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Sample records for advanced lasers optics

  1. Advanced optic fabrication using ultrafast laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lauren L.; Qiao, Jun; Qiao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Advanced fabrication and finishing techniques are desired for freeform optics and integrated photonics. Methods including grinding, polishing and magnetorheological finishing used for final figuring and polishing of such optics are time consuming, expensive, and may be unsuitable for complex surface features while common photonics fabrication techniques often limit devices to planar geometries. Laser processing has been investigated as an alternative method for optic forming, surface polishing, structure writing, and welding, as direct tuning of laser parameters and flexible beam delivery are advantageous for complex freeform or photonics elements and material-specific processing. Continuous wave and pulsed laser radiation down to the nanosecond regime have been implemented to achieve nanoscale surface finishes through localized material melting, but the temporal extent of the laser-material interaction often results in the formation of a sub-surface heat affected zone. The temporal brevity of ultrafast laser radiation can allow for the direct vaporization of rough surface asperities with minimal melting, offering the potential for smooth, final surface quality with negligible heat affected material. High intensities achieved in focused ultrafast laser radiation can easily induce phase changes in the bulk of materials for processing applications. We have experimentally tested the effectiveness of ultrafast laser radiation as an alternative laser source for surface processing of monocrystalline silicon. Simulation of material heating associated with ultrafast laser-material interaction has been performed and used to investigate optimized processing parameters including repetition rate. The parameter optimization process and results of experimental processing will be presented.

  2. Russian collaborations on lasers and advanced optics

    SciTech Connect

    Munroe, J.; Cooper, D.; Koym, V.; Salesky, E.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. There are several technological areas where the Russians appear to be well ahead of the West. Russian work in lasers and advanced optics, high power nonlinear optics, and optical phase conjugation in particular, are some of these areas. The objective of this project is to establish collaboration with key Russian scientists in this area to analytically and experimentally validate the technologies and identify potential applications. This technology has the potential to solve very important military, civil, and commercial problems. The emphasis of this project is on civil and commercial applications, but the technologies have dual-use applications.

  3. An advanced optical system for laser ablation propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstue, Grant; Fork, Richard; Reardon, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel space-based ablation driven propulsion engine concept utilizing transmitted energy in the form of a series of ultra-short optical pulses. Key differences are generating the pulses at the transmitting spacecraft and the safe delivery of that energy to the receiving spacecraft for propulsion. By expanding the beam diameter during transmission in space, the energy can propagate at relatively low intensity and then be refocused and redistributed to create an array of ablation sites at the receiver. The ablation array strategy allows greater control over flight dynamics and eases thermal management. Research efforts for this transmission and reception of ultra-short optical pulses include: (1) optical system design; (2) electrical system requirements; (3) thermal management; (4) structured energy transmission safety. Research has also been focused on developing an optical switch concept for the multiplexing of the ultra-short pulses. This optical switch strategy implements multiple reflectors polished into a rotating momentum wheel device to combine the pulses from different laser sources. The optical system design must minimize the thermal load on any one optical element. Initial specifications and modeling for the optical system are being produced using geometrical ray-tracing software to give a better understanding of the optical requirements. In regards to safety, we have advanced the retro-reflective beam locking strategy to include look-ahead capabilities for long propagation distances. Additional applications and missions utilizing multiplexed pulse transmission are also presented. Because the research is in early development, it provides an opportunity for new and valuable advances in the area of transmitted energy for propulsion as well as encourages joint international efforts. Researchers from different countries can cooperate in order to find constructive and safe uses of ordered pulse transmission for propulsion in future space

  4. Advanced metaheuristic algorithms for laser optimization in optical accelerator technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomizawa, Hiromitsu

    2011-10-01

    Lasers are among the most important experimental tools for user facilities, including synchrotron radiation and free electron lasers (FEL). In the synchrotron radiation field, lasers are widely used for experiments with Pump-Probe techniques. Especially for X-ray-FELs, lasers play important roles as seed light sources or photocathode-illuminating light sources to generate a high-brightness electron bunch. For future accelerators, laser-based techonologies such as electro-optic (EO) sampling to measure ultra-short electron bunches and optical-fiber-based femtosecond timing systems have been intensively developed in the last decade. Therefore, controls and optimizations of laser pulse characteristics are strongly required for many kinds of experiments and improvement of accelerator systems. However, people believe that lasers should be tuned and customized for each requirement manually by experts. This makes it difficult for laser systems to be part of the common accelerator infrastructure. Automatic laser tuning requires sophisticated algorithms, and the metaheuristic algorithm is one of the best solutions. The metaheuristic laser tuning system is expected to reduce the human effort and time required for laser preparations. I have shown some successful results on a metaheuristic algorithm based on a genetic algorithm to optimize spatial (transverse) laser profiles, and a hill-climbing method extended with a fuzzy set theory to choose one of the best laser alignments automatically for each machine requirement.

  5. Advances in optical materials for large aperture lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stokowski, S.E.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Marchi, F.T.; Swain, J.E.; Wallerstein, E.P.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1981-12-15

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is using large aperture Nd: glass lasers to investigate the feasibility of inertial confinement fusion. In our experiments high power laser light is focussed onto a small (100 to 500 micron) target containing a deuterium-tritium fuel mixture. During the short (1 to 5 ns) laser pulse the fuel is compressed and heated, resulting in fusion reactions. The generation and control of the powerful laser pulses for these experiments is a challenging scientific and engineering task, which requires the development of new optical materials, fabrication techniques, and coatings. LLNL with the considerable cooperation and support from the optical industry, where most of the research and development and almost all the manufacturing is done, has successfully applied several new developments in these areas.

  6. Advances in lasers and optical micro-nano-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurell, F.; Fazio, E.

    2010-09-01

    Lasers represent a well consolidated technology: nevertheless, research in this field remains very active and productive, in both basic and applied directions. At the moment significant attention is given to those sources that bring together high power and compactness. Such high power lasers find important applications for material treatments and such applications are presented by Ehsani et al and Saiedeh Saghafi et al, in the treatment of dielectric thin films (Alteration of optical and morphological properties of polycarbonate illuminated by visible/IR laser beams) or of biological tissues like pistachio seeds (Investigating the effects of laser beams (532 and 660 nm) in annihilation of pistachio mould fungus using spectrophotometry analysis). In particular the latter paper show how laser sources can find very important applications in new domains, preserving goods and food without the need for preservatives or pesticides by simply sterilizing them using light. Optical Micro and Nano Systems presents a new domain for exploration. In this framework this special issue is very attractive, because it assembles papers reporting new results in three directions: new techniques for monitoring integrated micro- and nano-systems, new integrated systems and novel high performance metamaterial configurations. Integrated micro-components can be monitored and controlled using reflectance measurements as presented by Piombini et al (Toward the reflectance measurement of micro components). Speckle formation during laser beam reflection can also be a very sophisticated tool for detecting ultra-precise displacements, as presented by Filter et al (High resolution displacement detection with speckles : accuracy limits in linear displacement speckle metrology). Three dimensional integrated optical structures is indeed a big challenge and a peculiarity of photonics, they can be formed through traditional holography or using more sophisticated and novel ! technologies. Thus, special

  7. Continued advancement of laser damage resistant optically functional microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Douglas S.; MacLeod, Bruce D.; Sabatino, Ernest

    2012-11-01

    Micro- and nano-structured optically functional surface textures continue to exhibit higher performance and longer term survivability than thin-film coatings for an increasing number of materials used within high energy laser (HEL) systems. Anti-reflection (AR) microstructures (ARMs) produce a graded refractive index yielding high transmission over wide spectral ranges along with a chemical, mechanical and laser damage resistance inherited from the bulk optic material. In this study, ARMs were fabricated in the relevant HEL materials sapphire, neodymium-doped YAG, fused silica, BK7 glass, and the magnesium aluminate known as SPINEL. Standardized pulsed laser induced damage threshold (LiDT) measurements were made using commercial testing services to directly compare the damage resistance of ARMs-treated optics to uncoated and thin-film-AR-coated (TFARC) optics at wavelengths of 532nm, 694nm, 800nm, 1064nm, and 1538nm. As found with prior work, the LiDT of ARMs etched in fused silica was typically in the range of 35 J/cm2 at a wavelength of 1064nm and a pulse width of 10ns, a level that is comparable to uncoated samples and 3.5 times greater than the level specified by six prominent TFARC providers. The Army Research Laboratory measured the pulsed LiDT at 532nm (10ns) of ARMs in fused silica to be up to 5 times the level of the ion beam sputtered TFARC previously employed in their HEL system, and 2 times higher than a low performance single layer MgF2 TFARC. This result was repeated and expanded using a commercial LiDT testing service for ARMs in two types of fused silica and for Schott N-BK7 glass. An average damage threshold of 26.5 J/cm2 was recorded for the ARMs-treated glass materials, a level 4 times higher than the commercial IBS TFARCs tested.

  8. Combined advanced finishing and UV laser conditioning process for producing damage resistant optics

    DOEpatents

    Menapace, Joseph A.; Peterson, John E.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Miller, Philip E.; Parham, Thomas G.; Nichols, Michael A.

    2005-07-26

    A method for reducing the density of sites on the surface of fused silica optics that are prone to the initiation of laser-induced damage, resulting in optics which have far fewer catastrophic defects, and are better capable of resisting optical deterioration upon exposure to a high-power laser beam.

  9. Optics and lasers: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A number of innovative devices and techniques in optics and related fields were presented. The following areas were covered: advances in laser and holography technology, articles on spectroscopy and general optics, new information in the area of photography.

  10. Combined Advanced Finishing and UV-Laser Conditioning for Producing UV-Damage-Resistant Fused Silica Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Penetrante, B; Golini, D; Slomba, A; Miller, P E; Parham, T; Nichols, M; Peterson, J

    2001-11-01

    Laser induced damage initiation on fused silica optics can limit the lifetime of the components when used in high power UV laser environments. Foe example in inertial confinement fusion research applications, the optics can be exposed to temporal laser pulses of about 3-nsec with average fluences of 8 J/cm{sup 2} and peak fluences between 12 and 15 J/cm{sup 2}. During the past year, we have focused on optimizing the damage performance at a wavelength of 355-nm (3{omega}), 3-nsec pulse length, for optics in this category by examining a variety of finishing technologies with a challenge to improve the laser damage initiation density by at least two orders of magnitude. In this paper, we describe recent advances in improving the 3{omega} damage initiation performance of laboratory-scale zirconium oxide and cerium oxide conventionally finished fused silica optics via application of processes incorporating magnetorheological finishing (MRF), wet chemical etching, and UV laser conditioning. Details of the advanced finishing procedures are described and comparisons are made between the procedures based upon large area 3{omega} damage performance, polishing layer contamination, and optical subsurface damage.

  11. Advances in optically pumped semiconductor lasers for blue emission under frequency doubling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yanbo; Wisdom, Jeffrey; Charles, John; Hyland, Patrick; Scholz, Christian; Xu, Zuntu; Lin, Yong; Weiss, Eli; Chilla, Juan; Lepert, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    Optically pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSL) offer the advantage of excellent beam quality, wavelength agility, and high power scaling capability. In this talk we will present our recent progress of high-power, 920nm OPSLs frequency doubled to 460nm for lightshow applications. Fundamental challenges and mitigations are revealed through electrical, optical, thermal, and mechanical modeling. Results also include beam quality enhancement in addressing the competition from diode lasers.

  12. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-01-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process. PMID:27484188

  13. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-01-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process. PMID:27484188

  14. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-08-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process.

  15. Optical pulse generation using fiber lasers and integrated optics

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.B.; Browning, D.F.; Burkhart, S.C.; VanWonterghem, B.W.

    1995-03-27

    We have demonstrated an optical pulse forming system using fiber and integrated optics, and have designed a multiple-output system for a proposed fusion laser facility. Our approach is an advancement over previous designs for fusion lasers, and an unusual application of fiber lasers and integrated optics.

  16. Optical diagnostics of gas-dynamic flows using advanced laser measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    Using laser-induced fluorescence to probe nitrogen flows seeded with small amounts of nitric oxide, simultaneous measurements of all three thermodynamic scalar quantities temperature, density, and pressure, were demonstrated in a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. Instrumental uncertainty is 1% for temperature and 2% for density and pressure, making the techniques suitable for measurements of turbulent fluctuations. This technology is currently being transferred to an experimental program designed to use these optical techniques in conjunction with traditional methods to make measurements in turbulent flowfields that were not possible before. A detailed descritpion of the research progress and pertinent results are presented.

  17. Threaded molecular wires as building blocks for advanced polymer blends: WPLEDs, ultra-broadband optical amplifiers, multi color lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, Sergio; Mroz, Marta; Sforazzini, Giuseppe; Virgili, Tersilla; Meinardi, Franco; Paleari, Alberto; Anderson, Harry L.; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Cacialli, Franco

    2011-03-01

    The ability to produce semiconducting polymer blends with white emission spectra, large emission cross sections and broad optical gain is critical to their application in white PLEDs, lasers and broadband amplifiers. Cyclodextrin-encapsulation is an effective means of suppressing detrimental intermolecular interactions, and energy transfer (ET) channels in polymer blends, thus enabling fabrication of white-PLEDs. We show that all such properties combine into a high impact photonic application: ultra-broad optical gain and two-color lasing in a binary polyrotaxane blend. We study the ultrafast photophysics of a blend of a conventional and an encapsulated polyfluorene. The morphology is investigated by microRaman imaging, AFM, and fluorescence lifetime microscopy. We ascribe the ultra-broad optical gain (>850 meV), and the simultaneous ASE for both constituents, to the dual effect of reduced polaron formation and suppressed ET. Our results demonstrate that polyrotaxanes could realistically represent the building blocks for advanced polymer blends with highly controlled optical properties, for applications in solid state lightning, lasers and photovoltaic technologies.

  18. Optics and lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Report describes twenty-seven optical concepts developed for holographic viewing, spectral transmission, and film camera technology. Articles include developments in laser-Doppler systems, laser beam deflection controls, X-ray photography, and camera components.

  19. Advancing adaptive optics technology: Laboratory turbulence simulation and optimization of laser guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampy, Rachel A.

    Since Galileo's first telescope some 400 years ago, astronomers have been building ever-larger instruments. Yet only within the last two decades has it become possible to realize the potential angular resolutions of large ground-based telescopes, by using adaptive optics (AO) technology to counter the blurring effects of Earth's atmosphere. And only within the past decade have the development of laser guide stars (LGS) extended AO capabilities to observe science targets nearly anywhere in the sky. Improving turbulence simulation strategies and LGS are the two main topics of my research. In the first part of this thesis, I report on the development of a technique for manufacturing phase plates for simulating atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory. The process involves strategic application of clear acrylic paint onto a transparent substrate. Results of interferometric characterization of the plates are described and compared to Kolmogorov statistics. The range of r0 (Fried's parameter) achieved thus far is 0.2--1.2 mm at 650 nm measurement wavelength, with a Kolmogorov power law. These plates proved valuable at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at University of California, Santa Cruz, where they have been used in the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics testbed, during integration and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager, and as part of the calibration system of the on-sky AO testbed named ViLLaGEs (Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiments). I present a comparison of measurements taken by ViLLaGEs of the power spectrum of a plate and the real sky turbulence. The plate is demonstrated to follow Kolmogorov theory well, while the sky power spectrum does so in a third of the data. This method of fabricating phase plates has been established as an effective and low-cost means of creating simulated turbulence. Due to the demand for such devices, they are now being distributed to other members of the AO community. The second topic of this thesis pertains to understanding and

  20. Advances in chemical lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.

    1987-09-25

    High-power chemical lasers thrive in an array of special environments and present many fascinating associated subjects ripe for developmental research. Included are processes to produce the source reactants; supersonic mixing and reacting flow fields; the production and dissipation of multiple vibrational-rotational molecular states; optical gain extraction in complex geometries; media inhomogeneity effects, and waste energy and reaction products removal. Some configurations require wavelength selectivity, special optical components, and coherent cavity or beam combining. In recent years, progress has been made in these areas on behalf of continuous-wave and repetitively pulsed hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers, subsonic and supersonic oxygen-iodine lasers, and potential shorter wavelength chemical lasers based on chemically excited higher electronic states. This paper presents a brief review of the technical approach of some of the technology areas, and the status in achieving practical, integrated high-power chemical lasers.

  1. Advancing adaptive optics technology: Laboratory turbulence simulation and optimization of laser guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampy, Rachel A.

    Since Galileo's first telescope some 400 years ago, astronomers have been building ever-larger instruments. Yet only within the last two decades has it become possible to realize the potential angular resolutions of large ground-based telescopes, by using adaptive optics (AO) technology to counter the blurring effects of Earth's atmosphere. And only within the past decade have the development of laser guide stars (LGS) extended AO capabilities to observe science targets nearly anywhere in the sky. Improving turbulence simulation strategies and LGS are the two main topics of my research. In the first part of this thesis, I report on the development of a technique for manufacturing phase plates for simulating atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory. The process involves strategic application of clear acrylic paint onto a transparent substrate. Results of interferometric characterization of the plates are described and compared to Kolmogorov statistics. The range of r0 (Fried's parameter) achieved thus far is 0.2--1.2 mm at 650 nm measurement wavelength, with a Kolmogorov power law. These plates proved valuable at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at University of California, Santa Cruz, where they have been used in the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics testbed, during integration and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager, and as part of the calibration system of the on-sky AO testbed named ViLLaGEs (Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiments). I present a comparison of measurements taken by ViLLaGEs of the power spectrum of a plate and the real sky turbulence. The plate is demonstrated to follow Kolmogorov theory well, while the sky power spectrum does so in a third of the data. This method of fabricating phase plates has been established as an effective and low-cost means of creating simulated turbulence. Due to the demand for such devices, they are now being distributed to other members of the AO community. The second topic of this thesis pertains to understanding and

  2. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R. J.

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  3. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  4. Introduction to Optics and Lasers in Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Gabriel

    1996-07-01

    In a very short period of time, lasers have advanced from a mere research interest to an increasingly useful, commercially available tool for material processing, precision measurements, surgery, communication, and entertainment. This book provides the background in theoretical physics necessary to understand the engineering applications of lasers. It summarizes relevant theories of geometrical optics, physical optics, quantum optics, and laser physics while tying them to applications in such areas as fluid mechanics, combustion, surface analysis, material processing, and laser machining. The author clearly and thoroughly explains advanced topics such as laser Doppler velocimetry, laser-induced fluorescence, and holography. The book includes numerous examples and advanced problems that simulate real-world research and encourage independent reading and analysis. The book will benefit researchers and students across all branches of engineering.

  5. Advanced optical diagnostics of multiphase combustion flow field using OH planar laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kevin Young-jin

    High-repetition-rate (5 kHz, 10 kHz) OH planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to investigate the combustion of liquid, gelled, and solid propellants. For the liquid monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) droplet combustion experiment in N2O/N2 using 5 kHz OH PLIF and visible imaging system, the OH profile and the droplet diameter were measured. The N2O partial pressure was varied by 20% and 40%, and the total pressure was varied by 103, 172, 276, 414, 552 kPa. The OH location indicated that the oxidation flame front is between the visible dual flame fronts. The results showed thicker flame sheet and higher burning rate for increased N2O concentration for a given pressure. The burning rate increased with increased pressure at 20% partial pressure N2O, and the burning rate decreased with increased pressure at 40% partial pressure N2O. This work provides experimental data for validating chemical kinetics models. For the gelled droplet combustion experiment using a 5 kHz OH PLIF system, speeds and locations of fuel jets emanating from the burning gelled droplets were quantified for the first time. MMH was gelled with organic gellant HPC at 3 wt.% and 6 wt.%, and burned in air at 35, 103, 172, 276, and 414 kPa. Different types of interaction of vapor jets and flame front were distinguished for the first time. For high jet speed, local extinction of the flame was observed. By analyzing the jet speed statistics, it was concluded that pressure and jet speed had an inverse relationship and gellant concentration and jet speed had a direct relationship. This work provides more fundamental insight into the physics of gelled fuel droplet combustion. A 3D OH PLIF system was assembled and demonstrated using a 10 kHz OH PLIF system and a galvanometric scanning mirror. This is the first time that a reacting flow field was imaged with a 3D optical technique using OH PLIF. A 3D scan time of 1 ms was achieved, with ten slices generated per sweep with 1000 Hz scan rate. Alternatively

  6. Apparatus for advancing a wellbore using high power laser energy

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

    2014-09-02

    Delivering high power laser energy to form a borehole deep into the earth using laser energy. Down hole laser tools, laser systems and laser delivery techniques for advancement, workover and completion activities. A laser bottom hole assembly (LBHA) for the delivery of high power laser energy to the surfaces of a borehole, which assembly may have laser optics, a fluid path for debris removal and a mechanical means to remove earth.

  7. Advanced optical instruments technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William

    1992-01-01

    The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

  8. Polymer lasers: recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, T.; Rabe, T.; Görrn, P.; Wang, J.; Weinmann, T.; Hinze, P.; Galbrecht, F.; Scherf, U.; Kowalsky, W.

    2007-09-01

    The development of organic thin film lasers has seen tremendous progress over the past few years. Only a few materials are necessary to allow for continuous wavelength tunability in the spectral region from the UV to the near IR. At the same time, the lasing thresholds of organic thin film lasers have been reduced considerably both due to improved low-loss distributed feedback (DFB) resonator structures and highly efficient gain materials based on guest-host energy transfer. Aside from the as yet open issue of electrical operation of organic lasers, which we will address briefly in this paper, there are numerous applications (e.g. in biotechnology, spectroscopy) where optically driven organic lasers may be the more cost effective and versatile solution. In this context, tunable polymer lasers pumped by compact and inexpensive InGaN laser diodes will be shown. These lasers are based on a modified poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene) derivative (BN-PFO) containing 12% of -6,6'-(2,2'-octyloxy-1,1'-binaphthyl) spacer groups doped with a few wt% of the stilbene dye 1,4-Bis(2-(4-(N,N-di(p-tolyl)amino)phenyl)vinyl-benzene (DPAVB). With the same host polymer (BN-PFO) quasi continuous wave operation (up to 5 MHz) can be demonstrated. Highly repetitive lasers are especially desirable for many spectroscopic applications. This regime of operstion is found to be impeded by the photo-physics in doped organic systems where the accumulation of absorptive species in the gain medium leads to piled-up absorption losses and consequently to termination of the lasing process. The presence of the dopand molecules seems to strongly promote the formation and stabilization of the species which we relate to triplet excitons. Therefore, the concentration of the dopand affects the feasibility of quasi-cw operation of thin-film organic lasers. Strategies and results to achieve highly repetitive operation in low-threshold guest-host systems BN-PFO:DPAVB or BN-PFO:poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1

  9. The advanced LIGO input optics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Chris L; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan T; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Martin, Rodica M; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Tanner, David B; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design. PMID:26827334

  10. The advanced LIGO input optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Chris L.; Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan. T.; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V.; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J.; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z.; Martin, Rodica M.; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H.; Tanner, David B.; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F.; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  11. Optical fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Snitzer, E.

    1988-10-25

    This patent describes an optical fiber laser comprising: a gain cavity including a single mode optical fiber of given length and index of refraction and a cladding surrounding the core and having an index of refraction lower than that of the core. The core comprising a host material having incorporated therein a predetermined concentration of just erbium oxide having a fluorescence spectrum with a peak emission line at 1.54 micrometers; filter means optically coupled to each end of the fiber gain cavity for providing feedback in the cavity at the peak emission line of the erbium oxide and for permitting energy to be introduced into the cavity at the absorption band of the erbium oxide in the region of 1.45 to 1.53 micrometers; and a laser diode optically coupled to one end of the core for pumping energy into the end of the gain cavity so that the gain cavity oscillates at just the peak emission line.

  12. Optical and infrared lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javan, A.

    1978-01-01

    Quantum mechanical predictions for the gain of an optically pumped CW FIR laser are presented for cases in which one or both of the pump and FIR transitions are pressure or Doppler broadened. The results are compared to those based on the rate equation model. Some of the quantum mechanical predictions are verified in CH3OH.

  13. Advanced optical document security elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereš, Marek; Svoboda, Jakub; Possolt, Martin; Květoš, Milan; Fiala, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Synthetic diffractive structures represent an important tool in the optical document security. Their macroscopic visual behavior is based on properties of a very fine micro-structure which cannot be copied using common copying techniques. The visual effects can be easily observed by a common observer without any special inspection tools. However, when a high level of security is needed, additional features are often included based on an optical encryption of information. In this paper, a novel encryption technique is presented, which is based on utilizing the plastic holographic foil as a waveguide and special diffractive structures as coupling elements. When an in-coupling area is illuminated with a defined light beam, the light is coupled into the waveguide and travels to an out-coupling part. The encrypted information is encoded either in the shape of the out-coupling area or it can be formed from an out-coupling hologram in free space above the element. Both laser and normal white light sources can be used for reading the information. The coupling areas can be mixed with diffractive micro-structures forming visual effects and can be invisible during a normal observation of the hologram. The couplers can be realized using the technology fully compatible with the standard process for mastering and replication of the security elements. Several extensions of the described idea of waveguide cryptograms are also included. Finally, a set of real samples of the security elements is presented, which were realized using an advanced matrix laser lithography technique.

  14. Optical fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hakimi, F.; Po, H.; Snitzer, E.

    1987-07-14

    An optical fiber laser is described comprising: a gain cavity including a single mode optical fiber of given length having a core with a given index of refraction and a cladding surrounding the core and having an index of refraction lower than that of the core. The core comprises a host glass having incorporated a laser gain material with a fluorescence spectrum having at least one broadband region in which there is at least one peak emission line; filter means optically coupled to one end of the gain cavity and reflective to radiation emitted from the gain material over a predetermined wavelength interval about the peak emission line to provide feedback in the gain cavity; an etalon filter section butt coupled to the remaining end of the gain cavity optical fiber, the etalon filter section comprising a pair of filters spaced apart in parallel by a predetermined length of material transparent to any radiation emitted from the gain cavity. The predetermined length of the transparent material is such that the etalon filter section is no longer than the distance over which the wave train energy from the fiber core remains substantially planar so that the etalon filter section is inside the divergent region to enhance feedback in the gain cavity; and means for pumping energy into the gain cavity to raise the interval energy level such that only a small part of the ion population, corresponding to a predetermined bandwidth about the peak emission line, is raised above laser threshold. The laser emits radiation only over narrow lines over a narrow wavelength interval centered about the peak emission line.

  15. Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Watterson, C.E.

    1997-05-01

    The Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices project was initiated in march 1991 to support design laboratory guidance on electro-optic device packaging and evaluation. Sandia National Laboratory requested AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), to prepare for future packaging efforts in electro-optic integrated circuits. Los Alamos National Laboratory requested the evaluation of electro-optic waveguide devices for nuclear surety applications. New packaging techniques involving multiple fiber optic alignment and attachment, binary lens array development, silicon V-groove etching, and flip chip bonding were requested. Hermetic sealing of the electro-optic hybrid and submicron alignment of optical components present new challenges to be resolved. A 10-channel electro-optic modulator and laser amplifier were evaluated for potential surety applications.

  16. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  17. Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

  18. Space simulators for laser optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Different approaches that are being utilized to test laser optical systems are described. One of the most crucial areas in the testing phase is the stability of the laser optics mounted inside the space simulator. The thermal vacuum system, the refrigeration system, and the space simulator are discussed.

  19. Fiber optics for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The increased use of composites makes the digital control more susceptible to electromagnetic effects. In order to provide the protection to the digital control additional shielding will be required as well as protective circuitry for the electronics. This results in increased weight and reduced reliability. The advantages that fiber optic technology provides for advanced aircraft applications is recognized. The use of optical signals to carry information between the aircraft and the control module provides immunity from contamination by electromagnetic sources as well as other important benefits such as reduced weight and volume resulting from the elimination of the shielding and the replacement of metal conductors with low weight glass fibers. In 1975 NASA began work to develop passive optical sensors for use with fiber optics in aircraft control systems. The problem now is to choose the best optical sensor concepts and evaluate them for use. In 1985 NASA and DOD entered into a joint program, Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI), to look at optical technology specifically for use in advanced aircraft systems. The results of this program are discussed. The conclusion of the study indicated that the use of fiber optic technology in advanced aircraft systems is feasible and desirable. The study pointed to a lack of available sensors from vendors capable of operating in the adverse environments of advanced aircraft.

  20. Fiber optics for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    The increased use of composites makes the digital control more susceptible to electromagnetic effects. In order to provide the protection to the digital control additional shielding will be required as well as protective circuitry for the electronics. This results in increased weight and reduced reliability. The advantages that fiber optic technology provides for advanced aircraft applications is recognized. The use of optical signals to carry information between the aircraft and the control module provides immunity from contamination by electromagnetic sources as well as other important benefits such as reduced weight and volume resulting from the elimination of the shielding and the replacement of metal conductors with low weight glass fibers. In 1975 NASA began work to develop passive optical sensors for use with fiber optics in aircraft control systems. The problem now is to choose the best optical sensor concepts and evaluate them for use. In 1985 NASA and DOD entered into a joint program, Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI), to look at optical technology specifically for use in advanced aircraft systems. The results of this program are discussed. The conclusion of the study indicated that the use of fiber optic technology in advanced aircraft systems is feasible and desirable. The study pointed to a lack of available sensors from vendors capable of operating in the adverse environments of advanced aircraft.

  1. Initial alignment method for free space optics laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yuta; Tashiro, Yuki; Izumi, Kiyotaka; Yoshida, Koichi; Tsujimura, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    The authors have newly proposed and constructed an active free space optics transmission system. It is equipped with a motor driven laser emitting mechanism and positioning photodiodes, and it transmits a collimated thin laser beam and accurately steers the laser beam direction. It is necessary to introduce the laser beam within sensible range of the receiver in advance of laser beam tracking control. This paper studies an estimation method of laser reaching point for initial laser beam alignment. Distributed photodiodes detect laser luminescence at respective position, and the optical axis of laser beam is analytically presumed based on the Gaussian beam optics. Computer simulation evaluates the accuracy of the proposed estimation methods, and results disclose that the methods help us to guide the laser beam to a distant receiver.

  2. Advanced laser remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.; Czuchlewski, S.; Karl, R.

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Remote measurement of wind velocities is critical to a wide variety of applications such as environmental studies, weather prediction, aircraft safety, the accuracy of projectiles, bombs, parachute drops, prediction of the dispersal of chemical and biological warfare agents, and the debris from nuclear explosions. Major programs to develop remote sensors for these applications currently exist in the DoD and NASA. At present, however, there are no real-time, three-dimensional wind measurement techniques that are practical for many of these applications and we report on two new promising techniques. The first new technique uses an elastic backscatter lidar to track aerosol patterns in the atmosphere and to calculate three dimensional wind velocities from changes in the positions of the aerosol patterns. This was first done by Professor Ed Eloranta of the University of Wisconsin using post processing techniques and we are adapting Professor Eloranta`s algorithms to a real-time data processor and installing it in an existing elastic backscatter lidar system at Los Alamos (the XM94 helicopter lidar), which has a compatible data processing and control system. The second novel wind sensing technique is based on radio-frequency (RF) modulation and spatial filtering of elastic backscatter lidars. Because of their compactness and reliability, solid state lasers are the lasers of choice for many remote sensing applications, including wind sensing.

  3. Laser peening with fiber optic delivery

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Herbert W.; Ault, Earl R.; Scheibner, Karl F.

    2004-11-16

    A system for processing a workpiece using a laser. The laser produces at least one laser pulse. A laser processing unit is used to process the workpiece using the at least one laser pulse. A fiber optic cable is used for transmitting the at least one laser pulse from the laser to the laser processing unit.

  4. Optical eye simulator for laser dazzle events.

    PubMed

    Coelho, João M P; Freitas, José; Williamson, Craig A

    2016-03-20

    An optical simulator of the human eye and its application to laser dazzle events are presented. The simulator combines optical design software (ZEMAX) with a scientific programming language (MATLAB) and allows the user to implement and analyze a dazzle scenario using practical, real-world parameters. Contrary to conventional analytical glare analysis, this work uses ray tracing and the scattering model and parameters for each optical element of the eye. The theoretical background of each such element is presented in relation to the model. The overall simulator's calibration, validation, and performance analysis are achieved by comparison with a simpler model based uponCIE disability glare data. Results demonstrate that this kind of advanced optical eye simulation can be used to represent laser dazzle and has the potential to extend the range of applicability of analytical models. PMID:27140558

  5. Optically biased laser gyro

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.Z.; Chow, W.W.; Scully, M.O.; Sanders, V.E.

    1980-10-01

    We describe a four-mode ring laser that exhibits none of the mode-locking characteristics that plague laser gyros. This laser is characterized by a bias that changes sign with a change in the direction of rotation and prevents the counterpropagating modes from locking. A theoretical analysis explaining the experimental results is outlined.

  6. Advanced infrared laser modulator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheo, P. K.; Wagner, R.; Gilden, M.

    1984-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to develop an electrooptic waveguide modulator for generating continuous tunable sideband power from an infrared CO2 laser. Parameters included were the waveguide configurations, microstrip dimensions device impedance, and effective dielectric constants. An optimum infrared laser modulator was established and was fabricated. This modulator represents the state-of-the-art integrated optical device, which has a three-dimensional topology to accommodate three lambda/4 step transformers for microwave impedance matching at both the input and output terminals. A flat frequency response of the device over 20 HGz or = 3 dB) was achieved. Maximum single sideband to carrier power greater than 1.2% for 20 W microwave input power at optical carrier wavelength of 10.6 microns was obtained.

  7. Advances In Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. H.; Giallorenzi, T. G.; Bucaro, J. A.

    1981-07-01

    Over the past several years, a new non-communication optical fiber application has emerged. This application utilizes optical fibers for sensing. Initial interest centered around rate rotation sensing. Since that time, however, acoustic, magnetic, and temperature sensing utilizing optical fibers has evolved into a viable research effort with significant potential payoff. As an example, laboratory fiber optic acoustic sensors now rival the best sensitivity obtained with piezoelectric ceramics. These sensors possess a unique geometric versatility previously unavailable. In conjunction with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Navy has begun a Fiber Optic Sensor System (FOSS) program to develop associated technology necessary to realize these sensors. Substantial effort is ongoing at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and other Navy laboratories with considerable contractual effort from universities and industry. This paper reviews the status of the FOSS program.

  8. Optics assembly for high power laser tools

    DOEpatents

    Fraze, Jason D.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-06-07

    There is provided a high power laser rotational optical assembly for use with, or in high power laser tools for performing high power laser operations. In particular, the optical assembly finds applications in performing high power laser operations on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations. The optical assembly has rotational seals and bearing configurations to avoid contamination of the laser beam path and optics.

  9. Advanced photonic integrated technologies for optical routing and switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masanovic, Milan L.; Burmeister, Emily; Dummer, Matthew M.; Koch, Brian; Nicholes, Steven C.; Jevremovic, Biljana; Nguyen, Kim; Lal, Vikrant; Bowers, John E.; Coldren, Larry A.; Blumenthal, Daniel J.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the latest advances in implementation of the photonic integrated circuits (PICs) required for optical routing. These components include high-speed, high-performance integrated tunable wavelength converters and packet forwarding chips, integrated optical buffers, and integrated mode-locked lasers.

  10. Advanced optics in an interdisciplinary graduate program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nic Chormaic, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, established in November 2011, provides a 5- year interdisciplinary PhD program, through English, within Japan. International and Japanese students entering the program undertake coursework and laboratory rotations across a range of topics, including neuroscience, molecular science, physics, chemistry, marine science and mathematics, regardless of previous educational background. To facilitate interdisciplinarity, the university has no departments, ensuring seamless interactions between researchers from all sectors. As part of the PhD program a course in Advanced Optics has been developed to provide PhD students with the practical and theoretical skills to enable them to use optics tools in any research environment. The theoretical aspect of the course introduces students to procedures for complex beam generation (e.g. Laguerre-Gaussian), optical trapping, beam analysis and photon optics, and is supported through a practical program covering introductory interference/diffraction experiments through to more applied fiber optics. It is hoped that, through early exposure to optics handling and measurement techniques, students will be able to develop and utilize optics tools regardless of research field. In addition to the formal course in Advanced Optics, a selection of students also undertakes 13 week laboratory rotations in the Light-Matter Interactions research laboratory, where they work side-by-side with physicists in developing optics tools for laser cooling, photonics or bio-applications. While currently in the first year, conclusive results about the success of such an interdisciplinary PhD training are speculative. However, initial observations indicate a rich cross-fertilization of ideas stemming from the diverse backgrounds of all participants.

  11. Stitching Techniques Advance Optics Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Because NASA depends on the fabrication and testing of large, high-quality aspheric (nonspherical) optics for applications like the James Webb Space Telescope, it sought an improved method for measuring large aspheres. Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Goddard Space Flight Center, QED Technologies, of Rochester, New York, upgraded and enhanced its stitching technology for aspheres. QED developed the SSI-A, which earned the company an R&D 100 award, and also developed a breakthrough machine tool called the aspheric stitching interferometer. The equipment is applied to advanced optics in telescopes, microscopes, cameras, medical scopes, binoculars, and photolithography."

  12. Advanced optical manufacturing digital integrated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Li, Wei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    It is necessarily to adapt development of advanced optical manufacturing technology with modern science technology development. To solved these problems which low of ration, ratio of finished product, repetition, consistent in big size and high precision in advanced optical component manufacturing. Applied business driven and method of Rational Unified Process, this paper has researched advanced optical manufacturing process flow, requirement of Advanced Optical Manufacturing integrated System, and put forward architecture and key technology of it. Designed Optical component core and Manufacturing process driven of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Digital Integrated System. the result displayed effective well, realized dynamic planning Manufacturing process, information integration improved ratio of production manufactory.

  13. Advanced centering of mounted optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Christian; Winkelmann, Ralf; Klar, Rainer; Philippen, Peter; Garden, Ron; Pearlman, Sasha; Pearlman, Guy

    2016-03-01

    Camera objectives or laser focusing units consist of complex lens systems with multiple lenses. The optical performance of such complex lens systems is dependent on the correct positioning of lenses in the system. Deviations in location or angle within the system directly affect the achievable image quality. To optimize the achievable performance of lens systems, these errors can be corrected by machining the mount of the lens with respect to the optical axis. The Innolite GmbH and Opto Alignment Technology have developed a novel machine for such center turning operation. A confocal laser reflection measurement sensor determines the absolute position of the optical axis with reference to the spindle axis. As a strong advantage compared to autocollimator measurements the utilized Opto Alignment sensor is capable of performing centration and tilt measurements without changing objectives on any radius surface from 2 mm to infinity and lens diameters from 0.5 mm to 300 mm, including cylinder, aspheric, and parabolic surfaces. In addition, it performs significantly better on coated lenses. The optical axis is skewed and offset in reference to the spindle axis as determined by the measurement. Using the information about the mount and all reference surfaces, a machine program for an untrue turning process is calculated from this data in a fully automated manner. Since the optical axis is not collinear with the spindle axis, the diamond tool compensates for these linear and tilt deviations with small correction movements. This results in a simple machine setup where the control system works as an electronic alignment chuck. Remaining eccentricity of <1 μm and angular errors of < 10 sec are typical alignment results.

