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Sample records for advanced laser techniques

  1. Advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedkowski, Janusz; Jankowski, Stanislaw

    2008-11-01

    This paper show an advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation. The LRF is the common sensor for unmanned ground vehicle, autonomous mobile robot and security applications. The cost of the measurement system is extremely high, therefore the simulation tool is designed. The simulation gives an opportunity to execute algorithm such as the obstacle avoidance[1], slam for robot localization[2], detection of vegetation and water obstacles in surroundings of the robot chassis[3], LRF measurement in crowd of people[1]. The Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) and alternative technique based on CUDA (NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture) is presented.

  2. Antimicrobial nanospheres thin coatings prepared by advanced pulsed laser technique

    PubMed Central

    Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Valentina; Vasile, Bogdan Ştefan; Truşcă, Roxana; Cristescu, Rodica; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report on the fabrication of thin coatings based on polylactic acid-chitosan-magnetite-eugenol (PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG) nanospheres by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation proved that the homogenous Fe3O4@EUG nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 7 nm, while the PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG nanospheres diameter sizes range between 20 and 80 nm. These MAPLE-deposited coatings acted as bioactive nanosystems and exhibited a great antimicrobial effect by impairing the adherence and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteria strains. Moreover, the obtained nano-coatings showed a good biocompatibility and facilitated the normal development of human endothelial cells. These nanosystems may be used as efficient alternatives in treating and preventing bacterial infections. PMID:24991524

  3. Aerodynamic measurement techniques. [laser based diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Laser characteristics of intensity, monochromatic, spatial coherence, and temporal coherence were developed to advance laser based diagnostic techniques for aerodynamic related research. Two broad categories of visualization and optical measurements were considered, and three techniques received significant attention. These are holography, laser velocimetry, and Raman scattering. Examples of the quantitative laser velocimeter and Raman scattering measurements of velocity, temperature, and density indicated the potential of these nonintrusive techniques.

  4. Advanced combination of laser and synchrotron techniques to study minerals at extreme conditions in the time-domain mode (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakapenka, V.; Zinin, P.; Goncharov, A.; Zhuravlev, K. K.; Tkachev, S. N.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past two decades, high pressure research has made breakthrough progress in many fields of science mainly due to significant advances in development of both high pressure vessels (diamond anvil cell and large volume press) and high brilliance synchrotron based techniques, including high resolution x-ray micro-diffraction, x-ray spectroscopy (absorption, emission, resonance), micro-imaging, inelastic and nuclear resonance scattering. Combination of double-sided laser heating with synchrotron x-ray radiation has stimulated synthesis and investigation of new materials with unique composition and properties in-situ at high temperatures and high pressures in the diamond anvil cell. Equation of state, structure, phase transformations, element partitioning, electronic and optical properties of various minerals (single crystal, powder, nano-crystalline, amorphous solid and fluids) have been successfully studied at extreme conditions with help of the lasers and x-ray beams. Recent developments in pulse laser heating technique, including application of fiber lasers and flat top laser beam shaping optics, result in significant improvement in synthesis of new metastable materials with tuneable composition and properties controlled in-situ with high resolution x-ray and optical techniques in time-domain mode. To study elastic properties of opaque minerals in situ at high pressure and temperature we have combined laser ultrasonic with laser heating techniques. The shear and longitudinal wave velocities were measured for iron at pressures up to 60 GPa in the diamond anvil cell. The details and application of the synchrotron and optical techniques for studies unique physical and chemical properties of minerals in-situ at extreme conditions will be discussed on example of iron-bearing materials.

  5. Optical diagnostics of gas-dynamic flows using advanced laser measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    Using laser-induced fluorescence to probe nitrogen flows seeded with small amounts of nitric oxide, simultaneous measurements of all three thermodynamic scalar quantities temperature, density, and pressure, were demonstrated in a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. Instrumental uncertainty is 1% for temperature and 2% for density and pressure, making the techniques suitable for measurements of turbulent fluctuations. This technology is currently being transferred to an experimental program designed to use these optical techniques in conjunction with traditional methods to make measurements in turbulent flowfields that were not possible before. A detailed descritpion of the research progress and pertinent results are presented.

  6. The SALUT Project: Study of Advanced Laser Techniques for the Uncovering of Polychromed Works of Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Snickt, G.; De Boeck, A.; Keutgens, K.; Anthierens, D.

    In order to find out whether the existing laser systems can be employed to remove superimposed layers of paint on secco wall paintings in a selective way, laser tests were carried out on three types of prepared samples simulating three stratigraphies that are frequently encountered in practice. OM, EPMA, colorimetry, μRaman, and FT-IR were used to evaluate the results. It was found that Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers emitting at 1,064nm could be employed to remove unwanted layers of oil paint and limewash, but the treatment of large areas requires implementation of a computer-controlled X-Y-Z station in order to control the parameters. However, the applicability of this technique will remain limited as ablation at the established optimum parameters implied a discoloration of the pigments cinnabar, yellow ochre, and burnt sienna. Moreover, it was observed that no ablation took place when the limewash thickness exceeds 25 μm. Unwanted layers of acrylic could be removed in an efficient way with an excimer laser emitting at 193 nm.

  7. Laser Scar Management Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ohshiro, Toshio; Sasaki, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: Scars are common and cause functional problems and psychological morbidity. Recent advances in optical technologies have produced various laser systems capable of revising the appearance of scars from various etiologies to optimize their appearance. Methods: Laser treatment can commence as early as the time of the initial injury and as late as several years after the injury. Several optical technologies are currently available and combined laser/light treatments are required for treatment of scars. Since 2006, we have set up a scar management department in our clinic and more than 2000 patients have been treated by our combined laser irradiation techniques. Herein, we review several available light technologies for treatment of surgical, traumatic, and inflammatory scars, and discuss our combined laser treatment of scars, based upon our clinical experience. Results and Conclusions: Because scars have a variety of potential aetiologies and take a number of forms, no single approach can consistenty provide good scar treatment and management. The combination of laser and devices is essential, the choice of wavelength and approach being dictated by each patient as an individual. PMID:24511202

  8. Techniques for laser welding polymeric devices.

    PubMed

    Jones, I A

    2003-04-01

    Recent advances in laser techniques mean that lasers are now being considered as an alternative to vibration, ultrasonic, dielectric, hot plate or hot bar welding, and adhesive bonding of plastics. The techniques required to put laser welding methods into practice are described for medical devices, tubular systems, films and synthetic fabrics. PMID:12789697

  9. Laser beam shaping techniques

    SciTech Connect

    DICKEY,FRED M.; WEICHMAN,LOUIS S.; SHAGAM,RICHARD N.

    2000-03-16

    Industrial, military, medical, and research and development applications of lasers frequently require a beam with a specified irradiance distribution in some plane. A common requirement is a laser profile that is uniform over some cross-section. Such applications include laser/material processing, laser material interaction studies, fiber injection systems, optical data image processing, lithography, medical applications, and military applications. Laser beam shaping techniques can be divided into three areas: apertured beams, field mappers, and multi-aperture beam integrators. An uncertainty relation exists for laser beam shaping that puts constraints on system design. In this paper the authors review the basics of laser beam shaping and present applications and limitations of various techniques.

  10. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  11. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Avicola, K; Thompson, C A; Kartz, M W; Winters, S; Hartley, R; Wihelmsen, J; Dowla, F V; Carrano, C J; Bauman, B J; Pennington, D M; Lande, D; Sawvel, R M; Silva, D A; Cooke, J B; Brown, C G

    2001-02-21

    Programs at LLNL that involve large laser systems--ranging from the National Ignition Facility to new tactical laser weapons--depend on the maintenance of laser beam quality through precise control of the optical wavefront. This can be accomplished using adaptive optics, which compensate for time-varying aberrations that are often caused by heating in a high-power laser system. Over the past two decades, LLNL has developed a broad capability in adaptive optics technology for both laser beam control and high-resolution imaging. This adaptive optics capability has been based on thin deformable glass mirrors with individual ceramic actuators bonded to the back. In the case of high-power lasers, these adaptive optics systems have successfully improved beam quality. However, as we continue to extend our applications requirements, the existing technology base for wavefront control cannot satisfy them. To address this issue, this project studied improved modeling tools to increase our detailed understanding of the performance of these systems, and evaluated novel approaches to low-order wavefront control that offer the possibility of reduced cost and complexity. We also investigated improved beam control technology for high-resolution wavefront control. Many high-power laser systems suffer from high-spatial-frequency aberrations that require control of hundreds or thousands of phase points to provide adequate correction. However, the cost and size of current deformable mirrors can become prohibitive for applications requiring more than a few tens of phase control points. New phase control technologies are becoming available which offer control of many phase points with small low-cost devices. The goal of this project was to expand our wavefront control capabilities with improved modeling tools, new devices that reduce system cost and complexity, and extensions to high spatial and temporal frequencies using new adaptive optics technologies. In FY 99, the second year of

  12. Advanced mid-IR Solid-State Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art 2-micron solid-state laser developments. A world record one-Joule-per-pulse energy laser system and an advanced thermal management with fully conductive cooled laser technique are discussed

  13. Advancements in electrode design and laser techniques for fabricating micro-electrode arrays as part of a retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Dodds, C W D; Schuettler, M; Guenther, T; Lovell, N H; Suaning, G J

    2011-01-01

    Retinal micro-electrode arrays (MEAs) for a visual prosthesis were fabricated by laser structuring of platinum (Pt) foil and liquid silicone rubber. A new design was created using a folding technique to create a multi-layered array from a single Pt sheet. This method allowed a reduction in both the electrode pitch, and the overall width of the array, while maintaining coplanar connection points for more stable interconnections to other components of the system. The design also included a section which could be rolled to create a cylindrical segment in order to minimise the size of the exit in the sclera after implantation. A picosecond mode-locked 532 nm laser system was investigated as a replacement for the nanosecond Q-switched 1064 nm laser currently in use. Trials showed that the ps system could produce high quality electrode tracks with a minimum pitch of 30 μm, less than 40% the pitch achievable with the ns laser. A method was investigated for the cutting of Pt foils without damaging the underlying silicone by laser machining to a depth just below the thickness of the foil. Initial samples showed promise with full penetration of the foil only occurring at cross points of the laser paths. The ps laser was also used to create roughened surfaces, in order to increase the electrochemical surface area of the electrodes. Surfaces were imaged using a scanning electron microscope, and compared to surfaces roughened with the ns laser. The ps laser was seen to offer a reduction in feature size, as well as an increase in control over the appearance of the electrode surface. PMID:22254389

  14. Advanced laser remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.; Czuchlewski, S.; Karl, R.

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Remote measurement of wind velocities is critical to a wide variety of applications such as environmental studies, weather prediction, aircraft safety, the accuracy of projectiles, bombs, parachute drops, prediction of the dispersal of chemical and biological warfare agents, and the debris from nuclear explosions. Major programs to develop remote sensors for these applications currently exist in the DoD and NASA. At present, however, there are no real-time, three-dimensional wind measurement techniques that are practical for many of these applications and we report on two new promising techniques. The first new technique uses an elastic backscatter lidar to track aerosol patterns in the atmosphere and to calculate three dimensional wind velocities from changes in the positions of the aerosol patterns. This was first done by Professor Ed Eloranta of the University of Wisconsin using post processing techniques and we are adapting Professor Eloranta`s algorithms to a real-time data processor and installing it in an existing elastic backscatter lidar system at Los Alamos (the XM94 helicopter lidar), which has a compatible data processing and control system. The second novel wind sensing technique is based on radio-frequency (RF) modulation and spatial filtering of elastic backscatter lidars. Because of their compactness and reliability, solid state lasers are the lasers of choice for many remote sensing applications, including wind sensing.

  15. Apparatus for advancing a wellbore using high power laser energy

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

    2014-09-02

    Delivering high power laser energy to form a borehole deep into the earth using laser energy. Down hole laser tools, laser systems and laser delivery techniques for advancement, workover and completion activities. A laser bottom hole assembly (LBHA) for the delivery of high power laser energy to the surfaces of a borehole, which assembly may have laser optics, a fluid path for debris removal and a mechanical means to remove earth.

  16. Advanced radiographic imaging techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, J. B.; Brown, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Examination of the nature and operational constraints of conventional X-radiographic and neutron imaging methods, providing a foundation for a discussion of advanced radiographic imaging systems. Two types of solid-state image amplifiers designed to image X rays are described. Operational theory, panel construction, and performance characteristics are discussed. A closed-circuit television system for imaging neutrons is then described and the system design, operational theory, and performance characteristics are outlined. Emphasis is placed on a description of the advantages of these imaging systems over conventional methods.

  17. Advances in chemical lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.

    1987-09-25

    High-power chemical lasers thrive in an array of special environments and present many fascinating associated subjects ripe for developmental research. Included are processes to produce the source reactants; supersonic mixing and reacting flow fields; the production and dissipation of multiple vibrational-rotational molecular states; optical gain extraction in complex geometries; media inhomogeneity effects, and waste energy and reaction products removal. Some configurations require wavelength selectivity, special optical components, and coherent cavity or beam combining. In recent years, progress has been made in these areas on behalf of continuous-wave and repetitively pulsed hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers, subsonic and supersonic oxygen-iodine lasers, and potential shorter wavelength chemical lasers based on chemically excited higher electronic states. This paper presents a brief review of the technical approach of some of the technology areas, and the status in achieving practical, integrated high-power chemical lasers.

  18. Advances in analytical spectrochemistry with ionized gases. I. Improved fundamental understanding through laser based techniques. II. Novel bioanalytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamez, Gerardo

    Over the past several decades plasma spectrochemistry has become the workhorse for performing elemental analysis. Nevertheless, we are still far from fully understanding the fundamental mechanisms that affect and led to the production of the analytical signal. Thus, the first part of this study was focused on improving our knowledge of plasma fundamental processes. First, the effect of exposing an inductively coupled plasma to a mass spectrometer sampling interface was investigated. Our results show that the mass spectrometer sampler affects the plasma fundamental parameters in a way that changes with gas flow, forward r.f. power, and plasma torch-to-sampler distance. The findings help to better explain the plasma sampling process and have made clear that results from mass-spectrometry based plasma diagnostics are applicable to unperturbed plasmas only as a rough approximation. Second, and instrument was constructed to characterize the fundamental parameters of an analytical glow discharge by using Thomson and Rayleigh laser scattering. A continuous dc glow discharge source was studied and a set of corresponding numerical modeling experiments were performed. The resulting theory agrees qualitatively with the experimental findings; moreover, the theoretical and experimental techniques often provide complementary information. Finally, a temporally and spatially resolved map of the fundamental parameters of a dc glow discharge operated in pulsed mode was obtained. The results confirm previously proposed electron energy-transfer mechanisms at the beginning of the pulse. In contrast, the findings call into question other mechanisms involving plasma gas metastable formation proposed for the time period immediately after the end of the pulse. In the second part of the study an imaging radio frequency glow discharge instrument was developed to provide three-dimensional elemental analysis of solids. The newly developed instrument was then applied to the simultaneous

  19. Advanced Techniques for the Amplification of Sub -100-FEMTOSECOND Pulses in TITANIUM:SAPPHIRE-BASED Laser Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, James Vanhartness

    This dissertation is concerned with the design, construction, and characterization of a Ti:sapphire-based kHz-amplifier system. The main goals are to (1) expand upon our knowledge of the dispersive properties of grating and prism sequences; (2) improve our understanding of how this dispersion affects an optical pulse; and (3) determine the limits to the contrast of this system by studying the pulse shape of the oscillator; and (4) study the noise properties of the oscillator. All four of these studies will help us re-design and build an improved kHz-amplifier system. However, the knowledge gained will be generally applicable to any chirped-pulse amplifier system. Specifically, the Ti:sapphire oscillator's noise characteristics are presented and compared with those of the better known colliding-pulse modelocked laser in order to determine its suitability as a short-pulse source. Also, we investigate the determination of the pulse shape using autocorrelation techniques. By using a high-dynamic-range autocorrelation in conjunction with a spectrum we show how pulse shapes can be more accurately determined. We find that oscillators and amplifiers can produce both hyperbolic -secant-squared and gaussian pulses by using the proper design. The role of dispersion in shaping the pulse, both in the oscillator and amplifier systems, is expanded beyond the present state-of-the-art. The knowledge gained in these studies is applied in the design of a kilohertz-repetition rate, chirped-pulse amplifier system capable of amplifying 40-fs, 0.45 mJ pulses of light. Finally, future ways of improving the performance of the system are presented in the conclusion.

  20. Advanced optic fabrication using ultrafast laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lauren L.; Qiao, Jun; Qiao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Advanced fabrication and finishing techniques are desired for freeform optics and integrated photonics. Methods including grinding, polishing and magnetorheological finishing used for final figuring and polishing of such optics are time consuming, expensive, and may be unsuitable for complex surface features while common photonics fabrication techniques often limit devices to planar geometries. Laser processing has been investigated as an alternative method for optic forming, surface polishing, structure writing, and welding, as direct tuning of laser parameters and flexible beam delivery are advantageous for complex freeform or photonics elements and material-specific processing. Continuous wave and pulsed laser radiation down to the nanosecond regime have been implemented to achieve nanoscale surface finishes through localized material melting, but the temporal extent of the laser-material interaction often results in the formation of a sub-surface heat affected zone. The temporal brevity of ultrafast laser radiation can allow for the direct vaporization of rough surface asperities with minimal melting, offering the potential for smooth, final surface quality with negligible heat affected material. High intensities achieved in focused ultrafast laser radiation can easily induce phase changes in the bulk of materials for processing applications. We have experimentally tested the effectiveness of ultrafast laser radiation as an alternative laser source for surface processing of monocrystalline silicon. Simulation of material heating associated with ultrafast laser-material interaction has been performed and used to investigate optimized processing parameters including repetition rate. The parameter optimization process and results of experimental processing will be presented.

  1. Recent advances in laser dermatology.

    PubMed

    Butani, Anjali; Dudelzak, Jacob; Goldberg, David J

    2009-03-01

    Lasers have revolutionized the practice of modern dermatology. Our understanding of laser physics and selective photothermolysis has expanded greatly over the last 20 years. In the last 2 years, we have looked beyond the traditional lasers and explored new concepts. This article will look at five of these new concepts. A strong understanding of these new techniques will allow dermatologists to use them either primarily or in combination with more conventional methods. PMID:18991153

  2. Laser techniques in conservation in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimbeni, Renzo

    2005-06-01

    The state of the art of laser techniques employed in conservation of cultural heritage is continuously growing in Europe. Many research projects organised at the European level have contributed to this achievement, being complementary to the development carried out at national level. The COST Action G7 is playing its unique role since the year 2000 in promoting the experimentation, comparing the experiences and disseminating best practices. This role has been particularly effective for monitoring of the results of many short-term research projects completed along the G7 Action lifetime. After that several laser cleaning techniques have been followed and evaluated it appears now clear an evolution of the systems, a specialization of the cleaning task, the achievement of side-effect free procedures. The validation of these advanced cleaning techniques has been extensive and diffused in many European countries, especially for stone and metals. Laser-based diagnostics have also specialised their tasks toward material analysis, defects detection and multidimensional documentation. Laser and optical methods successfully monitor deterioration effects. In many European countries interdisciplinary networks are managing the experimentation of these techniques giving them a sound scientific approach, but also a technology transfer to end-users. So doing the appreciation for these techniques is growing in all the conservation institutions involved at national level, disseminating a positive evaluation about the benefits provided by laser techniques in conservation. Several laser systems became products for the activity of professional restorers and their increasing sales demonstrate a growing utilisation throughout all Europe.

  3. Recent advancement of turbulent flow measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battle, T.; Wang, P.; Cheng, D. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Advancements of the fluctuating density gradient cross beam laser Schlieren technique, the fluctuating line-reversal temperature measurement and the development of the two-dimensional drag-sensing probe to a three-dimensional drag-sensing probe are discussed. The three-dimensionality of the instantaneous momentum vector can shed some light on the nature of turbulence especially with swirling flow. All three measured fluctuating quantities (density, temperature, and momentum) can provide valuable information for theoreticians.

  4. Polymer lasers: recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, T.; Rabe, T.; Görrn, P.; Wang, J.; Weinmann, T.; Hinze, P.; Galbrecht, F.; Scherf, U.; Kowalsky, W.

    2007-09-01

    The development of organic thin film lasers has seen tremendous progress over the past few years. Only a few materials are necessary to allow for continuous wavelength tunability in the spectral region from the UV to the near IR. At the same time, the lasing thresholds of organic thin film lasers have been reduced considerably both due to improved low-loss distributed feedback (DFB) resonator structures and highly efficient gain materials based on guest-host energy transfer. Aside from the as yet open issue of electrical operation of organic lasers, which we will address briefly in this paper, there are numerous applications (e.g. in biotechnology, spectroscopy) where optically driven organic lasers may be the more cost effective and versatile solution. In this context, tunable polymer lasers pumped by compact and inexpensive InGaN laser diodes will be shown. These lasers are based on a modified poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene) derivative (BN-PFO) containing 12% of -6,6'-(2,2'-octyloxy-1,1'-binaphthyl) spacer groups doped with a few wt% of the stilbene dye 1,4-Bis(2-(4-(N,N-di(p-tolyl)amino)phenyl)vinyl-benzene (DPAVB). With the same host polymer (BN-PFO) quasi continuous wave operation (up to 5 MHz) can be demonstrated. Highly repetitive lasers are especially desirable for many spectroscopic applications. This regime of operstion is found to be impeded by the photo-physics in doped organic systems where the accumulation of absorptive species in the gain medium leads to piled-up absorption losses and consequently to termination of the lasing process. The presence of the dopand molecules seems to strongly promote the formation and stabilization of the species which we relate to triplet excitons. Therefore, the concentration of the dopand affects the feasibility of quasi-cw operation of thin-film organic lasers. Strategies and results to achieve highly repetitive operation in low-threshold guest-host systems BN-PFO:DPAVB or BN-PFO:poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1

  5. Advances in femtosecond laser technology

    PubMed Central

    Callou, Thais Pinheiro; Garcia, Renato; Mukai, Adriana; Giacomin, Natalia T; de Souza, Rodrigo Guimarães; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser technology has become widely adopted by ophthalmic surgeons. The purpose of this study is to discuss applications and advantages of femtosecond lasers over traditional manual techniques, and related unique complications in cataract surgery and corneal refractive surgical procedures, including: LASIK flap creation, intracorneal ring segment implantation, presbyopic treatments, keratoplasty, astigmatic keratotomy, and intrastromal lenticule procedures. PMID:27143847

  6. Advances in femtosecond laser technology.

    PubMed

    Callou, Thais Pinheiro; Garcia, Renato; Mukai, Adriana; Giacomin, Natalia T; de Souza, Rodrigo Guimarães; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser technology has become widely adopted by ophthalmic surgeons. The purpose of this study is to discuss applications and advantages of femtosecond lasers over traditional manual techniques, and related unique complications in cataract surgery and corneal refractive surgical procedures, including: LASIK flap creation, intracorneal ring segment implantation, presbyopic treatments, keratoplasty, astigmatic keratotomy, and intrastromal lenticule procedures. PMID:27143847

  7. Advanced qualification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, P.S; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.

    1993-12-01

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML ``builds in`` the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structured-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish ``process capability`` is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co{sup 60} gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883D, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SSC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe`s Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  8. Advanced qualification techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winokur, P. S.; Shaneyfelt, M. R.; Meisenheimer, T. L.; Fleetwood, D. M.

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML 'builds in' the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structured-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish 'process capability' is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co-60 gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883D, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SSC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe's Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  9. Advanced qualification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, P.S.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Fleetwood, D.M. )

    1994-06-01

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML ''builds in'' the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structure-to-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish ''process capability'' is illustrated and a comparison of 10-kev x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish ''process capability'' is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co[sup 60] gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SCC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe's Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  10. Advanced qualification techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winokur, P. S.; Shaneyfelt, M. R.; Meisenheimer, T. L.; Fleetwood, D. M.

    1994-06-01

    This paper demonstrates use of the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology to qualify commercial and military microelectronics for use in space applications. QML 'builds in' the hardness of product through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to low-dose-rate space scenarios. Each of these elements is demonstrated and shown to be a cost-effective alternative to expensive end-of-line IC testing. Several examples of test structure-to-IC correlations are provided and recent work on complications arising from transistor scaling and geometry is discussed. The use of a 10-keV x-ray wafer-level test system to support SPC and establish 'process capability' is illustrated and a comparison of 10-keV x-ray and Co-60 gamma irradiations is provided for a wide range of CMOS technologies. The x-ray tester is shown to be cost-effective and its use in lot acceptance/qualification is recommended. Finally, a comparison is provided between MIL-STD-883, Test Method 1019.4, which governs the testing of packaged semiconductor microcircuits in the DoD, and ESA/SCC Basic Specification No. 22900, Europe's Total Dose Steady-State Irradiation Test Method. Test Method 1019.4 focuses on conservative estimates of MOS hardness for space and tactical applications, while Basic Specification 22900 focuses on improved simulation of low-dose-rate space environments.

  11. Development in laser peening of advanced ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Pratik; Smith, Graham C.; Waugh, David G.; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    Laser peening is a well-known process applicable to surface treat metals and alloys in various industrial sectors. Research in the area of laser peening of ceramics is still scarce and a complete laser-ceramic interaction is still unreported. This paper focuses on laser peening of SiC ceramics employed for cutting tools, armor plating, dental and biomedical implants, with a view to elucidate the unreported work. A detailed investigation was conducted with 1064nm Nd:YAG ns pulse laser to first understand the surface effects, namely: the topography, hardness, KIc and the microstructure of SiC advanced ceramics. The results showed changes in surface roughness and microstructural modification after laser peening. An increase in surface hardness was found by almost 2 folds, as the diamond footprints and its flaws sizes were considerably reduced, thus, enhancing the resistance of SiC to better withstand mechanical impact. This inherently led to an enhancement in the KIc by about 42%. This is attributed to an induction of compressive residual stress and phase transformation. This work is a first-step towards the development of a 3-dimensional laser peening technique to surface treat many advanced ceramic components. This work has shown that upon tailoring the laser peening parameters may directly control ceramic topography, microstructure, hardness and the KIc. This is useful for increasing the performance of ceramics used for demanding applications particularly where it matters such as in military. Upon successful peening of bullet proof vests could result to higher ballistic strength and resistance against higher sonic velocity, which would not only prevent serious injuries, but could also help to save lives of soldiers on the battle fields.

  12. Microfabrication techniques for semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamanuki, Takemasa; Tadokoro, T.; Morito, Ken; Koyama, Fumio; Iga, Kenichi

    1991-03-01

    Several important techniques for fabricating micro-cavity semiconductor lasers including surface emitting lasers have been developed. Reactive ion beam etch (RIBE) for GaA1As and GaInAsP is employed and its condition for vertical fine etch under low damages and removal of residual damages are made clear. Passivation by sulfur is introduced to the fabrication process. Regrowth techniques for DII structures by LPE and MOCVD has been established. Some device applications are discussed. 1. MICRO-ETCHING PROCESS Micro-cavity lasers including a vertical cavity surface emitting laser1 are attracting the research interest for optical parallel processing and parallel light wave systems. In order to realize micron-order or sub-micron laserdevices the technology of micro-fabrication must be established. In this study the total fabrication technology has been almost completed. First fine and low damage etching condition by ultrahigh vacuum background RIBE using a Cl2 gas has been made clear. We have found an isotropic etching condition for the vertical side wall formation and good mask traceability i. e. the acceleration voltage is 500 V and substrate temperature is 150 C with a 5000A thickness Si02 mask. Residual damages induced on the surface and the side wall are characterized by photo-luminescence and making stripe lasers. Figure 1 is the histogram of the nominal threshold current density for (a) oxide-defined stripe lasers (b) RIBE etched and LPE regrown BH-lasers using an LPE grown DII wafer (LPE/LPE) and (c) RIBE etched

  13. Ultrasensitive coherent Raman technique with picosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, M.W.; Pellin, M.J.; Biwer, B.M.; Gruen, D.M.

    1987-02-16

    The use of picosecond, Q-switched lasers and advanced polarization schemes has led to the development of a coherent Raman technique with the sensitivity of coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy experiments but without the troublesome phase-matching requirements. Experiments in dilute solutions of benzene indicate a limit of sensitivity for the current apparatus of 2.5 x 10/sup -4/ M in two minutes of signal averaging over 150 cm/sup -1/. Possible applications to the in situ study of passive films and thin films on transparent media are discussed.

  14. Modeling techniques for quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Jirauschek, Christian; Kubis, Tillmann

    2014-03-15

    Quantum cascade lasers are unipolar semiconductor lasers covering a wide range of the infrared and terahertz spectrum. Lasing action is achieved by using optical intersubband transitions between quantized states in specifically designed multiple-quantum-well heterostructures. A systematic improvement of quantum cascade lasers with respect to operating temperature, efficiency, and spectral range requires detailed modeling of the underlying physical processes in these structures. Moreover, the quantum cascade laser constitutes a versatile model device for the development and improvement of simulation techniques in nano- and optoelectronics. This review provides a comprehensive survey and discussion of the modeling techniques used for the simulation of quantum cascade lasers. The main focus is on the modeling of carrier transport in the nanostructured gain medium, while the simulation of the optical cavity is covered at a more basic level. Specifically, the transfer matrix and finite difference methods for solving the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation and Schrödinger-Poisson system are discussed, providing the quantized states in the multiple-quantum-well active region. The modeling of the optical cavity is covered with a focus on basic waveguide resonator structures. Furthermore, various carrier transport simulation methods are discussed, ranging from basic empirical approaches to advanced self-consistent techniques. The methods include empirical rate equation and related Maxwell-Bloch equation approaches, self-consistent rate equation and ensemble Monte Carlo methods, as well as quantum transport approaches, in particular the density matrix and non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. The derived scattering rates and self-energies are generally valid for n-type devices based on one-dimensional quantum confinement, such as quantum well structures.

  15. Advanced Bode Plot Techniques for Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeAngelis, D. A.; Schulze, G. W.

    The Bode plot, displayed as either impedance or admittance versus frequency, is the most basic test used by ultrasonic transducer designers. With simplicity and ease-of-use, Bode plots are ideal for baseline comparisons such as spacing of parasitic modes or impedance, but quite often the subtleties that manifest as poor process control are hard to interpret or are nonexistence. In-process testing of transducers is time consuming for quantifying statistical aberrations, and assessments made indirectly via the workpiece are difficult. This research investigates the use of advanced Bode plot techniques to compare ultrasonic transducers with known "good" and known "bad" process performance, with the goal of a-priori process assessment. These advanced techniques expand from the basic constant voltage versus frequency sweep to include constant current and constant velocity interrogated locally on transducer or tool; they also include up and down directional frequency sweeps to quantify hysteresis effects like jumping and dropping phenomena. The investigation focuses solely on the common PZT8 piezoelectric material used with welding transducers for semiconductor wire bonding. Several metrics are investigated such as impedance, displacement/current gain, velocity/current gain, displacement/voltage gain and velocity/voltage gain. The experimental and theoretical research methods include Bode plots, admittance loops, laser vibrometry and coupled-field finite element analysis.

  16. Advances in drilling with fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Mohammed

    2015-07-01

    High brightness quasi- continuous wave (QCW) and continuous wave (CW) fiber lasers are routinely being used for cutting and welding for a range of industrial applications. However, to date very little work has been carried out or has been reported on laser drilling with these laser sources. This work describes laser drilling ((trepan and percussion) of nickel based superalloys (thermal barrier coated and uncoated) with a high power QCW fiber laser. This presentation will highlight some of the most significant aspect of laser drilling, i.e. SmartPierceTM, deep hole drilling and small hole drilling. These advances in processing also demonstrate the potential for fiber laser processing when an advanced interface between laser and an open architecture controller are used.

  17. Advances in Procedural Techniques - Antegrade

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, William; Spratt, James C.

    2014-01-01

    There have been many technological advances in antegrade CTO PCI, but perhaps most importantly has been the evolution of the “hybrid’ approach where ideally there exists a seamless interplay of antegrade wiring, antegrade dissection re-entry and retrograde approaches as dictated by procedural factors. Antegrade wire escalation with intimal tracking remains the preferred initial strategy in short CTOs without proximal cap ambiguity. More complex CTOs, however, usually require either a retrograde or an antegrade dissection re-entry approach, or both. Antegrade dissection re-entry is well suited to long occlusions where there is a healthy distal vessel and limited “interventional” collaterals. Early use of a dissection re-entry strategy will increase success rates, reduce complications, and minimise radiation exposure, contrast use as well as procedural times. Antegrade dissection can be achieved with a knuckle wire technique or the CrossBoss catheter whilst re-entry will be achieved in the most reproducible and reliable fashion by the Stingray balloon/wire. It should be avoided where there is potential for loss of large side branches. It remains to be seen whether use of newer dissection re-entry strategies will be associated with lower restenosis rates compared with the more uncontrolled subintimal tracking strategies such as STAR and whether stent insertion in the subintimal space is associated with higher rates of late stent malapposition and stent thrombosis. It is to be hoped that the algorithms, which have been developed to guide CTO operators, allow for a better transfer of knowledge and skills to increase uptake and acceptance of CTO PCI as a whole. PMID:24694104

  18. Femtosecond laser enabled keratoplasty for advanced keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Yathish; Nagaraja, Harsha; Kugar, Thungappa; Shetty, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and advantages of femtosecond laser enabled keratoplasty (FLEK) over conventional penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) in advanced keratoconus. Materials and Methods: Detailed review of literature of published randomized controlled trials of operative techniques in PKP and FLEK. Results: Fifteen studies were identified, analyzed, and compared with our outcome. FLEK was found to have better outcome in view of better and earlier stabilization uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and better refractive outcomes with low astigmatism as compared with conventional PKP. Wound healing also was noticed to be earlier, enabling early suture removal in FLEK. Conclusions: Studies relating to FLEK have shown better results than conventional PKP, however further studies are needed to assess the safety and intraoperative complications of the procedure. PMID:23925340

  19. One Micron Laser Technology Advancements at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the advancements made in one micron laser technology at Goddard Space Flight Center. It includes information about risk factors that are being addressed by GSFC, and overviews of the various programs that GSFC is currently managing that are using 1 micron laser technology.

  20. Laser jamming technique research based on combined fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Xu; Shanghong, Zhao; Rui, Hou; Shengbao, Zhan; Lei, Shi; Jili, Wu; Shaoqiang, Fang; Yongjun, Li

    2009-06-01

    A compact and light laser jamming source is needed to increase the flexibility of laser jamming technique. A novel laser jamming source based on combined fiber lasers is proposed. Preliminary experimental results show that power levels in excess of 10 kW could be achieved. An example of laser jamming used for an air-to-air missile is given. It shows that the tracking system could complete tracking in only 4 s and came into a steady state with its new tracking target being the laser jamming source.

  1. Laser techniques for ground to air applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove

    1989-02-01

    Laser techniques used in air defense for rangefinding, tracking, beamriding, and for ground to air applications are examined. Of special interest are the coherent systems which will add classical radar functions at optical wavelengths and allow imaging systems and Doppler functions. Besides target acquisition, future laser systems will also offer a possibility of atmospheric wind sounding and slant path measurements. Lasers can be used for jamming and destruction of optical sensors. Ordnance information about tactical laser weapons is included.

  2. Advanced Spectroscopy Technique for Biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Zeng, Haishan

    This chapter presents an overview of the applications of optical spectroscopy in biomedicine. We focus on the optical design aspects of advanced biomedical spectroscopy systems, Raman spectroscopy system in particular. Detailed components and system integration are provided. As examples, two real-time in vivo Raman spectroscopy systems, one for skin cancer detection and the other for endoscopic lung cancer detection, and an in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy system for skin assessment are presented. The applications of Raman spectroscopy in cancer diagnosis of the skin, lung, colon, oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, breast, and cervix are summarized.

  3. Stitching Techniques Advance Optics Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Because NASA depends on the fabrication and testing of large, high-quality aspheric (nonspherical) optics for applications like the James Webb Space Telescope, it sought an improved method for measuring large aspheres. Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Goddard Space Flight Center, QED Technologies, of Rochester, New York, upgraded and enhanced its stitching technology for aspheres. QED developed the SSI-A, which earned the company an R&D 100 award, and also developed a breakthrough machine tool called the aspheric stitching interferometer. The equipment is applied to advanced optics in telescopes, microscopes, cameras, medical scopes, binoculars, and photolithography."

  4. New techniques for laser prostatectomy: an update

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Doreen E.; Te, Alexis E.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, the gold standard for treatment of BPH has been the electrocautery-based TransUrethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP). However, the number of laser techniques being performed is rapidly increasing. Potential advantages of laser therapy over traditional TURP include decreased morbidity and shorter hospital stay. There are several techniques for laser prostatectomy that continue to evolve. The main competing techniques are currently the Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate (HoLEP) and the 80W 532nm laser prostatectomy. The HoLEP, using the Holmium:YAG laser, has been shown to have clinical results similar to TURP and is suitable for patients on anticoagulation as well as those with large prostates. Disadvantages of this technique are the high learning curve and requirement of a morcellator. When used to treat BPH, studies have demonstrated that, like the HoLEP, the 80W KTP laser is safe and effective in patients with large prostates and in those taking oral anticoagulation. Several studies have compared these two techniques to TURP. Frequently reported advantages of the HoLEP over the 80W laser prostatectomy are the availability after the procedure of a pathology specimen and ability to remove a higher percentage of prostate tissue during resection. However, the transurethral laser enucleation of the prostate addresses these concerns and has shown to have durable outcomes at 2-year follow-up. Two new laser systems and techniques, the thulium laser and the 980nm laser, have emerged recently. However, clinical data from these procedures are in their infancy and large long-term studies are required. PMID:21789057

  5. Laser Techniques in Photovoltaic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. T.; Wood, R. F.; Westbrook, R. D.; Narayan, J.; White, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    High-power laser pulses were used to replace the conventional high temperature furnace processing for the p-n junction formation step in high speed, low cost solar cell fabrication. Three different approaches to junction formation were tested: (1) laser annealing of ion-implanted Si in which laser radiation is used to remove the radiation damage and to recover the electrical activity in the implanted layer; (2) a process in which a thin film of dopant is first deposited on the substrate and then incorporated into the near-surface region by laser-induced diffusion; and (3) a process in which a heavily doped amorphous silicon layer is deposited on the Si substrate and epitaxially regrown from the melted substrate layer by laser radiation. All three methods were found to provide suitable candidates for high efficiency Si solar cells.

  6. Advanced measurement techniques, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Carraway, Debra L.; Manuel, Gregory S.; Croom, Cynthia C.

    1987-01-01

    In modern laminar flow flight and wind tunnel research, it is important to understand the specific cause(s) of laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition. Such information is crucial to the exploration of the limits of practical application of laminar flow for drag reduction on aircraft. The process of transition involves both the possible modes of disturbance growth, and the environmental conditioning of the instabilities by freestream or surface conditions. The possible modes of disturbance growth include viscous, inviscid, and modes which may bypass these natural ones. Theory provides information on the possible modes of disturbance amplification, but experimentation must be relied upon to determine which of those modes actually dominates the transition process in a given environment. The results to date of research on advanced devices and methods used for the study of transition phenomena in the subsonic and transonic flight and wind tunnel environments are presented.

  7. Laser characterization with advanced digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piels, Molly; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Zibar, Darko

    2015-01-01

    The use of machine learning techniques to characterize lasers with low output power is reviewed. Optimized phase tracking algorithms that can produce accurate noise spectra are discussed, and a method for inferring the amplitude noise spectrum and rate equation model of the laser under test is presented.

  8. Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

  9. Advanced targets preparation for TNSA laser irradiation and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccio, G.; Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.

    2016-04-01

    Thin targets have been investigated at low laser intensity in order to prepare foils for TNSA (Target Normal Sheath Acceleration) laser irradiation at high intensity. Foils were prepared with different techniques, such as deposition of metallic nanoparticles on polymeric substrates. Polymer films were covered by solutions containing nanoparticles or embedded inside or covered by nanostructures. Such advanced targets permit to enhance the laser wavelength absorbance. Thick and thin targets were irradiated using laser radiation at 1010 W/cm2 intensity and prepared to be submitted to laser irradiation at higher intensity. The foils were characterized by optical measurements of absorbance and transmittance as a function of wavelength in the regions UV, VIS and IR. Laser irradiation measurements using a Nd:YAG laser simulate the prepulse of high laser intensity. Accelerated ions were measured with ion collectors using time of flight techniques. The protons and ions acceleration and their yields were measured as a function of the equivalent atomic number of the foils and of other characteristics, as it will be presented and discussed.

  10. Nuclear material investigations by advanced analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, C.; Kuri, G.; Martin, M.; Froideval, A.; Cammelli, S.; Orlov, A.; Bertsch, J.; Pouchon, M. A.

    2010-10-01

    Advanced analytical techniques have been used to characterize nuclear materials at the Paul Scherrer Institute during the last decade. The analysed materials ranged from reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, Zircaloy claddings to fuel samples. The processes studied included copper cluster build up in RPV steels, corrosion, mechanical and irradiation damage behaviour of PWR and BWR cladding materials as well as fuel defect development. The used advanced techniques included muon spin resonance spectroscopy for zirconium alloy defect characterization while fuel element materials were analysed by techniques derived from neutron and X-ray scattering and absorption spectroscopy.

  11. Delphi technique used in laser incident surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Krystyn R.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Neal, Thomas A.

    2004-07-01

    There are several data sources for collecting laser incidents. All reviewed sources collect information differently for varying purposes. An effort was undertaken to combine laser exposure reporting data into a single database so that trends in laser incidents could be identified. A review of available datasets revealed significant disparities in laser exposure reporting. As a result, utilizing the existing database to predict personnel at increased risk for laser exposure and injury is challenging if not impossible. For example, many of the data sources do not contain information about physical examinations, diagnosis, or medical follow-up, which are important for studying laser injury outcomes. This study proposes using the Delphi Technique to identify relevant fields that should be collected for a laser incident database based on the experiences of three groups of United States Air Force (USAF) professionals: (1) Engineers (Bioenvironmental Engineers), (2) Health Physicists, and (3) Physicians (Ophthalmologists and Flight Surgeons). In broad terms, these three professional groups coordinate laser incident analyses and investigations. Knowing what information is most important for studying laser incidents is the first step in establishing an effective database that will assist in identifying occupations that are at high-risk for laser injury. Robust data sets obtained for analysis by these healthcare professionals can be an effective tool for laser injury prevention and management.

  12. High power disk lasers: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, David; Holzer, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Though the genesis of the disk laser concept dates to the early 90's, the disk laser continues to demonstrate the flexibility and the certain future of a breakthrough technology. On-going increases in power per disk, and improvements in beam quality and efficiency continue to validate the genius of the disk laser concept. As of today, the disk principle has not reached any fundamental limits regarding output power per disk or beam quality, and offers numerous advantages over other high power resonator concepts, especially over monolithic architectures. With well over 1000 high power disk lasers installations, the disk laser has proven to be a robust and reliable industrial tool. With advancements in running cost, investment cost and footprint, manufacturers continue to implement disk laser technology with more vigor than ever. This paper will explain important details of the TruDisk laser series and process relevant features of the system, like pump diode arrangement, resonator design and integrated beam guidance. In addition, advances in applications in the thick sheet area and very cost efficient high productivity applications like remote welding, remote cutting and cutting of thin sheets will be discussed.

  13. Laser; best practice techniques and evidence.

    PubMed

    Carradice, Daniel; Leung, Clement; Chetter, Ian

    2015-11-01

    Laser ablation involves the delivery of laser light through a glass fibre placed into the lumen of a refluxing vein. This energy is converted into heat inducing a permanent, non-thrombotic occlusion. This highly effective and safe approach has significant advantages over traditional surgical treatment and has driven the endovenous revolution in the management of varicose veins. This chapter will explore the mechanism of action, present the evidence of laser' clinical and cost effectiveness, and analyse specific and generic aspects of laser ablation technique. PMID:26556701

  14. Laser technique in management of laryngomalacia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Udayan K.; McGuirt, William F., Jr.; Wetmore, Ralph F.; Healy, Gerald B.

    1998-07-01

    Laryngomalacia is the most common cause of newborn stridor. Management can usually be accomplished without surgery. When surgery is necessary, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser plays an essential role in enabling precise, hemostatic dissection. The authors present their application of the CO2 laser with microspot control for laser correction of laryngomalacia, with emphasis upon the use of the Boston University suspension system to achieve external suspension of the larynx and the bivalved laryngoscope to achieve tissue distension. Review of indications, technique and results is shared to detail the utility of the CO2 laser in supraglottoplasty.

  15. Advanced infrared laser modulator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheo, P. K.; Wagner, R.; Gilden, M.

    1984-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to develop an electrooptic waveguide modulator for generating continuous tunable sideband power from an infrared CO2 laser. Parameters included were the waveguide configurations, microstrip dimensions device impedance, and effective dielectric constants. An optimum infrared laser modulator was established and was fabricated. This modulator represents the state-of-the-art integrated optical device, which has a three-dimensional topology to accommodate three lambda/4 step transformers for microwave impedance matching at both the input and output terminals. A flat frequency response of the device over 20 HGz or = 3 dB) was achieved. Maximum single sideband to carrier power greater than 1.2% for 20 W microwave input power at optical carrier wavelength of 10.6 microns was obtained.

  16. Lincoln Advanced Science & Engineering Reinforcement (LASER) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Willie

    The Lincoln Advanced Science and Engineering Reinforcement (LASER) Program at Lincoln University, which has recruited over 100 students for majors in technical fields, is described in this report. To date, over 70% have completed or will complete technical degrees in engineering, physics, chemistry, and computer science. Of those completing the…

  17. Diagnostics for advanced laser acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Misuri, Alessio

    2002-06-01

    The first proposal for plasma based accelerators was suggested by 1979 by Tajima and Dawson. Since then there has been a tremendous progress both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical progress is particularly due to the growing interest in the subject and to the development of more accurate numerical codes for the plasma simulations (especially particle-in-cell codes). The experimental progress follows from the development of multi-terawatt laser systems based on the chirped-pulse amplification technique. These efforts have produced results in several experiments world-wide, with the detection of accelerated electrons of tens of MeV. The peculiarity of these advanced accelerators is their ability to sustain extremely large acceleration gradients. In the conventional radio frequency linear accelerators (RF linacs) the acceleration gradients are limited roughly to 100 MV/m; this is partially due to breakdown which occurs on the walls of the structure. The electrical breakdown is originated by the emission of the electrons from the walls of the cavity. The electrons cause an avalanche breakdown when they reach other metal parts of the RF linacs structure.

  18. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing

    PubMed Central

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T; Huang, Yong; Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie, Yubing; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location (±5 μm) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing. PMID:20814088

  19. Laser Doppler measurement techniques for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Gagliardi, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Two techniques are proposed for using laser links to measure the relative radial velocity of two spacecraft. The first technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on a transponded radio-frequency subcarrier. The subcarrier intensity-modulates reciprocating laser beams. The second technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on an optical frequency carrier which is transponded between spacecraft using optical Costas loops. The first technique might be used in conjunction with noncoherent optical communications, while the second technique is compatible with coherent optical communications. The first technique simultaneously exploits the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the maturity of radio-frequency phase-locked loop technology. The second technique exploits both the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the large Doppler effect at optical frequencies. The second technique has the potential for greater accuracy; unfortunately, it is more difficult to implement since it involves optical Costas loops.

  20. The Mercury Laser Advances Laser Technology for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbers, C A; Caird, J; Moses, E

    2009-01-21

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is on target to demonstrate 'breakeven' - creating as much fusion-energy output as laser-energy input. NIF will compress a tiny sphere of hydrogen isotopes with 1.8 MJ of laser light in a 20-ns pulse, packing the isotopes so tightly that they fuse together, producing helium nuclei and releasing energy in the form of energetic particles. The achievement of breakeven will culminate an enormous effort by thousands of scientists and engineers, not only at Livermore but around the world, during the past several decades. But what about the day after NIF achieves breakeven? NIF is a world-class engineering research facility, but if laser fusion is ever to generate power for civilian consumption, the laser will have to deliver pulses nearly 100,000 times faster than NIF - a rate of perhaps 10 shots per second as opposed to NIF's several shots a day. The Mercury laser (named after the Roman messenger god) is intended to lead the way to a 10-shots-per-second, electrically-efficient, driver laser for commercial laser fusion. While the Mercury laser will generate only a small fraction of the peak power of NIF (1/30,000), Mercury operates at higher average power. The design of Mercury takes full advantage of the technology advances manifest in its behemoth cousin (Table 1). One significant difference is that, unlike the flashlamp-pumped NIF, Mercury is pumped by highly efficient laser diodes. Mercury is a prototype laser capable of scaling in aperture and energy to a NIF-like beamline, with greater electrical efficiency, while still running at a repetition rate 100,000 times greater.

  1. Advanced laser systems for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosner, Marc; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Gross, Daniel; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-03-01

    We describe the ongoing development of laser systems for advanced photoacoustic imaging (PAI). We discuss the characteristics of these laser systems and their particular benefits for soft tissue imaging and next-generation breast cancer diagnostics. We provide an overview of laser performance and compare this with other laser systems that have been used for early-stage development of PAI. These advanced systems feature higher pulse energy output at clinically relevant repetition rates, as well as a novel wavelength-cycling output pulse format. Wavelength cycling provides pulse sequences for which the output repeatedly alternates between two wavelengths that provide differential imaging. This capability improves co-registration of captured differential images. We present imaging results of phantoms obtained with a commercial ultrasound detector system and a wavelength-cycling laser source providing ~500 mJ/pulse at 755 and 797 nm, operating at 25 Hz. The results include photoacoustic images and corresponding pulse-echo data from a tissue mimicking phantom containing inclusions, simulating tumors in the breast. We discuss the application of these systems to the contrast-enhanced detection of various tissue types and tumors.

  2. Hybrid mesh generation using advancing reduction technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study presents an extension of the application of the advancing reduction technique to the hybrid mesh generation. The proposed algorithm is based on a pre-generated rectangle mesh (RM) with a certain orientation. The intersection points between the two sets of perpendicular mesh lines in RM an...

