements. A paired t-test was performed on subject means in each measurement by method. Nine subjects were used in this study: five males (one African-American and four Caucasian females) and four females displaying a range of facial dimensions. Five measurements showed significant differences (p<0.05), with most accounted for by subject movements or amended by scanning technique modifications. Laser scanning measurements showed high precision and accuracy when compared with traditional methods. Significant differences found can be very small changes in measurements and are unlikely to present a practical difference. The laser scanning technique demonstrated reliable and quick anthropometric data collection for use in future projects in redesigning respirators.

  3. FAST CARS: engineering a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid identification of bacterial spores.

    PubMed

    Scully, M O; Kattawar, G W; Lucht, R P; Opatrny, T; Pilloff, H; Rebane, A; Sokolov, A V; Zubairy, M S

    2002-08-20

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is challenging. In particular, the short dephasing times and rapid internal conversion rates are major obstacles. However, adiabatic fast passage techniques and the ability to generate combs of phase-coherent femtosecond pulses provide tools for the generation and utilization of maximal quantum coherence in large molecules and biopolymers. We call this technique FAST CARS (femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy), and the present article proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify preselected molecules in real time.

  4. High-spatial-resolution sub-surface imaging using a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Balogun, Oluwaseyi; Cole, Garrett D; Huber, Robert; Chinn, Diane; Murray, Todd W; Spicer, James B

    2011-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy techniques operating at frequencies in the gigahertz range are suitable for the elastic characterization and interior imaging of solid media with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. Acoustic wave propagation at these frequencies is strongly limited by energy losses, particularly from attenuation in the coupling media used to transmit ultrasound to a specimen, leading to a decrease in the depth in a specimen that can be interrogated. In this work, a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique is presented that uses a pulsed laser source for the generation of broadband acoustic waves and an optical interferometer for detection. The use of a 900-ps microchip pulsed laser facilitates the generation of acoustic waves with frequencies extending up to 1 GHz which allows for the resolution of micrometer-scale features in a specimen. Furthermore, the combination of optical generation and detection approaches eliminates the use of an ultrasonic coupling medium, and allows for elastic characterization and interior imaging at penetration depths on the order of several hundred micrometers. Experimental results illustrating the use of the laser-based acoustic microscopy technique for imaging micrometer-scale subsurface geometrical features in a 70-μm-thick single-crystal silicon wafer with a (100) orientation are presented.

  5. Heterodyne stabilization as a possible laser frequency stabilization technique for LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichholz, Johannes

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna is a joint NASA/ESA mission aimed at the detection of gravitational wave radiation in the frequency range from 30 uHz to 0.1 Hz. LISA uses a modified Michelson interferometer setup consisting of three identical spacecraft, arranged in an equilateral triangular constellation. It measures the differential length changes of the 5 · 109 m long interferometer arms between free-floating proof masses housed within each spacecraft. Laser pre-stabilization is required in conjunction with Time-Delay Interferometry data post-processing to monitor the armlength changes with picometer precision. A modulation/demodulation technique to stabilize the frequency of the lasers to an optical reference cavity has been proposed for a long time, but it requires several additional optical components and would need to be built as a separate system. Using a different sensing tech-nique, heterodyne interferometry, we propose a modified stabilization scheme, which similarly transfers the stability of an optical reference cavity to the laser frequency. It only uses com-ponents that are already available in the LISA assembly and can easily be integrated into the optical bench design. A similar stabilization scheme is going to be used in LISA Pathfinder. We will discuss this technique in detail and present initial experimental results, as well as predicted performances on the LISA bench.

  6. Technique Errors and Limiting Factors in Laser Ranging to Geodetic Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, G. M.; Luceri, V.; Mueller, H.; Noll, C. E.; Otsubo, T.; Wilkinson, M.