  14. Detection of immunoglobulins in a laser induced fluorescence system utilizing polydimethysiloxane microchips with advanced surface and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Schrott, Walter; Nebyla, Marek; Přibyl, Michal; Snita, Dalimil

    2011-01-01

    We developed an automated laser induced fluorescence system utilizing microfluidic chips for detection and quantification of immunoglobulins. Microchips were fabricated from polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) using the so-called "prepolymerization technique." The microchip structure helped minimize the effects of PDMS autofluorescence and light scattering. Furthermore, a thin and uniform PDMS layer forming the top of the microchip enabled proper focusing and collection of the excitation beam and the emitted fluorescence, respectively. The developed system was tested for the detection of mouse immunoglobulins. The capturing antibodies were immobilized on internal microchannel walls in the form of a polyelectrolyte. We clearly show that this immobilization technique, if correctly realized, gives results with high reproducibility. After sample incubation and washing, secondary antibodies labeled by fluorescein isothiocyanate were introduced into microchannels to build a detectable complex. We show that mouse antibodies can be quantified in a wide concentration range, 0.01-100 μg ml(-1). The lower detection limit was below 0.001 μg ml(-1) (6.7 pM). The developed laser induced fluorescence (LIF) apparatus is relatively cheap and easy to construct. The total cost of the developed LIF detector is lower than a typical price of plate readers. If compared to classical ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) plate systems, the detection of immunoglobulins or other proteins in the developed PDMS microfluidic device brings other important benefits such as reduced time demands (10 min incubation) and low reagent consumption (less than 1 μl). The cost of the developed PDMS chips is comparable with the price of commercial ELISA plates. The main troubleshooting related to the apparatus development is also discussed in order to help potential constructors. PMID:21359027

  15. Stabilizing a gaseous optical laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jauan, A.; Shimoda, K.

    1974-01-01

    Frequency of gaseous optical laser can be stabilized by sinusoidally modulating the geometry of the cavity. Fabry-Perot dielectric mirrors are mounted in two Invar blocks that are connected by four magnetorestrictive bars. Each bar has three coils to sinusoidally modulate system. Ac establishes frequency, and dc the average value; both are supplied to coil from control system.

  16. The input optics of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, D. B.; Arain, M. A.; Ciani, G.; Feldbaum, D.; Fulda, P.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, R.; Heintze, M.; Martin, R. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Williams, L. F.; Mueller, G.; Quetschke, V.; Korth, W. Z.; Reitze, D. H.; Derosa, R. T.; Effler, A.; Kokeyama, K.; Frolov, V. V.; Mullavey, A.; Poeld, J.

    2016-03-01

    The Input Optics (IO) of advanced LIGO will be described. The IO consists of all the optics between the laser and the power recycling mirror. The scope of the IO includes the following hardware: phase modulators, power control, input mode cleaner, an in-vacuum Faraday isolator, and mode matching telescopes. The IO group has developed and characterized RTP-based phase modulators capable of operation at 180 W cw input power. In addition, the Faraday isolator is compensated for depolarization and thermal lensing effects up to the same power and is capable of achieving greater than 40 dB isolation. This research has been supported by the NSF through Grants PHY-1205512 and PHY-1505598. LIGO-G1600067.

  17. Optical resonator and laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  18. Coupled optical resonance laser locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burd, S. C.; du Toit, P. J. W.; Uys, H.

    2014-10-01

    We have demonstrated simultaneous laser frequency stabilization of a UV and IR laser, to the same spectroscopic sample, by monitoring only the absorption of the UV laser. For trapping and cooling Yb$^{+}$ ions, a frequency stabilized laser is required at 369.95nm to drive the $^{2}S_{1/2}$ $ \\rightarrow $ $ ^{2}P_{1/2}$ cooling transition. Since the cycle is not closed, a 935.18nm laser is needed to drive the $^{2}D_{3/2}$ $\\rightarrow$ $^{3}D_{[3/2]1/2}$ transition which is followed by rapid decay to the $^{2}S_{1/2}$ state. Our 369nm laser is locked to Yb$^{+}$ ions generated in a hollow cathode discharge lamp using saturated absorption spectroscopy. Without pumping, the metastable $^{2}D_{3/2}$ level is only sparsely populated and direct absorption of 935nm light is difficult to detect. A resonant 369nm laser is able to significantly populate the $^{2}D_{3/2}$ state due to the coupling between the levels. Fast re-pumping to the $^{2}S_{1/2}$ state, by 935nm light, can be detected by observing the change in absorption of the 369nm laser using lock-in detection of the photodiode signal. In this way simultaneous locking of two optical frequencies in very different spectral regimes is accomplished. A rate equation model gives good qualitative agreement with the experimental results. This technique offers improved laser frequency stabilization compared to lasers locked individually to the sample and should be readily applicable to similar ion systems.

  19. Laser Measurement of Optical Errors of the Eye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Wiesner, Hartmut

    2006-01-01

    One way to motivate students' interest in physics is to teach it in the context of medicine. Optics, for example, can be taught with examples from the eye. For many years simple optics of lenses has been taught using a model of the eye. However, recent advances in using lasers for ophthalmological (ocular) examinations can be used to increase…

  20. Laser beam modeling in optical storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treptau, J. P.; Milster, T. D.; Flagello, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A computer model has been developed that simulates light propagating through an optical data storage system. A model of a laser beam that originates at a laser diode, propagates through an optical system, interacts with a optical disk, reflects back from the optical disk into the system, and propagates to data and servo detectors is discussed.

  1. Integrated optic chip for laser threat identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2010-04-01

    In this conference last year, we proposed free-space gratings, Fizeau interferometers and wavefront estimation for detecting the different lasers deployed in the battlefield for range finding, target designation, communications, dazzle, location of targets, munitions guidance, and destruction. Since last year, advanced laser weapons of the electron cyclotron type, are in development, such as the free-electron laser, that are tunable and can, unlike conventional bound-electron state lasers, be used at any wavelength from microwaves to soft X-rays. We list the characteristics of the nine dominant laser weapons because we assume that the free-electron lasers will initially use one of the current threat wavelengths because of availability of components and instrumentation. In this paper we replace the free-space grating with a higher performing array waveguide grating integrated optic chip, similar to that used in telecommunications, because integrated circuits are more robust and less expensive. It consists of a star coupler that fans out amongst waveguides of different length followed by a star coupler that focuses different wavelengths to different outputs in order to separate them. Design equations are derived to cover a range of frequencies at specific frequency spacing relevant to this application.

  2. Optical scanner. [laser doppler velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, D. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An optical scanner that sequentially focuses optical energy (light) at selected points in space is described. The essential component is a scanning wheel including several glass windows with each window having a different thickness. Due to this difference in thickness, the displacement of the emerging light from the incident light is different for each window. The scanner transmits optical energy to a point in space while at the same time receiving any optical energy generated at that point and then moves on to the next selected point and repeats this transmit and receive operation. It fills the need for a system that permits a laser velocimeter to rapidly scan across a constantly changing flow field in an aerodynamic test facility.

  3. Advances in tunable powerful lasers: The advanced free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, S.; Sheffield, R.

    1993-12-31

    In the past several decades, remarkable progress in laser science and technology has made it possible to obtain laser light from the ultra-violet to the far infra-red from a variety of laser types, and at power levels from milliwatts to kilowatts (and, some day, megawatts). However, the availability of tunable lasers at ``high`` power (above a few tens of watts) is more limited. Figure 1, an assessment of the availability of tunable lasers, shows the covered range to be about 400 to 2000 nanometers. A variety of dye lasers cover the visible and near infra red, each one of which is tunable over approximately a 10% range. In the same region, the TI:saphire laser is adjustable over a 20 to 25% range. And finally, optical parametric oscillators can cover the range from about 400 nanometers out to about 2000 nm (even farther at reduced energy output). The typical output energy per pulse may vary from a few to one hundred millijoules, and since repetition rates of 10 to 100 Hertz are generally attainable, average output powers of tens of watts are possible. In recent years, a new approach to powerful tunable lasers -- the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) -- has emerged. In this paper we will discuss advances in FEL technology which not only enable tunability at high average power over a very broad range of wavelengths, but also make this device more usable. At present, that range is about one micron to the far infra red; with extensions of existing technology, it should be extendable to the vacuum ultra violet region.

  4. Output optics for laser velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Dana H. (Inventor); Gunter, William D. (Inventor); Mcalister, Kenneth W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Space savings are effected in the optical output system of a laser velocimeter. The output system is comprised of pairs of optical fibers having output ends from which a beam of laser light emerges, a transfer lens for each light beam, and at least one final (LV) lens for receiving the light passing through the transfer lenses and for focussing that light at a common crossing point or area. In order to closely couple the transfer lenses to the final lens, each transfer lens is positioned relative to the final lens receiving light therefrom such that the output waist of the corresponding beam received by the final lens from the transfer lens is a virtual waist located before the transfer lens.

  5. Advanced experiments with an erbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Paulo V. S.; Marques, Manuel B.; Rosa, Carla C.

    2014-07-01

    This communication describes an optical hands-on fiber laser experiment aimed at advanced college courses. Optical amplifiers and laser sources represent very important optical devices in numerous applications ranging from telecommunications to medicine. The study of advanced photonics experiments is particularly relevant at undergraduate and master level. This paper discusses the implementation of an optical fiber laser made with a cavity built with two tunable Bragg gratings. This scheme allows the students to understand the laser working principles as a function of the laser cavity set-up. One or both of the gratings can be finely tuned in wavelength through applied stress; therefore, the degree of spectral mismatch of the two gratings can be adjusted, effectively changing the cavity feedback. The impact of the cavity conditions on the laser threshold, spectrum and efficiency is analyzed. This experiment assumes that in a previous practice, the students should had already characterized the erbium doped fiber in terms of absorption and fluorescent spectra, and the spectral gain as a function of pump power.

  6. Recent advances in ultrafast optical parametric oscillator frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Richard A.; Zhang, Zhaowei; Reid, Derryck T.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss recent advances in the stabilization and application of femtosecond frequency combs based on optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) pumped by femtosecond lasers at 800 and 1060 nm. A method for locking to zero the carrier-envelope-offset of a Ti:sapphire-pumped OPO comb is described. The application of Yb:KYW-laser-pumped dual-combs for mid-infrared spectroscopy is detailed, specifically methane spectroscopy at approximately a 0.7% concentration at 1 atm.

  7. Advances in drilling with fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Mohammed

    2015-07-01

    High brightness quasi- continuous wave (QCW) and continuous wave (CW) fiber lasers are routinely being used for cutting and welding for a range of industrial applications. However, to date very little work has been carried out or has been reported on laser drilling with these laser sources. This work describes laser drilling ((trepan and percussion) of nickel based superalloys (thermal barrier coated and uncoated) with a high power QCW fiber laser. This presentation will highlight some of the most significant aspect of laser drilling, i.e. SmartPierceTM, deep hole drilling and small hole drilling. These advances in processing also demonstrate the potential for fiber laser processing when an advanced interface between laser and an open architecture controller are used.

  8. Frequency modulated lasers for interferometric optical gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Komljenovic, Tin; Tran, Minh A; Belt, Michael; Gundavarapu, Sarat; Blumenthal, Daniel J; Bowers, John E

    2016-04-15

    We study the use of frequency modulated lasers in interferometric optical gyroscopes and show that by exploiting various frequency modulation signals, the laser coherence can be controlled. We show that both angle random walk and bias stability of an interferometric optical gyroscope based on laser sources can be improved with this technique. PMID:27082342

  9. Advanced micromoulding of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Hans-Dieter; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Paatzsch, Thomas; Smaglinski, Ingo; Weber, Lutz

    1999-09-01

    There is a growing need for micro-optical components in the field of tele- and datacom applications. Such components have to be very precise and should be available in reasonable numbers. Microtechnology provides manufacturing techniques that fulfill both requirements. Using micro electro discharge machining, laser micromachining, ultra precision milling and deep lithography with subsequent electroforming methods, complex tools for the replication of highly precise plastic parts have been manufactured. In many cases a combination of methods enumerated above gives a tool which shows both functionality and cost-efficiency. As examples we present the realization of integrated-optical components with passive fiber-waveguide coupling used as components in optical networks and as velocity sensors for two-phase flows, like liquids containing small gas bubbles or particles. In the first case multimode 4 X 4 star couplers have been manufactured in a pilot series that show excess loss values below 3 dB and a uniformity better than 3 dB at 830 nm. This performance becomes possible by using a compression molding process. By stamping the microstructured mold into a semifinished PMMA plate exact replication of the molds as well as very low surface roughness of the waveguide side walls could be observed. In the second case the waveguide channels of the flow sensors show dimensions of between 20 micrometer and 100 micrometer and an aspect ratio of about 20. These structures have been replicated by injection molding of PMMA using variotherm process treatment with a cycle time of about 2 - 3 min.

  10. Laser And Nonlinear Optical Materials For Laser Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    2005-01-01

    NASA remote sensing missions involving laser systems and their economic impact are outlined. Potential remote sensing missions include: green house gasses, tropospheric winds, ozone, water vapor, and ice cap thickness. Systems to perform these measurements use lanthanide series lasers and nonlinear devices including second harmonic generators and parametric oscillators. Demands these missions place on the laser and nonlinear optical materials are discussed from a materials point of view. Methods of designing new laser and nonlinear optical materials to meet these demands are presented.

  11. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  12. Laser diode array and transmission optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, Jin H.

    1989-01-01

    Information on laser diode array and transmission optics is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on coherent combining of laser diode arrays, amplification through a laser diode array, the far field pattern of a laser diode transmitter, and beam diameter at receiver vs. transmission distance.

  13. Session: CSP Advanced Systems: Optical Materials (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.

    2008-04-01

    The Optical Materials project description is to characterize advanced reflector, perform accelerated and outdoor testing of commercial and experimental reflector materials, and provide industry support.

  14. Dye laser studies using zig-zag optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Klimek, D.E.; Mandl, A.E.; Willman, B. )

    1994-06-01

    The authors report a substantial advance in dye laser performance using a zig-zag optical cavity. This configuration drastically reduces the effects of intrapulse medium disturbances due to acoustics and thermal lensing on pulse duration, beam quality, and extraction efficiency. Laser outputs of up to 2 J were observed from Coumarin-498 dye pumped by a KrF excimer laser. The dye laser output faithfully replicates the flat-top KrF laser pump pulse over the entire 1.7-[mu]s pulse duration. An intrinsic laser photon conversion efficiency (Photons[sub in]/Photons[sub absorbed]) of 44% was measured. When unstable resonator optics were used, beam qualities of about 2 XDL were measured.

  15. Precision optical metrology without lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ralf B.; Burke, Jan; Falldorf, Claas

    2015-07-01

    Optical metrology is a key technique when it comes to precise and fast measurement with a resolution down to the micrometer or even nanometer regime. The choice of a particular optical metrology technique and the quality of results depends on sample parameters such as size, geometry and surface roughness as well as user requirements such as resolution, measurement time and robustness. Interferometry-based techniques are well known for their low measurement uncertainty in the nm range, but usually require careful isolation against vibration and a laser source that often needs shielding for reasons of eye-safety. In this paper, we concentrate on high precision optical metrology without lasers by using the gradient based measurement technique of deflectometry and the finite difference based technique of shear interferometry. Careful calibration of deflectometry systems allows one to investigate virtually all kinds of reflecting surfaces including aspheres or free-form surfaces with measurement uncertainties below the μm level. Computational Shear Interferometry (CoSI) allows us to combine interferometric accuracy and the possibility to use cheap and eye-safe low-brilliance light sources such as e.g. fiber coupled LEDs or even liquid crystal displays. We use CoSI e.g. for quantitative phase contrast imaging in microscopy. We highlight the advantages of both methods, discuss their transfer functions and present results on the precision of both techniques.

  16. Advancing High Contrast Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, M.; Poyneer, L.; GPI Team

    2014-09-01

    A long-standing challenge has been to directly image faint extrasolar planets adjacent to their host suns, which may be ~1-10 million times brighter than the planet. Several extreme AO systems designed for high-contrast observations have been tested at this point, including SPHERE, Magellan AO, PALM-3000, Project 1640, NICI, and the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI, Macintosh et al. 2014). The GPI is the world's most advanced high-contrast adaptive optics system on an 8-meter telescope for detecting and characterizing planets outside of our solar system. GPI will detect a previously unstudied population of young analogs to the giant planets of our solar system and help determine how planetary systems form. GPI employs a 44x44 woofer-tweeter adaptive optics system with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor operating at 1 kHz. The controller uses Fourier-based reconstruction and modal gains optimized from system telemetry (Poyneer et al. 2005, 2007). GPI has an apodized Lyot coronal graph to suppress diffraction and a near-infrared integral field spectrograph for obtaining planetary spectra. This paper discusses current performance limitations and presents the necessary instrumental modifications and sensitivity calculations for scenarios related to high-contrast observations of non-sidereal targets.

  17. Applications of Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Roorda, Austin

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) describes a set of tools to correct or control aberrations in any optical system. In the eye, AO allows for precise control of the ocular aberrations. If used to correct aberrations over a large pupil, for example, cellular level resolution in retinal images can be achieved. AO systems have been demonstrated for advanced ophthalmoscopy as well as for testing and/or improving vision. In fact, AO can be integrated to any ophthalmic instrument where the optics of the eye is involved, with a scope of applications ranging from phoropters to optical coherence tomography systems. In this paper, I discuss the applications and advantages of using AO in a specific system, the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope, or AOSLO. Since the Borish award was, in part, awarded to me because of this effort, I felt it appropriate to select this as the topic for this paper. Furthermore, users of AOSLO continue to appreciate the benefits of the technology, some of which were not anticipated at the time of development, and so it is time to revisit this topic and summarize them in a single paper. PMID:20160657

  18. Optical fiber lasers and amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Snitzer, E.; Po, H.; Tumminelli, R.P.; Hakimi, F.

    1989-03-21

    An optical fiber is described, which comprises: a substantially single-mode core having an index of refraction n/sub 1/ comprised of laser material disposed within a multi-mode cladding having an index of refraction n/sub 2/; and a further cladding having an index of refraction n/sub 3/ surrounding the multi-mode cladding with substantially no space between the further cladding and the multi-mode cladding; wherein the single-mode core is disposed at an offset from the geometric center of the multi-mode cladding.

  19. Advanced manufacturing methods for chalcogenide molded optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogburn, Gabriel

    2011-06-01

    As Chalcogenide glass and Precision Molded Optics (PMO) have developed and matured to a point of being accepted as replacements for Germanium Single Point Diamond Turned (SPDT) optics; technological research is being dedicated to developing infrared PMO that can be used in a broader application base. These include laser arrays, large aperture molded chalcogenide optics, and molded in mount infrared optics. This paper presents applications for infrared laser arrays and the corresponding optics that must be closely mechanically mounted to avoid clipping the beams. Different molding and mounting techniques will be discussed to solve this issue which include; dicing chalcogenide optic lenses, molded in mount chalcogenide optics and stepped optic shape molding for mounting purposes. Accompanying the research and discussion of these techniques will be experiments and molded chalcogenide glass lenses showing the results and application for each lens type.

  20. One Micron Laser Technology Advancements at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the advancements made in one micron laser technology at Goddard Space Flight Center. It includes information about risk factors that are being addressed by GSFC, and overviews of the various programs that GSFC is currently managing that are using 1 micron laser technology.

  1. Laser Light Scattering, from an Advanced Technology Development Program to Experiments in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Tscharnuter, Walther W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Dautet, Henri; Deschamps, Pierre; Boucher, Francois; Zuh, Jixiang; Tin, Padetha; Rogers, Richard B.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in laser light scattering hardware are described. These include intelligent single card correlators; active quench/active reset avalanche photodiodes; laser diodes; and fiber optics which were used by or developed for a NASA advanced technology development program. A space shuttle experiment which will employ aspects of these hardware developments is previewed.

  2. Recent advances in laser dermatology.

    PubMed

    Butani, Anjali; Dudelzak, Jacob; Goldberg, David J

    2009-03-01

    Lasers have revolutionized the practice of modern dermatology. Our understanding of laser physics and selective photothermolysis has expanded greatly over the last 20 years. In the last 2 years, we have looked beyond the traditional lasers and explored new concepts. This article will look at five of these new concepts. A strong understanding of these new techniques will allow dermatologists to use them either primarily or in combination with more conventional methods. PMID:18991153

  3. First light : from the ruby laser to nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordmaine, J. A.

    2010-02-01

    Laser action was first demonstrated by Maiman in a flashlamp-pumped ruby crystal in May of 1960. This talk, based in part on personal recollections, recounts some of the research highlights during the two years that followed - a period of exponential growth in the field of quantum electronics, driven by the newly available, unprecedented coherence, power, and monochomaticity of laser light. Active areas from the beginning were new lasers in HeNe and other gas systems, in host crystals with increasingly effective dopants, and in glass. Modes in open resonators became understood, as did the surprising granularity of laser light An important step was the Q-switch, enabling megawatt lasers and providing a new tool for the study of dielectrics at high optical fields. The field of nonlinear optics opened up with experimental discoveries including optical second harmonic generation, two-photon absorption, phase matching and stimulated Raman scattering. A key to subsequent progress was a comprehensive quantum mechanical theory that provided a general description of nonlinear optical processes. The end of the two-year period covered here coincided with two advances which were to shape the future role of lasers in technology and science: the first semiconductor lasers; and a theoretical description of states of light having truly quantum properties, properties not evident in laser light up to that time. )

  4. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-03-04

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  5. Advances in femtosecond laser technology

    PubMed Central

    Callou, Thais Pinheiro; Garcia, Renato; Mukai, Adriana; Giacomin, Natalia T; de Souza, Rodrigo Guimarães; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser technology has become widely adopted by ophthalmic surgeons. The purpose of this study is to discuss applications and advantages of femtosecond lasers over traditional manual techniques, and related unique complications in cataract surgery and corneal refractive surgical procedures, including: LASIK flap creation, intracorneal ring segment implantation, presbyopic treatments, keratoplasty, astigmatic keratotomy, and intrastromal lenticule procedures. PMID:27143847

  6. Advances in femtosecond laser technology.

    PubMed

    Callou, Thais Pinheiro; Garcia, Renato; Mukai, Adriana; Giacomin, Natalia T; de Souza, Rodrigo Guimarães; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser technology has become widely adopted by ophthalmic surgeons. The purpose of this study is to discuss applications and advantages of femtosecond lasers over traditional manual techniques, and related unique complications in cataract surgery and corneal refractive surgical procedures, including: LASIK flap creation, intracorneal ring segment implantation, presbyopic treatments, keratoplasty, astigmatic keratotomy, and intrastromal lenticule procedures. PMID:27143847

  7. Optical components for the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wallerstein, E.P.; Baker, P.C.; Brown, N.J.

    1982-05-17

    In addition to its other characteristics, the Nova Laser Fusion facility may well be the largest precision optical project ever undertaken. Moreover, during the course of construction, concurrent research and development has been successfully conducted, and has resulted in significant advances in various technical areas, including manufacturing efficiency. Although assembly of the first two beams of Nova is just commencing, the optical production, including construction of the special facilities required for many of the components, has been underway for over three years, and many phases of the optical manufacturing program for the first 10 beams will be completed within the next two years. On the other hand, new requirements for second and third harmonic generation have created the need to initiate new research and development. This work has been accomplished through the enormous cooperation DOE/LLNL has received from commercial industry on this project. In many cases, industry, where much of the optical component research and development and virtually all of the manufacturing is being done, has made substantial investment of its own funds in facilities, equipment, and research and development, in addition to those supplied by DOE/LLNL.

  8. Fiber optic applications for laser polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, W.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1997-10-01

    For the past two years, the laser polarized target group at Argonne has been used multi-mode fiber optic patch cords for a variety of applications. In this paper, the authors describe the design for transporting high power laser beams with optical fibers currently in use at IUCF.

  9. Fiber-Optic Probe For Laser Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Dana H.; Mcalister, Kenneth W.; Gunter, William D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Size and weight of optics reduced considerably. Proposed fiber-optic probe in laser velocimeter smaller (and, therefore, lighter in weight and more maneuverable) than previous probe. Proposed configuration is product of calculations and experiments showing virtual waists serve same purpose. Laser-velocimeter lens brought close to transfer lenses to focus on virtual waists, thereby shortening probe head considerably.

  10. Recent advances in optical computing in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Satoshi

    The results of recent Japanese research in optical and hybrid computer systems and components are summarized and illustrated with drawings and diagrams, and the organizational structure of the research efforts is outlined. Topics addressed include optical logic devices, spatial light modulators, two-dimensional lasers, optical bistable devices, device theory, optically controlled array processing, an optical bus for a multiprocessor system, real-time multiple-matrix-product processing, optical numerical processing, optical parallel-array logic systems, optical associative memory, and neural-network computation. Consideration is given to the roles of the Optical Computer Group of the Japan Society of Applied Physics, industry, and government (through the universities and Ministry of Education and through the Ministry of International Trade and Industry).

  11. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3d vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.B.; Simonson, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  12. Lessons Learned from the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Matt; Patel, Deepak; Bradshaw, Heather; Robinson, Frank; Neuberger, Dave

    2016-01-01

    The ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) instrument is an upcoming Earth Science mission focusing on the effects of climate change. The flight instrument passed all environmental testing at GSFC (Goddard Space Flight Center) and is now ready to be shipped to the spacecraft vendor for integration and testing. This presentation walks through the lessons learned from design, hardware, analysis and testing perspective. ATLAS lessons learned include general thermal design, analysis, hardware, and testing issues as well as lessons specific to laser systems, two-phase thermal control, and optical assemblies with precision alignment requirements.

  13. Optical trapping of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Usman, Anwar; Chiang, Wei-Yi; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Optical trapping with continuous-wave lasers has been a fascinating field in the optical manipulation. It has become a powerful tool for manipulating micrometer-sized objects, and has been widely applied in physics, chemistry, biology, material, and colloidal science. Replacing the continuous-wave- with pulsed-mode laser in optical trapping has already revealed some novel phenomena, including the stable trap, modifiable trapping positions, and controllable directional optical ejections of particles in nanometer scales. Due to two distinctive features; impulsive peak powers and relaxation time between consecutive pulses, the optical trapping with the laser pulses has been demonstrated to have some advantages over conventional continuous-wave lasers, particularly when the particles are within Rayleigh approximation. This would open unprecedented opportunities in both fundamental science and application. This Review summarizes recent advances in the optical trapping with laser pulses and discusses the electromagnetic formulations and physical interpretations of the new phenomena. Its aim is rather to show how beautiful and promising this field will be, and to encourage the in-depth study of this field. PMID:23738434

  14. Optical coatings for laser fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, W.H.; Milam, D.; Rainer, F.

    1980-04-24

    Lasers for fusion experiments use thin-film dielectric coatings for reflecting, antireflecting and polarizing surface elements. Coatings are most important to the Nd:glass laser application. The most important requirements of these coatings are accuracy of the average value of reflectance and transmission, uniformity of amplitude and phase front of the reflected or transmitted light, and laser damage threshold. Damage resistance strongly affects the laser's design and performance. The success of advanced lasers for future experiments and for reactor applications requires significant developments in damage resistant coatings for ultraviolet laser radiation.

  15. Robotic visible-light laser adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit

    2013-12-01

    Robo-AO is the first autonomous laser adaptive optics system and science instrument operating on sky. With minimal human oversight, the system robotically executes large scale surveys, monitors long-term astrophysical dynamics and characterizes newly discovered transients, all at the visible diffraction limit. The adaptive optics setup time, from the end of the telescope slew to the beginning of an observation, is a mere ~50-60 s, enabling over 200 observations per night. The first of many envisioned systems has finished 58 nights of science observing at the Palomar Observatory 60-inch (1.5 m) telescope, with over 6,400 robotic observations executed thus far. The system will be augmented in late 2013 with a low-noise wide field infrared camera, which doubles as a tip-tilt sensor, to widen the spectral bandwidth of observations and increase available sky coverage while also enabling deeper visible imaging using adaptive-optics sharpened infrared tip-tilt guide sources. Techniques applicable to larger telescope systems will also be tested: the infrared camera will be used to demonstrate advanced multiple region-of-interest tip-tilt guiding methods, and a visitor instrument port will be used for evaluation of other instrumentation, e.g. single-mode and photonic fibers to feed compact spectrographs.

  16. Advances in transmission x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ceglio, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics are reviewed. Specific advances in coded aperture imaging, zone plate lens fabrication, time and space resolved spectroscopy, and CCD x-ray detection are discussed.

  17. Advanced laser diodes for sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    VAWTER,GREGORY A.; MAR,ALAN; CHOW,WENG W.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-01-01

    The authors have developed diode lasers for short pulse duration and high peak pulse power in the 0.01--100.0 m pulsewidth regime. A primary goal of the program was producing up to 10 W while maintaining good far-field beam quality and ease of manufacturability for low cost. High peak power, 17 W, picosecond pulses have been achieved by gain switching of flared geometry waveguide lasers and amplifiers. Such high powers area world record for this type of diode laser. The light emission pattern from diode lasers is of critical importance for sensing systems such as range finding and chemical detection. They have developed a new integrated optical beam transformer producing rib-waveguide diode lasers with a symmetric, low divergence, output beam and increased upper power limits for irreversible facet damage.

  18. Advanced targets preparation for TNSA laser irradiation and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccio, G.; Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.

    2016-04-01

    Thin targets have been investigated at low laser intensity in order to prepare foils for TNSA (Target Normal Sheath Acceleration) laser irradiation at high intensity. Foils were prepared with different techniques, such as deposition of metallic nanoparticles on polymeric substrates. Polymer films were covered by solutions containing nanoparticles or embedded inside or covered by nanostructures. Such advanced targets permit to enhance the laser wavelength absorbance. Thick and thin targets were irradiated using laser radiation at 1010 W/cm2 intensity and prepared to be submitted to laser irradiation at higher intensity. The foils were characterized by optical measurements of absorbance and transmittance as a function of wavelength in the regions UV, VIS and IR. Laser irradiation measurements using a Nd:YAG laser simulate the prepulse of high laser intensity. Accelerated ions were measured with ion collectors using time of flight techniques. The protons and ions acceleration and their yields were measured as a function of the equivalent atomic number of the foils and of other characteristics, as it will be presented and discussed.

  19. High power disk lasers: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, David; Holzer, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Though the genesis of the disk laser concept dates to the early 90's, the disk laser continues to demonstrate the flexibility and the certain future of a breakthrough technology. On-going increases in power per disk, and improvements in beam quality and efficiency continue to validate the genius of the disk laser concept. As of today, the disk principle has not reached any fundamental limits regarding output power per disk or beam quality, and offers numerous advantages over other high power resonator concepts, especially over monolithic architectures. With well over 1000 high power disk lasers installations, the disk laser has proven to be a robust and reliable industrial tool. With advancements in running cost, investment cost and footprint, manufacturers continue to implement disk laser technology with more vigor than ever. This paper will explain important details of the TruDisk laser series and process relevant features of the system, like pump diode arrangement, resonator design and integrated beam guidance. In addition, advances in applications in the thick sheet area and very cost efficient high productivity applications like remote welding, remote cutting and cutting of thin sheets will be discussed.

  20. Advanced Laser Architecture for Two-Step Laser Tandem Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, Molly E.; Li, Steven X.; Yu, Anthony W.; Getty, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Future astrobiology missions will focus on planets with significant astrochemical or potential astrobiological features, such as small, primitive bodies and the icy moons of the outer planets that may host diverse organic compounds. These missions require advanced instrument techniques to fully and unambiguously characterize the composition of surface and dust materials. Laser desorptionionization mass spectrometry (LDMS) is an emerging instrument technology for in situ mass analysis of non-volatile sample composition. A recent Goddard LDMS advancement is the two-step laser tandem mass spectrometer (L2MS) instrument to address the need for future flight instrumentation to deconvolve complex organic signatures. The L2MS prototype uses a resonance enhanced multi-photon laser ionization mechanism to selectively detect aromatic species from a more complex sample. By neglecting the aliphatic and inorganic mineral signatures in the two-step mass spectrum, the L2MS approach can provide both mass assignments and clues to structural information for an in situ investigation of non-volatile sample composition. In this paper we will describe our development effort on a new laser architecture that is based on the previously flown Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) laser transmitter for the L2MS instrument. The laser provides two discrete midinfrared wavelengths (2.8 m and 3.4 m) using monolithic optical parametric oscillators and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength (266 nm) on a single laser bench with a straightforward development path toward flight readiness.

  1. Optical Effects on Laser Ablated Polymer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, R. D.; Govinthasamy, R.; Murthy, N. S.

    2006-03-01

    Laser ablation of poly (ethylene terephthalate) and polyimide films were investigated using Excimer-UV laser. SEM analyses indicate the presence of rings for a wide range of ablation parameters (fluence, frequency and number of pulses). It is proposed that the particles present in the plasma plume could cause the incident laser light to diffract, similar to the optical effects observed in the femtosecond laser ablation of solids. The polymer surface provides a perfect medium to register the optical signatures as seen in the SEM images. The fringe-spacings observed in the images are compared with the theoretical diffraction patterns and the height of the plasma particles above the surface is estimated using an optimization scheme. The results of the analysis are consistent with experimentally observed dynamics of the plasma plume. It is proposed that such optical effects could be a routine feature in the laser ablation of polymers. The significance of such artifacts for lithography is discussed.

  2. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 1016 W cm-2 to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations.

  3. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 1016 W cm−2 to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations. PMID:27283369

  4. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D A; Mori, W B; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 10(16) W cm(-2) to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations. PMID:27283369

  5. 14th International Conference 'Laser Optics 2010'

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Artur A

    2010-10-15

    The 14th International Conference 'Laser Optics 2010' in which more than 800 scientists and experts from 35 countries took part, was held from June 28 to July 2, 2010, in St. Petersburg. (information)

  6. Advances in laser diodes for pyrotechnic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Richard R.

    1993-01-01

    Background information concerning the use of laser diodes in pyrotechnic applications is provided in viewgraph form. The following topics are discussed: damage limits, temperature stability, fiber coupling issues, and small (100 micron) and large (400 micron) fiber results. The discussions concerning fiber results concentrate on the areas of package geometry and electro-optical properties.

  7. Laser cooling in solids: advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Seletskiy, Denis V; Epstein, Richard; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses the progress and ongoing efforts in optical refrigeration. Optical refrigeration is a process in which phonons are removed from a solid by anti-Stokes fluorescence. The review first summarizes the history of optical refrigeration, noting the success in cooling rare-earth-doped solids to cryogenic temperatures. It then examines in detail a four-level model of rare-earth-based optical refrigeration. This model elucidates the essential roles that the various material parameters, such as the spacing of the energy levels and the radiative quantum efficiency, play in the process of optical refrigeration. The review then describes the experimental techniques for cryogenic optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids employing non-resonant and resonant optical cavities. It then examines the work on laser cooling of semiconductors, emphasizing the differences between optical refrigeration of semiconductors and rare-earth-doped solids and the new challenges and advantages of semiconductors. It then describes the significant experimental results including the observed optical refrigeration of CdS nanostructures. The review concludes by discussing the engineering challenges to the development of practical optical refrigerators, and the potential advantages and uses of these refrigerators. PMID:27484295

  8. Laser cooling in solids: advances and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seletskiy, Denis V.; Epstein, Richard; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses the progress and ongoing efforts in optical refrigeration. Optical refrigeration is a process in which phonons are removed from a solid by anti-Stokes fluorescence. The review first summarizes the history of optical refrigeration, noting the success in cooling rare-earth-doped solids to cryogenic temperatures. It then examines in detail a four-level model of rare-earth-based optical refrigeration. This model elucidates the essential roles that the various material parameters, such as the spacing of the energy levels and the radiative quantum efficiency, play in the process of optical refrigeration. The review then describes the experimental techniques for cryogenic optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids employing non-resonant and resonant optical cavities. It then examines the work on laser cooling of semiconductors, emphasizing the differences between optical refrigeration of semiconductors and rare-earth-doped solids and the new challenges and advantages of semiconductors. It then describes the significant experimental results including the observed optical refrigeration of CdS nanostructures. The review concludes by discussing the engineering challenges to the development of practical optical refrigerators, and the potential advantages and uses of these refrigerators.

  9. Interferometric ring lasers and optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1995-03-14

    Two ring diode lasers are optically coupled together to produce tunable, stable output through a Y-junction output coupler which may also be a laser diode or can be an active waveguide. These devices demonstrate a sharp peak in light output with an excellent side-mode-rejection ratio. The rings can also be made of passive or active waveguide material. With additional rings the device is a tunable optical multiplexer/demultiplexer. 11 figs.

  10. Interferometric ring lasers and optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.; Craft, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Two ring diode lasers are optically coupled together to produce tunable, stable output through a Y-junction output coupler which may also be a laser diode or can be an active waveguide. These devices demonstrate a sharp peak in light output with an excellent side-mode-rejection ratio. The rings can also be made of passive or active waveguide material. With additional rings the device is a tunable optical multiplexer/demultiplexer.

  11. Lincoln Advanced Science & Engineering Reinforcement (LASER) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Willie

    The Lincoln Advanced Science and Engineering Reinforcement (LASER) Program at Lincoln University, which has recruited over 100 students for majors in technical fields, is described in this report. To date, over 70% have completed or will complete technical degrees in engineering, physics, chemistry, and computer science. Of those completing the…

  12. Semiconductor laser gyro with optical frequency dithering

    SciTech Connect

    Prokof'eva, L P; Sakharov, V K; Shcherbakov, V V

    2014-04-28

    The semiconductor laser gyro is described, in which the optical frequency dithering implemented by intracavity phase modulation suppresses the frequency lock-in and provides the interference of multimode radiation. The sensitivity of the device amounted to 10–20 deg h{sup -1}. (laser gyroscopes)

  13. Laser fiber optics ordnance initiation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    Recent progress on system development in the laser initiation of explosive devices is summarized. The topics included are: development of compact free-running mode and Q-switched lasers, development of low-loss fiber optic bundles and connectors, study of nuclear radiation effects on the system, characterization of laser initiation sensitivities of insensitive high explosives, and the design methods used to achieve attractive system weight and cost savings. Direction for future work is discussed.

  14. Improved multipass optics for diode laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, T.A.; Chappell, E.L.; Munley, J.T.; Sharpe, S.W. )

    1993-12-01

    Feedback between optical elements can be a major source of noise when trying to attain high sensitivity in infrared absorption experiments. We find that a conventional White-cell optical arrangement introduces etaloning fringes that modulate the peak-to-peak amplitude of our signals by 1 part in 16 666, a fractional change of 6[times]10[sup [minus]5]. Although relatively small, this noise'' is systematic and adds coherently with averaging, obscuring interesting absorption features. An easily constructed multipass optical system suited for performing high-resolution infrared spectroscopy in molecular beams is described. The design is based on a variation of the White cell and has been optimized for use with lead salt diode lasers. One of the key components in the improved design is the addition of an oscillating mirror for spoiling optical feedback generated by laser scatter and/or poor mode coupling of the laser to the multipass optics.