  3. Advanced Laser Architecture for Two-Step Laser Tandem Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, Molly E.; Li, Steven X.; Yu, Anthony W.; Getty, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Future astrobiology missions will focus on planets with significant astrochemical or potential astrobiological features, such as small, primitive bodies and the icy moons of the outer planets that may host diverse organic compounds. These missions require advanced instrument techniques to fully and unambiguously characterize the composition of surface and dust materials. Laser desorptionionization mass spectrometry (LDMS) is an emerging instrument technology for in situ mass analysis of non-volatile sample composition. A recent Goddard LDMS advancement is the two-step laser tandem mass spectrometer (L2MS) instrument to address the need for future flight instrumentation to deconvolve complex organic signatures. The L2MS prototype uses a resonance enhanced multi-photon laser ionization mechanism to selectively detect aromatic species from a more complex sample. By neglecting the aliphatic and inorganic mineral signatures in the two-step mass spectrum, the L2MS approach can provide both mass assignments and clues to structural information for an in situ investigation of non-volatile sample composition. In this paper we will describe our development effort on a new laser architecture that is based on the previously flown Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) laser transmitter for the L2MS instrument. The laser provides two discrete midinfrared wavelengths (2.8 m and 3.4 m) using monolithic optical parametric oscillators and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength (266 nm) on a single laser bench with a straightforward development path toward flight readiness.

  4. Perspectives of powerful laser technique for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konov, Vitali I.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.; Shcherbakov, Ivan A.

    1991-11-01

    The optimum laser-system parameters are being selected for several types of surgical operations using ablation techniques. The choice is based on the specific demands of the operation performed, knowledge of the ablation laws, limitations on laser-beam intensity which come from the necessity to transport high-intensity light through flexible fiber, and the peculiarities of different laser systems. At present it is more expedient to develop laser medical setups oriented to the solution of one task or a limited number of problems. The choice of a concrete installation should be based on the investigation results of interaction of radiation with biological tissues and its transmission through the fiber, the analysis of the level of development of laser and fiber technique, specificity of the operation, and compatibility of laser facilitates and traditional medical equipment. The paper illustrates such an approach by way of several concrete examples and notes the corresponding laser systems, which were developed or are in the developmental stage in the General Physics Institute of the USSR Academy of Sciences and in organizations connected with the Institute.

  5. Method and system for advancement of a borehole using a high power laser

    SciTech Connect

    Moxley, Joel F.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2014-09-09

    There is provided a system, apparatus and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. There is further provided with in the systems a means for delivering high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates, a laser bottom hole assembly, and fluid directing techniques and assemblies for removing the displaced material from the borehole.

  6. Laser techniques in high-pressure geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Mao, H. K.

    1987-01-01

    Laser techniques in conjunction with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study high-pressure properties of materials important to a wide range of problems in earth and planetary science. Spontaneous Raman scattering of crystalline and amorphous solids at high pressure demonstrates that dramatic changes in structure and bonding occur on compression. High-pressure Brillouin scattering is sensitive to the pressure variations of single-crystal elastic moduli and acoustic velocities. Laser heating techniques with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study phase transitions, including melting, under deep-earth conditions. Finally, laser-induced ruby fluorescence has been essential for the development of techniques for generating the maximum pressures now possible with the diamond-anvil cell, and currently provides a calibrated in situ measure of pressure well above 100 gigapascals.

  7. Advanced techniques in laser-ion acceleration: Conversion efficiency, beam distribution and energy scaling in the Break-Out Afterburner regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Daniel; Yin, Lin; Albright, Brian; Gautier, Donald; Hoerlein, Rainer; Johnson, Randall; Kiefer, Daniel; Letzring, Sam; Shah, Rahul; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Shimada, Tsutomu; Habs, Dietrich; Fernandez, Juan; Hegelich, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Recently, increasing laser intensities and contrast made acceleration mechanisms such as the radiation pressure acceleration or the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) accessible. These mechanisms efficiently couple laser energy into all target ion species, making them a competitive alternative to conventional accelerators. We here present experimental data addressing conversion efficiency and ion distribution scaling for both carbon C6+ and protons within the BOA regime and the transit into the TNSA regime. Unique high resolution measurements of angularly resolved carbon C6+ and proton energy spectra for targets ranging from 30nm to 25microns - recorded with a novel ion wide angle spectrometer - are presented and used to derive thickness scaling estimates. While the measured conversion efficiency for C6+ reaches up to ~6%, peak energies of 1GeV and 120MeV have been measured for C6+ and protons, respectively.

  8. Laser lithotripsy using double pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfmann, Juergen; Doerschel, Klaus; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1990-07-01

    There are currntly several methods in the field of laser lithotripsy which operate not only at different wavelengths and pulse lengths but also with various types of optical front ends and various irrigation fluids'6. The methods can be divided into two main groups: First, those which utilize stone absorption and plasma formation on the stone surface to initiate stone fragmentation, such as dye lasers. Second, those which generate shock waves and caviatation in the surrounding fluid and which require additional means to produce aplasma (e.g. irrigation, focussing fiber end or metal surfaces). The pulsed Nd:YAG laser belongs to this group. The method presented here is the double pulse technique which is a combination of both methods. It uses two laser pulses with a short time delay transmitted by means of a fiber to destroy body concrements. The first pulse is the first harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser (532nm) which improves the coupling efficiency of the laser radiation with the stone. The second pulse is in the fundamental mode of the laser (1064 nm) delivering the high energy for the stone disruption.

  9. Pulse Compression Techniques for Laser Generated Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, R. F.; Madaras, E. I.

    1999-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound for nondestructive evaluation has an optical power density limit due to rapid high heating that causes material damage. This damage threshold limits the generated ultrasound amplitude, which impacts nondestructive evaluation inspection capability. To increase ultrasound signal levels and improve the ultrasound signal-to-noise ratio without exceeding laser power limitations, it is possible to use pulse compression techniques. The approach illustrated here uses a 150mW laser-diode modulated with a pseudo-random sequence and signal correlation. Results demonstrate the successful generation of ultrasonic bulk waves in aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials using a modulated low-power laser diode and illustrate ultrasound bandwidth control.

  10. Laser Remote Sensing: Velocimetry Based Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molebny, Vasyl; Steinvall, Ove

    Laser-based velocity measurement is an area of the field of remote sensing where the coherent properties of laser radiation are the most exposed. Much of the published literature deals with the theory and techniques of remote sensing. We restrict our discussion to current trends in this area, gathered from recent conferences and professional journals. Remote wind sensing and vibrometry are promising in their new scientific, industrial, military, and biomedical applications, including improving flight safety, precise weapon correction, non-contact mine detection, optimization of wind farm operation, object identification based on its vibration signature, fluid flow studies, and vibrometry-associated diagnosis.

  11. Laser beam shaping for biomedical microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Kaiser, Peter; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2016-04-01

    Uniform illumination of a working field is very important in optical systems of confocal microscopy and various implementations of fluorescence microscopy like TIR, SSIM, STORM, PALM to enhance performance of these laser-based research techniques. Widely used TEM00 laser sources are characterized by essentially non-uniform Gaussian intensity profile which leads usually to non-uniform intensity distribution in a microscope working field or in a field of microlenses array of a confocal microscope optical system, this non-uniform illumination results in instability of measuring procedure and reducing precision of quantitative measurements. Therefore transformation of typical Gaussian distribution of a TEM00 laser to flat-top (top hat) profile is an actual technical task, it is solved by applying beam shaping optics. Due to high demands to optical image quality the mentioned techniques have specific requirements to a uniform laser beam: flatness of phase front and extended depth of field, - from this point of view the microscopy techniques are similar to holography and interferometry. There are different refractive and diffractive beam shaping approaches used in laser industrial and scientific applications, but only few of them are capable to fulfil the optimum conditions for beam quality required in discussed microscopy techniques. We suggest applying refractive field mapping beam shapers πShaper, which operational principle presumes almost lossless transformation of Gaussian to flat-top beam with flatness of output wavefront, conserving of beam consistency, providing collimated low divergent output beam, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with several lasers with different wavelengths simultaneously. The main function of a beam shaper is transformation of laser intensity profile, further beam transformation to provide optimum for a particular technique spot size and shape has to

  12. High Rate Laser Pitting Technique for Solar Cell Texturing

    SciTech Connect

    Hans J. Herfurth; Henrikki Pantsar

    2013-01-10

    High rate laser pitting technique for solar cell texturing Efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells can be improved by creating a texture on the surface to increase optical absorption. Different techniques have been developed for texturing, with the current state-of-the-art (SOA) being wet chemical etching. The process has poor optical performance, produces surfaces that are difficult to passivate or contact and is relatively expensive due to the use of hazardous chemicals. This project shall develop an alternative process for texturing mc-Si using laser micromachining. It will have the following features compared to the current SOA texturing process: -Superior optical surfaces for reduced front-surface reflection and enhanced optical absorption in thin mc-Si substrates -Improved surface passivation -More easily integrated into advanced back-contact cell concepts -Reduced use of hazardous chemicals and waste treatment -Similar or lower cost The process is based on laser pitting. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a high rate laser pitting process which will exceed the rate of former laser texturing processes by a factor of ten. The laser and scanning technologies will be demonstrated on a laboratory scale, but will use inherently technologies that can easily be scaled to production rates. The drastic increase in process velocity is required for the process to be implemented as an in-line process in PV manufacturing. The project includes laser process development, development of advanced optical systems for beam manipulation and cell reflectivity and efficiency testing. An improvement of over 0.5% absolute in efficiency is anticipated after laser-based texturing. The surface textures will be characterized optically, and solar cells will be fabricated with the new laser texturing to ensure that the new process is compatible with high-efficiency cell processing. The result will be demonstration of a prototype process that is suitable for scale-up to a

  13. Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques in Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    2005-01-01

    This is the final technical report for grant number NAG-1-02101. The title of this grant was "Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques In Aerospace Systems". The principal investigator on this grant was Dr. John C. Knight of the Computer Science Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4740. This report summarizes activities under the grant during the period 7/01/2002 to 9/30/2004. This report is organized as follows. In section 2, the technical background of the grant is summarized. Section 3 lists accomplishments and section 4 lists students funded under the grant. In section 5, we present a list of presentations given at various academic and research institutions about the research conducted. Finally, a list of publications generated under this grant is included in section 6.

  14. Advanced laser stratospheric monitoring systems analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the software support supplied by Systems and Applied Sciences Corporation for the study of Advanced Laser Stratospheric Monitoring Systems Analyses under contract No. NAS1-15806. This report discusses improvements to the Langley spectroscopic data base, development of LHS instrument control software and data analyses and validation software. The effect of diurnal variations on the retrieved concentrations of NO, NO2 and C L O from a space and balloon borne measurement platform are discussed along with the selection of optimum IF channels for sensing stratospheric species from space.

  15. Applications of laser techniques in fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, W. K.; Liu, C. Y.; Wong, Y. W.

    1991-03-01

    Three examples of different applications of laser techniques in experimental fluid mechanics are described including flow field around a proposed heart prostheses, flow field around a model motor vehicle, and flow visualization of the vortex shedding from a delta wing. Velocity measurements of flow around the heart valve prosthesis indicate that the new design is capable of delaying flow separation. Velocity measurements of flow around a model motor vehicle show that separation occurs above the bonnet and at the rear of the vehicle.

  16. Full Endoscopic Spinal Surgery Techniques: Advancements, Indications, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Long, William

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in both surgical instrumentation and full endoscopic spine techniques have resulted in positive clinical outcomes in the treatment of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pathologies. Endoscopic techniques impart minimal approach related disruption of non-pathologic spinal anatomy and function while concurrently maximizing functional visualization and correction of pathological tissues. An advanced understanding of the applicable functional neuroanatomy, in particular the neuroforamen, is essential for successful outcomes. Additionally, an understanding of the varying types of disc prolapse pathology in relation to the neuroforamen will result in more optimal surgical outcomes. Indications for lumbar endoscopic spine surgery include disc herniations, spinal stenosis, infections, medial branch rhizotomy, and interbody fusion. Limitations are based on both non spine and spine related findings. A high riding iliac wing, a more posteriorly located retroperitoneal cavity, an overly distal or proximally migrated herniated disc are all relative contra-indications to lumbar endoscopic spinal surgery techniques. Modifications in scope size and visual field of view angulation have enabled both anterior and posterior cervical decompression. Endoscopic burrs, electrocautery, and focused laser technology allow for the least invasive spinal surgical techniques in all age groups and across varying body habitus. Complications include among others, dural tears, dysesthsia, nerve injury, and infection. PMID:26114086

  17. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Markl, M; Schnell, S; Wu, C; Bollache, E; Jarvis, K; Barker, A J; Robinson, J D; Rigsby, C K

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented. PMID:26944696

  18. Endoscopic laser palliation for advanced malignant dysphagia.

    PubMed Central

    Bown, S G; Hawes, R; Matthewson, K; Swain, C P; Barr, H; Boulos, P B; Clark, C G

    1987-01-01

    Palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia aims to optimise swallowing for the maximum time possible with the minimum of general distress to these seriously ill patients. Thirty four patients considered unsuitable for surgery because of advanced malignancy, other major pathology or in whom previous surgery had been unsuccessful were treated endoscopically with the Nd YAG laser. Significant improvement was achieved in 29 (85%). On a scale of 0-4 (0 = normal swallowing; 4 = dysphagia for all fluids), mean improvement was 1.7, with 25 patients (74%) able to swallow most, or all solids after treatment. With increasing experience, the average number of treatment sessions required for each patient became less; initial time in hospital became comparable to that needed for intubation. Failures were caused by inappropriate patient selection (3), or laser related perforation (2). The mean survival in the whole group was 19 weeks (range 2-44). Eighteen patients needed further treatment for recurrent dysphagia, a mean of six weeks (range 2-15) after initial therapy. Ten of these responded, but eight eventually required insertion of a prosthetic tube. The duration of good palliation was very variable after initial laser therapy. Images Fig. 3 PMID:2443431

  19. Advances in tunable powerful lasers: The advanced free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, S.; Sheffield, R.

    1993-12-31

    In the past several decades, remarkable progress in laser science and technology has made it possible to obtain laser light from the ultra-violet to the far infra-red from a variety of laser types, and at power levels from milliwatts to kilowatts (and, some day, megawatts). However, the availability of tunable lasers at ``high`` power (above a few tens of watts) is more limited. Figure 1, an assessment of the availability of tunable lasers, shows the covered range to be about 400 to 2000 nanometers. A variety of dye lasers cover the visible and near infra red, each one of which is tunable over approximately a 10% range. In the same region, the TI:saphire laser is adjustable over a 20 to 25% range. And finally, optical parametric oscillators can cover the range from about 400 nanometers out to about 2000 nm (even farther at reduced energy output). The typical output energy per pulse may vary from a few to one hundred millijoules, and since repetition rates of 10 to 100 Hertz are generally attainable, average output powers of tens of watts are possible. In recent years, a new approach to powerful tunable lasers -- the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) -- has emerged. In this paper we will discuss advances in FEL technology which not only enable tunability at high average power over a very broad range of wavelengths, but also make this device more usable. At present, that range is about one micron to the far infra red; with extensions of existing technology, it should be extendable to the vacuum ultra violet region.

  20. Pre-stabilized Lasers for Advanced Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, C.-Nary

    Gravitational wave detectors need very stable continuous wave laser sources able to delivering high power beams. Realization of those lasers is a special R&D calling on very low noise controls on very reliable laser sources. After a brief introduction on the laser principles, we review the current laser sources for gravitational wave interferometric detectors, shortly describing the technologies of both solid-state and fiber lasers and amplifiers. A final section addresses the issue of laser pre-stabilization.

  1. Advanced nanoparticle generation and excitation by lasers in liquids.

    PubMed

    Barcikowski, Stephan; Compagnini, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    Today, nanoparticles are widely implemented as functional elements onto surfaces, into volumes and as nano-hybrids, resulting for example in bioactive composites and biomolecule conjugates. However, only limited varieties of materials compatible for integration into advanced functional materials are available: nanoparticles synthesized using conventional gas phase processes are often agglomerated into micro powders that are hard to re-disperse into functional matrices. Chemical synthesis methods often lead to impurities of the nanoparticle colloids caused by additives and precursor reaction products. In the last decade, laser ablation and nanoparticle generation in liquids has proven to be a unique and efficient technique to generate, excite, fragment, and conjugate a large variety of nanostructures in a scalable and clean manner. This editorial briefly highlights selected recent advancements and critical aspects in the field of pulsed laser-based nanoparticle generation and manipulation, including exemplary strategies to harvest the unique properties of the laser-generated nanomaterials in the field of biomedicine and catalysis. The presented critical aspects address future assignments such as size control and scale-up. PMID:23138867

  2. Russian collaborations on lasers and advanced optics

    SciTech Connect

    Munroe, J.; Cooper, D.; Koym, V.; Salesky, E.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. There are several technological areas where the Russians appear to be well ahead of the West. Russian work in lasers and advanced optics, high power nonlinear optics, and optical phase conjugation in particular, are some of these areas. The objective of this project is to establish collaboration with key Russian scientists in this area to analytically and experimentally validate the technologies and identify potential applications. This technology has the potential to solve very important military, civil, and commercial problems. The emphasis of this project is on civil and commercial applications, but the technologies have dual-use applications.

  3. Challenge to advanced materials processing with lasers in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Isamu

    2003-02-01

    Japan is one of the most advanced countries in manufacturing technology, and lasers have been playing an important role for advancement of manufacturing technology in a variety of industrial fields. Contribution of laser materials processing to Japanese industry is significant for both macroprocessing and microprocessing. The present paper describes recent trend and topics of industrial applications in terms of the hardware and the software to show how Japanese industry challenges to advanced materials processing using lasers, and national products related to laser materials processing are also briefly introduced.

  4. Cold laser technique for cell surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel V.; Ohad, Shoshanit; Lewis, Aaron; Laufer, Neri

    1992-08-01

    A new cell surgery technique has been developed to produce well-defined alterations in cells and tissues without detectable heating and/or other structural damage in the surroundings. The technique involves the use of a 193 nm argon fluoride excimer laser which is guided through a glass pipette filled with a positive air pressure. To demonstrate the method holes were drilled in the zona pellucida of mouse oocytes. The diameter of the drilled hole was determined by the pipette tip size, and its depth by an energy emitted per pulse and number of pulses. Scanning electron microscopy of the drilled mouse oocytes showed uniform, round, well circumscribed holes with sharp edges. Oocytes that had their zona pellucida drilled with this new method fertilized in vitro and developed to the blastocyst stage in a rate similar to that of control group. These results demonstrate the non-perturbing nature of this cold laser microsurgical procedure. In addition to the extension of our results for clinical in vitro fertilization purposes, such as enhancement of fertilization and embryo biopsy, there are wide ranging possible uses of our method in fundamental and applied investigations that require sub-micron accuracy in cellular alteration.

  5. Multispectral laser imaging for advanced food analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senni, L.; Burrascano, P.; Ricci, M.

    2016-07-01

    A hardware-software apparatus for food inspection capable of realizing multispectral NIR laser imaging at four different wavelengths is herein discussed. The system was designed to operate in a through-transmission configuration to detect the presence of unwanted foreign bodies inside samples, whether packed or unpacked. A modified Lock-In technique was employed to counterbalance the significant signal intensity attenuation due to transmission across the sample and to extract the multispectral information more efficiently. The NIR laser wavelengths used to acquire the multispectral images can be varied to deal with different materials and to focus on specific aspects. In the present work the wavelengths were selected after a preliminary analysis to enhance the image contrast between foreign bodies and food in the sample, thus identifying the location and nature of the defects. Experimental results obtained from several specimens, with and without packaging, are presented and the multispectral image processing as well as the achievable spatial resolution of the system are discussed.

  6. Laser hardening techniques on steam turbine blade and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Zhang, Qunli; Kong, Fanzhi; Ding, Qingming

    Different laser surface hardening techniques, such as laser alloying and laser solution strengthening were adopted to perform modification treatment on the local region of inset edge for 2Cr13 and 17-4PH steam turbine blades to prolong the life of the blades. The microstructures, microhardness and anti-cavitation properties were investigated on the blades after laser treatment. The hardening mechanism and technique adaptability were researched. Large scale installation practices confirmed that the laser surface modification techniques are safe and reliable, which can improve the properties of blades greatly with advantages of high automation, high quality, little distortion and simple procedure.

  7. Advances in procedural techniques--antegrade.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William; Spratt, James C

    2014-05-01

    There have been many technological advances in antegrade CTO PCI, but perhaps most importantly has been the evolution of the "hybrid' approach where ideally there exists a seamless interplay of antegrade wiring, antegrade dissection re-entry and retrograde approaches as dictated by procedural factors. Antegrade wire escalation with intimal tracking remains the preferred initial strategy in short CTOs without proximal cap ambiguity. More complex CTOs, however, usually require either a retrograde or an antegrade dissection re-entry approach, or both. Antegrade dissection re-entry is well suited to long occlusions where there is a healthy distal vessel and limited "interventional" collaterals. Early use of a dissection re-entry strategy will increase success rates, reduce complications, and minimise radiation exposure, contrast use as well as procedural times. Antegrade dissection can be achieved with a knuckle wire technique or the CrossBoss catheter whilst re-entry will be achieved in the most reproducible and reliable fashion by the Stingray balloon/wire. It should be avoided where there is potential for loss of large side branches. It remains to be seen whether use of newer dissection re-entry strategies will be associated with lower restenosis rates compared with the more uncontrolled subintimal tracking strategies such as STAR and whether stent insertion in the subintimal space is associated with higher rates of late stent malapposition and stent thrombosis. It is to be hoped that the algorithms, which have been developed to guide CTO operators, allow for a better transfer of knowledge and skills to increase uptake and acceptance of CTO PCI as a whole. PMID:24694104

  8. Advances in fiber lasers for nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, F. W.; Ouzounov, D.; Kieu, K.; Renninger, W.; Chong, A.; Liu, H.

    2008-02-01

    In the past 30 years major advances in medical imaging have been made in areas such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound. These techniques have become quite effective for structural imaging at the organ or tissue level, but do not address the clear need for imaging technologies that exploit existing knowledge of the genetic and molecular bases of disease. Techniques that can provide similar information on the cellular and molecular scale would be very powerful, and ultimately the extension of such techniques to in vivo measurements will be desired. The availability of these imaging capabilities would allow monitoring of the early stages of disease or therapy, for example. Optical techniques provide excellent imaging capabilities, with sub-micron spatial resolution, and are noninvasive. An overall goal of biomedical imaging is to obtain diagnostic or functional information about biological structures. The difficulty of acquiring high-resolution images of structures deep in tissue presents a major challenge, however, owing to strong scattering of light. As a consequence, optical imaging has been limited to thin (typically ~0.5 mm) samples or superficial tissue. In contrast, techniques such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance provide images of structures centimeters deep in tissue, with ~100-micron resolution. It is desirable to develop techniques that offer the resolution of optics with the depth-penetration of other techniques. Since 1990, a variety of nonlinear microscopies have been demonstrated. These include 2- and 3-photon fluorescence microscopy, and 2nd- and 3rd-harmonic generation microscopies. These typically employ femtosecond-pulse excitation, for maximum peak power (and thus nonlinear excitation) for a given pulse energy. A relative newcomer to the group is CARS microscopy [1], which exploits resonant vibrational excitation of molecules or bonds. The CARS signal contrast arises from intrinsic elements of cells, and thus

  9. Advanced Diamond Anvil Techniques (Customized Diamond Anvils)

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S

    2009-02-11

    A complete set of diamond-based fabrication tools now exists for making a wide range of different types of diamond anvils which are tailored for various high-P applications. Current tools include: CVD diamond deposition (making diamond); Diamond polishing, laser drilling, plasma etching (removal of diamond); and Lithography, 3D laser pantography (patterning features onto diamond); - Metal deposition (putting electrical circuits and metal masks onto diamond). Current applications include the following: Electrical Conductivity; Magnetic Susceptibility; and High-P/High-T. Future applications may include: NMR; Hall Effect; de Haas - Shubnikov (Fermi surface topology); Calorimetry; and thermal conductivity.

  10. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  11. Sensitive Technique For Detecting Alignment Of Seed Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1994-01-01

    Frequency response near resonance measured. Improved technique for detection and quantification of alignment of injection-seeding laser with associated power-oscillator laser proposed. Particularly useful in indicating alignment at spectral purity greater than 98 percent because it becomes more sensitive as perfect alignment approached. In addition, implemented relatively easily, without turning on power-oscillator laser.

  12. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  13. Vestibuloplasty: a retrospective study on conventional and laser operation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neckel, Claus P.

    1999-05-01

    40 patients with edentulous maxillary jaws were referred to our private practice limited to maxillofacial surgery, due to atrophy of the alveolar ridge. Before prosthetic renewal of the upper removable prosthesis the restorative dentist requested a sufficient vestibule. After supraperiostal preparation, soft tissue advancement and fixation with absorbable sutures. The recipient site was covered with a free gingival graft. Group I was operated on traditionally using a scalpel. In group II incision and soft tissue preparation was performed using a diode laser. Wavelength: 810 nm; Continuous wave mode; 400 micron optic fiber; Output power 1.6 Watt. All operations were performed by one surgeon experienced in both operation techniques. Every patient was followed-up 1, 4, 8 weeks, 6 and 12 months. The vestibular height directly adjacent to the nasal cavity and 2cm distal to these first measuring locations were taken. Each patient was asked to evaluate their individual discomfort and postoperative pain level. Both groups showed no significant difference in vestibular height after 1, 4, 8 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. The postoperative height of 1.28 cm was reduced to 0.84 cm after 1 year. Furthermore both groups showed uneventful healing and take of the free gingival grafts. The assessment of the pain and discomfort level by the patients brought a significant difference between both groups in favor of the laser assisted operation technique.

  14. Laser cooling in solids: advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Seletskiy, Denis V; Epstein, Richard; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses the progress and ongoing efforts in optical refrigeration. Optical refrigeration is a process in which phonons are removed from a solid by anti-Stokes fluorescence. The review first summarizes the history of optical refrigeration, noting the success in cooling rare-earth-doped solids to cryogenic temperatures. It then examines in detail a four-level model of rare-earth-based optical refrigeration. This model elucidates the essential roles that the various material parameters, such as the spacing of the energy levels and the radiative quantum efficiency, play in the process of optical refrigeration. The review then describes the experimental techniques for cryogenic optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids employing non-resonant and resonant optical cavities. It then examines the work on laser cooling of semiconductors, emphasizing the differences between optical refrigeration of semiconductors and rare-earth-doped solids and the new challenges and advantages of semiconductors. It then describes the significant experimental results including the observed optical refrigeration of CdS nanostructures. The review concludes by discussing the engineering challenges to the development of practical optical refrigerators, and the potential advantages and uses of these refrigerators. PMID:27484295

  15. Laser cooling in solids: advances and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seletskiy, Denis V.; Epstein, Richard; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses the progress and ongoing efforts in optical refrigeration. Optical refrigeration is a process in which phonons are removed from a solid by anti-Stokes fluorescence. The review first summarizes the history of optical refrigeration, noting the success in cooling rare-earth-doped solids to cryogenic temperatures. It then examines in detail a four-level model of rare-earth-based optical refrigeration. This model elucidates the essential roles that the various material parameters, such as the spacing of the energy levels and the radiative quantum efficiency, play in the process of optical refrigeration. The review then describes the experimental techniques for cryogenic optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids employing non-resonant and resonant optical cavities. It then examines the work on laser cooling of semiconductors, emphasizing the differences between optical refrigeration of semiconductors and rare-earth-doped solids and the new challenges and advantages of semiconductors. It then describes the significant experimental results including the observed optical refrigeration of CdS nanostructures. The review concludes by discussing the engineering challenges to the development of practical optical refrigerators, and the potential advantages and uses of these refrigerators.

  16. High-power disk lasers: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, David; Ryba, Tracey; Holzer, Marco

    2012-03-01

    Though the genesis of the disk laser concept dates to the early 90's, the disk laser continues to demonstrate the flexibility and the certain future of a breakthrough technology. On-going increases in power per disk, and improvements in beam quality and efficiency continue to validate the genius of the disk laser concept. As of today, the disk principle has not reached any fundamental limits regarding output power per disk or beam quality, and offers numerous advantages over other high power resonator concepts, especially over monolithic architectures. With about 2,000 high power disk lasers installations, and a demand upwards of 1,000 lasers per year, the disk laser has proven to be a robust and reliable industrial tool. With advancements in running cost, investment cost and footprint, manufacturers continue to implement disk laser technology with more vigor than ever. This paper will explain recent advances in disk laser technology and process relevant features of the laser, like pump diode arrangement, resonator design and integrated beam guidance. In addition, advances in applications in the thick sheet area and very cost efficient high productivity applications like remote welding, remote cutting and cutting of thin sheets will be discussed.

  17. Lasers in dentistry: new possibilities with advancing laser technology?

    PubMed

    Frentzen, M; Koort, H J

    1990-12-01

    Although there are a considerable number of published papers on the role of laser treatment in dentistry, a critical review shows that laser technology is used only by specialists in a small therapeutic field. Most lasers are heat-producing devices converting electromagnetic energy into thermal energy. These lasers find uses in oral surgery for cutting or coagulating soft tissues or in the welding of dental prostheses. More recently, new types of lasers have offered non-thermal modes of tissue interaction, called photoablation, photodisruption and photochemical effects. Basic and clinical research is being carried out into the application of these devices in dentistry. However, much development will be required before lasers can replace conventional surgical methods for treating oral cancer or indeed replace the conventional bur for excavating carious lesions. PMID:2276829

  18. Stabilized High Power Laser for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willke, B.; Danzmann, K.; Fallnich, C.; Frede, M.; Heurs, M.; King, P.; Kracht, D.; Kwee, P.; Savage, R.; Seifert, F.; Wilhelm, R.

    2006-03-01

    Second generation gravitational wave detectors require high power lasers with several 100W of output power and with very low temporal and spatial fluctuations. In this paper we discuss possible setups to achieve high laser power and describe a 200W prestabilized laser system (PSL). The PSL noise requirements for advanced gravitational wave detectors will be discussed in general and the stabilization scheme proposed for the Advanced LIGO PSL will be described. Special emphasis will be given to the most demanding power stabilization requiremets and new results (RIN <= 4×10-9/surdHz) will be presented.

  19. Advanced laser diodes for sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    VAWTER,GREGORY A.; MAR,ALAN; CHOW,WENG W.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-01-01

    The authors have developed diode lasers for short pulse duration and high peak pulse power in the 0.01--100.0 m pulsewidth regime. A primary goal of the program was producing up to 10 W while maintaining good far-field beam quality and ease of manufacturability for low cost. High peak power, 17 W, picosecond pulses have been achieved by gain switching of flared geometry waveguide lasers and amplifiers. Such high powers area world record for this type of diode laser. The light emission pattern from diode lasers is of critical importance for sensing systems such as range finding and chemical detection. They have developed a new integrated optical beam transformer producing rib-waveguide diode lasers with a symmetric, low divergence, output beam and increased upper power limits for irreversible facet damage.

  20. Simple technique for sequential Q-switching of molecular lasers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucht, R. A.; Allario, F.; Jarrett, O., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A simple technique for sequentially Q-switching molecular lasers is discussed in which an optical scanner is used as an optical folding element in a laser cavity consisting of a stationary diffraction grating and partially reflecting mirror. Sequential Q-switching of a conventional CO2 laser is demonstrated in which over sixty-two transitions between 9.2 and 10.8 microns are observed. Rapid repetition rates (200 Hz) and narrow laser pulses (less than 5 microsec) allow conventional signal processing techniques to be used with this multiwavelength laser source which is a versatile tool for laser propagation studies, absorption spectroscopy, and gain measurements. Results of a preliminary experiment demonstrating the utility of measuring selective absorption of CO2 laser wavelengths by C2H4 are shown.

  1. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  2. Advances in mode-locked semiconductor disk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornaszewski, Lukaz; Hempler, Nils; Hamilton, Craig J.; Maker, Gareth T.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.

    2013-02-01

    NonLinear Microscopy techniques, such as Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence and Second Harmonic Generation provide advantages over conventional Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. A key element in a NonLinear Microscope is an ultrafast laser which produces short pulses with the high intensities needed for exciting nonlinear processes. Semiconductor Disk Lasers potentially offer an alternative to expensive Ti:Sapphire lasers. The reported 200MHz operation of a modelocked Semiconductor Disk laser is to our knowledge the lowest repetition rate as yet demonstrated.

  3. Advanced Fibre Bragg Grating and Microfibre Bragg Grating Fabrication Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kit Man

    Fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) have become a very important technology for communication systems and fibre optic sensing. Typically, FBGs are less than 10-mm long and are fabricated using fused silica uniform phase masks which become more expensive for longer length or non-uniform pitch. Generally, interference UV laser beams are employed to make long or complex FBGs, and this technique introduces critical precision and control issues. In this work, we demonstrate an advanced FBG fabrication system that enables the writing of long and complex gratings in optical fibres with virtually any apodisation profile, local phase and Bragg wavelength using a novel optical design in which the incident angles of two UV beams onto an optical fibre can be adjusted simultaneously by moving just one optical component, instead of two optics employed in earlier configurations, to vary the grating pitch. The key advantage of the grating fabrication system is that complex gratings can be fabricated by controlling the linear movements of two translation stages. In addition to the study of advanced grating fabrication technique, we also focus on the inscription of FBGs written in optical fibres with a cladding diameter of several ten's of microns. Fabrication of microfibres was investigated using a sophisticated tapering method. We also proposed a simple but practical technique to filter out the higher order modes reflected from the FBG written in microfibres via a linear taper region while the fundamental mode re-couples to the core. By using this technique, reflection from the microfibre Bragg grating (MFBG) can be effectively single mode, simplifying the demultiplexing and demodulation processes. MFBG exhibits high sensitivity to contact force and an MFBG-based force sensor was also constructed and tested to investigate their suitability for use as an invasive surgery device. Performance of the contact force sensor packaged in a conforming elastomer material compares favourably to one

  4. Advanced metaheuristic algorithms for laser optimization in optical accelerator technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomizawa, Hiromitsu

    2011-10-01

    Lasers are among the most important experimental tools for user facilities, including synchrotron radiation and free electron lasers (FEL). In the synchrotron radiation field, lasers are widely used for experiments with Pump-Probe techniques. Especially for X-ray-FELs, lasers play important roles as seed light sources or photocathode-illuminating light sources to generate a high-brightness electron bunch. For future accelerators, laser-based techonologies such as electro-optic (EO) sampling to measure ultra-short electron bunches and optical-fiber-based femtosecond timing systems have been intensively developed in the last decade. Therefore, controls and optimizations of laser pulse characteristics are strongly required for many kinds of experiments and improvement of accelerator systems. However, people believe that lasers should be tuned and customized for each requirement manually by experts. This makes it difficult for laser systems to be part of the common accelerator infrastructure. Automatic laser tuning requires sophisticated algorithms, and the metaheuristic algorithm is one of the best solutions. The metaheuristic laser tuning system is expected to reduce the human effort and time required for laser preparations. I have shown some successful results on a metaheuristic algorithm based on a genetic algorithm to optimize spatial (transverse) laser profiles, and a hill-climbing method extended with a fuzzy set theory to choose one of the best laser alignments automatically for each machine requirement.

  5. Lincoln Advanced Science and Engineering Reinforcement (LASER) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Willie E.

    Lincoln University, under the Lincoln Advanced Science and Engineering Reinforcement (LASER) Program, has identified and successfully recruited over 100 students for majors in technical fields. To date, over 70 percent of these students have completed or will complete technical degrees in engineering, physics, chemistry, and computer science. Of those completing the undergraduate degree, over 40 percent have gone on to graduate and professional schools. This success is attributable to well planned approaches to student recruitment, training, personal motivation, retention, and program staff. Very closely coupled to the above factors is a focus designed to achieve excellence in program services and student performance. Future contributions by the LASER Program to the pool of technical minority graduates will have a significant impact. This is already evident from the success of the students that began the first year of the program. With program plans to refine many of the already successful techniques, follow-on activities are expected to make even greater contributions to the availability of technically trained minorities. For example, undergraduate research exposure, broadened summer, and co-op work experiences will be enhanced.

  6. Lincoln Advanced Science and Engineering Reinforcement (LASER) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Willie E.

    1989-01-01

    Lincoln University, under the Lincoln Advanced Science and Engineering Reinforcement (LASER) Program, has identified and successfully recruited over 100 students for majors in technical fields. To date, over 70 percent of these students have completed or will complete technical degrees in engineering, physics, chemistry, and computer science. Of those completing the undergraduate degree, over 40 percent have gone on to graduate and professional schools. This success is attributable to well planned approaches to student recruitment, training, personal motivation, retention, and program staff. Very closely coupled to the above factors is a focus designed to achieve excellence in program services and student performance. Future contributions by the LASER Program to the pool of technical minority graduates will have a significant impact. This is already evident from the success of the students that began the first year of the program. With program plans to refine many of the already successful techniques, follow-on activities are expected to make even greater contributions to the availability of technically trained minorities. For example, undergraduate research exposure, broadened summer, and co-op work experiences will be enhanced.

  7. Recent Advances in Beam Diagnostic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorito, R. B.

    2002-12-01

    We describe recent advances in diagnostics of the transverse phase space of charged particle beams. The emphasis of this paper is on the utilization of beam-based optical radiation for the precise measurement of the spatial distribution, divergence and emittance of relativistic charged particle beams. The properties and uses of incoherent as well as coherent optical transition, diffraction and synchrotron radiation for beam diagnosis are discussed.

  8. Latest advances in high brightness disk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Vincent; Gottwald, Tina; Stolzenburg, Christian; Schad, Sven-Silvius; Killi, Alexander; Ryba, Tracey

    2015-02-01

    In the last decade diode pumped solid state lasers have become an important tool for many industrial materials processing applications. They combine ease of operation with efficiency, robustness and low cost. This paper will give insight in latest progress in disk laser technology ranging from kW-class CW-Lasers over frequency converted lasers to ultra-short pulsed lasers. The disk laser enables high beam quality at high average power and at high peak power at the same time. The power from a single disk was scaled from 1 kW around the year 2000 up to more than 10 kW nowadays. Recently was demonstrated more than 4 kW of average power from a single disk close to fundamental mode beam quality (M²=1.38). Coupling of multiple disks in a common resonator results in even higher power. As an example we show 20 kW extracted from two disks of a common resonator. The disk also reduces optical nonlinearities making it ideally suited for short and ultrashort pulsed lasers. In a joint project between TRUMPF and IFSW Stuttgart more than 1.3 kW of average power at ps pulse duration and exceptionally good beam quality was recently demonstrated. The extremely low saturated gain makes the disk laser ideal for internal frequency conversion. We show >1 kW average power and >6 kW peak power in multi ms pulsed regime from an internally frequency doubled disk laser emitting at 515 nm (green). Also external frequency conversion can be done efficiently with ns pulses. >500 W of average UV power was demonstrated.

  9. Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) update: focus on device and procedure advances.

    PubMed

    Choy, D S

    1993-08-01

    This discussion is an update on the U.S. advances in percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). This report summarizes the knowledge that has been gained about the procedure, advances in technique, and increased information about the three lasers currently in use for PLDD: KTP, Nd:YAG, and holmium. A new surgical approach to the L5-S1 disc is described. It is concluded that PLDD has become an established procedure that will be more widely used because it is simple, effective, and reasonably safe. PMID:10146384

  10. The future of high power laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poprawe, Reinhart; Loosen, Peter; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-05-01

    High Power Lasers have been used for years in corresponding applications. Constantly new areas and new processes have been demonstrated, developed and transferred to fruitful use in industry. With the advent of diode pumped solid state lasers in the multi-kW-power regime at beam qualities not far away from the diffraction limit, a new area of applicability has opened. In welding applications speeds could be increased and systems could be developed with higher efficiently leading also to new perspectives for increased productivity, e.g. in combined processing. Quality control is increasingly demanded by the applying industries, however applications still are rare. Higher resolution of coaxial process control systems in time and space combined with new strategies in signal processing could give rise to new applications. The general approach described in this paper emphasizes the fact, that laser applications can be developed more efficiently, more precisely and with higher quality, if the laser radiation is tailored properly to the corresponding application. In applying laser sources, the parameter ranges applicable are by far wider and more flexible compared to heat, mechanical or even electrical energy. The time frame ranges from several fs to continuous wave and this spans approximately 15 orders of magnitude. Spacewise, the foci range from several µm to cm and the resulting intensities suitable for materials processing span eight orders of magnitude from 10 3 to 10 11 W/cm2. In addition to space (power, intensity) and time (pulse) the wavelength can be chosen as a further parameter of optimization. As a consequence, the resulting new applications are vast and can be utilized in almost every market segment of our global economy (Fig. 1). In the past and only partly today, however, this flexibility of laser technology is not exploited in full in materials processing, basically because in the high power regime the lasers with tailored beam properties are not

  11. Advances in laparoscopic urologic surgery techniques

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Muhsin, Haidar M.; Humphreys, Mitchell R.

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades witnessed the inception and exponential implementation of key technological advancements in laparoscopic urology. While some of these technologies thrived and became part of daily practice, others are still hindered by major challenges. This review was conducted through a comprehensive literature search in order to highlight some of the most promising technologies in laparoscopic visualization, augmented reality, and insufflation. Additionally, this review will provide an update regarding the current status of single-site and natural orifice surgery in urology. PMID:27134743

  12. Advances in laparoscopic urologic surgery techniques.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Muhsin, Haidar M; Humphreys, Mitchell R

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades witnessed the inception and exponential implementation of key technological advancements in laparoscopic urology. While some of these technologies thrived and became part of daily practice, others are still hindered by major challenges. This review was conducted through a comprehensive literature search in order to highlight some of the most promising technologies in laparoscopic visualization, augmented reality, and insufflation. Additionally, this review will provide an update regarding the current status of single-site and natural orifice surgery in urology. PMID:27134743

  13. Laser induced damage testing: Equipment and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, G. L.

    1993-07-01

    A laser damage test station was designed and built at the AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). The purpose of this effort was to establish the capability for testing polished optical fibers for high energy laser transmission to support the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI), optical firing-set program. A single shot, conditioned threshold type laser damage test was implemented. A flashlamp pumped, multimode, Q-switched, Nd:YAG laser was utilized as the test source. The test laser's operational parameters were extensively characterized. The pulse width, beam divergence, and polarization state of the laser were all held constant throughout the tests. A single plano-convex lens was utilized to focus the laser beam energy into the optical fibers. A focusing geometry was utilized which avoided bulk damage and minimized damage at the fiber's core/cladding interface. A special holding fixture was fabricated, which minimized the mechanical stresses on the fiber during testing. Several uncoated, step-index, multimode, optical fibers were damage tested to verify the functionality of the test station. The fibers all had a 400 micron diameter core of pure fused silica, a 440 micron diameter fluorine doped fused silica cladding, and a 15 micron thick polyimide buffer layer. The fibers were tested up to a fluence level greater than 55.7 J/cm(exp 2) or until damage was observed. Cleaning, inspection, and testing procedures were developed and documented.

  14. Advance crew procedures development techniques: Procedures generation program requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, J. D.; Benbow, R. L.; Hawk, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    The Procedures Generation Program (PGP) is described as an automated crew procedures generation and performance monitoring system. Computer software requirements to be implemented in PGP for the Advanced Crew Procedures Development Techniques are outlined.

  15. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  16. Advanced airfoil design empirically based transonic aircraft drag buildup technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, W. D., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    To systematically investigate the potential of advanced airfoils in advance preliminary design studies, empirical relationships were derived, based on available wind tunnel test data, through which total drag is determined recognizing all major aircraft geometric variables. This technique recognizes a single design lift coefficient and Mach number for each aircraft. Using this technique drag polars are derived for all Mach numbers up to MDesign + 0.05 and lift coefficients -0.40 to +0.20 from CLDesign.

  17. Advanced Optical Imaging Techniques for Neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicong; Christensen, Ryan; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, developmental neuroscience has been transformed by the widespread application of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Even greater progress is imminent, as recent innovations in microscopy now enable imaging with increased depth, speed, and spatial resolution; reduced phototoxicity; and in some cases without external fluorescent probes. We discuss these new techniques and emphasize their dramatic impact on neurobiology, including the ability to image neurons at depths exceeding 1 mm, to observe neurodevelopment noninvasively throughout embryogenesis, and to visualize neuronal processes or structures that were previously too small or too difficult to target with conventional microscopy. PMID:23831260

  18. Advanced laser sensing receiver concepts based on FPA technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, P. L.; Petrin, R. R.; Jolin, J. L.; Foy, B. R.; Lowrance, J. L.; Renda, G.

    2002-01-01

    The ultimate performance of any remote sensor is ideally governed by the hardware signal-to-noise capability and allowed signal-averaging time. In real-world scenarios, this may not be realizable and the limiting factors may suggest the need for more advanced capabilities. Moving from passive to active remote sensors offers the advantage of control over the illumination source, the laser. Added capabilities may include polarization discrimination, instantaneous imaging, range resolution, simultaneous multi-spectral measurement, or coherent detection. However, most advanced detection technology has been engineered heavily towards the straightforward passive sensor requirements, measuring an integrated photon flux. The need for focal plane array technology designed specifically for laser sensing has been recognized for some time, but advances have only recently made the engineering possible. This paper will present a few concepts for laser sensing receiver architectures, the driving specifications behind those concepts, and test/modeling results of such designs.

  19. Time-resolved spectroscopic techniques in laser medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Martínez, Roberto; Román-Moreno, Carlos J.; Rodríguez-Rosales, Antonio A.

    2000-10-01

    Spectroscopic lasers techniques are very useful for the detection and treatment of cancer and removing atherosclerotic plaque. Photobiology and photochemical studies, with the new generation of lasers high resolution time-resolved optical tomography is mentioned. A brief review of some of these applications is discussed and a partial list of recent references is given.

  20. Advanced analysis techniques for uranium assay

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, W. H.; Ensslin, Norbert; Carrillo, L. A.; Beard, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium has a negligible passive neutron emission rate making its assay practicable only with an active interrogation method. The active interrogation uses external neutron sources to induce fission events in the uranium in order to determine the mass. This technique requires careful calibration with standards that are representative of the items to be assayed. The samples to be measured are not always well represented by the available standards which often leads to large biases. A technique of active multiplicity counting is being developed to reduce some of these assay difficulties. Active multiplicity counting uses the measured doubles and triples count rates to determine the neutron multiplication (f4) and the product of the source-sample coupling ( C ) and the 235U mass (m). Since the 35U mass always appears in the multiplicity equations as the product of Cm, the coupling needs to be determined before the mass can be known. A relationship has been developed that relates the coupling to the neutron multiplication. The relationship is based on both an analytical derivation and also on empirical observations. To determine a scaling constant present in this relationship, known standards must be used. Evaluation of experimental data revealed an improvement over the traditional calibration curve analysis method of fitting the doubles count rate to the 235Um ass. Active multiplicity assay appears to relax the requirement that the calibration standards and unknown items have the same chemical form and geometry.

  1. Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy with Diode Laser: A Promising Technique

    PubMed Central

    Knezevic, Nikola; Maric, Marjan; Grkovic, Marija Topalovic; Krhen, Ivan; Kastelan, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate application of diode laser in laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN), and to question this technique in terms of ease of tumor excision and reduction of warm ischemia time (WIT). Background data: LPN is the standard operative method for small renal masses. The benefits of LPN are numerous, including preserving renal function and prolonging overall survival. However, reduction of WIT remains main challenge in this operation. In order to shorten WIT, many techniques have been developed, with variable results. Patients and methods: We performed a prospective collection and analysis of health records for patients who were operated on between March 2011 and August 2012. Inclusion criteria were single tumor ≤4 cm, predominant exophytic growth and intraparenchymal depth ≤1.5 cm, with a minimum distance of 5 mm from the urinary collecting system. Results: We operated on 17 patients. Median operative time was 170 min. In all but two patients, we had to perform hilar clamping. Median duration of WIT was 16 min. Pathohistological evaluation revealed clear cell renal cancer and confirmed margins negative for tumor in all cases. Median size of the tumor was 3 cm. Median postoperative hospitalization was 5 days. Average follow up was 11.5 months. There were no intraoperative complications. One postoperative complication was noted: perirenal hematoma. Conclusions: Laser LPN is feasible, and offers the benefit of shorter WIT, with effective tissue coagulation and hemostasis. With operative experience and technical advances, WIT will be reduced or even eliminated, and a solution to some technical difficulties, such as significant smoke production, will be found. PMID:24460067

  2. Advanced Orion Optimized Laser System Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Contractor shall perform a complete analysis of the potential of the solid state laser in the very long pulse mode (100 ns pulse width, 10-30 hz rep-rate) and in the very short pulse mode (100 ps pulse width 10-30 hz rep rate) concentrating on the operation of the device in the 'hot-rod' mode, where no active cooling the laser operation is attempted. Contractor's calculations shall be made of the phase aberrations which develop during the repped-pulse train, and the results shall feed into the adaptive optics analyses. The contractor shall devise solutions to work around ORION track issues. A final report shall be furnished to the MSFC COTR including all calculations and analysis of estimates of bulk phase and intensity aberration distribution in the laser output beam as a function of time during the repped-pulse train for both wave forms (high-energy/long-pulse, as well as low-energy/short-pulse). Recommendations shall be made for mitigating the aberrations by laser re-design and/or changes in operating parameters of optical pump sources and/or designs.

  3. Advances in laser diodes for pyrotechnic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Richard R.

    1993-01-01

    Background information concerning the use of laser diodes in pyrotechnic applications is provided in viewgraph form. The following topics are discussed: damage limits, temperature stability, fiber coupling issues, and small (100 micron) and large (400 micron) fiber results. The discussions concerning fiber results concentrate on the areas of package geometry and electro-optical properties.

  4. Recent advances in DNA sequencing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rama Shankar

    2013-06-01

    Successful mapping of the draft human genome in 2001 and more recent mapping of the human microbiome genome in 2012 have relied heavily on the parallel processing of the second generation/Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) DNA machines at a cost of several millions dollars and long computer processing times. These have been mainly biochemical approaches. Here a system analysis approach is used to review these techniques by identifying the requirements, specifications, test methods, error estimates, repeatability, reliability and trends in the cost reduction. The first generation, NGS and the Third Generation Single Molecule Real Time (SMART) detection sequencing methods are reviewed. Based on the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) data, the achieved cost reduction of 1.5 times per yr. from Sep. 2001 to July 2007; 7 times per yr., from Oct. 2007 to Apr. 2010; and 2.5 times per yr. from July 2010 to Jan 2012 are discussed.

  5. Computer-assisted surgical techniques: can they really improve laser surgery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Lou; Arango, Pablo; Howard, John G.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Ossoff, Robert H.