    2012-12-01

    The tracking stations of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) global network provide to the Data Centres a steady stream of very precise laser range normal points to the primary geodetic spherical satellites LAGEOS (-1 and -2) and Etalon (-1 and -2). Analysis of these observations to determine instantaneous site coordinates and Earth orientation parameters provides a major contribution to ongoing international efforts to define a precise terrestrial reference frame, which itself supports research into geophysical processes at the few mm level of precision. For example, the latest realization of the reference frame, ITRF2008, used weekly laser range solutions from 1983 to 2009, the origin of the Frame being determined solely by the SLR technique. However, in the ITRF2008 publication, Altamimi et al (2011, Journal of Geodesy) point out that further improvement in the ITRF is partly dependent upon improving an understanding of sources of technique error. In this study we look at SLR station hardware configuration that has been subject to major improvements over the last four decades, at models that strive to provide accurate translations of the laser range observations to the centres of mass of the small geodetic satellites and at the considerable body of work that has been carried out via orbital analyses to determine range corrections for some of the tracking stations. Through this study, with specific examples, we start to put together an inventory of system-dependent technique errors that will be important information for SLR re-analysis towards the next realization of the ITRF.

  7. FAST CARS: Engineering a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid identification of bacterial spores

    PubMed Central

    Scully, M. O.; Kattawar, G. W.; Lucht, R. P.; Opatrný, T.; Pilloff, H.; Rebane, A.; Sokolov, A. V.; Zubairy, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is challenging. In particular, the short dephasing times and rapid internal conversion rates are major obstacles. However, adiabatic fast passage techniques and the ability to generate combs of phase-coherent femtosecond pulses provide tools for the generation and utilization of maximal quantum coherence in large molecules and biopolymers. We call this technique FAST CARS (femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy), and the present article proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify preselected molecules in real time. PMID:12177405

  8. PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF MAGNETIC MULTILAYERS FOR THE GRANT ENTITLED LASER PROCESSING OF ADVANCED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Monica Sorescu

    2003-10-11

    Nanostructured magnetite/T multilayers, with T = Ni, Co, Cr, have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition. The thickness of individual magnetite and metal layers takes values in the range of 5-40 nm with a total multilayer thickness of 100-120 nm. X-ray diffraction has been used to study the phase characteristics as a function of thermal treatment up to 550 C. Small amounts of maghemite and hematite were identified together with prevailing magnetite phase after treatments at different temperatures. The mean grain size of magnetite phase increases with temperature from 12 nm at room temperature to 54 nm at 550 C. The thermal behavior of magnetite in multilayers in comparison with powder magnetite is discussed. These findings were published in peer-reviewed conference proceedings after presentation at an international materials conference.

  9. In-situ laser material process monitoring using a cladding power detection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Daoning; Norris, Ian; Peters, Chris; Hall, Denis R.; Jones, Julian D. C.

    Progress in laser material processing may require real-time monitoring and process control for consistent quality and productivity. We report a method of in-situ monitoring of laser metal cutting and drilling using cladding power monitoring of an optical fibre beam delivery system—a technique which detects the light reflected or scattered from the workpiece. The light signal carries information about the quality of the process. Experiments involving drilling and cutting of two samples, a thin aluminum foil and a 2-mm thick stainless steel plate, confirmed the effectiveness of this method.

  10. Optical coherent tomography with electrically tunable semiconductor laser using FMCW techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, Udo; Blazek, Vladimir; Schmitt, Hans J.

    1996-12-01

    Imaging of highly scattering objects in scattering media can play an important part in assessing melanoma in human skin. The technique to be presented is based on frequency modulated continuous waves using a coherent tunable semiconductor laser irradiating a Michelson interferometer. The electrically tunable laser is characterized and the procedure to linearize the instantaneous frequency with time is described. The temporal point spread function of dilute milk is measured. Finally the performance of our imaging system is demonstrated on 2D-images of solid scattering phantoms and of an eye of a pig.

  11. Advanced techniques for high resolution spectroscopic observations of cosmic gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Pelling, M. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Pehl, R. H.; Hurley, K. C.; Vedrenne, G.; Sniel, M.; Durouchoux, P.