  15. Coupled optical resonance laser locking.

    PubMed

    Burd, S C; du Toit, P J W; Uys, H

    2014-10-20

    We have demonstrated simultaneous laser frequency stabilization of a UV and IR laser, to coupled transitions of ions in the same spectroscopic sample, by detecting only the absorption of the UV laser. Separate signals for locking the different lasers are obtained by modulating each laser at a different frequency and using lock-in detection of a single photodiode signal. Experimentally, we simultaneously lock a 369 nm and a 935 nm laser to the (2)S(1/2) → (2)(P(1/2) and (2)D(3/2) → (3)D([3/2]1/2) transitions, respectively, of Yb(+) ions generated in a hollow cathode discharge lamp. Stabilized lasers at these frequencies are required for cooling and trapping Yb(+) ions, used in quantum information and in high precision metrology experiments. This technique should be readily applicable to other ion and neutral atom systems requiring multiple stabilized lasers. PMID:25401537

  16. Advanced optical disk storage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haritatos, Fred N.

    1996-01-01

    There is a growing need within the Air Force for more and better data storage solutions. Rome Laboratory, the Air Force's Center of Excellence for C3I technology, has sponsored the development of a number of operational prototypes to deal with this growing problem. This paper will briefly summarize the various prototype developments with examples of full mil-spec and best commercial practice. These prototypes have successfully operated under severe space, airborne and tactical field environments. From a technical perspective these prototypes have included rewritable optical media ranging from a 5.25-inch diameter format up to the 14-inch diameter disk format. Implementations include an airborne sensor recorder, a deployable optical jukebox and a parallel array of optical disk drives. They include stand-alone peripheral devices to centralized, hierarchical storage management systems for distributed data processing applications.

  17. Single-Event-Upset Laser Scanner With Optical Bias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Quiesup

    1992-01-01

    Light-assisted microelectronic advanced laser scanner (LAMEALS) is augmented version of microelectronic advanced laser scanner (MEALS) described in article, "Laser Scanner Tests For Single-Event Upsets", (NPO-18216). Only major difference, steady illumination from helium/neon laser, argon-ion laser, and/or other source(s) combined with pulsed dye-laser illumination of MEALS into single illuminating beam.

  18. Optical-fiber-coupled optical bistable semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhing Lichen; Tang Yunxin; Qin Ying; Guo Yili

    1986-12-01

    A compact, low input power optical bistable device, consisting of a photodetector, an optical fiber directional coupler, and a semiconductor laser diode, was presented. The principle is described graphically to explain the observed effects such as hysteresis, differential operational gain and memory functions.

  19. Technical Advances in the Continuous Melting of Phosphate Laser Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T; Thorsness, C; Campbell, J; Takeuchi, K; Suzuki, K; Yamamoto, K; Cimino, J; Thorne, A; Hayden, J

    2001-09-05

    Continuous melting of phosphate laser glass is now being used for the first time to prepare meter-scale amplifier optics for megajoule lasers. The scale-up to continuous melting from the previous one-at-a-time ''discontinuous'' batch process has allowed for the production of glass at rates more than 20 times faster, 5 times cheaper, and with 2-3 times better optical quality. Almost 8000 slabs of laser glass will be used in high-energy, high-peak-power laser systems that are being designed and built for fusion energy research. The success of this new continuous melting process, which is a result of a six year joint R&D program between government and industry, stems from numerous technical advances which include (1) dehydroxylating the glass to concentrations less than {approx}100 ppm OH; (2) minimizing damage-causing Pt-inclusions; (3) preventing glass fracture; (4) minimizing impurities such as Cu and Fe to <20 ppm; (5) improving forming methods to get high optical homogeneity glass; and (6) developing large aperture quality assurance tools to verify properties of the glass.

  20. Advanced mid-IR Solid-State Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art 2-micron solid-state laser developments. A world record one-Joule-per-pulse energy laser system and an advanced thermal management with fully conductive cooled laser technique are discussed

  1. Development in laser peening of advanced ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Pratik; Smith, Graham C.; Waugh, David G.; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    Laser peening is a well-known process applicable to surface treat metals and alloys in various industrial sectors. Research in the area of laser peening of ceramics is still scarce and a complete laser-ceramic interaction is still unreported. This paper focuses on laser peening of SiC ceramics employed for cutting tools, armor plating, dental and biomedical implants, with a view to elucidate the unreported work. A detailed investigation was conducted with 1064nm Nd:YAG ns pulse laser to first understand the surface effects, namely: the topography, hardness, KIc and the microstructure of SiC advanced ceramics. The results showed changes in surface roughness and microstructural modification after laser peening. An increase in surface hardness was found by almost 2 folds, as the diamond footprints and its flaws sizes were considerably reduced, thus, enhancing the resistance of SiC to better withstand mechanical impact. This inherently led to an enhancement in the KIc by about 42%. This is attributed to an induction of compressive residual stress and phase transformation. This work is a first-step towards the development of a 3-dimensional laser peening technique to surface treat many advanced ceramic components. This work has shown that upon tailoring the laser peening parameters may directly control ceramic topography, microstructure, hardness and the KIc. This is useful for increasing the performance of ceramics used for demanding applications particularly where it matters such as in military. Upon successful peening of bullet proof vests could result to higher ballistic strength and resistance against higher sonic velocity, which would not only prevent serious injuries, but could also help to save lives of soldiers on the battle fields.

  2. Optically pumped molecular bromine laser. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.W.

    1990-12-01

    An optically pumped molecular bromine laser was studied to investigate the quenching kinetics state of Br2. This included characterization of the pressure dependence of the laser output power. The approach was to excite molecular bromine in a sealed cell with a Nd:YAG pumped dye laser. Unresolved side fluorescence and amplified stimulated emission (ASE) spectra were recorded. ASE offered the advantage of a simpler optical system with no externally induced wavelength dependencies. Stimulated emission as a signal monitor offered greater resolution than side fluorescence spectra and facilitated spectroscopic assignment. (JS)

  3. Fiber optic mounted laser driven flyer plates

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a laser driven flyer plate where the flyer plate is deposited directly onto the squared end of an optical fiber. The plasma generated by a laser pulse drives the flyer plate toward a target. In another embodiment, a first metal layer is deposited onto the squared end of an optical fiber, followed by a layer of a dielectric material and a second metal layer. The laser pulse generates a plasma in the first metal layer, but the plasma is kept away from the second metal layer by the dielectric layer until the pressure reaches the point where shearing occurs. 2 figs.

  4. The Mercury Laser Advances Laser Technology for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbers, C A; Caird, J; Moses, E

    2009-01-21

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is on target to demonstrate 'breakeven' - creating as much fusion-energy output as laser-energy input. NIF will compress a tiny sphere of hydrogen isotopes with 1.8 MJ of laser light in a 20-ns pulse, packing the isotopes so tightly that they fuse together, producing helium nuclei and releasing energy in the form of energetic particles. The achievement of breakeven will culminate an enormous effort by thousands of scientists and engineers, not only at Livermore but around the world, during the past several decades. But what about the day after NIF achieves breakeven? NIF is a world-class engineering research facility, but if laser fusion is ever to generate power for civilian consumption, the laser will have to deliver pulses nearly 100,000 times faster than NIF - a rate of perhaps 10 shots per second as opposed to NIF's several shots a day. The Mercury laser (named after the Roman messenger god) is intended to lead the way to a 10-shots-per-second, electrically-efficient, driver laser for commercial laser fusion. While the Mercury laser will generate only a small fraction of the peak power of NIF (1/30,000), Mercury operates at higher average power. The design of Mercury takes full advantage of the technology advances manifest in its behemoth cousin (Table 1). One significant difference is that, unlike the flashlamp-pumped NIF, Mercury is pumped by highly efficient laser diodes. Mercury is a prototype laser capable of scaling in aperture and energy to a NIF-like beamline, with greater electrical efficiency, while still running at a repetition rate 100,000 times greater.

  5. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  6. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-09-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  7. Optical wavelength modulation in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, R.M.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    An attribute of the free electron laser (FEL) is the continuous tunability of the optical wavelength by modulation of the electron beam energy. The variation of the wavelength and power of the optical beam is studied as a function of FEL operating parameters. These results will be applied to the Stanford SCA FEL and Boeing FEL.

  8. Optical characterization in laser damage studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commandré, Mireille; Natoli, Jean Yves; Gallais, Laurent; Wagner, Frank; Amra, Claude

    2007-01-01

    The development of high power lasers and optical micro-components requires optical characterization techniques for studying behavior of optical materials under illumination, laser damage phenomena and ageing. More usual optical characterization tools are based on measurements of absorption, scattering and luminescence; they are non destructive evaluation techniques. It is important to combine several tools which allow getting complementary information. Optical tools can be used in damage initiation studies or to characterize properties of damaged areas. Because defects involved in laser damage initiation are sub-micrometer sized, both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity are required to detect defects as small as possible. Furthermore optical tools have to be implemented in damage set-up and at the same wavelength for a detailed analysis of damage mechanisms. We present an overview of recent developments in the field of optical characterization in connection with laser damage. Especially, a high resolution photothermal deflection microscopy has been coupled with a damage set-up to detect nano-absorbing precursors of damage and to study their behavior under irradiation. Thus model defects such as gold inclusions of various sizes have been followed through irradiation and results are compared with numerical simulations. Optical characterization allows to get determining information if several techniques are associated with numerical simulations.

  9. Projection optics for a laser velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Projection optics for laser velocimeter (LV) scans constant focal volume over entire focus-position range. Optics thus simplify LV measurements over large flow fields (such as those encountered in wind tunnels) by eliminating calibrations required when focal volume varies with position.

  10. Advanced laser systems for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosner, Marc; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Gross, Daniel; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-03-01

    We describe the ongoing development of laser systems for advanced photoacoustic imaging (PAI). We discuss the characteristics of these laser systems and their particular benefits for soft tissue imaging and next-generation breast cancer diagnostics. We provide an overview of laser performance and compare this with other laser systems that have been used for early-stage development of PAI. These advanced systems feature higher pulse energy output at clinically relevant repetition rates, as well as a novel wavelength-cycling output pulse format. Wavelength cycling provides pulse sequences for which the output repeatedly alternates between two wavelengths that provide differential imaging. This capability improves co-registration of captured differential images. We present imaging results of phantoms obtained with a commercial ultrasound detector system and a wavelength-cycling laser source providing ~500 mJ/pulse at 755 and 797 nm, operating at 25 Hz. The results include photoacoustic images and corresponding pulse-echo data from a tissue mimicking phantom containing inclusions, simulating tumors in the breast. We discuss the application of these systems to the contrast-enhanced detection of various tissue types and tumors.

  11. Modeling the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Trace R.; McNamara, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Creating an optical model of the Laser Interferometer Space antenna which can be used to predict optical sensitivities and set tolerances sufficiently well such that picometer level displacements can be reliably seen poses certain challenges. In part, because the distances between key optical elements, the proof masses, are constantly changing, at speeds of meters/second, the separation between them is about 5 million kilometers and a contributing factor to optical jitter is the self-gravity of the spacecraft. A discussion of the current state and future approach(s) to the creation of such an optical model will be presented.

  12. Latest advances in high brightness disk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Vincent; Gottwald, Tina; Stolzenburg, Christian; Schad, Sven-Silvius; Killi, Alexander; Ryba, Tracey

    2015-02-01

    In the last decade diode pumped solid state lasers have become an important tool for many industrial materials processing applications. They combine ease of operation with efficiency, robustness and low cost. This paper will give insight in latest progress in disk laser technology ranging from kW-class CW-Lasers over frequency converted lasers to ultra-short pulsed lasers. The disk laser enables high beam quality at high average power and at high peak power at the same time. The power from a single disk was scaled from 1 kW around the year 2000 up to more than 10 kW nowadays. Recently was demonstrated more than 4 kW of average power from a single disk close to fundamental mode beam quality (M²=1.38). Coupling of multiple disks in a common resonator results in even higher power. As an example we show 20 kW extracted from two disks of a common resonator. The disk also reduces optical nonlinearities making it ideally suited for short and ultrashort pulsed lasers. In a joint project between TRUMPF and IFSW Stuttgart more than 1.3 kW of average power at ps pulse duration and exceptionally good beam quality was recently demonstrated. The extremely low saturated gain makes the disk laser ideal for internal frequency conversion. We show >1 kW average power and >6 kW peak power in multi ms pulsed regime from an internally frequency doubled disk laser emitting at 515 nm (green). Also external frequency conversion can be done efficiently with ns pulses. >500 W of average UV power was demonstrated.

  13. Optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system

    DOEpatents

    Buchwald, Melvin I.; Jones, Claude R.; Nelson, Leonard Y.

    1982-01-01

    An optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system which is capable of producing a plurality of frequencies in the middle infrared spectral region. Two optical pumping mechanisms are disclosed, i.e., pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J) in response to enhancement of rotational cascade lasing including stimulated Raman effects, and, pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J+2). The disclosed apparatus for optical pumping include a hole coupled cavity and a grating coupled cavity.

  14. Advanced rotorcraft helmet display sighting system optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynal, Francois; Chen, Muh-Fa

    2002-08-01

    Kaiser Electronics' Advanced Rotorcraft Helmet Display Sighting System is a Biocular Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) for Rotary Wing Aviators. Advanced Rotorcraft HMDs requires low head supported weight, low center of mass offsets, low peripheral obstructions of the visual field, large exit pupils, large eye relief, wide field of view (FOV), high resolution, low luning, sun light readability with high contrast and low prismatic deviations. Compliance with these safety, user acceptance and optical performance requirements is challenging. The optical design presented in this paper provides an excellent balance of these different and conflicting requirements. The Advanced Rotorcraft HMD optical design is a pupil forming off axis catadioptric system that incorporates a transmissive SXGA Active Matrix liquid Crystal Display (AMLCD), an LED array backlight and a diopter adjustment mechanism.

  15. Beam shaping for laser initiated optical primers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.

    2008-08-01

    Remington was one of the first firearm manufacturing companies to file a patent for laser initiated firearms, in 1969. Nearly 40 years later, the development of laser initiated firearms has not become a mainstream technology in the civilian market. Requiring a battery is definitely a short coming, so it is easy to see how such a concept would be problematic. Having a firearm operate reliably and the delivery of laser energy in an efficient manner to ignite the shock-sensitive explosive primer mixtures is a tall task indeed. There has been considerable research on optical element based methods of transferring or compressing laser energy to ignite primer charges, including windows, laser chip primers and various lens shaped windows to focus the laser energy. The focusing of laser light needs to achieve igniting temperatures upwards of >400°C. Many of the patent filings covering this type of technology discuss simple approaches where a single point of light might be sufficient to perform this task. Alternatively a multi-point method might provide better performance, especially for mission critical applications, such as precision military firearms. This paper covers initial design and performance test of the laser beam shaping optics to create simultaneous multiple point ignition locations and a circumferential intense ring for igniting primer charge compounds. A simple initial test of the ring beam shaping technique was evaluated on a standard large caliber primer to determine its effectiveness on igniting the primer material. Several tests were conducted to gauge the feasibility of laser beam shaping, including optic fabrication and mounting on a cartridge, optic durability and functional ignition performance. Initial data will be presented, including testing of optically elements and empirical primer ignition / burn analysis.

  16. Dual-Wavelength Internal-Optically-Pumped Semiconductor Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Benjamin

    Dual-wavelength laser sources have various existing and potential applications in wavelength division multiplexing, differential techniques in spectroscopy for chemical sensing, multiple-wavelength interferometry, terahertz-wave generation, microelectromechanical systems, and microfluidic lab-on-chip systems. In the drive for ever smaller and increasingly mobile electronic devices, dual-wavelength coherent light output from a single semiconductor laser diode would enable further advances and deployment of these technologies. The output of conventional laser diodes is however limited to a single wavelength band with a few subsequent lasing modes depending on the device design. This thesis investigates a novel semiconductor laser device design with a single cavity waveguide capable of dual-wavelength laser output with large spectral separation. The novel dual-wavelength semiconductor laser diode uses two shorter- and longer-wavelength active regions that have separate electron and hole quasi-Fermi energy levels and carrier distributions. The shorter-wavelength active region is based on electrical injection as in conventional laser diodes, and the longer-wavelength active region is then pumped optically by the internal optical field of the shorter-wavelength laser mode, resulting in stable dual-wavelength laser emission at two different wavelengths quite far apart. Different designs of the device are studied using a theoretical model developed in this work to describe the internal optical pumping scheme. The carrier transport and separation of the quasi-Fermi distributions are then modeled using a software package that solves Poisson's equation and the continuity equations to simulate semiconductor devices. Three different designs are grown using molecular beam epitaxy, and broad-area-contact laser diodes are processed using conventional methods. The modeling and experimental results of the first generation design indicate that the optical confinement factor of the

  17. Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beam Amplification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Govind

    2015-01-01

    The Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beam Amplification (SOCLBA) project will provide a capability to amplify a laser beam that is received in a modulating retro-reflector (MRR) located in a satellite in low Earth orbit. It will also improve the pointing procedure between Earth and spacecraft terminals. The technology uses laser arrays to strengthen the reflected laser beam from the spacecraft. The results of first year's work (2014) show amplification factors of 60 times the power of the signal beam. MMRs are mirrors that reflect light beams back to the source. In space optical communications, a high-powered laser interrogator beam is directed from the ground to a satellite. Within the satellite, the beam is redirected back to ground using the MMR. In the MMR, the beam passes through modulators, which encode a data signal onto the returning beam. MMRs can be used in small spacecraft for optical communications. The SOCLBA project is significant to NASA and small spacecraft due to its application to CubeSats for optical data transmission to ground stations, as well as possible application to spacecraft for optical data transmission.

  18. Advanced Orion Optimized Laser System Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Contractor shall perform a complete analysis of the potential of the solid state laser in the very long pulse mode (100 ns pulse width, 10-30 hz rep-rate) and in the very short pulse mode (100 ps pulse width 10-30 hz rep rate) concentrating on the operation of the device in the 'hot-rod' mode, where no active cooling the laser operation is attempted. Contractor's calculations shall be made of the phase aberrations which develop during the repped-pulse train, and the results shall feed into the adaptive optics analyses. The contractor shall devise solutions to work around ORION track issues. A final report shall be furnished to the MSFC COTR including all calculations and analysis of estimates of bulk phase and intensity aberration distribution in the laser output beam as a function of time during the repped-pulse train for both wave forms (high-energy/long-pulse, as well as low-energy/short-pulse). Recommendations shall be made for mitigating the aberrations by laser re-design and/or changes in operating parameters of optical pump sources and/or designs.

  19. Advanced channel monitoring for optical layer management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weiguo; Zheng, Zheng

    2003-12-01

    We categorized synchronous optical network (SONET) operations, administration, maintenance, and provisioning (OAM&P) requirements according to their time urgency as related to the network operation and assigned them to a three-layer telecommunications management network for transparent networks accordingly. Because all-optical bit-by-bit processing at data rates is not yet available, a solution that is currently feasible for optical management layer requirements is proposed on the basis of a previously demonstrated advanced channel-monitoring method. Indicators for signal quality as well as channel use can be provided, and the scheme is transparent to current SONET network elements.

  20. Advanced Geothermal Optical Transducer (AGOT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-01

    Today's geothermal pressure-temperature measuring tools are short endurance, high value instruments, used sparingly because their loss is a major expense. In this project LEL offered to build and test a rugged, affordable, downhole sensor capable ofretuming an uninterrupted data stream at pressures and of 10,000 psi and temperatures up to 250 C, thus permitting continuous deep-well logging. It was proposed to meet the need by specializing LEL's patented 'Twin Column Transducer' technology to satisfy the demands of geothermal pressure/temperature measurements. TCT transducers have very few parts, none of which are moving parts, and all of which can be fabricated from high-temperature super alloys or from ceramics; the result is an extremely rugged device, essentially impervious to chemical attack and readily modified to operate at high pressure and temperature. To measure pressure and temperature they capitalize on the relative expansion of optical elements subjected to thermal or mechanical stresses; if one element is maintained at a reference pressure while the other is opened to ambient, the differential displacement then serves as a measure of pressure. A transducer responding to temperature rather than pressure is neatly created by 'inverting' the pressure-measuring design so that both deflecting structures see identical temperatures and temperature gradients, but whose thermal expansion coefficients are deliberately mismatched to give differential expansion. The starting point for development of a PT Tool was the company's model DPT feedback-stabilized 5,000 psi sensor (U.S. Patent 5,311,014, 'Optical Transducer for Measuring Downhole Pressure', claiming a pressure transducer capable of measuring static, dynamic, and true bi-directional differential pressure at high temperatures), shown in the upper portion of Figure 1. The DPT occupies a 1 x 2 x 4-inch volume, weighs 14 ounces, and is accurate to 1 percent of full scale. Employing a pair of identical, low

  1. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  2. AFIRE: fiber Raman laser for laser guide star adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccini Calia, D.; Hackenberg, W.; Chernikov, S.; Feng, Y.; Taylor, L.

    2006-06-01

    Future adaptive optics systems will benefit from multiple sodium laser guide stars in achieving satisfactory sky coverage in combination with uniform and high-Strehl correction over a large field of view. For this purpose ESO is developing with industry AFIRE, a turn-key, rack-mounted 589-nm laser source based on a fiber Raman laser. The fiber laser will deliver the beam directly at the projector telescope. The required output power is in the order of 10 W in air per sodium laser guide star, in a diffraction-limited beam and with a bandwidth of < 2 GHz. This paper presents the design and first demonstration results obtained with the AFIRE breadboard. 4.2W CW at 589nm have so far been achieved with a ~20% SHG conversion efficiency.

  3. Advances in telecom and datacom optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.

    2001-07-01

    We review and contrast key technologies developed to address the optical components market for telecom and datacom applications. We first look at different material systems, compare their properties, and describe the functions achieved to date in each of them. The material systems reviewed include glass fiber, silica on silicon, silicon on insulator, silicon oxynitride, sol-gels, polymers, thin film dielectrics, lithium niobate, indium phosphide, gallium arsenide, magneto-optic materials, and birefringent crystals. We then look at the most commonly used classes of technology and present their pros and cons as well as the functions achieved to date in each. The technologies reviewed include passive, actuation, and active technologies. The passive technologies described include fused fibers, dispersion-compensating fiber, beam steering (e.g., AWG), Bragg gratings, diffraction gratings, holographic elements, thin film filters, photonic crystals, microrings, and birefringent elements. The actuation technologies include thermo-optics, electro-optics, acousto- optics, magneto-optics, liquid crystals, total internal reflection technologies (e.g., bubble technology), and mechanical actuation (e.g., moving fibers and MEMS). We finally describe active technologies including heterostructures, quantum wells, rare earth doping, and semiconductor optical amplifiers. We also investigate the use of different material systems and technologies to achieve building block functions including lasers, amplifiers, detectors, modulators, polarization controllers, couplers, filters, switches, attenuators, nonreciprocal elements (Faraday rotators or nonreciprocal phase shifters) for isolators and circulators, wavelength converters, and dispersion compensators.

  4. Advanced lithography for micro-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitner, U. D.; Kley, E.-B.

    2006-08-01

    Since the beginning of micro-optics fabrication most of the used technologies have been adapted from or are related to semiconductor fabrication techniques. These are widely known and the special microelectronics fabrication tools, especially lithography machines, are available at numerous places. Besides the fact that therefore micro-optics was able to took advantage of the steady development of semiconductor technology this tight linkage has also a lot of drawbacks. The adaptation of element properties to the fabrication limits given by the available technologies is very often connected with compromises in optical performance. In nowadays micro-optics fabrication has reached a level which justifies the development of fabrication tools specialized to its own demands. In the article the special demands of optical microstructures on the fabrication technologies are discussed and newly developed mico-optics fabrication tools are introduced. The first one is an electron-beam lithography machine for use with up substrates up to 300mm large and 15mm thick achieving a very high overlay accuracy and writing speed. The second one is a laser-lithography system capable to expose micro-optical structures onto non-planar substrates.

  5. Relaxation oscillations in optically pumped molecular lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Koepf, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of relaxation oscillations in both the (C-13)H3F and (C-12)H3F optically pumped lasers is reported. Expressions are derived for the oscillation frequency and its temperature and pressure dependences using a four-level rate equation model. Excellent agreement between measured frequencies and the theory presented is observed. Models are considered for using this phenomenon to determine the rotational and vibrational relaxation mechanisms of the laser gases.

  6. Optical transceiver platform for laser communication experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffelt, Everett L.; Ebben, Thomas H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a laser communication (lasercom) transceiver platform to be used for laboratory experiments. The platform features a directly modulated semiconductor laser, avalanche photodiode receiver, and microprocessor-controlled acquisition and tracking system. The platform provides a test-bed, enabling study in vital areas of lasercom hardware such as system performance versus link distance, optical power, tracking accuracy, and subsystem and component characterization for future system specifications, including critical areas limiting present system performance.

  7. Laser induced damage in optical materials: ninth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1978-08-01

    The Ninth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 4-6 October 1977. The symposium was under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy (formerly ERDA), and the Office of Naval Research. About 185 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Australia, Union of South Africa, and the Soviet Union. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Laser Windows and Materials, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, Laser Glass and Glass Lasers, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the uv region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were also discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The Tenth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 12-14 September 1978 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20203792

  8. Adaptive Optics Imaging in Laser Pointer Maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Sheyman, Alan T; Nesper, Peter L; Fawzi, Amani A; Jampol, Lee M

    2016-08-01

    The authors report multimodal imaging including adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) (Apaeros retinal image system AOSLO prototype; Boston Micromachines Corporation, Boston, MA) in a case of previously diagnosed unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy (UAIM) that demonstrated features of laser pointer maculopathy. The authors also show the adaptive optics images of a laser pointer maculopathy case previously reported. A 15-year-old girl was referred for the evaluation of a maculopathy suspected to be UAIM. The authors reviewed the patient's history and obtained fluorescein angiography, autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, infrared reflectance, and AOSLO. The time course of disease and clinical examination did not fit with UAIM, but the linear pattern of lesions was suspicious for self-inflicted laser pointer injury. This was confirmed on subsequent questioning of the patient. The presence of linear lesions in the macula that are best highlighted with multimodal imaging techniques should alert the physician to the possibility of laser pointer injury. AOSLO further characterizes photoreceptor damage in this condition. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:782-785.]. PMID:27548458

  9. Optical Undulators for Free Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, James; Bisognano, Joseph; Bosch, Robert; Green, Michael; Jacobs, Kenneth; Yavuz, Deniz

    2014-05-01

    Free Electron Lasers (FELs) in the x-ray region are opening new research directions in AMO physics and other fields, but beam time is quite limited at these expensive facilities. There are conceptual designs for much less expensive soft x-ray FELs using sheared pulses from Table Top Terawatt (T3) lasers as optical undulators. A nearly co-propagating laser pulse can be angle tuned to yield soft x-rays, and shearing the pulse can optimize use of the laser photons. Undulator K values near unity are available from T3 lasers, and angle tuning provides almost arbitrary effective undulator periods. A combination of these optical undulator ideas with pre-``micro-bunching'' at a photocathode followed by electron beam emittance exchange can reduce the energy needed from the T3 laser. A combination of a nearly co-propagating optical undulator with a Bragg-reflection diamond mirror cavity may lower the cost of an x-ray frequency comb for metrology.

  10. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Frederic; Sun, X.

    1989-01-01

    This interim report describes the progress in the construction of a 220 Mbps Q=4 PPM optical communication system that uses a semiconductor laser as the optical transmitter and an avalanche photodiode (APD) as the photodetector. The transmitter electronics have been completed and contain both GaAs and ECL III IC's. The circuit was able to operate at a source binary data rate from 75 Mbps to 290 Mbps with pulse rise and fall times of 400 ps. The pulse shapes of the laser diode and the response from the APD/preamplifier module were also measured.

  11. Nonlinear optical protection against frequency agile lasers

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, V.P.

    1988-08-04

    An eye-protection or equipment-filter device for protection from laser energy is disclosed. The device may be in the form of a telescope, binoculars, goggles, constructed as part of equipment such as image intensifiers or range designators. Optical elements focus the waist of the beam within a nonlinear frequency-doubling crystal or nonlinear optical element or fiber. The nonlinear elements produce a harmonic outside the visible spectrum in the case of crystals, or absorb the laser energy in the case of nonlinear fibers. Embodiments include protectors for the human eye as well as filters for sensitive machinery such as TV cameras, FLIR systems or other imaging equipment.

  12. Aero-optics overview. [laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, K. G.

    1980-01-01

    Various aero-optical phenomena are discussed with reference to their effect on airborne high energy lasers. Major emphasis is placed on: compressibility effects induced in the surrounding flow field; viscous effects which manifests themselves as aircraft boundary layers or shear layers; inviscid flow fields surrounding the aircraft due to airflow around protuberance such as laser turret assemblies; and shocks, established whenever local flow exceeds Mach one. The significant physical parameters affecting the interaction of a laser beam with a turbulent boundary layer are also described.

  13. Optical fiber laser of multifrequency emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Pérez, Georgina; Jacobo Aispuro, Liliana; Lucian Rocha, Froylan; Castillo Mixcóatl, Juan; Múñoz Aguirre, Severino

    2007-03-01

    The wavelength division multiplexor (WDM) has a great importance in the technology of the communications by optical fiber, is an economic and efficient form, to increase the capacity of transmission by several orders of magnitude, reason why it is desirable to have laser sources of multiple wavelengths in a system WDM, which, according to reported works, have been obtained using diverse types of filters. In this work we presented a laser of multifrequency emission, of Erbium doped optical fiber, tuned with an optical fiber filter. The configuration of the optical filter, presents high stability and low lost by insertion, independence to the changes of polarization, low powers of light entrance, and has an useful spectral wide. It has the advantage to have a simple design and easy manufacture in addition to his low losses.

  14. Advances in optical imaging for pharmacological studies

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Imaging approaches are an essential tool for following up over time representative parameters of in vivo models, providing useful information in pharmacological studies. Main advantages of optical imaging approaches compared to other imaging methods are their safety, straight-forward use and cost-effectiveness. A main drawback, however, is having to deal with the presence of high scattering and high absorption in living tissues. Depending on how these issues are addressed, three different modalities can be differentiated: planar imaging (including fluorescence and bioluminescence in vivo imaging), optical tomography, and optoacoustic approaches. In this review we describe the latest advances in optical in vivo imaging with pharmacological applications, with special focus on the development of new optical imaging probes in order to overcome the strong absorption introduced by different tissue components, especially hemoglobin, and the development of multimodal imaging systems in order to overcome the resolution limitations imposed by scattering. PMID:26441646

  15. Carbon Dioxide Laser Fiber Optics In Endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Terry A.

    1982-12-01

    Carbon dioxide laser surgery has been limited to a great extent to surgical application on the integument and accessible cavities such as the cervix, vagina, oral cavities, etc. This limitation has been due to the rigid delivery systems available to all carbon dioxide lasers. Articulating arms (series of hollow tubes connected by articulating mirrors) have provided an effective means of delivery of laser energy to the patient as long as the lesion was within the direct line of sight. Even direct line-of-sight applications were restricted to physical dimension of the articulating arm or associated hand probes, manipulators and hollow tubes. The many attempts at providing straight endoscopic systems to the laser only stressed the need for a fiber optic capable of carrying the carbon dioxide laser wavelength. Rectangular and circular hollow metal waveguides, hollow dielectric waveguides have proven ineffective to the stringent requirements of a flexible surgical delivery system. One large diameter (1 cm) fiber optic delivery system, incorporates a toxic thalliumAbased fiber optic material. The device is an effective alternative to an articulating arm for external or conventional laser surgery, but is too large and stiff to use as a flexible endoscopic tool. The author describes the first highly flexible inexpensive series of fiber optic systems suitable for either conventional or endoscopic carbon dioxide laser surgery. One system (IRFLEX 3) has been manufactured by Medlase, Inc. for surgical uses capable of delivering 2000w, 100 mJ pulsed energy and 15w continuous wave. The system diameter is 0.035 inches in diameter. Surgically suitable fibers as small as 120 um have been manufactured. Other fibers (IRFLEX 142,447) have a variety of transmission characteristics, bend radii, etc.

  16. Lasers and space optical systems study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Concetto; Annaballi, Angela L.

    1998-01-01

    The Air Force and other government organizations have considered the application of space-based lasers since the early 1970s. Recent studies have identified the enormous potential of lasers and optical systems in space to support the Full-Spectrum Dominance envisioned by the Joint Chiefs of Staff in ``Joint Vision 2010.'' The Air Force Research Laboratory has undertaken the LAsers and S_pace O_ptical S_ystems (LASSOS) Study to examine in detail how space lasers and optics (defined as any laser system based in space or any terrestrial-based laser whose beam transits space) could best be used to satisfy this critical need. This twelve-month study will identify promising technology concepts for space laser/optic systems, develop system concepts based on these technologies with special emphasis on systems capable of performing multiple missions, assess how well these systems can accomplish operational tasks in a quantitative manner, and design technology development roadmaps for selected concepts. Since work on the study had commenced only days before the publication deadline, this manuscript is necessarily limited to a description of the background, motivation, and organization of the study. The ``Concept Definition'' phase of the study is scheduled to be completed by the time of the STAIF conference. By that time, study participants will have identified key concepts that best satisfy criteria for timely and cost-effective augmentation of combat capability. A final report, which will be made available to authorized recipients, will be written after completion of the study in August 1998.

  17. Chemical Approaches for Advanced Optical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhixing

    Advances in optical microscopy have been constantly expanding our knowledge of biological systems. The achievements therein are a result of close collaborations between physicists/engineers who build the imaging instruments and chemists/biochemists who design the corresponding probe molecules. In this work I present a number of chemical approaches for the development of advanced optical imaging methods. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the recent advances of novel imaging approaches taking advantage of chemical tag technologies. Chapter 2 describes the second-generation covalent trimethoprim-tag as a viable tool for live cell protein-specific labeling and imaging. In Chapter 3 we present a fluorescence lifetime imaging approach to map protein-specific micro-environment in live cells using TMP-Cy3 as a chemical probe. In Chapter 4, we present a method harnessing photo-activatable fluorophores to extend the fundamental depth limit in multi-photon microscopy. Chapter 5 describes the development of isotopically edited alkyne palette for multi-color live cell vibrational imaging of cellular small molecules. These studies exemplify the impact of modern chemical approaches in the development of advanced optical microscopies.

  18. Acousto-optic filter for electronic laser tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    Electronically tunable lithium niobate filter utilizes acoustic-optic diffraction for tuning laser to desired frequencies. Filter placed inside laser cavity diffracts incident optical signal of one polarization into orthogonal polarization by collinearly propagating acoustic beam to desired wavelength.

  19. Simplified Optics and Controls for Laser Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Hemmati, Hamid

    2006-01-01

    A document discusses an architecture of a spaceborne laser communication system that provides for a simplified control subsystem that stabilizes the line of sight in a desired direction. Heretofore, a typical design for a spaceborne laser communication system has called for a high-bandwidth control loop, a steering mirror and associated optics, and a fast steering-mirror actuator to stabilize the line of sight in the presence of vibrations. In the present architecture, the need for this fast steering-mirror subsystem is eliminated by mounting the laser-communication optics on a disturbance-free platform (DFP) that suppresses coupling of vibrations to the optics by 60 dB. Taking advantage of microgravitation, in the DFP, the optical assembly is free-flying relative to the rest of the spacecraft, and a low-spring-constant pointing control subsystem exerts small forces to regulate the position and orientation of the optics via voice coils. All steering is effected via the DFP, which can be controlled in all six degrees of freedom relative to the spacecraft. A second control loop, closed around a position sensor and the spacecraft attitude-control system, moves the spacecraft as needed to prevent mechanical contact with the optical assembly.

  20. Optical Fiber Sensors for Advanced Civil Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Marten Johannes Cornelius

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation is to develop, analyze, and implement optical fiber-based sensors for the nondestructive quantitative evaluation of advanced civil structures. Based on a comparative evaluation of optical fiber sensors that may be used to obtain quantitative information related to physical perturbations in the civil structure, the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) optical fiber sensor is selected as the most attractive sensor. The operation of the EFPI sensor is explained using the Kirchhoff diffraction approach. As is shown in this dissertation, this approach better predicts the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of gap length than methods employed previously. The performance of the optical fiber sensor is demonstrated in three different implementations. In the first implementation, performed with researchers in the Civil Engineering Department at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, optical fiber sensors were used to obtain quantitative strain information from reinforced concrete interior and exterior column-to-beam connections. The second implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the United States Bureau of Mines in Spokane, Washington, used optical fiber sensors to monitor the performance of roof bolts used in mines. The last implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the Turner-Fairbanks Federal Highway Administration Research Center in McLean, Virginia, used optical fiber sensors, attached to composite prestressing strands used for reinforcing concrete, to obtain absolute strain information. Multiplexing techniques including time, frequency and wavelength division multiplexing are briefly discussed, whereas the principles of operation of spread spectrum and optical time domain reflectometery (OTDR) are discussed in greater detail. Results demonstrating that spread spectrum and OTDR techniques can be used to multiplex optical fiber sensors are presented. Finally, practical

  1. Advancements in integrated structural/thermal/optical (STOP) analysis of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckel, Gerhard; Crompton, David; Perron, Gerard

    2007-09-01

    Applications involving optical systems with a variety of transient loading conditions in conjunction with tight optical error budgets require new tools to assess system performance accurately and quickly. For example, an optical telescope in geostationary orbit (e.g.: laser communications or weather satellite) may be required to maintain excellent optical performance with sun intermittently crossing near, or even within the telescope's field of view. To optimize the design, the designer would wish to analyze a large number of time steps through the orbit without sacrificing accuracy of the results. Historically, shortcuts have been taken to make the analysis effort manageable: contributing errors are combined in a root-sum-squared fashion; non-linear optical sensitivities to optical motions are made linear; and the surface deformation of non-circular optics and/or footprints are fit with zernike polynomials. L-3 SSG-Tinsley presents a method that eliminates these errors while allowing very fast processing of many cases. The method uses a software application that interfaces with both structural and optical analysis codes, and achieves raytrace-generated results from the optical model. This technique is shown to provide more accurate results than previous methods, as well as provide critical insights into the performance of the system that may be exploited in the design process. Results from the Advanced Baseline Imager ABI telescope are presented as an example.

  2. Optical turbulence in fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2014-03-15

    We analyze the nonlinear stage of modulation instability in passively mode-locked fiber lasers leading to chaotic or noise-like emission. We present the phase-transition diagram among different regimes of chaotic emission in terms of the key cavity parameters: amplitude or phase turbulence, and spatio-temporal intermittency. PMID:24690788

  3. Advance lightpath provisioning in interdomain optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafid, A.; Maach, A.; Khair, M. G.; Drissi, J.

    2005-11-01

    In interconnected optical networks, users submit lightpath requests at the time they wish to establish the lightpath. The service provider consults the information gathered by the interdomain routing protocols for available resources. For each request, the network must decide immediately whether to accept or reject the request. In this model, there is always the uncertainty of whether the user will be able to establish the desired lightpath at the desired time or not. Furthermore, in the context of a number of applications, e.g., grid applications, users need to set up lightpaths in advance to perform their activities that are planned in advance. We propose a new interdomain routing protocol called Advance Optical Routing Border Gateway Protocol (AORBGP) and a scheme that allows the setup of interdomain lightpaths in advance. AORBGP allows gathering information about interdomain paths and availability of wavelengths in the future. The proposed advance lightpath setup scheme makes use of AORBGP to get information about available resources (i.e., wavelengths) required to process lightpath setup requests. One of the key innovations of the scheme is that it provides the user with alternatives, carefully selected, when his or her request cannot be accommodated because of resource shortages. Indeed, the scheme provides the user with options to set up a lightpath later than the requested start time or with shorter duration than the requested duration. We performed a set of simulations to evaluate the benefits of the proposed scheme and the effect of a number of parameters on the performance of AORBGP.