    1995-05-01

    As part of our Computer-Assisted Surgical Techniques (CAST) program, we use computers to guide surgical lasers, create minimal incision widths, regulate the rate of tissue ablation, monitor the types of tissue being ablated with photo-acoustic feedback, and track and compensate for patient motions due to respiration and heart beat. The union of the computer, robotics and lasers can assist the surgeon and permit several new applications. Although these advances in laser surgery appear to have obvious benefits, it is important to evaluate and quantify the clinical advantages. We have compared the CAST system to manually controlled laser surgery and studied the wound healing after laser incision. We have found definite advantages to the CAST system. However, the computer, alone, cannot compensate for the thermal damage lateral to the incision site. The results suggest the need for motion tracking and compensation to be a part of the CAST system.

  6. Techniques for measurement of the thermal expansion of advanced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques available to measure small thermal displacements in flat laminates and structural tubular elements of advanced composite materials are described. Emphasis is placed on laser interferometry and the laser interferometric dilatometer system used at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. Thermal expansion data are presented for graphite-fiber reinforced 6061 and 2024 aluminum laminates and for graphite fiber reinforced AZ91 C and QH21 A magnesium laminates before and after processing to minimize or eliminate thermal strain hysteresis. Data are also presented on the effects of reinforcement volume content on thermal expansion of silicon-carbide whisker and particulate reinforced aluminum.

  7. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuji; Sahay, Peeyush

    2009-01-01

    Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC) disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS). Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis. PMID:22408503

  8. A survey of laser lightning rod techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Arnold A., Jr.; Berthel, Robert O.

    1991-01-01

    The work done to create a laser lightning rod (LLR) is discussed. Some ongoing research which has the potential for achieving an operational laser lightning rod for use in the protection of missile launch sites, launch vehicles, and other property is discussed. Because of the ease with which a laser beam can be steered into any cloud overhead, an LLR could be used to ascertain if there exists enough charge in the clouds to discharge to the ground as triggered lightning. This leads to the possibility of using LLRs to test clouds prior to launching missiles through the clouds or prior to flying aircraft through the clouds. LLRs could also be used to probe and discharge clouds before or during any hazardous ground operations. Thus, an operational LLR may be able to both detect such sub-critical electrical fields and effectively neutralize them.

  9. Laser Spinning: A New Technique for Nanofiber Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penide, J.; Quintero, F.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; Riveiro, A.; Pou, J.

    Laser Spinning is a new technique to produce ultralongnanofibers with tailored chemical compositions. In this method, a high power laser is employed to melt a small volume of the precursor material at high temperatures. At the same time, a supersonic gas jet is injected on this molten volume producing its rapid cooling and elongation by viscous friction with the high speed gas flow, hence forming the amorphous nanofibers. This paper collects the main results obtained since the introduction of this technique in 2007.

  10. Research on the application of laser ultrasonic technique in weaponry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingjian; Xu, Jun; Yan, Yisheng; Gu, Xiaofei; Zhu, Guifang

    2005-12-01

    Laser Ultrasonics is a new branch in Ultrasonics, which is based on the generation of ultrasonic by a laser and the detection of stress wave with laser interferometer, and is an ideal combination of laser and ultrasonic for non-destructive testing. It is a noncontact, remote and precise technique for nondestructive testing of materials and products. Firstly, this paper introduces the principles of laser ultrasonic generation, and the ablation excitation theory. And then optical detection method of laser-induced ultrasonic with the confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer is introduced. Based on the principles of laser-induced ultrasonic generation and detection, the integrated structure of the laser ultrasonic induced by laser line source and detected by a confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer is presented to detect multilayer structure such as solid propellant rocket motor structures in weaponry. Considering how laser ultrasonics would be used in the field and some mostly effects to the results. The laser system, accepting its present limitations, was optimized and developed for the inspection of the multilayer structure of solid propellant rocket motor as the experimental program progressed.

  11. Diagnostics of nonlocal plasmas: advanced techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafaev, Alexander; Grabovskiy, Artiom; Strakhova, Anastasiya; Soukhomlinov, Vladimir

    2014-10-01

    This talk generalizes our recent results, obtained in different directions of plasma diagnostics. First-method of flat single-sided probe, based on expansion of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in series of Legendre polynomials. It will be demonstrated, that flat probe, oriented under different angles with respect to the discharge axis, allow to determine full EVDF in nonlocal plasmas. It is also shown, that cylindrical probe is unable to determine full EVDF. We propose the solution of this problem by combined using the kinetic Boltzmann equation and experimental probe data. Second-magnetic diagnostics. This method is implemented in knudsen diode with surface ionization of atoms (KDSI) and based on measurements of the magnetic characteristics of the KDSI in presence of transverse magnetic field. Using magnetic diagnostics we can investigate the wide range of plasma processes: from scattering cross-sections of electrons to plasma-surface interactions. Third-noncontact diagnostics method for direct measurements of EVDF in remote plasma objects by combination of the flat single-sided probe technique and magnetic polarization Hanley method.

  12. Architectural stability analysis of the rotary-laser scanning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bin; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhu, Jigui

    2016-03-01

    The rotary-laser scanning technique is an important method in scale measurements due to its high accuracy and large measurement range. This paper first introduces a newly designed measurement station which is able to provide two-dimensional measurement information including the azimuth and elevation by using the rotary-laser scanning technique, then presents the architectural stability analysis of this technique by detailed theoretical derivations. Based on the designed station, a validation using both experiment and simulation is presented in order to verify the analytic conclusion. The results show that the architectural stability of the rotary-laser scanning technique is only affected by the two scanning angles' difference. And the difference which brings the best architectural stability can be calculated by using pre-calibrated parameters of the two laser planes. This research gives us an insight into the rotary-laser scanning technique. Moreover, the measurement accuracy of the rotary-laser scanning technique can be further improved based on the results of the study.

  13. Alternative technique for laser cooling with superradiance

    SciTech Connect

    Nemova, Galina; Kashyap, Raman

    2011-01-15

    We present a theoretical scheme for laser cooling of rare-earth-doped solids with optical superradiance (SR), which is the coherent, sharply directed spontaneous emission of photons by a system of laser-excited rare-earth ions in the solid-state host (glass or crystal). We consider an Yb{sup +}-doped ZnF{sub 4}-BaF{sub 2}-LaF{sub 3}-AlF{sub 3}-NaF (ZBLAN) sample pumped at a wavelength 1015 nm, with a rectangular pulsed source with a power of {approx}433 W and a duration of 10 ns. The intensity of the SR is proportional to the square of the number of excited ions. This unique feature of SR permits an increase in the rate of the cooling process in comparison with the traditional laser cooling of the rare-earth-doped solids with anti-Stokes spontaneous incoherent radiation (fluorescence). This scheme overcomes the limitation of using only low phonon energy glasses for laser cooling.

  14. Lidar: A laser technique for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, T. D.; Hickman, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental airborne lidar systems proved to be useful for shallow water bathymetric measurements, and detection and identification of oil slicks and algae. Dye fluorescence applications using organic dyes was studied. The possibility of remotely inducing dye flourescence by means of pulsed lasers opens up several hydrospheric applications for measuring water currents, water temperature, and salinity. Aerosol measurements by lidar are also discussed.

  15. Development of rike techniques using picosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, M.W.; Pellin, M.J.; Biwer, B.M.; Gruen, D.M.

    1987-09-25

    The sensitivity of the Raman-induced Kerr effect is greatly enhanced through the use of picosecond lasers. Experiments in dilute solutions of benzene indicate that sensitivity at the monolayer level is achievable. Applications to transparent media, to fluorescing samples, and to in situ measurements of electrode surfaces are discussed.

  16. Ultrasensitive coherent Raman technique with picosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, M.W.; Pellin, M.J.; Biwer, B.M.; Gruen, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Raman-induced Kerr effect is greatly enhanced through the use of picosecond lasers. Experiments in dilute solutions of benzene indicate that sensitivity at the monolayer level is achievable. Applications to transparent media, to fluorescing samples, and to in situ measurements of electrode surfaces are discussed.

  17. Evaluation of Advanced Retrieval Techniques in an Experimental Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Ray R.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses subject searching problems in online library catalogs; explains advanced information retrieval (IR) techniques; and describes experiments conducted on a test collection database, CHESHIRE (California Hybrid Extended SMART for Hypertext and Information Retrieval Experimentation), which was created to evaluate IR techniques in online…

  18. Innovative Tools Advance Revolutionary Weld Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The iconic, orange external tank of the space shuttle launch system not only contains the fuel used by the shuttle s main engines during liftoff but also comprises the shuttle s backbone, supporting the space shuttle orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Given the tank s structural importance and the extreme forces (7.8 million pounds of thrust load) and temperatures it encounters during launch, the welds used to construct the tank must be highly reliable. Variable polarity plasma arc welding, developed for manufacturing the external tank and later employed for building the International Space Station, was until 1994 the best process for joining the aluminum alloys used during construction. That year, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers began experimenting with a relatively new welding technique called friction stir welding (FSW), developed in 1991 by The Welding Institute, of Cambridge, England. FSW differs from traditional fusion welding in that it is a solid-state welding technique, using frictional heat and motion to join structural components without actually melting any of the material. The weld is created by a shouldered pin tool that is plunged into the seam of the materials to be joined. The tool traverses the line while rotating at high speeds, generating friction that heats and softens but does not melt the metal. (The heat produced approaches about 80 percent of the metal s melting temperature.) The pin tool s rotation crushes and stirs the plasticized metal, extruding it along the seam as the tool moves forward. The material cools and consolidates, resulting in a weld with superior mechanical properties as compared to those weld properties of fusion welds. The innovative FSW technology promises a number of attractive benefits. Because the welded materials are not melted, many of the undesirables associated with fusion welding porosity, cracking, shrinkage, and distortion of the weld are minimized or avoided. The process is more energy efficient, safe

  19. Laser alexandrite crystals grown by horizontal oriented crystallization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurov, V. V.; Tsvetkov, E. G.; Yurkin, A. M.

    2008-05-01

    Comparative studies were performed for alexandrite crystals, Al 2BeO 4:Cr 3+, employed in solid state lasers and grown by the horizontal oriented crystallization (HOC) technique and alexandrite crystals grown by the Czochralski (Cz) method. It was shown that the structural quality and possibilities of generation of stimulated emission HOC-crystals are similar to Cz-crystals, whereas their damage threshold is about three times higher. The obtained results and considerably lower cost price of HOC-alexandrite crystals prove their advantageous application in powerful laser systems, which require large laser rods with a higher resistance to laser beam. It is emphasized that application of HOC technique is promising for growth of laser crystals of other high-temperature oxide compounds.

  20. Analysis techniques for airborne laser range safety evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsburg, M. S.; Jenkins, D. L.; Doerflein, R. D.

    1982-08-01

    Techniques to evaluate safety of airborne laser operations on the range are reported. The objectives of the safety evaluations were to (1) protect civilian and military personnel from the hazards associated with lasers, (2) provide users with the least restrictive constraints in which to perform their mission and still maintain an adequate degree of safety, and (3) develop a data base for the Navy in the event of suspected laser exposure of other related incidents involving military or civilian personnel. A microcomputer code, written in ASNI 77 FORTRAN, has been developed, which will provide safe flight profiles for airborne laser systems. The output of this code can also be used in establishing operating areas for ground based Lasers. Input to the code includes output parameters, NOHD and assigned buffer zone for the laser system, as well as parameters describing the geometry of the range.

  1. Novel integration technique for silicon/III-V hybrid laser.

    PubMed

    Dong, Po; Hu, Ting-Chen; Liow, Tsung-Yang; Chen, Young-Kai; Xie, Chongjin; Luo, Xianshu; Lo, Guo-Qiang; Kopf, Rose; Tate, Alaric

    2014-11-01

    Integrated semiconductor lasers on silicon are one of the most crucial devices to enable low-cost silicon photonic integrated circuits for high-bandwidth optic communications and interconnects. While optical amplifiers and lasers are typically realized in III-V waveguide structures, it is beneficial to have an integration approach which allows flexible and efficient coupling of light between III-V gain media and silicon waveguides. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a novel fabrication technique and associated transition structure to realize integrated lasers without the constraints of other critical processing parameters such as the starting silicon layer thicknesses. This technique employs epitaxial growth of silicon in a pre-defined trench with taper structures. We fabricate and demonstrate a long-cavity hybrid laser with a narrow linewidth of 130 kHz and an output power of 1.5 mW using the proposed technique. PMID:25401832

  2. Techniques for increasing output power from mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mar, A.; Vawter, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    Mode-locked semiconductor lasers have drawn considerable attention as compact, reliable, and relatively inexpensive sources of short optical pulses. Advances in the design of such lasers have resulted in vast improvements in pulsewidth and noise performance, at a very wide range of repetition rates. An attractive application for these lasers would be to serve as alternatives for large benchtop laser systems such as dye lasers and solid-state lasers. However, mode-locked semiconductor lasers have not yet approached the performance of such systems in terms of output power. Different techniques for overcoming the problem of low output power from mode-locked semiconductor lasers will be discussed. Flared and arrayed lasers have been used successfully to increase the pulse saturation energy limit by increasing the gain cross section. Further improvements have been achieved by use of the MOPA configuration, which utilizes a flared semiconductor amplifier s amplify pulses to energies of 120 pJ and peak powers of nearly 30W.

  3. Techniques for enhancing laser ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J; Chinn, D; Huber, R; Spicer, J; Thomas, G

    1999-02-16

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is an extremely powerful tool for characterizing materials and detecting defects. A majority of the ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is performed with piezoelectric transducers that generate and detect high frequency acoustic energy. The liquid needed to couple the high frequency acoustic energy from the piezoelectric transducers restricts the applicability of ultrasonics. For example, traditional ultrasonics cannot evaluate parts at elevated temperatures or components that would be damaged by contact with a fluid. They are developing a technology that remotely generates and detects the ultrasonic pulses with lasers and consequently there is no requirement for liquids. Thus the research in laser-based ultrasound allows them to solve inspection problems with ultrasonics that could not be done before. This technology has wide application in many Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory programs, especially when remote and/or non-contact sensing is necessary.

  4. Development of Advanced Laser Diode Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, J. J.; Papen, G. C.

    1998-01-01

    The design and operation of InGaAs-GaAs-AlGaAs asymmetric cladding ridge waveguide distributed Bragg reflector lasers is presented. Targeted for the remote sensing of water vapor with absorption lines in the lambda approximately 930 nm region, these devices operate CW with threshold currents as low as 11 MA and slope efficiencies as high as 0.37 W/A. Tbey also operate with over 30-dB side-mode suppression, and the typical CW characteristic temperature, T(sub o), is 95 K.

  5. Recent advances in high-power tunable lasers (UV, visible, and near IR)

    SciTech Connect

    Smiley, V.N.

    1981-05-01

    A review of the current technology of high-power tunable lasers is presented with the emphasis on dye lasers. Among the topics covered are color center lasers, excimer lasers, picosecond techniques, and nonlinear coherent sources. (AIP)

  6. Advanced experiments with an erbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Paulo V. S.; Marques, Manuel B.; Rosa, Carla C.

    2014-07-01

    This communication describes an optical hands-on fiber laser experiment aimed at advanced college courses. Optical amplifiers and laser sources represent very important optical devices in numerous applications ranging from telecommunications to medicine. The study of advanced photonics experiments is particularly relevant at undergraduate and master level. This paper discusses the implementation of an optical fiber laser made with a cavity built with two tunable Bragg gratings. This scheme allows the students to understand the laser working principles as a function of the laser cavity set-up. One or both of the gratings can be finely tuned in wavelength through applied stress; therefore, the degree of spectral mismatch of the two gratings can be adjusted, effectively changing the cavity feedback. The impact of the cavity conditions on the laser threshold, spectrum and efficiency is analyzed. This experiment assumes that in a previous practice, the students should had already characterized the erbium doped fiber in terms of absorption and fluorescent spectra, and the spectral gain as a function of pump power.

  7. Visualization tool for advanced laser system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Gregg A.; Brunson, Richard L.

    2002-06-01

    Simulation development for Laser Weapon Systems design and system trade analyses has progressed to new levels with the advent of object-oriented software development tools and PC processor capabilities. These tools allow rapid visualization of upcoming laser weapon system architectures and the ability to rapidly respond to what-if scenario questions from potential user commands. These simulations can solve very intensive problems in short time periods to investigate the parameter space of a newly emerging weapon system concept, or can address user mission performance for many different scenario engagements. Equally important to the rapid solution of complex numerical problems is the ability to rapidly visualize the results of the simulation, and to effectively interact with visualized output to glean new insights into the complex interactions of a scenario. Boeing has applied these ideas to develop a tool called the Satellite Visualization and Signature Tool (SVST). This Windows application is based upon a series of C++ coded modules that have evolved from several programs at Boeing-SVS. The SVST structure, extensibility, and some recent results of applying the simulation to weapon system concepts and designs will be discussed in this paper.

  8. Advances in gamma titanium aluminides and their manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Kunal; Radhakrishnan, Ramachandran; Wereley, Norman M.

    2012-11-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides display attractive properties for high temperature applications. For over a decade in the 1990s, the attractive properties of titanium aluminides were outweighed by difficulties encountered in processing and machining at room temperature. But advances in manufacturing technologies, deeper understanding of titanium aluminides microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and advances in micro-alloying, has led to the production of gamma titanium aluminide sheets. An in-depth review of key advances in gamma titanium aluminides is presented, including microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and alloy development. Traditional manufacturing techniques such as ingot metallurgy and investment casting are reviewed and advances via powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques are discussed. Finally, manufacturing challenges facing gamma titanium aluminides, as well as avenues to overcome them, are discussed.

  9. The application of advanced analytical techniques to direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.; Robbins, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    Consol is coordinating a program designed to bridge the gap between the advanced, modern techniques of the analytical chemist and the application of those techniques by the direct coal liquefaction process developer, and to advance our knowledge of the process chemistry of direct coal liquefaction. The program is designed to provide well-documented samples to researchers who are utilizing techniques potentially useful for the analysis of coal derived samples. The choice of samples and techniques was based on an extensive survey made by Consol of the present status of analytical methodology associated with direct coal liquefaction technology. Sources of information included process developers and analytical chemists. Identified in the survey are a number of broadly characterizable needs. These categories include a need for: A better understanding of the nature of the high molecular weight, non-distillable residual materials (both soluble and insoluble) in the process streams; improved techniques for molecular characterization, heteroatom and hydrogen speciation and a knowledge of the hydrocarbon structural changes across coal liquefaction systems; better methods for sample separation; application of advanced data analysis methods; the use of more advanced predictive models; on-line analytical techniques; and better methods for catalyst monitoring.

  10. Laser sources and techniques for spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, A.H.

    1993-12-01

    This program focuses on the development of novel laser and spectroscopic techniques in the IR, UV, and VUV regions for studying combustion related molecular dynamics at the microscopic level. Laser spectroscopic techniques have proven to be extremely powerful in the investigation of molecular processes which require very high sensitivity and selectivity. The authors approach is to use quantum electronic and non-linear optical techniques to extend the spectral coverage and to enhance the optical power of ultrahigh resolution laser sources so as to obtain and analyze photoionization, fluorescence, and photoelectron spectra of jet-cooled free radicals and of reaction products resulting from unimolecular and bimolecular dissociations. New spectroscopic techniques are developed with these sources for the detection of optically thin and often short-lived species. Recent activities center on regenerative amplification of high resolution solid-state lasers, development of tunable high power mid-IR lasers and short-pulse UV/VUV tunable lasers, and development of a multipurpose high-order suppressor crossed molecular beam apparatus for use with synchrotron radiation sources. This program also provides scientific and technical support within the Chemical Sciences Division to the development of LBL`s Combustion Dynamics Initiative.

  11. Advanced liner-cooling techniques for gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Component research for advanced small gas turbine engines is currently underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center. As part of this program, a basic reverse-flow combustor geometry was being maintained while different advanced liner wall cooling techniques were investigated. Performance and liner cooling effectiveness of the experimental combustor configuration featuring counter-flow film-cooled panels is presented and compared with two previously reported combustors featuring: splash film-cooled liner walls; and transpiration cooled liner walls (Lamilloy).

  12. [Advanced online search techniques and dedicated search engines for physicians].

    PubMed

    Nahum, Yoav

    2008-02-01

    In recent years search engines have become an essential tool in the work of physicians. This article will review advanced search techniques from the world of information specialists, as well as some advanced search engine operators that may help physicians improve their online search capabilities, and maximize the yield of their searches. This article also reviews popular dedicated scientific and biomedical literature search engines. PMID:18357673

  13. 75 FR 44015 - Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing... importation of certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques and products containing... certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques or products containing same...

  14. Ground-to-orbit laser propulsion: Advanced applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    Laser propulsion uses a large fixed laser to supply energy to heat an inert propellant in a rocket thruster. Such a system has two potential advantages: extreme simplicity of the thruster, and potentially high performance -- particularly high exhaust velocity. By taking advantage of the simplicity of the thruster, it should be possible to launch small (10--1000 kg) payloads to orbit using roughly 1 MW of average laser power per kg of payload. The incremental cost of such launches would be of order $200/kg for the smallest systems, decreasing to essentially the cost of electricity to run the laser (a few times $10/kg) for large systems. Although the individual payload size would be small, a laser launch system would be inherently high-volume, with the capacity to launch tens of thousands of payloads per year. Also, with high exhaust velocity, a laser launch system could launch payloads to high velocities -- geosynchronous transfer, Earth escape, or beyond -- at a relatively small premium over launches to LEO. In this paper, we briefly review the status of pulsed laser propulsion, including proposals for advanced vehicles. We then discuss qualitatively several unique applications appropriate to the early part of the next century, and perhaps valuable well into the next millenium: space habitat supply, deep space mission supply, nuclear waste disposal, and manned vehicle launching.

  15. Ground-to-orbit laser propulsion: Advanced applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kare, Jordin T.

    1990-01-01

    Laser propulsion uses a large fixed laser to supply energy to heat an inert propellant in a rocket thruster. Such a system has two potential advantages: extreme simplicity of the thruster, and potentially high performance, particularly high exhaust velocity. By taking advantage of the simplicity of the thruster, it should be possible to launch small (10 to 1000 kg) payloads to orbit using roughly 1 MW of average laser power per kg of payload. The incremental cost of such launches would be of an order of $200/kg for the smallest systems, decreasing to essentially the cost of electricity to run the laser (a few times $10/kg) for larger systems. Although the individual payload size would be smaller, a laser launch system would be inherently high-volume, with the capacity to launch tens of thousands of payloads per year. Also, with high exhaust velocity, a laser launch system could launch payloads to high velocities - geosynchronous transfer, Earth escape, or beyond - at a relatively small premium over launches to LEO. The status of pulsed laser propulsion is briefly reviewed including proposals for advanced vehicles. Several applications appropriate to the early part of the next century and perhaps valuable well into the next millennium are discussed qualitatively: space habitat supply, deep space mission supply, nuclear waste disposal, and manned vehicle launching.

  16. New test techniques and analytical procedures for understanding the behavior of advanced propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefko, G. L.; Bober, L. J.; Neumann, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical procedures and experimental techniques were developed to improve the capability to design advanced high speed propellers. Some results from the propeller lifting line and lifting surface aerodynamic analysis codes are compared with propeller force data, probe data and laser velocimeter data. In general, the code comparisons with data indicate good qualitative agreement. A rotating propeller force balance demonstrated good accuracy and reduced test time by 50 percent. Results from three propeller flow visualization techniques are shown which illustrate some of the physical phenomena occurring on these propellers.

  17. Defect Imaging Technique Using a Scanning Laser Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Murase, M.; Kitayama, T.

    2011-06-01

    Considering the applications to in-line testing of products, water-free imaging technique is required. This study described defect imaging technique using a scanning laser source. Laser beam was emitted onto a surface of a plate, and then guided waves excited at the laser source were detected by ultrasonic transducers fixed on the plate surface. For a plate with rounded defects, amplitude distributions obtained by scanning the laser source corresponded to thickness distributions, but for plates with rectangular notches, unwanted artifacts were seen due to reflection, diffraction, and ultrasonic attenuation. Then, using multiple receiving transducers and synthesizing multiple images, distinct defect images were obtained for a flat plate and a curved plate with rectangular notches.

  18. Evaluation of a satellite laser ranging technique using pseudonoise code modulated laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Carolyn Kay

    1987-01-01

    Several types of Satellite Laser Ranging systems exist, operating with pulsed, high-energy lasers. The distance between a ground point and an orbiting satellite can be determined to within a few centimeters. A new technique substitutes pseudonoise code modulated laser diodes, which are much more compact, reliable and less costly, for the lasers now used. Since laser diode technology is only now achieving sufficiently powerful lasers, the capabilities of the new technique are investigated. Also examined are the effects of using an avalanche photodiode detector instead of a photomultiplier tube. The influence of noise terms (including background radiation, detector dark and thermal noise and speckle) that limit the system range and performance is evaluated.

  19. Investigation of laser holographic interferometric techniques for structure inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    The application of laser holographic interferometric techniques for nondestructive inspection of material structures commonly used in aerospace works is investigated. Two types of structures, composite plate and solid fuel rocket engine motor casing, were examined. In conducting the experiments, both CW HeNe gas lasers and Q-switched ruby lasers were used as light sources for holographic recording setups. Different stressing schemes were investigated as to their effectiveness in generating maximum deformation at regions of structural weakness such as flaws and disbonds. Experimental results on stressing schemes such as thermal stressing, pressurized stressing, transducer excitation, and mechanical impact are presented and evaluated.

  20. Dye-sensitized solar cells using laser processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heungsoo; Pique, Alberto; Kushto, Gary P.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Lee, S. H.; Arnold, Craig B.; Kafafi, Zakia H.

    2004-07-01

    Laser processing techniques, such as laser direct-write (LDW) and laser sintering, have been used to deposit mesoporous nanocrystalline TiO2 (nc-TiO2) films for use in dye-sensitized solar cells. LDW enables the fabrication of conformal structures containing metals, ceramics, polymers and composites on rigid and flexible substrates without the use of masks or additional patterning techniques. The transferred material maintains a porous, high surface area structure that is ideally suited for dye-sensitized solar cells. In this experiment, a pulsed UV laser (355nm) is used to forward transfer a paste of commercial TiO2 nanopowder (P25) onto transparent conducting electrodes on flexible polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) and rigid glass substrates. For the cells based on flexible PET substrates, the transferred TiO2 layers were sintered using an in-situ laser to improve electron paths without damaging PET substrates. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of laser processing techniques to produce nc-TiO2 films (~10 μm thickness) on glass for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (Voc = 690 mV, Jsc = 8.7 mA/cm2, ff = 0.67, η = 4.0 % at 100 mW/cm2). This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  1. Lessons Learned from the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Matt; Patel, Deepak; Bradshaw, Heather; Robinson, Frank; Neuberger, Dave

    2016-01-01

    The ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) instrument is an upcoming Earth Science mission focusing on the effects of climate change. The flight instrument passed all environmental testing at GSFC (Goddard Space Flight Center) and is now ready to be shipped to the spacecraft vendor for integration and testing. This presentation walks through the lessons learned from design, hardware, analysis and testing perspective. ATLAS lessons learned include general thermal design, analysis, hardware, and testing issues as well as lessons specific to laser systems, two-phase thermal control, and optical assemblies with precision alignment requirements.

  2. Advanced Marketing Core Curriculum. Test Items and Assessment Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clifton L.; And Others

    This document contains duties and tasks, multiple-choice test items, and other assessment techniques for Missouri's advanced marketing core curriculum. The core curriculum begins with a list of 13 suggested textbook resources. Next, nine duties with their associated tasks are given. Under each task appears one or more citations to appropriate…

  3. Surface-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry techniques for application in forensics.

    PubMed

    Guinan, Taryn; Kirkbride, Paul; Pigou, Paul E; Ronci, Maurizio; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent analytical technique for the rapid and sensitive analysis of macromolecules (>700 Da), such as peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and synthetic polymers. However, the detection of smaller organic molecules with masses below 700 Da using MALDI-MS is challenging due to the appearance of matrix adducts and matrix fragment peaks in the same spectral range. Recently, nanostructured substrates have been developed that facilitate matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI), contributing to an emerging analytical paradigm referred to as surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) MS. Since SALDI enables the detection of small organic molecules, it is rapidly growing in popularity, including in the field of forensics. At the same time, SALDI also holds significant potential as a high throughput analytical tool in roadside, work place and athlete drug testing. In this review, we discuss recent advances in SALDI techniques such as desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS), nano-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) and nano assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI™) and compare their strengths and weaknesses with particular focus on forensic applications. These include the detection of illicit drug molecules and their metabolites in biological matrices and small molecule detection from forensic samples including banknotes and fingerprints. Finally, the review highlights recent advances in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using SALDI techniques. PMID:24916100

  4. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Plato, J.G.; Russell, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 {mu}m) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented.

  5. Development of Underwater Laser Cladding and Underwater Laser Seal Welding Techniques for Reactor Components (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Masataka Tamura; Shohei Kawano; Wataru Kouno; Yasushi Kanazawa

    2006-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the major reasons to reduce the reliability of aged reactor components. Toshiba has been developing underwater laser welding onto surface of the aged components as maintenance and repair techniques. Because most of the reactor internal components to apply this underwater laser welding technique have 3-dimensional shape, effect of welding positions and welded shapes are examined and presented in this report. (authors)

  6. Holographic femtosecond laser manipulation for advanced material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2016-02-01

    Parallel femtosecond laser processing using a computer-generated hologram displayed on a spatial light modulator, known as holographic femtosecond laser processing, provides the advantages of high throughput and high-energy use efficiency. Therefore, it has been widely used in many applications, including laser material processing, two-photon polymerization, two-photon microscopy, and optical manipulation of biological cells. In this paper, we review the development of holographic femtosecond laser processing over the past few years from the perspective of wavefront and polarization modulation. In particular, line-shaped and vector-wave femtosecond laser processing are addressed. These beam-shaping techniques are useful for performing large-area machining in laser cutting, peeling, and grooving of materials and for high-speed fabrication of the complex nanostructures that are applied to material-surface texturing to control tribological properties, wettability, reflectance, and retardance. Furthermore, issues related to the nonuniformity of diffraction light intensity in optical reconstruction and wavelength dispersion from a computer-generated hologram are addressed. As a result, large-scale holographic femtosecond laser processing over 1000 diffraction spots was successfully demonstrated on a glass sample.

  7. Advances in optical materials for large aperture lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stokowski, S.E.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Marchi, F.T.; Swain, J.E.; Wallerstein, E.P.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1981-12-15

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is using large aperture Nd: glass lasers to investigate the feasibility of inertial confinement fusion. In our experiments high power laser light is focussed onto a small (100 to 500 micron) target containing a deuterium-tritium fuel mixture. During the short (1 to 5 ns) laser pulse the fuel is compressed and heated, resulting in fusion reactions. The generation and control of the powerful laser pulses for these experiments is a challenging scientific and engineering task, which requires the development of new optical materials, fabrication techniques, and coatings. LLNL with the considerable cooperation and support from the optical industry, where most of the research and development and almost all the manufacturing is done, has successfully applied several new developments in these areas.

  8. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with a relatively low intensity (3  ×  1016 W cm-2) allowed the enhancing of the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the ‘ultraclean’ proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as a target. A combination of the specific target composition and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed the enhancing of the yield of alpha particles up to 109 per steradian. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long-laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  9. Advanced laser diagnostics for diamond deposition research

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, C.H.; Owano, T.G.; Wahl, E.H.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using thermal plasmas is attractive for diamond synthesis applications due to the inherently high reactant densities and throughput, but the associated high gas-phase collision rates in the boundary layer above the substrate produce steep thermal and species gradients which can drive the complex plasma chemistry away from optimal conditions. To understand and control these environments, accurate measurements of temperature and species concentrations within the reacting boundary layer are needed. This is challenging in atmospheric pressure reactors due to the highly luminous environment, steep thermal and species gradients, and small spatial scales. The applicability of degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) as a spectroscopic probe of atmospheric pressure reacting plasmas has been investigated. This powerful, nonlinear technique has been applied to the measurement of temperature and radical species concentrations in the boundary layer of a diamond growth substrate immersed in a flowing atmospheric pressure plasma. In-situ measurements of CH and C{sub 2} radicals have been performed to determine spatially resolved profiles of vibrational temperature, rotational temperature, and species concentration. Results of these measurements are compared with the predictions of a detailed numerical simulation.

  10. High volume fabrication of laser targets using MEMS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindloe, C.; Arthur, G.; Hall, F.; Tomlinson, S.; Potter, R.; Kar, S.; Green, J.; Higginbotham, A.; Booth, N.; Tolley, M. K.

    2016-04-01

    The latest techniques for the fabrication of high power laser targets, using processes developed for the manufacture of Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) devices are discussed. These laser targets are designed to meet the needs of the increased shot numbers that are available in the latest design of laser facilities. Traditionally laser targets have been fabricated using conventional machining or coarse etching processes and have been produced in quantities of 10s to low 100s. Such targets can be used for high complexity experiments such as Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) studies and can have many complex components that need assembling and characterisation with high precision. Using the techniques that are common to MEMS devices and integrating these with an existing target fabrication capability we are able to manufacture and deliver targets to these systems. It also enables us to manufacture novel targets that have not been possible using other techniques. In addition, developments in the positioning systems that are required to deliver these targets to the laser focus are also required and a system to deliver the target to a focus of an F2 beam at 0.1Hz is discussed.

  11. Comparison of laser transit anemometry data analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Gartrell, Luther R.

    1991-01-01

    Two techniques for the extraction of two-dimensional flow information from laser transit anemometry (LTA) data sets are presented and compared via a simulation study and experimental investigation. The methods are a probability density function (PDF) estimation technique and a marginal distribution analysis technique. The simulation study builds on the results of previous work and provides a quantification of the accuracy of both techniques for various LTA data acquisition scenarios. The experimental comparison consists of using an LTA system to survey the flow downstream of a turbulence generator in a small low-speed wind tunnel. The collected data sets are analyzed and compared.

  12. CW laser generated ultrasound techniques for microstructure material properties evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thursby, Graham; Culshaw, Brian; Pierce, Gareth; Cleary, Alison; McKee, Campbell; Veres, Istvan

    2009-03-01

    Mechanical properties of materials may be obtained from the inversion of ultrasonic Lamb wave dispersion curves. In order to do this broadband excitation and detection of ultrasound is required. As sample size and, in particular, thickness, are reduced to those of microstructures, ultrasound frequencies in the range of the gigahertz region will be required. We look at two possible cw laser excitation techniques which, having far lower peak powers than the more frequently used Q-switched lasers, therefore give a negligible risk of damaging the sample through ablation. In the first method the modulation frequency of a sinusoidally modulated laser is swept over the required range. In the second, the laser is modulated with a series of square pulses whose timing is given by a PRBS (pseudo random binary sequence) in the form of a modified m-sequence.

  13. Diode laser based water vapor DIAL using modulated pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Phong Le Hoai; Abo, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a diode laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for measuring lower-tropospheric water vapor profile using the modulated pulse technique. The transmitter is based on single-mode diode laser and tapered semiconductor optical amplifier with a peak power of 10W around 800nm absorption band, and the receiver telescope diameter is 35cm. The selected wavelengths are compared to referenced wavelengths in terms of random error and systematic errors. The key component of modulated pulse technique, a macropulse, is generated with a repetition rate of 10 kHz, and the modulation within the macropulse is coded according to a pseudorandom sequence with 100ns chip width. As a result, we evaluate both single pulse modulation and pseudorandom coded pulse modulation technique. The water vapor profiles conducted from these modulation techniques are compared to the real observation data in summer in Japan.

  14. Novel atmospheric extinction measurement techniques for aerospace laser system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Novel techniques for laser beam atmospheric extinction measurements, suitable for manned and unmanned aerospace vehicle applications, are presented in this paper. Extinction measurements are essential to support the engineering development and the operational employment of a variety of aerospace electro-optical sensor systems, allowing calculation of the range performance attainable with such systems in current and likely future applications. Such applications include ranging, weaponry, Earth remote sensing and possible planetary exploration missions performed by satellites and unmanned flight vehicles. Unlike traditional LIDAR methods, the proposed techniques are based on measurements of the laser energy (intensity and spatial distribution) incident on target surfaces of known geometric and reflective characteristics, by means of infrared detectors and/or infrared cameras calibrated for radiance. Various laser sources can be employed with wavelengths from the visible to the far infrared portions of the spectrum, allowing for data correlation and extended sensitivity. Errors affecting measurements performed using the proposed methods are discussed in the paper and algorithms are proposed that allow a direct determination of the atmospheric transmittance and spatial characteristics of the laser spot. These algorithms take into account a variety of linear and non-linear propagation effects. Finally, results are presented relative to some experimental activities performed to validate the proposed techniques. Particularly, data are presented relative to both ground and flight trials performed with laser systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) at λ = 1064 nm and λ = 1550 nm. This includes ground tests performed with 10 Hz and 20 kHz PRF NIR laser systems in a large variety of atmospheric conditions, and flight trials performed with a 10 Hz airborne NIR laser system installed on a TORNADO aircraft, flying up to altitudes of 22,000 ft.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition: the road to hybrid nanocomposites coatings and novel pulsed laser adaptive technique.

    PubMed

    Serbezov, Valery

    2013-01-01

    The applications of Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for producing nanoparticles, nanostructures and nanocomposites coatings based on recently developed laser ablating techniques and their convergence are being reviewed. The problems of in situ synthesis of hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposites coatings by these techniques are being discussed. The novel modification of PLD called Pulsed Laser Adaptive Deposition (PLAD) technique is presented. The in situ synthesized inorganic/organic nanocomposites coatings from Magnesium (Mg) alloy/Rhodamine B and Mg alloy/ Desoximetasone by PLAD are described. The trends, applications and future development of discussed patented methods based on the laser ablating technologies for producing hybrid nanocomposite coatings have also been discussed in this review. PMID:22747717

  16. Transmyocardial laser revascularization--a technique in evolution.

    PubMed

    Rosengart, T K

    1997-12-01

    Transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMLR) is a rapidly evolving technique that represents the recent rediscovery of an old therapy. A growing clinical experience is being assimilated into clear indications and contraindications for and the appropriate performance of this procedure. This technique can be judged to improve patient quality of life and survival in appropriately selected patients. The therapy should still be applied cautiously, in that a full understanding of its indications and mechanism of action remains in a state of evolution. PMID:9641087

  17. Possibilities of holographic techniques in laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Yu.; Muravyeva, M.; Dudenkova, V.; Mukhina, I.; Meglinski, I.

    2015-07-01

    Holographic scanning microscopy - novel technique both in laser scanning microscopy and digital holographic microscopy allow multimodal approach to cell and tissue investigation in biomedical applications promising new advantages (quantitative phase imaging, superresolution, computerized tomography), but regular reconstruction leads to incorrectness. Analysis of light propagation through the schematics allows to offer reconstruction procedures depending on recording conditions.

  18. Optical fringe reduction technique for FM laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Nee-Yin; Sachse, Glen W.; Wang, Liang-Guo; Gallagher, Thomas F.

    1989-01-01

    A simple fringe reduction method for FM diode laser spectroscopy is discussed. The fringes can be effectively suppressed by using a modulation frequency that is an integral multiple of the free spectral range of the fringes. The technique is experimentally confirmed by two-tone FM spectroscopy of water vapor absorption lines. A factor of 20 fringe reduction is observed.

  19. REMOTE MONITORING OF GASEOUS POLLUTANTS BY DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION LASER TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single-ended laser radar (LIDAR) system was designed, built, and successfully operated to measure range-resolved concentrations of NO2, SO2, and O3 in the atmosphere using a Differential Absorption of Scattered Energy (DASE) LIDAR technique. The system used a flash-lamp pumped ...

  20. Advanced Packaging Materials and Techniques for High Power TR Module: Standard Flight vs. Advanced Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Del Castillo, Linda; Miller, Jennifer; Jenabi, Masud; Hunter, Donald; Birur, Gajanana

    2011-01-01

    The higher output power densities required of modern radar architectures, such as the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI) require increasingly dense high power electronics. To enable these higher power densities, while maintaining or even improving hardware reliability, requires advances in integrating advanced thermal packaging technologies into radar transmit/receive (TR) modules. New materials and techniques have been studied and compared to standard technologies.

  1. [Important bio-thermal physical problems and latest advancement in laser cell engineering].

    PubMed

    Li, H J; Liu, J; Zhang, X X

    2001-10-01

    The recently emerging technique of laser microsurgery (optical tweezers, optical scissors, etc.) is providing a new precise, sterile method for the cell engineering practices such as introduction of external gene into an object cell, cell-fusion, and trapping or transportation of microscopic objects (cells or chromosomes etc.). The thermal effects thus induced usually proved to be critical factors for successful operation of this method. In order to meet the requirement for the rapid development in this territory, some important bio-thermal physical problems and the corresponding research subjects in this area were comprehensively summarized. Difficulties and critical issues were discussed. The latest advancement of the laser cell engineering was also described. This review is attempted to bridge up the gap between bioengineering and thermal science fields and then to enhance the rapid progress of laser microsurgery. PMID:11845828

  2. Advancing Techniques of Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sagar A; Wo, Jennifer Y; Hong, Theodore S

    2016-07-01

    Since the advent of radiation therapy for rectal cancer, there has been continual investigation of advancing technologies and techniques that allow for improved dose conformality to target structures while limiting irradiation of surrounding normal tissue. For locally advanced disease, intensity modulated and proton beam radiation therapy both provide more highly conformal treatment volumes that reduce dose to organs at risk, though the clinical benefit in terms of toxicity reduction is unclear. For early stage disease, endorectal contact therapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy may be a definitive treatment option for patients who are poor operative candidates or those with low-lying tumors that desire sphincter-preservation. Finally, there has been growing evidence that supports stereotactic body radiotherapy as a safe and effective salvage treatment for the minority of patients that locally recur following trimodality therapy for locally advanced disease. This review addresses these topics that remain areas of active clinical investigation. PMID:27238474

  3. An Advanced Time Averaging Modelling Technique for Power Electronic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankuloski, Goce

    For stable and efficient performance of power converters, a good mathematical model is needed. This thesis presents a new modelling technique for DC/DC and DC/AC Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) converters. The new model is more accurate than the existing modelling techniques such as State Space Averaging (SSA) and Discrete Time Modelling. Unlike the SSA model, the new modelling technique, the Advanced Time Averaging Model (ATAM) includes the averaging dynamics of the converter's output. In addition to offering enhanced model accuracy, application of linearization techniques to the ATAM enables the use of conventional linear control design tools. A controller design application demonstrates that a controller designed based on the ATAM outperforms one designed using the ubiquitous SSA model. Unlike the SSA model, ATAM for DC/AC augments the system's dynamics with the dynamics needed for subcycle fundamental contribution (SFC) calculation. This allows for controller design that is based on an exact model.

  4. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  5. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-09-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  6. Technology development of fabrication techniques for advanced solar dynamic concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the advanced concentrator program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived space solar dynamic concentrators. The advanced concentrator program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. Fabrication techniques include methods of fabricating the substrates and coating substrate surfaces to produce high quality optical surfaces, acceptable for further coating with vapor deposited optical films. The selected materials to obtain a high quality optical surface include microsheet glass and Eccocoat EP-3 epoxy, with DC-93-500 selected as a candidate silicone adhesive and levelizing layer. The following procedures are defined: cutting, cleaning, forming, and bonding microsheet glass. Procedures are also defined for surface cleaning, and EP-3 epoxy application. The results and analyses from atomic oxygen and thermal cycling tests are used to determine the effects of orbital conditions in a space environment.

  7. Technology development of fabrication techniques for advanced solar dynamic concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the advanced concentrator program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived space solar dynamic concentrators. The advanced concentrator program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. Fabrication techniques include methods of fabricating the substrates and coating substrate surfaces to produce high-quality optical surfaces, acceptable for further coating with vapor deposited optical films. The selected materials to obtain a high quality optical surface include microsheet glass and Eccocoat EP-3 epoxy, with DC-93-500 selected as a candidate silicone adhesive and levelizing layer. The following procedures are defined: cutting, cleaning, forming, and bonding microsheet glass. Procedures are also defined for surface cleaning, and EP-3 epoxy application. The results and analyses from atomic oxygen and thermal cycling tests are used to determine the effects of orbital conditions in a space environment.

  8. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J. A.; Amado, J. M.; Tobar, M. J.; Mateo, M. P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G.

    2015-05-01

    Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  9. Advance techniques for monitoring human tolerance to positive Gz accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R.; Sandler, H.; Rositano, S.; Skrettingland, K.; Mancini, R.

    1973-01-01

    Tolerance to positive g accelerations was measured in ten normal male subjects using both standard and advanced techniques. In addition to routine electrocardiogram, heart rate, respiratory rate, and infrared television, monitoring techniques during acceleration exposure included measurement of peripheral vision loss, noninvasive temporal, brachial, and/or radial arterial blood flow, and automatic measurement of indirect systolic and diastolic blood pressure at 60-sec intervals. Although brachial and radial arterial flow measurements reflected significant cardiovascular changes during and after acceleration, they were inconsistent indices of the onset of grayout or blackout. Temporal arterial blood flow, however, showed a high correlation with subjective peripheral light loss.

  10. Data Compression Techniques for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, William G.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced space transportation systems, including vehicle state of health systems, will produce large amounts of data which must be stored on board the vehicle and or transmitted to the ground and stored. The cost of storage or transmission of the data could be reduced if the number of bits required to represent the data is reduced by the use of data compression techniques. Most of the work done in this study was rather generic and could apply to many data compression systems, but the first application area to be considered was launch vehicle state of health telemetry systems. Both lossless and lossy compression techniques were considered in this study.

  11. The Advanced Space Plant Culture Device with Live Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weibo; Zhang, Tao; Tong, Guanghui

    The live imaging techniques, including the color and fluorescent imags, are very important and useful for space life science. The advanced space plant culture Device (ASPCD) with live imaging Technique, developed for Chinese Spacecraft, would be introduced in this paper. The ASPCD had two plant experimental chambers. Three cameras (two color cameras and one fluorescent camera) were installed in the two chambers. The fluorescent camera could observe flowering genes, which were labeled by GFP. The lighting, nutrient, temperature controling and water recycling were all independent in each chamber. The ASPCD would beed applied to investigate for the growth and development of the high plant under microgravity conditions on board the Chinese Spacecraft.

  12. Three-dimensional hybrid grid generation using advancing front techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrenner, John P.; Noack, Ralph W.

    1995-01-01

    A new 3-dimensional hybrid grid generation technique has been developed, based on ideas of advancing fronts for both structured and unstructured grids. In this approach, structured grids are first generate independently around individual components of the geometry. Fronts are initialized on these structure grids, and advanced outward so that new cells are extracted directly from the structured grids. Employing typical advancing front techniques, cells are rejected if they intersect the existing front or fail other criteria When no more viable structured cells exist further cells are advanced in an unstructured manner to close off the overall domain, resulting in a grid of 'hybrid' form. There are two primary advantages to the hybrid formulation. First, generating blocks with limited regard to topology eliminates the bottleneck encountered when a multiple block system is used to fully encapsulate a domain. Individual blocks may be generated free of external constraints, which will significantly reduce the generation time. Secondly, grid points near the body (presumably with high aspect ratio) will still maintain a structured (non-triangular or tetrahedral) character, thereby maximizing grid quality and solution accuracy near the surface.

  13. Surveying converter lining erosion state based on laser measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongsheng; Shi, Tielin; Yang, Shuzi

    1998-08-01

    It is very important to survey the eroding state of the steelmaking converter lining real time so as to optimize technological process, extend converter durability and reduce steelmaking production costs. This paper gives one practical method based on the laser measure technique. It presents the basic principle of the measure technique. It presents the basic principle of the measure method, the composition of the measure system and the researches on key technological problems. The method is based on the technique of the laser range finding to net points on the surface of the surveyed converter lining, and the technology of angle finding to the laser beams. The angle signals would be used to help realizing the automatic scanning function also. The laser signals would be modulated and encoded. In the meantime, we would adopt the wavelet analysis and other filter algorithms, to denoise noisy data and extract useful information. And the main idea of some algorithms such as the net point measuring path planning and the measure device position optimal algorithm would also be given in order to improve the measure precision and real time property of the system.

  14. Design and improvement of laser tracking control system using ANN technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ying; Zhang, Guoxiong; Li, Xingfei

    2005-01-01

    Laser tracking method for space coordinates measurement is a newly developed technique that possesses the characteristics of high accuracy, large measuring range, flexible and dynamic measurement and so on. Laser tracking interferometer system based on this method has become an important measuring tool in many industrial fields. However, the control system sometimes acts nonlinearly because of long-range measurement and various applications. To solve this problem, artificial neural network (ANN) controller is introduced as an advanced adaptive control configuration in laser tracking interferometer system. The reason is that artificial neural network which is an important branch of intelligent control area has great potential ability in dealing with high nonlinearity and indeterminate factors. Then the simulation of tracking control system based on either conventional PID controller or ANN controller is carried out separately and the result of comparison is given.

  15. Lead extraction using a laser system: Techniques, efficacy, and limitations.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hideo

    2016-08-01

    Transvenous lead extraction is becoming popular in Japan since the approval of laser extraction system in 2010. The laser system seems to be the standard method used by most physicians, owing to its efficacy and ease of handling. The efficacy and safety of this technology has been well proven in many studies and the data suggest that it can be used for Japanese patients safely. However, lead extraction can cause serious complications. Thus, it is important to learn the limitations as well as the basic techniques and efficacy of this procedure. PMID:27588149

  16. Progress in laser-spectroscopic techniques for aerodynamic measurements - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities and recent progress in laser-spectroscopic measurement techniques for use in aerodynamic test facilities and flight research vehicles. It includes a survey of the literature which is centered on this application of laser spectroscopy. The intended reader is the specialist in experimental fluid dynamics who is not intimately familiar with the physics or applications of laser spectroscopy. Thus, some discussion is also included of the nature of each laser-spectroscopic technique and the practical aspects of its use for aerodynamic measurements. The specific techniques reviewed include laser absorption, laser-induced fluorescence, laser Rayleigh scattering, and laser Raman scattering including spontaneous and coherent processes.

  17. Technical Advances in the Continuous Melting of Phosphate Laser Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T; Thorsness, C; Campbell, J; Takeuchi, K; Suzuki, K; Yamamoto, K; Cimino, J; Thorne, A; Hayden, J

    2001-09-05

    Continuous melting of phosphate laser glass is now being used for the first time to prepare meter-scale amplifier optics for megajoule lasers. The scale-up to continuous melting from the previous one-at-a-time ''discontinuous'' batch process has allowed for the production of glass at rates more than 20 times faster, 5 times cheaper, and with 2-3 times better optical quality. Almost 8000 slabs of laser glass will be used in high-energy, high-peak-power laser systems that are being designed and built for fusion energy research. The success of this new continuous melting process, which is a result of a six year joint R&D program between government and industry, stems from numerous technical advances which include (1) dehydroxylating the glass to concentrations less than {approx}100 ppm OH; (2) minimizing damage-causing Pt-inclusions; (3) preventing glass fracture; (4) minimizing impurities such as Cu and Fe to <20 ppm; (5) improving forming methods to get high optical homogeneity glass; and (6) developing large aperture quality assurance tools to verify properties of the glass.