    1985-01-01

    An advanced gamma-ray spectrometer that is currently in development is described. It will obtain a sensitivity of 0.0001 ph/sq cm./sec in a 6 hour balloon observation and uses innovative techniques for background reduction and source imaging.

  12. Recognizing and Managing Complexity: Teaching Advanced Programming Concepts and Techniques Using the Zebra Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, John; Zhang, Xihui

    2015-01-01

    Teaching advanced programming can be a challenge, especially when the students are pursuing different majors with diverse analytical and problem-solving capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to explore the efficacy of using a particular problem as a vehicle for imparting a broad set of programming concepts and problem-solving techniques. We…

  13. Real-time application of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques for research aircraft simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Steven B.

    1990-01-01

    Visual aids are valuable assets to engineers for design, demonstration, and evaluation. Discussed here are a variety of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques used to enhance the displays of test aircraft dynamics. The new software's capabilities are examined and possible future uses are considered.

  14. Fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials using sol-gel processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. T.; Chu, Jay; Zheng, Haixing

    1995-01-01

    Advanced materials play an important role in electrochemical energy devices such as batteries, fuel cells, and electrochemical capacitors. They are being used as both electrodes and electrolytes. Sol-gel processing is a versatile solution technique used in fabrication of ceramic materials with tailored stoichiometry, microstructure, and properties. The application of sol-gel processing in the fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials will be presented. The potentials of sol-gel derived materials for electrochemical energy applications will be discussed along with some examples of successful applications. Sol-gel derived metal oxide electrode materials such as V2O5 cathodes have been demonstrated in solid-slate thin film batteries; solid electrolytes materials such as beta-alumina for advanced secondary batteries had been prepared by the sol-gel technique long time ago; and high surface area transition metal compounds for capacitive energy storage applications can also be synthesized with this method.

  15. An ultrafast optics undergraduate advanced laboratory with a mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, Andrew; Fredrick, Connor; Hoyt, Chad; Jones, Jason

    2015-05-01

    We describe an ultrafast optics undergraduate advanced laboratory comprising a mode-locked erbium fiber laser, auto-correlation measurements, and an external, free-space parallel grating dispersion compensation apparatus. The simple design of the stretched pulse laser uses nonlinear polarization rotation mode-locking to produce pulses at a repetition rate of 55 MHz and average power of 5.5 mW. Interferometric and intensity auto-correlation measurements are made using a Michelson interferometer that takes advantage of the two-photon nonlinear response of a common silicon photodiode for the second order correlation between 1550 nm laser pulses. After a pre-amplifier and compression, pulse widths as narrow as 108 fs are measured at 17 mW average power. A detailed parts list includes previously owned and common components used by the telecommunications industry, which may decrease the cost of the lab to within reach of many undergraduate and graduate departments. We also describe progress toward a relatively low-cost optical frequency comb advanced laboratory. NSF EIR #1208930.

  16. Investigations of ultrafast charge dynamics in laser-irradiated targets by a self probing technique employing laser driven protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, H.; Kar, S.; Cantono, G.; Nersisyan, G.; Brauckmann, S.; Doria, D.; Gwynne, D.; Macchi, A.; Naughton, K.; Willi, O.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-09-01

    The divergent and broadband proton beams produced by the target normal sheath acceleration mechanism provide the unique opportunity to probe, in a point-projection imaging scheme, the dynamics of the transient electric and magnetic fields produced during laser-plasma interactions. Commonly such experimental setup entails two intense laser beams, where the interaction produced by one beam is probed with the protons produced by the second. We present here experimental studies of the ultra-fast charge dynamics along a wire connected to laser irradiated target carried out by employing a 'self' proton probing arrangement - i.e. by connecting the wire to the target generating the probe protons. The experimental data shows that an electromagnetic pulse carrying a significant amount of charge is launched along the wire, which travels as a unified pulse of 10s of ps duration with a velocity close to speed of light. The experimental capabilities and the analysis procedure of this specific type of proton probing technique are discussed.