  4. Advanced optical blade tip clearance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, M. J.; Honeycutt, R. E.; Nordlund, R. E.; Robinson, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced electro-optical system was developed to measure single blade tip clearances and average blade tip clearances between a rotor and its gas path seal in an operating gas turbine engine. This system is applicable to fan, compressor, and turbine blade tip clearance measurement requirements, and the system probe is particularly suitable for operation in the extreme turbine environment. A study of optical properties of blade tips was conducted to establish measurement system application limitations. A series of laboratory tests was conducted to determine the measurement system's operational performance characteristics and to demonstrate system capability under simulated operating gas turbine environmental conditions. Operational and environmental performance test data are presented.

  5. Excimer laser machining of optical fiber taps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyle, Richard J.; Serafino, Anthony J.; Grimes, Gary J.; Bortolini, James R.

    1991-05-01

    Precision openings for construction of an optical backplane have been machined in an optical fiber using an excimer laser operating at a wavelength of 193 nm. The openings were made by imaging the laser beam onto the polymer fiber cladding with a telescope, then ablating the cladding with a sufficient number of pulses to expose the core. Circular openings measuring 250 and 625 microns and elliptical openings measuring 650 X 350 microns have been made in the cladding of a 1 mm polymer-clad silica fiber. Examination by scanning electron microscopy reveals that the best quality openings are obtained with either the smaller circular geometry or the elliptical geometry. For various reasons, elliptical openings, with the major axis oriented along the longitudinal axis of the fiber, appear more suitable for tap construction. Individual optical fiber taps have been constructed by attaching a tap fiber to a laser machined opening in a central fiber using an ultraviolet-curable acralate. Individual tap measurements were made on the elliptical and the 250 micron circular openings. In addition, a triple tap assembly was made using elliptical tap openings. These results indicate that the excimer laser machining technique may be applicable to the construction of a linear tapped bus for optical backplanes.

  6. Miniaturized symmetrization optics for junction laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Jacob M. (Inventor); Kaiser, Charlie J. (Inventor); Neil, Clyde C. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Miniaturized optics comprising transverse and lateral cylindrical lenses composed of millimeter-sized rods with diameters, indices-of-refraction and spacing such that substantially all the light emitted as an asymmetrical beam from the emitting junction of the laser is collected and translated to a symmetrical beam.

  7. Electro-Optical Laser Technology. Curriculum Utilization. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawn, John H.

    This report describes a program to prepare students for employment as laser technicians and laser operators and to ensure that they have the necessary skills required by the industry. The objectives are to prepare a curriculum and syllabus for an associate degree program in Electro-Optical Laser Technology. The 2-year Electro-Optical Laser program…

  8. Ultrahigh-Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography Using Femtosecond Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, J. G.; Aguirre, A. D.; Chen, Y.; Herz, P. R.; Hsiung, P.-L.; Ko, T. H.; Nishizawa, N.; Kärtner, F. X.

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging optical imaging modality for biomedical research and clinical medicine. OCT can perform high resolution, cross-sectional tomographic imaging in materials and biological systems by measuring the echo time delay and magnitude of backreflected or backscattered light [1]. In medical applications, OCT has the advantage that imaging can be performed in situ and in real time, without the need to remove and process specimens as in conventional excisional biopsy and histopathology. OCT can achieve axial image resolutions of 1 to 15 μm; one to two orders of magnitude higher than standard ultrasound imaging. The image resolution in OCT is determined by the coherence length of the light source and is inversely proportional to its bandwidth. Femtosecond lasers can generate extremely broad bandwidths and have enabled major advances in ultrahigh-resolution OCT imaging. This chapter provides an overview of OCT technology and ultrahigh-resolution OCT imaging using femtosecond lasers.

  9. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications (AVLOC) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A series of optical communication experiments between a high altitude aircraft at 18.3 km (60,000 ft) and a ground station were conducted by NASA from summer 1972 through winter 1973. The basic system was an optical tracker and transmitter located in each terminal. The aircraft transceiver consisted of a 5-mW HeNe laser transmitter with a 30-megabit modulator. The ground station beacon was an argon laser operating at 488 nm. A separate pulsed laser radar was used for initial acquisition. The objective of the experiment was to obtain engineering data on the precision tracking and communication system performance at both terminals. Atmospheric effects on the system performance was also an experiment objective. The system description, engineering analysis, testing, and flight results are discussed.

  10. Airborne visible laser optical communication experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A series of optical communication experiments between a high altitude aircraft at 18.3 km (60,000 ft) and a ground station are planned by NASA in the summer of 1972. The basic concept is that an optical tracker and transmitter will be located in each terminal. The aircraft transceiver consists of a 5-mW HeNe laser transmitter with a 30-megabit modulator. The ground station beacon is an argon laser operating at 488 nm. A separate pulsed laser radar is used for initial acquisition. The objective of the experiment is to obtain engineering data on the precision tracking and communication system performance at both terminals. Atmospheric effects on the system performance are of prime importance.

  11. Optical design of laser transmission system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yulan; Feng, Jinliang; Li, Yongliang; Yang, Jiandong

    1998-08-01

    This paper discusses a design of optical transfer system used in carbon-dioxide laser therapeutic machine. The design of this system is according to the requirement of the therapeutic machine. The therapeutic machine requires the movement of laser transfer system is similar to the movement of human beings arms, which possesses 7 rotating hinges. We use optical hinges, which is composed of 45 degree mirrors. Because the carbon-dioxide laser mode is not good, light beam diameter at focus and divergence angle dissemination are big, we use a collecting lens at the transfer system output part in order to make the light beam diameter at focus in 0.2 to approximately 0.3 mm. For whole system the focus off-axis error is less than 0.5 mm, the transfer power consumption is smaller than 10%. The system can move in three dimension space freely and satisfies the therapeutic machine requirement.

  12. Advanced laser stratospheric monitoring systems analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the software support supplied by Systems and Applied Sciences Corporation for the study of Advanced Laser Stratospheric Monitoring Systems Analyses under contract No. NAS1-15806. This report discusses improvements to the Langley spectroscopic data base, development of LHS instrument control software and data analyses and validation software. The effect of diurnal variations on the retrieved concentrations of NO, NO2 and C L O from a space and balloon borne measurement platform are discussed along with the selection of optimum IF channels for sensing stratospheric species from space.

  13. Advancements in metro optical network architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschis, Loukas

    2005-02-01

    This paper discusses the innovation in network architectures, and optical transport, that enables metropolitan networks to cost-effectively scale to hundreds Gb/s of capacity, and to hundreds km of reach, and to also meet the diverse service needs of enterprise and residential applications. A converged metro network, where Ethernet/IP services, and traditional TDM traffic operate over an intelligent WDM transport layer is increasingly becoming the most attractive architecture addressing the primary need of network operators for significantly improved capital and operational network cost. At the same time, this converged network has to leverage advanced technology, and introduce intelligence in order to significantly improve the deployment and manageability of WDM transport. The most important system advancements and the associated technology innovations that enhance the cost-effectiveness of metropolitan optical networks are being reviewed.

  14. Recent advances in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhihua; Wang, Chuan; Shen, Yi; Huang, Liangming; Wu, Lan; Du, Chixin

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports recent advances in spectral domain Doppler optical coherence tomography (SD-DOCT) in our group. A high speed SD-DOCT system is developed and applied to animal study and microchip evaluation. Further improvements concerning SD-DOCT are presented, those including higher-order cross-correlation for phase retrieval, transit-time analysis for velocity quantification, and orthogonal dispersive SD-OCT for depth extension.

  15. Compact multipass optical cell for laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tuzson, Béla; Mangold, Markus; Looser, Herbert; Manninen, Albert; Emmenegger, Lukas

    2013-02-01

    A multipass cell (MPC) design for laser absorption spectroscopy is presented. The development of this new type of optical cell was driven by stringent criteria for compactness, robustness, low volume, and ease of use in optical systems. A single piece of reflective toroidal surface forms a near-concentric cavity with a volume of merely 40 cm(3). Contrary to traditional MPCs, this design allows for flexible path-length adjustments by simply changing the aiming angle of the laser beam at the entrance window. Two effective optical path lengths of 2.2 and 4.1 m were chosen to demonstrate the cell's suitability for high-precision isotope ratio measurements of CO(2) at 1% and ambient mixing ratio levels. PMID:23381403

  16. Laser-driven polyplanar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L.; Beiser, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte-black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 200 milliwatt green solid-state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the DLP chip, the optomechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  17. Optical design for laser Doppler angular encoder with sub-nanoradian sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Alp, E.E.; Barraza, J.; Kuzay, T.M.; Mooney, T.

    1997-09-01

    A novel laser angular encoder system has been developed based on the principles of radar, the Doppler effect, optical heterodyning, and self aligning multiple reflection optics. Using this novel three dimensional multiple reflection optical path, a 10 to 20 times better resolution has been reached compared to commercially available laser Doppler displacement meters or laser interferometer systems. With the new angular encoder, sub-nanoradian resolution has been attained in the 8 degree measuring range in a compact setup about 60 mm (H) x 150 mm (W) x 370 mm (L) in size for high energy resolution applications at the Advanced Photon Source undulator beamline 3-ID.

  18. Optical metrology devices for high-power laser large optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurios, J.; Bouillet, S.; Gaborit, G.; Poncetta, J. C.

    2007-06-01

    High power laser systems such as the LMJ laser or the LIL laser, its prototype, require large optical components with very strict and various specifications. Technologies used for the fabrication of these components are now usually compatible of such specifications, but need the implementation at the providers' sites of different kind of metrology like interferometry, photometry, surface inspection, etc., systematically performed on the components. So, during the production for the LIL and now for the LMJ, CEA has also equipped itself with a wide range of specific metrology devices used to verify the effective quality of these large optics. These various systems are now used to characterize and validate the LMJ vendors' processes or to perform specific controls dedicated to analyzes which are going further than the simple "quality control" of the component (mechanical mount effect, environment effect, ageing effect,...). After a short introduction on the LMJ laser and corresponding optical specifications for components, we will focus on different metrology devices concerning interferometry and photometry measurements or surface inspection. These systems are individually illustrated here by the mean of different results obtained during controls done in the last few years.

  19. Optically pumped planar waveguide lasers: Part II: Gain media, laser systems, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivas, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The field of optically pumped planar waveguide lasers has seen a rapid development over the last two decades driven by the requirements of a range of applications. This sustained research effort has led to the demonstration of a large variety of miniature highly efficient laser sources by combining different gain media and resonator geometries. One of the most attractive features of waveguide lasers is the broad range of regimes that they can operate, spanning from continuous wave and single frequency through to the generation of femtosecond pulses. Furthermore, their technology has experienced considerable advances to provide increased output power levels, deriving benefits from the relative immunity from the heat generated in the gain medium during laser operation and the use of cladding-pumped architectures. This second part of the review on optically pumped planar waveguide lasers provides a snapshot of the state-of-the-art research in this field in terms of gain materials, laser system designs, and as well as a perspective on the status of their application as real devices in various research areas.

  20. Endoscopic laser palliation for advanced malignant dysphagia.

    PubMed Central

    Bown, S G; Hawes, R; Matthewson, K; Swain, C P; Barr, H; Boulos, P B; Clark, C G

    1987-01-01

    Palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia aims to optimise swallowing for the maximum time possible with the minimum of general distress to these seriously ill patients. Thirty four patients considered unsuitable for surgery because of advanced malignancy, other major pathology or in whom previous surgery had been unsuccessful were treated endoscopically with the Nd YAG laser. Significant improvement was achieved in 29 (85%). On a scale of 0-4 (0 = normal swallowing; 4 = dysphagia for all fluids), mean improvement was 1.7, with 25 patients (74%) able to swallow most, or all solids after treatment. With increasing experience, the average number of treatment sessions required for each patient became less; initial time in hospital became comparable to that needed for intubation. Failures were caused by inappropriate patient selection (3), or laser related perforation (2). The mean survival in the whole group was 19 weeks (range 2-44). Eighteen patients needed further treatment for recurrent dysphagia, a mean of six weeks (range 2-15) after initial therapy. Ten of these responded, but eight eventually required insertion of a prosthetic tube. The duration of good palliation was very variable after initial laser therapy. Images Fig. 3 PMID:2443431

  1. Catadioptric Optics for laser Doppler velocimeter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    In the design of a laser velocimeter system, attention must be given to the performance of the optical elements in their two principal tasks: focusing laser radiation into the probe volume, and collecting the scattered light. For large aperture applications, custom lens design and fabrication costs, long optical path requirements, and chromatic aberration (for two color operation) can be problematic. The adaptation of low cost Schmidt-Cassegrain astronomical telescopes to perform these laser beam manipulation and scattered light collection tasks is examined. A generic telescope design is analyzed using ray tracing and Gaussian beam propagation theory, and a simple modification procedure for converting from infinite to near unity conjugate ratio operation with image quality near the diffraction limit was identified. Modification requirements and performance are predicted for a range of geometries. Finally, a 200-mm-aperture telescope was modified for f/10 operation; performance data for this modified optic for both laser beam focusing and scattered light collection tasks agree well with predictions.

  2. Adaptive optics and laser guide stars at Lick observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J.M.

    1994-11-15

    For the past several years LLNL has been developing adaptive optics systems for correction of both atmospheric turbulence effects and thermal distortions in optics for high-power lasers. Our early work focused on adaptive optics for beam control in laser isotope separation and ground-based free electron lasers. We are currently developing innovative adaptive optics and laser systems for sodium laser guide star applications at the University of California`s Lick and Keck Observeratories. This talk will describe our adaptive optics technology and some of its applications in high-resolution imaging and beam control.

  3. Laser action by optically depumping lower states

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for obtaining laser action between an upper energy level and a lower energy level of a gaseous medium, which comprises populating the upper energy level to some degree (short of achieving a conventional inverted population) by any suitable pumping means, and thereafter establishing an inverted population by transiently and selectively depumping the lower energy level such as by exposing the medium to an intense source of radiation which selectively causes the transformation of the lower energy level species to some other energy level. Thus, a thermally pumped/optically depumped gas laser system is produced.

  4. Laser action by optically depumping lower states

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-11-26

    A method and apparatus are described for obtaining laser action between an upper energy level and a lower energy level of a gaseous medium. The upper energy level is populated to some degree (short of achieving a conventional inverted population) by any suitable pumping means, and an inverted population is established by transiently and selectively depumping the lower energy level. The depumping may be done by exposing the medium to an intense source of radiation which selectively causes the transformation of the lower energy level species to some other energy level. Thus, a thermally pumped/optically depumped gas laser system is produced.

  5. Optical isolators for 2-micron fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Gary; Legg, Thomas H.; Shardlow, Peter

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development and testing of optical isolators for use in 2-micron fiber laser systems. A variety of potential Faraday rotator materials were characterised to identify the most suitable materials for use in the 1700-2100nm wavelength range. Isolators based on the three best performing materials were then developed and packaged as fiber-in, fiber-out and fiber-in, beam-out devices. The isolators were then tested in CW, pulsed and ultrafast laser systems. The three different designs produced different performance characteristics, but all designs demonstrated isolation >25dB and insertion losses of <1.2 dB.

  6. Optical materials for space based laser systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.; Armagan, G.; Byvik, C. E.; Albin, S.

    1989-01-01

    The design features and performance characteristics of a sensitized holmium laser applicable to differential lidar and Doppler windshear measurements are presented, giving attention to the optimal choice of sensitizing/activating dopant ions. This development of a 2-micron region eye-safe laser, where holmium is sensitized by either hulium or erbium, has called for interionic energy transfer processes whose rate will not result in gain-switched pulses that are excessively long for atmospheric lidar and Doppler windshear detection. The application of diamond films for optical component hardening is noted.

  7. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.B.; Gallman, P.G.; Slotwinski, A.R.; Wagner, K.; Weaver, S.; Xu, Jieping

    1996-12-31

    This CLVS will provide a substantial advance in high speed computer vision performance to support robotic Environmental Management (EM) operations. This 3D system employs a compact fiber optic based scanner and operator at a 128 x 128 pixel frame at one frame per second with a range resolution of 1 mm over its 1.5 meter working range. Using acousto-optic deflectors, the scanner is completely randomly addressable. This can provide live 3D monitoring for situations where it is necessary to update once per second. This can be used for decontamination and decommissioning operations in which robotic systems are altering the scene such as in waste removal, surface scarafacing, or equipment disassembly and removal. The fiber- optic coherent laser radar based system is immune to variations in lighting, color, or surface shading, which have plagued the reliability of existing 3D vision systems, while providing substantially superior range resolution.

  8. Improved optics for laser light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, H. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Laser light scattering experiments contemplated for use in a microgravity environment must conform to a number of operational constraints which do not apply on Earth. In particular, the use of index matching fluid to control flare is unacceptable. Work to eliminate index matching fluids by the use of high spatial resolution receiving optics is described. By increasing on-axis spatial resolution flare from the sample cell walls (both the cell sample and cell air interfaces) can be effectively prevented from reaching the photodetector. In general, improving the on-axis discrimination degrades the angular resolution of a receiving optical train. Several different possible configurations of receiving optics are compared for their spatial resolution and angular resolution. For cylinder symmetric optics, the dual lens, fourier transform pair, receiving train with a center mask located between the lenses gives the best on-axis spatial resolution.

  9. Femtosecond laser polishing of optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lauren L.; Qiao, Jun; Qiao, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Technologies including magnetorheological finishing and CNC polishing are commonly used to finish optical elements, but these methods are often expensive, generate waste through the use of fluids or abrasives, and may not be suited for specific freeform substrates due to the size and shape of finishing tools. Pulsed laser polishing has been demonstrated as a technique capable of achieving nanoscale roughness while offering waste-free fabrication, material-specific processing through direct tuning of laser radiation, and access to freeform shapes using refined beam delivery and focusing techniques. Nanosecond and microsecond pulse duration radiation has been used to perform successful melting-based polishing of a variety of different materials, but this approach leads to extensive heat accumulation resulting in subsurface damage. We have experimentally investigated the ability of femtosecond laser radiation to ablate silicon carbide and silicon. By substituting ultrafast laser radiation, polishing can be performed by direct evaporation of unwanted surface asperities with minimal heating and melting, potentially offering damage-free finishing of materials. Under unoptimized laser processing conditions, thermal effects can occur leading to material oxidation. To investigate these thermal effects, simulation of the heat accumulation mechanism in ultrafast laser ablation was performed. Simulations have been extended to investigate the optimum scanning speed and pulse energy required for processing various substrates. Modeling methodologies and simulation results will be presented.

  10. Electro-optic and acousto-optic laser beam scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heberle, Johannes; Bechtold, Peter; Strauß, Johannes; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Electro-optical deflectors (EOD) and acousto-optical deflectors (AOD) are based on deflection of laser light within a solid state medium. As they do not contain any moving parts, they yield advantages compared to mechanical scanners which are conventionally used for laser beam deflection. Even for arbitrary scan paths high feed rates can be achieved. In this work the principles of operation and characteristic properties of EOD and AOD are presented. Additionally, a comparison to mirror based mechanical deflectors regarding deflection angles, speed and accuracy is made in terms of resolvable spots and the rate of resolvable spots. Especially, the latter one is up to one order of magnitude higher for EOD and AOD systems compared to conventional systems. Further characteristic properties such as response time, damage threshold, efficiency and beam distortions are discussed. Solid state laser beam deflectors are usually characterized by small deflection angles but high angular deflection velocities. As mechanical deflectors exhibit opposite properties an arrangement of a mechanical scanner combined with a solid state deflector provides a solution with the benefits of both systems. As ultrashort pulsed lasers with average power above 100 W and repetition rates in the MHz range have been available for several years this approach can be applied to fully exploit their capabilities. Thereby, pulse overlap can be reduced and by this means heat affected zones are prevented to provide proper processing results.

  11. Laser tomography adaptive optics: a performance study.

    PubMed

    Tatulli, Eric; Ramaprakash, A N

    2013-12-01

    We present an analytical derivation of the on-axis performance of adaptive optics systems using a given number of guide stars of arbitrary altitude, distributed at arbitrary angular positions in the sky. The expressions of the residual error are given for cases of both continuous and discrete turbulent atmospheric profiles. Assuming Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing with circular apertures, we demonstrate that the error is formally described by integrals of products of three Bessel functions. We compare the performance of adaptive optics correction when using natural, sodium, or Rayleigh laser guide stars. For small diameter class telescopes (≲5 m), we show that a small number of Rayleigh beacons can provide similar performance to that of a single sodium laser, for a lower overall cost of the instrument. For bigger apertures, using Rayleigh stars may not be such a suitable alternative because of the too severe cone effect that drastically degrades the quality of the correction. PMID:24323009

  12. Pre-stabilized Lasers for Advanced Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, C.-Nary

    Gravitational wave detectors need very stable continuous wave laser sources able to delivering high power beams. Realization of those lasers is a special R&D calling on very low noise controls on very reliable laser sources. After a brief introduction on the laser principles, we review the current laser sources for gravitational wave interferometric detectors, shortly describing the technologies of both solid-state and fiber lasers and amplifiers. A final section addresses the issue of laser pre-stabilization.

  13. Picosecond electron-optic diagnostics in laser studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, A. M.

    The papers included in this volume provide an overview of research aimed at the development of methods and instrumentation for ultrahigh-speed electron-optic detection and of their applications in laser physics, laser fusion, fiber-optic communication, picosecond spectroscopy, and photobiology. Topics discussed include the physics of a picosecond electron-optic converter, the aberration theory for cathode lenses, picosecond and subpicosecond laser sources, and a beam deflection system for a subpicosecond electron-optic converter.

  14. Guide star lasers for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, William Thomas, Jr.

    Exploitation of the imaging capabilities of the new generation of ground-based astronomical telescopes relies heavily on Adaptive Optics (AO). Current AO system designs call for sodium guide star lasers capable of producing at least eight Watts of power tuned to the peak of the sodium D2 line, with a high duty cycle to avoid saturation, and with 0.5-1.0 GHz spectral broadening. This work comprises development and testing of six candidate laser systems and materials which may afford a path to achieving these goals. An end-pumped CW dye laser producing 4.0 Watts of tuned output power was developed and used to obtain the first accurate measurement of sodium layer scattering efficiency. Methods of optimizing the laser output through improving pump overlap efficiency and reducing the number of intracavity scattering surfaces are covered. The 1181 nm fluorescence peak of Mn5+ ion in Ba5 (PO4)3Cl could be tuned and doubled to reach 589 nm. While efforts to grow this crystal were under way, the Mn5+ ion in natural apatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) was studied as a potential laser material. Fluorescence saturation measurements and transmission saturation are presented, as well as efforts to obtain CW lasing in natural apatite. A Q-switched laser color-center laser in LiF : F-2 was developed and successfully tuned and doubled to the sodium D 2 line. Broad-band lasing of 80 mW and tuned narrow-band lasing of 35 mW at 1178 nm were obtained with 275 mW of input pump power at 1064 nm. The measured thermal properties of this material indicate its potential for scaling to much higher power. A Q-switched intracavity Raman laser was developed in which CaWO 4 was used to shift a Nd:YAG laser, the frequency-doubled output of which was centered at 589.3 nm. To obtain light at 589.0 nm, a compositionally tuned pump laser of Nd : Y3Ga1.1Al3.9O 12 was produced which generated the desired shift, but was inhomogeneous broadened, limiting the tunable power of the material. Finally, temperature tuning of

  15. Final report on LDRD project : advanced optical trigger systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Roose, Lars D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Mar, Alan; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas M.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Montano, Victoria A.

    2008-09-01

    Advanced optically-activated solid-state electrical switch development at Sandia has demonstrated multi-kA/kV switching and the path for scalability to even higher current/power. Realization of this potential requires development of new optical sources/switches based on key Sandia photonic device technologies: vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been used to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. In VCSEL arrays, adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and are lithographically patterned to the required dimensions. We have demonstrated multiple-line filament triggering using VCSEL arrays to approximate line generation. These arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs have fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. Using these arrays, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices. Photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices offer advantages of high voltage operation (multi-kV), optical isolation, triggering with laser pulses that cannot occur accidentally in nature, low cost, high speed, small size, and radiation hardness. PCSS devices are candidates for an assortment of potential applications that require multi-kA switching of current. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been demonstrated to trigger multiple filaments, but they

  16. Optical properties of laser spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova-Ulmane, Nina; Skvortsova, Vera; Smirnovs, Andrejs; Riekstinya, Daina; Litvinov, L.; Sildos, Ilmo; Osvet, Andris

    1997-02-01

    The present work summarizes the results of absorption and luminescence spectra investigation of natural and synthetic magnesium aluminum spinels (MgO*nAl2O3) containing chromium and manganese ions. The spectra have been analyzed with an aim to determine the effect of stoichiometry 'n' on distribution of emitting ions. The Mn2+ is observed in both tetrahedral and octahedral coordinations providing green or orange emission. Absorption bands have been explained in terms of the Mn2+ configuration model. Laser excitation of chromium-comprising magnesium aluminum spinel crystals has been carried out at 7 K with the purpose to detect the nearest neighbors of Cr3+ ions. Luminescence emission spectra have been obtained for natural sample and three synthetic samples (MgO*nAl2O3, n equals 1, 2, 2.8). Decay time has been measured at different wavelengths and compared for crystals of different stoichiometry. In case n equals 2 or 2.8, computer simulation has been used to decompose smeared luminescence spectra in the 680 - 700 nm region. Gaussian curves corresponding to R- and N-lines of natural spinel spectrum have been applied as components in the calculations of nonstoichiometric spinel spectra. This suggests that there aren't normally arranged Cr-occupied octahedral positions in nonstoichiometric spinel (n equals 2.8, e.g.).

  17. Pulsed laser damage to optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Gillies, G.T.; Magnuson, D.W.; Pagano, T.S.

    1985-10-01

    This paper describes some observations of pulsed laser damage to optical fibers with emphasis on a damage mode characterized as a linear fracture along the outer core of a fiber. Damage threshold data are presented which illustrate the effects of the focusing lens, end-surface preparation, and type of fiber. An explanation based on fiber-beam misalignment is given and is illustrated by a simple experiment and ray trace.

  18. Precision laser range finder system design for Advanced Technology Laboratory applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, K. E.; Kohn, R. L.; Seib, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    Preliminary system design of a pulsed precision ruby laser rangefinder system is presented which has a potential range resolution of 0.4 cm when atmospheric effects are negligible. The system being proposed for flight testing on the advanced technology laboratory (ATL) consists of a modelocked ruby laser transmitter, course and vernier rangefinder receivers, optical beacon retroreflector tracking system, and a network of ATL tracking retroreflectors. Performance calculations indicate that spacecraft to ground ranging accuracies of 1 to 2 cm are possible.

  19. Key optical components for spaceborne lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhring, J.; Winzen, M.; Faidel, H.; Miesner, J.; Plum, D.; Klein, J.; Fitzau, O.; Giesberts, M.; Brandenburg, W.; Seidel, A.; Schwanen, N.; Riesters, D.; Hengesbach, S.; Hoffmann, H.-D.

    2016-03-01

    Spaceborne lidar (light detection and ranging) systems have a large potential to become powerful instruments in the field of atmospheric research. Obviously, they have to be in operation for about three years without any maintenance like readjusting. Furthermore, they have to withstand strong temperature cycles typically in the range of -30 to +50 °C as well as mechanical shocks and vibrations, especially during launch. Additionally, the avoidance of any organic material inside the laser box is required, particularly in UV lasers. For atmospheric research pulses of about several 10 mJ at repetition rates of several 10 Hz are required in many cases. Those parameters are typically addressed by DPSSL that comprise components like: laser crystals, nonlinear crystals in pockels cells, faraday isolators and frequency converters, passive fibers, diode lasers and of course a lot of mirrors and lenses. In particular, some components have strong requirements regarding their tilt stability that is often in the 10 μrad range. In most of the cases components and packages that are used for industrial lasers do not fulfil all those requirements. Thus, the packaging of all these key components has been developed to meet those specifications only making use of metal and ceramics beside the optical component itself. All joints between the optical component and the laser baseplate are soldered or screwed. No clamps or adhesives are used. Most of the critical properties like tilting after temperature cycling have been proven in several tests. Currently, these components are used to build up first prototypes for spaceborne systems.

  20. Optically (solar) pumped oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, O. B.; Zhevlakov, A. P.; Yur'ev, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of theoretical and experimental studies demonstrating the possibility of developing an oxygen-iodine laser (OIL) with direct optical pumping of molecular oxygen involving inter-molecular interaction with charge transfer from donor molecule (buffer gas) to acceptor molecule (oxygen). This interaction lifts degeneracy of the lower energy states of molecular oxygen and increases its absorption cross section in the visible spectral region and the UV Herzberg band, where high quantum yield of singlet oxygen is achieved (QY ˜ 1 and QY ˜ 2, respectively) at the same time. A pulse-periodic optical pump sources with pulse energy of ˜50 kJ, pulse duration of ˜25 μs, and repetition rate of ˜10 Hz, which are synchronized with the mechanism of singlet oxygen generation, are developed. This allows implementation of a pulse-periodic oxygen-iodine laser with an efficiency of ˜25%, optical efficiency of ˜40%, and parameter L/ T ˜ 1/1.5, where T is the thermal energy released in the laser active medium upon generation of energy L. It is demonstrated that, under direct solar pumping of molecular oxygen, the efficiency parameter of the OIL can reach L/ T ˜ 1/0.8 in a wide range of scaling factors.

  1. Femtosecond laser enabled keratoplasty for advanced keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Yathish; Nagaraja, Harsha; Kugar, Thungappa; Shetty, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and advantages of femtosecond laser enabled keratoplasty (FLEK) over conventional penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) in advanced keratoconus. Materials and Methods: Detailed review of literature of published randomized controlled trials of operative techniques in PKP and FLEK. Results: Fifteen studies were identified, analyzed, and compared with our outcome. FLEK was found to have better outcome in view of better and earlier stabilization uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and better refractive outcomes with low astigmatism as compared with conventional PKP. Wound healing also was noticed to be earlier, enabling early suture removal in FLEK. Conclusions: Studies relating to FLEK have shown better results than conventional PKP, however further studies are needed to assess the safety and intraoperative complications of the procedure. PMID:23925340

  2. Optical Pattern Generator Using Excimer Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Bernhard F.

    1988-01-01

    Reticles (masks on enlarged scale) are needed for optical pattern transfer in the production of integrated semiconductor circuits. In order to meet present requirements for 5X reticles only a direct writing technique is feasible. This means direct exposing of photoresist either with light or an electron beam. Many of todays highly dense reticles require some 10 5 to 10 6 discrete exposures when generated with an optical pattern generator. Optical pattern generators normally use mercury arc lamps to expose positive photoresist, which in turn need 200 milliseconds for each of these discrete exposures, thus requiring to stop the table at every exposure position ("stop and go" mode). This results in running times of several days per reticle. Therefore most reticles are nowadays being manufactured with very expensive e-beam machines. In the early 80's we started the first experiments to expose photoresist with an excimer laser. In order to obtain the maximum gain in speed, the goal was to operate with only one excimer laser pulse per exposure, so that a fast "flash on the fly" operation with an optical pattern generator became true. Equipping a conventional optical pattern generator with an excimer laser as the light source, it has become possible to expose substrates coated with standard photoresist in the "flash on the fly" mode with only 13 nanoseconds per flash. So the thruput could be increased up to 25 times in comparison to a pattern generator equipped with a mercury lamp. A comparison of both operation modes will show that an immense increase of speed is possible, even when a ten years old M3600 pattern generator is used. This system is in function now with very high reliability since more than three years in our IC development line.

  3. Challenge to advanced materials processing with lasers in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Isamu

    2003-02-01

    Japan is one of the most advanced countries in manufacturing technology, and lasers have been playing an important role for advancement of manufacturing technology in a variety of industrial fields. Contribution of laser materials processing to Japanese industry is significant for both macroprocessing and microprocessing. The present paper describes recent trend and topics of industrial applications in terms of the hardware and the software to show how Japanese industry challenges to advanced materials processing using lasers, and national products related to laser materials processing are also briefly introduced.

  4. Application of repumping laser in optical switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Ayan; Ali, Md. Sabir; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-08-01

    The application of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in high speed optical switching has remained as a key topic in research related to all optical switching. Demonstration of optical switching through EIT realized under ladder (Ξ) level coupling has been reported earlier. Due to narrow linewidth (ГEIT) and low coherent dephasing rate (γ) the EIT needs to be prepared only once to demonstrate such switching action. However, in a Ξ system the EIT is accompanied with double resonance optical pumping (DROP) signal, which is limited by spontaneous decay (Г) rates. It has been shown by our group that the simultaneous presence of DROP-EIT combination paves the way for executing a kind of slow-fast switching action. However the focus always remain on improving the modulation depth in such type of coherence assisted switch. Here we report a possible way to improve modulation depth by using an additional (named 'repumping' after convention used in laser cooling experiments) laser in the Ξ system. The 5S1/2→5P3/2→5D5/2 level coupling scheme of 87Rb atom is used in the current experiment.

  5. Analytical model for ring heater thermal compensation in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

    PubMed

    Ramette, Joshua; Kasprzack, Marie; Brooks, Aidan; Blair, Carl; Wang, Haoyu; Heintze, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Advanced laser interferometer gravitational-wave detectors use high laser power to achieve design sensitivity. A small part of this power is absorbed in the interferometer cavity mirrors where it creates thermal lenses, causing aberrations in the main laser beam that must be minimized by the actuation of "ring heaters," which are additional heater elements that are aimed to reduce the temperature gradients in the mirrors. In this article we derive the first, to the best of our knowledge, analytical model of the temperature field generated by an ideal ring heater. We express the resulting optical aberration contribution to the main laser beam in this axisymmetric case. Used in conjunction with wavefront measurements, our model provides a more complete understanding of the thermal state of the cavity mirrors and will allow a more efficient use of the ring heaters in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory. PMID:27139664

  6. Advanced optical network architecture for integrated digital avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, D. Reed

    1996-12-01

    For the first time in the history of avionics, the network designer now has a choice in selecting the media that interconnects the sources and sinks of digital data on aircraft. Electrical designs are already giving way to photonics in application areas where the data rate times distance product is large or where special design requirements such as low weight or EMI considerations are critical. Future digital avionic architectures will increasingly favor the use of photonic interconnects as network data rates of one gigabit/second and higher are needed to support real-time operation of high-speed integrated digital processing. As the cost of optical network building blocks is reduced and as temperature-rugged laser sources are matured, metal interconnects will be forced to retreat to applications spanning shorter and shorter distances. Although the trend is already underway, the widespread use of digital optics will first occur at the system level, where gigabit/second, real-time interconnects between sensors, processors, mass memories and displays separated by a least of few meters will be required. The application of photonic interconnects for inter-printed wiring board signalling across the backplane will eventually find application for gigabit/second applications since signal degradation over copper traces occurs before one gigabit/second and 0.5 meters are reached. For the foreseeable future however, metal interconnects will continue to be used to interconnect devices on printed wiring boards since 5 gigabit/second signals can be sent over metal up to around 15 centimeters. Current-day applications of optical interconnects at the system level are described and a projection of how advanced optical interconnect technology will be driven by the use of high speed integrated digital processing on future aircraft is presented. The recommended advanced network for application in the 2010 time frame is a fiber-based system with a signalling speed of around 2

  7. Even Illumination from Fiber-Optic-Coupled Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    A method of equipping fiber-optic-coupled laser diodes to evenly illuminate specified fields of view has been proposed. The essence of the method is to shape the tips of the optical fibers into suitably designed diffractive optical elements. One of the main benefits afforded by the method would be more nearly complete utilization of the available light. Diffractive optics is a relatively new field of optics in which laser beams are shaped by use of diffraction instead of refraction.

  8. Plasma and laser kinetics and field emission from carbon nanotube fibers for an Advanced Noble Gas Laser (ANGL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Paul J.; Lockwood, Nathaniel P.; Lange, Matthew A.; Hostutler, David A.; Guild, Eric M.; Guy, Matthew R.; McCord, John E.; Pitz, Greg A.

    2016-03-01

    A metastable argon laser operating at 912 nm has been demonstrated by optically pumping with a pulsed titanium sapphire laser to investigate the temporal dynamics of an Advanced Noble Gas Laser (ANGL). Metastable argon concentrations on the order of 1011 cm-3 were maintained with the use of a radio frequency (RF) capacitively coupled discharge. The end-pumped laser produced output powers under 2 mW of average power with pulse lengths on the order of 100 ns. A comparison between empirical results and a four level laser model using longitudinally average pump and inter-cavity intensities is made. An alternative, highly-efficient method of argon metastable production for ANGL was explored using carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers.

  9. Broad-Area Laser Diode With Fiber-Optic Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazel, Geoffrey; Mead, Patricia; Davis, Christopher; Cornwell, Donald

    1992-01-01

    Fiber-optic injection-locked broad-area laser diode features single-mode output via fiber-optic injection and serves as compact, rugged, high-power near-infrared source. Useful in free-space and fiber-optic communication links, as communication-receiver preamplifier, and pump source for solid-state lasers.

  10. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Pfeiffer, S.; Prędki, P.; Schefer, S.; Schmidt, C.; Wegner, U.; Schlarb, H.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2015-01-20

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.

  11. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; et al

    2015-01-20

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarilymore » by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.« less

  12. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Pfeiffer, S.; Prędki, P.; Schefer, S.; Schmidt, C.; Wegner, U.; Schlarb, H.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses. PMID:25600823

  13. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Pfeiffer, S.; Prędki, P.; Schefer, S.; Schmidt, C.; Wegner, U.; Schlarb, H.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.

  14. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Schulz, S; Grguraš, I; Behrens, C; Bromberger, H; Costello, J T; Czwalinna, M K; Felber, M; Hoffmann, M C; Ilchen, M; Liu, H Y; Mazza, T; Meyer, M; Pfeiffer, S; Prędki, P; Schefer, S; Schmidt, C; Wegner, U; Schlarb, H; Cavalieri, A L

    2015-01-01

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses. PMID:25600823

  15. Recent Advances in Miniaturized Optical Gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Olio, F.; Tatoli, T.; Ciminelli, C.; Armenise, M. N.

    2014-03-01

    Low-cost chip-scale optoelectronic gyroscopes having a resolution ≤ 10 °/h and a good reliability also in harsh environments could have a strong impact on the medium/high performance gyro market, which is currently dominated by well-established bulk optical angular velocity sensors. The R&D activity aiming at the demonstration of those miniaturized sensors is crucial for aerospace/defense industry, and thus it is attracting an increasing research effort and notably funds. In this paper the recent technological advances on the compact optoelectronic gyroscopes with low weight and high energy saving are reviewed. Attention is paid to both the so-called gyroscope-on-a-chip, which is a novel sensor, at the infantile stage, whose optical components are monolithically integrated on a single indium phosphide chip, and to a new ultra-high Q ring resonator for gyro applications with a configuration including a 1D photonic crystal in the resonant path. The emerging field of the gyros based on passive ring cavities, which have already shown performance comparable with that of optical fiber gyros, is also discussed.

  16. Advanced X-ray diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Comamala, J.; Jefimovs, K.; Pilvi, T.; Ritala, M.; Sarkar, S. S.; Solak, H. H.; Guzenko, V. A.; Stampanoni, M.; Marone, F.; Raabe, J.; Tzvetkov, G.; Fink, R. H.; Grolimund, D.; Borca, C. N.; Kaulich, B.; David, C.