  18. New laser technique for the identification of molecular transitions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skribanowitz, N.; Kelly, M. J.; Feld, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    A laser technique is proposed which may be useful for the assignment of molecular spectra in the visible and infrared regions. The method is based on the resonant interaction of two monochromatic fields with a Doppler-broadened three-level system. Under the appropriate conditions the absorption line shape of one of the transitions shows a complex structure over a narrow section of the Doppler profile, and for sufficiently high laser power the line shape splits into a number of narrow peaks. Analysis of the resulting intensity pattern leads to unambiguous assignment of the angular momentum quantum numbers of the three levels involved. A simple set of rules is given to facilitate interpretation of spectra. The line shapes discussed are also relevant to monochromatic optical pumping of gases and unidirectional laser amplifiers.

  19. The new kid on the block for advanced imaging in Barrett's esophagus: a review of volumetric laser endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Arvind J; Smith, Michael S; Pleskow, Douglas K

    2016-05-01

    Advanced imaging techniques used in the management of Barrett's esophagus include electronic imaging enhancement (e.g. narrow band imaging, flexible spectral imaging color enhancement, and i-Scan), chromoendoscopy, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. Electronic imaging enhancement is used frequently in daily practice, but use of the other advanced technologies is not routine. High-definition white light endoscopy and random four quadrant biopsy remain the standard of care for evaluation of Barrett's esophagus; this is largely due to the value of advanced imaging technologies not having been validated in large studies or in everyday practice. A new advanced imaging technology called volumetric laser endomicroscopy is commercially available in the United States. Its ease of use and rapid acquisition of high-resolution images make this technology very promising for widespread application. In this article we review the technology and its potential for advanced imaging in Barrett's esophagus. PMID:27134668

  20. The new kid on the block for advanced imaging in Barrett’s esophagus: a review of volumetric laser endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Arvind J.; Smith, Michael S.; Pleskow, Douglas K.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced imaging techniques used in the management of Barrett’s esophagus include electronic imaging enhancement (e.g. narrow band imaging, flexible spectral imaging color enhancement, and i-Scan), chromoendoscopy, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. Electronic imaging enhancement is used frequently in daily practice, but use of the other advanced technologies is not routine. High-definition white light endoscopy and random four quadrant biopsy remain the standard of care for evaluation of Barrett’s esophagus; this is largely due to the value of advanced imaging technologies not having been validated in large studies or in everyday practice. A new advanced imaging technology called volumetric laser endomicroscopy is commercially available in the United States. Its ease of use and rapid acquisition of high-resolution images make this technology very promising for widespread application. In this article we review the technology and its potential for advanced imaging in Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:27134668

  1. Characterization of PTFE Using Advanced Thermal Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumm, J.; Lindemann, A.; Meyer, M.; Strasser, C.

    2010-10-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a synthetic fluoropolymer used in numerous industrial applications. It is often referred to by its trademark name, Teflon. Thermal characterization of a PTFE material was carried out using various thermal analysis and thermophysical properties test techniques. The transformation energetics and specific heat were measured employing differential scanning calorimetry. The thermal expansion and the density changes were determined employing pushrod dilatometry. The viscoelastic properties (storage and loss modulus) were analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis. The thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash technique. Combining thermal diffusivity data with specific heat and density allows calculation of the thermal conductivity of the polymer. Measurements were carried out from - 125 °C up to 150 °C. Additionally, measurements of the mechanical properties were carried out down to - 170 °C. The specific heat tests were conducted into the fully molten regions up to 370 °C.

  2. Growth of metal oxide nanoparticles using pulsed laser ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, M. A.; Drmosh, Q. A.; Saleh, Tawfik A.; Yamani, Z. H.

    2011-02-01

    Nano particles exhibit physical and chemical properties distinctively different from that of bulk due to high number of surface atoms, surface energy and surface area to volume ratio. Laser is a unique source of radiation and has been applied in the synthesis of nano structured metal oxides. The pulsed laser ablation (PLA) technique in liquid medium has been proven an effective and simple technique for preparing nanoparticles of high purity. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is another way to fabricate nano structured single crystal thin films of metal oxides. PLA technique has been applied in our laboratory for the growth of metal oxides such as nano-ZnO, nano-ZnO2 nano- SnO2, nano-Bi2O3, nano-NiO and nano-MnO2. Different techniques such as AFM, UV, FT-IR, PL and XRD were applied to characterize these materials. We will present our latest development in the growth of nano metal oxides using PLA and PLD.

  3. Canine transurethral laser prostatectomy using a rotational technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromeens, Douglas M.; Johnson, Douglas E.

    1995-05-01

    Conventional radical prostatectomy in the dog has historically been attended by unacceptably high incidence of urinary incontinence (80 - 100%). Ablation of the prostate can be accomplished in the dog by transurethral irradiation of the prostate with the Nd:YAG laser and a laterally deflecting fiber. Exposure has ranged between 40 and 60 watts for 60 seconds at 4 fixed locations. Although prostatectomies performed with the above described technique offers significant advantage over conventional prostatectomies, the high power density at each location can result in small submucosal explosions (`popcorn effect') that increase the potential for bleeding and rupture of the prostatic capsule. We describe a new technique in which the energy is applied continuously by a laser fiber rotating around a central point. Delivering 40 watts of Nd:YAG energy for 4 minutes using a new angle-delivery device (UrotekTM), we produced results comparable to those of other previously reported techniques in the canine model with two added advantages: (1) a more even application of heat resulting in no `popcorn' effect and (2) a more reliably predictable area of coagulative necrosis within a given axial plane. This technique should provide additional safety for the veterinary surgeon performing visual laser ablation of the prostate in the dog.

  4. A new technique for Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jung Kee; An, Jae Hwan; Yim, Jin Ho

    2014-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of a new opening pattern in neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser posterior capsulotomy on visual function. METHODS This technique was conducted along a circular pattern. The energy ranged between 0.8 and 1.2 mJ/pulse was consumed and mean total energy levels were 74±21 mJ (mean±standard deviation: SD, from 40 to 167) and laser shots aimed at 150 µm away behind a datum point and went along an imaginary line which extends 0.5 mm inside from optic margin and into the circular en bloc pattern. Vitreous stands were attached with fragment and then they were cut off by the laser after circular application. The circular fragment was completely separated from vitreous, and then this fragment was quickly sunk in intravitreal space. RESULTS The follow-up period ranges from at least a week to 40mo, making 15.8mo on average. The procedural outcome showed 96% (74 eyes out of the 77 eyes) enhancement in patients' visual acuity. Cystoid macular edema or retinal detachment was not observed in any of the patients during follow-up periods. CONCLUSION This new technique is expected to improve the weaknesses that the conventional procedures have by adding the process to cut off vitreous stands attached with the fragment by the laser to the circular application. PMID:24790883

  5. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronne, Antonio; Bloisi, Francesco; Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria; Depero, Laura E.; Fanelli, Esther; Federici, Stefania; Massoli, Patrizio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2015-05-01

    Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  6. Emerging Laser Materials Processing Techniques for Future Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukreja, L. M.; Kaul, R.; Paul, C. P.; Ganesh, P.; Rao, B. T.

    Lasers are not only the proven and indispensable tools for some of the contemporary manufacturing technologies but have the potential for providing solutions to some of the upcoming intricate problems of industrial materials processing. The ongoing research is spearheading in the direction to develop novel fabrication techniques for improving qualities of the products, possibilities to engineer integrated multi-materials and multi-functional components and enhancing economic or procedural benefits. To explore the possibilities of achieving some of these objectives, we have carried out studies on the laser rapid manufacturing of structures of different metals with control over porosity, bimetallic integration, and other technologically important mechanical characteristics, laser melting based surface processing , laser shock peening , hybrid welding , and laser profile cutting of metal sheets. The results of these studies with comprehensiveness are presented and discussed in this chapter. A brief review of their scope for the industrial acceptability and adaptability has also been presented to assess the real potential of these research areas.

  7. Laser Pyrolysis Techniques: Application To Catalysis, Combustion Diagnostics, And Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gregory P.

    1984-05-01

    A pulsed laser pyrolysis method has been developed to study kinetic processes at high temperatures. A CO2 laser is used to irradiate a 100 torr mixture of an infrared absorber (SF6), bath gas (N2), and reactants. Rapid heating to 700-1400 K occurs, followed by two-stage cooling. Unimolecular reactions are studied by competitive kinetics with a known standard, using mass-spectrometric or gas-chromatographic analysis. Bimolecular processes are examined using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The technique offers great advantages in reaching reactive temperatures in a fast and time-resolved manner, without the complications of hot surfaces. It is thus an ideal tool for analyzing and measuring some of the basic processes occurring in more complicated, real, hot systems. Our recent applications of the laser pyrolysis method in the areas of catalysis and combustion are summarized here. Several transition metal-carbonyl bond dissociation energies have been measured, and catalysis by the hot metal particulate products was observed. Since the use of LIF as a flame diagnotic requires some knowledge of the fluorescence quenching rates at high temperatures, the laser pyrolysis method was used to measure these rates for the important OH radical. Its reaction rate with acetylene was also measured, with implications for flame modeling and the mechanism of soot formation. Finally, this method can be used to ignite low concentrations of fuel and oxidant, and then study the time-resolved evolution of the flame chemistry by LIF and chemiluminescence observations.

  8. Novel technique for high-quality microstructuring with excimer lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Stephan; Geiger, Manfred

    2000-06-01

    Laser micromachining has become increasingly established in many microsystem applications during the past years. These new fields occasion higher demands on the quality of micromachiend devices combined with high resolution and working velocity. Due to the disadvantages of conventional excimer laser processing, a novel technique is required to meet these demands. The main problems of conventional excimer laser machining are the redeposition of ablated material on the irradiated work piece and the formation of a strong melting phase especially for metals. These difficulties greatly reduce the applicability of excimer laser material processing for manufacturing microsystems technology components. By applying a thin water film to the substrate surface, the redeposition of ablated material can be completely avoided, which results in a better quality of the microstructures. Usage of a water film, however, has proved to lead to a marked reduction of the ablation rate for the examined materials - ceramics and stainless steel. Therefore, one of the objectives of future research will be to raise the ablation rate in order to render excimer laser processing more interesting economically. Adding alcoholic additives, among others, has improved the wetting of the liquid films on the surface. The effect of the modified chemical composition of the liquid on ablation rate and structure quality for various materials is presented here.

  9. Laser ablation--reflections on a very complex technique for solid sampling.

    PubMed

    Niemax, K

    2001-06-01

    This paper is an attempt to point out the complex correlations between the experimental conditions in solid sampling by lasers. In particular, the influence of the laser properties, the surrounding gas, and the matrix on the analytical results of laser ablation techniques, such as laser induced breakdown spectrometry or laser ablation-ICP-MS, will be discussed. PMID:11495052

  10. Laser Illumination Modality of Photoacoustic Imaging Technique for Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong-qing; Peng, Yuan-yuan; Guo, Jian; Li, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has recently emerged as a promising imaging technique for prostate cancer. But there was still a lot of challenge in the PAI for prostate cancer detection, such as laser illumination modality. Knowledge of absorbed light distribution in prostate tissue was essential since the distribution characteristic of absorbed light energy would influence the imaging depth and range of PAI. In order to make a comparison of different laser illumination modality of photoacoustic imaging technique for prostate cancer, optical model of human prostate was established and combined with Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the light absorption distribution in the prostate tissue. Characteristic of light absorption distribution of transurethral and trans-rectal illumination case, and of tumor at different location was compared with each other.The relevant conclusions would be significant for optimizing the light illumination in a PAI system for prostate cancer detection.

  11. Field tests of laser ranging using PRBS modulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalik, J.; Wilson, K.; Wright, M.; Williamson, W.

    2011-06-01

    We have developed and tested an optical ranging system using a Pseudo-Random Bit Stream (PRBS) modulation technique. The optical transceiver consisted of an infrared laser transmitter co-aligned with a receiver telescope. The infrared laser beam was propagated to a retro-reflector and then received by a detector coupled to the telescope. The transceiver itself was mounted on a gimbal that could actively track moving targets through a camera that was bore sighted with the optical detector. The detected optical signal was processed in real time to produce a range measurement with sub mm accuracy. This system was tested in the field using both stationary and moving targets up to 5 km away. Ranging measurements to an aircraft were compared with results obtained by differential GPS (Global Positioning System) techniques.

  12. Phosphate laser glass for NIF: production status, slab selection, and recent technical advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratwala, Tayyab I.; Campbell, John H.; Miller, Philip E.; Thorsness, Charles B.; Riley, Michael O.; Ehrmann, Paul R.; Steele, Rusty A.

    2004-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized high-energy (1.8 megajoule) / high-peak power (500 terawatt) laser system, which will utilize over 3000 meter-size Nd-doped metaphosphate glasses as its gain media. The current production status, the selection criteria of individual slabs for specific beam line locations, and some recent technical advances are reviewed. The glass blanks are manufactured by a novel continuous glass melting process, and the finished slabs are then prepared by epoxy bonding a Cu-doped phosphate glass edge cladding and by advanced finishing techniques. To date, nearly 3400 slab equivalents have been melted, 2600 have been rough-cut to blanks, 1200 have been finished, and 144 have been installed in NIF. A set of selection rules, which are designed to optimize laser performance (e.g., maintain gain balance between beam lines and minimize beam walkoff) and to maximize glass lifetime with respect to Pt damage site growth, have been established for assigning individual slabs to specific beam line locations. Recent technical advances for amplifier slab production, which include: 1) minimizing surface pitting (hazing) after final finishing; 2) minimizing humidity-induced surface degradation (weathering) upon storage and use; and 3) preventing mounting-induced surface fractures upon installation, have contributed in improving the laser glass quality.

  13. Advanced computer modeling techniques expand belt conveyor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Alspaugh, M.

    1998-07-01

    Increased mining production is continuing to challenge engineers and manufacturers to keep up. The pressure to produce larger and more versatile equipment is increasing. This paper will show some recent major projects in the belt conveyor industry that have pushed the limits of design and engineering technology. Also, it will discuss the systems engineering discipline and advanced computer modeling tools that have helped make these achievements possible. Several examples of technologically advanced designs will be reviewed. However, new technology can sometimes produce increased problems with equipment availability and reliability if not carefully developed. Computer modeling techniques that help one design larger equipment can also compound operational headaches if engineering processes and algorithms are not carefully analyzed every step of the way.

  14. Advanced aeroservoelastic stabilization techniques for hypersonic flight vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Samuel Y.; Cheng, Peter Y.; Myers, Thomas T.; Klyde, David H.; Magdaleno, Raymond E.; Mcruer, Duane T.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced high performance vehicles, including Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) hypersonic flight vehicles, that are statically unstable, require higher bandwidth flight control systems to compensate for the instability resulting in interactions between the flight control system, the engine/propulsion dynamics, and the low frequency structural modes. Military specifications, such as MIL-F-9490D and MIL-F-87242, tend to limit treatment of structural modes to conventional gain stabilization techniques. The conventional gain stabilization techniques, however, introduce low frequency effective time delays which can be troublesome from a flying qualities standpoint. These time delays can be alleviated by appropriate blending of gain and phase stabilization techniques (referred to as Hybrid Phase Stabilization or HPS) for the low frequency structural modes. The potential of using HPS for compensating structural mode interaction was previously explored. It was shown that effective time delay was significantly reduced with the use of HPS; however, the HPS design was seen to have greater residual response than a conventional gain stablized design. Additional work performed to advance and refine the HPS design procedure, to further develop residual response metrics as a basis for alternative structural stability specifications, and to develop strategies for validating HPS design and specification concepts in manned simulation is presented. Stabilization design sensitivity to structural uncertainties and aircraft-centered requirements are also assessed.

  15. Laser speckle technique for monitoring of blood and lymph flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosov, Ivan V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2004-07-01

    Laser speckle technique developed for monitoring of micro scale blood and lymph flows is described and discussed. It is based on the space-time correlation properties of dynamic speckle field formed by coherent light scattered by capillary flow of blood or lymph. As it was proved experimentally, the estimating of cross-correlation of speckle-field intensity fluctuations recorded in two different point allows for measurement of flow velocity and flow direction discrimination. Developed technique was applied for investigation of push-pull dynamics of lymph flow in rat mesentery. The results of experiments with models of bioflows and in vivo measurements are presented.

  16. Flow visualization techniques in the Airborne Laser Laboratory program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walterick, R. E.; Vankuren, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    A turret/fairing assembly for laser applications was designed and tested. Wind tunnel testing was conducted using flow visualization techniques. The techniques used have included the methods of tufting, encapsulated liquid crystals, oil flow, sublimation and schlieren and shadowgraph photography. The results were directly applied to the design of fairing shapes for minimum drag and reduced turret buffet. In addition, the results are of primary importance to the study of light propagation paths in the near flow field of the turret cavity. Results indicate that the flow in the vicinity of the turret is an important factor for consideration in the design of suitable turret/fairing or aero-optic assemblies.

  17. Advances in CO2 laser fabrication for high power fibre laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Keiron; Rees, Simon; Simakov, Nikita; Daniel, Jae M. O.; Swain, Robert; Mies, Eric; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W. A.; Haub, John

    2016-03-01

    CO2 laser processing facilitates contamination free, rapid, precise and reproducible fabrication of devices for high power fibre laser applications. We present recent progress in fibre end-face preparation and cladding surface modification techniques. We demonstrate a fine feature CO2 laser process that yields topography significantly smaller than that achieved with typical mechanical cleaving processes. We also investigate the side processing of optical fibres for the fabrication of all-glass cladding light strippers and demonstrate extremely efficient cladding mode removal. We apply both techniques to fibres with complex designs containing multiple layers of doped and un-doped silica as well as shaped and circularly symmetric structures. Finally, we discuss the challenges and approaches to working with various fibre and glass-types.

  18. Testing aspects of advanced coherent electron cooling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.; Jing, Y.; Pinayev, I.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Ratner, D.

    2015-05-03

    An advanced version of the Coherent-electron Cooling (CeC) based on the micro-bunching instability was proposed. This approach promises significant increase in the bandwidth of the CeC system and, therefore, significant shortening of cooling time in high-energy hadron colliders. In this paper we present our plans of simulating and testing the key aspects of this proposed technique using the set-up of the coherent-electron-cooling proof-of-principle experiment at BNL.

  19. [The role of electronic techniques for advanced neuroelectrophysiology].

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Zhang, Lijun; Cao, Maoyong

    2008-12-01

    The rapid development in the fields of electroscience, computer science, and biomedical engineering are propelling the electrophysiologyical techniques. Recent technological advances have made it possible to simultaneously record the activity of large numbers of neurons in awake and behaving animals using implanted extracellular electrodes. Several laboratories use chronically implanted electrode arrays in freely moving animals because they allow stable recordings of discriminated single neurons and/or field potentials from up to hundreds of electrodes over long time periods. In this review, we focus on the new technologies for neuroelectrophysiology. PMID:19166233

  20. 193 nm excimer laser sclerostomy in pseudophakic patients with advanced open angle glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, B D; van Saarloos, P P; Cooper, R L; Constable, I J

    1994-01-01

    A modified open mask system incorporating an en face air jet to dry the target area during ablation and a conjunctival plication mechanism, which allows ab externo delivery of the 193 nm excimer laser without prior conjunctival dissection, has been developed to form small bore sclerostomies accurately and atraumatically. Full thickness sclerostomies, and sclerostomies guarded by a smaller internal ostium can be created. A pilot therapeutic trial was conducted in pseudophakic patients with advanced open angle glaucoma. Six full thickness sclerostomies (200 microns and 400 microns diameter) and three guarded sclerostomies were created in nine patients by 193 nm excimer laser ablation (fluence per pulse 400 mJ/cm2, pulse rate 16 Hz, air jet pressure intraocular pressure +25 mm Hg). After 6 months' follow up, intraocular pressure was controlled (< or = 16 mm Hg) in eight of the nine patients (6/9 without medication). Early postoperative complications included hyphaema (trace--2.5 mm) (6/9), temporary fibrinous sclerostomy occlusion (4/9), profound early hypotony (all patients without fibrinous occlusion), and suprachoroidal haemorrhage in one case. Conjunctival laser wounds were self sealing. Small bore laser sclerostomy procedures are functionally equivalent to conventional full thickness procedures, producing early postoperative hypotony, with an increased risk of suprachoroidal haemorrhage in association with this. Further research is required to improve control over internal guarding in excimer laser sclerostomy before clinical trials of this technique can safely proceed. Images PMID:8148335

  1. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of laser deposited advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistla, Harihar Rakshit

    Additive manufacturing in the form of laser deposition is a unique way to manufacture near net shape metallic components from advanced materials. Rapid solidification facilitates the extension of solid solubility, compositional flexibility and decrease in micro-segregation in the melt among other advantages. The current work investigates the employment of laser deposition to fabricate the following: 1. Functionally gradient materials: This allows grading dissimilar materials compositionally to tailor specific properties of both these materials into a single component. Specific compositions of the candidate materials (SS 316, Inconel 625 and Ti64) were blended and deposited to study the brittle intermetallics reported in these systems. 2. High entropy alloys: These are multi- component alloys with equiatomic compositions of 5 or more elements. The ratio of Al to Ni was decreased to observe the transition of solid solution from a BCC to an FCC crystal structure in the AlFeCoCrNi system. 3. Structurally amorphous alloys: Zr-based metallic glasses have been reported to have high glass forming ability. These alloys have been laser deposited so as to rapidly cool them from the melt into an amorphous state. Microstructural analysis and X-ray diffraction were used to study the phase formation, and hardness was measured to estimate the mechanical properties.

  2. [INVITED] A review: Warm laser shock peening and related laser processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yiliang; Ye, Chang; Cheng, Gary J.

    2016-04-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress in warm laser shock peening (WLSP) and related laser processing technique. The process design, enhanced mechanical performance, and microstructure evolution of WLSP are discussed in details. The fundamental process mechanism is reviewed by building the processing-microstructure-property relationship. In particular, the precipitation kinetics during WLSP is discussed to study the effect of process parameters on the nucleation of nano-precipitates, and multiscale discrete dislocation dynamics (MDDD) simulation results are summarized to investigate the dislocation multiplication and propagation behaviors as well as the dislocation pinning effect. In addition, the research progress of thermal engineered laser shock peening (TE-LSP) technique is reviewed with a focus on the coarsening of precipitates, the extended fatigue life, and more importantly, the fundamental process mechanism.

  3. Advances in laser technology for the atmospheric sciences; Proceedings of the Seminar, San Diego, Calif., August 25, 26, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, J. D. (Editor); Moore, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    These papers deal with recent research, developments, and applications in laser and electrooptics technology, particularly with regard to atmospheric effects in imaging and propagation, laser instrumentation and measurements, and particle measurement. Specific topics include advanced imaging techniques, image resolution through atmospheric turbulence over the ocean, an efficient method for calculating transmittance profiles, a comparison of a corner-cube reflector and a plane mirror in folded-path and direct transmission through atmospheric turbulence, line-spread instrumentation for propagation measurements, scaling laws for thermal fluctuations in the layer adjacent to ocean waves, particle sizing by laser photography, and an optical Fourier transform analysis of satellite cloud imagery. Other papers discuss a subnanosecond photomultiplier tube for laser application, holography of solid propellant combustion, diagnostics of turbulence by holography, a camera for in situ photography of cloud particles from a hail research aircraft, and field testing of a long-path laser transmissometer designed for atmospheric visibility measurements.

  4. Recent advances in laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) for label-free analysis of single cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, James W

    2013-01-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS), a technique that integrates optical tweezers with confocal Raman spectroscopy, is a variation of micro-Raman spectroscopy that enables the manipulation and biochemical analysis of single biological particles in suspension. This article provides an overview of the LTRS method, with an emphasis on highlighting recent advances over the past several years in the development of the technology and several new biological and biomedical applications that have been demonstrated. A perspective on the future developments of this powerful cytometric technology will also be presented. PMID:23175434

  5. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  6. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-01

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  7. Recent Advances in Techniques for Hyperspectral Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza, Antonio; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Boardman, Joseph W.; Brazile, Jason; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Fauvel, Mathieu; Gamba, Paolo; Gualtieri, Anthony; Marconcini, Mattia; Tilton, James C.; Trianni, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than 30 years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspectral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal view on recent advances in techniques for hyperspectral image processing. Our main focus is on the design of techniques able to deal with the highdimensional nature of the data, and to integrate the spatial and spectral information. Performance of the discussed techniques is evaluated in different analysis scenarios. To satisfy time-critical constraints in specific applications, we also develop efficient parallel implementations of some of the discussed algorithms. Combined, these parts provide an excellent snapshot of the state-of-the-art in those areas, and offer a thoughtful perspective on future potentials and emerging challenges in the design of robust hyperspectral imaging algorithms

  8. Surgical techniques for advanced stage pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Brown, Douglas N; Strauchon, Christopher; Gonzalez, Hector; Gruber, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse is an extremely common condition, with approximately 12% of women requiring surgical correction over their lifetime. This manuscript reviews the most recent literature regarding the comparative efficacy of various surgical repair techniques in the treatment of advanced stage pelvic organ prolapse. Uterosacral ligament suspension has similar anatomic and subjective outcomes when compared to sacrospinous ligament fixation at 12 months and is considered to be equally effective. The use of transvaginal mesh has been shown to be superior to native tissue vaginal repairs with respect to anatomic outcomes but at the cost of a higher complication rate. Minimally invasive sacrocolpopexy appears to be equivalent to abdominal sacrocolpopexy (ASC). Robot-assisted sacrocolpopexy (RSC) and laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy (LSC) appear as effective as abdominal sacrocolpopexy, however, prospective studies of comparing long-term outcomes of ASC, LSC, and RSC in relation to health care costs is paramount in the near future. Surgical correction of advanced pelvic organ prolapse can be accomplished via a variety of proven techniques. Selection of the correct surgical approach is a complex decision process and involves a multitude of factors. When deciding on the most suitable surgical intervention, the chosen route must be individualized for each patient taking into account the specific risks and benefits of each procedure. PMID:26448444

  9. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hsin, Tse-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  10. Advanced IMCW Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS CO2 Column Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel; lin, bing; nehrir, amin; harrison, fenton; obland, michael

    2015-04-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation.

  11. Mechanical characterization of thin film structures using a laser spallation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianxin

    The laser spallation technique has been developed to measure the interface strength between different materials, especially thin film structures. In this work, it is refined and applied to various material systems. With these advances, the laser spallation technique is now fully mature for applications not only to measurement of material interface strength, but also to the study of laser-material interaction, dynamic fracture mechanics, as well as to the measurement of material bulk properties. In the first part of this work, the laser spallation technique was examined quantitatively for signal processing and stress wavefield recovery. It is shown that the short time Fourier transformation is another appropriate means for recovering the free surface displacement from the acquired optical signal. Two methods have been chosen to recover the stress field inside the sample. When the displacement of the coating's free surface is recorded directly, it is convenient to use a special finite difference strategy. When the free surface displacement is recorded on the bare substrate surface, it is more convenient to use the finite element method to calculate the interface strength. The application work includes several topics. The first one was the evaluation of the effect of substrate orientation and deposition mode on the interface strength of Nb-sapphire interfaces. The interface strength is higher for the sapphire substrate with prismatic orientation, and RF deposition mode yields higher interface strength than the DC mode. The second application estimated the effect of substrate roughness on the interface strength of Nb-alumina system. The effect of chemical composition of thin films on the interface strength was also investigated. The final application investigated the dynamic fracture mechanics of thin film structures. The purpose of this chapter is to clarify the controversial topic regarding the limit speed of bimaterial interface crack propagation. We were successful

  12. Advances in micro/nano scale materials processing by ultrafast lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotakis, Costas

    2009-03-01

    Materials processing by ultrafast lasers offers several attractive possibilities for micro/nano scale applications based on surface and in bulk laser induced modifications. The origin of these applications lies in the reduction of undesirable thermal effects, the non-equilibrium surface and volume structural modifications which may give rise to complex and unusual structures, the supression of photochemical effects in molecular substrates, the possibility of optimization of energy dissipation by temporal pulse shaping and the exploitation of filamentation effects. Diverse applications will be discussed, including the development and functionalization of laser engineered surfaces, the laser transfer of biomolecules and the functionalization of 3D structures constructed by multiphoton stereolithography. Two examples will be presented in this context: A new approach for the development of superhydrophobic, self-cleaning surfaces [1,2] and the fabrication of functional scaffolds for tissue engineering applications [3-5]. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] V. Zorba et al., ``Biomimetic artificial surfaces quantitatively reproduce the water repellency of a Lotus leaf'', Advanced Materials 20, 4049 (2008).[0pt] [2] V. Zorba et al., ``Tailoring the wetting response of silicon surfaces via fs laser structuring'', Applied Physics A 93, 819 (2008).[0pt] [3] V. Dinca et al., ``Quantification of the activity of biomolecules in microarrays obtained by direct laser transfer'', Biomedical Microdevices 10, 719 (2008).[0pt] [4] B. Hopp et al., ``Laser-based techniques for living cell pattern formation'', Applied Physics A 93, 45 (2008).[0pt] [5] V. Dinca et al., ``Directed three-dimensional patterning of self-assembled peptide fibrils'', Nano Letters 8, 538 (2008).

  13. Laser diode self-mixing technique for liquid velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrova, A.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-09-01

    Using the self-mixing technique, or optical feedback interferometry, fluid velocity measurements of water seeded with titanium dioxide have been performed using a laser diode to measure the effect of the seeding particle concentration and also the pump speed of the flow. The velocimeter utilises commercially available laser diodes with a built-in photodiode for detection of the self-mixing effect. The device has demonstrated an accuracy better than 10% for liquid flow velocities up to 1.5 m/s with a concentration of scattering particles in the range of 0.8-0.03%. This is an improvement of one order of magnitude compared to previous experiments. The proposed velocimeter is to be developed further for application in gas-jet measurements.

  14. Laser Shockwave Technique For Characterization Of Nuclear Fuel Plate Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Barry H. Rabin; Mathieu Perton; Daniel Lévesque; Jean-Pierre Monchalin; Martin Lord

    2012-07-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  15. Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perton, M.; Levesque, D.; Monchalin, J.-P.; Lord, M.; Smith, J. A.; Rabin, B. H.

    2013-01-25

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  16. Monitoring interfacial dynamics by pulsed laser techniques. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, G.

    1995-12-31

    The research is aimed at understanding the structural, electronic, and reactive properties of semiconductors in solutions. Focus is on Si and GaAs surfaces because they are used in photovoltaic devices, etc. The pulsed laser techniques used included surface second harmonic generation in Si and laser induced photoluminescence in GaAs. SHG can measure space charge effects in the semiconductor under various conditions, ie, immersed in electrolyte, in presence of oxide overlayers, and under UHV conditions. The Si studies demonstrated the sensitivity of the phase of the SH response to space charge effects. With GaAs, time-correlated single photon counting methods were used in the picosecond time regime to examine the recombination luminescence following above band gap excitation (surface trapping velocities).

  17. Design of a family of advanced Nd:YLF/phosphate glass lasers for pulsed holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grichine, Mikhail V.; Ratcliffe, David B.; Rodin, Alexey M.

    1998-02-01

    We discuss the design of a family of advanced hybrid Nd:YLF/phosphate glass lasers with output energies of 1, 2, 5 and 8 J at (lambda) equals 526.5 nm that have been optimized for holographic mastering and transfer work. By employing passive Q-switching using a long-life Cr4+:GSGG crystal we have attained an oscillator output of greater than 120 mJ in single transverse and longitudinal mode. This avoids the need to use expensive injection seeding, destabilizing etalons and extra preamplifiers and results in maximal stored-energy depletion of the Nd:Glass/SBS amplifier. This and other techniques has led to a family of compact, reliable and stable lasers with almost perfect parameters for holography.

  18. Laser welding and syncristallization techniques comparison: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Fornaini, C; Merigo, E; Vescovi, P; Meleti, M; Nammour, S

    2012-01-01

    Background. Laser welding was first reported in 1967 and for many years it has been used in dental laboratories with several advantages versus the conventional technique. Authors described, in previous works, the possibility of using also chair-side Nd : YAG laser device (Fotona Fidelis III, λ = 1064 nm) for welding metallic parts of prosthetic appliances directly in the dental office, extra- and also intra-orally. Syncristallisation is a soldering technique based on the creation of an electric arc between two electrodes and used to connect implants to bars intra-orally. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare two different laser welding devices with a soldering machine, all of these used in prosthetic dentistry. Material and Methods. In-lab Nd : YAG laser welding (group A = 12 samples), chair-side Nd : YAG laser welding (group B = 12 samples), and electrowelder (group C = 12 samples) were used. The tests were performed on 36 CrCoMo plates and the analysis consisted in evaluation, by microscopic observation, of the number of fissures in welded areas of groups A and B and in measurement of the welding strength in all the groups. The results were statistically analysed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests. Results. The means and standard deviations for the number of fissures in welded areas were 8.12 ± 2.59 for group A and 5.20 ± 1.38 for group B. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.0023 at the level 95%). On the other hand, the means and standard deviations for the traction tests were 1185.50 ± 288.56 N for group A, 896.41 ± 120.84 N for group B, and 283.58 ± 84.98 N for group C. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.01 at the level 95%). Conclusion. The joint obtained by welding devices had a significant higher strength compared with that obtained by the electrowelder, and the comparison between the two laser devices used demonstrated that the chair-side Nd : YAG, even giving

  19. Laser Welding and Syncristallization Techniques Comparison: In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, C.; Merigo, E.; Vescovi, P.; Meleti, M.; Nammour, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Laser welding was first reported in 1967 and for many years it has been used in dental laboratories with several advantages versus the conventional technique. Authors described, in previous works, the possibility of using also chair-side Nd : YAG laser device (Fotona Fidelis III, λ = 1064 nm) for welding metallic parts of prosthetic appliances directly in the dental office, extra- and also intra-orally. Syncristallisation is a soldering technique based on the creation of an electric arc between two electrodes and used to connect implants to bars intra-orally. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare two different laser welding devices with a soldering machine, all of these used in prosthetic dentistry. Material and Methods. In-lab Nd : YAG laser welding (group A = 12 samples), chair-side Nd : YAG laser welding (group B = 12 samples), and electrowelder (group C = 12 samples) were used. The tests were performed on 36 CrCoMo plates and the analysis consisted in evaluation, by microscopic observation, of the number of fissures in welded areas of groups A and B and in measurement of the welding strength in all the groups. The results were statistically analysed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests. Results. The means and standard deviations for the number of fissures in welded areas were 8.12 ± 2.59 for group A and 5.20 ± 1.38 for group B. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.0023 at the level 95%). On the other hand, the means and standard deviations for the traction tests were 1185.50 ± 288.56 N for group A, 896.41 ± 120.84 N for group B, and 283.58 ± 84.98 N for group C. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.01 at the level 95%). Conclusion. The joint obtained by welding devices had a significant higher strength compared with that obtained by the electrowelder, and the comparison between the two laser devices used demonstrated that the chair-side Nd : YAG, even giving

  20. Advanced terahertz techniques for quality control and counterfeit detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahi, Kiarash; Anwar, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports our invented methods for detection of counterfeit electronic. These versatile techniques are also handy in quality control applications. Terahertz pulsed laser systems are capable of giving the material characteristics and thus make it possible to distinguish between the materials used in authentic components and their counterfeit clones. Components with material defects can also be distinguished in section in this manner. In this work different refractive indices and absorption coefficients were observed for counterfeit components compared to their authentic counterparts. Existence of unexpected ingredient materials was detected in counterfeit components by Fourier Transform analysis of the transmitted terahertz pulse. Thicknesses of different layers are obtainable by analyzing the reflected terahertz pulse. Existence of unexpected layers is also detectable in this manner. Recycled, sanded and blacktopped counterfeit electronic components were detected as a result of these analyses. Counterfeit ICs with die dislocations were detected by depicting the terahertz raster scanning data in a coordinate plane which gives terahertz images. In the same manner, raster scanning of the reflected pulse gives terahertz images of the surfaces of the components which were used to investigate contaminant materials and sanded points on the surfaces. The results of the later technique, reveals the recycled counterfeit components.

  1. Application of advanced laser diagnostics to hypersonic wind tunnels and combustion systems.

    SciTech Connect

    North, Simon W.; Hsu, Andrea G.; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2009-09-01

    This LDRD was a Sandia Fellowship that supported Andrea Hsu's PhD research at Texas A&M University and her work as a visitor at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility. The research project at Texas A&M University is concerned with the experimental characterization of hypersonic (Mach>5) flowfields using experimental diagnostics. This effort is part of a Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) and is a collaboration between the Chemistry and Aerospace Engineering departments. Hypersonic flight conditions often lead to a non-thermochemical equilibrium (NTE) state of air, where the timescale of reaching a single (equilibrium) Boltzmann temperature is much longer than the timescale of the flow. Certain molecular modes, such as vibrational modes, may be much more excited than the translational or rotational modes of the molecule, leading to thermal-nonequilibrium. A nontrivial amount of energy is therefore contained within the vibrational mode, and this energy cascades into the flow as thermal energy, affecting flow properties through vibrational-vibrational (V-V) and vibrational-translational (V-T) energy exchanges between the flow species. The research is a fundamental experimental study of these NTE systems and involves the application of advanced laser and optical diagnostics towards hypersonic flowfields. The research is broken down into two main categories: the application and adaptation of existing laser and optical techniques towards characterization of NTE, and the development of new molecular tagging velocimetry techniques which have been demonstrated in an underexpanded jet flowfield, but may be extended towards a variety of flowfields. In addition, Andrea's work at Sandia National Labs involved the application of advanced laser diagnostics to flames and turbulent non-reacting jets. These studies included quench-free planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide (NO) and mixture fraction measurements via Rayleigh scattering.

  2. Advanced Techniques for Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, Bogdan; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2012-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have proven valuable for the prevention of primary or recurrent pulmonary embolism in selected patients with or at high risk for venous thromboembolic disease. Their use has become commonplace, and the numbers implanted increase annually. During the last 3 years, in the United States, the percentage of annually placed optional filters, i.e., filters than can remain as permanent filters or potentially be retrieved, has consistently exceeded that of permanent filters. In parallel, the complications of long- or short-term filtration have become increasingly evident to physicians, regulatory agencies, and the public. Most filter removals are uneventful, with a high degree of success. When routine filter-retrieval techniques prove unsuccessful, progressively more advanced tools and skill sets must be used to enhance filter-retrieval success. These techniques should be used with caution to avoid damage to the filter or cava during IVC retrieval. This review describes the complex techniques for filter retrieval, including use of additional snares, guidewires, angioplasty balloons, and mechanical and thermal approaches as well as illustrates their specific application.

  3. Current Methods to Assess Human Cutaneous Blood Flow: An Updated Focus on Laser-Based-Techniques.

    PubMed

    Cracowski, Jean-Luc; Roustit, Matthieu

    2016-07-01

    Several noninvasive techniques have been developed using laser light interaction in the skin to explore the skin's microcirculation. Combined with laser Doppler or LSCI, reactivity tests are used to explore skin endothelial and neurovascular function in humans, including PORH, LTH, PIV, and iontophoresis of vasodilators. Recent advances in our comprehension of the physiological pathways underlying these reactivity tests have been possible through topical or intradermal delivery of drugs that produce elevated local concentrations. Skin microvascular function has also been proposed as a prognostic biomarker or for evaluating the effect of drugs. Comprehension of the physiological pathways, together with recent technological improvements in microcirculation imaging, has provided reliable and reproducible tools to study skin microcirculation. PMID:26607042

  4. Advancements in sensing and perception using structured lighting techniques :an LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, David Keith; Padilla, Denise D.; Davidson, Patrick A. Jr.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2005-09-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Advancements in Sensing and Perception using Structured Lighting Techniques''. There is an ever-increasing need for robust, autonomous ground vehicles for counterterrorism and defense missions. Although there has been nearly 30 years of government-sponsored research, it is undisputed that significant advancements in sensing and perception are necessary. We developed an innovative, advanced sensing technology for national security missions serving the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and other government agencies. The principal goal of this project was to develop an eye-safe, robust, low-cost, lightweight, 3D structured lighting sensor for use in broad daylight outdoor applications. The market for this technology is wide open due to the unavailability of such a sensor. Currently available laser scanners are slow, bulky and heavy, expensive, fragile, short-range, sensitive to vibration (highly problematic for moving platforms), and unreliable for outdoor use in bright sunlight conditions. Eye-safety issues are a primary concern for currently available laser-based sensors. Passive, stereo-imaging sensors are available for 3D sensing but suffer from several limitations : computationally intensive, require a lighted environment (natural or man-made light source), and don't work for many scenes or regions lacking texture or with ambiguous texture. Our approach leveraged from the advanced capabilities of modern CCD camera technology and Center 6600's expertise in 3D world modeling, mapping, and analysis, using structured lighting. We have a diverse customer base for indoor mapping applications and this research extends our current technology's lifecycle and opens a new market base for outdoor 3D mapping. Applications include precision mapping, autonomous navigation, dexterous manipulation, surveillance and

  5. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.

    1993-09-01

    The Los Alamos compact Advanced FEL has lased at 4.7 and 5.2 {mu}m with a 1-cm period wiggler and a high-brightness electron beam at 16.8 and 15.8 MeV, respectively. The measured electron beam normalized emittance is 1.7 {pi}{center_dot}mm{center_dot}mrad at a peak current of 100 A, corresponding to a beam brightness greater than 2 {times} 10{sup 12} A/m{sup 2}rad{sup 2}. Initial results indicate that the AFEL small signal gain is {approximately}8% at 0.3 nC (30 A peak). The maximum output energy is 7 mJ over a 2-{mu}s macropulse. The AFEL performance can be significantly enhanced by improvements in the rf and drive laser stability.

  6. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing

  7. Laser Light Scattering, from an Advanced Technology Development Program to Experiments in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Tscharnuter, Walther W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Dautet, Henri; Deschamps, Pierre; Boucher, Francois; Zuh, Jixiang; Tin, Padetha; Rogers, Richard B.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in laser light scattering hardware are described. These include intelligent single card correlators; active quench/active reset avalanche photodiodes; laser diodes; and fiber optics which were used by or developed for a NASA advanced technology development program. A space shuttle experiment which will employ aspects of these hardware developments is previewed.

  8. COAL AND CHAR STUDIES BY ADVANCED EMR TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    R. Linn Belford; Robert B. Clarkson; Mark J. Nilges; Boris M. Odintsov; Alex I. Smirnov

    2001-04-30

    Advanced electronic magnetic resonance (EMR) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have been used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. During the span of this grant, progress was made on construction and applications to coals and chars of two high frequency EMR systems particularly appropriate for such studies--48 GHz and 95 GHz electron magnetic resonance spectrometer, on new low-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments to examine the interaction between water and the surfaces of suspended char particulates in slurries, and on a variety of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to measure characteristics of the water directly in contact with the surfaces and pore spaces of carbonaceous particulates.

  9. Techniques for developing approximate optimal advanced launch system guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Timothy S.; Speyer, Jason L.

    1991-01-01

    An extension to the authors' previous technique used to develop a real-time guidance scheme for the Advanced Launch System is presented. The approach is to construct an optimal guidance law based upon an asymptotic expansion associated with small physical parameters, epsilon. The trajectory of a rocket modeled as a point mass is considered with the flight restricted to an equatorial plane while reaching an orbital altitude at orbital injection speeds. The dynamics of this problem can be separated into primary effects due to thrust and gravitational forces, and perturbation effects which include the aerodynamic forces and the remaining inertial forces. An analytic solution to the reduced-order problem represented by the primary dynamics is possible. The Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman or dynamic programming equation is expanded in an asymptotic series where the zeroth-order term (epsilon = 0) can be obtained in closed form.

  10. Advanced imaging techniques for the detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jochelson, Maxine

    2012-01-01

    Mammography is the only breast imaging examination that has been shown to reduce breast cancer mortality. Population-based sensitivity is 75% to 80%, but sensitivity in high-risk women with dense breasts is only in the range of 50%. Breast ultrasound and contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become additional standard modalities used in the diagnosis of breast cancer. In high-risk women, ultrasound is known to detect approximately four additional cancers per 1,000 women. MRI is exquisitely sensitive for the detection of breast cancer. In high-risk women, it finds an additional four to five cancers per 100 women. However, both ultrasound and MRI are also known to lead to a large number of additional benign biopsies and short-term follow-up examinations. Many new breast imaging tools have improved and are being developed to improve on our current ability to diagnose early-stage breast cancer. These can be divided into two groups. The first group is those that are advances in current techniques, which include digital breast tomosynthesis and contrast-enhanced mammography and ultrasound with elastography or microbubbles. The other group includes new breast imaging platforms such as breast computed tomography (CT) scanning and radionuclide breast imaging. These are exciting advances. However, in this era of cost and radiation containment, it is imperative to look at all of them objectively to see which will provide clinically relevant additional information. PMID:24451711

  11. A Supersonic Tunnel for Laser and Flow-Seeding Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; Lepicovsky, Jan

    1994-01-01

    A supersonic wind tunnel with flow conditions of 3 lbm/s (1.5 kg/s) at a free-stream Mach number of 2.5 was designed and tested to provide an arena for future development work on laser measurement and flow-seeding techniques. The hybrid supersonic nozzle design that was used incorporated the rapid expansion method of propulsive nozzles while it maintained the uniform, disturbance-free flow required in supersonic wind tunnels. A viscous analysis was performed on the tunnel to determine the boundary layer growth characteristics along the flowpath. Appropriate corrections were then made to the contour of the nozzle. Axial pressure distributions were measured and Mach number distributions were calculated based on three independent data reduction methods. A complete uncertainty analysis was performed on the precision error of each method. Complex shock-wave patterns were generated in the flow field by wedges mounted near the roof and floor of the tunnel. The most stable shock structure was determined experimentally by the use of a focusing schlieren system and a novel, laser based dynamic shock position sensor. Three potential measurement regions for future laser and flow-seeding studies were created in the shock structure: deceleration through an oblique shock wave of 50 degrees, strong deceleration through a normal shock wave, and acceleration through a supersonic expansion fan containing 25 degrees of flow turning.

  12. A hypervelocity debris simulating technique with laser driven flyer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, J.; Dong, H.; Wang, J.

    Theoretical models suggest that most of the space debris in LEO consist of particles are smaller than 0.5mm. LDEF exposed a total surface area of about 130m 2 for 69 months in the LEO environment. It provided a huge collection of impact data that covers a wide size range of impact crater. Total of 34336 impacts were found on the LDEF surface, of which 27385 impact craters were less than 0.5mm in diameter. The small space debris can cause a gradual degradation of a satellite surfaces, including mechanical damage and contamination generated by impacts. Moreover the small debris may cause greater synergistic effects with AO. AO undercutting of impact damage can further expand the damage areas. This paper describes a new method to simulate small space debris by the laser driven flyer technique. A neodymium-glass pulsed laser was used in this work, capable of up 20 joules in 20 nanoseconds. Tow bonding methods to adhere the aluminum foil to the glass substrate were used. One was a field assisted thermal diffusion bond. The other used silicon oil as the adhesive. In the diffusion bond, the laser is used to vaporize the interface of a aluminum foil diffusively bonded to a glass substrate. The vapor reaches high pressures and then cuts out and accelerates a aluminum disk in the diameter of the periphery of the laser beam. In the second flyer configuration, the silicon oil was vaporized by the laser beam and the expanding gas drove the aluminum disc to the hypervelocity. In our tests, both of methods were successful. In the method of silicon oil adhesion, a 2mm diameter, 60micron thick aluminum disc was accelerated to 3.2km/s. But the velocity data of diffusion bond could not be obtained because the meas uring appliance was improper. The method to measure velocity was very simple and cheap. First, the flight time of a particle was measured with a piezoelectric transducer and a digital oscilloscope. Then attaining the flight time and distance of the particle, its velocity

  13. Advances in the Rising Bubble Technique for discharge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgersom, Koen; Luxemburg, Willem; Willemsen, Geert; Bussmann, Luuk

    2014-05-01

    Already in the 19th century, d'Auria described a discharge measurement technique that applies floats to find the depth-integrated velocity (d'Auria, 1882). The basis of this technique was that the horizontal distance that the float travels on its way to the surface is the image of the integrated velocity profile over depth. Viol and Semenov (1964) improved this method by using air bubbles as floats, but still distances were measured manually until Sargent (1981) introduced a technique that could derive the distances from two photographs simultaneously taken from each side of the river bank. Recently, modern image processing techniques proved to further improve the applicability of the method (Hilgersom and Luxemburg, 2012). In the 2012 article, controlling and determining the rising velocity of an air bubble still appeared a major challenge for the application of this method. Ever since, laboratory experiments with different nozzle and tube sizes lead to advances in our self-made equipment enabling us to produce individual air bubbles with a more constant rising velocity. Also, we introduced an underwater camera to on-site determine the rising velocity, which is dependent on the water temperature and contamination, and therefore is site-specific. Camera measurements of the rising velocity proved successful in a laboratory and field setting, although some improvements to the setup are necessary to capture the air bubbles also at depths where little daylight penetrates. References D'Auria, L.: Velocity of streams; A new method to determine correctly the mean velocity of any perpendicular in rivers and canals, (The) American Engineers, 3, 1882. Hilgersom, K.P. and Luxemburg, W.M.J.: Technical Note: How image processing facilitates the rising bubble technique for discharge measurement, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16(2), 345-356, 2012. Sargent, D.: Development of a viable method of stream flow measurement using the integrating float technique, Proceedings of

  14. Advances in lasers and optical micro-nano-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurell, F.; Fazio, E.

    2010-09-01

    Lasers represent a well consolidated technology: nevertheless, research in this field remains very active and productive, in both basic and applied directions. At the moment significant attention is given to those sources that bring together high power and compactness. Such high power lasers find important applications for material treatments and such applications are presented by Ehsani et al and Saiedeh Saghafi et al, in the treatment of dielectric thin films (Alteration of optical and morphological properties of polycarbonate illuminated by visible/IR laser beams) or of biological tissues like pistachio seeds (Investigating the effects of laser beams (532 and 660 nm) in annihilation of pistachio mould fungus using spectrophotometry analysis). In particular the latter paper show how laser sources can find very important applications in new domains, preserving goods and food without the need for preservatives or pesticides by simply sterilizing them using light. Optical Micro and Nano Systems presents a new domain for exploration. In this framework this special issue is very attractive, because it assembles papers reporting new results in three directions: new techniques for monitoring integrated micro- and nano-systems, new integrated systems and novel high performance metamaterial configurations. Integrated micro-components can be monitored and controlled using reflectance measurements as presented by Piombini et al (Toward the reflectance measurement of micro components). Speckle formation during laser beam reflection can also be a very sophisticated tool for detecting ultra-precise displacements, as presented by Filter et al (High resolution displacement detection with speckles : accuracy limits in linear displacement speckle metrology). Three dimensional integrated optical structures is indeed a big challenge and a peculiarity of photonics, they can be formed through traditional holography or using more sophisticated and novel ! technologies. Thus, special

  15. LLNL medical and industrial laser isotope separation: large volume, low cost production through advanced laser technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Scheibner, K. F.; Shaw, M.; Wilder, J.