  17. Laser Based In Situ Techniques: Novel Methods for Generating Extreme Conditions in TEM Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, M; Lagrange, T; Reed, B; Armstrong, M; Campbell, G; DeHope, W; Kim, J; King, W; Masiel, D; Browning, N

    2008-02-25

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) is introduced as a novel tool for in situ processing of materials. Examples of various types of dynamic studies outline the advantages and differences of laser-based heating in the DTEM in comparison to conventional (resistive) heating in situ TEM methods. We demonstrate various unique capabilities of the drive laser, namely, in situ processing of nanoscale materials, rapid and high temperature phase transformations, and controlled thermal activation of materials. These experiments would otherwise be impossible without the use of the DTEM drive laser. Thus, the potential of the DTEM to as a new technique to process and characterize the growth of a myriad of micro and nanostructures is demonstrated.

  18. Enamel fusion using a carbon dioxide laser: A technique for sealing pits and fissures

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, L.J.; Perham, S.J. )

    1991-05-01

    The well-established enhanced resistance of lased enamel to demineralization is the basis for clinical application of the carbon dioxide laser to caries prevention. This in vitro study examined the effect of focused infrared laser radiation on sound enamel and early pit and fissure caries. Low power levels (2-5 W) induced localized melting and resolidification of enamel with little surface destruction. For sound fissures, fusion of enamel from the lateral walls of the fissure eliminated the fissure space, providing a sealant effect; while in carious fissures, carious enamel was vaporized and adjacent sound enamel fused to partially eliminate the defect. The technique for enamel fusion using CO2 lasers has potential application for sealing pits and fissures and producing physicochemical alterations in enamel which may have preventive benefits.

  19. Advancements in high-power diode laser stacks for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Rajiv; Merchen, David; Stapleton, Dean; Patterson, Steve; Kissel, Heiko; Fassbender, Wilhlem; Biesenbach, Jens

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports on the latest advancements in vertical high-power diode laser stacks using micro-channel coolers, which deliver the most compact footprint, power scalability and highest power/bar of any diode laser package. We present electro-optical (E-O) data on water-cooled stacks with wavelengths ranging from 7xx nm to 9xx nm and power levels of up to 5.8kW, delivered @ 200W/bar, CW mode, and a power-conversion efficiency of >60%, with both-axis collimation on a bar-to-bar pitch of 1.78mm. Also, presented is E-O data on a compact, conductively cooled, hardsoldered, stack package based on conventional CuW and AlN materials, with bar-to-bar pitch of 1.8mm, delivering average power/bar >15W operating up to 25% duty cycle, 10ms pulses @ 45C. The water-cooled stacks can be used as pump-sources for diode-pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) or for more traditional diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSL). which are power/brightness scaled for directed energy weapons applications and the conductively-cooled stacks as illuminators.

  20. Effect of advanced nanowire-based targets in nanosecond laser-matter interaction (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzalone, G.; Altana, C.; Mascali, D.; Tudisco, S.; Muoio, A.; Malferrari, L.; Odorici, F.

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the effects of innovative nanostructured targets based on Ag nanowires on laser energy absorption in the ns time domain has been carried out at the Laser Energy for Nuclear Science laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania. The tested targets were realized at INFN-Bologna by anodizing aluminium sheets in order to obtain layers of porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} of different thicknesses, on which nanowires of various metals are grown by electro-deposition with different heights. Targets were then irradiated by using a Nd:YAG laser at different pumping energies. Advanced diagnostic tools were used for characterizing the plasma plume and ion production. As compared with targets of pure Al, a huge enhancement (of almost two order of magnitude) of the X-ray flux emitted by the plasma has been observed when using the nanostructured targets, with a corresponding decrease of the “optical range” signal, pointing out that the energetic content of the laser produced plasma was remarkably increased. This analysis was furthermore confirmed from time-of-flight spectra.