    2009-09-01

    X-ray microscopy greatly benefits from the advances in x-ray optics. At the Paul Scherrer Institut, developments in x-ray diffractive optics include the manufacture and optimization of Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) and diffractive optical elements for both soft and hard x-ray regimes. In particular, we demonstrate here a novel method for the production of ultra-high resolution FZPs. This technique is based on the deposition of a zone plate material (iridium) onto the sidewalls of a prepatterned template structure (silicon) by atomic layer deposition. This approach overcomes the limitations due to electron-beam writing of dense patterns in FZP fabrication and provides a clear route to push the resolution into sub-10 nm regime. A FZP fabricated by this method was used to resolve test structures with 12 nm lines and spaces at the scanning transmission x-ray microscope of the PolLux beamline of the Swiss Light Source at 1.2 keV photon energy.

  17. Laser induced damage in optical materials: tenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1979-07-01

    The tenth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 12-14 September 1978. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 175 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning the measurement of absorption characteristics, bulk material properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film damage, coating materials and design, and breakdown phenomena. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was also discussed. In commemoration of the tenth symposium in this series, a number of comprehensive review papers were presented to assess the state of the art in various facets of laser induced damage in optical materials. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The eleventh annual symposium is scheduled for 30-31 October 1979 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20212622

  18. Precision targeting with a tracking adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Bigelow, Chad E.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Ustun, Teoman E.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Hodnett, Harvey M.; Imholte, Michelle L.; Kumru, Semih S.; McCall, Michelle N.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2006-02-01

    Precise targeting of retinal structures including retinal pigment epithelial cells, feeder vessels, ganglion cells, photoreceptors, and other cells important for light transduction may enable earlier disease intervention with laser therapies and advanced methods for vision studies. A novel imaging system based upon scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) with adaptive optics (AO) and active image stabilization was designed, developed, and tested in humans and animals. An additional port allows delivery of aberration-corrected therapeutic/stimulus laser sources. The system design includes simultaneous presentation of non-AO, wide-field (~40 deg) and AO, high-magnification (1-2 deg) retinal scans easily positioned anywhere on the retina in a drag-and-drop manner. The AO optical design achieves an error of <0.45 waves (at 800 nm) over +/-6 deg on the retina. A MEMS-based deformable mirror (Boston Micromachines Inc.) is used for wave-front correction. The third generation retinal tracking system achieves a bandwidth of greater than 1 kHz allowing acquisition of stabilized AO images with an accuracy of ~10 μm. Normal adult human volunteers and animals with previously-placed lesions (cynomolgus monkeys) were tested to optimize the tracking instrumentation and to characterize AO imaging performance. Ultrafast laser pulses were delivered to monkeys to characterize the ability to precisely place lesions and stimulus beams. Other advanced features such as real-time image averaging, automatic highresolution mosaic generation, and automatic blink detection and tracking re-lock were also tested. The system has the potential to become an important tool to clinicians and researchers for early detection and treatment of retinal diseases.

  19. Ultrasonic Technology for Characterizing Laser Damage in Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G; Martin, L P; Chambers, D

    2002-04-30

    An ultrasonic technique was developed to detect and characterize laser damage in critical optics. During normal usage, sub critical flaws induced by high laser fluence can grow to critical size and potentially can cause unanticipated failure of the optics. This ultrasonic technique monitors the optic in situ and provides a quick, reliable way to quantify the location, number and, ultimately, the size of defects that may initiate and grow during firing of the laser. The feasibility of detecting and sizing laser-induced damage with an ultrasonic technology was theoretically and experimentally demonstrated. An experiment was conducted whereby ultrasonic data was acquired in situ on an optic as it was damaged by a laser. This monitoring of laser induced damage clearly demonstrated the potential for ultrasonic monitoring of critical optics for laser-induced damage.

  20. Wave-Chaotic Optical Resonators and Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, A. Douglas

    2001-10-01

    Deformed cylindrical and spherical dielectric optical resonators and lasers are analyzed from the perspective of non-linear dynamics and quantum chaos theory. In the short-wavelength limit such resonators behave like billiard systems with non-zero escape probability due to refraction. A ray model is introduced to predict the resonance lifetimes and emission patterns from such a cavity. A universal wavelength-independent broadening is predicted and found for large deformations of the cavity. However there are significant wave-chaotic corrections to the model which arise from chaos-assisted tunneling and dynamical localization effects. Highly directional emission from lasers based on these resonators is predicted from chaotic "whispering gallery" modes for index of refraction less than two. The detailed nature of the emission pattern can be understood from the nature of the phase-space flow in the billiard, and a dramatic variation of this pattern with index of refraction is found due to an effect we term "dynamical eclipsing". Semiconductor lasers of this type also show highly directional emission and high output power but from different modes associated with periodic orbits, both stable and unstable. A semiclassical approach to these modes is briefly reviewed. These asymmetric resonant cavities (ARCs) show promise as components in future integrated optical devices, providing perhaps the first application of quantum chaos theory.

  1. Grating THz laser with optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Jed; Haji-saeed, Bahareh; Woods, Charles; Kierstead, John

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we present a design for a widely tunable solid-state optically and electrically pumped THz laser based on the Smith-Purcell free-electron laser. In the free-electron laser, an energetic electron beam pumps a metallic grating to generate surface plasmons. Our solid-state optically pumped design consists of a thin layer of dielectic, such as SiNx, sandwiched between a corrugated structure and a thin metal or semiconductor layer. The lower layer is for current streaming, and replaces the electron beam in the original design. The upper layer consists of one micro-grating for coupling the electromagnetic field in, another for coupling out, and a nano-grating for coupling with the current in the lower layer for electromagnetic field generation. The surface plasmon waves generated from the upper layer by an external electromagnetic field, and the lower layer by the applied current, are coupled. Emission enhancement occurs when the plasmonic waves in both layers are resonantly coupled.

  2. Adaptive Optics with Sodium Laser Guide Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd-Hart, M.; Angel, J. R. P.; Jacobsen, B.; Wittman, D.; McCarthy, D.; Martinez, T.

    1994-12-01

    Adaptive optics requires a reference source of light in the sky to measure wavefront aberration introduced by atmospheric turbulence. Natural stars are ideal for this purpose, but the density of bright stars is not sufficient to provide complete sky coverage. The problem can be overcome with an artificial beacon generated from resonant backscattering off mesospheric sodium atoms exited by a low-power laser tuned to the D2 resonance. Recent experiments at the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) have demonstrated for the first time that an adaptive optics system using a sodium laser guide beacon can be used to improve the imaging quality of the telescope. A beacon of mv = 10.4 was used to control the relative image motion between two of the six apertures of the MMT, while a natural star was used to measure the absolute tilt. A factor of two improvement in the K-band Strehl ratio was measured, and the resolution improved from 0(\\?.58) to 0(\\?.41) . The experiment demonstrated all the features needed for correction of telescopes of 6.5 to 8-m diameter to the diffraction limit in the near infrared with a single sodium laser beacon.

  3. Optical damage performance measurements of multilayer dielectric gratings for high energy short pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, D.; Carr, C. W.; Negres, R. A.; Hackel, R. P.; Stanion, K. A.; Cross, D. A.; Guss, G.; Nissen, J. D.; Luthi, R.; Fair, J. E.; Britten, J. A.; Haefner, C.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the laser damage resistance of multilayer dielectric (MLD) diffraction gratings used in the pulse compressors for high energy, high peak power laser systems such as the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) Petawatt laser on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our study includes measurements of damage threshold and damage density (ρ(Φ)) with picosecond laser pulses at 1053 nm under relevant operational conditions. Initial results indicate that sparse defects present on the optic surface from the manufacturing processes are responsible for damage initiation at laser fluences below the damage threshold indicated by the standard R-on-1 test methods, as is the case for laser damage with nanosecond pulse durations. As such, this study supports the development of damage density measurements for more accurate predictions on the damage performance of large area optics.

  4. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 8th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1977-05-01

    The Eighth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, from 13 to 15 July 1976. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Office of Naval Research. About 160 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and Brazil. The Symposium was divided into five half-day sessions concerning Bulk Material Properties and Thermal Behavior, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Film Properties, Thin Film Damage, and Scaling Laws and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to new materials for use at 10.6 microm in mirror substrates, windo s, and coatings. New techniques in film deposition and advances in diamond-turning of optics were described. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons of the Symposium. The Ninth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 4-6 October 1977 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20168679

  5. Laser guide star adaptive optics: Present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, C.E.

    1993-03-01

    Feasibility demonstrations using one to two meter telescopes have confirmed the utility of laser beacons as wavefront references for adaptive optics systems. Laser beacon architectures suitable for the new generation of eight and ten meter telescopes are presently under study. This paper reviews the concept of laser guide star adaptive optics and the progress that has been made by groups around the world implementing such systems. A description of the laser guide star program at LLNL and some experimental results is also presented.

  6. Applications of optical fiber to remote laser fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Shin, Jang Soo; Lee, Sang Mock; Kim, Jeong Moog; Kim, Duk Heon; Hong, Seok Kyung

    1991-12-01

    Fluorescence analysis using time-resolved laser fluorimetry was used for trace uranium analysis because this method shows high sensitivity and low detection limit and is less matrix dependent than any other fluorimetric measurement. By this time, the uranium analyses in the solution of reprocessing process or high radioactive area were primarily analyzed by sampling of the solution, but recently, a study on a remote uranium fluorescence analysis using optical fiber was setting out based on the development of an optical fiber with radiation resistivity and of an advanced laser excitation source. Laser fluorimetry developed by our laboratory for trace uranium analyses in uranium handling process or in urine samples of workers in a nuclear facility was used in our institute since 1988. A development of the system for remote control of uranium fluorescence analysis will be expected to contribute to an on-line uranium concentration monitoring in the cooling water of reconversion stream. The information related to fluorescence analyses and remote fluorescence monitoring methods established by foreign countries and our laboratory were summarized. A future research direction for remote on-line monitoring of uranium in conversion or reconversion processes was presented.

  7. Laser-induced damage in optical materials: sixteenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Guenther, A H; Milam, D; Newnam, B E

    1987-03-01

    The Sixteenth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, CO, 15-17 Oct. 1984. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Approximately 180 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives from England, France, The Netherlands, Scotland, and West Germany. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Materials and Measurements, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6,microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin-film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. Harold E. Bennett of the U.S. Naval Weapons Center, Arthur H. Guenther of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Laboratory, David Milam of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the Symposium. PMID:20454228

  8. Damage thresholds in laser irradiated optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guignard, F.; Autric, M.; Baudinaud, V.

    1997-12-01

    An experimental study on the damage induced by laser irradiation on different materials, borosilicate glass, fused silicate, moulded and stretched polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), has been performed. The irradiation source is a 1KJ pulsed cold cathode electron gun preionized TEA CO{sub 2} laser. Damage mechanisms are controlled by the in-depth absorption of the 10,6 {mu}m radiation according to the Beer-Lambert law. The heating of the interaction area gives rise to thermal or thermo-mechanical damages. PMMA is damaged following a boiling process. Stretched PMMA is fractured first, releasing stresses, then boiled like moulded PMMA at higher energy. BK7 crazed after the irradiation due to thermomechanical stresses, silicate melt and vaporized. Optical damages have been characterized by measuring the contrast transfer function through the irradiated samples.

  9. Optical reprogramming with ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans G.; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    The use of sub-15 femtosecond laser pulses in stem cell research is explored with particular emphasis on the optical reprogramming of somatic cells. The reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be evoked through the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors. Conventional approaches utilize retro/lenti-viruses to deliver genes/transcription factors as well as to facilitate the integration of transcription factors into that of the host genome. However, the use of viruses may result in insertional mutations caused by the random integration of genes and as a result, this may limit the use within clinical applications due to the risk of the formation of cancer. In this study, a new approach is demonstrated in realizing non-viral reprogramming through the use of ultrashort laser pulses, to introduce transcription factors into the cell so as to generate iPS cells.

  10. Optically pumped Na/sub 2/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kanorskii, S.I.; Kaslin, V.M.; Yakushev, O.F.

    1980-10-01

    A pulsed copper vapor laser emitting the 578.2 nm line was used as the pump source in achieving stimulated emission as a result of the electronic A/sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub u/ to X/sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub g/ transitions in the Na/sub 2/ molecule in the spectral range 0.765 to 0.804 ..mu... The average power of all the emission lines was 10 mW when the pulsed pump power was 150 W and the efficiency of conversion of the optical pump energy was about 3%. The pulse repetition frequency was 3.3 kHz. Violet diffuse radiation of the Na/sub 2/ molecules, generated by pumping with the copper vapor laser, was observed. The superradiance regime was found for some of the lines.

  11. Optical Phase Locking of Modelocked Lasers for Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Sinha, S.; Wisdom, J.; Colby, E.R.; /SLAC

    2006-02-17

    Particle accelerators require precise phase control of the electric field through the entire accelerator structure. Thus a future laser driven particle accelerator will require optical synchronism between the high-peak power laser sources that power the accelerator. The precise laser architecture for a laser driven particle accelerator is not determined yet, however it is clear that the ability to phase-lock independent modelocked oscillators will be of crucial importance. We report the present status on our work to demonstrate long term phaselocking between two modelocked lasers to within one degree of optical phase and describe the optical synchronization techniques that we employ.

  12. Stabilized high-power laser system for the gravitational wave detector advanced LIGO.

    PubMed

    Kwee, P; Bogan, C; Danzmann, K; Frede, M; Kim, H; King, P; Pöld, J; Puncken, O; Savage, R L; Seifert, F; Wessels, P; Winkelmann, L; Willke, B

    2012-05-01

    An ultra-stable, high-power cw Nd:YAG laser system, developed for the ground-based gravitational wave detector Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory), was comprehensively characterized. Laser power, frequency, beam pointing and beam quality were simultaneously stabilized using different active and passive schemes. The output beam, the performance of the stabilization, and the cross-coupling between different stabilization feedback control loops were characterized and found to fulfill most design requirements. The employed stabilization schemes and the achieved performance are of relevance to many high-precision optical experiments. PMID:22565688

  13. Open-ended projects in undergraduate optics and lasers courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Chad

    This talk will describe the format and experience of undergraduate Lasers and Optics courses at Bethel University. The courses, which include a rigorous lecture portion, are built on open-ended research projects that have a novel aspect. They begin with four weeks of small student groups rotating between several standard laser and optics laboratory exercises. These may include, for example, alignment and characterization of a helium neon laser and measurements with a Michelson interferometer or a scanning Fabry-Pérot optical cavity. During the following seven weeks of the course, student groups (2-4 people) choose and pursue research questions in the lab. Their work culminates in a group manuscript typeset in and a twenty-minute presentation to the class. Projects in the spring, 2014 Optics course included experiments with ultracold lithium atoms in a magneto-optical trap, optical tweezers, digital holography and adaptive optics. Projects in the spring, 2015 Lasers course included ultrafast optics with a mode-locked erbium fiber laser, quantum optics, surface plasmon lasers (led by Nathan Lindquist) and a low-cost, near-infrared spectrometer. Several of these projects are related to larger scale, funded research in the physics department. The format and experience in Lasers and Optics is representative of other upper-level courses at Bethel, including Fluid Mechanics and Computer Methods. A physics education research group from the University of Colorado evaluated the spring, 2015 Lasers course. They focused on student experimental attitudes and measurements of student project ownership.

  14. Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Essien, Marcelino; Keicher, David M.; Schlienger, M. Eric; Jellison, James L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

  15. From laser ultrasonics to optical manipulation.

    PubMed

    Požar, Tomaž; Babnik, Aleš; Možina, Janez

    2015-03-23

    During the interaction of a laser pulse with the surface of a solid object, the object always gains momentum. The delivered force impulse is manifested as propulsion. Initially, the motion of the object is composed of elastic waves that carry and redistribute the acquired momentum as they propagate and reflect within the solid. Even though only ablation- and light-pressure-induced mechanical waves are involved in propulsion, they are always accompanied by the ubiquitous thermoelastic waves. This paper describes 1D elastodynamics of pulsed optical manipulation and presents two diametrical experimental observations of elastic waves generated in the confined ablation and in the radiation pressure regime. PMID:25837135

  16. Optical Alignment Device For Laser Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Optical alignment device under development enables continuous tracking and coalignment of two beams of light. Intended primarily for laser-communication station, in which transmitted beam must be aligned with received beam to ensure transmitted beam falls on receiver at other station. Expected to consume less power and be smaller and less complicated than alignment shutter and drive previously used. Prism and filter separate two overlapping collimated light beams of different wavelength or polarization. Coordinates of two beams tracked on charge-coupled device to determine degree of directional misalignment between two beams.

  17. HIGH-EFFICIENCY AUTONOMOUS LASER ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Hogstrom, Kristina; Bui, Khanh; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Law, Nicholas M.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Punnadi, Sujit

    2014-07-20

    As new large-scale astronomical surveys greatly increase the number of objects targeted and discoveries made, the requirement for efficient follow-up observations is crucial. Adaptive optics imaging, which compensates for the image-blurring effects of Earth's turbulent atmosphere, is essential for these surveys, but the scarcity, complexity and high demand of current systems limit their availability for following up large numbers of targets. To address this need, we have engineered and implemented Robo-AO, a fully autonomous laser adaptive optics and imaging system that routinely images over 200 objects per night with an acuity 10 times sharper at visible wavelengths than typically possible from the ground. By greatly improving the angular resolution, sensitivity, and efficiency of 1-3 m class telescopes, we have eliminated a major obstacle in the follow-up of the discoveries from current and future large astronomical surveys.

  18. Diagnostics for advanced laser acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Misuri, Alessio

    2002-06-01

    The first proposal for plasma based accelerators was suggested by 1979 by Tajima and Dawson. Since then there has been a tremendous progress both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical progress is particularly due to the growing interest in the subject and to the development of more accurate numerical codes for the plasma simulations (especially particle-in-cell codes). The experimental progress follows from the development of multi-terawatt laser systems based on the chirped-pulse amplification technique. These efforts have produced results in several experiments world-wide, with the detection of accelerated electrons of tens of MeV. The peculiarity of these advanced accelerators is their ability to sustain extremely large acceleration gradients. In the conventional radio frequency linear accelerators (RF linacs) the acceleration gradients are limited roughly to 100 MV/m; this is partially due to breakdown which occurs on the walls of the structure. The electrical breakdown is originated by the emission of the electrons from the walls of the cavity. The electrons cause an avalanche breakdown when they reach other metal parts of the RF linacs structure.

  19. Femtosecond laser pulse induced birefringence in optically isotropic glass.

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, Gregory Allen; Luk, Ting Shan; Guo, Junpeng; Yang, Pin; Burns, George Robert

    2003-07-01

    We used a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser to create optical birefringence in an isotropic glass medium. Between two crossed polarizers, regions modified by the femtosecond laser show bright transmission with respect to the dark background of the isotropic glass. This observation immediately suggests that these regions possess optical birefringence. The angular dependence of transmission through the laser-modified region is consistent with that of an optically birefringent material. Laser-induced birefringence is demonstrated in different glasses, including fused silica and borosilicate glass. Experimental results indicate that the optical axes of laser-induced birefringence can be controlled by the polarization direction of the femtosecond laser. The amount of laser-induced birefringence depends on the pulse energy level and number of accumulated pulses.

  20. Advanced laser driver for soft x-ray projection lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.E.; Beach, R.J.; Dane, C.B.; Reichert, P.; Honig, J.N.; Hackel, L.A.

    1994-03-01

    A diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser for use as a driver for a soft x-ray projection lithography system is described. The laser will output 0.5 to 1 J per pulse with about 5 ns pulse width at up to 1.5 kHz repetition frequency. The design employs microchannel-cooled diode laser arrays for optical pumping, zigzag slab energy storage, and a single frequency oscillator injected regenerative amplifier cavity using phase conjugator beam correction for near diffraction limited beam quality. The design and initial results of this laser`s activation experiments will be presented.

  1. Fiber-optic technologies for advanced thermo-therapy applied ex vivo to liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, D.; Perrone, G.; Vallan, A.; Braglia, A.; Liu, Y.; Macchi, E. G.; Braschi, G.; Gallati, M.; Cigada, A.; Poeggel, S.; Duraibabu, D. B.; Leen, G.; Lewis, E.

    2015-07-01

    Thermal ablation, using radiofrequency, microwave, and laser sources, is a common treatment for hepatic tumors. Sensors allow monitoring, at the point of treatment, the evolution of thermal ablation procedures. We present optical fiber sensors that allow advanced capabilities for recording the biophysical phenomena occurring in the tissue in real time. Distributed or quasi-distributed thermal sensors allow recording temperature with spatial resolution ranging from 0.1 mm to 5 mm. In addition, a thermally insensitive pressure sensor allows recording pressure rise, supporting advanced treatment of encapsulated tumors. Our investigation is focused on two case studies: (1) radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tissue, performed on a phantom with a stem-shaped applicator; (2) laser ablation of a liver phantom, performed with a fiber laser. The main measurement results are discussed, comparing the technologies used for the investigation, and drawing the potential for using optical fiber sensors for "smart"-ablation.

  2. CO2 laser and plasma microjet process for improving laser optics

    DOEpatents

    Brusasco, Raymond M.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Butler, James A.; Grundler, Walter; Governo, George K.

    2003-09-16

    A optic is produced for operation at the fundamental Nd:YAG laser wavelength of 1.06 micrometers through the tripled Nd:YAG laser wavelength of 355 nanometers by the method of reducing or eliminating the growth of laser damage sites in the optics by processing the optics to stop damage in the optics from growing to a predetermined critical size. A system is provided of mitigating the growth of laser-induced damage in optics by virtue of very localized removal of glass and absorbing material.

  3. Electro-optics and lasers in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zwaren, Joesph

    1992-05-01

    With over 3,000 scientists, engineers, and technicians spread out in some 86 companies, and in 10 universities and research institutes, all within less than a 2 hour drive from one another, Israel has no doubt one of the largest concentrations of researchers and skilled manpower in electro-optics and lasers in the world. This report presents an up-to-date picture of the field in Israel, covering the industry, academia and education. The recent wave of Russian immigration is bringing thousands of scientists and tens of thousands of engineers and is expected to make an impact on the field of electro-optics and lasers. A million immigrants from Russia are expected to come between 1990 and 1995. There were 3,700 scientists and 2,800 engineers among the first 200,000 Soviet immigrants. As most of this qualified manpower can not be expected to be absorbed by the existing industry, the Israeli government is actively encouraging local and foreign investors and local and multinational companies to help develop new and expanded high-tech enterprises in Israel. The Ministry of Industry and Trade has embarked upon a broad ranged program for industrial growth and immigrant absorption with the goal of doubling technology-based exports in the next four years. The Ministry of Science and Technology has started a program supporting R&D projects at the different universities for immigrant scientists with the goal of capitalizing on the talents of the newcomers to strengthen academia.

  4. Laser induced damage in optical materials: eleventh ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1980-07-15

    The eleventh Symposium on Optical Materials for High-Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30-31 October 1979. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and Denmark. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning transparent optical materials and the measurement of their properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film characteristics, thin film damage, considerations for high-power systems, and finally theory and breakdown. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory were cochairpersons. The twelfth annual symposium is scheduled for 30 September-1 October 1980 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20234423

  5. Advances in fiber lasers for nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, F. W.; Ouzounov, D.; Kieu, K.; Renninger, W.; Chong, A.; Liu, H.

    2008-02-01

    In the past 30 years major advances in medical imaging have been made in areas such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound. These techniques have become quite effective for structural imaging at the organ or tissue level, but do not address the clear need for imaging technologies that exploit existing knowledge of the genetic and molecular bases of disease. Techniques that can provide similar information on the cellular and molecular scale would be very powerful, and ultimately the extension of such techniques to in vivo measurements will be desired. The availability of these imaging capabilities would allow monitoring of the early stages of disease or therapy, for example. Optical techniques provide excellent imaging capabilities, with sub-micron spatial resolution, and are noninvasive. An overall goal of biomedical imaging is to obtain diagnostic or functional information about biological structures. The difficulty of acquiring high-resolution images of structures deep in tissue presents a major challenge, however, owing to strong scattering of light. As a consequence, optical imaging has been limited to thin (typically ~0.5 mm) samples or superficial tissue. In contrast, techniques such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance provide images of structures centimeters deep in tissue, with ~100-micron resolution. It is desirable to develop techniques that offer the resolution of optics with the depth-penetration of other techniques. Since 1990, a variety of nonlinear microscopies have been demonstrated. These include 2- and 3-photon fluorescence microscopy, and 2nd- and 3rd-harmonic generation microscopies. These typically employ femtosecond-pulse excitation, for maximum peak power (and thus nonlinear excitation) for a given pulse energy. A relative newcomer to the group is CARS microscopy [1], which exploits resonant vibrational excitation of molecules or bonds. The CARS signal contrast arises from intrinsic elements of cells, and thus

  6. Optical properties measurement of the laser-ablated tissues for the combined laser ablation with photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Norihiro; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2012-03-01

    Laser ablation therapy combined with photodynamic therapy (PDT) is studied for treatment of advanced cancers. The clinical outcome of PDT may be improved by the accurate knowledge about the light distribution within tissue. Optical properties [absorption coefficient (μa), scattering coefficient (μs), anisotropy factor (g), refractive index, etc.] of tissues help us realizing a light propagation through the tissue. It is important to understand of the effect of laser coagulation formed by laser ablation to PDT. The aim of this study is to estimate of influence of coagulated region to PDT for effective PDT combined laser ablation therapy. We evaluated the optical property of mouse tumor tissue in native and coagulated state using a double integrating sphere system and an inverse Monte Carlo method in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm. After laser ablation, the μa and reduced scattering coefficient spectra of coagulated tissues were increased in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm. The optical penetration depth of coagulated tissues is 1.2-2.9 times lower than the native state in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm. The intensity of the light energy inside the coagulated tissue falls to about 60% of its original value at the end of coagulated layer. The evaluation of light energy distribution by the determination of the tissues optical properties could be useful for optimization of the treatment procedure in combined laser ablation with PDT.

  7. Adaptive optics at the PHELIX laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuck, Hans-Martin; Wittrock, Ulrich; Fils, Jérôme; Borneis, Stefan; Witte, Klaus; Eisenbart, Udo; Javorkova, Dasa; Bagnoud, Vincent; Götte, Stefan; Tauschwitz, Andreas; Onkels, Eckehard

    2007-05-01

    GSI Darmstadt currently builds a high-energy petawatt Nd:glass laser system, called PHELIX (Petawatt High-Energy Laser for Heavy-Ion Experiments). PHELIX will offer the world-wide unique combination of a high current, high-energy heavy-ion beam with an intense laser beam. Aberrations due to the beam transport and due to the amplification process limit the focusability and the intensity at the target. We have investigated the aberrations of the different amplification stages. The pre-amplifier stage consists of three rod-amplifiers which cause mainly defocus, but also a small part of coma and astigmatism. The main amplifier consists of five disk amplifiers with a clear aperture of 315 mm. These large disk-amplifiers cause pump-shot aberrations which occur instantly. After a shot, the disk amplifiers need a cooling time of several hours to relax to their initial state. This limits the repetition rate and causes long-term aberrations. We will present first measurements of the pump-shot and long-term aberrations caused by the pre- and the main amplifier in a single-pass configuration. In this context, we will present the adaptive optics system which is implemented in the PHELIX beam line and discuss its capability to compensate for the pump-shot and long-term aberrations.

  8. Optical diagnostics integrated with laser spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-09-02

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  9. Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography: recent advances toward clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Bouma, Brett E; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Vakoc, Benjamin J; Suter, Melissa J; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of Fourier-domain techniques, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has advanced from high-resolution ‘point’ imaging over small fields-of-view to comprehensive microscopic imaging over three-dimensional volumes that are comparable to the dimensions of luminal internal organs. This advance has required the development of new lasers, improved spectrometers, minimally invasive catheters and endoscopes, and novel optical and signal processing strategies. In recent cardiovascular, ophthalmic, and gastrointestinal clinical studies, the capabilities of Fourier-domain OCT have enabled a new paradigm for diagnostic screening of large tissue areas, which addresses the shortcomings of existing technologies and focal biopsy. PMID:19264475

  10. Hole drilling with fiber-optically delivered visible lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, D.D.; Berzins, L.V.; Dragon, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The use of lasers for high-speed drilling of holes in materials is well documented. To allow easier use of lasers in manufacturing processes, fiber-optically delivered beams are preferable to the use of conventional optics. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has adapted fiber-optic technology to its visible light, copper vapor lasers for use in hole drilling studies. Visible lasers afford better coupling of light to the workpiece and when fiber-optically delivered, allow high quality holes to be drilled in difficult accessibility areas and with easier setup. A fiber-optic delivery system was attached to the presently hard-optic copper vapor laser system. This system consisted of a 0.6 mm (0.024 in.) fiber that was then telescoped and refocused by a hard optics package at the workstation end of the fiber. The optics package produced a 0.2 mm (0.008 in.) focused spot size at the workpiece. This system was then run down to a 3-axis CNC machining table to allow part movement for these studies. The fiber-optically delivered light was found to work extremely well for drilling small diameter holes. In summary, it was found that fiber-optically delivered, visible laser beams have several advantages in drilling over those same beams delivered through conventional hard optics. These include much easier setup, reduced system maintenance, and typically higher hole quality.

  11. Biological research by optically pumped far infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhengyu, Mi

    1989-05-01

    The FIR breeding for paddy rice, black bean and wheat, the chlorophyll mutation of paddy rice induced by optically pumped FIR laser, etc., are presented. The results of SDS electrophoresis analysis of soluble proteins of Drosophita melanrgaster irradiated by optically pumped FIR laser are described and discussed.

  12. Optical system design and integration of the mercury laser altimeter.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Lzquierdo, Luis; Scott, V Stanley; Schmidt, Stephen; Britt, Jamie; Mamakos, William; Trunzo, Raymond; Cavanaugh, John; Miller, Roger

    2005-03-20

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA), developed for the 2004 MESSENGER mission to Mercury, is designed to measure the planet's topography by laser ranging. A description of the MLA optical system and its measured optical performance during instrument-level and spacecraft-level integration and testing are presented. PMID:15813279

  13. Optical System Design and Integration of the Mercury Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Scott, V. Stanley, III; Schmidt, Stephen; Britt, Jamie; Mamakos, William; Trunzo, Raymond; Cavanaugh, John; Miller, Roger

    2005-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA). developed for the 2004 MESSENGER mission to Mercury, is designed to measure the planet's topography via laser ranging. A description of the MLA optical system and its measured optical performance during instrument-level and spacecraft-level integration and testing are presented.

  14. CO.sub.2 optically pumped distributed feedback diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    A diode laser optically pumped by a CO.sub.2 coherent source. Interference fringes generated by feeding the optical pumping beam against a second beam, periodically alter the reflectivity of the diode medium allowing frequency variation of the output signal by varying the impingent angle of the CO.sub.2 laser beams.

  15. Measuring the Dispersion Curve of a PMMA-Fibre Optic Cable Using a Dye Laser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorba, Serkan; Farah, Constantine; Pant, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    An advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment is outlined which uses a dye laser to map out the chromatic dispersion curve of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) optical fibre. Seven different wavelengths across the visible spectrum are employed using five different dyes. The light pulse is split into two pulses, one to a nearby photodetector and…

  16. Advanced Integrated Optical Signal Processing Components.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastani, Kasra

    This research was aimed at the development of advanced integrated optical components suitable for devices capable of processing multi-dimensional inputs. In such processors, densely packed waveguide arrays with low crosstalk are needed to provide dissection of the information that has been partially processed. Waveguide arrays also expand the information in the plane of the processor while maintaining its coherence. Rib waveguide arrays with low loss, high mode confinement and highly uniform surface quality (660 elements, 8 μm wide, 1 μm high, and 1 cm long with 2 mu m separations) were fabricated on LiNbO _3 substrates through the ion beam milling technique. A novel feature of the multi-dimensional IO processor architecture proposed herein is the implementation of large area uniform outcoupling (with low to moderate outcoupling efficiencies) from rib waveguide arrays in order to access the third dimension of the processor structure. As a means of outcoupling, uniform surface gratings (2 μm and 4 μm grating periods, 0.05 μm high and 1 mm long) with low outcoupling efficiencies (of approximately 2-18%/mm) were fabricated on the nonuniform surface of the rib waveguide arrays. As a practical technique of modulating the low outcoupling efficiencies of the surface gratings, it was proposed to alter the period of the grating as a function of position along each waveguide. Large aperture (2.5 mm) integrated lenses with short positive focal lengths (1.2-2.5 cm) were developed through a modification of the titanium-indiffused proton exchanged (TIPE) technique. Such integrated lenses were fabricated by increasing the refractive index of the slab waveguides by the TIPE process while maintaining the refractive index of the lenses at the lower level of Ti:LiNbO _3 waveguide. By means of curvature reversal of the integrated lenses, positive focal length lenses have been fabricated while providing high mode confinement for the slab waveguide. The above elements performed as

  17. Laser-induced microwave generation with nonlinear optical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, Francesco; Braggio, Caterina; Carugno, Giovanni; Della Valle, Federico; Ruoso, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    We report about a novel technique to generate microwave radiation by the irradiation of a nonlinear optical crystal with uniformly spaced, ultrashort optical pulses delivered by a mode-locked laser. We study systematically the laser polarization and intensity dependence of the microwave signal to conclusively show that it is a nonlinear phenomenon and that it originates from optical rectification. The measurements have been conducted using KTP, LBO and ZnSe crystals. The observed pulsed microwave signals are harmonically related to the laser pulses repetition rate, a feature that can be exploited to develop an innovative ultrafast laser detector.

  18. High-power disk lasers: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, David; Ryba, Tracey; Holzer, Marco

    2012-03-01

    Though the genesis of the disk laser concept dates to the early 90's, the disk laser continues to demonstrate the flexibility and the certain future of a breakthrough technology. On-going increases in power per disk, and improvements in beam quality and efficiency continue to validate the genius of the disk laser concept. As of today, the disk principle has not reached any fundamental limits regarding output power per disk or beam quality, and offers numerous advantages over other high power resonator concepts, especially over monolithic architectures. With about 2,000 high power disk lasers installations, and a demand upwards of 1,000 lasers per year, the disk laser has proven to be a robust and reliable industrial tool. With advancements in running cost, investment cost and footprint, manufacturers continue to implement disk laser technology with more vigor than ever. This paper will explain recent advances in disk laser technology and process relevant features of the laser, like pump diode arrangement, resonator design and integrated beam guidance. In addition, advances in applications in the thick sheet area and very cost efficient high productivity applications like remote welding, remote cutting and cutting of thin sheets will be discussed.

  19. The Laser Level as an Optics Laboratory Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey

    2013-12-01

    For decades now, the laser has been used as a handy device for performing ray traces in geometrical optics demonstrations and laboratories. , 2 For many ray- trace applications, I have found the laser level3 to be even more visually compelling and easy for student use than the laser pointer.

  20. Permanent laser conditioning of thin film optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, C. Robert; Kozlowski, Mark R.; Campbell, John H.; Staggs, Michael; Rainer, Frank

    1995-01-01

    The invention comprises a method for producing optical thin films with a high laser damage threshold and the resulting thin films. The laser damage threshold of the thin films is permanently increased by irradiating the thin films with a fluence below an unconditioned laser damage threshold.

  1. Permanent laser conditioning of thin film optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, C.R.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Campbell, J.H.; Staggs, M.; Rainer, F.

    1995-12-05

    The invention comprises a method for producing optical thin films with a high laser damage threshold and the resulting thin films. The laser damage threshold of the thin films is permanently increased by irradiating the thin films with a fluence below an unconditioned laser damage threshold. 9 figs.

  2. Optical velocimeters for moving surfaces using gas and semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, P. Ya.; Dubnistshev, Yu. N.; Meledin, V. G.

    1990-10-01

    A differential arrangement using a laser for the measurement of the velocity of moving surfaces is discussed. Configurations of optical velocimeters with diffraction beam-splitters are shown not to be critical on the wavelength stability of a semiconductor laser. Laser meters measuring the velocity and length of rolled stock have been built on the basis of the devices considered.

  3. Optical nonuniformities in nuclear-pumped cylindrical lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mat'ev, V Yu; Borovkov, V V; Mel'nikov, S P

    2000-03-31

    The optical nonuniformities, formed as a result of the effect of the inhomogeneous energy deposition by the fission fragments irradiating the laser-active gas from thin uranium-containing layers, were calculated for cylindrical nuclear-pumped gas lasers. The results of the calculations agree with the experiment. (active media. lasers)

  4. The Laser Level as an Optics Laboratory Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutzner, Mickey

    2013-01-01

    For decades now, the laser has been used as a handy device for performing ray traces in geometrical optics demonstrations and laboratories. For many ray- trace applications, I have found the laser level 3 to be even more visually compelling and easy for student use than the laser pointer.

  5. Lasers in dentistry: new possibilities with advancing laser technology?

    PubMed

    Frentzen, M; Koort, H J

    1990-12-01

    Although there are a considerable number of published papers on the role of laser treatment in dentistry, a critical review shows that laser technology is used only by specialists in a small therapeutic field. Most lasers are heat-producing devices converting electromagnetic energy into thermal energy. These lasers find uses in oral surgery for cutting or coagulating soft tissues or in the welding of dental prostheses. More recently, new types of lasers have offered non-thermal modes of tissue interaction, called photoablation, photodisruption and photochemical effects. Basic and clinical research is being carried out into the application of these devices in dentistry. However, much development will be required before lasers can replace conventional surgical methods for treating oral cancer or indeed replace the conventional bur for excavating carious lesions. PMID:2276829

  6. Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Siekhaus, Wigbert

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities comprising, a focused and pulsed laser, an photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

  7. Pulse-stretched Alexandrite laser for improved optical fiber reliability for laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, David; Koschmann, Eric C.

    1992-06-01

    Clinical data shows that short pulse duration lasers used in laser induced shock wave lithotripsy severely damage optical fibers on both the proximal and distal ends which is unsuitable for clinical use. An Alexandrite laser system has been developed that uses dynamic pulse stretching of the Q-switched laser pulse and improved optical fiber coupling to eliminate the fiber damage. The method of pulse stretching presented controls the laser output pulse energy from 50 to 150 millijoules and temporal shape from 0.5 to 1.5 microseconds. This yields effective fragmentation of calculi without damage to the optical fiber.

  8. The Recovery of Optical Quality after Laser Vision Correction

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyeong-Gi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the optical quality after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) or serial photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) using a double-pass system and to follow the recovery of optical quality after laser vision correction. Methods This study measured the visual acuity, manifest refraction and optical quality before and one day, one week, one month, and three months after laser vision correction. Optical quality parameters including the modulation transfer function, Strehl ratio and intraocular scattering were evaluated with a double-pass system. Results This study included 51 eyes that underwent LASIK and 57 that underwent PRK. The optical quality three months post-surgery did not differ significantly between these laser vision correction techniques. Furthermore, the preoperative and postoperative optical quality did not differ significantly in either group. Optical quality recovered within one week after LASIK but took between one and three months to recover after PRK. The optical quality of patients in the PRK group seemed to recover slightly more slowly than their uncorrected distance visual acuity. Conclusions Optical quality recovers to the preoperative level after laser vision correction, so laser vision correction is efficacious for correcting myopia. The double-pass system is a useful tool for clinical assessment of optical quality. PMID:23908570

  9. Stabilized High Power Laser for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willke, B.; Danzmann, K.; Fallnich, C.; Frede, M.; Heurs, M.; King, P.; Kracht, D.; Kwee, P.; Savage, R.; Seifert, F.; Wilhelm, R.