    1998-09-02

    The goal of this LDRD project was to demonstrate the technical and economical feasibility of applying laser isotope separation technology to the commercial enrichment (>lkg/y) of stable isotopes. A successful demonstration would well position the laboratory to make a credible case for the creation of an ongoing medical and industrial isotope production and development program at LLNL. Such a program would establish LLNL as a center for advanced medical isotope production, successfully leveraging previous LLNL Research and Development hardware, facilities, and knowledge.

  16. Advanced rapid prototyping by laser beam sintering of metal prototypes: design and development of an optimized laser beam delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Manfred; Coremans, A.; Neubauer, Norbert; Niebling, F.

    1996-08-01

    Fast technological advances and steadily increasing severe worldwide competition force industry to respond all the time faster to new and chanced customer wishes. Some of the recently emerged processes, commonly referred to as 'rapid prototyping' (RP), have proved to be powerful tools for accelerating product and process development. Early approaches aimed at the automated production of plastic models. These techniques achieved industrial maturity extremely fast and are meanwhile established as standard utilities in the field of development/design processes. So far, their applicability to metal working industry was limited to design studies because the mechanical properties of the prototypes, e.g. modulus of elasticity and mechanical strength were not comparable to the final products they represented. Therefore, RP-processes aimed at the direct production of metallic prototypes gained more and more importance during recent years. A technique belonging to this group is manufacturing of prototypes by using a laser beam sintering machine capable of directly processing metal powders. This so called laser beam sintering process showed a great potential for direct manufacturing of functional tools and prototypes in early feasibility studies. Detailed examinations were performed at several research centers to determine the attainable quality of the parts concerning roughness, dimensional accuracy and mechanical strength. These examinations showed, that there still is a considerable demand for quality improvements of the previously mentioned parameters. The practical application and the potential for improvement of the geometrical accuracy of laser beam sintered parts by using a dual beam concept was proven. An innovative beam guiding and forming concept, similar to the previously mentioned patented beam guiding system, was developed and built with the goal to improve the process parameters governing mechanical properties as well as geometrical accuracy. Further reaching

  17. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the

  18. Application of Strong Field Physics Techniques to X-Ray Free Electron Laser Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roedig, Christoph Antony

    With the commissioning of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) was realized at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This novel device brings an unprecedented parameter set to a diverse community of scientists. The short wavelengths and short pulse durations enable an entire new class of time resolved structural analysis. The imaging capabilities enabled by the machine will lead to many breakthroughs in the fields of biophysics and nano technology. With the new capabilities of the LCLS come many challenges. The understanding required to effectively utilize the XFEL on complex molecular or biological systems goes back to the basic atomic physics of the interaction of light and matter. The parameter set of this machine is as unprecedented as it will be untested. To make informed measurements with the LCLS beam, a set of novel diagnostic techniques will be required. This report outlines major contributions made to the early experimental atomic physics and diagnostic efforts at LCLS. Building on a rich history of techniques used for ultra short optical lasers and atomic physics experimentation, a diagnostic instrument and experimental techniques are developed to make spectral, energy and temporal measurements of the LCLS pulses possible. Expanding on earlier studies of ionization performed on optical lasers and synchrotron sources, new ionization mechanisms such as multiphoton ionization in the x-ray regime are observed. Leveraging the unique combination of hard x-ray photon energy, extremely short pulse duration and high pulse energy, a technique for the time resolved study of ultrafast inner shell electronic relaxation processes is developed and studied for feasibility. The common theme to the efforts described here is the advancement of proven techniques and interesting atomic physics phenomena to the next generation of ultra short pulsed x-ray laser systems. The atomic physics explored here lay the groundwork for the

  19. Novel Coherent Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Minor Species Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Berenice Ann

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The aim of this thesis was to research novel coherent laser spectroscopic techniques with the application to combustion diagnostics as a long term objective. Two techniques, Picosecond Absorption Modulated Spectroscopy (PAMS) and Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing Spectroscopy (DFWM), have been experimentally investigated. PAMS is an optical pump-probe type experiment and offers the possibility of making direct, absolute in situ measurements of species concentrations. Results are presented of the PAMS signal against temporal delay for 10^{-6}M rhodamine B solution in methanol, gaseous sodium atoms and in iodine vapour. Iodine was detected at ambient room temperature and atmospheric pressure of air at a concentration of approximately 10ppm. A particular result was the observation of a negative absorption prior to the coherence spike, which has been identified as arising from a coherent transient effect. DFWM has been applied to the measurement of nitrogen dioxide spectra using the pulsed output of a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser and the tuneable output of an excimer -pumped dye laser DFWM signals have been obtained for the first time in NO_2. Initial characterisation experiments were performed in which DFWM spectra of NO _2 were obtained and identified in the region of 450-480nm. The DFWM signal was investigated as a function of laser intensity, concentration of NO _2 and buffer gas pressure. DFWM has also been demonstrated as a two-dimensional imaging diagnostic in a sodium-seeded premixed acetylene/air slot burner. Further experiments were performed in which single shot DFWM two dimensional images of the distribution of NO_2 in a cold air/NO _2 gas flow have been recorded. Additional images have been obtained of NO_2 doped into a propane-air flame at concentrations of 5000ppm with an estimated spatial resolution of 150 mu m. The images taken in the flame follow the disappearance of NO_2 molecules in the flame

  20. Laser ultrasonic techniques for assessment of tooth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, David W.; Baldwin, Kevin C.

    2000-06-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. For example, there is a need to image the margins of a restoration for the detection of poor bonding or voids between the restorative material and the dentin. With conventional x-ray techniques, it is difficult to detect cracks and to visualize interfaces between hard media. This due to the x-ray providing only a 2 dimensional projection of the internal structure (i.e. a silhouette). In addition, a high resolution imaging modality is needed to detect tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated which can help the tooth to re-mineralize itself. Currently employed x-ray imaging is incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration with a synthetic material. Other clinical applications include the visualization of periodontal defects, the localization of intraosseous lesions, and determining the degree of osseointegration between a dental implant and the surrounding bone. A means of assessing the internal structure of the tooth based upon use of high frequency, highly localized ultrasound (acoustic waves) generated by a laser pulse is discussed. Optical interferometric detection of ultrasound provides a complementary technique with a very small detection footprint. Initial results using laser-based ultrasound for assessment of dental structures are presented. Discussion will center on the adaptability of this technique to clinical applications.

  1. Advanced solar energy conversion. [solar pumped gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    An atomic iodine laser, a candidate for the direct solar pumped lasers, was successfully excited with a 4 kW beam from a xenon arc solar simulator, thus proving the feasibility of the concept. The experimental set up and the laser output as functions of operating conditions are presented. The preliminary results of the iodine laser amplifier pumped with the HCP array to which a Q switch for giant pulse production was coupled are included. Two invention disclosures - a laser driven magnetohydrodynamic generator for conversion of laser energy to electricity and solar pumped gas lasers - are also included.

  2. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss small-group apprenticeships (SGAs) as a method to instruct cell culture techniques to high school participants. The study aimed to teach cell culture practices and to introduce advanced imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Participants designed and completed experiments using both flow cytometry and laser scanning cytometry during the 1-month summer apprenticeship. In addition to effectively and efficiently teaching cell biology laboratory techniques, this course design provided an opportunity for research training, career exploration, and mentoring. Students participated in active research projects, working with a skilled interdisciplinary team of researchers in a large research institution with access to state-of-the-art instrumentation. The instructors, composed of graduate students, laboratory managers, and principal investigators, worked well together to present a real and worthwhile research experience. The students enjoyed learning cell culture techniques while contributing to active research projects. The institution's researchers were equally enthusiastic to instruct and serve as mentors. In this article, we clarify and illuminate the value of small-group laboratory apprenticeships to the institution and the students by presenting the results and experiences of seven middle and high school participants and their instructors. PMID:12587031

  3. Biotechnology apprenticeship for secondary-level students: teaching advanced cell culture techniques for research.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer R; Kotur, Mark S; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss small-group apprenticeships (SGAs) as a method to instruct cell culture techniques to high school participants. The study aimed to teach cell culture practices and to introduce advanced imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Participants designed and completed experiments using both flow cytometry and laser scanning cytometry during the 1-month summer apprenticeship. In addition to effectively and efficiently teaching cell biology laboratory techniques, this course design provided an opportunity for research training, career exploration, and mentoring. Students participated in active research projects, working with a skilled interdisciplinary team of researchers in a large research institution with access to state-of-the-art instrumentation. The instructors, composed of graduate students, laboratory managers, and principal investigators, worked well together to present a real and worthwhile research experience. The students enjoyed learning cell culture techniques while contributing to active research projects. The institution's researchers were equally enthusiastic to instruct and serve as mentors. In this article, we clarify and illuminate the value of small-group laboratory apprenticeships to the institution and the students by presenting the results and experiences of seven middle and high school participants and their instructors. PMID:12587031

  4. Investigation of PACVD protective coating processes using advanced diagnostics techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, W.C.

    1993-05-07

    Objective is to understand the mechanisms governing nonequilibrium plasma atomistic or molecular deposition of hard face coatings. Laser diagnostic methods include coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and laser-induced fluorescence. TiB[sub 2] and diamonds were used as the hard face coating materials. Diborane was used as precursor to TiB[sub 2].

  5. Advances in Poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline) Nanofibers Preparation by Electrospinning Technique.

    PubMed

    Della Pina, C; Busacca, C; Frontera, P; Antonucci, P L; Scarpino, L A; Sironi, A; Falletta, E

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers are drawing a great deal of interest from academia and industry due to their multiple applications, especially in biomedical field. PANI nanofibers were successfully electrospun for the first time by MacDiarmid and co-workers at the beginning of the millennium and since then many efforts have been addressed to improve their quality. However, traditional PANI prepared from aniline monomer shows some drawbacks, such as presence of toxic (i.e., benzidine) and inorganic (salts and metals) co-products, that complicate polymer post-treatment, and low solubility in common organic solvents, making hard its processing by electrospinning technique. Some industrial sectors, such as medical and biomedical, need to employ materials free from toxic and polluting species. In this regard, the oxidative polymerization of N-(4-aminophenyl)aniline, aniline dimer, to produce poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline), P4ADA, a kind of PANI, represents an innovative alternative to the traditional synthesis because the obtained polymer results free from carcinogenic and/or polluting co-products, and, moreover, more soluble than traditional PANI. This latter feature can be exploited to obtain P4ADA nanofibers by electrospinning technique. In this paper we report the advances obtained in the P4ADA nanofibers electrospinnig. A comparison among polyethylene oxide (PEO), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS), as the second polymer to facilitate the electrospinning process, is shown. In order to increase the conductivity of P4ADA nanofibers, two strategies were adopted and compared: selective insulating binder removal from electrospun nanofibers by a rinsing tratment, afterwards optimizing the minimum amount of binder necessary for the electrospinning process. Moreover, the effect of PEO/P4ADA weight ratio on the fibers morphology and conductivity was highlighted. PMID:27483933

  6. A review of hemorheology: Measuring techniques and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Patrícia C.; Pinho, Fernando T.; Alves, Manuel A.; Oliveira, Mónica S. N.

    2016-02-01

    Significant progress has been made over the years on the topic of hemorheology, not only in terms of the development of more accurate and sophisticated techniques, but also in terms of understanding the phenomena associated with blood components, their interactions and impact upon blood properties. The rheological properties of blood are strongly dependent on the interactions and mechanical properties of red blood cells, and a variation of these properties can bring further insight into the human health state and can be an important parameter in clinical diagnosis. In this article, we provide both a reference for hemorheological research and a resource regarding the fundamental concepts in hemorheology. This review is aimed at those starting in the field of hemodynamics, where blood rheology plays a significant role, but also at those in search of the most up-to-date findings (both qualitative and quantitative) in hemorheological measurements and novel techniques used in this context, including technical advances under more extreme conditions such as in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow or under extensional flow, which impose large deformations comparable to those found in the microcirculatory system and in diseased vessels. Given the impressive rate of increase in the available knowledge on blood flow, this review is also intended to identify areas where current knowledge is still incomplete, and which have the potential for new, exciting and useful research. We also discuss the most important parameters that can lead to an alteration of blood rheology, and which as a consequence can have a significant impact on the normal physiological behavior of blood.

  7. Fabrication of a microlens array in BK7 through laser ablation and thermal treatment techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, M.; Nieto, D.; Flores-Arias, M. T.

    2015-04-01

    We propose a laser-based method for fabricating microlens on borosilicate glass substrates. The technique is composed by a laser direct-write technique using a Nd : YVO4 for fabricating the microlens arrays and a post thermal treatment with a CO2 laser for improving its morphological and optical properties. The proposed technique will allow us to obtain microlenses with a broad range of diameters (50μm-500μm) and focal lengths (1mm-5mm). By combining laser direct-write and the thermal treatment assisted by a CO2 laser, we are able to obtain good quality elements.

  8. Innovative Laser Techniques in Chemical Kinetics: A Pedagogical Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalenko, Laurie J.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    Considers two types of laser applications in kinetics. Explores short laser pulses to prepare a reactant in a known state and a continuous laser as a probe to monitor specific species in a reaction. Describes how lasers work and provides several examples of kinetic reactions. (ML)

  9. Thermal diffusivity of diamond films using a laser pulse technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Winfree, William P.; Crews, B. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process. A laser pulse technique was developed to measure the thermal diffusivity of diamond films deposited on a silicon substrate. The effective thermal diffusivity of a diamond film on silicon was measured by observing the phase and amplitude of the cyclic thermal waves generated by laser pulses. An analytical model is presented to calculate the effective in-plane (face-parallel) diffusivity of a two-layer system. The model is used to reduce the effective thermal diffusivity of the diamonds/silicon sample to a value for the thermal diffusivity and conductivity of the diamond film. The average effective diffusivity values are 1.47 + or - 0.03 and 1.83 + or - 0.10 yielding thermal diffusivity values of 7.46 + or - 0.90 and 7.33 + or - 0.70 sq cm/s respectively, for the two samples; the calculated thermal con ductivity values are 13.50 and 13.28 W/cmK, which are better than that of type 1a natural diamond. The phase and amplitude measurements give similar results.

  10. Removing baseline flame's spectrum by using advanced recovering spectrum techniques.

    PubMed

    Arias, Luis; Sbarbaro, Daniel; Torres, Sergio

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, a novel automated algorithm to estimate and remove the continuous baseline from measured flame spectra is proposed. The algorithm estimates the continuous background based on previous information obtained from a learning database of continuous flame spectra. Then, the discontinuous flame emission is calculated by subtracting the estimated continuous baseline from the measured spectrum. The key issue subtending the learning database is that the continuous flame emissions are predominant in the sooty regions, in absence of discontinuous radiation. The proposed algorithm was tested using natural gas and bio-oil flames spectra at different combustion conditions, and the goodness-of-fit coefficient (GFC) quality metric was used to quantify the performance in the estimation process. Additionally, the commonly used first derivative method (FDM) for baseline removing was applied to the same testing spectra in order to compare and to evaluate the proposed technique. The achieved results show that the proposed method is a very attractive tool for designing advanced combustion monitoring strategies of discontinuous emissions. PMID:22945158

  11. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask ‘how are nanoshapes created?’, ‘how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?’, ‘how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?’. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed. PMID:25485133

  12. Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Advances in Science, Techniques, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2009-01-01

    More than 25% of children survive to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrests, and 5% to 10% survive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. This review of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation addresses the epidemiology of pediatric cardiac arrests, mechanisms of coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the 4 phases of cardiac arrest resuscitation, appropriate interventions during each phase, special resuscitation circumstances, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The key elements of pathophysiology that impact and match the timing, intensity, duration, and variability of the hypoxic-ischemic insult to evidence-based interventions are reviewed. Exciting discoveries in basic and applied-science laboratories are now relevant for specific subpopulations of pediatric cardiac arrest victims and circumstances (eg, ventricular fibrillation, neonates, congenital heart disease, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Improving the quality of interventions is increasingly recognized as a key factor for improving outcomes. Evolving training strategies include simulation training, just-in-time and just-in-place training, and crisis-team training. The difficult issue of when to discontinue resuscitative efforts is addressed. Outcomes from pediatric cardiac arrests are improving. Advances in resuscitation science and state-of-the-art implementation techniques provide the opportunity for further improvement in outcomes among children after cardiac arrest. PMID:18977991

  13. Development of advanced strain diagnostic techniques for reactor environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Miller, Timothy J.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Urrea, David Anthony,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01

    The following research is operated as a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative at Sandia National Laboratories. The long-term goals of the program include sophisticated diagnostics of advanced fuels testing for nuclear reactors for the Department of Energy (DOE) Gen IV program, with the future capability to provide real-time measurement of strain in fuel rod cladding during operation in situ at any research or power reactor in the United States. By quantifying the stress and strain in fuel rods, it is possible to significantly improve fuel rod design, and consequently, to improve the performance and lifetime of the cladding. During the past year of this program, two sets of experiments were performed: small-scale tests to ensure reliability of the gages, and reactor pulse experiments involving the most viable samples in the Annulated Core Research Reactor (ACRR), located onsite at Sandia. Strain measurement techniques that can provide useful data in the extreme environment of a nuclear reactor core are needed to characterize nuclear fuel rods. This report documents the progression of solutions to this issue that were explored for feasibility in FY12 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.

  14. Thermal characterization of nanofluids using laser induced thermal lens technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, Achamma; Kumar, Rajesh B.; George, Sajan D.

    2009-08-01

    A laser induced thermal lens technique has been employed to evaluate the dynamic thermal parameter, the thermal diffusivity, of gold nanofluids. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by citrate reduction of HAuCl4 in water. The UVVIS optical absorption spectra show an absorption peak around 540 nm owing to surface Plasmon resonance band of the gold particles. The thermal diffusivity of gold nanoparticles was evaluated by knowing the time constant of transient thermal lens obtained by fitting the experimental curve to the theoretical model of the mode-matched thermal lens. Analyses of the results show that the nanofluid exhibits lower thermal diffusivity value in comparison to the host medium, water. Further investigations also reveal that the concentration of nanoparticles in the fluid have influence on the measured thermal diffusivity value. Results are interpreted in terms of interfacial thermal resistance around the nanoparticles as well as on the clustering of nanoparticles.

  15. Mars laser altimeter based on a single photon ranging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel; Sopko, B.; Pershin, S.

    1993-01-01

    The Mars 94/96 Mission will carry, among others things, the balloon probe experiment. The balloon with the scientific cargo in the gondola underneath will drift in the Mars atmosphere, its altitude will range from zero, in the night, up to 5 km at noon. The accurate gondola altitude will be determined by an altimeter. As the Balloon gondola mass is strictly limited, the altimeter total mass and power consumption are critical; maximum allowed is a few hundred grams a few tens of mWatts of average power consumption. We did propose, design, and construct the laser altimeter based on the single photon ranging technique. Topics covered include the following: principle of operation, altimeter construction, and ground tests.

  16. An advanced optical system for laser ablation propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstue, Grant; Fork, Richard; Reardon, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel space-based ablation driven propulsion engine concept utilizing transmitted energy in the form of a series of ultra-short optical pulses. Key differences are generating the pulses at the transmitting spacecraft and the safe delivery of that energy to the receiving spacecraft for propulsion. By expanding the beam diameter during transmission in space, the energy can propagate at relatively low intensity and then be refocused and redistributed to create an array of ablation sites at the receiver. The ablation array strategy allows greater control over flight dynamics and eases thermal management. Research efforts for this transmission and reception of ultra-short optical pulses include: (1) optical system design; (2) electrical system requirements; (3) thermal management; (4) structured energy transmission safety. Research has also been focused on developing an optical switch concept for the multiplexing of the ultra-short pulses. This optical switch strategy implements multiple reflectors polished into a rotating momentum wheel device to combine the pulses from different laser sources. The optical system design must minimize the thermal load on any one optical element. Initial specifications and modeling for the optical system are being produced using geometrical ray-tracing software to give a better understanding of the optical requirements. In regards to safety, we have advanced the retro-reflective beam locking strategy to include look-ahead capabilities for long propagation distances. Additional applications and missions utilizing multiplexed pulse transmission are also presented. Because the research is in early development, it provides an opportunity for new and valuable advances in the area of transmitted energy for propulsion as well as encourages joint international efforts. Researchers from different countries can cooperate in order to find constructive and safe uses of ordered pulse transmission for propulsion in future space

  17. Hybrid inverse lithography techniques for advanced hierarchical memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guangming; Hooker, Kevin; Irby, Dave; Zhang, Yunqiang; Ward, Brian; Cecil, Tom; Hall, Brett; Lee, Mindy; Kim, Dave; Lucas, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Traditional segment-based model-based OPC methods have been the mainstream mask layout optimization techniques in volume production for memory and embedded memory devices for many device generations. These techniques have been continually optimized over time to meet the ever increasing difficulties of memory and memory periphery patterning. There are a range of difficult issues for patterning embedded memories successfully. These difficulties include the need for a very high level of symmetry and consistency (both within memory cells themselves and between cells) due to circuit effects such as noise margin requirements in SRAMs. Memory cells and access structures consume a large percentage of area in embedded devices so there is a very high return from shrinking the cell area as much as possible. This aggressive scaling leads to very difficult resolution, 2D CD control and process window requirements. Additionally, the range of interactions between mask synthesis corrections of neighboring areas can extend well beyond the size of the memory cell, making it difficult to fully take advantage of the inherent designed cell hierarchy in mask pattern optimization. This is especially true for non-traditional (i.e., less dependent on geometric rule) OPC/RET methods such as inverse lithography techniques (ILT) which inherently have more model-based decisions in their optimizations. New inverse methods such as model-based SRAF placement and ILT are, however, well known to have considerable benefits in finding flexible mask pattern solutions to improve process window, improve 2D CD control, and improve resolution in ultra-dense memory patterns. They also are known to reduce recipe complexity and provide native MRC compliant mask pattern solutions. Unfortunately, ILT is also known to be several times slower than traditional OPC methods due to the increased computational lithographic optimizations it performs. In this paper, we describe and present results for a methodology to

  18. Synthesis of designed materials by laser-based direct metal deposition technique: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Huan

    Direct metal deposition (DMD), a laser-cladding based solid freeform fabrication technique, is capable of depositing multiple materials at desired composition which makes this technique a flexible method to fabricate heterogeneous components or functionally-graded structures. The inherently rapid cooling rate associated with the laser cladding process enables extended solid solubility in nonequilibrium phases, offering the possibility of tailoring new materials with advanced properties. This technical advantage opens the area of synthesizing a new class of materials designed by topology optimization method which have performance-based material properties. For better understanding of the fundamental phenomena occurring in multi-material laser cladding with coaxial powder injection, a self-consistent 3-D transient model was developed. Physical phenomena including laser-powder interaction, heat transfer, melting, solidification, mass addition, liquid metal flow, and species transportation were modeled and solved with a controlled-volume finite difference method. Level-set method was used to track the evolution of liquid free surface. The distribution of species concentration in cladding layer was obtained using a nonequilibrium partition coefficient model. Simulation results were compared with experimental observations and found to be reasonably matched. Multi-phase material microstructures which have negative coefficients of thermal expansion were studied for their DMD manufacturability. The pixel-based topology-optimal designs are boundary-smoothed by Bezier functions to facilitate toolpath design. It is found that the inevitable diffusion interface between different material-phases degrades the negative thermal expansion property of the whole microstructure. A new design method is proposed for DMD manufacturing. Experimental approaches include identification of laser beam characteristics during different laser-powder-substrate interaction conditions, an

  19. New advanced surface modification technique: titanium oxide ceramic surface implants: long-term clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Gyorgy; Kovacs, Lajos; Barabas, Jozsef; Nemeth, Zsolt; Maironna, Carlo

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background to advanced surface modification technologies and to present a new technique, involving the formation of a titanium oxide ceramic coating, with relatively long-term results of its clinical utilization. Three general techniques are used to modify surfaces: the addition or removal of material and the change of material already present. Surface properties can also be changed without the addition or removal of material, through the laser or electron beam thermal treatment. The new technique outlined in this paper relates to the production of a corrosion-resistant 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure on the surface of titanium implants. The layer is grown electrochemically from the bulk of the metal and is modified by heat treatment. Such oxide ceramic-coated implants have a number of advantageous properties relative to implants covered with various other coatings: a higher external hardness, a greater force of adherence between the titanium and the oxide ceramic coating, a virtually perfect insulation between the organism and the metal (no possibility of metal allergy), etc. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical, electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for a qualitative characterization. Finally, these implants (plates, screws for maxillofacial osteosynthesis and dental root implants) were applied in surgical practice for a period of 10 years. Tests and the experience acquired demonstrated the good properties of the titanium oxide ceramic-coated implants.

  20. Safe Helium--Neon Lasers Advance Understanding of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, C. Harry

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data, Federal and State regulations, and user data are presented to assess the safety factors of low-power lasers. General safety precautions, basic laser theory, the place of the laser in the classroom, and some introductory exercises are also presented. (Author/TS)

  1. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

    2004-08-20

    Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore

  2. Weldability and joining techniques for advanced fossil energy system alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Liu, W.; Yang, D.; Zhou, G.; Morrison, M.

    1998-05-01

    The efforts represent the concerns for the basic understanding of the weldability and fabricability of the advanced high temperature alloys so necessary to affect increases in the efficiency of the next generation Fossil Energy Power Plants. The effort was divided into three tasks with the first effort dealing with the welding and fabrication behavior of 310HCbN (HR3C), the second task details the studies aimed at understanding the weldability of a newly developed 310TaN high temperature stainless (a modification of 310 stainless) and Task 3 addressed the cladding of austenitic tubing with Iron-Aluminide using the GTAW process. Task 1 consisted of microstructural studies on 310HCbN and the development of a Tube Weldability test which has applications to production welding techniques as well as laboratory weldability assessments. In addition, the evaluation of ex-service 310HCbN which showed fireside erosion and cracking at the attachment weld locations was conducted. Task 2 addressed the behavior of the newly developed 310 TaN modification of standard 310 stainless steel and showed that the weldability was excellent and that the sensitization potential was minimal for normal welding and fabrication conditions. The microstructural evolution during elevated temperature testing was characterized and the second phase particles evolved upon aging were identified. Task 3 details the investigation undertaken to clad 310HCbN tubing with Iron Aluminide and developed welding conditions necessary to provide a crack free cladding. The work showed that both a preheat and a post-heat was necessary for crack free deposits and the effect of a third element on the cracking potential was defined together with the effect of the aluminum level for optimum weldability.

  3. Advanced laser driver for soft x-ray projection lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.E.; Beach, R.J.; Dane, C.B.; Reichert, P.; Honig, J.N.; Hackel, L.A.

    1994-03-01

    A diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser for use as a driver for a soft x-ray projection lithography system is described. The laser will output 0.5 to 1 J per pulse with about 5 ns pulse width at up to 1.5 kHz repetition frequency. The design employs microchannel-cooled diode laser arrays for optical pumping, zigzag slab energy storage, and a single frequency oscillator injected regenerative amplifier cavity using phase conjugator beam correction for near diffraction limited beam quality. The design and initial results of this laser`s activation experiments will be presented.

  4. Investigation of joining techniques for advanced austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Kikuchi, Y.; Shi, C.; Gill, T.P.S.

    1991-05-01

    Modified Alloys 316 and 800H, designed for high temperature service, have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Assessment of the weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys has been conducted at the University of Tennessee. Four aspects of weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys were included in the investigation.

  5. Airborne Laser Scanning and Image Processing Techniques for Archaeological Prospection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltýnová, M.; Nový, P.

    2014-06-01

    Aerial photography was, for decades, an invaluable tool for archaeological prospection, in spite of the limitation of this method to deforested areas. The airborne laser scanning (ALS) method can be nowadays used to map complex areas and suitable complement earlier findings. This article describes visualization and image processing methods that can be applied on digital terrain models (DTMs) to highlight objects hidden in the landscape. Thanks to the analysis of visualized DTM it is possible to understand the landscape evolution including the differentiation between natural processes and human interventions. Different visualization methods were applied on a case study area. A system of parallel tracks hidden in a forest and its surroundings - part of old route called "Devil's Furrow" near the town of Sázava was chosen. The whole area around well known part of Devil's Furrow has not been prospected systematically yet. The data from the airborne laser scanning acquired by the Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre was used. The average density of the point cloud was approximately 1 point/m2 The goal of the project was to visualize the utmost smallest terrain discontinuities, e.g. tracks and erosion furrows, which some were not wholly preserved. Generally we were interested in objects that are clearly not visible in DTMs displayed in the form of shaded relief. Some of the typical visualization methods were tested (shaded relief, aspect and slope image). To get better results we applied image-processing methods that were successfully used on aerial photographs or hyperspectral images in the past. The usage of different visualization techniques on one site allowed us to verify the natural character of the southern part of Devil's Furrow and find formations up to now hidden in the forests.

  6. Laser Stimulated Genomic Exchange in Stem Cells. Laser Non-cloning Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2012-02-01

    I propose a novel technique for a pluripotent stem cell generation. Genomic exchange is stimulated by the beat-wave free electron laser, (B-W FEL), frequency matching with the frequencies of the DNAootnotetextJ.D. Watson and F. H. C. Crick, Nature, 171, 737-738 (1953). eigen-oscillations. B-W FEL-1ootnotetextV. Stefan, B.I.Cohen, C. Joshi Science, 243,4890, (Jan 27,1989); Stefan, et al., Bull. APS. 32, No. 9, 1713 (1987); Stefan, APS March-2011, #S1.143; APS- March-2009, #K1.276. scans entire stem cell; B-W FEL-2 probes the chromosomes. The scanning and probing lasers: 300-500nm and 100-300nm, respectively; irradiances: the order-of-10s mW/cm^2 (above the threshold value for a particular gene structure); repetition rate of few-100s Hz. A variety of genetic-matching conditions can be arranged. Genomic glitches, (the cell nucleus transferootnotetextScott Noggle et al. Nature, 478, 70-75 (06 October 2011).), can be hedged by the use of lasers.

  7. Laser pediatric crowns performed without anesthesia: a contemporary technique.

    PubMed

    Jacboson, B; Berger, J; Kravitz, R; Patel, P

    2003-01-01

    Extensive caries resulting in the need for a stainless steel crown in primary teeth may now be prepared with the use of the WaterlaseTM YSGG Laser, (Biolase) hard and soft-tissue laser. The use of the laser eliminates the need for local anesthesia, thereby providing optimal patient comfort and compliance. PMID:14604135

  8. Defect luminescence in oxides nanocrystals grown by laser assisted techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, J.; Soares, M. R. N.; Santos, N. F.; Holz, T.; Ben Sedrine, N.; Nico, C.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Neves, A. J.; Costa, F. M.; Monteiro, T.

    2015-06-01

    Wide band gap oxides, such as ZnO, SnO2 and ZrO2, are functional materials with a wide range of applications in several important technological areas such as those including lighting, transparent electronics, sensors, catalysis and biolabeling. Recently, doping and co-doping of oxides with lanthanides have attracted a strong interest for lighting purposes, especially among them nanophosphors for bioassays. Tailoring the crystalline materials physical properties for such applications often requires a well-controlled incorporation of dopants in the material lattice and a comprehensive understanding of their role in the oxides matrices. These undoped or intentionally doped oxides have band gap energies exceeding 3.3 eV at room temperature and are known to exhibit optically active centers that span from the ultraviolet to the near infrared region. Typically, by using photon energy excitation above the materials band gap, high quality undoped materials display narrow emission lines near the band edge due to free and bound-exciton recombination, as well as shallow donor-acceptor recombination pairs. Additionally, broad emission bands are often observed in these wide band gap hosts, hampering some of the desired physical properties for further applications. Recognizing and understanding the role of the dopant-related defects when deliberately introduced in the oxide hosts, as well as their influence on the samples luminescence properties, constitutes a matter of exploitation by the scientific community worldwide. In this work, we investigate the luminescence properties of undoped and lanthanide doped oxide materials grown by laser assisted techniques. Laser assisted flow deposition (LAFD) and pulse laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) were used for the growth of ZnO, SnO2 and yttria stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) micro and nanocrystals with different morphologies, respectively. Regarding the YSZ host, trivalent lanthanide ions were optically activated by in-situ doping and co

  9. Technique of laser confocal and Raman spectroscopy for living cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaochen; Zhu, Lianqing

    2013-10-01

    Because of the shortcomings of the main methods used to analysis single cell, the need of single living cell analysis with no damage, unmarked and in situ dynamic multi-parameter measurement is urgent in the life sciences and biomedical advanced research field. And the method of for living cells analysis is proposed. The spectral pretreatment technology of living cell is the key work of laser confocal Raman spectroscopy. To study the spectrum processing methods for Raman spectrum on single living cell and develop the pre-process techniques to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, sensitivity, and decrease the influence of fluorescence, elimination the cosmic rays was used to improve the spectrum. The classification, average and filtration of spectrum were applied to enhance signal-to-noise ratio. The fluorescence was depressed for quantity analysis or utilized for analysis by comparing the background and the spectrum. The results show that the proposed technique for laser confocal Raman spectrum of single cell can perform the sensitive and weak intensity peaks and reflect the information of molecules structures very well.

  10. [Advances in the research of laser Doppler perfusion imaging in burn wounds].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Xu, Longshun; Hu, Dahai; Qu, Yi; Wang, Guodong; Wang, Hongtao

    2014-04-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) works through the Doppler effect of light wave, and it could depict the blood flow value of the entire wound in two-dimensional image without contacting the detection site directly. In resent years, LDPI has been proved to be effective to evaluate healing potential of a wound, and to predict burn depth and scar formation. The accuracy of LDPI is higher than other traditional methods and technique. However, there are still many influencing factors for the clinical application of LDPI scanning. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of advances in the research of LDPI for clinical application in the care of burn wounds and influencing factors for accurate scanning. PMID:24989665

  11. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Lasers do not require a vacuum (as do electron beam welders) and the welds they produce high depth-to-width ratios. Scoping with a small pulsed 50 J YAG laser indicated that lasers could produce successful welds in vanadium alloy (V-5%Cr-5%Ti) sheet (1 mm thick) when the fusion zone was isolated from air. The pulsed laser required an isolating chamber filled with inert gas to produce welds that did not contain cracks and showed only minor hardness increases. Following the initial scoping tests, a series of tests were preformed with a 6 kW continuous CO{sub 2} laser. Successful bead-on-plate welds were made on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys to depths of about 4 mm with this laser.

  12. CO{sub 2} laser technology for advanced particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1996-06-01

    Short-pulse, high-power CO{sub 2} lasers open new prospects for development of ultra-high gradient laser-driven electron accelerators. The advantages of {lambda}=10 {mu}m CO{sub 2} laser radiation over the more widely exploited solid state lasers with {lambda}{approximately}1 {mu}m are based on a {lambda}{sup 2}-proportional ponderomotive potential, {lambda}-proportional phase slippage, and {lambda}-proportional scaling of the laser accelerator structures. We show how a picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser that is under construction at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility may benefit the ATF`s experimental program of testing far-field, near-field, and plasma accelerator schemes.

  13. Plasma and laser kinetics and field emission from carbon nanotube fibers for an Advanced Noble Gas Laser (ANGL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Paul J.; Lockwood, Nathaniel P.; Lange, Matthew A.; Hostutler, David A.; Guild, Eric M.; Guy, Matthew R.; McCord, John E.; Pitz, Greg A.

    2016-03-01

    A metastable argon laser operating at 912 nm has been demonstrated by optically pumping with a pulsed titanium sapphire laser to investigate the temporal dynamics of an Advanced Noble Gas Laser (ANGL). Metastable argon concentrations on the order of 1011 cm-3 were maintained with the use of a radio frequency (RF) capacitively coupled discharge. The end-pumped laser produced output powers under 2 mW of average power with pulse lengths on the order of 100 ns. A comparison between empirical results and a four level laser model using longitudinally average pump and inter-cavity intensities is made. An alternative, highly-efficient method of argon metastable production for ANGL was explored using carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers.

  14. Key techniques for space-based solar pumped semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Xiong, Sheng-jun; Liu, Xiao-long; Han, Wei-hua

    2014-12-01

    In space, the absence of atmospheric turbulence, absorption, dispersion and aerosol factors on laser transmission. Therefore, space-based laser has important values in satellite communication, satellite attitude controlling, space debris clearing, and long distance energy transmission, etc. On the other hand, solar energy is a kind of clean and renewable resources, the average intensity of solar irradiation on the earth is 1353W/m2, and it is even higher in space. Therefore, the space-based solar pumped lasers has attracted much research in recent years, most research focuses on solar pumped solid state lasers and solar pumped fiber lasers. The two lasing principle is based on stimulated emission of the rare earth ions such as Nd, Yb, Cr. The rare earth ions absorb light only in narrow bands. This leads to inefficient absorption of the broad-band solar spectrum, and increases the system heating load, which make the system solar to laser power conversion efficiency very low. As a solar pumped semiconductor lasers could absorb all photons with energy greater than the bandgap. Thus, solar pumped semiconductor lasers could have considerably higher efficiencies than other solar pumped lasers. Besides, solar pumped semiconductor lasers has smaller volume chip, simpler structure and better heat dissipation, it can be mounted on a small satellite platform, can compose satellite array, which can greatly improve the output power of the system, and have flexible character. This paper summarizes the research progress of space-based solar pumped semiconductor lasers, analyses of the key technologies based on several application areas, including the processing of semiconductor chip, the design of small and efficient solar condenser, and the cooling system of lasers, etc. We conclude that the solar pumped vertical cavity surface-emitting semiconductor lasers will have a wide application prospects in the space.

  15. Optical-fiber-transmission laser sheet technique for flow visualization in intermittent high-speed wind tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chenghang

    2003-04-01

    The light sheet technique provides a unique method of visualization for off-body flow fields at subsonic through supersonic speeds. But conventional mirror tansmission laser systems have some shortcomings: The harsh environments of high speed wind tunnels often cause the misalignment of the optical components and the contamination of the mirror surfaces. The exposed laser beam is dangerous to the persons at the work sites. This paper presents an advanced optical-fiber-transmission laser sheet system, which provides a solution to the problems above and greatly improves the quality, safety and reliability of the light sheet. The emphasis is laid on the detailed composition of the new type visualization system. Some examples of its applications in transonic/supersonic wind tunnels are also given in this paper.

  16. Novel Polarization Techniques and Instrumentation for Glacial Melt Pond Laser Bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton-Grimley, R. A.; Gisler, A.; Thayer, J. P.; Stillwell, R. A.; Grigsby, S.; Crowley, G.

    2015-12-01

    Melt ponds contribute significantly to the feedback processes that serve to amplify the polar response to climate change. A substantial volume of melt water is found in shallow ponds during the Arctic summer on the Greenland Ice Sheet, which have consequences on glacial dynamics and ice loss, however, the water content and subsurface topography of the ponds has proven difficult to measure. The need for instrumentation to provide high-resolution depth measurements in shallow water is addressed by utilizing novel polarization discrimination techniques in a high repetition rate, low power, 532nm photon counting lidar system. Recent advances demonstrate the ability to achieve kHz acquisition rates with a depth precision of 1cm. Use of this technique eliminates the necessity for short laser pulses and high-bandwidth detectors and instead provides a less complex, smaller, and more economical solution to airborne lidar instrumentation. Recent deployment of the lidar system aboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft, during the 2015 NASA SARP campaign, provided critical engineering data and experience to facilitate further advancement of an airborne bathymetric lidar system for melt pond studies. Signal performance from flight indicates a 50 cm horizontal ground resolution at nominal altitudes below 1000 feet above ground level, and also indicates that maintaining a vertical precision of 1cm is achievable, though these results will be further examined. Results from the DC-8 aircraft deployment are promising, and the modest system size opens up the possibility for future integration into a UAS. This presentation will highlight the measurement capabilities of this novel lidar system, and explore polarization scattering properties of laser light with snow, ice, liquid water. System performance metrics will be evaluated for operating during summer periods in the Polar Regions and discuss the scientific contribution to Cryosphere research - most notably the depth and subsurface ice

  17. Advances in commercial, mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempler, Nils; Lubeigt, Walter; Bialkowski, Bartlomiej; Hamilton, Craig J.; Maker, Gareth T.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.

    2016-03-01

    In launching the Dragonfly, M Squared Lasers has successfully commercialized recent advances in mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting laser technologies operating between 920 nm - 1050 nm. This paper will describe the latest advances in the development of a new generation of Dragonfly lasers. The improved system has been engineered to utilise low-cost semiconductor gain media and integrated diode pumping, whilst exhibiting minimal footprint, diffraction limited beam quality and low intrinsic noise. Early experiments have resulted in pulses with 540mW of average output power and 150fs of duration at 200MHz pulse repetition frequency.

  18. AIRBORNE INERTIAL SURVEYING USING LASER TRACKING AND PROFILING TECHNIQUES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cyran, Edward J.

    1986-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey through a contract with the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory has developed the Aerial Profiling of Terrain System. This is an airborne inertial surveying system designed to use a laser tracker to provide position and velocity updates, and a laser profiler to measure terrain elevations. The performance characteristics of the system are discussed with emphasis placed on the performance of the laser devices. The results of testing the system are summarized for both performance evaluation and applications.

  19. NASA Laser Light Scattering Advanced Technology Development Workshop, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The major objective of the workshop was to explore the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware and to assess user requirements and needs for a laser light scattering instrument in a reduced gravity environment. The workshop addressed experimental needs and stressed hardware development.

  20. Particle acceleration studies with intense lasers and advanced light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, C. D.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; Rusby, D.; McKenna, P.; Ridgers, C. P.; Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Wilson, L.; Green, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    The interaction of lasers with matter is a subject which has progressed rapidly over the last two decades as higher intensity lasers are found to have possible applications in inertial fusion, laboratory astrophysics and ion acceleration for oncology or ultrafast proton probing. All of these applications require a good understanding of laser-electron coupling and fast electron transport in solid targets which has proven difficult to diagnose. Here we present data from an experiment carried out on the Astra Gemini laser system at STFC-Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, where novel targets and diagnostics illuminate the complex processes at play. An outline of how x-ray free electron lasers may further expand our understanding of such processes will also be described.

  1. Two Micron Laser Technology Advancements at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    An Independent Laser Review Panel set up to examine NASA s space-based lidar missions and the technology readiness of lasers appropriate for space-based lidars indicated a critical need for an integrated research and development strategy to move laser transmitter technology from low technical readiness levels to the higher levels required for space missions. Based on the review, a multiyear Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) was initiated by NASA in 2002 to develop technologies that ensure the successful development of the broad range of lidar missions envisioned by NASA. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of pulsed 2-micron solid-state laser technologies at NASA Langley Research Center for enabling space-based measurement of wind and carbon dioxide.

  2. Comparison of advanced optical imaging techniques with current otolaryngology diagnostics for improved middle ear assessment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Ryan M.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Spillman, Darold R.; Novak, Michael A.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otolaryngologists utilize a variety of diagnostic techniques to assess middle ear health. Tympanometry, audiometry, and otoacoustic emissions examine the mobility of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) and ossicles using ear canal pressure and auditory tone delivery and detection. Laser Doppler vibrometry provides non-contact vibrational measurement, and acoustic reflectometry is used to assess middle ear effusion using sonar. These technologies and techniques have advanced the field beyond the use of the standard otoscope, a simple tissue magnifier, yet the need for direct visualization of middle ear disease for superior detection, assessment, and management remains. In this study, we evaluated the use of portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) and pneumatic low-coherence interferometry (LCI) systems with handheld probe delivery to standard tympanometry, audiometry, otoacoustic emissions, laser Doppler vibrometry, and acoustic reflectometry. Comparison of these advanced optical imaging techniques and current diagnostics was conducted with a case study subject with a history of unilateral eardrum trauma. OCT and pneumatic LCI provide novel dynamic spatiotemporal structural data of the middle ear, such as the thickness of the eardrum and quantitative detection of underlying disease pathology, which could allow for more accurate diagnosis and more appropriate management than currently possible.

  3. Recent advances in sample preparation techniques for effective bioanalytical methods.

    PubMed

    Kole, Prashant Laxman; Venkatesh, Gantala; Kotecha, Jignesh; Sheshala, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent developments in bioanalysis sample preparation techniques and gives an update on basic principles, theory, applications and possibilities for automation, and a comparative discussion on the advantages and limitation of each technique. Conventional liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), protein precipitation (PP) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques are now been considered as methods of the past. The last decade has witnessed a rapid development of novel sample preparation techniques in bioanalysis. Developments in SPE techniques such as selective sorbents and in the overall approach to SPE, such as hybrid SPE and molecularly imprinted polymer SPE, have been addressed. Considerable literature has been published in the area of solid-phase micro-extraction and its different versions, e.g. stir bar sorptive extraction, and their application in the development of selective and sensitive bioanalytical methods. Techniques such as dispersive solid-phase extraction, disposable pipette extraction and micro-extraction by packed sorbent offer a variety of extraction phases and provide unique advantages to bioanalytical methods. On-line SPE utilizing column-switching techniques is rapidly gaining acceptance in bioanalytical applications. PP sample preparation techniques such as PP filter plates/tubes offer many advantages like removal of phospholipids and proteins in plasma/serum. Newer approaches to conventional LLE techniques (salting-out LLE) are also covered in this review article. PMID:21154887

  4. Analytical model for ring heater thermal compensation in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

    PubMed

    Ramette, Joshua; Kasprzack, Marie; Brooks, Aidan; Blair, Carl; Wang, Haoyu; Heintze, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Advanced laser interferometer gravitational-wave detectors use high laser power to achieve design sensitivity. A small part of this power is absorbed in the interferometer cavity mirrors where it creates thermal lenses, causing aberrations in the main laser beam that must be minimized by the actuation of "ring heaters," which are additional heater elements that are aimed to reduce the temperature gradients in the mirrors. In this article we derive the first, to the best of our knowledge, analytical model of the temperature field generated by an ideal ring heater. We express the resulting optical aberration contribution to the main laser beam in this axisymmetric case. Used in conjunction with wavefront measurements, our model provides a more complete understanding of the thermal state of the cavity mirrors and will allow a more efficient use of the ring heaters in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory. PMID:27139664

  5. BESTIA - The next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Skaritka, John; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.

    2016-09-01

    Over the last two decades, BNL's ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. Our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particle acceleration of ions and electrons.

  6. BESTIA - the next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Skaritka, John; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.

    2015-12-02

    Over the last two decades, BNL’s ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. In addition, our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particlemore » acceleration of ions and electrons.« less

  7. Status of advanced ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, K. L.; Akutsu, T.; Dwyer, S.; Puppo, P.

    2015-05-01

    Ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave (GW) detection were first constructed starting 20 years ago and as of 2010 collection of several years’ worth of science data at initial design sensitivities was completed. Upgrades to the initial detectors together with construction of brand new detectors are ongoing and feature advanced technologies to improve the sensitivity to GWs. This conference proceeding provides an overview of the common design features of ground-based laser interferometric GW detectors and establishes the context for the status updates of each of the four gravitational-wave detectors around the world: Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, GEO 600 and KAGRA.

  8. Advances in 193 nm excimer lasers for mass spectrometry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph; Esser, Hans-Gerd; Bonati, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Ongoing progress in mass analysis applications such as laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry of solid samples and ultraviolet photoionization mediated sequencing of peptides and proteins is to a large extent driven by ultrashort wavelength excimer lasers at 193 nm. This paper will introduce the latest improvements achieved in the development of compact high repetition rate excimer lasers and elaborate on the impact on mass spectrometry instrumentation. Various performance and lifetime measurements obtained in a long-term endurance test over the course of 18 months will be shown and discussed in view of the laser source requirements of different mass spectrometry tasks. These sampling type applications are served by excimer lasers delivering pulsed 193 nm output of several mJ as well as fast repetition rates which are already approaching one Kilohertz. In order to open up the pathway from the laboratory to broader market industrial use, sufficient component lifetimes and long-term stable performance behavior have to be ensured. The obtained long-term results which will be presented are based on diverse 193 nm excimer laser tube improvements aiming at e.g. optimizing the gas flow dynamics and have extended the operational life the laser tube for the first time over several billion pulses even under high duty-cycle conditions.

  9. Recent advances in microscopic techniques for visualizing leukocytes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rohit; Tikoo, Shweta; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Leukocytes are inherently motile and interactive cells. Recent advances in intravital microscopy approaches have enabled a new vista of their behavior within intact tissues in real time. This brief review summarizes the developments enabling the tracking of immune responses in vivo. PMID:27239292

  10. Recent advances in microscopic techniques for visualizing leukocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohit; Tikoo, Shweta; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Leukocytes are inherently motile and interactive cells. Recent advances in intravital microscopy approaches have enabled a new vista of their behavior within intact tissues in real time. This brief review summarizes the developments enabling the tracking of immune responses in vivo. PMID:27239292

  11. Bricklaying Curriculum: Advanced Bricklaying Techniques. Instructional Materials. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turcotte, Raymond J.; Hendrix, Laborn J.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist bricklaying instructors in providing performance-based instruction in advanced bricklaying. Included in the first section of the guide are units on customized or architectural masonry units; glass block; sills, lintels, and copings; and control (expansion) joints. The next two units deal with cut,…

  12. Advanced NDE techniques for quantitative characterization of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center and their applications that have resulted in quantitative assessment of material properties based on thermal and ultrasonic measurements are reviewed. Specific applications include ultrasonic determination of bolt tension, ultrasonic and thermal characterization of bonded layered structures, characterization of composite materials, and disbonds in aircraft skins.