    2006-03-01

    Second generation gravitational wave detectors require high power lasers with several 100W of output power and with very low temporal and spatial fluctuations. In this paper we discuss possible setups to achieve high laser power and describe a 200W prestabilized laser system (PSL). The PSL noise requirements for advanced gravitational wave detectors will be discussed in general and the stabilization scheme proposed for the Advanced LIGO PSL will be described. Special emphasis will be given to the most demanding power stabilization requiremets and new results (RIN <= 4×10-9/surdHz) will be presented.

  10. Laser characterization with advanced digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piels, Molly; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Zibar, Darko

    2015-01-01

    The use of machine learning techniques to characterize lasers with low output power is reviewed. Optimized phase tracking algorithms that can produce accurate noise spectra are discussed, and a method for inferring the amplitude noise spectrum and rate equation model of the laser under test is presented.

  11. Optical antenna in laser inter-satellite communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chuanhua; Wang, Chunxia; Li, Yuquan

    2005-02-01

    In the modern world of telecommunications, the concept of wireless global coverage is of the utmost importance. However, real global coverage can only be achieved by satellite systems. Satellites communication is the most important mean of the communication network. The traditional satellites communication and inter-satellites links are built by microwave. In recent years, laser links for inter-satellites communication are becoming more and more important. Laser communication systems operate in a frequency range above the regulated spectrum. Laser provides many advantages for using in point-to-point ISLs (inter-satellites links) such as for links between satellites and spacecraft in deep space. Such advantages include: high speed; high bandwidth; small antenna size; narrow field of view; and narrow antenna beam. These advantages combined with the advantages in fiber optic components (optical preamplifiers, multiplexers, detectors, etc) have made laser attractive for laser links. Now we can bring WDM (wavelength-division multiplexing) to emerging broadband satellite communication systems. By using the common antenna system and ATP (Aiming, Tracking and Pointing) system, the satellites will get more capacity. In the inter-satellites laser communication, the important performances of the systems such as BER and BL both have direct relation with the optical systems. The optical systems have the function of ATP. The optical antenna is the most important component of the optical system. So the optical antenna is an important key technology to the inter-satellites laser communication. In this paper, we mainly study the optical system in the inter-satellites laser communication. we compare with three kinds of optical antennas: refractor and reflector and Catadioptrics of the passive optical system; we also analyze the effect of bandwidth to the WDM communication systems; we use the correlative software, simulate the curves of the performance of the optical antennas. These

  12. Laser-induced heating in optical traps.

    PubMed

    Peterman, Erwin J G; Gittes, Frederick; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2003-02-01

    In an optical tweezers experiment intense laser light is tightly focused to intensities of MW/cm(2) in order to apply forces to submicron particles or to measure mechanical properties of macromolecules. It is important to quantify potentially harmful or misleading heating effects due to the high light intensities in biophysical experiments. We present a model that incorporates the geometry of the experiment in a physically correct manner, including heat generation by light absorption in the neighborhood of the focus, balanced by outward heat flow, and heat sinking by the glass surfaces of the sample chamber. This is in contrast to the earlier simple models assuming heat generation in the trapped particle only. We find that in the most common experimental circumstances, using micron-sized polystyrene or silica beads, absorption of the laser light in the solvent around the trapped particle, not in the particle itself, is the most important contribution to heating. To validate our model we measured the spectrum of the Brownian motion of trapped beads in water and in glycerol as a function of the trapping laser intensity. Heating both increases the thermal motion of the bead and decreases the viscosity of the medium. We measured that the temperature in the focus increased by 34.2 +/- 0.1 K/W with 1064-nm laser light for 2200-nm-diameter polystyrene beads in glycerol, 43.8 +/- 2.2 K/W for 840-nm polystyrene beads in glycerol, 41.1 +/- 0.7 K/W for 502-nm polystyrene beads in glycerol, and 7.7 +/- 1.2 K/W for 500-nm silica beads and 8.1 +/- 2.1 K/W for 444-nm silica beads in water. Furthermore, we observed that in glycerol the heating effect increased when the bead was trapped further away from the cover glass/glycerol interface as predicted by the model. We show that even though the heating effect in water is rather small it can have non-negligible effects on trap calibration in typical biophysical experimental circumstances and should be taken into consideration when

  13. Laser Scanning-Assisted Tip-Enhanced Optical Microscopy for Robust Optical Nanospectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yano, Taka-Aki; Tsuchimoto, Yuta; Mochizuki, Masahito; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Hara, Masahiko

    2016-07-01

    Laser-scanning-assisted tip-enhanced optical microscopy was developed for robust optical nanospectroscopy. The laser-scanning system was utilized to automatically set and keep the center of a tight laser-focusing spot in the proximity of a metallic tip with around 10 nm precision. This enabled us to efficiently and stably induce plasmon-coupled field enhancement at the apex of the metallic probe tip. The laser-scanning technique was also applied to tracking and compensating the thermal drift of the metallic tip in the spot. This technique is usable for long-term tip-enhanced optical spectroscopy without any optical degradation. PMID:27412187

  14. Optical limiting of short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.-C.; Wang, C.-K.; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2007-11-15

    The dynamics of pulse propagation accompanied by harmonic generation, stimulated Raman scattering, amplified spontaneous emission, and superfluorescence is studied near the two-photon resonance. We explore the optical limiting of intense and short laser pulses. The numerical solutions of the coupled Bloch and Maxwell's equations for the 4,4{sup '}-bis(dimethylamino) stilbene molecule are compared with the two-photon area theorem. It is shown that the area theorem explains qualitatively the major dynamical properties of pulse propagation even if the propagation is accompanied by the generation of new fields. In agreement with the area theorem, we see that the conventional dependence of the transmittance on the propagation depth is not valid for intense pulses.

  15. Optical pumping of generalized laser active materials.

    PubMed

    Fry, F H

    1967-11-01

    Results are presented of a computer-based study on the rate of excitation in the active cores of two types of optically pumped lasers as a function of a number of parameters of the active core. The absorption bands of the active materials are generated by Lorentzian and Gaussian functions. The excitation rate of the active core is proportional to the width of the absorption band at all depths of penetration. The plots of excitation rate as a function of frequency show curves similar to line reversal spectra and emphasize the importance of excitation some distance from the center of the absorption band in the slab model. In the cylindrical model, this wing pumping is even more important due to focusing. The effect of refractive index on the excitation rate is also described. PMID:20062337

  16. Ultrafast laser-induced changes in optical properties of semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chirila, C. C.; Lim, Freda C. H.; Gavaza, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    We study the effect of laser radiation on optical properties of semiconductors of industrial interest. The material is pumped with a laser of chosen central frequency, for which the absorption is maximal, thus inducing electron dynamics, which modifies the optical properties. By using an improved theoretical model, we study ultrafast dynamic changes in the refraction index and reflectivity corresponding to a wide frequency-interval of probing radiation and identify that interval where these optical changes are most significant.

  17. Temporal laser pulse manipulation using multiple optical ring-cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An optical pulse stretcher and a mathematical algorithm for the detailed calculation of its design and performance is disclosed. The optical pulse stretcher has a plurality of optical cavities, having multiple optical reflectors such that an optical path length in each of the optical cavities is different. The optical pulse stretcher also has a plurality of beam splitters, each of which intercepts a portion of an input optical beam and diverts the portion into one of the plurality of optical cavities. The input optical beam is stretched and a power of an output beam is reduced after passing through the optical pulse stretcher and the placement of the plurality of optical cavities and beam splitters is optimized through a model that takes into account optical beam divergence and alignment in the pluralities of the optical cavities. The optical pulse stretcher system can also function as a high-repetition-rate (MHz) laser pulse generator, making it suitable for use as a stroboscopic light source for high speed ballistic projectile imaging studies, or it can be used for high speed flow diagnostics using a laser light sheet with digital particle imaging velocimetry. The optical pulse stretcher system can also be implemented using fiber optic components to realize a rugged and compact optical system that is alignment free and easy to use.

  18. All-Optical Laser-Wakefield Electron Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Umstadter, Donald P.

    2003-07-01

    Demonstrated the principle of optical control of laser accelerators, namely, that one laser pulse could modify the properties (e.g., emittance and electron number) of an electron beam accelerated by a separate but synchronized laser pulse. Another recent highlight was that, using our new 30-fs 10-TW laser system, we accelerated with a laser accelerator an electron beam with a record low divergence (0.2 degrees). This is more than 100 times lower than the 30-degree divergence that was reported recently by a French group using a laser with similar parameters.

  19. Developing Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) Technology for the Manufacture of Large-Aperture Optics in Megajoule Class Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A

    2010-10-27

    Over the last eight years we have been developing advanced MRF tools and techniques to manufacture meter-scale optics for use in Megajoule class laser systems. These systems call for optics having unique characteristics that can complicate their fabrication using conventional polishing methods. First, exposure to the high-power nanosecond and sub-nanosecond pulsed laser environment in the infrared (>27 J/cm{sup 2} at 1053 nm), visible (>18 J/cm{sup 2} at 527 nm), and ultraviolet (>10 J/cm{sup 2} at 351 nm) demands ultra-precise control of optical figure and finish to avoid intensity modulation and scatter that can result in damage to the optics chain or system hardware. Second, the optics must be super-polished and virtually free of surface and subsurface flaws that can limit optic lifetime through laser-induced damage initiation and growth at the flaw sites, particularly at 351 nm. Lastly, ultra-precise optics for beam conditioning are required to control laser beam quality. These optics contain customized surface topographical structures that cannot be made using traditional fabrication processes. In this review, we will present the development and implementation of large-aperture MRF tools and techniques specifically designed to meet the demanding optical performance challenges required in large-aperture high-power laser systems. In particular, we will discuss the advances made by using MRF technology to expose and remove surface and subsurface flaws in optics during final polishing to yield optics with improve laser damage resistance, the novel application of MRF deterministic polishing to imprint complex topographical information and wavefront correction patterns onto optical surfaces, and our efforts to advance the technology to manufacture large-aperture damage resistant optics.

  20. Large aperture adaptive optics for intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, François; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-05-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed a range of large aperture electro-mechanical deformable mirrors (DM) suitable for ultra short pulsed intense lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations thanks to electromechanical actuators driven by stepper motors. DM design and assembly method have been adapted to large aperture beams and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm at 45° angle of incidence. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Simulations were correlated with measurements on optical bench and the design has been validated by calculation for very large aperture (up to Ø550mm). Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for actual MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The MD-AME mirrors can be adapted to circular, square or elliptical beams and they are compatible with all dielectric or metallic coatings.

  1. Performance characteristics of a narrow-linewidth distributed-Bragg-reflector laser for optical remote sensing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Little, L.M.; Beernink, K.J.; Papen, G.C.; Coleman, J.J.

    1996-10-01

    Optical remote sensing systems designed to track pollutants and greenhouse gases have received increasing interest. Here, the performance of a novel ridge-waveguide, distributed-Bragg-reflector laser was tested for spectroscopic remote sensing applications. The laser exhibits a narrow linewidth, excellent side-mode suppression, and flexible, highly repeatable wavelength tuning. These characteristics are significant improvements over current Fabry-Perot lasers, and indicate that distributed-Bragg-reflector lasers are promising candidates for implementing advanced semiconductor-based optical remote sensing systems.

  2. Matter-wave analog of an optical random laser

    SciTech Connect

    Plodzien, Marcin; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2011-08-15

    The accumulation of atoms in the lowest energy level of a trap and the subsequent out coupling of these atoms is a realization of a matter-wave analog of a conventional optical laser. Optical random lasers require materials that provide optical gain but, contrary to conventional lasers, the modes are determined by multiple scattering and not a cavity. We show that a Bose-Einstein condensate can be loaded in a spatially correlated disorder potential prepared in such a way that the Anderson localization phenomenon operates as a bandpass filter. A multiple scattering process selects atoms with certain momenta and determines laser modes which represents a matter-wave analog of an optical random laser.

  3. Optically Probed Laser-Induced Field-Free Molecular Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, O.; Lavorel, B.; Hertz, E.; Chaussard, F.

    Molecular alignment induced by laser fields has been investigated in research laboratories for over two decades. It led to a better understanding of the fundamental processes at play in the interaction of strong laser fields with molecules, and also provided significant contributions to the fields of high harmonic generation, laser spectroscopy, and laser filamentation. In this chapter, we discuss molecular alignment produced under field-free conditions, as resulting from the interaction of a laser pulse of duration shorter than the rotational period of the molecule. The experimental results presented will be confined to the optically probed alignment of linear as well as asymmetric top molecules. Special care will be taken to describe and compare various optical methods that can be employed to characterize laser-induced molecular alignment. Promising applications of optically probed molecular alignment will be also demonstrated.

  4. [Important bio-thermal physical problems and latest advancement in laser cell engineering].

    PubMed

    Li, H J; Liu, J; Zhang, X X

    2001-10-01

    The recently emerging technique of laser microsurgery (optical tweezers, optical scissors, etc.) is providing a new precise, sterile method for the cell engineering practices such as introduction of external gene into an object cell, cell-fusion, and trapping or transportation of microscopic objects (cells or chromosomes etc.). The thermal effects thus induced usually proved to be critical factors for successful operation of this method. In order to meet the requirement for the rapid development in this territory, some important bio-thermal physical problems and the corresponding research subjects in this area were comprehensively summarized. Difficulties and critical issues were discussed. The latest advancement of the laser cell engineering was also described. This review is attempted to bridge up the gap between bioengineering and thermal science fields and then to enhance the rapid progress of laser microsurgery. PMID:11845828

  5. Laser induced damage in optical materials: twelfth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1981-09-01

    The twelfth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30 Sept.-l Oct., 1980. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-l, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific research. Over 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Japan, and West Germany. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning materials and measurements, mirrors and surfaces, thin films, and finally fundamental mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high power systems. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the symposium. The thirteenth annual symposium is scheduled for 17-18 Nov. 1981 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20333088

  6. Integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ling-Xiu; Liu, Bo-Wen; Lv, Xiao-Meng; Yang, Yue-De; Xiao, Jin-Long; Huang, Yong-Zhen

    2015-05-11

    We experimentally study the characteristics of an integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection through a connected optical waveguide. Based on the lasing spectra, four-wave mixing, injection locking, and period-two oscillation states are observed due to the mutually optical injection by adjusting the injected currents applied to the two microdisks. The enhanced 3 dB bandwidth is realized for the microdisk laser at the injection locking state, and photonic microwave is obtained from the electrode of the microdisk laser under the period-two oscillation state. The plentifully dynamical states similar as semiconductor lasers subject to external optical injection are realized due to strong optical interaction between the two microdisks.

  7. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; et al

    2015-04-22

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  8. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; Milathianaki, Despina; Polzin, Wayne; Ratner, Daniel; Tavella, Franz; Vetter, Sharon; Welch, Marc; White, William E.; Fry, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS. PMID:25931064

  9. Laser-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhixing; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F; Puliafito, Carmen A

    2009-06-15

    We have developed a laser-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy method that can potentially fuse with existing optical microscopic imaging modalities. To acquire an image, the ultrasonic transducer is kept stationary during data acquisition, and only the laser light is raster scanned by an x-y galvanometer scanner. A lateral resolution of 7.8 microm and a circular field of view with a diameter of 6 mm were achieved in an optically clear medium. Using a laser system working at a pulse repetition rate of 1,024 Hz, the data acquisition time for an image consisting of 256 x 256 pixels was less than 2 min. PMID:19529698

  10. Advances in nonlinear optical materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The recent progress in the application of nonlinear techniques to extend the frequency of laser sources has come from the joint progress in laser sources and in nonlinear materials. A brief summary of the progress in diode pumped solid state lasers is followed by an overview of progress in nonlinear frequency extension by harmonic generation and parametric processes. Improved nonlinear materials including bulk crystals, quasiphasematched interactions, guided wave devices, and quantum well intersubband studies are discussed with the idea of identifying areas of future progress in nonlinear materials and devices.

  11. Pulse front adaptive optics: a new method for control of ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bangshan; Salter, Patrick S; Booth, Martin J

    2015-07-27

    Ultrafast lasers enable a wide range of physics research and the manipulation of short pulses is a critical part of the ultrafast tool kit. Current methods of laser pulse shaping are usually considered separately in either the spatial or the temporal domain, but laser pulses are complex entities existing in four dimensions, so full freedom of manipulation requires advanced forms of spatiotemporal control. We demonstrate through a combination of adaptable diffractive and reflective optical elements - a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) and a deformable mirror (DM) - decoupled spatial control over the pulse front (temporal group delay) and phase front of an ultra-short pulse was enabled. Pulse front modulation was confirmed through autocorrelation measurements. This new adaptive optics technique, for the first time enabling in principle arbitrary shaping of the pulse front, promises to offer a further level of control for ultrafast lasers. PMID:26367595

  12. Versatile optical manipulation system for inspection, laser processing, and isolation of individual living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhrmann, B.; Jahnke, H.-G.; Schmidt, M.; Jähn, K.; Betz, T.; Müller, K.; Rothermel, A.; Käs, J.; Robitzki, A. A.

    2006-06-01

    Isolation of individual cells from a heterogeneous cell population is an invaluable step in the analysis of single cell properties. The demands in molecular and cellular biology as well as molecular medicine are the selection, isolation, and monitoring of single cells and cell clusters of biopsy material. Of particular interest are methods which complement a passive optical or spectroscopic selection with a variety of active single cell processing techniques such as mechanical, biochemical, or genetic manipulation prior to isolation. Sophisticated laser-based cell processing systems are available which can perform single cell processing in a contact-free and sterile manner. Until now, however, these multipurpose turnkey systems offer only basic micromanipulation and are not easily modified or upgraded, whereas laboratory situations often demand simple but versatile and adaptable solutions. We built a flexible laser micromanipulation platform combining contact-free microdissection and catapulting capabilities using a pulsed ultraviolet (337nm) laser with simultaneous generation of optical tweezing forces using a continuous wave infrared (1064nm) laser. The potential of our platform is exemplified with techniques such as local laser-induced injection of biomolecules into individual living cells, laser surgery, isolation of single cells by laser catapulting, and control of neuronal growth using optical gradient forces. Arbitrary dynamic optical force patterns can be created by fast laser scanning with acousto-optical deflectors and galvanometer mirrors, allowing multibeam contact-free micromanipulation, a prerequisite for reliable handling of material in laboratory-on-a-chip applications. All common microscopy techniques can be used simultaneously with the offered palette of micromanipulation methods. Taken together, we show that advanced optical micromanipulation systems can be designed which combine quality, cost efficiency, and adaptability.

  13. Laser Safety Method For Duplex Open Loop Parallel Optical Link

    DOEpatents

    Baumgartner, Steven John; Hedin, Daniel Scott; Paschal, Matthew James

    2003-12-02

    A method and apparatus are provided to ensure that laser optical power does not exceed a "safe" level in an open loop parallel optical link in the event that a fiber optic ribbon cable is broken or otherwise severed. A duplex parallel optical link includes a transmitter and receiver pair and a fiber optic ribbon that includes a designated number of channels that cannot be split. The duplex transceiver includes a corresponding transmitter and receiver that are physically attached to each other and cannot be detached therefrom, so as to ensure safe, laser optical power in the event that the fiber optic ribbon cable is broken or severed. Safe optical power is ensured by redundant current and voltage safety checks.

  14. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  15. Reliability of high power laser diodes with external optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonsendorf, Dennis; Schneider, Stephan; Meinschien, Jens; Tomm, Jens W.

    2016-03-01

    Direct diode laser systems gain importance in the fields of material processing and solid-state laser pumping. With increased output power, also the influence of strong optical feedback has to be considered. Uncontrolled optical feedback is known for its spectral and power fluctuation effects, as well as potential emitter damage. We found that even intended feedback by use of volume Bragg gratings (VBG) for spectral stabilization may result in emitter lifetime reduction. To provide stable and reliable laser systems design, guidelines and maximum feedback ratings have to be found. We present a model to estimate the optical feedback power coupled back into the laser diode waveguide. It includes several origins of optical feedback and wide range of optical elements. The failure thresholds of InGaAs and AlGaAs bars have been determined not only at standard operation mode but at various working points. The influence of several feedback levels to laser diode lifetime is investigated up to 4000h. The analysis of the semiconductor itself leads to a better understanding of the degradation process by defect spread. Facet microscopy, LBIC- and electroluminescence measurements deliver detailed information about semiconductor defects before and after aging tests. Laser diode protection systems can monitor optical feedback. With this improved understanding, the emergency shutdown threshold can be set low enough to ensure laser diode reliability but also high enough to provide better machine usability avoiding false alarms.

  16. Advanced laser sensing receiver concepts based on FPA technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, P. L.; Petrin, R. R.; Jolin, J. L.; Foy, B. R.; Lowrance, J. L.; Renda, G.

    2002-01-01

    The ultimate performance of any remote sensor is ideally governed by the hardware signal-to-noise capability and allowed signal-averaging time. In real-world scenarios, this may not be realizable and the limiting factors may suggest the need for more advanced capabilities. Moving from passive to active remote sensors offers the advantage of control over the illumination source, the laser. Added capabilities may include polarization discrimination, instantaneous imaging, range resolution, simultaneous multi-spectral measurement, or coherent detection. However, most advanced detection technology has been engineered heavily towards the straightforward passive sensor requirements, measuring an integrated photon flux. The need for focal plane array technology designed specifically for laser sensing has been recognized for some time, but advances have only recently made the engineering possible. This paper will present a few concepts for laser sensing receiver architectures, the driving specifications behind those concepts, and test/modeling results of such designs.

  17. An optically-triggered semiconductor switch for high power laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng W.; Warren, M.E.

    1995-04-01

    The work involves research leading to an optically triggered switch for a high power laser pulse. The switch uses a semiconductor heterostructure whose optical properties are modified by a low power laser trigger such as a laser diode. Potential applications include optical control of pulsed power systems, control of medical lasers and implementation of security features in optical warhead architectures.

  18. Laser-Induced Damage Threshold and Certification Procedures for Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This document provides instructions for performing laser-induced-damage-threshold tests and pass-fail certification tests on optical materials used in pulsed-laser systems. The optical materials to which these procedures apply include coated and uncoated optical substrates, laser crystals, Q-switches, polarizers, and other optical components employed in pulsed-laser systems.

  19. All-optical logic gates and wavelength conversion via the injection locking of a Fabry-Perot semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, E.; Pochet, M.; Schmidt, J.; Locke, T.; Naderi, N.; Usechak, N. G.

    2013-03-01

    This work investigates the implementation of all-optical logic gates based on optical injection locking (OIL). All-optical inverting, NOR, and NAND gates are experimentally demonstrated using two distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, a multi-mode Fabry-Perot laser diode, and an optical band-pass filter. The DFB lasers are externally modulated to represent logic inputs into the cavity of the multi-mode Fabry-Perot slave laser. The input DFB (master) lasers' wavelengths are aligned with the longitudinal modes of the Fabry-Perot slave laser and their optical power is used to modulate the injection conditions in the Fabry-Perot slave laser. The optical band-pass filter is used to select a Fabry- Perot mode that is either suppressed or transmitted given the logic state of the injecting master laser signals. When the input signal(s) is (are) in the on state, injection locking, and thus the suppression of the non-injected Fabry-Perot modes, is induced, yielding a dynamic system that can be used to implement photonic logic functions. Additionally, all-optical photonic processing is achieved using the cavity-mode shift produced in the injected slave laser under external optical injection. The inverting logic case can also be used as a wavelength converter — a key component in advanced wavelength-division multiplexing networks. As a result of this experimental investigation, a more comprehensive understanding of the locking parameters involved in injecting multiple lasers into a multi-mode cavity and the logic transition time is achieved. The performance of optical logic computations and wavelength conversion has the potential for ultrafast operation, limited primarily by the photon decay rate in the slave laser.

  20. Optical protocols for advanced spacecraft networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    Most present day fiber optic networks are in fact extensions of copper wire networks. As a result, their speed is still limited by electronics even though optics is capable of running three orders of magnitude faster. Also, the fact that photons do not interact with one another (as electrons do) provides optical communication systems with some unique properties or new functionality that is not readily taken advantage of with conventional approaches. Some of the motivation for implementing network protocols in the optical domain, a few possible approaches including optical code-division multiple-access (CDMA), and how this class of networks can extend the technology life cycle of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) with increased performance and functionality are described.

  1. Method and apparatus for efficient operation of optically pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipes, Jr., Donald L. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An optically pumped single mode laser, e.g., Nd:YAG crystal (20) with planoconcave mirrors is increased in efficiency by an order of magnitude to about 8% by optics (25, 27) for focusing the high power multimode output of laser diode arrays (21, 22) into the mode volume (20') of the laser medium (20). A plurality of these optically pumped single mode lasers (1-4) may be cascaded in a ring with dichroic mirrors (M.sub.1 -M.sub.4) at the corners for coupling in the laser diode arrays, each having its own means for spatially tailoring its beam to concentrate pump distribution inside the lasing mode volume of the medium. An InGaAlAs pump diode (30) with its wavelength the same as the lasing medium makes the ring unidirectional.

  2. Holographic femtosecond laser manipulation for advanced material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2016-02-01

    Parallel femtosecond laser processing using a computer-generated hologram displayed on a spatial light modulator, known as holographic femtosecond laser processing, provides the advantages of high throughput and high-energy use efficiency. Therefore, it has been widely used in many applications, including laser material processing, two-photon polymerization, two-photon microscopy, and optical manipulation of biological cells. In this paper, we review the development of holographic femtosecond laser processing over the past few years from the perspective of wavefront and polarization modulation. In particular, line-shaped and vector-wave femtosecond laser processing are addressed. These beam-shaping techniques are useful for performing large-area machining in laser cutting, peeling, and grooving of materials and for high-speed fabrication of the complex nanostructures that are applied to material-surface texturing to control tribological properties, wettability, reflectance, and retardance. Furthermore, issues related to the nonuniformity of diffraction light intensity in optical reconstruction and wavelength dispersion from a computer-generated hologram are addressed. As a result, large-scale holographic femtosecond laser processing over 1000 diffraction spots was successfully demonstrated on a glass sample.

  3. COIL--Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser: advances in development and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodymova, Jarmila

    2005-09-01

    Advantageous features of Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL) for laser technologies have increased considerably activities of international COIL communities during past ten years. They have been focused on the advanced concepts of hardware designs of the COIL subsystems, and testing and scaling-up of existing laser facilities. Prospective special applications of COIL technology, both civil and military, have received a significant attention and gained concrete aims. The paper is introduced by a brief description of the COIL operation mechanism and key device subsystems. It deals then with presentation of some investigated advanced concepts of singlet oxygen generators, alternative methods for atomic iodine generation, a mixing and ejector nozzle design to downsize a pressure recovery system, and optical resonators for high power COIL systems. The advanced diagnostics and computational modeling are also mentioned as very useful tools for critical insight into the laser kinetics and fluid dynamics, supporting thus the COIL research. The recent progress in the COIL development moves this laser closer to the application projects that are also briefly presented.

  4. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1987-01-01

    A 25 megabit/sec direct detection optical communication system that used Q=4 PPM signalling was constructed and its performance measured under laboratory conditions. The system used a single-mode AlGaAs laser diode transmitter and low noise silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) photodetector. Comparison of measured performance with the theoretical revealed that modeling the APD output as a Gaussian process under conditions of negligible background radiation and low (less than 10 to the -12 power A) APD bulk leakage currents leads to substantial underestimates of optimal APD gain to use and overestimates of system bit error probability. A procedure is given to numerically compute system performance which uses the more accurate Webb's Approximation of the exact Conradi distribution for the APD ouput signal that does not require excessive amounts of computer time (a few minutes of VAX 8600 CPU time per system operating point). Examples are given which illustrate the breakdown of the Gaussian approximation in assessing system performance. This system achieved a bit error probability of 10 to the -6 power at a received signal energy corresponding to an average of 60 absorbed photons/bit and optimal APD gain of 700.

  5. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1988-01-01

    Slot timing recovery in a direct detection optical PPM communication system can be achieved by processing the photodetector waveform with a nonlinear device whose output forms the input to a phase lock group. The choice of a simple transition detector as the nonlinearity is shown to give satisfactory synchronization performance. The rms phase error of the recovered slot clock and the effect of slot timing jitter on the bit error probability were directly measured. The experimental system consisted of an AlGaAs laser diode (lambda = 834 nm) and a silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) photodetector and used Q=4 PPM signaling operated at a source data rate of 25 megabits/second. The mathematical model developed to characterize system performance is shown to be in good agreement with actual performance measurements. The use of the recovered slot clock in the receiver resulted in no degradation in receiver sensitivity compared to a system with perfect slot timing. The system achieved a bit error probability of 10 to the minus 6 power at received signal energies corresponding to an average of less than 60 detected photons per information bit.

  6. Electro-optical sensor with automatic suppression of laser dazzling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, G.; Eberle, B.

    2012-10-01

    The progress in laser technology leads to very compact but nevertheless powerful laser sources. In the visible and near infrared spectral region, lasers of any wavelength can be purchased. Especially continuous wave laser sources pose a serious threat to the human eye and electro-optical sensors due to their high proliferation and easy availability. The manifold of wavelengths cannot be encountered by conventional safety measures like absorption or interference filters. We present a protection concept for electro-optical sensors to suppress dazzling in the visible spectral region. The key element of the concept is the use of a digital micromirror device (DMD) in combination with wavelength multiplexing. This approach allows selective spectral filtering in defined regions of interest in the scene. The system offers the possibility of automatic attenuation of dazzling laser radiation. An anti-dazzle algorithm comprises the analysis of the laser wavelength and the subsequent activation of the appropriate micromirrors of the DMD.

  7. Integrated Electro-optical Laser-Beam Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boord, Warren T.

    1990-01-01

    Scanners using solid-state devices compact, consume little power, and have no moving parts. Integrated electro-optical laser scanner, in conjunction with external lens, points outgoing beam of light in any number of different directions, depending on number of upper electrodes. Offers beam-deflection angles larger than those of acousto-optic scanners. Proposed for such diverse applications as nonimpact laser printing, color imaging, ranging, barcode reading, and robotic vision.

  8. Recent advances in digital camera optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Keizo

    2012-10-01

    The digital camera market has extremely expanded in the last ten years. The zoom lens for digital camera is especially the key determining factor of the camera body size and image quality. Its technologies have been based on several analog technological progresses including the method of aspherical lens manufacturing and the mechanism of image stabilization. Panasonic is one of the pioneers of both technologies. I will introduce the previous trend in optics of zoom lens as well as original optical technologies of Panasonic digital camera "LUMIX", and in addition optics in 3D camera system. Besides, I would like to suppose the future trend in digital cameras.

  9. Key notes to the advancement of optical scanning (Keynote Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiser, Leo

    2005-08-01

    In forming an historical perspective of the development of optical scanning, we ask a probing question: What was the first major optical scanning innovation? We offer one having unexpected attributes, and seek audience ideas. We then demonstrate the pioneering work in Optical Scanning for information transfer, some created long before we arrived on the scene. Our job has been and is: Make it Faster and Better. The body of the presentation addresses how our technology advanced to this useful state.

  10. Tight focusing of ultra-intense laser pulses by innovative plasma optics toward extreme intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsutsumi, M.; Kon, A.; Fuchs, J.; Buffechoux, S.; Audebert, P.; Kodama, R.

    2009-11-01

    With rapid advances in laser technology, laser beams are now available that can be routinely focused to intensities approaching >10^21 Wcm-2. Enhancement of laser intensity is achieved by truncating the pulse width, increasing the laser-energy, or reducing the focal spot size. Although the reduction of the spot size is the simplest among those, by using low f-number optics, this method is not frequently employed because of the difficulty in avoiding damage from target debris or complexity of alignment procedure. We developed for the first time very compact (<1 cm^3) extremely low f-number (0.4) plasma-based, confocal ellipsoid focusing systems. Direct measurement of the laser focal spot using low-energy laser indicates 1/5 reduction of spot size compared to standard focusing (using a f/3 optics). Around tenfold enhancement of laser intensity by reduction of the spot size for high power shots is clearly evidenced by remarkable enhancement of proton energy. The experiment was performed at LULI 100TW laser facility.

  11. Laser guide stars and adaptive optics for astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.

    1992-07-15

    Five papers are included: feasibility experiment for sodium-alyer laser guide stars at LLNL; system design for a high power sodium beacon laser; sodium guide star adaptive optics system for astronomical imaging in the visible and near-infrared; high frame-rate, large field wavefront sensor; and resolution limits for ground-based astronomical imaging. Figs, tabs, refs.

  12. Wide baseline optical interferometry with Laser Guide Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D. T., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    Laser guide stars have been used successfully as a reference source for adaptive optics systems. We present a possible method for utilizing laser beacons as sources for interferometric phasing. The technique would extend the sky coverage for wide baseline interferometers and allow interferometric measurement and imaging of dim objects.

  13. Innovative optics for shaping and focusing industrial CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielewicz, Edward J.; Sherman, Glenn H.

    1989-03-01

    Applications of diamond-turned axicons for high power CO2 lasers are reviewed. The use of transmissive and reflective axicons in laser applications and the use of faceted optics for shaping and directing laser light are discussed. Diamond-turned ZnSe lenses are compared with conventional plano-convex and meniscus lenses. Results are presented from cutting and welding plastics and metals, noting the advantages of diamond-turned focusing elements.

  14. A Comparison of Two Prototype Laser-Optical Firing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg L. Morelli; Michelle R. Bright

    2008-08-11

    The design and characterization of small, ruggedized laser-optical subsystems is required for the continued development of robust laser-optical firing systems. Typically, these subsystems must be capable of generating the needed laser optical energy, delivering that energy via fiber-optical cables while taking up occupying a volume as small as possible. A novel beam splitting and fiber injection scheme has been proposed which utilizes two diffractive optical components. These components were utilized to reduce the volume of a previously designed system. A laser-optical prototype system was assembled and tested which utilized this beam splitting and fiber injection scheme along other modifications to the laser module and the power supply. This prototype was based on earlier designs that utilized environmentally proven opto-mechanical sub-assemblies. The system was tested to characterize the laser performance, the splitter-coupler transmission efficiency, channel-to-channel energy balance and fiber interchangeability. The results obtained for this design will be compared to the performance of a prototype system based on a more traditional beam splitting and fiber injection scheme. The traditional design utilized partially reflecting mirrors for beam splitting and plano-convex lenses for fiber injection. These results will be discussed as will their ultimate impact on future designs and packaging strategies.

  15. A survey of advanced excimer optical imaging and lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Suwa, Kyoichi

    1998-11-01

    The first item discussed in this paper is to estimate the future trend regarding minimum geometry and the optical parameters, such as NA and wavelength. Simulations based on aerial images are performed for the estimation. The resolution limit is defined as a minimum feature size which retains practical depth of focus (DOF). Pattern geometry is classified into two categories, which are dense lines and isolated lines. Available wavelengths are assumed to be KrF excimer laser (λ=248 nm), ArF excimer laser (λ=193 nm) and F2 excimer laser (λ=157 nm). Based upon the simulation results, the resolution limit is estimated for each geometry and each wavelength. The second item is to survey ArF optics. At present, the ArF excimer laser is regarded as one of the most promising candidates as a next-generation light source. Discussions are ranging over some critical issues. The lifetime of ArF optics supposedly limited by the radiation compaction of silica glass is estimated in comparison with KrF optics. Availability of calcium fluoride (CaF2) is also discussed. As a designing issue, a comparative study is made about the optical configuration, dioptric or catadioptric. In the end, our resist-based performance is shown.

  16. Digital polarization holography advancing geometrical phase optics.

    PubMed

    De Sio, Luciano; Roberts, David E; Liao, Zhi; Nersisyan, Sarik; Uskova, Olena; Wickboldt, Lloyd; Tabiryan, Nelson; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    Geometrical phase or the fourth generation (4G) optics enables realization of optical components (lenses, prisms, gratings, spiral phase plates, etc.) by patterning the optical axis orientation in the plane of thin anisotropic films. Such components exhibit near 100% diffraction efficiency over a broadband of wavelengths. The films are obtained by coating liquid crystalline (LC) materials over substrates with patterned alignment conditions. Photo-anisotropic materials are used for producing desired alignment conditions at the substrate surface. We present and discuss here an opportunity of producing the widest variety of "free-form" 4G optical components with arbitrary spatial patterns of the optical anisotropy axis orientation with the aid of a digital spatial light polarization converter (DSLPC). The DSLPC is based on a reflective, high resolution spatial light modulator (SLM) combined with an "ad hoc" optical setup. The most attractive feature of the use of a DSLPC for photoalignment of nanometer thin photo-anisotropic coatings is that the orientation of the alignment layer, and therefore of the fabricated LC or LC polymer (LCP) components can be specified on a pixel-by-pixel basis with high spatial resolution. By varying the optical magnification or de-magnification the spatial resolution of the photoaligned layer can be adjusted to an optimum for each application. With a simple "click" it is possible to record different optical components as well as arbitrary patterns ranging from lenses to invisible labels and other transparent labels that reveal different images depending on the side from which they are viewed. PMID:27505793

  17. Analysis of advanced optical glass and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry; Feng, Chen

    1991-01-01

    Optical lens systems performance utilizing optical materials comprising reluctant glass forming compositions was studied. Such special glasses are being explored by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) researchers utilizing techniques such as containerless processing in space on the MSFC Acoustic Levitation Furnace and on the High Temperature Acoustic Levitation Furnace in the conceptual design phase for the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML) series of shuttle flights. The application of high refractive index and low dispersive power glasses in optical lens design was investigated. The potential benefits and the impacts to the optical lens design performance were evaluated. The results of the studies revealed that the use of these extraordinary glasses can result in significant optical performance improvements. Recommendations of proposed optical properties for potential new glasses were also made. Applications of these new glasses are discussed, including the impact of high refractive index and low dispersive power, improvements of the system performance by using glasses which are located outside of traditional glass map, and considerations in establishing glass properties beyond conventional glass map limits.

  18. EDITORIAL: Special issue on optical neural engineering: advances in optical stimulation technology Special issue on optical neural engineering: advances in optical stimulation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoham, Shy; Deisseroth, Karl

    2010-08-01

    a single spine, with two-photon uncaging) and in rapid, flexible spatial-temporal patterns [10-14]. Nevertheless, current technology generally requires damaging doses of UV or violet illumination and the continuous re-introduction of the caged compound, which, despite interest, makes for a difficult transition beyond in vitro preparations. Thus, the tremendous progress in the in vivo application of photo-stimulation tools over the past five years has been largely facilitated by two 'exciting' new photo-stimulation technologies: photo-biological stimulation of a rapidly increasing arsenal of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps ('optogenetic' probes[15-18]) and direct photo-thermal stimulation of neural tissue with an IR laser [19-21]. The Journal of Neural Engineering has dedicated a special section in this issue to highlight advances in optical stimulation technology, which includes original peer-reviewed contributions dealing with the design of modern optical systems for spatial-temporal control of optical excitation patterns and with the biophysics of neural-thermal interaction mediated by electromagnetic waves. The paper by Nikolenko, Peterka and Yuste [22] presents a compact design of a microscope-photo-stimulator based on a transmissive phase-modulating spatial-light modulator (SLM). Computer-generated holographic photo-stimulation using SLMs [12-14, 23] allows the efficient parallel projection of intense sparse patterns of light, and the welcome development of compact, user-friendly systems will likely reduce the barrier to its widespread adoption. The paper by Losavio et al [24] presents the design and functional characteristics of their acousto-optical deflector (AOD) systems for studying spatial-temporal dendritic integration in single neurons in vitro. Both single-photon (UV) and two-photon (femtosecond pulsed IR) AOD uncaging systems are described in detail. The paper presents an excellent overview of the current state of the art and limitations of

  19. Laser chemical etching of waveguides and quasi-optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet D'Aubigny, Christian Yann Pierre

    2003-11-01

    The terahertz (THz) frequency domain, located at the frontier of radio and light, is the last unexplored region of the electromagnetic spectrum. As technology becomes available, THz systems are finding applications to fields ranging all the way from astronomical and atmospheric remote sensing to space telecommunications, medical imaging, and security. In Astronomy the THz and far infrared (IR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (λ = 300 to 10 μm) may hold the answers to countless questions regarding the origin and evolution of the Universe, galaxy, star and planet formation. Over the past decade, advances in telescope and detector technology have for the first time made this regime available to astronomers. Near THz frequencies, metallic hollow waveguide structures become so small, (typically much less than a millimeter), that conventional machining becomes extremely difficult, and in many cases, nearly impossible. Laser induced, micro-chemical etching is a promising new technology that can be used to fabricate three dimensional structures many millimeters across with micrometer accuracy. Laser micromachining of silicon possesses a significant edge over more conventional techniques. It does not require the use of masks and is not confined to crystal planes. A non-contact process, it eliminates tool wear and vibration problems associated with classical milling machines. At the University of Arizona we have constructed the first such laser micromachining system optimized for the fabrication of THz and far IR waveguide and quasi-optical components. The system can machine structures up to 50 mm in diameter, down to a few microns accuracy in a few minutes and with a remarkable surface finish. A variety of THz devices have been fabricated using this technique, their design, fabrication, assembly and theoretical performance is described in the chapters that follow.

  20. Optical properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) during nanosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankova, N. E.; Atanasov, P. A.; Nikov, Ru. G.; Nikov, R. G.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Stoyanchov, T. R.; Fukata, N.; Kolev, K. N.; Valova, E. I.; Georgieva, J. S.; Armyanov, St. A.

    2016-06-01

    This article presents experimental investigations of effects of the process parameters on the medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer processed by laser source with irradiation at UV (266 and 355 nm), VIS (532 nm) and NIR (1064 nm). Systematic experiments are done to characterize how the laser beam parameters (wavelength, fluence, and number of pulses) affect the optical properties and the chemical composition in the laser treated areas. Remarkable changes of the optical properties and the chemical composition are observed. Despite the low optical absorption of the native PDMS for UV, VIS and NIR wavelengths, successful laser treatment is accomplished due to the incubation process occurring below the polymer surface. With increasing of the fluence and the number of the pulses chemical transformations are revealed in the entire laser treated area and hence decreasing of the optical transmittance is observed. The incubation gets saturation after a certain number of pulses and the laser ablation of the material begins efficiently. At the UV and VIS wavelengths the number of the initial pulses, at which the optical transmittance begins to reduce, decreases from 16 up to 8 with increasing of the laser fluence up to 1.0, 2.5 and 10 J cm-2 for 266, 355 and 532 nm, respectively. In the case of 1064 nm the optical transmittance begins to reduce at 11th pulse incident at a fluence of 13 J cm-2 and the number of the pulses decreases to 8 when the fluence reaches value of 16 J cm-2. The threshold laser fluence needed to induce incubation process after certain number of pulses of 8 is different for every wavelength irradiation as the values increase from 1.0 for 266 nm up to 16 J cm-2 for 1064 nm. The incubation and the ablation processes occur in the PDMS elastomer material during its pulsed laser treatment are a complex function of the wavelength, fluence, number of pulses and the material properties as well.

  1. Nonlinear dynamics of quantum cascade lasers with optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumpertz, L.; Ferré, S.; Schires, K.; Carras, M.; Grillot, F.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers are widely used in optical communications, high-resolution spectroscopy, imaging, and remote sensing due to their wide spectral range, going from mid-infrared to the terahertz regime. The dynamics of QClasers are dominated by their ultrafast carrier lifetime, typically of the order of a few picoseconds. The combination of optical nonlinearities and ultrafast dynamics is an interesting feature of QC-lasers, and investigating the dynamical properties of such lasers gives unprecedented insights into the underlying physics of the components, which is of interest for the next generation of QC devices. A particular feature of QC-lasers is the absence of relaxation oscillations, which is the consequence of the relatively short carrier lifetime compared to photon lifetime. Optical feedback (i.e. self-injection) is known to be a robust technique for stabilizing or synchronizing a free-running laser, however its effect on QC-lasers remains mostly unexplored. This work aims at discussing the dynamical properties of QC-lasers operating under optical feedback by employing a novel set of rate equations taking into account the upper and lower lasing levels, the bottom state as well as the gain stage's cascading. This work analyzes the static laser properties subject to optical feedback and provides a comparison with experiments. Spectral analysis reveals that QC-lasers undergo distinct feedback regimes depending on the phase and amplitude of the reinjected field, and that the coherence-collapse regime only appears in a very narrow range of operation, making such lasers much more stable than their interband counterparts.

  2. Characterization of the Los Alamos IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser using multiple optical paths and laser focusing optics

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, John O; Bernal, John E

    2009-01-01

    Fiber laser technology has been identified as the replacement power source for the existing Los Alamos TA-55 production laser welding system. An IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser was purchased, installed at SM-66 R3, and accepted in February 2008. No characterization of the laser and no welding was performed in the Feb 2008 to May 2009 interval. T. Lienert and J. Bernal (Ref. 1, July 2009) determined the existing 200 mm Rofin collimator and focus heads used with the Rofin diode pumped lasers were inadequate for use with the IPG laser due to clipping of the IPG laser beam. Further efforts in testing of the IPG laser with Optoskand fiber delivery optics and a Rofin 120 mm collimator proved problematic due to optical fiber damage. As a result, IPG design optical fibers were purchased as replacements for subsequent testing. Within the same interval, an IPG fiber-to-fiber (F2F) connector, custom built for LANL, (J. Milewski, S. Gravener, Ref.2) was demonstrated and accepted at IPG Oxford, MA in August 2009. An IPG service person was contracted to come to LANL to assist in the installation, training, troubleshooting and characterization of the multiple beam paths and help perform laser head optics characterization. The statement of work is provided below: In summary the laser system, optical fibers, F2F connector, Precitec head, and a modified Rofin type (w/120mm Optoskand collimator) IWindowIBoot system focus head (Figure 1) were shown to perform well at powers up to 6 kW CW. Power measurements, laser spot size measurements, and other characterization data and lessons learned are contained within this report. In addition, a number of issues were identified that will require future resolution.

  3. Advanced data services over optical transport networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Lyndon; Razdan, Rajender; Wang, Yalin

    2005-11-01

    Work on optical network control plane protocols has enabled faster and more efficient provisioning and management of carrier core optical networks, thereby reducing operational costs and capital expenditure. Many potential data applications for such capabilities, however, require Ethernet as the physical interface into the network, rather than SONET/SDH or OTN (Optical Transport Network) interfaces. Support of such services over an optical network becomes a multi-layer networking problem, wherein the client layer is packet based (e.g., Ethernet) and the server layer is optical (SONET/SDH or OTN). This paper discusses the enhancements that have been created in SONET/SDH and OTN networks (e.g., GFP, VCAT, LCAS) for the efficient transport of Ethernet and other data networking protocols, and the related extensions to control plane protocols that are necessary to allow for the support of multi-layer networking. Different control-plane models are being pursued in standards bodies such as ITU-T and IETF, and prototyping is being carried out and tested in the OIF. These various approaches are discussed in detail here, with focus placed on the prototyping work that has been done in the OIF, especially for the OIF 2005 Interoperability Demonstration.

  4. Development of Advanced Laser Diode Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, J. J.; Papen, G. C.

    1998-01-01

    The design and operation of InGaAs-GaAs-AlGaAs asymmetric cladding ridge waveguide distributed Bragg reflector lasers is presented. Targeted for the remote sensing of water vapor with absorption lines in the lambda approximately 930 nm region, these devices operate CW with threshold currents as low as 11 MA and slope efficiencies as high as 0.37 W/A. Tbey also operate with over 30-dB side-mode suppression, and the typical CW characteristic temperature, T(sub o), is 95 K.

  5. Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Siekhaus, W.

    1985-02-04

    Disclosed is an apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities. The apparatus comprises a focused and pulsed laser, a photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

  6. Temperature Monitoring by Optical Methods in Laser Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smurov, I.; Doubenskaia, M.

    Diverse optical diagnostic tools were applied for monitoring high temperature heat and mass transfer in a number of laser-based technologies . A set of pyrometers was developed and applied for surface temperature monitoring in pulsed periodic Nd-YAG laser welding and surface treatment, deep penetration welding by CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers, laser cladding (LC) with lateral and coaxial powder injection, and selective laser melting (SLM). Particle-in-flight parameters in LC were measured by CCD camera-based diagnostic system. Infrared camera was applied for process visualization in laser welding, cladding, and SLM. Process monitoring was carried out at different temporal and spatial scales and in different spectral bands. True temperature was restored in pulsed laser surface treatment and in pulsed periodic (PP) LC.

  7. Advanced wavefront measurement and analysis of laser system modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Auerback, J.M.

    1994-11-15

    High spatial resolution measurements of the reflected or transmitted wavefronts of large aperture optical components used in high peak power laser systems is now possible. These measurements are produced by phase shifting interferometry. The wavefront data is in the form of 3-D phase maps that reconstruct the wavefront shape. The emphasis of this work is on the characterization of wavefront features in the mid-spatial wavelength range (from 0.1 to 10.0 mm) and has been accomplished for the first time. Wavefront structure from optical components with spatial wavelengths in this range are of concern because their effects in high peak power laser systems. At high peak power, this phase modulation can convert to large magnitude intensity modulation by non-linear processes. This can lead to optical damage. We have developed software to input the measured phase map data into beam propagation codes in order to model this conversion process. We are analyzing this data to: (1) Characterize the wavefront structure produced by current optical components, (2) Refine our understanding of laser system performance, (3) Develop a database from which future optical component specifications can be derived.

  8. Optical trapping with Bessel beams generated from semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovskii, G. S.; Dudelev, V. V.; Losev, S. N.; Soboleva, K. K.; Deryagin, A. G.; Kuchinskii, V. I.; Sibbett, W.; Rafailov, E. U.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we study generation of Bessel beams from semiconductor lasers with high beam propagation parameter M2 and their utilization for optical trapping and manipulation of microscopic particles including living cells. The demonstrated optical tweezing with diodegenerated Bessel beams paves the way to replace their vibronic-generated counterparts for a range of applications towards novel lab-on-a-chip configurations.

  9. Frequency chirping in semiconductor-optical fiber ring laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiangping; Ye, Peida )

    1990-01-01

    In this letter, a complete small-signal analysis for frequency chirping in the semiconductor-optical fiber ring laser is presented. It shows that chirp-to-power ratio (CPR) strongly depends on the junction phase shift, the optical coupling, and the phase detuning between two cavities, especially if the modulation frequency is below the gigahertz range. 7 refs.

  10. Fiber-optic interferometer using frequency-modulated laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes an electrically passive fiber-optic interferometer which uses dual frequency-modulated laser diodes. Experimental results show that this type of interferometer can attain a displacement range of 100 micron with subnanometer resolution. This technique can serve as the basis for a number of high-precision fiber-optic sensors.

  11. Advanced Imaging Optics Utilizing Wavefront Coding.

    SciTech Connect

    Scrymgeour, David; Boye, Robert; Adelsberger, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Image processing offers a potential to simplify an optical system by shifting some of the imaging burden from lenses to the more cost effective electronics. Wavefront coding using a cubic phase plate combined with image processing can extend the system's depth of focus, reducing many of the focus-related aberrations as well as material related chromatic aberrations. However, the optimal design process and physical limitations of wavefront coding systems with respect to first-order optical parameters and noise are not well documented. We examined image quality of simulated and experimental wavefront coded images before and after reconstruction in the presence of noise. Challenges in the implementation of cubic phase in an optical system are discussed. In particular, we found that limitations must be placed on system noise, aperture, field of view and bandwidth to develop a robust wavefront coded system.

  12. A Large Aperture, High Energy Laser System for Optics and Optical Component Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Nostrand, M C; Weiland, T L; Luthi, R L; Vickers, J L; Sell, W D; Stanley, J A; Honig, J; Auerbach, J; Hackel, R P; Wegner, P J

    2003-11-01

    A large aperture, kJ-class, multi-wavelength Nd-glass laser system has been constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Lab which has unique capabilities for studying a wide variety of optical phenomena. The master-oscillator, power-amplifier (MOPA) configuration of this ''Optical Sciences Laser'' (OSL) produces 1053 nm radiation with shaped pulse lengths which are variable from 0.1-100 ns. The output can be frequency doubled or tripled with high conversion efficiency with a resultant 100 cm{sup 2} high quality output beam. This facility can accommodate prototype hardware for large-scale inertial confinement fusion lasers allowing for investigation of integrated system issues such as optical lifetime at high fluence, optics contamination, compatibility of non-optical materials, and laser diagnostics.

  13. Visualization tool for advanced laser system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Gregg A.; Brunson, Richard L.

    2002-06-01

    Simulation development for Laser Weapon Systems design and system trade analyses has progressed to new levels with the advent of object-oriented software development tools and PC processor capabilities. These tools allow rapid visualization of upcoming laser weapon system architectures and the ability to rapidly respond to what-if scenario questions from potential user commands. These simulations can solve very intensive problems in short time periods to investigate the parameter space of a newly emerging weapon system concept, or can address user mission performance for many different scenario engagements. Equally important to the rapid solution of complex numerical problems is the ability to rapidly visualize the results of the simulation, and to effectively interact with visualized output to glean new insights into the complex interactions of a scenario. Boeing has applied these ideas to develop a tool called the Satellite Visualization and Signature Tool (SVST). This Windows application is based upon a series of C++ coded modules that have evolved from several programs at Boeing-SVS. The SVST structure, extensibility, and some recent results of applying the simulation to weapon system concepts and designs will be discussed in this paper.

  14. Multispectral laser imaging for advanced food analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senni, L.; Burrascano, P.; Ricci, M.

    2016-07-01

    A hardware-software apparatus for food inspection capable of realizing multispectral NIR laser imaging at four different wavelengths is herein discussed. The system was designed to operate in a through-transmission configuration to detect the presence of unwanted foreign bodies inside samples, whether packed or unpacked. A modified Lock-In technique was employed to counterbalance the significant signal intensity attenuation due to transmission across the sample and to extract the multispectral information more efficiently. The NIR laser wavelengths used to acquire the multispectral images can be varied to deal with different materials and to focus on specific aspects. In the present work the wavelengths were selected after a preliminary analysis to enhance the image contrast between foreign bodies and food in the sample, thus identifying the location and nature of the defects. Experimental results obtained from several specimens, with and without packaging, are presented and the multispectral image processing as well as the achievable spatial resolution of the system are discussed.

  15. AFRL Advanced Electric Lasers Branch - Construction and Upgrade of a 50-watt Facility-Class Sodium Guidestar Pump Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronder, T.; Miller, H.; Stohs, J.; Lu, C.; Baker, J.; Lucero, A.

    The development of a reliable and effective laser source for pumping mesospheric sodium to generate an artificial guidestar has been well documented. From the early achievements with 589nm high-power dye lasers at the Keck and Lick observatories to the ground-breaking 50W CW FASOR (Frequency Addition Source of Optical Radiation) Guidestar at the Air Forces Starfire Optical Range (SOR), there has been intense interest in this technology from both the academic and military communities. Beginning in the fall of 2008, the Air Force Research Laboratorys Advanced Electric Lasers Branch began a project to build, test, verify and deliver an upgraded version of the SOR FASOR for use at the AF Maui Optical Station (AMOS) in the summer of 2010. This FASOR will be similar in design to the existing SOR device and produce 50W of diffraction limited, linearly polarized narrow linewidth 589nm light by combining the output of two injection-locked Nd:YAG ring lasers (operating at 1064nm and 1319nm) using resonant sum-frequency generation in a lithium triborate crystal (LBO). The upgraded features will include modularized sub-components, embedded control electronics, and a simplified cooling system. The first portion of this upgrade project is to reconstruct the current SOR FASOR components and include improved methods of regulating the gain modules of the two injection lasers. In parallel with this effort, the technical plans for the modularization and re-packaging of the FASOR will be finalized and coordinated with the staff at Maui. This presentation will summarize the result of these efforts to date and provide updates on the AMOS FASOR status. Additionally, plans for "next-generation" FASOR upgrades for both SOR and AMOS will also be discussed.

  16. Near and medium infrared optical fiber lasers and emerging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudenzano, F.; Mescia, L.; Allegretti, L.; De Sario, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Di Tommaso, A.; Palmisano, T.; Petruzzelli, V.

    2010-02-01

    Laser cavities emitting in the near and medium infrared wavelength range, made of rare earth doped optical fibers and suitable pairs of integrated mirrors, are used in a large number of applications. Nowadays, the efficient employment of near and medium infrared laser beams is largely widespread in the field of m*aterial processing, surgery, directed energy, remote sensing, spectroscopy, imaging, and so on. In a lot of cases, the high conversion efficiency, the excellent beam quality, the compactness and, the good heat dissipation capability make fiber lasers competitive and attractive with respect to other light sources, such as ion-doped crystal and bulk glass lasers, optical parametric oscillators, semiconductor and gas lasers. The paper aims to recall and/or briefly illustrate a few among the numerous strategies recently followed by research laboratories and industries to obtain laser sources based on rare earth doped optical fibres. A recall on the host materials and the dopants employed for their construction, and the corresponding applications is given, too. Moreover, an example of near infrared (NIR) fiber optic laser development, by employing available on market components is illustrated by underlining the possibility to easily obtain high beam quality.

  17. Mid-IR laser system for advanced neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosner, M.; Wu, C.; Heller, D. F.

    2014-03-01

    We present work on a laser system operating in the near- and mid-IR spectral regions, having output characteristics designed to be optimal for cutting various tissue types. We provide a brief overview of laser-tissue interactions and the importance of controlling certain properties of the light beam. We describe the principle of operation of the laser system, which is generally based on a wavelength-tunable alexandrite laser oscillator/amplifier, and multiple Raman conversion stages. This configuration provides robust access to the mid-IR spectral region at wavelengths, pulse energies, pulse durations, and repetition rates that are attractive for neurosurgical applications. We summarize results for ultra-precise selective cutting of nerve sheaths and retinas with little collateral damage; this has applications in procedures such as optic-nerve-sheath fenestration and possible spinal repair. We also report results for cutting cornea, and dermal tissues.

  18. CO2 laser beam propagation with ZnSe optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, K. H.; Liu, Yi; Holdridge, D. J.

    Beam propagation characteristics of ZnSe optics used in kiloWatt power CO2 laser aided material processing applications are determined using the Prometec Laser Beam Analyzer. The laser used was a Rofin Sinar RS6000 CO2 laser with mode aperturing. Beam power varied from 500W to 6300W and beam modes used were TEM(sub 00), TEM(sub 01), TEM(sub 10), and TEM(sub 20). Both transmissive and reflective optics were examined. The ZnSe lenses tested included meniscus, diffractive, and cylindrical lenses of 5 in. focal length and a 10 in. focal length integrating lens. Reflective optics included an integrator and a 5 in. focal length parabolic mirror for welding. Parameters obtained included beam propagation profiles, intensity profiles, depth of focus, spot size, and back focal length. A subset of the data obtained is presented here. Details of the work will appear in a full length paper.

  19. Diffuse optical tomography using wavelength-swept laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaedu; Lim, Gukbin; Jeong, Myung Yung; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2013-03-01

    The design and implementation of a diffuse optical tomography system using wavelength-swept laser is described. Rapid and continuous wavelength change is utilized for high speed spectral scanning from 775 nm to 875 nm optical wavelength. Maximum speed of wavelength repetition is 1 kHz and averaged output power of the wavelength-swept laser is 20 mW. A fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is incorporated to conduct passive amplitude modulation of the wavelength-swept laser. It is shown that the wavelength-swept laser can be successfully incorporated to the DOT system, and then reduces wavelength-shifting time and hardware complexity in multi-wavelength DOT implementation.

  20. High-resolution optical frequency metrology with stabilized femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ronald Jason

    The merging of such seemingly disparate fields as optical frequency metrology and ultrafast physics over the past few years has had a revolutionary impact on both fields. Extensive research over the past several decades has focused on stabilizing cw lasers to atomic and molecular transitions. These transitions in the optical and near-infrared regimes provide some of the highest Q's accessible in spectroscopy due to their high resonant frequencies (Q ≡ nu o/deltanu). Modern experiments have enjoyed increasing levels of precision and accuracy due to such stabilized laser systems. A long standing problem in optical frequency metrology, however, is the difficulty to perform direct frequency measurements in the optical spectrum. Traditional optical frequency chains are complex, costly, and lack flexibility. Recent experiments based on mode-locked femtosecond (fs) lasers promise to eliminate this problem and make optical frequency measurements accessible as a general laboratory tool. The use of fs lasers now enables the direct measurement of optical transitions by simply linking these frequencies to the repetition rate of the fs laser. The ability of the femtosecond laser to link the optical and radio frequency regimes is ultimately limited by its stability. In this dissertation, we present a novel stabilization scheme in which the frequency, phase, and repetition rate of a Kerr-lens mode-locked (KLM) ti:sapphire laser are locked to that of an ultra-stable Fabry-Perot reference cavity. The large signal to noise ratio of the recovered cavity resonance allows the superb short term stability (tau < 1 second) of the passive reference cavity to be transferred to the femtosecond laser. This technique may find future application in any experiment involving the use of femtosecond pulses in which a resonant cavity is employed, such as intracavity studies of light-matter interactions with ultra-short pulses. The short term instability of the cavity stabilized femtosecond laser

  1. Laser Cooling of Lanthanides: from Optical Clocks to Quantum Simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovizin, A.; Kalganova, E.; Vishnyakova, G.; Tregubov, D.; Khabarova, K.; Sorokin, V.; Kolachevsky, N.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss current progress in laser cooling of lanthanides (Er, Yb, Dy, Tm etc.) focusing on applications. We describe some important peculiarities taking Thulium atom as an example: Two stage laser cooling, trapping in an optical lattice, anisotropic interactions and spectroscopy of narrow transitions. Specific level structure and presence of magic wavelengths make ultracold Thulium a favorable candidate for optical clock applications. On the other hand, abundance of Feshbach resonances allow to tune interactions in ultracold gases and thus reach quantum degeneracy. It opens intriguing perspectives for novel quantum simulators employing dipole-dipole interactions in an optical lattice.

  2. Note: external multipass optical trap for counterpropagating pulsed laser applications.

    PubMed

    Graul, J S; Ketsdever, A D; Andersen, G P; Lilly, T C

    2013-07-01

    Pulses from a 12 mJ, frequency doubled, 5 ns FWHM, pulsed Nd:YAG laser were split and injected into opposing sides of a symmetric 2.44 m (96 in.) optical ring trap. Using a Pockels cell, the counterpropagating pulses were "locked" into the trap for ≥50 round trips. This optical trap has potential applications ranging from established cavity processes, e.g., laser-based absorption spectroscopy and x-ray production, to new processes such as non-resonant optical lattice gas heating and time-resolved coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering diagnostic studies. PMID:23902119

  3. Optical Frequency Comb Generation based on Erbium Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droste, Stefan; Ycas, Gabriel; Washburn, Brian R.; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R.

    2016-06-01

    Optical frequency combs have revolutionized optical frequency metrology and are being actively investigated in a number of applications outside of pure optical frequency metrology. For reasons of cost, robustness, performance, and flexibility, the erbium fiber laser frequency comb has emerged as the most commonly used frequency comb system and many different designs of erbium fiber frequency combs have been demonstrated. We review the different approaches taken in the design of erbium fiber frequency combs, including the major building blocks of the underlying mode-locked laser, amplifier, supercontinuum generation and actuators for stabilization of the frequency comb.

  4. Note: External multipass optical trap for counterpropagating pulsed laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graul, J. S.; Ketsdever, A. D.; Andersen, G. P.; Lilly, T. C.

    2013-07-01

    Pulses from a 12 mJ, frequency doubled, 5 ns FWHM, pulsed Nd:YAG laser were split and injected into opposing sides of a symmetric 2.44 m (96 in.) optical ring trap. Using a Pockels cell, the counterpropagating pulses were "locked" into the trap for ≥50 round trips. This optical trap has potential applications ranging from established cavity processes, e.g., laser-based absorption spectroscopy and x-ray production, to new processes such as non-resonant optical lattice gas heating and time-resolved coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering diagnostic studies.

  5. Advanced lightweight optics development for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbro, James W.

    1998-01-15

    A considerable amount of effort over the past year has been devoted to exploring ultra-lightweight optics for two specific NASA programs, the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), and the High Throughput X-ray Spectrometer (HTXS). Experimental investigations have been undertaken in a variety of materials including glass, composites, nickel, beryllium, Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (CSiC), Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide, Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide, and Silicon. Overall results of these investigations will be summarized, and specific details will be provided concerning the in-house development of ultra-lightweight nickel replication for both grazing incidence and normal incidence optics. This will include x-ray test results of the grazing incidence optic and cryogenic test results of the normal incidence optic. The status of two 1.5 meter diameter demonstration mirrors for NGST will also be presented. These two demonstrations are aimed at establishing the capability to manufacture and test mirrors that have an areal density of 15 kilograms per square meter. Efforts in thin membrane mirrors and Fresnel lenses will also be briefly discussed.

  6. Advanced lightweight optics development for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbro, James W.

    1998-01-01

    A considerable amount of effort over the past year has been devoted to exploring ultra-lightweight optics for two specific NASA programs, the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), and the High Throughput X-ray Spectrometer (HTXS). Experimental investigations have been undertaken in a variety of materials including glass, composites, nickel, beryllium, Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (CSiC), Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide, Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide, and Silicon. Overall results of these investigations will be summarized, and specific details will be provided concerning the in-house development of ultra-lightweight nickel replication for both grazing incidence and normal incidence optics. This will include x-ray test results of the grazing incidence optic and cryogenic test results of the normal incidence optic. The status of two 1.5 meter diameter demonstration mirrors for NGST will also be presented. These two demonstrations are aimed at establishing the capability to manufacture and test mirrors that have an areal density of 15 kilograms per square meter. Efforts in thin membrane mirrors and Fresnel lenses will also be briefly discussed.

  7. Laser damage testing of optical components under cryogenic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulehla, Jindrich; Pokorný, Pavel; Lazar, Josef

    2012-11-01

    In this contribution we present a technology for deposition and testing of interference coatings for optical components designed to operate in power pulsed lasers. The aim of the technology is to prepare components for high power laser facilities such as ELI (Extreme Light Infrastructure) or HiLASE. ELI is a part of the European plan to build a new generation of large research facilities selected by the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). These facilities rely on the use of diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSL). The choice of the material for the lasers' optical components is critical. Some of the most important properties include the ability to be antireflection and high reflection coated to reduce the energy losses and increase the overall efficiency. As large amounts of heat need to be dissipated during laser operation, cryogenic cooling is necessary. The conducted experiments served as preliminary tests of laser damage threshold measurement methodology that we plan to use in the future. We designed a special apparatus consisting of a vacuum chamber and a cooling system. The samples were placed into the vacuum chamber which was evacuated and then the samples were cooled down to approximately 120K and illuminated by a pulsed laser. Pulse duration was in the nanosecond region. Multiple test sites on the sample's surface were used for different laser pulse energies. We used optical and electron microscopy and spectrophotometer measurements for coating investigation after the conducted experiments.

  8. Automatic Laser Glare Suppression in Electro-Optical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ritt, Gunnar; Eberle, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Progress in laser technology has led to very compact but nevertheless powerful laser sources. In the visible and near infrared spectral region, lasers of any wavelength can be purchased. Continuous wave laser sources pose an especially serious threat to the human eye and electro-optical sensors due to their high proliferation and easy availability. The manifold of available wavelengths cannot be covered by conventional safety measures like absorption or interference filters. We present a protection concept for electro-optical sensors to suppress dazzling in the visible spectral region. The key element of the concept is the use of a digital micromirror device (DMD) in combination with wavelength multiplexing. This approach allows selective spectral filtering in defined regions of interest in the scene. The system offers the possibility of automatic attenuation of dazzling laser radiation. PMID:25569754

  9. Automatic laser glare suppression in electro-optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Ritt, Gunnar; Eberle, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Progress in laser technology has led to very compact but nevertheless powerful laser sources. In the visible and near infrared spectral region, lasers of any wavelength can be purchased. Continuous wave laser sources pose an especially serious threat to the human eye and electro-optical sensors due to their high proliferation and easy availability. The manifold of available wavelengths cannot be covered by conventional safety measures like absorption or interference filters. We present a protection concept for electro-optical sensors to suppress dazzling in the visible spectral region. The key element of the concept is the use of a digital micromirror device (DMD) in combination with wavelength multiplexing. This approach allows selective spectral filtering in defined regions of interest in the scene. The system offers the possibility of automatic attenuation of dazzling laser radiation. PMID:25569754

  10. Diode-Pumped Dye Laser Using a Tapered Optical Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Brian; Stofel, James; Myers, Elliot; Knize, Randy

    2015-05-01

    We describe the construction of a simple dye laser based on a single-mode optical fiber. Light from a 120-mW laser diode (λ = 520 nm) is launched into the fiber. The fiber is tapered to a diameter of approximately 1 μm and placed in Rhodamine 6G laser dye. The pump light interacts with the gain medium through the evanescent field outside the fiber causing stimulated emission, which couples back into the fiber. Mirrors on each end of the fiber provide the necessary feedback for lasing, and a grating is used to narrow the spectral output. We characterize the lasing threshold and output spectrum of the laser. This has been a good project for undergraduate students to learn about lasers and optics.

  11. High energy laser optics manufacturing: a preliminary study

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, E.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents concepts and methods, major conclusions, and major recommendations concerning the fabrication of high energy laser optics (HELO) that are to be machined by the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Detailed discussions of concepts and methods proposed for metrological operations, polishing of reflective surfaces, mounting of optical components, construction of mirror substrates, and applications of coatings are included.

  12. Fabrication of Sapphire Micro Optics by F 2-Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Markus; Ihlemann, Jürgen

    F2-laser irradiation enables high precision ablation of sapphire. A mask projection system with high numerical aperture, equipped with an optical coherence tomography module for focus control, delivers submicron resolution. High fluences of up to 10 J/cm2 lead to smooth, crack free surfaces. Various micro-optical elements like fiber tip lenses, gratings, and diffractive optical elements can be manufactured this way.

  13. Calculations of laser cavity dumping for optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. L.; Rayman, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    For deep-space pulse-position modulation (PPM) optical communication links using Nd:YAG lasers, two types of laser transmitter modulation techniques are available for efficiently producing laser pulses over a broad range of repetition rates: Q-switching and cavity dumping. The desired modulation scheme is dependent on the required pulse repetition frequency and link parameters. These two techniques are discussed, theoretical and numerical calculations of the internal energy of the laser cavity in cavity dumping are described, and an example of cavity dumping is applied to a link for a proposed experiment package on Cassini.

  14. Laser based analysis using a passively Q-switched laser employing analysis electronics and a means for detecting atomic optical emission of the laser media

    DOEpatents

    Woodruff, Steven D.; Mcintyre, Dustin L.

    2016-03-29

    A device for Laser based Analysis using a Passively Q-Switched Laser comprising an optical pumping source optically connected to a laser media. The laser media and a Q-switch are positioned between and optically connected to a high reflectivity mirror (HR) and an output coupler (OC) along an optical axis. The output coupler (OC) is optically connected to the output lens along the optical axis. A means for detecting atomic optical emission comprises a filter and a light detector. The optical filter is optically connected to the laser media and the optical detector. A control system is connected to the optical detector and the analysis electronics. The analysis electronics are optically connected to the output lens. The detection of the large scale laser output production triggers the control system to initiate the precise timing and data collection from the detector and analysis.

  15. Optical testing and metrology III: Recent advances in industrial optical inspection; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 8-13, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, C.P.

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on recent advances in industrial optical inspection are presented. Individual topics addressed include: high-precision interferometric testing of spherical mirrors with long radius of curvature, aspheric surface testing techniques, apsheric testing using null mirrors, TV holography and image processing in practical use, holographic instrumentation for monitoring crystal growth in space, holography with a single picosecond pulse, phase-conjugate interferometry using dye-doped polymer films, phase-conjugate Twyman-Green interferometer for testing conicoidal surfaces. Also discussed are: new stereo laser triangulation device for specular surface inspection, fiber optical smart structures, near real-time operation of a centimeter-scale distributed fiber sensing sytem, interferometric fiber optic sensors for use with composite materials, fiber optic damage detection for an aircraft leading edge, low-cost fiber optic sensing systems using spatial division multiplexing, laser ultrasonics generation and detection considerations for improved SNR.

  16. Optical properties of a multibarrier structure under intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, D. A.; Akimov, V.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Morales, A. L.; Tulupenko, V.; Duque, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    Using the diagonalization method and within the effective mass and parabolic band approximations, the energy spectrum and the wave functions are investigated in biased multibarrier structure taking into account the effects of nonresonant intense laser fields. We calculated the optical properties from the susceptibility using a nonperturbative formalism recently reported. We study the changes in the intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refraction index for several values of the dressing laser parameter and for some specific values of the electric field applied along the growth direction of the heterostructure. It is concluded from our study that the peaks in the optical absorption spectrum have redshifts or blueshifts as a function of the laser parameter and the electric field. These parameters could be suitable tools for tuning the electronic and optical properties of the multibarrier structure.

  17. Laser speckle contrast imaging in biomedical optics

    PubMed Central

    Boas, David A.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2010-01-01

    First introduced in the 1980s, laser speckle contrast imaging is a powerful tool for full-field imaging of blood flow. Recently laser speckle contrast imaging has gained increased attention, in part due to its rapid adoption for blood flow studies in the brain. We review the underlying physics of speckle contrast imaging and discuss recent developments to improve the quantitative accuracy of blood flow measures. We also review applications of laser speckle contrast imaging in neuroscience, dermatology and ophthalmology. PMID:20210435

  18. Tunable excitation of mid-infrared optically pumped semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsen, Linda J.; Kunz, Jeremy; Ongstad, Andrew P.; Kaspi, Ron

    2013-01-01

    While conventional semiconductor lasers employ electrical injection for carrier excitation, optically pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSLs) have demonstrated high output powers and high brightness in the mid-infrared. An important consideration for optically pumped lasers is efficient absorption of the pump beam, which can be achieved through increasing the number of periods in the active region, by placing the active region in a cavity with an optical thickness of twice the pump wavelength between distributed Bragg reflectors (Optical Pumping Injection Cavity), or by periodically inserting the active quantum wells into an InGaAsSb waveguide designed to absorb the pump radiation (Integrated Absorber). A tunable optical pumping technique is utilized by which threshold intensities are minimized and efficiencies are maximized. The near-IR idler output of a Nd:YAG-pumped optical parametric oscillator (10 Hz, ~4 ns) is the tunable optical pumping source in this work. Results are presented for an OPSL with a type-II W active region embedded in an integrated absorber to enhance the absorption of the optical pump beam. Emission wavelengths range from 4.64 μm at 78 K to 4.82 μm at 190 K for optical pump wavelengths ranging from 1930-1950 nm. The effect of wavelength tuning is demonstrated and compared to single wavelength pumping (1940 nm) at a higher duty cycle (20- 30%). Comparisons are also made to other OPSLs, including a discussion of the characteristic temperature and high temperature performance of these devices.

  19. Ground-to-orbit laser propulsion: Advanced applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    Laser propulsion uses a large fixed laser to supply energy to heat an inert propellant in a rocket thruster. Such a system has two potential advantages: extreme simplicity of the thruster, and potentially high performance -- particularly high exhaust velocity. By taking advantage of the simplicity of the thruster, it should be possible to launch small (10--1000 kg) payloads to orbit using roughly 1 MW of average laser power per kg of payload. The incremental cost of such launches would be of order $200/kg for the smallest systems, decreasing to essentially the cost of electricity to run the laser (a few times $10/kg) for large systems. Although the individual payload size would be small, a laser launch system would be inherently high-volume, with the capacity to launch tens of thousands of payloads per year. Also, with high exhaust velocity, a laser launch system could launch payloads to high velocities -- geosynchronous transfer, Earth escape, or beyond -- at a relatively small premium over launches to LEO. In this paper, we briefly review the status of pulsed laser propulsion, including proposals for advanced vehicles. We then discuss qualitatively several unique applications appropriate to the early part of the next century, and perhaps valuable well into the next millenium: space habitat supply, deep space mission supply, nuclear waste disposal, and manned vehicle launching.

  20. Ground-to-orbit laser propulsion: Advanced applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kare, Jordin T.

    1990-01-01

    Laser propulsion uses a large fixed laser to supply energy to heat an inert propellant in a rocket thruster. Such a system has two potential advantages: extreme simplicity of the thruster, and potentially high performance, particularly high exhaust velocity. By taking advantage of the simplicity of the thruster, it should be possible to launch small (10 to 1000 kg) payloads to orbit using roughly 1 MW of average laser power per kg of payload. The incremental cost of such launches would be of an order of $200/kg for the smallest systems, decreasing to essentially the cost of electricity to run the laser (a few times $10/kg) for larger systems. Although the individual payload size would be smaller, a laser launch system would be inherently high-volume, with the capacity to launch tens of thousands of payloads per year. Also, with high exhaust velocity, a laser launch system could launch payloads to high velocities - geosynchronous transfer, Earth escape, or beyond - at a relatively small premium over launches to LEO. The status of pulsed laser propulsion is briefly reviewed including proposals for advanced vehicles. Several applications appropriate to the early part of the next century and perhaps valuable well into the next millennium are discussed qualitatively: space habitat supply, deep space mission supply, nuclear waste disposal, and manned vehicle launching.

  1. Advanced Laser Processing of Materials--Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsohn, E.; Ryan, M.

    1995-01-01

    Preparation of amorphous thin films in semiconductors and their transition to the crystalline phase may apply to switching devices. Surfaces of single crystal samples of bulk In2Se3 and thin films of InSe were treated using an excimer laser, and microscopic examination showed the treated portions of the surface had become amorphous. Film samples of InSe were laser-treated like the bulk samples. Examination of these treated flims showed shifts in the optical transmittance spectra as well as surface morphology changes.