  13. Advances in Direct Detection Doppler Lidar Technology and Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we will describe the ground based Doppler lidar system which is mounted in a modified delivery van to allow field deployment and operations. The system includes an aerosol double edge receiver optimized for aerosol backscatter Doppler measurements at 1064 nm and a molecular double edge receiver which operates at 355 nm. The lidar system will be described including details of the injection seeded diode pumped laser transmitter and the piezoelectrically tunable high spectral resolution Fabry Perot etalon which is used to measure the Doppler shift. Examples of tropospheric wind profiles obtained with the system will also be presented to demonstrate its capabilities.

  14. Recent advances in VECSELs for laser projection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, H.; Illek, S.; Pietzonka, I.; Furitsch, M.; Plößl, A.; Haupt, S.; Kühnelt, M.; Schulz, R.; Steegmüller, U.; Höfer, T.; Strauß, U.

    2011-03-01

    Laser projectors integrated in portable devices offer a new platform for media display but put strong demands on the laser sources in terms of efficiency, modulation band width, operating temperature range and device cost. Osram Opto Semiconductors has developed and produces synthetic green lasers for projection applications on which the latest results are reported. Based on vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) technology and second harmonic generation an output power of >75mW has been achieved. The maximum output power is to a large extent limited by the high thermal resistance of the monolithic VECSEL chip used. To overcome the thermal limitations a new thinfilm VECSEL chip design is proposed where the epitaxial layers are transferred to a silicon carrier and processed on wafer level, thus significantly lowering the thermal resistance and improving the maximum output power.

  15. Mid-IR laser system for advanced neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosner, M.; Wu, C.; Heller, D. F.

    2014-03-01

    We present work on a laser system operating in the near- and mid-IR spectral regions, having output characteristics designed to be optimal for cutting various tissue types. We provide a brief overview of laser-tissue interactions and the importance of controlling certain properties of the light beam. We describe the principle of operation of the laser system, which is generally based on a wavelength-tunable alexandrite laser oscillator/amplifier, and multiple Raman conversion stages. This configuration provides robust access to the mid-IR spectral region at wavelengths, pulse energies, pulse durations, and repetition rates that are attractive for neurosurgical applications. We summarize results for ultra-precise selective cutting of nerve sheaths and retinas with little collateral damage; this has applications in procedures such as optic-nerve-sheath fenestration and possible spinal repair. We also report results for cutting cornea, and dermal tissues.

  16. Advances in NASA research on nuclear-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Young, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    NASA has been primarily interested in nuclear-pumped lasers using the He-3 or U-235F6 reaction for lasant excitation. With He-3 excitation, a large volume, multiple-path He-3-Ar nuclear laser has produced an output of 1 kilowatt. Power deposition was shown to be homogeneous over this volume. The CO laser has been pumped for the first time using the He-3 reaction, producing approximately 200 Watts. Using a boron-10 coating to excite N2, nuclear lasing has been achieved in CO2 in a transfer laser configuration. Nuclear lasing of Ar-Xe has been demonstrated using fission fragment excitation from U-235F6. Research on the gas core reactor has resulted in a steady state operational power of 30 kilowatts with flowing U-235F6 in an argon vortex.

  17. Expanding applications for surface-contaminant sensing using the laser interrogation of surface agents (LISA) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick L.; Higdon, N. S.; Chyba, Thomas H.; Armstrong, Wayne T.; Sedlacek, Arthur J., III; Christesen, Steven D.; Wong, Anna

    2004-02-01

    Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents (LISA) is a UV-Raman technique that provides short-range standoff detection and identification of surface-deposited chemical agents. ITT Industries, Advanced Engineering and Sciences Division, is currently developing and expanding the LISA technology under several programs that span a variety of missions for homeland defense. We will present and discuss some of these applications, while putting in perspective the overall evolution undergone by the technique within the last years. These applications include LISA-Recon (now called the Joint Contaminated Surface Detector--JCSD) which was developed under a cost-sharing arrangement with the U.S. Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command (SBCCOM) for incorporation on the Army"s future reconnaissance vehicles, and designed to demonstrate single-shot on-the-move measurements of chemical contaminants at concentration levels below the Army's requirements. In parallel, LISA-Shipboard is being developed to optimize the sensor technique for detection of surface contaminants in the operational environment of a ship. The most recently started activity is LISA-Inspector that is being developed to provide a transportable sensor in a 'cart-like' configuration.

  18. Thermal Conductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by a Steady-state Laser Heat-flux Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of low conductivity and high temperature capable thermal barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity under future high-performance and low-emission engine heat-flux conditions. In this paper, a unique steady-state CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 microns) heat-flux approach is described for determining the thermal conductivity and conductivity deduced cyclic durability of ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coating systems at very high temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. The thermal conductivity behavior of advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings for metallic and Si-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) component applications has also been investigated using the laser conductivity approach. The relationships between the lattice and radiation conductivities as a function of heat flux and thermal gradient at high temperatures have been examined for the ceramic coating systems. The steady-state laser heat-flux conductivity approach has been demonstrated as a viable means for the development and life prediction of advanced thermal barrier coatings for future turbine engine applications.

  19. Backscattered Electron Microscopy as an Advanced Technique in Petrography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krinsley, David Henry; Manley, Curtis Robert

    1989-01-01

    Three uses of this method with sandstone, desert varnish, and granite weathering are described. Background information on this technique is provided. Advantages of this type of microscopy are stressed. (CW)

  20. A Secure Test Technique for Pipelined Advanced Encryption Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Youhua; Togawa, Nozomu; Yanagisawa, Masao; Ohtsuki, Tatsuo

    In this paper, we presented a Design-for-Secure-Test (DFST) technique for pipelined AES to guarantee both the security and the test quality during testing. Unlike previous works, the proposed method can keep all the secrets inside and provide high test quality and fault diagnosis ability as well. Furthermore, the proposed DFST technique can significantly reduce test application time, test data volume, and test generation effort as additional benefits.

  1. Laser treatment of 13 benign oral vascular lesions by three different surgical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Umberto; Del Vecchio, Alessandro; Russo, Claudia; Gaimari, Gianfranco; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; España, Antoni J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Benign Oral Vascular Lesions (BOVLs) are a group of vascular diseases characterized by congenital, inflammatory or neoplastic vascular dilations clinically evidenced as more or less wide masses of commonly dark bluish color. If traumatized BOVLs are characterized by a great risk of hemorrhage and their treatment usually requires great caution to prevent massive bleeding. In the last decades lasers have dramatically changed the way of treatment of BOVLs permitting the application of even peculiar techniques that gave interesting advantages in their management reducing hemorrhage risks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capabilities and disadvantages of three laser assisted techniques in the management of BOVLs. Study design: In this study 13 BOVLs were treated by three different laser techniques: the traditional excisional biopsy (EB), and two less invasive techniques, the transmucosal thermocoagulation (TMT) and the intralesional photocoagulation (ILP). Two different laser devices were adopted in the study: a KTP laser (DEKA, Florence, Italy, 532nm) and a GaAlAs laser (Laser Innovation, Castelgandolfo, Italy, 808nm) selected since their great effectiveness on hemoglobin. Results: In each case, lasers permitted safe treatments of BOVLs without hemorrhages, both during the intervention and in the post-operative period. The minimally invasive techniques (TMT and ILP) permitted even the safe resolution of big lesions without tissue loss. Conclusions: Laser devices confirm to be the gold standard in BOVLs treatment, permitting even the introduction of minimal invasive surgery principles and reducing the risks of hemorrhage typical of these neoplasms. As usual in laser surgery, it is necessary a clear knowledge of the devices and of the laser-tissue interaction to optimize the results reducing risks and disadvantages. Key words:Oral vascular diseases, laser, photocoagulation. PMID:23385496

  2. Coal and Coal Constituent Studies by Advanced EMR Techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.; Odintsov, B.; Ceroke, P.J.

    1997-09-30

    Advanced electronic magnetic resonance (EMR) methods are used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. During this grant period, progress was made on a high frequency EMR system particularly appropriate for such studies and on low-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to examine the interaction between fluids such as water and the surface of suspended char particles.

  3. Coal and char studies by advanced EMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.; Odintsov, B.M.

    1998-09-30

    Advanced magnetic resonance (EMR) methods are used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. During this grant period, further progress was made on proton NMR and low-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to examine the interaction between fluids such as water and the surface of suspended char particles. Effects of char particle size on water nuclear spin relaxation, T2, were measured.

  4. COAL AND COAL CONSTITUENT STUDIES BY ADVANCED EMR TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    R. Linn Belford; Robert B. Clarkson

    1997-03-28

    Advanced electronic magnetic resonance (EMR) methods are used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. During this grant period, progress was made on setting up a separate high frequency EMR system particularly appropriate for such studies and exploring the use of low-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to examine the interaction between fluids such as water and the surface of suspended char particles.

  5. Coal and char studies by advanced EMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.; Odintsov, B.M.

    1999-03-31

    Advanced magnetic resonance (EMR) methods are used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. During this grant period, further progress was made on proton NMR and low-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to examine the interaction between fluids such as water and the surface of suspended char particles. Effects of char particle size and type on water nuclear spin relaxation, T2, were measured and modeled.

  6. On-line composition with laser-based techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, F.T.; Hartford, A. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current methods for determining the composition of coal gasification streams generally involve sampling, some treatment, and inherent delay times prior to analysis. Optical instrumentation, on the other hand, provides the potential for on-line, rapid-response monitoring of gasifier streams. Among the optical technques that appear quite promising for this application are coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and synchronous detection of laser-induced fluorescence (SDLIF).

  7. Process of stopping atoms with the Zeeman tuning technique with a single laser

    SciTech Connect

    Firmino, M.E.; Faria Leite, C.A.; Zilio, S.C.; Bagnato, V.S. )

    1990-04-01

    We report an observation of atoms stopped by laser light in an experiment using the Zeeman tuning technique. In contrast to previous experiments using the same technique, we are able to stop the atoms outside the slower solenoid using a single laser. The deceleration process is monitored through the measurement of the fluorescence along the deceleration path in such a way that the slower laser is also used for diagnosis. This technique also permits the realization of a few interesting observations on the process such as the position where the atoms stop scattering photons.

  8. Test techniques for determining laser ranging system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zagwodzki, T. W.

    1981-01-01

    Procedures and results of an on going test program intended to evaluate laser ranging system performance levels in the field as well as in the laboratory are summarized. Tests show that laser ranging system design requires consideration of time biases and RMS jitters of individual system components. All simple Q switched lasers tested were found to be inadequate for 10 centimeter ranging systems. Timing discriminators operating over a typical 100:1 dynamic signal range may introduce as much as 7 to 9 centimeters of range bias. Time interval units commercially available today are capable of half centimeter performance and are adequate for all field systems currently deployed. Photomultipliers tested show typical tube time biases of one centimeter with single photoelectron transit time jitter of approximately 10 centimeters. Test results demonstrate that NASA's Mobile Laser Ranging System (MOBLAS) receiver configuration is limiting system performance below the 100 photoelectron level.

  9. An Analytic Technique for Investigating Mode-Locked Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Usechak, N.G.; Agrawal, G.P.

    2005-09-30

    We present an analytic theory capable of predicting pulse parameters in mode-locked lasers in the presence of dispersion and nonlinearity. Excellent agreement is obtained between this approach and full numerical solutions.

  10. Some laser measurement techniques used in aero engine research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. G.

    Holographic flow visualization and laser anemometry are described. Flow within a fan blade passage can be visualized in three dimensions by recording two superimposed holograms on the same film, using a double pulse laser. Interferometric fringes formed by the images represent a shearing of the density field with respect to itself, caused by rotor movement during the separation of the double pulse laser. Shocks, overtip vortices, wakes, shock interaction with the boundary layer, and separated boundary layers can be observed. The anemometer measures the time taken for particles to cross between two focused laser beams separated by a known amount. The backscattered light from each beam is recorded by two photomultipliers and the discriminated events from the two beams are cross correlated. Correlograms of events for selected angles of orientation of the two spots at gated positions in rotor passage provide a spatially localized, but time averaged, value of flow velocity.

  11. Successful treatment of traumatic scars with combined nonablative fractional laser and pinpoint technique of standard CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shady M; Elsaie, Mohamed L; Kamel, Mohamed Ismail; Mohammed, Essam-Eldin

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the use of a pinpoint irradiation technique followed by nonablative fractional technique in treatment of traumatic scars. Thirteen patients with traumatic sacrs were treated with pinpoint technique of CO2 laser using traditional headpiece activating laser at a frequency (50 Hz) to deliver pulsed mode with power of 1 W using the focusing technique followed by 3-5 passes of the nonablative 1540 nm fractional Er:glass laser. An independent physician evaluator assessed the treatment outcomes using Vancouver scar scale (VSS) and 5-point grading scale (grade 0, no improvement; grade 1, 1-25%; grade 2, 26-50%; grade 3, 51-75%; grade 4, 76-100% improvement). After the final treatment, average percentage changes of VSS were 41.5%. Improvement was evident in terms of vascularity, pigmentation, and height, while insignificant in terms of Pliability. Based on physician's global assessment, mean grade of 2.5 was achieved. Patient's subjective satisfaction scores paralleled the physician's objective evaluation. Pinpoint irradiation technique by CO2 laser followed by nonablative fractional laser is a safe and effective modality in treatment of scars. PMID:26581805

  12. Use of laser reflection technique for defect detection in CFRP-concrete systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Qiwen; Lau, Denvid

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a new laser reflection technique which can identify the near-surface defects in concrete structures bonded with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP). In this study, a laser beam is used to illuminate the surface of CFRP-concrete panel, and the pattern of the laser reflection is recorded by a high resolution digital camera. Under the laser illumination, the surface of the tested object is heated and expanded. The surface expansion can be identified through observing the expanding reflection pattern. Based on our experimental observation, the defect region exhibits much greater expansion of laser reflection pattern than that in intact region. Results also indicate that both the defect area and the defect depth can influence the change of reflection pattern. In view of the measurement principle of the laser reflection technique, it is expected that the application can be further extended to the areas like CFRP-wood structures, CFRP-masonry structures and CFRP-steel structures.

  13. Fiber Bragg grating Fabry-Perot cavity sensor based on pulse laser demodulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fangfang; Chen, Jianfeng; Liu, Yunqi; Wang, Tingyun

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate a fiber laser sensing technique based on fiber Bragg grating Fabry-Perot (FBG-FP) cavity interrogated by pulsed laser, where short pulses generated from active mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser and current modulated DFB laser are adopted. The modulated laser pulses launched into the FBG-FP cavity produce a group of reflected pulses. The optical loss in the cavity can be determined from the power ratio of the first two pulses reflected from the cavity. This technique does not require high reflectivity FBGs and is immune to the power fluctuation of the light source. Two short pulse laser sources were compared experimentally with each other on pulse width, pulse stability, pulse chirp and sensing efficiency.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thick Concrete Using Advanced Signal Processing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight A; Barker, Alan M; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Albright, Austin P; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years [1]. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations.

  15. Advanced implementations of the iterative multi region technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaburcuk, Fatih

    The integration of the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method into the iterative multi-region (IMR) technique, an iterative approach used to solve large-scale electromagnetic scattering and radiation problems, is presented in this dissertation. The idea of the IMR technique is to divide a large problem domain into smaller subregions, solve each subregion separately, and combine the solutions of subregions after introducing the effect of interaction to obtain solutions at multiple frequencies for the large domain. Solution of the subregions using the frequency domain solvers has been the preferred approach as such solutions using time domain solvers require computationally expensive bookkeeping of time signals between subregions. In this contribution we present an algorithm that makes it feasible to use the FDTD method, a time domain numerical technique, in the IMR technique to obtain solutions at a pre-specified number of frequencies in a single simulation. As a result, a considerable reduction in memory storage requirements and computation time is achieved. A hybrid method integrated into the IMR technique is also presented in this work. This hybrid method combines the desirable features of the method of moments (MoM) and the FDTD method to solve large-scale radiation problems more efficiently. The idea of this hybrid method based on the IMR technique is to divide an original problem domain into unconnected subregions and use the more appropriate method in each domain. The most prominent feature of this proposed method is to obtain solutions at multiple frequencies in a single IMR simulation by constructing time-limited waveforms. The performance of the proposed method is investigated numerically using different configurations composed of two, three, and four objects.

  16. Advances in high power and high brightness laser bars with enhanced reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Haiyan; Jiang, Ching-Long (John); Xiong, Yihan; Inyang, Aloysius; Zhang, Qiang; Lewin, Alexander; Strohmaier, Stephan; Treusch, Georg

    2013-02-01

    The advances in laser-diode technology have enabled high efficiency direct diode base modules to emerge as a building block for industrial high power laser systems. Consequently, these systems have been implemented with advance robust, higher-brightness and reliable laser sources for material processing application. Here at the company, we use low-fill factor bars to build fiber-coupled and passively cooled modules, which form the foundation for "TruDiode," the series of TRUMPF direct diode laser systems that can perform in the multi-kilowatt arena with high beam quality. However, higher reliable output power, additional efficiency and greater slow axis beam quality of the high power laser bars are necessary to further increase the brightness and reduce the cost of the systems. In order to improve the slow axis beam quality, we have optimized the bar epitaxial structures as well as the lateral design. The detailed near field and far field studies of the slow axis for each individual emitters on the bar provide us with information about the dependency of beam quality as a function of the drive current. Based on these study results for direct diode application, we have optimized the high brightness bar designs at 900-1070nm wavelengths. In addition, high power and high efficiency laser bars with high fill factors have been used to build the pump sources for thin disc laser systems at TRUMPF Photonics. For better system performances with lower costs, we have further optimized bar designs for this application. In this paper, we will give an overview of our recent advances in high power and brightness laser bars with enhanced reliability. We will exhibit beam quality study, polarization and reliability test results of our laser bars in the 900-1070nm wavelengths region for coarse wavelength multiplexing. Finally, we will also present the performance and reliability results of the 200W bar, which will be used for our next generation thin disk laser pump source.

  17. High-rate-long-distance fiber-optic communication based on advanced modulation techniques.

    PubMed

    Ivankovski, Y; Mendlovic, D

    1999-09-10

    The presence of fiber attenuation and chromatic dispersion is one of the major design aspects of fiber-optic communication systems when one addresses high-rate and long-distance digital data transmission. Conventional digital communication systems implement a modulation technique that generates light pulses at the fiber input end and tries to detect them at the fiber output end. Here an advanced modulation transmission system is developed based on knowledge of the exact dispersion parameters of the fiber and the principles of space-time mathematical analogy. The information encodes the phase of the input light beam (a continuous laser beam). This phase is designed such that, when the signal is transmitted through a fiber with a given chromatic dispersion, high peak pulses emerge at the output, which follows a desired bit pattern. Thus the continuous input energy is concentrated into short time intervals in which the information needs to be represented at the output. The proposed method provides a high rate-distance product even for fibers with high dispersion parameters, high power at the output, and also unique protection properties. Theoretical analysis of the proposed method, computer simulations, and some design aspects are given. PMID:18324062

  18. Application of advanced coating techniques to rocket engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The materials problem in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) is reviewed. Potential coatings and the method of their application for improved life of SSME components are discussed. A number of advanced coatings for turbine blade components and disks are being developed and tested in a multispecimen thermal fatigue fluidized bed facility at IIT Research Institute. This facility is capable of producing severe strains of the degree present in blades and disk components of the SSME. The potential coating systems and current efforts at IITRI being taken for life extension of the SSME components are summarized.

  19. Transcranial Doppler: Techniques and advanced applications: Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arvind K.; Bathala, Lokesh; Batra, Amit; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Sharma, Vijay K.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is the only diagnostic tool that can provide continuous information about cerebral hemodynamics in real time and over extended periods. In the previous paper (Part 1), we have already presented the basic ultrasound physics pertaining to TCD, insonation methods, and various flow patterns. This article describes various advanced applications of TCD such as detection of right-to-left shunt, emboli monitoring, vasomotor reactivity (VMR), monitoring of vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), monitoring of intracranial pressure, its role in stoke prevention in sickle cell disease, and as a supplementary test for confirmation of brain death. PMID:27011639

  20. Transcranial Doppler: Techniques and advanced applications: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arvind K; Bathala, Lokesh; Batra, Amit; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Sharma, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is the only diagnostic tool that can provide continuous information about cerebral hemodynamics in real time and over extended periods. In the previous paper (Part 1), we have already presented the basic ultrasound physics pertaining to TCD, insonation methods, and various flow patterns. This article describes various advanced applications of TCD such as detection of right-to-left shunt, emboli monitoring, vasomotor reactivity (VMR), monitoring of vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), monitoring of intracranial pressure, its role in stoke prevention in sickle cell disease, and as a supplementary test for confirmation of brain death. PMID:27011639

  1. Stomach and duodenum ulcer: comparing the efficiency of three laser therapeutic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myslovich, L. V.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of how effective various therapeutic techniques are in treating stomach and duodenum ulcers. The investigation was made on 105 patients (70 patients were affected by duodenum ulcer and 25 patients suffered from stomach ulcer). Three different complex laser therapeutic techniques were compared with each other and with a generally accepted drug treatment. It was found that the most pronounced therapeutic effect was observed in patients administered a complex laser technique that included drug therapy, the intravenous laser irradiation of blood, and the focal-segmental laser therapy. This complex laser therapy enabled ulcer scarring within 8 to 15 days after the beginning of the treatment (with the average scarring term of 9 days).

  2. Laser transmission welding of Clearweld-coated polyethylene glycol terephthalate by incremental scanning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Wang, A. H.; Weng, Z. K.; Xia, H. B.

    2016-06-01

    Transmission laser welding using Incremental Scanning Technique(TWIST) mode and conventional contour welding mode were adopted to investigate laser transmission welding of 0.5 mm thick PET plate. A 1064 nm fiber laser was used to weld PET at the (TWIST) mode, and an 808 nm diode laser was applied to conduct the conventional contour welding. The Clearweld coating was used as laser absorbing material. The influences of laser parameters (i.e. defocusing distance, distance between two circles) on the quality of weld seams were analyzed by optical microscopy. Moreover, geometry and shear strength of the weld zone were tested to optimize laser parameters. Additionally, the water vapor permeability (WVP) of weld seams was measured to test hermetical capacity. Results show that the shear strength and hermetic capacity of weld seam by TWIST mode are at the same level in comparison with that of the conventional contour welding.

  3. The application research of laser ultrasonic technique used in testing compound material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Kong, Lingjian; Gu, Xiaofei; Luo, Jijun; Hou, Xun

    2005-01-01

    The principles of laser ultrasonic generation and measurements with pulsed laser are presented. There are two kinds of means to actuate ultrasonic pulse: elasticity actuating and ablation actuating. The progress in laser ultrasonic about laser ultrasound generation, detection, propagation and its applications is introduced briefly. Applications in the field of Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) are reviewed. In the field of Non-Destructive Testing, according to the principle, the laser ultrasonic testing system consists of laser system, laser interferometer, photoelectric detector and receiving system with signal amplifier. Thus, long-range and non-contact on-line detection of ultrasonic testing system was realized. In view of some of the problems, the developing trends of such techniques are analyzed.

  4. In Situ Techniques for Monitoring Electrochromism: An Advanced Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saricayir, Hakan; Uce, Musa; Koca, Atif

    2010-01-01

    This experiment employs current technology to enhance and extend existing lab content. The basic principles of spectroscopic and electroanalytical techniques and their use in determining material properties are covered in some detail in many undergraduate chemistry programs. However, there are limited examples of laboratory experiments with in…

  5. Advances in reduction techniques for tire contact problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1995-01-01

    Some recent developments in reduction techniques, as applied to predicting the tire contact response and evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of the different response quantities, are reviewed. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the contact response to variations in the geometric and material parameters of the tire. The tire is modeled using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory with the effects of variation in geometric and material parameters, transverse shear deformation, and geometric nonlinearities included. The contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the stress resultants, the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with the contact conditions. The elemental arrays are obtained by using a modified two-field, mixed variational principle. For the application of reduction techniques, the tire finite element model is partitioned into two regions. The first region consists of the nodes that are likely to come in contact with the pavement, and the second region includes all the remaining nodes. The reduction technique is used to significantly reduce the degrees of freedom in the second region. The effectiveness of the computational procedure is demonstrated by a numerical example of the frictionless contact response of the space shuttle nose-gear tire, inflated and pressed against a rigid flat surface. Also, the research topics which have high potential for enhancing the effectiveness of reduction techniques are outlined.

  6. Benefits of advanced software techniques for mission planning systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasquet, A.; Parrod, Y.; Desaintvincent, A.

    1994-01-01

    The increasing complexity of modern spacecraft, and the stringent requirement for maximizing their mission return, call for a new generation of Mission Planning Systems (MPS). In this paper, we discuss the requirements for the Space Mission Planning and the benefits which can be expected from Artificial Intelligence techniques through examples of applications developed by Matra Marconi Space.

  7. Advances in CO2-Laser Drilling of Glass Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusberg, Lars; Queisser, Marco; Gentsch, Clemens; Schröder, Henning; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    The CO2 -laser drilling in Schott D263Teco thin glass having a thickness of 500 μm is intensively studied. The nearly cylindrical holes having diameters smaller 100 μm could be drilled in 0.25 seconds per hole. Reliability investigations by performing temperature cycling show cracks in 51% of the drilled holes in the glass substrate. The reason is thermally induced stress during thermal CO2 -laser ablation. Different thermal pre- and post-treatments have been successfully studied avoiding such cracks (98.4% crack-free holes) and show the high potential of CO2 -laser drilling for through glass via (TGV) processing in glass substrates for micro-system applications.

  8. Laser welding of an advanced rapidly-solidified titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeslack, W. A., III; Chiang, S.; Albright, C. A.

    1990-06-01

    The laser weldability of a complex RS titanium alloy containing yttrium is investigated by evaluating comparatively the microstructures, mechanical properties, and fracture characteristics of the base metal and the rapidly solidified weld fusion zone. To prevent atmospheric contamination the specimen was enclosed in a helium-purged plastic bag during the welding process. After welding, the coupons were sectioned transverse to the laser beam direction of traverse, epoxy mounted, polished down to 0.05 micron SiO2 and etched with Kroll's reagent for examination utilizing light and SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Results indicate that laser welding is effective in producing a fine fusion zone dispersoid structure in the RS Ti composite.

  9. Adaptability of laser diffraction measurement technique in soil physics methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Gyöngyi; Szabó, József; Rajkai, Kálmán; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Koós, Sándor; László, Péter; Hauk, Gabriella; Makó, András

    2016-04-01

    There are intentions all around the world to harmonize soils' particle size distribution (PSD) data by the laser diffractometer measurements (LDM) to that of the sedimentation techniques (pipette or hydrometer methods). Unfortunately, up to the applied methodology (e. g. type of pre-treatments, kind of dispersant etc.), PSDs of the sedimentation methods (due to different standards) are dissimilar and could be hardly harmonized with each other, as well. A need was arisen therefore to build up a database, containing PSD values measured by the pipette method according to the Hungarian standard (MSZ-08. 0205: 1978) and the LDM according to a widespread and widely used procedure. In our current publication the first results of statistical analysis of the new and growing PSD database are presented: 204 soil samples measured with pipette method and LDM (Malvern Mastersizer 2000, HydroG dispersion unit) were compared. Applying usual size limits at the LDM, clay fraction was highly under- and silt fraction was overestimated compared to the pipette method. Subsequently soil texture classes determined from the LDM measurements significantly differ from results of the pipette method. According to previous surveys and relating to each other the two dataset to optimizing, the clay/silt boundary at LDM was changed. Comparing the results of PSDs by pipette method to that of the LDM, in case of clay and silt fractions the modified size limits gave higher similarities. Extension of upper size limit of clay fraction from 0.002 to 0.0066 mm, and so change the lower size limit of silt fractions causes more easy comparability of pipette method and LDM. Higher correlations were found between clay content and water vapor adsorption, specific surface area in case of modified limit, as well. Texture classes were also found less dissimilar. The difference between the results of the two kind of PSD measurement methods could be further reduced knowing other routinely analyzed soil parameters

  10. Interstitial laser phototherapy assisted by magnetic resonance imaging: A new technique for monitoring laser-tissue interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, D.J.; Saxton, R.E.; Layfield, L.J.; Fetterman, H.R.; Castro, D.J.; Tartell, P.B.; Robinson, J.D.; To, S.Y.; Nishimura, E.; Lufkin, R.B. )

    1990-05-01

    The rapid technological advances of magnetic resonance imaging, laser fiberoptics, and compatible probes may allow treatment of deep and sometimes surgically unreachable tumors of the head and neck with minimal morbidity through interstitial laser phototherapy. In this study, a new application of magnetic resonance imaging was developed to monitor and quantify laser-induced tissue damages. Pig skin was exposed to increased levels of argon laser (514.5 nm) at energy densities between 62.5 and 375 J/cm2 as determined by an accurate and reproducible method of dosimetry. Thermal profiles were recorded using an infrared sensor and T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were taken; afterward, biopsies were performed to quantitate the level of tissue damage. Our results demonstrate that above a certain threshold of laser energy, the magnetic resonance imaging findings are temperature dependent. Appropriate development of a scale matching laser energies, temperature profiles, T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images, and histological quantitation of tissue destruction will allow us to optimize the three-dimensional control and monitoring of laser-tissue interactions.

  11. Advancement of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays For Space-based Laser Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, nathaniel R.; Baggott, Renee S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Space-based laser and lidar instruments play an important role in NASA s plans for meeting its objectives in both Earth Science and Space Exploration areas. Almost all the lidar instrument concepts being considered by NASA scientist utilize moderate to high power diode-pumped solid state lasers as their transmitter source. Perhaps the most critical component of any solid state laser system is its pump laser diode array which essentially dictates instrument efficiency, reliability and lifetime. For this reason, premature failures and rapid degradation of high power laser diode arrays that have been experienced by laser system designers are of major concern to NASA. This work addresses these reliability and lifetime issues by attempting to eliminate the causes of failures and developing methods for screening laser diode arrays and qualifying them for operation in space.

  12. The commissioning of the advanced radiographic capability laser system: experimental and modeling results at the main laser output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nicola, J. M.; Yang, S. T.; Boley, C. D.; Crane, J. K.; Heebner, J. E.; Spinka, T. M.; Arnold, P.; Barty, C. P. J.; Bowers, M. W.; Budge, T. S.; Christensen, K.; Dawson, J. W.; Erbert, G.; Feigenbaum, E.; Guss, G.; Haefner, C.; Hermann, M. R.; Homoelle, D.; Jarboe, J. A.; Lawson, J. K.; Lowe-Webb, R.; McCandless, K.; McHale, B.; Pelz, L. J.; Pham, P. P.; Prantil, M. A.; Rehak, M. L.; Rever, M. A.; Rushford, M. C.; Sacks, R. A.; Shaw, M.; Smauley, D.; Smith, L. K.; Speck, R.; Tietbohl, G.; Wegner, P. J.; Widmayer, C.

    2015-02-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the first of a kind megajoule-class laser with 192 beams capable of delivering over 1.8 MJ and 500TW of 351nm light [1], [2]. It has been commissioned and operated since 2009 to support a wide range of missions including the study of inertial confinement fusion, high energy density physics, material science, and laboratory astrophysics. In order to advance our understanding, and enable short-pulse multi-frame radiographic experiments of dense cores of cold material, the generation of very hard x-rays above 50 keV is necessary. X-rays with such characteristics can be efficiently generated with high intensity laser pulses above 1017 W/cm² [3]. The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) [4] which is currently being commissioned on the NIF will provide eight, 1 ps to 50 ps, adjustable pulses with up to 1.7 kJ each to create x-ray point sources enabling dynamic, multi-frame x-ray backlighting. This paper will provide an overview of the ARC system and report on the laser performance tests conducted with a stretched-pulse up to the main laser output and their comparison with the results of our laser propagation codes.

  13. Advanced Laser Processing of Materials--Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsohn, E.; Ryan, M.

    1995-01-01

    Preparation of amorphous thin films in semiconductors and their transition to the crystalline phase may apply to switching devices. Surfaces of single crystal samples of bulk In2Se3 and thin films of InSe were treated using an excimer laser, and microscopic examination showed the treated portions of the surface had become amorphous. Film samples of InSe were laser-treated like the bulk samples. Examination of these treated flims showed shifts in the optical transmittance spectra as well as surface morphology changes.

  14. Advanced tunable laser source for DoD applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cockroft, N.; Early, J.; Johnson, C.; Lester, C.; Quick, C.; Shimada, T.; Tiee, J.

    1996-06-01

    This is a final report of a two year project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project sought to develop a new solid- state laser transmitter that can be tuned over an exceptionally broad spectral range and integrated with LIDAR remote sensing systems for applications in species specific chemical sensing. Activities have included non-linear frequency conversion of tunable chromium doped LiSAF laser radiation to the ultraviolet and infrared spectral regions. This system is capable of the detection of chemical species previously unapproachable, as well as an improvement in detection sensitivity of 1-2 orders of magnitude for species currently studied.

  15. Orofacial hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: high power diode laser in early and advanced lesion treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempesta, Angela; Franco, Simonetta; Miccoli, Simona; Suppressa, Patrizia; De Falco, Vincenzo; Crincoli, Vito; Lacaita, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Michele; Favia, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a muco-cutaneous inherited disease. Symptoms are epistaxis, visceral arterio-venous malformations, multiple muco-cutaneous telangiectasia with the risk of number increasing enlargement, bleeding, and super-infection. The aim of this work is to show the dual Diode Laser efficacy in preventive treatment of Early Lesions (EL < 2mm) and therapeutic treatment of Advanced Lesions (AL < 2mm). 21 patients affected by HHT with 822 muco-cutaneous telangiectatic nodules have been treated in several sessions with local anaesthesia and cooling of treated sites. EL preventive treatment consists of single Laser impulse (fibre 320) in ultrapulsed mode (2 mm single point spot). AL therapeutic treatment consists of repeated Laser impulses in pulsed mode (on 200ms / off 400ms). According to the results, Diode Laser used in pulsed and ultra-pulsed mode is very effective as noninvasive treatment both in early and advanced oral and perioral telangiectasia.

  16. Interferometric technique for determining the energy deposition in gas-flow nuclear-pumped lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pikulev, A A

    2001-06-30

    An interference technique is developed for determining the energy deposition in gas-flow lasers pumped by uranium fission fragments. It is shown that four types of interference patterns may be formed. Algorithms are presented for determining the type of interference and for enumerating the maxima in interference pattern. (lasers, active media)

  17. Some advanced testing techniques for concentrator photovoltaic cells and lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Wiczer, J.J.; Chaffin, R.J.; Hibray, R.E.

    1982-09-01

    The authors describe two separate test techniques for evaluating concentrator photovoltaic components. For convenient characterization of concentrator solar cells, they have developed a method for measuring the entire illuminated I-V curve of a photovoltaic cell with a single flash of intense simulated sunlight. This method reduces the heat input to the cell and the time required to test a cell, thus making possible quick indoor measurements of photovoltaic conversion efficiency at concentrated illumination levels without the use of elaborate cell mounting fixtures or heat sink attachments. The other test method provides a technique to analyze the spatially dependent, spectral distribution of intense sunlight collected and focused by lenses designed for use in photovoltaic concentrator systems. This information is important in the design of multijunction photovoltaic receivers, secondary concentrators, and in optimizing the performance of conventional silicon cell concentrator systems.

  18. Developments and advances concerning the hyperpolarisation technique SABRE.

    PubMed

    Mewis, Ryan E

    2015-10-01

    To overcome the inherent sensitivity issue in NMR and MRI, hyperpolarisation techniques are used. Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) is a hyperpolarisation technique that utilises parahydrogen, a molecule that possesses a nuclear singlet state, as the source of polarisation. A metal complex is required to break the singlet order of parahydrogen and, by doing so, facilitates polarisation transfer to analyte molecules ligated to the same complex through the J-coupled network that exists. The increased signal intensities that the analyte molecules possess as a result of this process have led to investigations whereby their potential as MRI contrast agents has been probed and to understand the fundamental processes underpinning the polarisation transfer mechanism. As well as discussing literature relevant to both of these areas, the chemical structure of the complex, the physical constraints of the polarisation transfer process and the successes of implementing SABRE at low and high magnetic fields are discussed. PMID:26264565

  19. Phase generated carrier technique for fiber laser hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rizhong; Wang, Xinbing; Huang, Junbin; Gu, Hongcan

    2013-08-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser is compact, and is very suitable for using as a hydrophone to sense acoustic pressure. A DFB fiber laser hydrophone was researched. In the fiber laser hydrophone signal demodulating system, an unbalanced Michelson fiber interferometer and a Phase Generated Carrier (PGC) method were used. The PGC method can be used to demodulating the acoustic signal from the interference signal. Comparing with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) method and Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) method, the digitized PGC method requires a greater amount of computation because of the high signal sampling, but it demands only one interference signal which makes the less fiber connections of the fiber laser hydrophone array. So the fiber laser hydrophone array based on the PGC method has lower complexity and higher reliability than that based on the NRL method or NPS method. The experimental results approve that the PGC method can demodulate acoustic signal between 20~2000 Hz frequency range with good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when the PZT driving frequency is 20 kHz.

  20. Advance techniques for monitoring human tolerance to +Gz accelerations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R.; Sandler, H.; Rositano, S.; Skrettingland, K.; Mancini, R.

    1972-01-01

    Standard techniques for monitoring the acceleration-stressed human subject have been augmented by measuring (1) temporal, brachial and/or radial arterial blood flow, and (2) indirect systolic and diastolic blood pressure at 60-sec intervals. Results show that the response of blood pressure to positive accelerations is complex and dependent on an interplay of hydrostatic forces, diminishing venous return, redistribution of blood, and other poorly defined compensatory reflexes.

  1. Added Value of Assessing Adnexal Masses with Advanced MRI Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Thomassin-Naggara, I.; Balvay, D.; Rockall, A.; Carette, M. F.; Ballester, M.; Darai, E.; Bazot, M.

    2015-01-01

    This review will present the added value of perfusion and diffusion MR sequences to characterize adnexal masses. These two functional MR techniques are readily available in routine clinical practice. We will describe the acquisition parameters and a method of analysis to optimize their added value compared with conventional images. We will then propose a model of interpretation that combines the anatomical and morphological information from conventional MRI sequences with the functional information provided by perfusion and diffusion weighted sequences. PMID:26413542

  2. Precision laser range finder system design for Advanced Technology Laboratory applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, K. E.; Kohn, R. L.; Seib, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    Preliminary system design of a pulsed precision ruby laser rangefinder system is presented which has a potential range resolution of 0.4 cm when atmospheric effects are negligible. The system being proposed for flight testing on the advanced technology laboratory (ATL) consists of a modelocked ruby laser transmitter, course and vernier rangefinder receivers, optical beacon retroreflector tracking system, and a network of ATL tracking retroreflectors. Performance calculations indicate that spacecraft to ground ranging accuracies of 1 to 2 cm are possible.

  3. Development of processing techniques for advanced thermal protection materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvaduray, Guna S.

    1994-01-01

    The effort, which was focused on the research and development of advanced materials for use in Thermal Protection Systems (TPS), has involved chemical and physical testing of refractory ceramic tiles, fabrics, threads and fibers. This testing has included determination of the optical properties, thermal shock resistance, high temperature dimensional stability, and tolerance to environmental stresses. Materials have also been tested in the Arc Jet 2 x 9 Turbulent Duct Facility (TDF), the 1 atmosphere Radiant Heat Cycler, and the Mini-Wind Tunnel Facility (MWTF). A significant part of the effort hitherto has gone towards modifying and upgrading the test facilities so that meaningful tests can be carried out. Another important effort during this period has been the creation of a materials database. Computer systems administration and support have also been provided. These are described in greater detail below.

  4. Advanced materials and techniques for fibre-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Philip J.

    2014-06-01

    Fibre-optic monitoring systems came of age in about 1999 upon the emergence of the world's first significant commercialising company - a spin-out from the UK's collaborative MAST project. By using embedded fibre-optic technology, the MAST project successfully measured transient strain within high-performance composite yacht masts. Since then, applications have extended from smart composites into civil engineering, energy, military, aerospace, medicine and other sectors. Fibre-optic sensors come in various forms, and may be subject to embedment, retrofitting, and remote interrogation. The unique challenges presented by each implementation require careful scrutiny before widespread adoption can take place. Accordingly, various aspects of design and reliability are discussed spanning a range of representative technologies that include resonant microsilicon structures, MEMS, Bragg gratings, advanced forms of spectroscopy, and modern trends in nanotechnology. Keywords: Fibre-optic sensors, fibre Bragg gratings, MEMS, MOEMS, nanotechnology, plasmon.

  5. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; Kluth, Patrick; Tuomisto, Filip

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiationmore » effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.« less

  6. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; Kluth, Patrick; Tuomisto, Filip

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiation effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.

  7. Recent advances in the applications of pulsed lasers in the hydrosphere. [considering airborne bathymetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    Laboratory and field measurements have been performed on the transmission/scattering characteristics of a pulsed neon laser as a function of water turbidity. These results have been used to establish the criteria for an airborne laser bathymetry system. Extensive measurements have been made of laser induced fluorescence using a pulsed tunable dye laser. Feasibility has been demonstrated for remote detection and possible identification of various types of algae and oils. Similar measurements made on a wide variety of organic dyes have shown this technique to have applications in remote measurements of subsurface currents, temperature and salinity.

  8. Advanced techniques for constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jeffrey R; Balaraman, Gouthaman S; Niesen, Michiel J M; Larsen, Adrien B; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-04-30

    Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) methods provide a more natural description of a protein by using bond, angle, and torsional coordinates instead of a Cartesian coordinate representation. Freezing high-frequency bonds and angles in the ICMD model gives rise to constrained ICMD (CICMD) models. There are several theoretical aspects that need to be developed to make the CICMD method robust and widely usable. In this article, we have designed a new framework for (1) initializing velocities for nonindependent CICMD coordinates, (2) efficient computation of center of mass velocity during CICMD simulations, (3) using advanced integrators such as Runge-Kutta, Lobatto, and adaptive CVODE for CICMD simulations, and (4) cancelling out the "flying ice cube effect" that sometimes arises in Nosé-Hoover dynamics. The Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) method is an implementation of a CICMD method that we have developed to study protein dynamics. GNEIMO allows for a hierarchy of coarse-grained simulation models based on the ability to rigidly constrain any group of atoms. In this article, we perform tests on the Lobatto and Runge-Kutta integrators to determine optimal simulation parameters. We also implement an adaptive coarse-graining tool using the GNEIMO Python interface. This tool enables the secondary structure-guided "freezing and thawing" of degrees of freedom in the molecule on the fly during molecular dynamics simulations and is shown to fold four proteins to their native topologies. With these advancements, we envision the use of the GNEIMO method in protein structure prediction, structure refinement, and in studying domain motion. PMID:23345138

  9. Advanced Techniques for Constrained Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jeffrey R.; Balaraman, Gouthaman S.; Niesen, Michiel J. M.; Larsen, Adrien B.; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-01-01

    Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) methods provide a more natural description of a protein by using bond, angle and torsional coordinates instead of a Cartesian coordinate representation. Freezing high frequency bonds and angles in the ICMD model gives rise to constrained ICMD (CICMD) models. There are several theoretical aspects that need to be developed in order to make the CICMD method robust and widely usable. In this paper we have designed a new framework for 1) initializing velocities for non-independent CICMD coordinates, 2) efficient computation of center of mass velocity during CICMD simulations, 3) using advanced integrators such as Runge-Kutta, Lobatto and adaptive CVODE for CICMD simulations, and 4) cancelling out the “flying ice cube effect” that sometimes arises in Nosé-Hoover dynamics. The Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) method is an implementation of a CICMD method that we have developed to study protein dynamics. GNEIMO allows for a hierarchy of coarse-grained simulation models based on the ability to rigidly constrain any group of atoms. In this paper, we perform tests on the Lobatto and Runge-Kutta integrators to determine optimal simulation parameters. We also implement an adaptive coarse graining tool using the GNEIMO Python interface. This tool enables the secondary structure-guided “freezing and thawing” of degrees of freedom in the molecule on the fly during MD simulations, and is shown to fold four proteins to their native topologies. With these advancements we envision the use of the GNEIMO method in protein structure prediction, structure refinement, and in studying domain motion. PMID:23345138

  10. Advanced excimer laser technologies enable green semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Hitomi; Yoo, Youngsun; Minegishi, Yuji; Hisanaga, Naoto; Enami, Tatsuo

    2014-03-01

    "Green" has fast become an important and pervasive topic throughout many industries worldwide. Many companies, especially in the manufacturing industries, have taken steps to integrate green initiatives into their high-level corporate strategies. Governments have also been active in implementing various initiatives designed to increase corporate responsibility and accountability towards environmental issues. In the semiconductor manufacturing industry, there are growing concerns over future environmental impact as enormous fabs expand and new generation of equipments become larger and more powerful. To address these concerns, Gigaphoton has implemented various green initiatives for many years under the EcoPhoton™ program. The objective of this program is to drive innovations in technology and services that enable manufacturers to significantly reduce both the financial and environmental "green cost" of laser operations in high-volume manufacturing environment (HVM) - primarily focusing on electricity, gas and heat management costs. One example of such innovation is Gigaphoton's Injection-Lock system, which reduces electricity and gas utilization costs of the laser by up to 50%. Furthermore, to support the industry's transition from 300mm to the next generation 450mm wafers, technologies are being developed to create lasers that offer double the output power from 60W to 120W, but reducing electricity and gas consumption by another 50%. This means that the efficiency of lasers can be improve by up to 4 times in 450mm wafer production environments. Other future innovations include the introduction of totally Heliumfree Excimer lasers that utilize Nitrogen gas as its replacement for optical module purging. This paper discusses these and other innovations by Gigaphoton to enable green manufacturing.

  11. Recent advances in laser ablation modelling for asteroid deflection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, Nicolas; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2014-09-01

    Over the past few years, a series of studies have demonstrated the theoretical benefits of using laser ablation in order to mitigate the threat of a potential asteroid on a collision course with earth. Compared to other slow-push mitigation strategies, laser ablation allows for a significant reduction in fuel consumption since the ablated material is used as propellant. A precise modelling of the ablation process is however difficult due to the high variability in the physical parameters encountered among the different asteroids as well as the scarcity of experimental studies available in the literature. In this paper, we derive a new thermal model to simulate the efficiency of a laser-based detector. The useful material properties are first derived from thermochemical tables and equilibrium thermodynamic considerations. These properties are then injected in a 3D axisymetrical thermal model developed in Matlab. A temperature-dependent conduction flux is imposed on the exterior boundary condition that takes into account the balance between the incident power and the power losses due to the vaporization process across the Knudsen layer and the radiations respectively. A non-linear solver is finally used and the solution integrated over the ablation front to reconstruct the net thrust and the global mass flow. Compared to an initial 1D model, this new approach shows the importance of the parietal radiation losses in the case of a CW laser. Despite the low energy conversion efficiency, this new model still demonstrates the theoretical benefit of using lasers over more conventional low-thrust strategies.

  12. Challenges to Laser-Based Imaging Techniques in Gas Turbine Combustor Systems for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, Randy J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Zaller, Michelle M.; Hicks, Yolanda R.

    1998-01-01

    Increasingly severe constraints on emissions, noise and fuel efficiency must be met by the next generation of commercial aircraft powerplants. At NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) a cooperative research effort with industry is underway to design and test combustors that will meet these requirements. To accomplish these tasks, it is necessary to gain both a detailed understanding of the combustion processes and a precise knowledge of combustor and combustor sub-component performance at close to actual conditions. To that end, researchers at LeRC are engaged in a comprehensive diagnostic investigation of high pressure reacting flowfields that duplicate conditions expected within the actual engine combustors. Unique, optically accessible flame-tubes and sector rig combustors, designed especially for these tests. afford the opportunity to probe these flowfields with the most advanced, laser-based optical diagnostic techniques. However, these same techniques, tested and proven on comparatively simple bench-top gaseous flame burners, encounter numerous restrictions and challenges when applied in these facilities. These include high pressures and temperatures, large flow rates, liquid fuels, remote testing, and carbon or other material deposits on combustor windows. Results are shown that document the success and versatility of these nonintrusive optical diagnostics despite the challenges to their implementation in realistic systems.

  13. Advances in parameter estimation techniques applied to flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maben, Egbert; Zimmerman, David C.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, various parameter estimation techniques are investigated in the context of structural system identification utilizing distributed parameter models and 'measured' time-domain data. Distributed parameter models are formulated using the PDEMOD software developed by Taylor. Enhancements made to PDEMOD for this work include the following: (1) a Wittrick-Williams based root solving algorithm; (2) a time simulation capability; and (3) various parameter estimation algorithms. The parameter estimations schemes will be contrasted using the NASA Mini-Mast as the focus structure.

  14. Advances in dental veneers: materials, applications, and techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Núbia Pavesi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Lovadino, José Roberto; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    Laminate veneers are a conservative treatment of unaesthetic anterior teeth. The continued development of dental ceramics offers clinicians many options for creating highly aesthetic and functional porcelain veneers. This evolution of materials, ceramics, and adhesive systems permits improvement of the aesthetic of the smile and the self-esteem of the patient. Clinicians should understand the latest ceramic materials in order to be able to recommend them and their applications and techniques, and to ensure the success of the clinical case. The current literature was reviewed to search for the most important parameters determining the long-term success, correct application, and clinical limitations of porcelain veneers. PMID:23674920

  15. Advances in dental local anesthesia techniques and devices: An update

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Payal; Gupta, Saurabh K.; Newaskar, Vilas; Chandra, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Although local anesthesia remains the backbone of pain control in dentistry, researches are going to seek new and better means of managing the pain. Most of the researches are focused on improvement in the area of anesthetic agents, delivery devices and technique involved. Newer technologies have been developed that can assist the dentist in providing enhanced pain relief with reduced injection pain and fewer adverse effects. This overview will enlighten the practicing dentists regarding newer devices and methods of rendering pain control comparing these with the earlier used ones on the basis of research and clinical studies available. PMID:24163548

  16. Stabilized high-power laser system for the gravitational wave detector advanced LIGO.

    PubMed

    Kwee, P; Bogan, C; Danzmann, K; Frede, M; Kim, H; King, P; Pöld, J; Puncken, O; Savage, R L; Seifert, F; Wessels, P; Winkelmann, L; Willke, B

    2012-05-01

    An ultra-stable, high-power cw Nd:YAG laser system, developed for the ground-based gravitational wave detector Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory), was comprehensively characterized. Laser power, frequency, beam pointing and beam quality were simultaneously stabilized using different active and passive schemes. The output beam, the performance of the stabilization, and the cross-coupling between different stabilization feedback control loops were characterized and found to fulfill most design requirements. The employed stabilization schemes and the achieved performance are of relevance to many high-precision optical experiments. PMID:22565688

  17. Development of Advanced Seed Laser Modules for Lidar and Spectroscopy Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Rosiewicz, Alex; Coleman, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on recent progress made in the development of highly compact, single mode, distributed feedback laser (DFB) seed laser modules for lidar and spectroscopy applications from space based platforms. One of the intended application of this technology is in the NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The DFB laser modules operating at 1571 nm and 1262 nm have advanced current and temperature drivers built into them. A combination of temperature and current tuning allows coarse and fine adjustment of the diode wavelengths.

  18. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-01-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process. PMID:27484188

  19. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-01-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process. PMID:27484188

  20. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-08-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process.

  1. Advanced techniques in reliability model representation and solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    The current tendency of flight control system designs is towards increased integration of applications and increased distribution of computational elements. The reliability analysis of such systems is difficult because subsystem interactions are increasingly interdependent. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have been working for several years to extend the capability of Markov modeling techniques to address these problems. This effort has been focused in the areas of increased model abstraction and increased computational capability. The reliability model generator (RMG) is a software tool that uses as input a graphical object-oriented block diagram of the system. RMG uses a failure-effects algorithm to produce the reliability model from the graphical description. The ASSURE software tool is a parallel processing program that uses the semi-Markov unreliability range evaluator (SURE) solution technique and the abstract semi-Markov specification interface to the SURE tool (ASSIST) modeling language. A failure modes-effects simulation is used by ASSURE. These tools were used to analyze a significant portion of a complex flight control system. The successful combination of the power of graphical representation, automated model generation, and parallel computation leads to the conclusion that distributed fault-tolerant system architectures can now be analyzed.

  2. Advanced coding techniques for few mode transmission systems.

    PubMed

    Okonkwo, Chigo; van Uden, Roy; Chen, Haoshuo; de Waardt, Huug; Koonen, Ton

    2015-01-26

    We experimentally verify the advantage of employing advanced coding schemes such as space-time coding and 4 dimensional modulation formats to enhance the transmission performance of a 3-mode transmission system. The performance gain of space-time block codes for extending the optical signal-to-noise ratio tolerance in multiple-input multiple-output optical coherent spatial division multiplexing transmission systems with respect to single-mode transmission performance are evaluated. By exploiting the spatial diversity that few-mode-fibers offer, with respect to single mode fiber back-to-back performance, significant OSNR gains of 3.2, 4.1, 4.9, and 6.8 dB at the hard-decision forward error correcting limit are demonstrated for DP-QPSK 8, 16 and 32 QAM, respectively. Furthermore, by employing 4D constellations, 6 × 28Gbaud 128 set partitioned quadrature amplitude modulation is shown to outperform conventional 8 QAM transmission performance, whilst carrying an additional 0.5 bit/symbol. PMID:25835899

  3. Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Cancer Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lovitt, Carrie J.; Shelper, Todd B.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2014-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are an integral part of drug discovery practices. However, modeling the complexity of cancer utilizing these cell lines on standard plastic substrata, does not accurately represent the tumor microenvironment. Research into developing advanced tumor cell culture models in a three-dimensional (3D) architecture that more prescisely characterizes the disease state have been undertaken by a number of laboratories around the world. These 3D cell culture models are particularly beneficial for investigating mechanistic processes and drug resistance in tumor cells. In addition, a range of molecular mechanisms deconstructed by studying cancer cells in 3D models suggest that tumor cells cultured in two-dimensional monolayer conditions do not respond to cancer therapeutics/compounds in a similar manner. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of utilizing 3D cell culture models in drug discovery programs; however, it is evident that further research is required for the development of more complex models that incorporate the majority of the cellular and physical properties of a tumor. PMID:24887773

  4. Recent Advances in Spaceborne Precipitation Radar Measurement Techniques and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.; Tanelli, Simone

    2006-01-01

    NASA is currently developing advanced instrument concepts and technologies for future spaceborne atmospheric radars, with an over-arching objective of making such instruments more capable in supporting future science needs and more cost effective. Two such examples are the Second-Generation Precipitation Radar (PR-2) and the Nexrad-In-Space (NIS). PR-2 is a 14/35-GHz dual-frequency rain radar with a deployable 5-meter, wide-swath scanned membrane antenna, a dual-polarized/dual-frequency receiver, and a realtime digital signal processor. It is intended for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) operations to provide greatly enhanced rainfall profile retrieval accuracy while consuming only a fraction of the mass of the current TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR). NIS is designed to be a 35-GHz Geostationary Earth Orbiting (GEO) radar for providing hourly monitoring of the life cycle of hurricanes and tropical storms. It uses a 35-m, spherical, lightweight membrane antenna and Doppler processing to acquire 3-dimensional information on the intensity and vertical motion of hurricane rainfall.

  5. Coal and Coal Constituent Studies by Advanced EMR Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Alex I. Smirnov; Mark J. Nilges; R. Linn Belford; Robert B. Clarkson

    1998-03-31

    Advanced electronic magnetic resonance (EMR) methods are used to examine properties of coals, chars, and molecular species related to constituents of coal. We have achieved substantial progress on upgrading the high field (HF) EMR (W-band, 95 GHz) spectrometers that are especially advantageous for such studies. Particularly, we have built a new second W-band instrument (Mark II) in addition to our Mark I. Briefly, Mark II features: (i) an Oxford custom-built 7 T superconducting magnet which is scannable from 0 to 7 T at up to 0.5 T/min; (ii) water-cooled coaxial solenoid with up to ±550 G scan under digital (15 bits resolution) computer control; (iii) custom-engineered precision feed-back circuit, which is used to drive this solenoid, is based on an Ultrastab 860R sensor that has linearity better than 5 ppm and resolution of 0.05 ppm; (iv) an Oxford CF 1200 cryostat for variable temperature studies from 1.8 to 340 K. During this grant period we have completed several key upgrades of both Mark I and II, particularly microwave bridge, W-band probehead, and computer interfaces. We utilize these improved instruments for HF EMR studies of spin-spin interaction and existence of different paramagnetic species in carbonaceous solids.

  6. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Bead-on-plate and butt welds were previously performed to depths of about 4 mm with a 6-kW CO{sub 2} laser on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys. These welds were made at a speed of 0.042 m/s using argon purging at a flow rate of 2.8 m{sup 3}/s. The purge was distributed with a diffuser nozzle aimed just behind the laser beam during the welding operation. The fusion zones of welds made under these conditions consisted of very fine, needle-shaped grains and were also harder than the bulk metal (230-270 dph, compared to {approx}180 dph for the bulk metal). A limited number of impact tests showed that the as-welded ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTT) was above room temperature, but heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h in vacuum reduced the DBTT to <{minus}25{degrees}C. Activities during this reporting period focused on improvements in the purging system and determination of the effect of welding speed on welds. A 2-kW continuous YAG laser at Lumonics Corp. in Livonia, MI, was used to make 34 test welds for this study.

  7. Laser-scanning techniques for rapid ballistics identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodburgy, R. C.; Nakich, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Two different laser-scanning methods may be utilized. In each case scanned cylindrical bullet surface is displayed ""unwrapped'' on oscilloscope screen. Bullets are compared by photographing each display and superimposing negatives of two images. With some modifications bullets can be scanned and compared by superimposing images on screen of dual-beam oscilloscope.

  8. Observing techniques for astronomical laser guide star adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Macintosh, B.; Olivier, S.S.; Gavel, D.T.; Friedman, H.W.

    1998-05-01

    We discuss astronomical observing requirements and their implementation using sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics. Specific issues requiring implementation include the ability to place the astronomical object at different locations within the field of view; reliable subtraction of Rayleigh-scattered light; efficient focusing; and stable point-spread-function characterization.

  9. Vessel wall perforation mechanism of the excimer laser-assisted non-occlusive anastomosis technique.

    PubMed

    Bremmer, Jochem; van Doormaal, Tristan P C; Verweij, Bon H; van der Zwan, Albert; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2016-08-01

    The excimer laser assisted non-occlusive anastomosis (ELANA) technique is used to make anastomoses on intracerebral arteries. This end-to-side anastomosis is created without temporary occlusion of the recipient artery using a 308-nm excimer laser with a ring-shaped multi-fiber catheter to punch an opening in the arterial wall. Over 500 patients have received an ELANA bypass. However, the vessel wall perforation mechanism of the laser catheter is not known exactly and not 100 % successful. In this study, we aimed to understand the mechanism of ELANA vessel perforation using specialized imaging techniques to ultimately improve its effectiveness. High-speed imaging, high-contrast imaging, and high-sensitivity thermal imaging were used to study the laser wall perforation mechanism and reveal the mechanical and thermal effects involved. In vitro, rabbit arteries were exposed with the special designed laser catheter in a setup representative for the clinical setting, in which blood was replaced with a transparent UV absorbing liquid for visualization. We observed that laser vessel wall perforation was caused by explosive vapor bubbles tearing through the vessel wall, mostly within the first 20 of the total 200 pulses. Thermal effects were minimal. Unsymmetrical tension in the vessel wall inducing migration of the flap during laser exposure was observed in case of unsuccessful wall perforations. The laser wall perforation mechanism in the ELANA technique is primarily mechanical. Symmetric tension in the recipient vessel wall is essential and should be trained by neurosurgeons. PMID:27220531

  10. Improvement of the technique in treatment of internal hemorrhoids with Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiao-qing; Zhu, Jing; Shi, Hong-Min

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To observe and study the improvement of the technique in treatment of internal hemorrhoids with Nd:YAG laser and evaluate the effective rate. Methods: 60 patients of internal hemorrhoids were treated with Nd:YAG laser (10-15mw) irradiating on the mucosa of the lesions. Results: Among 60 patients, 57 patients were primarily cured with one treatment, 3 patients were primarily cured with two treatments. The effective rate was 95% with one treatment, and it reached to 100% with two treatments. Conclusions: the improvement of the technique in treatment of internal hemorrhoids with Nd:YAG laser is effective and easy to operate.

  11. Direct laser beam interference patterning technique for fast high aspect ratio surface structuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indrisiunas, Simonas; Voisiat, Bogdan; Žukauskas, Airidas; Račiukaitis, Gediminas

    2015-03-01

    New results on development of the Direct Laser Interference Patterning (DLIP) technique using the interference of several beams to directly ablate the material are presented. The method is capable of producing sub-wavelength features not limited by a beam spot size and is an effective method of forming two-dimensional periodic structures on relatively large area with just a single laser shot. Surface texturing speed of DLIP method and the direct laser writing was compared. Fabrication time reduction up to a few orders of magnitude using DLIP was evaluated. The sub-period scanning technique was applied for formation of the complex periodic structures. A new method of laser scanning for fabrication of periodic structures on large areas without any visible stitching signs between laser irradiation spots was tested.

  12. Suppression of Weibel Instabilities in Advanced Fast Ignition Laser Fusion Pellets by Two Cone-Guided Relativistic Laser Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V.

    2007-11-01

    I propose utilization of two cone-guided relativistic laser beams in antiparallel interaction with the fusion pellet as a novel approach for the suppression of Weibel instabilities in the core of advanced fast ignition pellets.ootnotetextM. Tabak, J. Hammer, M.E. Glinsky, W.L. Kruer, S. C. Wilks, J. Woodworth, E. M. Campbell, and M.D. Perry, Phys. Plasmas 1 (5), 1626 (1994). The propagation of generated suprathermal electron beam toward the core may lead to the appearance of colossal (˜10MG), small scale (L˜velocity of light/local electron plasma frequencyootnotetextV. Stefan, Suppression of Weibel Instabilities by High-Harmonic Electron Bernstein Modes in Advanced Fast Ignition Laser Fusion Pellets.APS-2006. October 30-November 3, 2006; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. magnetic fields. This would suppress the transport of magnetic fields into the core of the pellet and may eliminate the difficulties in the nonlinear-relativistic treatment of magnetized core plasma.

  13. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.; Arefian, V. V.; Warren, H. A.; Vuigner, A. A.; Pohlman, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  14. Advanced experimental techniques for transonic wind tunnels - Final lecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    A philosophy of experimental techniques is presented, suggesting that in order to be successful, one should like what one does, have the right tools, stick to the job, avoid diversions, work hard, interact with people, be informed, keep it simple, be self sufficient, and strive for perfection. Sources of information, such as bibliographies, newsletters, technical reports, and technical contacts and meetings are recommended. It is pointed out that adaptive-wall test sections eliminate or reduce wall interference effects, and magnetic suspension and balance systems eliminate support-interference effects, while the problem of flow quality remains with all wind tunnels. It is predicted that in the future it will be possible to obtain wind tunnel results at the proper Reynolds number, and the effects of flow unsteadiness, wall interference, and support interference will be eliminated or greatly reduced.

  15. EPS in Environmental Microbial Biofilms as Examined by Advanced Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, T. R.; Lawrence, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Biofilm communities are highly structured associations of cellular and polymeric components which are involved in biogenic and geogenic environmental processes. Furthermore, biofilms are also important in medical (infection), industrial (biofouling) and technological (biofilm engineering) processes. The interfacial microbial communities in a specific habitat are highly dynamic and change according to the environmental parameters affecting not only the cellular but also the polymeric constituents of the system. Through their EPS biofilms interact with dissolved, colloidal and particulate compounds from the bulk water phase. For a long time the focus in biofilm research was on the cellular constituents in biofilms and the polymer matrix in biofilms has been rather neglected. The polymer matrix is produced not only by different bacteria and archaea but also by eukaryotic micro-organisms such as algae and fungi. The mostly unidentified mixture of EPS compounds is responsible for many biofilm properties and is involved in biofilm functionality. The chemistry of the EPS matrix represents a mixture of polymers including polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids, neutral polymers, charged polymers, amphiphilic polymers and refractory microbial polymers. The analysis of the EPS may be done destructively by means of extraction and subsequent chemical analysis or in situ by means of specific probes in combination with advanced imaging. In the last 15 years laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has been established as an indispensable technique for studying microbial communities. LSM with 1-photon and 2-photon excitation in combination with fluorescence techniques allows 3-dimensional investigation of fully hydrated, living biofilm systems. This approach is able to reveal data on biofilm structural features as well as biofilm processes and interactions. The fluorescent probes available allow the quantitative assessment of cellular as well as polymer distribution. For this purpose

  16. Advances in endonasal low intensity laser irradiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jian-Ling; Liu, Timon C.; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Liu, Song-hao

    2005-07-01

    Endonasal low intensity laser therapy (ELILT) began in China in 1998. Now in China it is widely applied to treat hyperlipidemia and brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, insomnia, poststroke depression, intractable headache, ache in head or face, cerebral thrombosis, acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease, migraine, brain lesion and mild cognitive impairment. There are four pathways mediating EILILT, Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells. Two unhealth acupoints of Yangming channal inside nose might mediate the one as is low intensity laser acupuncture. Unbalance autonomic nervous systems might be modulated. Blood cells might mediate the one as is intravascular low intensity laser therapy. These three pathways are integrated in ELILT so that serum amyloid β protein, malformation rate of erythrocyte, CCK-8, the level of viscosity at lower shear rates and hematocrit, or serum lipid might decrease, and melanin production/SOD activity or β endorphin might increase after ELILT treatment. These results indicate ELILT might work, but it need to be verified by randomized placebo-controlled trial.

  17. Advances in laser driven accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim

    2004-08-23

    Current activities (last few years) at different laboratories, towards the development of a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) are reviewed, followed by a more in depth discussion of results obtained at the L'OASIS laboratory of LBNL. Recent results on laser guiding of relativistically intense beams in preformed plasma channels are discussed. The observation of mono-energetic beams in the 100 MeV energy range, produced by a channel guided LWFA at LBNL, is described and compared to results obtained in the unguided case at LOA, RAL and LBNL. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator has a very beneficial impact on the electron energy distribution. Progress on laser triggered injection is reviewed. Results are presented on measurements of bunch duration and emittance of the accelerated electron beams, that indicate the possibility of generating femtosecond duration electron bunches. Future challenges and plans towards the development of a 1 GeV LWFA module are discussed.

  18. Advanced wavefront measurement and analysis of laser system modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Auerback, J.M.

    1994-11-15

    High spatial resolution measurements of the reflected or transmitted wavefronts of large aperture optical components used in high peak power laser systems is now possible. These measurements are produced by phase shifting interferometry. The wavefront data is in the form of 3-D phase maps that reconstruct the wavefront shape. The emphasis of this work is on the characterization of wavefront features in the mid-spatial wavelength range (from 0.1 to 10.0 mm) and has been accomplished for the first time. Wavefront structure from optical components with spatial wavelengths in this range are of concern because their effects in high peak power laser systems. At high peak power, this phase modulation can convert to large magnitude intensity modulation by non-linear processes. This can lead to optical damage. We have developed software to input the measured phase map data into beam propagation codes in order to model this conversion process. We are analyzing this data to: (1) Characterize the wavefront structure produced by current optical components, (2) Refine our understanding of laser system performance, (3) Develop a database from which future optical component specifications can be derived.

  19. Advancing three-dimensional MEMS by complimentary laser micro manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Jeremy A.; Williams, John D.; Lemp, Tom; Lehecka, Tom M.; Medina, Francisco; Wicker, Ryan B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes improvements that enable engineers to create three-dimensional MEMS in a variety of materials. It also provides a means for selectively adding three-dimensional, high aspect ratio features to pre-existing PMMA micro molds for subsequent LIGA processing. This complimentary method involves in situ construction of three-dimensional micro molds in a stand-alone configuration or directly adjacent to features formed by x-ray lithography. Three-dimensional micro molds are created by micro stereolithography (MSL), an additive rapid prototyping technology. Alternatively, three-dimensional features may be added by direct femtosecond laser micro machining. Parameters for optimal femtosecond laser micro machining of PMMA at 800 nanometers are presented. The technical discussion also includes strategies for enhancements in the context of material selection and post-process surface finish. This approach may lead to practical, cost-effective 3-D MEMS with the surface finish and throughput advantages of x-ray lithography. Accurate three-dimensional metal microstructures are demonstrated. Challenges remain in process planning for micro stereolithography and development of buried features following femtosecond laser micro machining.

  20. Direct and absolute absorption measurements in optical materials and coatings by laser induced deflection (LID) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Ch.

    2011-11-01

    Different strategies of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique for direct and absolute absorption measurements are presented. Besides selected strategies for bulk and coating absorption measurements, respectively, a new strategy is introduced allowing the transfer of the LID technique to very small samples and to significantly increase the sensitivity for materials with a very weak photo-thermal response. Additionally, an emphasis is placed on the importance of the calibration procedure. The electrical calibration of the LID setup is compared to two other approaches that use either doped samples or highly absorptive reference samples in combination with numerical simulations. Applying the LID technique, we report on the characterization of AR coated LBO crystals used in high power NIR/VIS laser applications. The comparison of different LBO crystals shows that there are significant differences in both, the AR coating and the LBO bulk absorption. These differences are much larger at 515 nm than at 1030 nm. Absorption spectroscopy measurements combining LID technique with a high power OPO laser system indicate that the coating process affects the LBO bulk absorption properties. Furthermore, the change of the absorption upon 1030 nm laser irradiation of a Nd:YVO4 laser crystal is investigated and compared to recent results. Finally, Ytterbium doped silica raw materials for high power fiber lasers are characterized with respect to the absorption induced attenuation at 1550 nm in order to compare these data with the total attenuation obtained for the subsequently manufactured laser active fibers.

  1. Direct and absolute absorption measurements in optical materials and coatings by laser induced deflection (LID) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Different strategies of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique for direct and absolute absorption measurements are presented. Besides selected strategies for bulk and coating absorption measurements, respectively, a new strategy is introduced allowing the transfer of the LID technique to very small samples and to significantly increase the sensitivity for materials with a very weak photo-thermal response. Additionally, an emphasis is placed on the importance of the calibration procedure. The electrical calibration of the LID setup is compared to two other approaches that use either doped samples or highly absorptive reference samples in combination with numerical simulations. Applying the LID technique, we report on the characterization of AR coated LBO crystals used in high power NIR/VIS laser applications. The comparison of different LBO crystals shows that there are significant differences in both, the AR coating and the LBO bulk absorption. These differences are much larger at 515 nm than at 1030 nm. Absorption spectroscopy measurements combining LID technique with a high power OPO laser system indicate that the coating process affects the LBO bulk absorption properties. Furthermore, the change of the absorption upon 1030 nm laser irradiation of a Nd:YVO4 laser crystal is investigated and compared to recent results. Finally, Ytterbium doped silica raw materials for high power fiber lasers are characterized with respect to the absorption induced attenuation at 1550 nm in order to compare these data with the total attenuation obtained for the subsequently manufactured laser active fibers.

  2. Selection and amplification of modes of an optical frequency comb using a femtosecond laser injection-locking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, H. S.; Kim, E. B.; Park, S. E.; Park, C. Y.

    2006-10-30

    The authors have demonstrated the selection and the amplification of the components of an optical frequency comb using a femtosecond laser injectionlocking technique. The author used a mode-locked femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser as the master laser and a single-mode diode laser as the slave laser. The femtosecond laser injection-locking technique was applied to a filter for mode selection of the optical frequency comb and an amplifier for amplification of the selected mode. The authors could obtain the laser source selected only the desired mode of the optical frequency comb and amplified the power of the selected modes several thousand times.

  3. Advanced photoinjector laser and microwave technologies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F.V.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Talley, W.K.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of the design parameters of the compact, high gradient, high luminosity X-band (8.568 GHz) photoinjector facility currently being developed as a collaborative effort between LLNL and UC Davis, is followed by a more detailed description of each of its major subsystems : X-band rf gun, GHz repetition rate synchronously modelocked AlGaAs quantum well laser oscillator, and 8-pass Ti: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} chirped pulse laser amplifier. The photoinjector uses a high quantum efficiency ({approx}5%) Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode, and will be capable of producing high charge (> 1 nC), relativistic (5 MeV), ultrashort (< 1 ps) electron bunches at 2.142 GHz repetition rate in burst mode (100 photoelectron bunches). Design studies indicate that a normalized rms transverse emittance {epsilon}{sub n} = 0.75 {pi} mm-mrad is possible at 0.1 nC charge, while 2.5 {pi} mm-mrad can be obtained at 1 nC. A complete status report of our progress in the development and implementation of the design discussed herein is then given, together with initial experimental data concerning the performance of the 15 MW SLAC X-band klystron amplifier. Finally, the phase noise and jitter characteristics of the laser and rf systems of the high gradient X-band photoinjector have been measured experimentally. In this case, the laser oscillator is a self-modelocked Titanium:Sapphire system operating at the 108th subharmonic of the rf gun. The X-band signal is produced from the laser by a phase-locked dielectric resonance oscillator, and amplified by a pulsed TWT. A comparison between the TWT phase noise and the fields excited in the rf gun demonstrates the filtering effect of the high Q cavity resonant structure, thus indicating that the rf gun can be used as a master oscillator, and could be energized by either a magnetron or a cross-field amplifier.

  4. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchuk, Kyle

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called "non-blinking" quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  5. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, Kyle

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  6. A study on laser-based ultrasonic technique by the use of guided wave tomographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Junpil Lim, Juyoung; Cho, Younho; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2015-03-31

    Guided wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and coarse surfaces or geometrically complicated features. A non-contact setup with a laser ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is the classic attractive for guided wave inspection. The present work was done to develop a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique by laser ultrasonic technique in a plate-like structure. A method for Lam wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulse laser ultrasonic transmitter and a Michelson interferometer receiver has been developed. In the images obtained by laser scanning, the defect shape and area showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact-based online inspection and monitoring technique.

  7. Simple synchronization technique of a mode-locked laser for Laser-Compton scattering γ-ray source.

    PubMed

    Mori, Michiaki; Kosuge, Atsushi; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Hajima, Ryoichi; Kondo, Kiminori

    2016-06-01

    We propose a simple and effective synchronization technique between a reference electrical oscillator and a mode-locked laser for a narrowband picosecond Laser-Compton scattering γ-ray source by using a commercial-based 1-chip frequency synthesizer, which is widely used in radio communication. The mode-locked laser has been successfully synchronized in time with a jitter of 180 fs RMS for 10 Hz-100 kHz bandwidth. A good stability of 640 μHz at 80 MHz repetition rate for 10 h operation has also been confirmed. We discuss in detail the design and performance of this technique (in terms of timing jitter, stability, and validity). PMID:27370447

  8. Simple synchronization technique of a mode-locked laser for Laser-Compton scattering γ-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Michiaki; Kosuge, Atsushi; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Hajima, Ryoichi; Kondo, Kiminori

    2016-06-01

    We propose a simple and effective synchronization technique between a reference electrical oscillator and a mode-locked laser for a narrowband picosecond Laser-Compton scattering γ-ray source by using a commercial-based 1-chip frequency synthesizer, which is widely used in radio communication. The mode-locked laser has been successfully synchronized in time with a jitter of 180 fs RMS for 10 Hz-100 kHz bandwidth. A good stability of 640 μHz at 80 MHz repetition rate for 10 h operation has also been confirmed. We discuss in detail the design and performance of this technique (in terms of timing jitter, stability, and validity).

  9. Simulation of an advanced techniques of ion propulsion Rocket system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkiyaraj, R.

    2016-07-01

    The ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of Deuterium,Argon gas and Hexagonal shape Magneto hydrodynamic(MHD) techniques because of the stimulation indirectly generated the power from ionization chamber,design of thrust range is 1.2 N with 40 KW of electric power and high efficiency.The proposed work is the study of MHD power generation through ionization level of Deuterium gas and combination of two gaseous ions(Deuterium gas ions + Argon gas ions) at acceleration stage.IPR consists of three parts 1.Hexagonal shape MHD based power generator through ionization chamber 2.ion accelerator 3.Exhaust of Nozzle.Initially the required energy around 1312 KJ/mol is carrying out the purpose of deuterium gas which is changed to ionization level.The ionized Deuterium gas comes out from RF ionization chamber to nozzle through MHD generator with enhanced velocity then after voltage is generated across the two pairs of electrode in MHD.it will produce thrust value with the help of mixing of Deuterium ion and Argon ion at acceleration position.The simulation of the IPR system has been carried out by MATLAB.By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results,if reaches that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with 40KW power for simulating the IPR system.

  10. Advanced Manufacturing Techniques Demonstrated for Fabricating Developmental Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Chip

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center's Engineering Development Division has been working in support of innovative gas turbine engine systems under development by Glenn's Combustion Branch. These one-of-a-kind components require operation under extreme conditions. High-temperature ceramics were chosen for fabrication was because of the hostile operating environment. During the designing process, it became apparent that traditional machining techniques would not be adequate to produce the small, intricate features for the conceptual design, which was to be produced by stacking over a dozen thin layers with many small features that would then be aligned and bonded together into a one-piece unit. Instead of using traditional machining, we produced computer models in Pro/ENGINEER (Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC), Needham, MA) to the specifications of the research engineer. The computer models were exported in stereolithography standard (STL) format and used to produce full-size rapid prototype polymer models. These semi-opaque plastic models were used for visualization and design verification. The computer models also were exported in International Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) format and sent to Glenn's Thermal/Fluids Design & Analysis Branch and Applied Structural Mechanics Branch for profiling heat transfer and mechanical strength analysis.

  11. Advances in Current Rating Techniques for Flexible Printed Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Twist Capsule Assemblies are power transfer devices commonly used in spacecraft mechanisms that require electrical signals to be passed across a rotating interface. Flexible printed circuits (flex tapes, see Figure 2) are used to carry the electrical signals in these devices. Determining the current rating for a given trace (conductor) size can be challenging. Because of the thermal conditions present in this environment the most appropriate approach is to assume that the only means by which heat is removed from the trace is thru the conductor itself, so that when the flex tape is long the temperature rise in the trace can be extreme. While this technique represents a worst-case thermal situation that yields conservative current ratings, this conservatism may lead to overly cautious designs when not all traces are used at their full rated capacity. A better understanding of how individual traces behave when they are not all in use is the goal of this research. In the testing done in support of this paper, a representative flex tape used for a flight Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) application was tested by energizing individual traces (conductors in the tape) in a vacuum chamber and the temperatures of the tape measured using both fine-gauge thermocouples and infrared thermographic imaging. We find that traditional derating schemes used for bundles of wires do not apply for the configuration tested. We also determine that single active traces located in the center of a flex tape operate at lower temperatures than those on the outside edges.

  12. Advances in array detectors for X-ray diffraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Quentin S; Denton, M Bonner

    2005-09-01

    Improved focal plane array detector systems are described which can provide improved readout speeds, random addressing and even be employed to simultaneously measure position, intensity and energy. This latter capability promises to rekindle interests in Laue techniques. Simulations of three varieties of foil mask spectrometer in both on- and off-axis configurations indicate that systems of stacked silicon detectors can provide energy measurements within 1% of the true value based on the use of single 'foils' and approximately 10000 photons. An eight-detector hybrid design can provide energy coverage from 4 to 60 keV. Energy resolution can be improved by increased integration time or higher flux experiments. An off-axis spectrometer design in which the angle between the incident beam and the detector system is 45 degrees results in a shift in the optimum energy response of the spectrometer system. In the case of a 200 microm-thick silicon absorber, the energy optimum shifts from 8.7 keV to 10.3 keV as the angle of incidence goes from 0 to 45 degrees. These new designs make better use of incident photons, lower the impact of source flicker through simultaneous rather than sequential collection of intensities, and improve the energy range relative to previously reported systems. PMID:16120985

  13. Recent advances in the surface forces apparatus (SFA) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelachvili, J.; Min, Y.; Akbulut, M.; Alig, A.; Carver, G.; Greene, W.; Kristiansen, K.; Meyer, E.; Pesika, N.; Rosenberg, K.; Zeng, H.

    2010-03-01

    The surface forces apparatus (SFA) has been used for many years to measure the physical forces between surfaces, such as van der Waals (including Casimir) and electrostatic forces in vapors and liquids, adhesion and capillary forces, forces due to surface and liquid structure (e.g. solvation and hydration forces), polymer, steric and hydrophobic interactions, bio-specific interactions as well as friction and lubrication forces. Here we describe recent developments in the SFA technique, specifically the SFA 2000, its simplicity of operation and its extension into new areas of measurement of both static and dynamic forces as well as both normal and lateral (shear and friction) forces. The main reason for the greater simplicity of the SFA 2000 is that it operates on one central simple-cantilever spring to generate both coarse and fine motions over a total range of seven orders of magnitude (from millimeters to ångstroms). In addition, the SFA 2000 is more spacious and modulated so that new attachments and extra parts can easily be fitted for performing more extended types of experiments (e.g. extended strain friction experiments and higher rate dynamic experiments) as well as traditionally non-SFA type experiments (e.g. scanning probe microscopy and atomic force microscopy) and for studying different types of systems.

  14. Advanced signal processing technique for damage detection in steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel Kumar; Dao, Cac Minh; Dao, Kiet; Kundu, Tribikram

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, ultrasonic guided waves gained attention for reliable testing and characterization of metals and composites. Guided wave modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers either in transmission or reflection mode. In this study guided waves are excited and detected in the transmission mode and the phase change of the propagating wave modes are recorded. In most of the other studies reported in the literature, the change in the received signal strength (amplitude) is investigated with varying degrees of damage while in this study the change in phase is correlated with the extent of damage. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that the bonding condition between the transducer and the specimen does not affect the phase while it can affect the strength of recorded signal. Therefore, if the specimen is not damaged but the transducer-specimen bonding is deteriorated then the received signal strength is altered but the phase remains same and thus false positive predictions for damage can be avoided.

  15. Fast wavelength tuning techniques for external cavity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Wysocki, Gerard; Tittel, Frank K.

    2011-01-11

    An apparatus comprising a laser source configured to emit a light beam along a first path, an optical beam steering component configured to steer the light beam from the first path to a second path at an angle to the first path, and a diffraction grating configured to reflect back at least a portion of the light beam along the second path, wherein the angle determines an external cavity length. Included is an apparatus comprising a laser source configured to emit a light beam along a first path, a beam steering component configured to redirect the light beam to a second path at an angle to the first path, wherein the optical beam steering component is configured to change the angle at a rate of at least about one Kilohertz, and a diffraction grating configured to reflect back at least a portion of the light beam along the second path.

  16. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy as a technique for combustion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshov, M. A.; Kuritsyn, Yu. A.; Romanovskii, Yu. V.

    2015-04-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has become a proven method of rapid gas diagnostics. In the present review an overview of the state of the art of TDL-based sensors and their applications for measurements of temperature, pressure, and species concentrations of gas components in harsh environments is given. In particular, the contemporary tunable diode laser systems, various methods of absorption detection (direct absorption measurements, wavelength modulation based phase sensitive detection), and relevant algorithms for data processing that improve accuracy and accelerate the diagnostics cycle are discussed in detail. The paper demonstrates how the recent developments of these methods and algorithms made it possible to extend the functionality of TDLAS in the tomographic imaging of combustion processes. Some prominent examples of applications of TDL-based sensors in a wide range of practical combustion aggregates, including scramjet engines and facilities, internal combustion engines, pulse detonation combustors, and coal gasifiers, are given in the final part of the review.

  17. New technique for prostatectomy using Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daidoh, Yuichiro; Arai, Tsunenori; Murai, Masaru; Nakajima, Akio; Tsuji, Akira; Odajima, Kunio; Nakajima, Fumio; Kikuchi, Makoto; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    1994-05-01

    To develop a new transperineal laser prostatectomy through a biopsy needle, we determined the efficiency of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation for canine prostate. The Ho:YAG laser ((lambda) equals 2.1 micrometers ) may induced stress-wave to destroy the small vessels in prostate. After the exposure of the canine prostate, it was punctured by the needle. A quartz fiber of which core-diameter was 200 or 400 micrometers was inserted into the 18 G needle. The irradiation fluence was set to 150 - 600 J/cm2 and repetition rate was kept at 2 Hz. The cross-section of the irradiated portion of the prostate extracted immediately after the irradiation showed dark-colored hemorrhage layer around the ablation tract with 1 - 2 mm thickness. Some hemorrhage was histologically seen in stoma and gland in the irradiated prostate. In the case of 150 - 175 J/cm2 in the irradiation fluence, the irradiated portion of the prostate was found in the wedge-shaped area with brown color at one week after the irradiation. The lymphocytes infiltrating into the wedge-shaped zone were found. The wedge- shaped zone spread over the prostate and the change of urethral mucosa was minimum at one month after the irradiation. In the case of 500 - 600 J/cm2 irradiation, the paraurethral cavity was made at one month after the irradiation. The histological examination showed that the hemorrhage and subsequent histological changes may be caused by the laser induced stress-wave rather than thermal effect. Our results suggest that transperineal irradiation of pulsed Ho:YAG might offer an effective treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia with the minimal damage to the urethral mucosa.

  18. Advanced 2-micron Solid-state Laser for Wind and CO2 Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Significant advancements in the 2-micron laser development have been made recently. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. The world record 2-micron laser energy is demonstrated with an oscillator and two amplifiers system. It generates more than one joule per pulse energy with excellent beam quality. Based on the successful demonstration of a fully conductive cooled oscillator by using heat pipe technology, an improved fully conductively cooled 2-micron amplifier was designed, manufactured and integrated. It virtually eliminates the running coolant to increase the overall system efficiency and reliability. In addition to technology development and demonstration, a compact and engineering hardened 2-micron laser is under development. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser is expected to be integrated to a lidar system and take field measurements. The recent achievements push forward the readiness of such a laser system for space lidar applications. This paper will review the developments of the state-of-the-art solid-state 2-micron laser.

  19. Advanced techniques for determining long term compatibility of materials with propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. L.; Stebbins, J. P.; Smith, A. W.; Pullen, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method for the prediction of propellant-material compatibility for periods of time up to ten years is presented. Advanced sensitive measurement techniques used in the prediction method are described. These include: neutron activation analysis, radioactive tracer technique, and atomic absorption spectroscopy with a graphite tube furnace sampler. The results of laboratory tests performed to verify the prediction method are presented.

  20. Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Durlofsky, Louis J.

    2000-08-28

    This project targets the development of (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling non-conventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and well index (for use in simulation models), including the effects of wellbore flow; and (3) accurate approaches to account for heterogeneity in the near-well region.

  1. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss "small-group apprenticeships (SGAs)" as a method to instruct cell culture techniques to high school participants. The study aimed to teach cell culture practices and to introduce advanced imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Participants designed and completed experiments…

  2. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    Discusses small-group apprenticeships (SGAs) as a method for introducing cell culture techniques to high school participants. Teaches cell culture practices and introduces advance imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Clarifies and illuminates the value of small-group laboratory apprenticeships. (Author/KHR)

  3. COIL--Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser: advances in development and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodymova, Jarmila

    2005-09-01

    Advantageous features of Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL) for laser technologies have increased considerably activities of international COIL communities during past ten years. They have been focused on the advanced concepts of hardware designs of the COIL subsystems, and testing and scaling-up of existing laser facilities. Prospective special applications of COIL technology, both civil and military, have received a significant attention and gained concrete aims. The paper is introduced by a brief description of the COIL operation mechanism and key device subsystems. It deals then with presentation of some investigated advanced concepts of singlet oxygen generators, alternative methods for atomic iodine generation, a mixing and ejector nozzle design to downsize a pressure recovery system, and optical resonators for high power COIL systems. The advanced diagnostics and computational modeling are also mentioned as very useful tools for critical insight into the laser kinetics and fluid dynamics, supporting thus the COIL research. The recent progress in the COIL development moves this laser closer to the application projects that are also briefly presented.

  4. Continued advancement of laser damage resistant optically functional microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Douglas S.; MacLeod, Bruce D.; Sabatino, Ernest

    2012-11-01

    Micro- and nano-structured optically functional surface textures continue to exhibit higher performance and longer term survivability than thin-film coatings for an increasing number of materials used within high energy laser (HEL) systems. Anti-reflection (AR) microstructures (ARMs) produce a graded refractive index yielding high transmission over wide spectral ranges along with a chemical, mechanical and laser damage resistance inherited from the bulk optic material. In this study, ARMs were fabricated in the relevant HEL materials sapphire, neodymium-doped YAG, fused silica, BK7 glass, and the magnesium aluminate known as SPINEL. Standardized pulsed laser induced damage threshold (LiDT) measurements were made using commercial testing services to directly compare the damage resistance of ARMs-treated optics to uncoated and thin-film-AR-coated (TFARC) optics at wavelengths of 532nm, 694nm, 800nm, 1064nm, and 1538nm. As found with prior work, the LiDT of ARMs etched in fused silica was typically in the range of 35 J/cm2 at a wavelength of 1064nm and a pulse width of 10ns, a level that is comparable to uncoated samples and 3.5 times greater than the level specified by six prominent TFARC providers. The Army Research Laboratory measured the pulsed LiDT at 532nm (10ns) of ARMs in fused silica to be up to 5 times the level of the ion beam sputtered TFARC previously employed in their HEL system, and 2 times higher than a low performance single layer MgF2 TFARC. This result was repeated and expanded using a commercial LiDT testing service for ARMs in two types of fused silica and for Schott N-BK7 glass. An average damage threshold of 26.5 J/cm2 was recorded for the ARMs-treated glass materials, a level 4 times higher than the commercial IBS TFARCs tested.

  5. Advances in fiber combined pump modules for fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Trevor; Romero, Oscar; Li, Hanxuan; Jin, Xu; Towe, Terry; Chyr, Irving; Truchan, Tom; Liu, Daming; Cutillas, Serge; Johnson, Kelly; Park, Sang-Ki; Wolak, Ed; Miller, Robert; Bullock, Robert; Mott, Jeff; Fidric, Bernard; Harrison, James

    2009-02-01

    Fiber combining multiple pump sources for fiber lasers has enabled the thermal and reliability advantages of distributed architectures. Recently, mini-bar based modules have been demonstrated which combine the advantages of independent emitter failures previously shown in single-stripe pumps with improved brightness retention yielding over 2 MW/cm2Sr in compact economic modules. In this work multiple fiber-coupled mini-bars are fiber combined to yield an output of over 400 W with a brightness exceeding 1 MW/cm2Sr in an economic, low loss architecture.

  6. Development of technique for laser welding of biological tissues using laser welding device and nanocomposite solder.

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, A; Ichcitidze, L; Podgaetsky, V; Ryabkin, D; Pyankov, E; Saveliev, M; Selishchev, S

    2015-08-01

    The laser device for welding of biological tissues has been developed involving quality control and temperature stabilization of weld seam. Laser nanocomposite solder applied onto a wound to be weld has been used. Physicochemical properties of the nanocomposite solder have been elucidated. The nature of the tissue-organizing nanoscaffold has been analyzed at the site of biotissue welding. PMID:26738200

  7. Performance Measurements of the Injection Laser System Configured for Picosecond Scale Advanced Radiographic Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Haefner, L C; Heebner, J E; Dawson, J W; Fochs, S N; Shverdin, M Y; Crane, J K; Kanz, K V; Halpin, J M; Phan, H H; Sigurdsson, R J; Brewer, S W; Britten, J A; Brunton, G K; Clark, W J; Messerly, M J; Nissen, J D; Shaw, B H; Hackel, R P; Hermann, M R; Tietbohl, G L; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-10-23

    We have characterized the Advanced Radiographic Capability injection laser system and demonstrated that it meets performance requirements for upcoming National Ignition Facility fusion experiments. Pulse compression was achieved with a scaled down replica of the meter-scale grating ARC compressor and sub-ps pulse duration was demonstrated at the Joule-level.

  8. Advances in Laser/Lidar Technologies for NASA's Science and Exploration Mission's Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Laser Risk Reduction Program, begun in 2002, has achieved many technology advances in only 3.5 years. The recent selection of several lidar proposals for Science and Exploration applications indicates that the LRRP goal of enabling future space-based missions by lowering the technology risk has already begun to be met.

  9. Analytic and interferometric techniques for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, Scott E.

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is being designed to detect and study in detail gravitational waves from sources throughout the Universe such as massive black holes. The conceptual formulation of the LISA space-borne gravitational wave detector is now well developed. The interferometric measurements between the sciencecraft remain one of the most important technological and scientific design areas for the mission. Our work has concentrated on developing the interferometric technologies to create a LISA-like optical signal and to measure the phase of that signal using commercially available instruments. One of the most important goals of this research is to demonstrate the LISA phase timing and phase reconstruction for a LISA-like fringe signal, in the case of a high fringe rate and a low signal level. To this end we have constructed a table-top interferometer which produces LISA-like fringe signals. Over the past few years questions have been raised concerning the use of laser communications links between sciencecraft to transmit phase information crucial to the reduction of laser frequency noise in the LISA science measurement. The concern is that applying medium frequency phase modulations to the laser carrier could compromise the phase stability of the LISA fringe signal. We have modified our table-top interferometer by applying a phase modulation to the laser beam in order to evaluate the effects of such modulations on the LISA science fringe signal. We have demonstrated that the phase resolution of the science signal is not degraded by the presence of medium frequency phase modulations. Each spacecraft in LISA houses a proof mass which follows a geodesic through space. Disturbances that change the proof mass position, momentum, and acceleration will appear in the LISA data stream as additive quadratic functions. These data disturbances inhibit signal extraction and must be removed. Much of our analytical work has been focused on discussing the

  10. Endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer: Standard techniques and recent advances in ESD

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Keiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The technique of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now a well-known endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer. ESD was introduced to resect large specimens of early gastric cancer in a single piece. ESD can provide precision of histologic diagnosis and can also reduce the recurrence rate. However, the drawback of ESD is its technical difficulty, and, consequently, it is associated with a high rate of complications, the need for advanced endoscopic techniques, and a lengthy procedure time. Various advances in the devices and techniques used for ESD have contributed to overcoming these drawbacks. PMID:24914364

  11. Subtask 12B2: Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Keppler, E.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The development of techniques for joining vanadium alloys will be required for the construction of fusion devices utilizing the desirable properties of these alloys. The primary objective of this program is to develop of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys, particularly for the manufacture of welded materials testing specimens. Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material effected by the weld. Lasers do not require a vacuum (as does electron beam welders) and the welds they produce have large depth-to-width ratios. Results of scoping tests using a small, pulsed laser (50 joule, YAG laser) indicated that lasers could produce successful welds in vanadium alloy (V-5%Cr-5%Ti) sheet (1-mm thick) when the fusion zone was isolated from air. The pulsed laser required an isolating chamber filled with inert gas to produce welds that did not contain cracks and showed only minor hardness increases. Successful bead-on-plate welds have been made to depths of about 4-mm using a 6 kW continuous CO{sub 2} laser with argon purging. 2 figs.

  12. Element selective detection of molecular species applying chromatographic techniques and diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kunze, K; Zybin, A; Koch, J; Franzke, J; Miclea, M; Niemax, K

    2004-12-01

    Tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (DLAAS) combined with separation techniques and atomization in plasmas and flames is presented as a powerful method for analysis of molecular species. The analytical figures of merit of the technique are demonstrated by the measurement of Cr(VI) and Mn compounds, as well as molecular species including halogen atoms, hydrogen, carbon and sulfur. PMID:15561625

  13. Comparison of KTP, Thulium, and CO2 laser in stapedotomy using specialized visualization techniques: thermal effects.

    PubMed

    Kamalski, Digna M A; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M; de Boorder, Tjeerd; Vincent, Robert; Trabelzini, Franco; Grolman, Wilko

    2014-06-01

    High-speed thermal imaging enables visualization of heating of the vestibule during laser-assisted stapedotomy, comparing KTP, CO2, and Thulium laser light. Perforation of the stapes footplate with laser bears the risk of heating of the inner ear fluids. The amount of heating depends on absorption of the laser light and subsequent tissue ablation. The ablation of the footplate is driven by strong water absorption for the CO2 and Thulium laser. For the KTP laser wavelength, ablation is driven by carbonization of the footplate and it might penetrate deep into the inner ear without absorption in water. The thermal effects were visualized in an inner ear model, using two new techniques: (1) high-speed Schlieren imaging shows relative dynamic changes of temperatures up to 2 ms resolution in the perilymph. (2) Thermo imaging provides absolute temperature measurements around the footplate up to 40 ms resolution. The high-speed Schlieren imaging showed minimal heating using the KTP laser. Both CO2 and Thulium laser showed heating below the footplate. Thulium laser wavelength generated heating up to 0.6 mm depth. This was confirmed with thermal imaging, showing a rise of temperature of 4.7 (±3.5) °C for KTP and 9.4 (±6.9) for Thulium in the area of 2 mm below the footplate. For stapedotomy, the Thulium and CO2 laser show more extended thermal effects compared to KTP. High-speed Schlieren imaging and thermal imaging are complimentary techniques to study lasers thermal effects in tissue. PMID:23880918

  14. Guiding of high intensity ultrashort laser pulses in plasma channels produced with the dual laser pulse ignitor-heater technique

    SciTech Connect

    Volfbeyn, P.; Leemans, W.P.

    1998-07-01

    The authors present results of experimental investigations of laser guiding in plasma channels. A new technique for plasma channel creation, the Ignitor-Heater scheme is proposed and experimentally tested in hydrogen and nitrogen. It makes use of two laser pulses. The Ignitor, an ultrashort (< 100 fs) laser pulse, is brought to a line focus using a cylindrical lens to ionize the gas. The Heater pulse (160 ps long) is used subsequently to heat the existing spark via inverse Bremsstrahlung. The hydrodynamic shock expansion creates a partially evacuated plasma channel with a density minimum on axis. Such a channel has properties of an optical waveguide. This technique allows creation of plasma channels in low atomic number gases, such as hydrogen, which is of importance for guiding of highly intense laser pulses. The channel density was diagnosed with time resolved longitudinal interferometry. From these measurements the plasma temperature was inferred. The guiding properties of the channels were tested by injecting a > 5 {times} 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, 75 fs laser pulse.

  15. Monitoring interfacial dynamics by pulsed laser techniques: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, G.

    1987-01-01

    Several types of materials have been surveyed including thin film and layered semiconductors as well as a metal and semimetal. Second harmonic (SH) generation measurements on these materials were made using both nanosecond (Q-switched) and picosecond (mode-locked) pulsed Nd:YAG lasers with appropriate gated or photon counting detection. Initial studies were performed under steady state conditions in order to optimize the experiments for time-resolved studies. SHG were also extended to the time domain. A means of monitoring surface structure and reconstruction phenomena in-situ was developed. This discovery now opens a broad new area of dynamic interfacial measurements to be done in-situ.

  16. Application of iterative path revision technique for laser cutting with controlled fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chwan-Huei; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2004-01-01

    Laser cutting using the controlled fracture technique has great potential to be employed for the ceramic substrate machining. The heat produced on the surface of a ceramic substrate by the laser separates the substrate controllably along the moving path of the laser beam. Because the extension of the breaking frontier is lager than the movement of the laser spot, the actual fracture trajectory deviates from the desired trajectory when cutting a curve or cutting an asymmetrical straight line. To eliminate this deviation, the iterative learning control method is introduced to obtain the optimal laser beam movement path. The fracture contour image is grabbed by a CCD camera after laser cutting completion. A new image processing system is proposed to detect the deviation between the desired cutting path and the actual fracture trajectory. The laser-movement path for the next trial can then be determined according to the iterative path revision algorithm. The actual fracture trajectory converging to the desired cutting path is assured after a few path revisions. The experimental materials used in these experiments are alumina ceramics and the laser source is CO 2 laser. The proposed system can achieve a machining precision of about 0.1 mm.

  17. [Recent advances in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yin-hui; Yao, Ke

    2013-05-01

    As the leading cause of blindness, the type of surgery performed to remove cataracts has evolved from Intracapsular to Extracapsular and to phacoemulsification. Advantages of femtosecond laser include high instantaneous power, strong penetration, short pulse-duration and micro-precision present superior accuracy, predictability and safety to cataract surgery, while also minimizing injury to surrounding ocular tissue. It mainly assists in the procedures of anterior capsulotomy, lens fragmentation, clear corneal incision and limbal relaxing incision creation. However, compared to conventional phacoemulsification, problems such as the minimization of complications and difficulties in conducting peer-reviewed studies with a longer follow-up period and large sample, as well as coverage of added costs remain untracked.The purpose of this review is to outline the advantages and disadvantages as well as clinical value of this evolving technology compared to conventional phacoemulsification. PMID:24021187

  18. Numerical analysis of radiation propagation in innovative volumetric receivers based on selective laser melting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Fabrizio; Santiago, Sergio; Roccabruna, Mattia; Luque, Salvador; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose; Crema, Luigi; Romero, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Volumetric absorbers constitute one of the key elements in order to achieve high thermal conversion efficiencies in concentrating solar power plants. Regardless of the working fluid or thermodynamic cycle employed, design trends towards higher absorber output temperatures are widespread, which lead to the general need of components of high solar absorptance, high conduction within the receiver material, high internal convection, low radiative and convective heat losses and high mechanical durability. In this context, the use of advanced manufacturing techniques, such as selective laser melting, has allowed for the fabrication of intricate geometries that are capable of fulfilling the previous requirements. This paper presents a parametric design and analysis of the optical performance of volumetric absorbers of variable porosity conducted by means of detailed numerical ray tracing simulations. Sections of variable macroscopic porosity along the absorber depth were constructed by the fractal growth of single-cell structures. Measures of performance analyzed include optical reflection losses from the absorber front and rear faces, penetration of radiation inside the absorber volume, and radiation absorption as a function of absorber depth. The effects of engineering design parameters such as absorber length and wall thickness, material reflectance and porosity distribution on the optical performance of absorbers are discussed, and general design guidelines are given.

  19. Experimental validation of tilt measurement technique with a laser beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen'kii, Mikhail S.; Karis, Stephen J.; Brown, James M.; Fugate, Robert Q.

    1999-09-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated for the first time a method for sensing wavefront tilt with a laser guide star (LGS). The tilt components of wavefronts were measured synchronously from the LGS using a telescope with 0.75 m effective aperture and from Polaris using a 1.5 m telescope. The Rayleigh guide star was formed at the altitude of 6 km and at a corresponding range of 10.5 km by projecting a focused beam at Polaris from the full aperture at the 1.5 m telescope. Both telescope mounts were unpowered and bottled down in place allowing us to substantially reduce the telescope vibration. The maximum value of the measured cross-correlation coefficient between the tilt for Polaris and the LGS is 0.71. The variations of the measured cross- correlation coefficient in the range from 0.22 to 0.71 are caused by turbulence at altitudes above 6 km, which was not sampled by the laser beacon, but affected the tilt for Polaris. It is also caused by the cone effect for turbulence below 6 km, residual mount jitter of the telescopes, and variations of the S/N. The experimental results support our concept of sensing atmospheric tilt by observing a LGS with an auxiliary telescope and indicate that this method is a possible solution for the tip-tilt problem.

  20. Laser frequency comb techniques for precise astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Locke, Clayton R.; Light, Philip S.; Luiten, Andre N.; Lawrence, Jon S.

    2012-05-01

    Precise astronomical spectroscopic analyses routinely assume that individual pixels in charge-coupled devices (CCDs) have uniform sensitivity to photons. Intra-pixel sensitivity (IPS) variations may already cause small systematic errors in, for example, studies of extra-solar planets via stellar radial velocities and cosmological variability in fundamental constants via quasar spectroscopy, but future experiments requiring velocity precisions approaching ˜1 cm s-1 will be more strongly affected. Laser frequency combs have been shown to provide highly precise wavelength calibration for astronomical spectrographs, but here we show that they can also be used to measure IPS variations in astronomical CCDs in situ. We successfully tested a laser frequency comb system on the Ultra-High-Resolution Facility spectrograph at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. By modelling the two-dimensional comb signal recorded in a single CCD exposure, we find that the average IPS deviates by <8 per cent if it is assumed to vary symmetrically about the pixel centre. We also demonstrate that a series of comb exposures with absolutely known offsets between them can yield tighter constraints on symmetric IPS variations from ˜100 pixels. We discuss measurement of asymmetric IPS variations and absolute wavelength calibration of astronomical spectrographs and CCDs using frequency combs.

  1. Preparation of nanofluids using laser ablation in liquid technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.X.; Soong, Yee

    2007-06-01

    In this work we report some results on thermal and transport properties of Ag-di water and Al-di water nanofluids that were prepared using Nd:yag laser to ablate Ag and Al in deionized water. The produced nanofluids were characterized using UV-VIS spectroscopy and TEM analysis. Our results on the UV-VIS spectra of the generated nanofluids demonstrated that using laser ablation in liquid we could generate stable colloids containing well-dispersed nanosized particles without use of any dispersants or surface reactive reagents. For Ag-di water nanofluids, the particles were spherical and the majority of the particles were in the 9 – 21 nm range with some big ones 23 - 26nm in size. The results on Al showed that the amplitude of the UV-VIS absorption spectra of Al-di water changed with time indicating that the ablated Al species reacts with water to yield an amorphous gel that transforms to the crystallized aluminum hydroxides with different shapes and sizes. The shapes were fibrous, triangular, rectangular, spherical shapes and joining of two pieces of triangles. In fact, these triangular and rectangular shapes were indeed pyramidal structures and hexagonal prisms, respectively.

  2. Evaluation of the effectiveness of laser crust removal on granites by means of hyperspectral imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo-Antonio, J. S.; Fiorucci, M. P.; Ramil, A.; López, A. J.; Rivas, T.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present a study of the application of the hyperspectral imaging technique in order to non-destructively evaluate the laser cleaning of the biogenic patina and the sulphated black crust developed on a fine-grained granite used in the construction of Cultural Heritage in NW Spain. The grained polymineral texture of the granite hinders the adjustment of laser irradiation parameters during the cleaning, and therefore the in situ process control. The cleaning was performed with a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YVO4 laser at 355 nm. A hyperspectral camera was used to in situ assess the effectiveness of cleaning by recording images of the rock surfaces before and during the laser treatment. Different analytical techniques were used to test the ability of the hyperspectral imaging technique to evaluate the cleaning process of the granite samples: optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM - EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and spectrophotometer colour measurements. The results indicated that hyperspectral imaging technique is a reliable and more affordable technique to in situ evaluate the process of laser cleaning of the biogenic patina and the sulphated black crust in fine-grained granites.

  3. A unified planar measurement technique for compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1992-01-01

    A unified laser-induced fluorescence technique for conducting planar measurements of temperature, pressure and velocity in nonreacting, highly compressible flows has been developed, validated and demonstrated. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, was induced by an argon-ion laser and collected using a liquid-nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In the measurement technique, temperature is determined from the fluorescence induced with the laser operated broad band. Pressure and velocity are determined from the shape and position of the fluorescence excitation spectrum which is measured with the laser operated narrow band. The measurement approach described herein provides a means of obtaining accurate, spatially-complete maps of the primary flow field parameters in a wide variety of cold supersonic and transonic flows.

  4. Novel technique for low-jitter dual-laser synchronization in a thin film deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Pritish; Cuff, John B.; Witanachchi, Sarath

    2001-05-01

    The need for precise laser pulse synchronization in a dual-laser ablation system to optimize the quality of the deposited thin films has been previously demonstrated. We present, in this article, a novel technique for the synchronization of an excimer and a CO{sub 2} laser with synchronization having a temporal fluctuation (jitter) of less than {+-}14 ns. This is several times better than the best precision of temporal synchronization possible using traditional electronic techniques and is crucial for the application of dual-laser ablation in the manufacturing of thin films. Evidence for reproducibility in the ablation of targets using this system is presented by analyzing the initial stages of the ablated plasma using a time-gated charge coupled device imaging system.

  5. An Automatic Algorithm for Minimizing Anomalies and Discrepancies in Point Clouds Acquired by Laser Scanning Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordin, Fabiane; Gonzaga, Luiz, Jr.; Galhardo Muller, Fabricio; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Scaioni, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Laser scanning technique from airborne and land platforms has been largely used for collecting 3D data in large volumes in the field of geosciences. Furthermore, the laser pulse intensity has been widely exploited to analyze and classify rocks and biomass, and for carbon storage estimation. In general, a laser beam is emitted, collides with targets and only a percentage of emitted beam returns according to intrinsic properties of each target. Also, due interferences and partial collisions, the laser return intensity can be incorrect, introducing serious errors in classification and/or estimation processes. To address this problem and avoid misclassification and estimation errors, we have proposed a new algorithm to correct return intensity for laser scanning sensors. Different case studies have been used to evaluate and validated proposed approach.

  6. A Notch-Saddle-Compensation Technique in Butterfly-Type Laser Module Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Tsai, Ying-Chien; Kuang, Jao-Hwa; Sheen, Maw-Tyan; Hsu, Pu-Hsien; Cheng, Wood-Hi

    2007-06-01

    A quantitative postweld shift (PWS) correction employing a notch-saddle-compensation technique (NSCT) in a laser-welded butterfly-type laser module package is presented. A predetermined notch geometry is proposed to guide the welding compensation in the specific direction and magnitude precisely. The results show that 82% to 99% of the relative coupling efficiency before welding for the laser modules is achieved by using the NSCT. The fiber shifts due to the PWS can be realigned back closer to their original optimum position after applying the NSCT, and hence, the coupling loss due to the PWS can be regained. In comparison to the published studies on PWS compensation by the mechanical adjustment using the qualitative estimation and plastic deformation, the advantages of using this novel NSCT are the quantitative and nondestructive compensations in butterfly-type laser module packages. Therefore, high-yield butterfly-type laser modules used in lightwave transmission systems are developed and fabricated.

  7. Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: surgical technique and clinical follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Stephen J.; Miller, Drew V.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Kelly, Anne M.

    1991-05-01

    Fifteen patients were studied prospectively as a pilot study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the contact Neodynium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser in performing arthroscopic meniscal resection in a saline medium, (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malverne, PA). All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing, and post-operative swelling. Although there was increased time involved with setting up and calibrating the laser, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. In addition, the decreased need for secondary trimming and increased accessibility to the posterior horns of the menisci represent advantages over conventional instruments. Based on the findings, arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser surgery is a safe and effective clinical tool for meniscal resection which may, with increased technological advancements and cost reduction, replace standard instrumentation.

  8. A Novel Microcharacterization Technique in the Measurement of Strain and Orientation Gradient in Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmestai, H.; Harris, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-01-01

    Representation of morphology and evolution of the microstructure during processing and their relation to properties requires proper experimental techniques. Residual strains, lattice distortion, and texture (micro-texture) at the interface and the matrix of a layered structure or a functionally gradient material and their variation are among parameters important in materials characterization but hard to measure with present experimental techniques. Current techniques available to measure changes in interred material parameters (residual stress, micro-texture, microplasticity) produce results which are either qualitative or unreliable. This problem becomes even more complicated in the case of a temperature variation. These parameters affect many of the mechanical properties of advanced materials including stress-strain relation, ductility, creep, and fatigue. A review of some novel experimental techniques using recent advances in electron microscopy is presented here to measure internal stress, (micro)texture, interracial strength and (sub)grain formation and realignment. Two of these techniques are combined in the chamber of an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope to measure strain and orientation gradients in advanced materials. These techniques which include Backscattered Kikuchi Diffractometry (BKD) and Microscopic Strain Field Analysis are used to characterize metallic and intermetallic matrix composites and superplastic materials. These techniques are compared with the more conventional x-ray diffraction and indentation techniques.

  9. Manual for extending the laser specklegram technique to strain analysis of rotating components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, L. C.; Turner, J. L.; Weathers, J.; Swinson, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    The theory, techniques, and equipment necessary for extending laser speckle techniques to analyze stresses in rotating blades are described. Details for setting up the equipment, for timing the events, for data recording, and for data analysis are discussed. Finite element techniques are investigated for analysis of speckle data. Advantages and limitations of the finite element analysis for the speckle data are discussed. The finite element program is listed.

  10. Solid-State 2-Micron Laser Transmitter Advancement for Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements From Ground, Airborne, and Space-Based Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Ismail, Syed

    2008-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing 2-micron lidar technologies over a decade for wind measurements, utilizing coherent Doppler wind lidar technique and carbon dioxide measurements, utilizing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique. Significant advancements have been made towards developing state-of-the-art technologies towards laser transmitters, detectors, and receiver systems. These efforts have led to the development of solid-state lasers with high pulse energy, tunablility, wavelength-stability, and double-pulsed operation. This paper will present a review of these technological developments along with examples of high resolution wind and high precision CO2 DIAL measurements in the atmosphere. Plans for the development of compact high power lasers for applications in airborne and future space platforms for wind and regional to global scale measurement of atmospheric CO2 will also be discussed.

  11. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method.

    PubMed

    Fischer, D; de la Fuente, G F; Jansen, M

    2012-04-01

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 °C. PMID:22559543

  12. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: Scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.; Jansen, M.; Fuente, G. F. de la

    2012-04-15

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 deg. C.

  13. Contact Nd:YAG Laser Technique Applied To Head And Neck Reconstructive Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobori, Takuo; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Moriyama, Ichiro; Sannikorn, Phakdee; Ohyama, Masaru

    1989-09-01

    The contact Nd:YAG laser system with ceramics tip was applied to head and neck reconstructive surgery. Plastic surgery was performed in 78 patients with head and neck diseases during the past 11 years. Since 1984 reconstructive surgery in these patients was made on 60 cases and on 45 cases(75%) of these cases the contact Nd:YAG laser surgery was used. Using this laser technique, half volume of bleeding in the operation was obtained as compared with that of the conventional procedure.

  14. Laser-dye ablation technique for removal of carious dentin and enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Gillings, Barrie R.; Dawes, Judith M.

    1997-05-01

    A GaAlAs semiconductor diode laser operating at a wavelength of 796 nm has been sued in conjunction with Indocyanine Green (ICG) dye to ablate carious dentin and enamel from extracted human teeth. The laser-dye ablation technique offers selective ablation as it is controlled by the placement of the ICG dye. In contrast with other laser techniques, the risk of collateral thermal damage is substantially reduced. The diode laser is suitable for ordinary fiber delivery and is cheaper and more compact than the higher power CO2; Er:YAG, Nd:YAG and Argon lasers currently being used by researchers. This paper reports the ablation of dental caries in fifty extracted teeth with various laser diode powers and dye concentrations. The mass of material ablated, temperature rise in the pulp and surface temperature were measured. The ablation was found to be efficient with negligible thermal damage to surrounding tissue. At the same time average surface temperatures reached during ablation may be sufficient to sterilize the treated surface. Hardness measurements and scanning electron microscopy of the laser treated cavity surfaces show the new surfaces to be suitable for placement of a dental filling.

  15. Hypersonic Wake Diagnostics Using Laser Induced Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Jack L.; Sukenik, Charles I.; Balla, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    A review of recent research performed in iodine that involves a two photon absorption of light at 193 nm will be discussed, and it's potential application to velocimetry measurements in a hypersonic flow field will be described. An alternative seed atom, Krypton, will be presented as a good candidate for performing nonintrusive hypersonic flow diagnostics. Krypton has a metastable state with a lifetime of approximately 43 s which would prove useful for time of flight measurement (TOF) and a sensitivity to collisions that can be utilized for density measurements. Calculations using modest laser energies and experimental values show an efficiency of excited state production to be on the order of 10(exp -6) for a two photon absorption at 193 nm.

  16. Fuel Injector Patternation Evaluation in Advanced Liquid-Fueled, High Pressure, Gas Turbine Combustors, Using Nonintrusive Optical Diagnostic Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, R. J.; Hicks, Y. R.; Anderson, R. C.; Zaller, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging and planar Mie scattering are used to examine the fuel distribution pattern (patternation) for advanced fuel injector concepts in kerosene burning, high pressure gas turbine combustors. Three diverse fuel injector concepts for aerospace applications were investigated under a broad range of operating conditions. Fuel PLIF patternation results are contrasted with those obtained by planar Mie scattering. Further comparison is also made for one injector with data obtained through phase Doppler measurements. Differences in spray patterns for diverse conditions and fuel injector configurations are readily discernible. An examination of the data has shown that a direct determination of the fuel spray angle at realistic conditions is also possible. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the applicability and usefulness of these nonintrusive optical techniques for investigating fuel spray patternation under actual combustor conditions.

  17. Standardization of Laser Methods and Techniques for Vibration Measurements and Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Hans-Juergen von

    2010-05-28

    The realization and dissemination of the SI units of motion quantities (vibration and shock) have been based on laser interferometer methods specified in international documentary standards. New and refined laser methods and techniques developed by national metrology institutes and by leading manufacturers in the past two decades have been swiftly specified as standard methods for inclusion into in the series ISO 16063 of international documentary standards. A survey of ISO Standards for the calibration of vibration and shock transducers demonstrates the extended ranges and improved accuracy (measurement uncertainty) of laser methods and techniques for vibration and shock measurements and calibrations. The first standard for the calibration of laser vibrometers by laser interferometry or by a reference accelerometer calibrated by laser interferometry (ISO 16063-41) is on the stage of a Draft International Standard (DIS) and may be issued by the end of 2010. The standard methods with refined techniques proved to achieve wider measurement ranges and smaller measurement uncertainties than that specified in the ISO Standards. The applicability of different standardized interferometer methods to vibrations at high frequencies was recently demonstrated up to 347 kHz (acceleration amplitudes up to 350 km/s{sup 2}). The relative deviations between the amplitude measurement results of the different interferometer methods that were applied simultaneously, differed by less than 1% in all cases.

  18. Fabrication of synthetic diffractive elements using advanced matrix laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereň, M.; Svoboda, J.; Květoň, M.; Fiala, P.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a matrix laser writing device based on a demagnified projection of a micro-structure from a computer driven spatial light modulator. The device is capable of writing completely aperiodic micro-structures with resolution higher than 200 000 DPI. An optical system is combined with ultra high precision piezoelectric stages with an elementary step ~ 4 nm. The device operates in a normal environment, which significantly decreases the costs compared to competitive technologies. Simultaneously, large areas can be exposed up to 100 cm2. The capabilities of the constructed device will be demonstrated on particular elements fabricated for real applications. The optical document security is the first interesting field, where the synthetic image holograms are often combined with sophisticated aperiodic micro-structures. The proposed technology can easily write simple micro-gratings creating the color and kinetic visual effects, but also the diffractive cryptograms, waveguide couplers, and other structures recently used in the field of optical security. A general beam shaping elements and special photonic micro-structures are another important applications which will be discussed in this paper.

  19. Modulation/demodulation techniques for satellite communications. Part 2: Advanced techniques. The linear channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, J. K.; Simon, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory is presented for deducing and predicting the performance of transmitter/receivers for bandwidth efficient modulations suitable for use on the linear satellite channel. The underlying principle used is the development of receiver structures based on the maximum-likelihood decision rule. The application of the performance prediction tools, e.g., channel cutoff rate and bit error probability transfer function bounds to these modulation/demodulation techniques.

  20. Nondestructive Measurement Material Characterization of Thermal Sprayed Nickel Aluminum Coatings by using Laser Ultrasound Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Cheng Hung; Wu, Tai Chieh; Yang, Che Hua

    This research focused on characterization of mechanical properties in Nickel-Aluminum coating with different thermal technique and processing parameters at high temperature environment up to 295°C. With the laser ultrasound technique (LUT), guided acoustic waves are generated to propagate on the Ni-Al sprayed coatings. By measuring dispersive phase velocity followed by SCE-UA inversion algorithm. The Young's modulus of coatings which fabricated by HVOF technique is higher than APS technique. This technique is potentially useful to probe the material characterization at high temperature environment in a remote and non-destructive way.

  1. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  2. Detection of Skin Disbond in Honeycombs and Coating Detachment by a Laser Acoustic Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blouin, A.; Campagne, B.; Néron, C.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2007-03-01

    Many engineering structures are composite and include for example a protective coating or a bonded layer. A novel technique, close to laser-ultrasonics but significantly different, has been developed for the detection of disbonds between the coating or the bonded layer and the substrate. It is also applicable to the detection of core unbonds in honeycomb structures. The technique is based on the thermoelastic excitation by a pulsed laser of the top layer or top skin which is driven into vibration if it is detached from the substrate underneath. This vibration is then detected by a second laser coupled to a photorefractive interferometer. The technique can be made very flexible by using optical fiber coupling. One foresees its application to the in-service inspection of aerospace structures for the detection of core unbonds in honeycombs or near surface delaminations. Examples of application to honeycombs and to various coatings are presented.

  3. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  4. Comparison of laser and ultraviolet techniques used in the detection of body secretions.

    PubMed

    Auvdel, M J

    1987-03-01

    Evaluation of the detection capabilities of both laser and ultraviolet light sources was performed. The Spectra-Physics Model 171-19 argon ion laser was used in a comparison with the hand held Mineralight multiband ultraviolet lamp, Model UVSL-58 and the Fotodyne Foto UV 410, Model 3-4100. Both techniques were evaluated as to their detection limits for various biological stains. A serial dilution was made from semen, saliva, and sweat samples and their corresponding stains were examined under laser and ultraviolet light sources. The techniques were also evaluated as to possible interferences which may arise based on the type of fabric the stains were made on. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique in relationship to their initial costs are discussed. PMID:3572332

  5. Marker and pen graffiti cleaning on diverse calcareous stones by different laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriani, S. E.; Catalano, I. M.; Daurelio, G.; Albanese, A.

    2007-05-01

    Industries nowadays continuously produce new types of inks for markers and pens, so new different graffiti appear . In this paper laser cleaning tests on 41 new marker and pen types ( fluorescent, permanent, water-based, acrylic tempera, metallic paint, waterproof inks ), applied into laboratory on different litho- type samples (Chianca, Travertino di Roma, Tufo Carparo fine grain, Sabbie), typical stones employed in much more monuments in Puglia and Italian architectures were carried out. The same ones, were exposed for twelve months to outdoor ageing, subject to sunshine, rain, wind, IR and UV solar radiations. Ablation experiments and tests by using different cleaning techniques, each one in Dry and Wet condition (classic technique, Daurelio technique 1 and Daurelio technique 2 and others new techniques) and two different Nd:YAG laser systems (Palladio by QUANTA SYSTEM and SMART CLEAN II by EL.EN.), were adopted. The experimental modes, N-Mode (1064nm - 150, 300 and 500 μs pulse duration), Q-Switch (1064nm - 8 ns pulse duration) and SFR (Short Free Running - 1064 nm - 40 to 110μs pulse duration) were tested on each marked stones. It was found that according to the different ink types and stone substrate, Q-Switch laser cleaning ablation with optimized laser technique are the best solution to marker an pen graffiti removal. The work is still in progress.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF ULTRATRACE LASER SPECTROMETRY TECHNIQUES FOR MEASUREMENTS OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory


    Development of Arsenic Speciation Techniques Based on High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry

    J.B. Simeonsson, H.D. Beach and D.J. Thomas
    US EPA, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Resear...

  7. Development of techniques for quantum-enhanced laser-interferometric gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goda, Keisuke

    2007-08-01

    A detailed theoretical and experimental study of techniques necessary for quantum-enhanced laser-interferometric gravitational wave (GW) detectors was carried out. The basic theory of GWs and laser-interferometric GW detectors, quantum noise in GW detectors, the theory of squeezed states including generation, degradation, detection, and control of squeezed states using sub- threshold optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) and homodyne detectors, experimental characterization of these techniques (using periodically poled KTiOPO 4 in an OPO at 1064 nm for the first time), key requirements for quantum-enhanced GW detectors, and the propagation of a squeezed state in a complex interferometer and its interaction with the interferometer field were studied. Finally, the experimental demonstration of quantum-enhancement in a prototype GW detector was performed. By injecting a squeezed vacuum field of 9.3 dB (inferred) or 7.4 ± 0.1 dB (measured) at frequencies above 3 kHz and a cutoff frequency for squeezing at 700 Hz into the antisymmetric port of the prototype GW detector in a signal-recycled Michelson interferometer configuration, the shot noise floor of the detector was reduced broadband from 7.0 × 10^-17 m/[Special characters omitted.] to 5.0 × 10^-17 m/[Special characters omitted.] while the strength of a simulated GW signal was retained, resulting in a 40% increase in signal-to-noise ratio or detector sensitivity, which is equivalent to a factor of 1.4 3 = 2.7 increase in GW detection rate for isotropically distributed GW sources that are confined to the frequency band in which squeezing was effective. This is the first implementation of quantum-enhancement in a prototype GW detector with suspended optics and readout and control schemes similar to those used in LIGO and Advanced LIGO. It is, therefore, a critical step toward implementation of quantum-enhancement in long baseline GW detectors. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge

  8. Advances in Diode-Laser-Based Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, Scott; Repasky, Kevin; Morley, Bruce; Moen, Drew; Weckwerth, Tammy; Hayman, Matt; Nehrir, Amin

    2016-06-01

    An advanced diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (WV-DIAL) has been developed. The next generation design was built on the success of previous diode-laser-based prototypes and enables accurate measurement of water vapor closer to the ground surface, in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions, and in daytime cloudy conditions up to cloud base. The lidar provides up to 1 min resolution, 150 m range resolved measurements of water vapor in a broad range of atmospheric conditions. A description of the instrument and results from its initial field test in 2014 are discussed.

  9. Hybrid nuclear light bulb-nuclear-pumped laser propulsion for advanced missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, G. H.

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid ``nuclear light bulb'' gaseous core reactor that can radiantly transfer energy to a propellant or alternately activate laser action is proposed for advanced space missions. The propellant mode would be employed in the phases of the mission requiring a higher thrust. However, for the bulk of the travel, the propellant would be turned off and the ultrahigh specific impulse laser mode of operation would be employed. The concept is reviewed, research and development issues are identified, and steps necessary for a feasibility demonstration are discussed.

  10. Recent advances in efficient long-life, eye-safe solid state and CO2 lasers for laser radar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Buoncristiani, A. M.; Brockman, P.; Bair, C. H.; Schryer, D. R.; Upchurch, B. T.; Wood, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    The key problems in the development of eye-safe solid-state lasers are discussed, taking into account the energy transfer mechanisms between the complicated energy level manifolds of the Tm, Ho, Er ion dopants in hosts with decreasing crystal fields such as YAG or YLF. Optimization of energy transfer for efficient lasing through choice of dopant concentration, power density, crystal field and temperature is addressed. The tailoring of energy transfer times to provide efficient energy extraction for short pulses used in DIAL and Doppler lidar is considered. Recent advances in Pt/SnO2 oxide catalysts and other noble metal/metal oxide combinations for CO2 lasers are discussed. Emphasis is given to the dramatic effects of small quantities of H2O vapor for increasing the activity and lifetime of Pt/SnO2 catalysts and to increased lifetime operation with rare isotope (C-12)(O-18)2 lasing mixtures.

  11. Advanced combustion techniques for controlling NO sub x emissions of high altitude cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.; Reck, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    An array of experiments designed to explore the potential of advanced combustion techniques for controlling the emissions of aircraft into the upper atmosphere was discussed. Of particular concern are the oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions into the stratosphere. The experiments utilize a wide variety of approaches varying from advanced combustor concepts to fundamental flame tube experiments. Results are presented which indicate that substantial reductions in cruise NOx emissions should be achievable in future aircraft engines. A major NASA program is described which focuses the many fundamental experiments into a planned evolution and demonstration of the prevaporized-premixed combustion technique in a full-scale engine.

  12. POC-Scale Testing of an Advanced Fine Coal Dewatering Equipment/Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Karekh, B K; Tao, D; Groppo, J G

    1998-08-28

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 mm) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy's program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20% or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 45 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from January 1 - March 31, 1998.

  13. A novel one lobe technique of thulium laser enucleation of the prostate: 'All-in-One' technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Lee, Yoon Hyung; Kwon, Joon Beom; Cho, Sung Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The thulium laser is the most recently introduced technology for the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Until recently, most thulium laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuLEP) was performed by use of the three-lobe technique. We introduce a novel one-lobe enucleation technique for ThuLEP called the "All-in-One" technique. We report our initial experiences here. Materials and Methods From June 2013 to May 2014, a total of 47 patients underwent the All-in-One technique of ThuLEP for symptomatic BPH performed by a single surgeon. All patients were assessed with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), transrectal ultrasonography, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), maximal urine flow rate (Qmax), and postvoid residual urine volume (PVR) before and 1 month after surgery. We reassessed IPSS, Qmax, and PVR 3 months after surgery. To assess the efficacy of the All-in-One technique, we checked the PSA reduction ratio, transitional zone volume reduction ratio, and enucleation failure rate. Results The mean operative time was 82.1±33.3 minutes. The mean enucleation time and morcellation time were 52.7±21.7 minutes and 8.2±7.0 minutes, respectively. The mean resected tissue weight and decrease in hemoglobin were 36.9±24.6 g and 0.4±0.8 g/dL, respectively. All perioperative parameters showed significant improvement (p<0.05). No major complications were observed. The PSA reduction ratio, transitional zone volume reduction ratio, and enucleation failure rate were 0.81, 0.92, and 4.3%, respectively. Conclusions The All-in-One technique of ThuLEP showed efficacy and effectiveness comparable to that of other techniques. We expect that this new technique could reduce the operation time and the bleeding and improve the effectiveness of enucleation. PMID:26568795

  14. Modulation/demodulation techniques for satellite communications. Part 3: Advanced techniques. The nonlinear channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, J. K.; Simon, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory for deducing and predicting the performance of transmitter/receivers for bandwidth efficient modulations suitable for use on the nonlinear satellite channel is presented. The underlying principle used throughout is the development of receiver structures based on the maximum likelihood decision rule and aproximations to it. The bit error probability transfer function bounds developed in great detail in Part 4 is applied to these modulation/demodulation techniques. The effects of the various degrees of receiver mismatch are considered both theoretically and by numerous illustrative examples.

  15. Optical diagnostics of vascular reactions triggered by weak allergens using laser speckle-contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Yu L; Kalchenko, V V; Astaf'eva, N G; Meglinski, I V

    2014-08-31

    The capability of using the laser speckle contrast imaging technique with a long exposure time for visualisation of primary acute skin vascular reactions caused by a topical application of a weak contact allergen is considered. The method is shown to provide efficient and accurate detection of irritant-induced primary acute vascular reactions of skin. The presented technique possesses a high potential in everyday diagnostic practice, preclinical studies, as well as in the prognosis of skin reactions to the interaction with potentially allergenic materials. (laser biophotonics)

  16. Stabilizing operation point technique based on the tunable distributed feedback laser for interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xuefeng; Zhou, Xinlei; Yu, Qingxu

    2016-02-01

    We describe a stabilizing operation point technique based on the tunable Distributed Feedback (DFB) laser for quadrature demodulation of interferometric sensors. By introducing automatic lock quadrature point and wavelength periodically tuning compensation into an interferometric system, the operation point of interferometric system is stabilized when the system suffers various environmental perturbations. To demonstrate the feasibility of this stabilizing operation point technique, experiments have been performed using a tunable-DFB-laser as light source to interrogate an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric vibration sensor and a diaphragm-based acoustic sensor. Experimental results show that good tracing of Q-point was effectively realized.

  17. Laser ablation in liquids as a new technique of sampling in elemental analysis of solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muravitskaya, E. V.; Rosantsev, V. A.; Belkov, M. V.; Ershov-Pavlov, E. A.; Klyachkovskaya, E. V.

    2009-02-01

    Laser ablation in liquid media is considered as a new sample preparation technique in the elemental composition analysis of materials using optical emission spectroscopy of inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES). Solid samples are transformed into uniform colloidal solutions of nanosized analyte particles using laser radiation focused onto the sample surface. High homogeneity of the resulting solution allows performing the ICP-OES quantitative analysis especially for the samples, which are poorly soluble in acids. The technique is compatible with the conventional solution-based standards.

  18. Standoff detection of hazardous materials using a novel dual-laser pulse technique: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Alan; Waterbury, Robert D.; Rose, Jeremy; Dottery, Edwin L.

    2009-05-01

    The present work focuses on a new variant of double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) called Townsend effect plasma spectroscopy (TEPS) for standoff applications. In the TEPS technique, the atomic and molecular emission lines are enhanced by a factor on the order of 25 to 300 times over LIBS, depending upon the emission lines observed. As a result, it is possible to extend the range of laser induced plasma techniques beyond LIBS and DP-LIBS for the detection of CBRNE materials at distances of several meters.

  19. Design and implementation of a system for laser assisted milling of advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuefeng; Feng, Gaocheng; Liu, Xianli

    2016-04-01

    Laser assisted machining is an effective method to machine advanced materials with the added benefits of longer tool life and increased material removal rates. While extensive studies have investigated the machining properties for laser assisted milling(LAML), few attempts have been made to extend LAML to machining parts with complex geometric features. A methodology for continuous path machining for LAML is developed by integration of a rotary and movable table into an ordinary milling machine with a laser beam system. The machining strategy and processing path are investigated to determine alignment of the machining path with the laser spot. In order to keep the material removal temperatures above the softening temperature of silicon nitride, the transformation is coordinated and the temperature interpolated, establishing a transient thermal model. The temperatures of the laser center and cutting zone are also carefully controlled to achieve optimal machining results and avoid thermal damage. These experiments indicate that the system results in no surface damage as well as good surface roughness, validating the application of this machining strategy and thermal model in the development of a new LAML system for continuous path processing of silicon nitride. The proposed approach can be easily applied in LAML system to achieve continuous processing and improve efficiency in laser assisted machining.

  20. Autonomous structural health monitoring technique for interplanetary drilling applications using laser Doppler velocimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statham, Shannon M.

    The research work presented in this thesis is devoted to the formulation and field testing of a dynamics-based structural health monitoring system for an interplanetary subsurface exploration drill system. Structural health monitoring is the process of detecting damage or other types of defects in structural and mechanical systems that have the potential to adversely affect the current or future performance of these systems. Interplanetary exploration missions, specifically to Mars, involve operations to search for water and other signs of extant or past life. Such missions require advanced robotic systems that are more susceptible to structural and mechanical failures, which motivates a need for structural health monitoring techniques relevant to interplanetary exploration systems. Strict design requirements for interplanetary exploration missions create unique research problems and challenges compared with structural health monitoring procedures and techniques developed to date. These challenges include implementing sensors and devices that will not interfere with the drilling operation, producing "real-time" diagnostics of the drilling condition, and developing an automation procedure for complete autonomous operations. The first research area involves modal analysis experiments to understand the dynamic characteristics of interplanetary drill structural systems in operation. These experiments also validate the use of Laser Doppler Velocimeter sensors in real-time structural health monitoring and prove the drill motor system adequately excites the drill for dynamic measurements and modal analysis while the drill is in operation. The second research area involves the development of modal analysis procedures for rotating structures using a Chebyshev signal filter to remove harmonic component and other noise from the rotating drill signal. This filter is necessary to accurately analyze the condition of the rotating drill auger tube while in operation. The third

  1. An Overview of High Energy Short Pulse Technology for Advanced Radiography of Laser Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J; Key, M; Britten, J; Beach, R; Beer, G; Brown, C; Bryan, S; Caird, J; Carlson, T; Crane, J; Dawson, J; Erlandson, A C; Fittinghoff, D; Hermann, M; Hoaglan, C; Iyer, A; Jones, L; Jovanovic, I; Komashko, A; Landen, O; Liao, Z; Molander, W; Mitchell, A; Moses, E; Nielsen, N; Nguyen, H; Nissen, J; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Risinger, L; Rushford, M; Skulina, K; Spaeth, M; Stuart, B; Tietbohl, G; Wattellier, B

    2004-06-18

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with NIF-class, Nd:glass laser systems are reviewed. High energy short pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on the NIF. Development of meter-scale, high efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of HEPW pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fiber-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for high energy petawatt pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion.

  2. Recent Advances in Synthesis and Characterization of SWCNTs produced by laser oven process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Results from the parametric study of the two-laser oven process indicated possible improvements with flow conditions and laser characteristics (ref. 1). Higher flow rates, lower operating pressures coupled with changes in flow tube material are found to improve the nanotube yields. The collected nanotube material is analyzed using a combination of characterization techniques including SEM, TEM, TGA, Raman and UV-VIS-NIR to estimate the purity of the samples. Insitu diagnostics of the laser oven process is now extended to include the surface temperature of the target material. Spectral emission from the target surface is compared with black body type emission to estimate the temperature. The surface temperature seemed to correlate well with the ablation rate as well as the quality of the SWCNTs. Recent changes in improving the production rate by rastering the target and using cw laser will be presented.

  3. Recent Advances in Synthesis and Characterization of SWCNTs Produced by Laser Oven Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Results from the parametric study of the two-laser oven process indicated possible improvements with flow conditions and laser characteristics. Higher flow rates, lower operating pressures coupled with changes in flow tube material are found to improve the nanotube yields. The collected nanotube material is analyzed using a combination of characterization techniques including SEM, TEM, TGA, Raman and UV-VIS-NIR to estimate the purity of the samples. In-situ diagnostics of the laser oven process is now extended to include the surface temperature of the target material. Spectral emission from the target surface is compared with black body type emission to estimate the temperature. The surface temperature seemed to correlate well with the ablation rate as well as the quality of the SWCNTs. Recent changes in improving the production rate by rastering the target and using cw laser will be presented.

  4. Science Investigations with Laser Ranging to the Moon and Mars/Phobos: Recent Advances, Technology Demonstrations, and New Ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Williams, James G.; Folkner, William M.

    2010-05-01

    Since it's initiation by the Apollo 11 astronauts in 1969, LLR has strongly contributed to our understanding of the Moon's internal structure and the dynamics of the Earth-Moon system. The data provide for unique, multi-disciplinary results in the areas of lunar science, gravitational physics, Earth sciences, geodesy and geodynamics, solar system ephemerides, and terrestrial and celestial reference frames. However, the current distribution of the retroreflectors is not optimal, other weaknesses exist. A geographic distribution of new instruments on the lunar surface wider than the current distribution would be a great benefit; the accuracy of the lunar science parameters would increase several times. We are developing the next-generation of the LLR experiment. This work includes development of new retroreflector arrays and laser transponders to be deployed on the lunar surface by a series of proposed missions to the moon. The new laser instruments will enable strong advancements in LLR-derived science. Anticipated science impact includes lunar science, gravitational physics, geophysics, and geodesy. Thus, properties of the lunar interior, including tidal properties, liquid core and solid inner core can be determined from lunar rotation, orientation, and tidal response. Anticipated improvements in Earth geophysics and geodesy would include the positions and rates for the Earth stations, Earth rotation, precession rate, nutation, and tidal influences on the orbit. Strong improvements are also expected in several tests of general relativity. We address the science return enabled by the new laser retroreflectors. We also discuss deployment of pulsed laser transponders with future landers on Mars/Phobos. The development of active laser techniques would extend the accuracies characteristic of passive laser tracking to interplanetary distances. Highly-accurate time-series of the round-trip travel times of laser pulses between an observatory on the Earth and an optical

  5. Advanced Laser Based Measurements in Porous Media Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements using dual-pump dual-broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (DP-DBB-CARS) inside a porous media burner. This work continues our previous measurements in such combustion systems. The existing setup was significantly modified with the aim of providing improved data quality and data rate, reduction of interferences and additional species information. These changes are presented and discussed in detail. The CARS technique was expanded to a dual-pump dual-broadband CARS system which in principle enables acquisition of temperatures together with relative H2/N2- and O2/N2- species concentrations. Experimental complexity was reduced by the use of a modified spectrometer enabling the detection of both signals, vibrational and rotational CARS, with only one detection system.

  6. AFRL Advanced Electric Lasers Branch - Construction and Upgrade of a 50-watt Facility-Class Sodium Guidestar Pump Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronder, T.; Miller, H.; Stohs, J.; Lu, C.; Baker, J.; Lucero, A.

    The development of a reliable and effective laser source for pumping mesospheric sodium to generate an artificial guidestar has been well documented. From the early achievements with 589nm high-power dye lasers at the Keck and Lick observatories to the ground-breaking 50W CW FASOR (Frequency Addition Source of Optical Radiation) Guidestar at the Air Forces Starfire Optical Range (SOR), there has been intense interest in this technology from both the academic and military communities. Beginning in the fall of 2008, the Air Force Research Laboratorys Advanced Electric Lasers Branch began a project to build, test, verify and deliver an upgraded version of the SOR FASOR for use at the AF Maui Optical Station (AMOS) in the summer of 2010. This FASOR will be similar in design to the existing SOR device and produce 50W of diffraction limited, linearly polarized narrow linewidth 589nm light by combining the output of two injection-locked Nd:YAG ring lasers (operating at 1064nm and 1319nm) using resonant sum-frequency generation in a lithium triborate crystal (LBO). The upgraded features will include modularized sub-components, embedded control electronics, and a simplified cooling system. The first portion of this upgrade project is to reconstruct the current SOR FASOR components and include improved methods of regulating the gain modules of the two injection lasers. In parallel with this effort, the technical plans for the modularization and re-packaging of the FASOR will be finalized and coordinated with the staff at Maui. This presentation will summarize the result of these efforts to date and provide updates on the AMOS FASOR status. Additionally, plans for "next-generation" FASOR upgrades for both SOR and AMOS will also be discussed.

  7. Characterization techniques for semiconductors and nanostructures: a review of recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acher, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy techniques are widely used for the characterization of semiconductors and nanostructures. Confocal Raman microscopy is useful to retrieve chemical and molecular information at the ultimate submicrometer resolution of optical microscopy. Fast imaging capabilities, 3D confocal ability, and multiple excitation wavelengths, have increased the power of the technique while making it simpler to use for material scientists. Recently, the development of the Tip Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (TERS) has opened the way to the use of Raman information at nanoscale, by combining the resolution of scanning probe microscopy and chemical selectivity of Raman spectroscopy. Significant advances have been reported in the field of profiling the atomic composition of multilayers, using the Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy technique, including real-time determination of etched depth by interferometry. This allows the construction of precise atomic profiles of sophisticated multilayers with a few nm resolution. Ellipsometry is another widely used technique to determine the profile of multilayers, and recent development have provided enhanced spatial resolution useful for the investigation of patterned materials. In addition to the advances of the different characterization techniques, the capability to observe the same regions at micrometer scale at different stages of material elaboration, or with different instrument, is becoming a critical issue. Several advances have been made to allow precise re-localization and co-localization of observation with different complementary characterization techniques.

  8. Line Raman, Rayleigh, and laser-induced predissociation fluorescence technique for combustion with a tunable KrF excimer laser.

    PubMed

    Mansour, M S; Chen, Y C

    1996-07-20

    We have applied a line UV Raman, Rayleigh, and laser-induced predissociation fluorescence technique for measurement of turbulent hydrocarbon flames. The species concentration of CO(2), O(2), CO, N(2), CH(4), H(2)O, OH, and H(2) and the temperature are measured instantaneously and simultaneously along a line of 11.4 mm, from which the gradients with respect to mixture fraction and spatial direction are obtained. The technique has been successfully tested in a laminar premixed stoichiometric methane flame and a laminar hydrogen diffusion flame. In addition the technique has been tested in a highly turbulent rich premixed methane flame. The data show that the technique can be used to provide instantaneous measurements of local profiles that describe the local flame structure in highly turbulent flames. PMID:21102834

  9. Advances in solid state laser technology for space and medical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in laser technology and their potential for medical applications are discussed. Gas discharge lasers, dye lasers, excimer lasers, Nd:YAG lasers, HF and DF lasers, and other commonly used lasers are briefly addressed. Emerging laser technology is examined, including diode-pumped lasers and other solid state lasers.

  10. Final Report - ADVANCED LASER-BASED SENSORS FOR INDUSTRIAL PROCESS CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this work is to capture the potential of real-time monitoring and overcome the challenges of harsh industrial environments, Los Gatos Research (LGR) is fabricating, deploying, and commercializing advanced laser-based gas sensors for process control monitoring in industrial furnaces (e.g. electric arc furnaces). These sensors can achieve improvements in process control, leading to enhanced productivity, improved product quality, and reduced energy consumption and emissions. The first sensor will utilize both mid-infrared and near-infrared lasers to make rapid in-situ measurements of industrial gases and associated temperatures in the furnace off-gas. The second sensor will make extractive measurements of process gases. During the course of this DOE project, Los Gatos Research (LGR) fabricated, tested, and deployed both in-situ tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry (TDLAS) analyzers and extractive Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (Off-Axis ICOS) analyzers.

  11. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven proton-boron fusion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Morrissey, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-02-01

    A low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with relatively low intensity (3 × 1016 W cm-2) was used to enhance the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the "ultraclean" proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha-particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as target. The combination of the specific target geometry and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed enhancing the yield of alpha-particles up to 109 per steradian, i.e 100 times higher than previous experimental achievements. Moreover the alpha particle stream presented a clearly peaked angular and energy distribution, which make this secondary source attractive for potential applications. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  12. 75 FR 81643 - In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... certain claims of U.S. Patent No. 6,042,998. 75 FR. 44,015 (July 27, 2010). The complaint named two... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and... for ] importation, and sale within the United States after importation of certain...

  13. Advanced Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques of the Human Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Andre, Jalal B.; Bammer, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Unlike those of the brain, advances in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the human spinal cord have been challenged by the more complicated and inhomogeneous anatomy of the spine, the differences in magnetic susceptibility between adjacent air and fluid-filled structures and the surrounding soft tissues, and the inherent limitations of the initially used echo-planar imaging techniques used to image the spine. Interval advances in DWI techniques for imaging the human spinal cord, with the specific aims of improving the diagnostic quality of the images, and the simultaneous reduction in unwanted artifacts have resulted in higher-quality images that are now able to more accurately portray the complicated underlying anatomy and depict pathologic abnormality with improved sensitivity and specificity. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has benefited from the advances in DWI techniques, as DWI images form the foundation for all tractography and DTI. This review provides a synopsis of the many recent advances in DWI of the human spinal cord, as well as some of the more common clinical uses for these techniques, including DTI and tractography. PMID:22158130

  14. Real-time application of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques for research aircraft simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Steven B.

    1990-01-01

    Visual aids are valuable assets to engineers for design, demonstration, and evaluation. Discussed here are a variety of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques used to enhance the displays of test aircraft dynamics. The new software's capabilities are examined and possible future uses are considered.

  15. Recognizing and Managing Complexity: Teaching Advanced Programming Concepts and Techniques Using the Zebra Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, John; Zhang, Xihui

    2015-01-01

    Teaching advanced programming can be a challenge, especially when the students are pursuing different majors with diverse analytical and problem-solving capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to explore the efficacy of using a particular problem as a vehicle for imparting a broad set of programming concepts and problem-solving techniques. We…

  16. Fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials using sol-gel processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. T.; Chu, Jay; Zheng, Haixing

    1995-01-01

    Advanced materials play an important role in electrochemical energy devices such as batteries, fuel cells, and electrochemical capacitors. They are being used as both electrodes and electrolytes. Sol-gel processing is a versatile solution technique used in fabrication of ceramic materials with tailored stoichiometry, microstructure, and properties. The application of sol-gel processing in the fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials will be presented. The potentials of sol-gel derived materials for electrochemical energy applications will be discussed along with some examples of successful applications. Sol-gel derived metal oxide electrode materials such as V2O5 cathodes have been demonstrated in solid-slate thin film batteries; solid electrolytes materials such as beta-alumina for advanced secondary batteries had been prepared by the sol-gel technique long time ago; and high surface area transition metal compounds for capacitive energy storage applications can also be synthesized with this method.

  17. Advances in high-power 9XXnm laser diodes for pumping fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, Jay; Peters, Matthew; Rossin, Victor; Guo, James; Xiao, Yan; Cheng, Jane; Shieh, Allen; Srinivasan, Raman; Singh, Jaspreet; Wei, Cailin; Duesterberg, Richard; Morehead, James J.; Zucker, Erik

    2016-03-01

    A multi-mode 9XXnm-wavelength laser diode was developed to optimize the divergence angle and reliable ex-facet power. Lasers diodes were assembled into a multi-emitter pump package that is fiber coupled via spatial and polarization multiplexing. The pump package has a 135μm diameter output fiber that leverages the same optical train and mechanical design qualified previously. Up to ~ 270W CW power at 22A is achieved at a case temperature ~ 30ºC. Power conversion efficiency is 60% (peak) that drops to 53% at 22A with little thermal roll over. Greater than 90% of the light is collected at < 0.12NA at 16A drive current that produces 3.0W/(mm-mr)2 radiance from the output fiber.

  18. Nd:YVO4 and YVO4 laser crystal integration by a direct bonding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Akira; Fukuyama, Hiroyasu; Katsumata, Masaki; Okada, Yukikatsu

    2003-04-01

    Laser crystal integration using a neodymium-doped yttrium vanadate (or orthovanadate) laser crystal, and non-doped yttrium vanadate crystals that function as cold fingers has been demonstrated. In our bonding technique of YVO4 crystals, a newly developed dry etching process was adopted in the preparation for contact of mechanically polished surfaces. In the successive heat treatment process, temperature optimization was essential to get rid of precipitation of vanadic acid caused by the thermo-chemical reaction in a vacuum furnace. The bonded surface of 5 mm × 6 mm was studied via optical characteristics and magnified inspection. In addition, we also compared the integrated crystal with a normal one in laser output power pumped by a CW laser diode. From these experiments, it was clear that the integrated Nd:YVO4 laser crystal, securing the well-improved thermal conductivity, can increase laser output power nearly twice that of the conventional single crystal which was cracked in high power laser pumping due to its intrinsic poor thermal conductivity.

  19. Development of a mid-infrared laser for study of infrared countermeasures techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekman, H. H. P. T.; van den Heuvel, J. C.; van Putten, F. J. M.; Schleijpen, Ric

    2004-12-01

    Countermeasures against heat seeking missiles require access to efficient laser sources, which should emit wavelengths at band I, II and IV. Efficient diode pumped solid-state lasers, combined with efficient non-linear wavelength shifters, allow the development of practical tuneable mid-IR countermeasure sources. The paper describes the requirements and the development of a tabletop laser source for study of DIRCM techniques. Jamming laser systems must be able of creating pulse sequences in the frequency range between 100 Hz and 10,000 Hz, including the capability to mix and sweep the jam frequency. A Nd:YVO4 pump laser with maximum pump power of 3 Watt and pulse length of 10 ns, and a maximum modulation frequency of 100 kHz was selected. A linear single resonant OPO cavity with 30 mm long, 1mm thick PPLN crystals was build. With the tabletop laser system we were able to generate wavelengths from 1.5 to 4 micron. In band I, at 2 micron we can generate between 400-550 mW, and in band II, from 3-4 micron we can generate 130-160 mW laser jam power. The beam quality (M2) is approximately 2.5. The power efficiency for the idler was 8.8%, while the slope power efficiency was 15%. Jam patterns are generated by use of an acousto-optic modulator.

  20. Development of Laser Marking as a Mass Marking Technique : Annual Report FY 1993.

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, H.Lee; Thompson, Dan; United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife

    1993-11-01

    The first year of work with development of lasers as a mass marking technique provided both disappointing and encouraging results. A Coumarin Dye 480 laser was used to mark coho salmon in a variety of body locations and with varying energy levels. A ``bleached`` white mark was made void of any pigment. Areas marked included the nape area behind the head and in front of the dorsal fin, slightly above the anal fin, the upper lobe of the caudal fin, the dorsal fin and on the operculum. The mark appeared immediately after being lasered but started to gradually fade after one month and was fairly completely re-pigmented after three months. Complete removal and notching of the adipose fin was also attempted with a Carbon Dioxide laser. This surgical method of fin removal appears to have advantages over scissor excision (no bleeding or regeneration), and has possible application as part of a device or system which could be employed for mass marking.