  2. Test results from LAGEOS-2 optical characterization using pulsed lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Thomas K.; Selden, Michael; Oldham, Thomas; Clarke, Christopher; Zagwodzki, Thomas

    1993-01-01

    The Laser Geodynamic Satellite-2 (LAGEOS-2) has undergone extensive optical testing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center during 1989. The techniques included measuring the far field diffraction pattern using cw and pulsed lasers. In the pulsed measurement technique, response of the satellite was studied by measuring the far-field diffraction pattern (FFDP) as a function of pulsewidth, wavelength, polarization, position in the FFDP, detector/processing techniques, and satellite orientation. The purpose of the pulsed laser testing was two-fold: (1) to characterize the satellite optical response with the detector and signal processing electronics currently used in most SLR stations using the portable laser ranging standard, and (2) to characterize the satellite response for various conditions using the highest bandwidth optical detector (streak camera) available for the next generation of satellite laser ranging (SLR) technology. The portable ranging standard employed multiple measurement devices and an optical calibration scheme to eliminate range-dependent and amplitude-dependent systematics. These precautions were taken to eliminate/minimize instrumental errors and provide maximum accuracy. For LAGEOS orbit (6000 Km), ground stations are located 34 to 38 Mu radians off the axis of the return signal from the satellite; therefore, an optical mask was used to restrict the field of view (FOV) of detection to this annular region of the FFDP. The two measurement techniques were implemented using an aperture sharing scheme and complemented each other by providing mutual verification.

  3. Beam shaping for laser-based adaptive optics in astronomy.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Clémentine; Guesalaga, Andrés; Neichel, Benoit; Fesquet, Vincent; González-Núñez, Héctor; Zúñiga, Sebastián; Escarate, Pedro; Guzman, Dani

    2014-06-01

    The availability and performance of laser-based adaptive optics (AO) systems are strongly dependent on the power and quality of the laser beam before being projected to the sky. Frequent and time-consuming alignment procedures are usually required in the laser systems with free-space optics to optimize the beam. Despite these procedures, significant distortions of the laser beam have been observed during the first two years of operation of the Gemini South multi-conjugate adaptive optics system (GeMS). A beam shaping concept with two deformable mirrors is investigated in order to provide automated optimization of the laser quality for astronomical AO. This study aims at demonstrating the correction of quasi-static aberrations of the laser, in both amplitude and phase, testing a prototype of this two-deformable mirror concept on GeMS. The paper presents the results of the preparatory study before the experimental phase. An algorithm to control amplitude and phase correction, based on phase retrieval techniques, is presented with a novel unwrapping method. Its performance is assessed via numerical simulations, using aberrations measured at GeMS as reference. The results predict effective amplitude and phase correction of the laser distortions with about 120 actuators per mirror and a separation of 1.4 m between the mirrors. The spot size is estimated to be reduced by up to 15% thanks to the correction. In terms of AO noise level, this has the same benefit as increasing the photon flux by 40%. PMID:24921496

  4. Holographic optical system for aberration corrections in laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, R. C.; Case, S. K.; Schock, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    An optical system containing multifaceted holographic optical elements (HOEs) has been developed to correct for aberrations introduced by nonflat windows in laser Doppler velocimetry. The multifacet aberration correction approach makes it possible to record on one plate many sets of adjacent HOEs that address different measurement volume locations. By using 5-mm-diameter facets, it is practical to place 10-20 sets of holograms on one 10 x 12.5-cm plate, so that the procedure of moving the entire optical system to examine different locations may not be necessary. The holograms are recorded in dichromated gelatin and therefore are nonabsorptive and suitable for use with high-power argon laser beams. Low f-number optics coupled with a 90-percent efficient distortion-correcting hologram in the collection side of the system yield high optical efficiency.

  5. Advanced Sensors Boost Optical Communication, Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Brooklyn, New York-based Amplification Technologies Inc. (ATI), employed Phase I and II SBIR funding from NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory to forward the company's solid-state photomultiplier technology. Under the SBIR, ATI developed a small, energy-efficient, extremely high-gain sensor capable of detecting light down to single photons in the near infrared wavelength range. The company has commercialized this technology in the form of its NIRDAPD photomultiplier, ideal for use in free space optical communications, lidar and ladar, night vision goggles, and other light sensing applications.

  6. Applications of fiber optic sensors in advanced engine controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitka, Edward F., II

    1989-06-01

    Measured parameters, operating ranges, accuracy requirements, environmental constraints, and speed of response of fiber optic sensors are identified for three categories of engines. The three engine categories are: (1) current turbojet, turbofan, and turboprop engines; (2) next generation and turbofan engines to be built in the 1990s; and (3) advanced supersonic/hypersonic engines represented by ramjet, scramjet, and air-turbo-ramjet concepts. The key development and test efforts in engine control applications of fiber optic sensors are discussed.

  7. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  8. Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2006-01-03

    A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

  9. Laser damage threshold measurements of optical materials for direct laser accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Ken; Byer, R. L.; Colby, E. R.; England, R. J.; Peralta, E. A.

    2012-12-21

    The laser-damage threshold is a fundamental limit for any dielectric laser-driven accelerator and is set by the material of the structure. In this paper, we present a theoretical model of the laser damage mechanism, in comparison with experimental data on the damage threshold of silicon. Additionally, we present damage threshold measurement data of various optical materials, most of which have not been previously characterized in the picosecond-regime.

  10. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Optical velocimeter based on a semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, P. Ya; Dubnishchev, Yu N.; Meledin, V. G.

    1988-03-01

    It is shown that optical velocimeters using diffraction beam splitters are not critically sensitive to the stability of the emission wavelength of a semiconductor laser. A functional scheme of a semiconductor laser source with systems for stabilization of the temperature and pump current is described. The technical characteristics are given of a semiconductor-laser velocimeter for the determination of the velocity and length of rolling stock.

  11. Integrated modeling of advanced optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Needels, Laura; Levine, B. Martin

    1993-02-01

    This poster session paper describes an integrated modeling and analysis capability being developed at JPL under funding provided by the JPL Director's Discretionary Fund and the JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program (CSI). The posters briefly summarize the program capabilities and illustrate them with an example problem. The computer programs developed under this effort will provide an unprecedented capability for integrated modeling and design of high performance optical spacecraft. The engineering disciplines supported include structural dynamics, controls, optics and thermodynamics. Such tools are needed in order to evaluate the end-to-end system performance of spacecraft such as OSI, POINTS, and SMMM. This paper illustrates the proof-of-concept tools that have been developed to establish the technology requirements and demonstrate the new features of integrated modeling and design. The current program also includes implementation of a prototype tool based upon the CAESY environment being developed under the NASA Guidance and Control Research and Technology Computational Controls Program. This prototype will be available late in FY-92. The development plan proposes a major software production effort to fabricate, deliver, support and maintain a national-class tool from FY-93 through FY-95.

  12. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Plato, J.G.; Russell, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 {mu}m) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented.

  13. Observation of "True" Optical Vortices in a Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barland, S.; Caboche, E.; Genevet, P.; Hachair, X.; Giudici, M.; Pedaci, F.; Tredicce, J. R.

    We briefly review a series of experiments performed at the Institut Nonlineaire de Nice on localized structures in semiconductor optical devices. We concentrate our attention on the observation of localized single addressable optical vortices. This type of optical vortices, predicted theoretically more than 30 years ago, have been only observed recently in a system formed by two vertical cavity surface emitter lasers (VCSELs) in a face-to-face configuration. We describe the experimental setup and we discuss the results and the reasons for which such a system is able to display "true" optical vortices.

  14. Fiber optics interface for a dye laser oscillator and method

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Steve A.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1986-01-01

    A dye laser oscillator in which one light beam is used to pump a continuous tream of dye within a cooperating dye chamber for producing a second, different beam is generally disclosed herein along with a specific arrangement including an optical fiber and a fiber optics interface for directing the pumping beam into the dye chamber. The specific fiber optics interface illustrated includes three cooperating lenses which together image one particular dimension of the pumping beam into the dye chamber from the output end of the optical fiber in order to insure that the dye chamber is properly illuminated by the pumping beam.

  15. Fiber optics interface for a dye laser oscillator and method

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, S.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1984-06-13

    A dye laser oscillator in which one light beam is used to pump a continuous stream of dye within a cooperating dye chamber for producing a second, different beam is generally disclosed herein along with a specific arrangement including an optical fiber and a fiber optics interface for directing the pumping beam into the dye chamber. The specific fiber optics interface illustrated includes three cooperating lenses which together image one particular dimension of the pumping beam into the dye chamber from the output end of the optical fiber in order to insure that the dye chamber is properly illuminated by the pumping beam.

  16. Laser Pulse-Stretching Using Multiple Optical Ring-Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Lee, Chi-Ming (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a simple and passive nanosecond-long (ns-long) laser 'pulse-stretcher' using multiple optical ring-cavities. We present a model of the pulse-stretching process for an arbitrary number of optical ring-cavities. Using the model, we optimize the design of a pulse-stretcher for use in a spontaneous Raman scattering excitation system that avoids laser-induced plasma spark problems. From the optimized design, we then experimentally demonstrate and verify the model with a 3-cavity pulse-stretcher system that converts a 1000 mJ, 8.4 ns-long input laser pulse into an approximately 75 ns-long (FWHM) output laser pulse with a peak power reduction of 0.10X, and an 83% efficiency.

  17. Acousto-optic laser projection systems for displaying TV information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, Yu V.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Mokrushin, Yu M.; Shakin, O. V.

    2015-04-01

    This review addresses various approaches to television projection imaging on large screens using lasers. Results are presented of theoretical and experimental studies of an acousto-optic projection system operating on the principle of projecting an image of an entire amplitude-modulated television line in a single laser pulse. We consider characteristic features of image formation in such a system and the requirements for its individual components. Particular attention is paid to nonlinear distortions of the image signal, which show up most severely at low modulation signal frequencies. We discuss the feasibility of improving the process efficiency and image quality using acousto-optic modulators and pulsed lasers. Real-time projectors with pulsed line imaging can be used for controlling high-intensity laser radiation.

  18. Recent advancements towards green optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Alan; Glesk, Ivan; Buis, Adrianus; Wang, Junjia; Chen, Lawrence

    2014-12-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth in demand for ultra high speed data transmission with end users expecting fast, high bandwidth network access. With this rapid growth in demand, data centres are under pressure to provide ever increasing data rates through their networks and at the same time improve the quality of data handling in terms of reduced latency, increased scalability and improved channel speed for users. However as data rates increase, present technology based on well-established CMOS technology is becoming increasingly difficult to scale and consequently data networks are struggling to satisfy current network demand. In this paper the interrelated issues of electronic scalability, power consumption, limited copper interconnect bandwidth and the limited speed of CMOS electronics will be explored alongside the tremendous bandwidth potential of optical fibre based photonic networks. Some applications of photonics to help alleviate the speed and latency in data networks will be discussed.

  19. Advanced Optical Technologies for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is involved in the development of photonic devices and systems for space exploration missions. Photonic technologies of particular interest are those that can be utilized for in-space communication, remote sensing, guidance navigation and control, lunar descent and landing, and rendezvous and docking. NASA Langley has recently established a class-100 clean-room which serves as a Photonics Fabrication Facility for development of prototype optoelectronic devices for aerospace applications. In this paper we discuss our design, fabrication, and testing of novel active pixels, deformable mirrors, and liquid crystal spatial light modulators. Successful implementation of these intelligent optical devices and systems in space, requires careful consideration of temperature and space radiation effects in inorganic and electronic materials. Applications including high bandwidth inertial reference units, lightweight, high precision star trackers for guidance, navigation, and control, deformable mirrors, wavefront sensing, and beam steering technologies are discussed. In addition, experimental results are presented which characterize their performance in space exploration systems.

  20. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; Long, Cary D.; Huang, Chunning; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Liu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    A compact optical correlator system that measures both the autocorrelation between two infrared (IR) lights and the cross-correlation between an IR and an ultraviolet (UV) light using a single nonlinear optical crystal has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. The rapid scanning of optical delay line, switching between auto and cross-correlations, crystal angle tuning, and data acquisition and processing are all computer controlled. Pulse widths of an IR light from a mode-locked laser are measured by the correlator and the results are compared with a direct measurement using a high-speed photodetector system. The correlator has been used to study the parametermore » dependence of the pulse width of a macropulse UV laser designed for laser-assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.« less

  1. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; Long, Cary D.; Huang, Chunning; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Liu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    A compact optical correlator system that measures both the autocorrelation between two infrared (IR) lights and the cross-correlation between an IR and an ultraviolet (UV) light using a single nonlinear optical crystal has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. The rapid scanning of optical delay line, switching between auto and cross-correlations, crystal angle tuning, and data acquisition and processing are all computer controlled. Pulse widths of an IR light from a mode-locked laser are measured by the correlator and the results are compared with a direct measurement using a high-speed photodetector system. The correlator has been used to study the parameter dependence of the pulse width of a macropulse UV laser designed for laser-assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  2. Recent advance in application of acousto-optic tunable filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khansuvarov, Ruslan A.; Shakin, Oleg V.; Vaganov, Mikhail A.; Zhdanov, Arseniy Y.; Prokashev, Vadim N.

    2014-09-01

    This paper aims to inform those interested in the scientific work of a large group of scientists: workers of the Department of Electronics and Optical communications of St. Petersburg State University of Aerospace Instrumentation in collaboration with workers of the Department of Quantum Electronics of St. Petersburg State Technical University in the area of researches and development of acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF). Paper discusses the important features of the AOTF structure and their parameters that affect its work, such as: spectral range of optical radiation, spectral resolution, active aperture of the optical radiation, optical transmission of the working spectral range, optical radiation polarization (linear, circular or arbitrary) , diffraction efficiency, contrast, distortion of the optical radiation's front, frequency range of elastic waves, switching time, maximum electric control power, impedance. Also the AOTF using is considered: AOTF's implications for control of laser radiation, AOTF's application to determine the counterfeit money. The last part of the report focuses on materials that act as antireflection thin films. Spectral characteristics of "clean" and enlightened substrates of ZnSe and Ge are shown. As seen from the examples in the report, antireflection thin films increase transmittance of optical elements.

  3. Synchronization of laser oscillators, associative memory, and optical neurocomputing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppensteadt, Frank C.; Izhikevich, Eugene M.

    2000-09-01

    We investigate here possible neurocomputational features of networks of laser oscillators. Our approach is similar to classical optical neurocomputing where artificial neurons are lasers and connection matrices are holographic media. However, we consider oscillatory neurons communicating via phases rather than amplitudes. Memorized patterns correspond to synchronized states where the neurons oscillate with equal frequencies and with prescribed phase relations. The mechanism of recognition is related to phase locking.

  4. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with a relatively low intensity (3  ×  1016 W cm-2) allowed the enhancing of the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the ‘ultraclean’ proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as a target. A combination of the specific target composition and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed the enhancing of the yield of alpha particles up to 109 per steradian. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long-laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  5. Advanced NDE research in electromagnetic, thermal, and coherent optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, S. Ballou

    1992-01-01

    A new inspection technology called magneto-optic/eddy current imaging was investigated. The magneto-optic imager makes readily visible irregularities and inconsistencies in airframe components. Other research observed in electromagnetics included (1) disbond detection via resonant modal analysis; (2) AC magnetic field frequency dependence of magnetoacoustic emission; and (3) multi-view magneto-optic imaging. Research observed in the thermal group included (1) thermographic detection and characterization of corrosion in aircraft aluminum; (2) a multipurpose infrared imaging system for thermoelastic stress detection; (3) thermal diffusivity imaging of stress induced damage in composites; and (4) detection and measurement of ice formation on the space shuttle main fuel tank. Research observed in the optics group included advancements in optical nondestructive evaluation (NDE).

  6. Deformation of ultra-short laser pulses by optical systems for laser scanners.

    PubMed

    Büsing, Lasse; Bonhoff, Tobias; Gottmann, Jens; Loosen, Peter

    2013-10-21

    Current experiments of processing glass with ultra-short laser pulses (< 1 ps) lead to scan angle depending processing results. This scan angle depending effect is examined by simulations of a common focusing lens for laser scanners. Due to dispersion, focusing lenses may cause pulse deformations and increase the pulse duration in the focal region. If the field angle of the incoming laser beam is variable, the pulse deformation may also vary as a function of the field angle. By ray tracing as well as wave optical simulations we investigate pulse deformations of optical systems for different scan angles. PMID:24150292

  7. Dynamics and Synchronization of Semiconductor Lasers for Chaotic Optical Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Chen, How-Foo; Tang, Shuo

    The objective of this chapter is to provide a complete picture of the nonlinear dynamics and chaos synchronization of single-mode semiconductor lasers for chaotic optical communications. Basic concepts and theoretical framework are reviewed. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the fundamental concepts. Numerical computations are employed for mapping the dynamical states and for illustrating certain detailed characteristics of the chaotic states. Three different semiconductor laser systems, namely, the optical injection system, the optical feedback system, and the optoelectronic feedback system, that are of most interest for high-bit-rate chaotic optical communications are considered. The optical injection system is a nonautonomous system that follows a period-doubling route to chaos. The optical feedback system is a phase-sensitive delayed-feedback autonomous system for which all three known routes, namely, period-doubling, quasiperiodicity, and intermittency, to chaos can be found. The optical feedback system is a phase-insensitive delayed-feedback autonomous system that follows a quasiperiodicity route to chaotic pulsing. Identical synchronization in unidirectionally coupled configurations is the focus of discussions for chaotic communications. For optical injection and optical feedback systems, the frequency, phase, and amplitude of the optical fields of both transmitter and receiver lasers are all locked in synchronism when complete synchronization is accomplished. For the optoelectronic feedback system, chaos synchronization involves neither the locking of the optical frequency nor the synchronization of the optical phase. For both optical feedback and optoelectronic feedback systems, where the transmitter is configured with a delayed feedback loop, anticipated and retarded synchronization can be observed as the difference between the feedback delay time and the propagation time from the transmitter laser to the receiver laser is varied. For a

  8. Optical diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma using advanced optical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-02-01

    Clinical imaging techniques for diagnosing breast cancer mainly include X-ray mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which have respective drawbacks. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a potentially attractive optical technique to bridge the current gap in clinical utility. In this paper, MPM was used to image normal and ductal cancerous breast tissues, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Our results showed that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of normal breast tissue, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) lesions at the molecular level comparable to histopathology. These findings indicate that, with integration of MPM into currently accepted clinical imaging system, it has the potential to make a real-time histological diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma in vivo.

  9. Airborne molecular contamination: quality criterion for laser and optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Airborne molecular contaminations (AMCs) have been recognized as a major problem in semiconductor fabrication. Enormous technical and financial efforts are made to remove or at least reduce these contaminations in production environments to increase yield and process stability. It can be shown that AMCs from various sources in laser devices have a negative impact on quality and lifetime of lasers and optical systems. Outgassing of organic compounds, especially condensable compounds were identified as the main source for deterioration of optics. These compounds can lead to hazing on surfaces of optics, degradation of coating, reducing the signal transmission or the laser signal itself and can enhance the probability of laser failure and damage. Sources of organic outgassing can be molding materials, resins, seals, circuit boards, cable insulation, coatings, paints and others. Critical compounds are siloxanes, aromatic amines and high boiling aromatic hydrocarbons like phthalates which are used as softeners in plastic materials. Nowadays all sensitive assembly steps are performed in controlled cleanroom environments to reduce risks of contamination. We will demonstrate a high efficient air filter concept to remove AMCs for production environments with special AMC filters and methods for the qualification and monitoring of these environments. Additionally, we show modern techniques and examples for the pre-qualification of materials. For assembled components, we provide sampling concepts for a routine measurement for process, component and product qualification. A careful selection of previously tested and certified materials and components is essential to guarantee the quality of lasers and optical devices.

  10. Skin optical clearing for improvement of laser tattoo removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Gavrilova, Anna A.; Pravdin, Alexander B.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.

    2007-06-01

    The removal of tattoo pigments by laser energy is effected through a process of selective photothermolysis. Dehydration and optical immersion based on refractive index matching of scattering centers with that of surrounding matter through introduction of an exogenous index-matching agent can improve laser tattoo removal by providing increased efficiency of laser delivery to embedded ink particles and enabling the use of shorter wavelength visible lasers more effective on certain inks. Effectiveness of a method of accelerating penetration of the index-matching compounds by enhancing skin permeability through creating a lattice of micro-zones of limited thermal damage in the stratum corneum was studied. As optical clearing agents 100% and 88%-aqueous glycerol solutions were used. The effect of stratum corneum perforation on the rate of the immersion clearing of skin was studied. Dynamics of refractive index alteration of glycerol solution during its interaction with skin samples was monitored. Improvement of tattoo visualization was observed. The results of the experiments have shown that the lattice of island damage method the is effective for transepidermal delivery of optical clearing agents and could be used successfully in in vivo conditions for the enhancement of optical clearing of treated skin area and as enabling improvement of laser tattoo removal.

  11. Laser and Optical Subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Elliott, Ethan; Krutzik, Markus; Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We describe the design and validation of the laser and optics subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), a multi-user facility being developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory for studies of ultra-cold quantum gases in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Ultra-cold atoms will be generated in CAL by employing a combination of laser cooling techniques and evaporative cooling in a microchip-based magnetic trap. Laser cooling and absorption imaging detection of bosonic mixtures of 87 Rb and 39 K or 41 K will be accomplished using a high-power (up to 500 mW ex-fiber), frequency-agile dual wavelength (767 nm and 780 nm) laser and optical subsystem. The CAL laser and optical subsystem also includes the capability to generate high-power multi-frequency optical pulses at 784.87 nm to realize a dual-species Bragg atom interferometer. Currently at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

  12. Advanced fiber optic face plate quality detector design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Su, Liping; Zhao, Jingxia

    2010-10-01

    A fiber optic face plate is defined by a plurality of fibers of transparent material that are fused and compressed together to transmit an image from one end to another end. Fiber optic face plates exhibit utility in the image intensifiers, cathoderay tubes, and other media displays. In this paper, the design of an advanced fiber optic face plate quality detector is presented. Modern optoelectronic imaging techniques are being used to form fiber optic plate transmission images that are suitable for analyzing the quality parameters of fiber optic face plate. The diffusing light from a halogen lamp is condensed by condenser lens then through a fiber optic face plate, a set of lenses are used to magnify the transmission image, a computer controls a long linear CCD to scan the transmission image, a data grabber captures the CCD's output data and the computer transforms the data into frame image for further analysis. Digital image processing techniques are adopted to analyze the transmission image to obtain the required quality parameters. The image analysis software combines the API that a company provided and programed API is used to acquire the quality parameter that a relevant criteria required. With the long linear CCD scanning and image analysis being computerized, it accomplishes the detection of quality parameters of fiber optic face plates automaticly. The detector can replace the manual detection method and can be widely used for the quality detection of fiber optic face plate. Manufacturers of fiber optic face plates can benefit from the detector for quality control.

  13. Fundamentals and curriculum of education on optical and laser metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabukho, Vladimir P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper we are to observing the training system for specialists in the physics of optical and laser measurements at the Department of Optics, Saratov State University and at its Branch at Mechanical Engineering Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The training course is presented in educational schedule. The specialists are prepared for researching and designing of laser measurements, testing, and diagnostical methods and systems at universities, academic and research institutes, enterprises with high technological level and at medical institutes and hospitals.

  14. Application and the key technology on high power fiber-optic laser in laser weapon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhou; Li, Qiushi; Meng, Haihong; Sui, Xin; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhai, Xuhua

    2014-12-01

    The soft-killing laser weapon plays an important role in photoelectric defense technology. It can be used for photoelectric detection, search, blinding of photoelectric sensor and other devices on fire control and guidance devices, therefore it draws more and more attentions by many scholars. High power fiber-optic laser has many virtues such as small volume, simple structure, nimble handling, high efficiency, qualified light beam, easy thermal management, leading to blinding. Consequently, it may be used as the key device of soft-killing laser weapon. The present study introduced the development of high power fiber-optic laser and its main features. Meanwhile the key technology of large mode area (LMA) optical fiber design, the beam combination technology, double-clad fiber technology and pumping optical coupling technology was stated. The present study is aimed to design high doping LMA fiber, ensure single mode output by increasing core diameter and decrease NA. By means of reducing the spontaneous emission particle absorbed by fiber core and Increasing the power density in the optical fiber, the threshold power of nonlinear effect can increase, and the power of single fiber will be improved. Meantime, high power will be obtained by the beam combination technology. Application prospect of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology was also set forth. Lastly, the present study explored the advantages of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology.

  15. Advanced optical interference filters based on metal and dielectric layers.

    PubMed

    Begou, Thomas; Lemarchand, Fabien; Lumeau, Julien

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the design and the fabrication of an advanced optical interference filter based on metal and dielectric layers. This filter respects the specifications of the 2016 OIC manufacturing problem contest. We study and present all the challenges and solutions that allowed achieving a low deviation between the fabricated prototype and the target. PMID:27607695

  16. University teaching laboratory on laser physics, photonics and fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnin, I. V.; Makarov, V. A.; Morozov, V. B.; Nanii, O. E.; Shlenov, S. A.

    2005-10-01

    International laser Center of Moscow State University offers teaching setups for undergraduate students and students of retraining courses who apply photonics, lasers, and optical communication methods in different fields. Each teaching task is targeted to make a student carry out a real experiment. Most of laboratory works are intended both for phenomena demonstration and for in-depth study of physical mechanisms. The developers of the laboratory works tried to link them to the concepts from other physics courses: quantum mechanics, electricity and magnetism, solid-state physics. Laboratory experience with lasers and photonics reinforces ideas learned in these courses.

  17. Laser radiation attenuation by sparks of optical breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnik, A. P.; Semenov, L. P.; Skripkin, A. M.; Volkovitskii, O. A.

    1989-06-01

    A breakdown generated by laser radiation in a gas contaminated by aerosol particles is known to occur at much lower radiation intensities than in case of pure gases. Laser radiation is heavily attenuated by sparks of plasma formed at breakdowns. Energy loss estimation is important at radiation propagation in the atmosphere and in laser resonators. The breakdown phenomenon may be used in diagnostics of the atmospheric aerosol contamination events. The report presents experimental data on the influence of aerosol size distribution and concentration on optical breakdown generation and other results.

  18. Laser Radiation Attenuation By Sparks Of Optical Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnik, A. P.; Semenov, L. P.; Skripkin, A. M.; Volkovitsky, O. A.

    1990-01-01

    A breakdown generated by laser radiation in a gas contaminated by aerosol particles is known to occur at much lower radiation intensities than in case of pure gases, Laser radiation is heavily attenuated by sparks of plasma formed at breakdowns. Energy loss estimation is important at radiation propagation in the atmosphere and in laser resonators. The breakdown phenomenon may be used in diagnostics of the atmospheric aerosol contamination events. The report presents experimental data on the influence of aerosol size distribution and concentration on optical breakdown generation and other results.

  19. Multiple Isotope Magneto Optical Trap from a single diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Eduardo; Valenzuela, Victor; Hamzeloui, Saeed; Gutierrez, Monica

    2013-05-01

    We present a simple design for a Dual Isotope Magneto Optical Trap. The system requires a single diode laser, a fiber modulator and a tapered amplifier to trap and completely control both 85Rb and 87Rb. We generate all the frequencies needed for trapping both species using the fiber intensity modulator. All the frequencies are amplified simultaneously with the tapered amplifier. The position and power of each frequency is now controlled independently on the RF rather than on the optical side. This introduces an enormous simplification for laser cooling that often requires an acousto-optic modulator for each frequency. The range of frequency changes is much bigger than what is available with acousto-optic modulators since in our case is determined by the modulator bandwidth (10 GHz). Additional isotopes can be simply added by including additional RF frequencies to the modulator and extra beams for other uses can be produced the same way. Support from CONACYT, PROMEP and UASLP.

  20. Evaluation and testing of semiconductor laser reliability in optic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenyan; Fan, Xianguang; Sun, Heyi

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of an optic system, a new evaluation and testing methodology for the light source which uses semiconductor laser is presented. A new system, combining high accuracy source and measure capabilities for pulsed testing, is developed to achieve the aim of automatic measurement of Light-Current-Power (LIV) for semiconductor laser. The test can provide customer with L-I, V-I curves and other correlative parameters, such as the threshold current and slope efficiency, and so on. Meanwhile, the change of environment temperature versus lasing wavelength under pulse injection is discussed, and the relationship between the lasing wavelength and the width and cycle of injection pulse is obtained. The temperature character of packaged laser unit is measured conveniently. Making use of the above examined curves and parameters, the reliability of semiconductor laser and quality of device can be compared directly and evaluated accurately. The technique is successfully applied for the evaluation of semiconductor laser reliability.

  1. Medical Applications Of CO2 Laser Fiber Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    In 1978, Hughes Laboratories reported development of fiber optics that were capable of transmitting CO2 laser energy. These fibers are now being tested for medical applications. Wide ranging medical investigation with CO2 lasers has occurred during the twelve years since the first observations of laser hemostasis. Specialists in ophthalmology, neurosurgery, urology, gynecology, otolaryngology, maxillo-facial/plastic surgery, dermatology, and oncology among others, have explored its use. In principle, all these specialists use CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 microns to thermally destroy diseased tissues. As such, CO2 lasers compare and compete with electrosurgical devices. The fundamental difference between these modalities lies in how they generate heat in treated tissue.

  2. Optical cell cleaning with NIR femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    Femtosecond laser microscopes have been used as both micro and nanosurgery tools. The optical knock-out of undesired cells in multiplex cell clusters shall be further reported on in this study. Femtosecond laser-induced cell death is beneficial due to the reduced collateral side effects and therefore can be used to selectively destroy target cells within monolayers, as well as within 3D tissues, all the while preserving cells of interest. This is an important characteristic for the application in stem cell research and cancer treatment. Non-precise damage compromises the viability of neighboring cells by inducing side effects such as stress to the cells surrounding the target due to the changes in the microenvironment, resulting from both the laser and laser-exposed cells. In this study, optimum laser parameters for optical cleaning by isolating single cells and cell colonies are exploited through the use of automated software control. Physiological equilibrium and cellular responses to the laser induced damages are also investigated. Cell death dependence on laser focus, determination and selectivity of intensity/dosage, controllable damage and cell recovery mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Theoretical and experimental studies of optically pumped molecular gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratanavis, Amarin

    Optically pumped molecular gas lasers based on vibrational-rotational transitions in the infrared spectral region were studied experimentally and theoretically. A model was developed to predict the performance of such lasers and explore their potentials for energy and power scaling. This rate equation model was applied to explore the performance of a second-overtone (pulsed) and a first-overtone (CW) pumped HBr laser. Experimental improvements concerning temperature spectral tuning and frequency stabilization of a Nd:YAG laser that pumped HBr were accomplished. Lasing at 4 microns was demonstrated from such a system. We identified acetylene and hydrogen cyanide as potential laser gases that can be pumped with lasers emitting in the attractive telecommunication C band region at about 1.5 microns. Estimations and fluorescence measurements suggest the possibility of lasing in the 3 micron region. Lasing was demonstrated for the first time with a 5 ns pump pulse from an optical parametric oscillator using traditional cavities. The first gas filled hollow fiber laser based on population inversion was demonstrated with C2H2 and emission in the 3 micron region was observed. An analytical model indicates the possibility of CW lasing with small Stokes shift in both C2H 2 and HCN.

  4. Optical coatings on laser crystals for HiPER project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulehla, Jindrich; Pokorný, Pavel; Lazar, Josef

    2011-12-01

    In this contribution we present a technology for deposition of interference coatings for optical components designed to operate as active media in power pulsed lasers. The aim of the technology is to prepare crystals for lasers for the HiPER project (High Power laser Energy Research facility) which should demonstrate the feasibility of laser driven fusion as a future energy source. Diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSL) are the most likely option for fusion ignition. The choice of the material for the lasers' active medium is critical. Some of the most important properties include the ability to be antireflection coated to reduce the energy losses and increase the overall efficiency. This contribution deals with some of the materials considered to be candidates for slabs serving as the active medium of the DPSSLs. We tested Yb:YAG and Yb:CaF2 samples. As large amounts of heat need to be dissipated during laser operation, cryogenic cooling is necessary. Appropriate coating materials and techniques need to be chosen. Therefore differences between available coating techniques are investigated in terms of adhesion, enduring of stress from temperature shocks, etc. Coated samples were placed into cryogenic environment in order to simulate conditions similar to those in real life operation. Optical microscopy was used for coating investigation after the conducted experiments.

  5. Optical coatings on laser crystals for HiPER project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulehla, Jindrich; Pokorný, Pavel; Lazar, Josef

    2011-06-01

    In this contribution we present a technology for deposition of interference coatings for optical components designed to operate as active media in power pulsed lasers. The aim of the technology is to prepare crystals for lasers for the HiPER project (High Power laser Energy Research) which should demonstrate the feasibility of laser driven fusion as a future energy source. Diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSL) are the most likely option for fusion ignition. The choice of material for the lasers active medium is critical. Some of the most important properties include the ability to be antireflection coated to reduce the energy losses and increase the overall efficiency. This contribution deals with some of the materials considered to be candidates for slabs serving as the active medium of the DPSSLs. We tested Yb:YAG, Yb:CaF2 and Yb:KGW samples. As large amounts of heat need to be dissipated during laser operation, cryogenic cooling is necessary. Appropriate coating materials and techniques need to be chosen. Therefore differences between available coating techniques are investigated in terms of adhesion, enduring of stress resulting from temperature shocks, etc. Coated samples were placed in a specially designed cryogenic apparatus in order to simulate conditions similar to those in real life operation. Optical microscopy and spectrophotometer measurements were used for coating investigation after the conducted experiments.

  6. Advanced studies on the Polycapillary Optics use at XLab Frascati

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampai, D.; Dabagov, S. B.; Cappuccio, G.

    2015-07-01

    X-ray analytical techniques are widely used in the world. By the way, due to the strong radiation-matter interaction, to design optical devices suitable for X-ray radiation remains still of wide interest. As a consequence of novel advanced material studies, in the last 30 years several typologies of X-ray lenses have been developed. In this work, a short review on the status of Polycapillary Optics (polyCO), from design and fabrication to various applications, has been presented making comparison of the results achieved by several groups through different X-ray optical elements. A focus is regarded for advanced X-ray imaging and spectroscopy tools based on combination of the modern polyCO hardware and the reconstruction software, available as homemade and commercially ones. Recent results (in three main fields, high resolution X-ray imaging, micro-XRF spectroscopy and micro-tomography) obtained at XLab Frascati have been discussed.

  7. Recent advances in laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) for label-free analysis of single cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, James W

    2013-01-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS), a technique that integrates optical tweezers with confocal Raman spectroscopy, is a variation of micro-Raman spectroscopy that enables the manipulation and biochemical analysis of single biological particles in suspension. This article provides an overview of the LTRS method, with an emphasis on highlighting recent advances over the past several years in the development of the technology and several new biological and biomedical applications that have been demonstrated. A perspective on the future developments of this powerful cytometric technology will also be presented. PMID:23175434

  8. Laser ablation plasmas for diagnostics of structured electronic and optical materials during or after laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; González, Jhanis J.

    2012-03-01

    Laser induced plasma can be used for rapid optical diagnostics of electronic, optical, electro-optical, electromechanical and other structures. Plasma monitoring and diagnostics can be realized during laser processing in real time by means of measuring optical emission that originates from the pulsed laser-material interaction. In post-process applications, e.g., quality assurance and quality control, surface raster scanning and depth profiling can be realized with high spatial resolution (~10 nm in depth and ~3 μm lateral). Commercial instruments based on laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) are available for these purposes. Since only a laser beam comes in direct contact with the sample, such diagnostics are sterile and non-disruptive, and can be performed at a distance, e.g. through a window. The technique enables rapid micro-localized chemical analysis without a need for sample preparation, dissolution or evacuation of samples, thus it is particularly beneficial in fabrication of thin films and structures, such as electronic, photovoltaic and electro-optical devices or circuits of devices. Spectrum acquisition from a single laser shot provides detection limits for metal traces of ~10 μg/g, which can be further improved by accumulating signal from multiple laser pulses. LIBS detection limit for Br in polyethylene is 90 μg/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation (halogen detection is a requirement for semiconductor package materials). Three to four orders of magnitude lower detection limits can be obtained with a femtosecond laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS), which is also provided on commercial basis. Laser repetition rate is currently up to 20 Hz in LIBS instruments and up to 100 kHz in LA-ICP-MS.

  9. Fiber optic detector probes for laser light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Wu, Chi; Chu, Benjamin

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the role of fiber optic detector probes in laser light scattering is presented. A quantitative comparison between different detector configurations is accomplished by measuring the time taken for one million photocounts to be accumulated in the extrapolated zeroth delay channel of the net unnormalized intensity time correlation function. A considerable reduction in the accumulation time is achieved by relaxing a rather stringent requirement for the spatial coherence of the optical field.

  10. Nested parabolic reflective optics for laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, D.

    1995-12-31

    Applications for laboratory soft-x-ray/VuV sources would benefit from the ability to collect a large energy bandwidth of radiation emanating from the very small source and redirect it into a well collimated beam without losing most of the incident radiation. Such optics would be beneficial to x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray lithography, diffractometry and other applications. The author has been working to apply technology originally developed for astronomical x-ray telescopes to production of low cost replicated collimation optics for such x-ray/VuV instruments. Most of the steps in the production of these optics have previously been accomplished with the larger astronomical optics but the author wants to reduce the size of these optics by at least an order of magnitude which introduces problems. In addition, very few copies of an x-ray telescope are made while he wants to make hundreds of copies of the optics. This paper briefly discusses the design and fabrication of these small collimation optics and is a report on work in progress.

  11. Optical Fiber Multiplexer For Industrial Nd:YAG Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goethals, Walther A.

    1989-03-01

    A lot of industrial Nd:YAG lasers are now being equipped with fiber optics for application in flexible manufacturing. One laser can be supplied with several fibers so different processing positions can receive laser power according to the time-and/or energy sharing principle. Most of the time-sharing devices (multiplexers) are based on a galvanometer mirror that couples a converging laser beam into different fibers respectively. From the industry several questions have risen to make these multiplexers faster, more reliable and suitable for smaller diameter fibers. The current designs are limited by the positioning accuracy of the galvanometer mirror and by their sensitiveness to variations in the parameters of the laser beam due to thermal lensing effects. In the patented design of the multiplexer presented here, based on a telescopic image relay and a precision fiber positioning unit, these problems were solved. A prototype has been built which addresses five fibers with 200 μm cores at a switching rate higher than 100 times per second. The fibers have special termination connectors and can be exchanged easily without losing the alignment of the optical system. For spot welding applications with pulsed Nd:YAG lasers this means that this type of multiplexer could be used to take advantage of the high laser pulse rates and the pulse shape and energy programming possibilities that manufacturers of these types of lasers offer nowadays. Another application that has been shown now is the use of several remote laser engraving units served by a single CW/Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser and a fiber multiplexer.

  12. Novel fiber optic tip designs and devices for laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchens, Thomas Clifton

    Fiber optic delivery of laser energy has been used for years in various types of surgical procedures in the human body. Optical energy provides several benefits over electrical or mechanical surgery, including the ability to selectively target specific tissue types while preserving others. Specialty fiber optic tips have also been introduced to further customize delivery of laser energy to the tissue. Recent evolution in lasers and miniaturization has opened up opportunities for many novel surgical techniques. Currently, ophthalmic surgeons use relatively invasive mechanical tools to dissect retinal deposits which occur in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. By using the tight focusing properties of microspheres combined with the short optical penetration depth of the Erbium:YAG laser and mid-IR fiber delivery, a precise laser scalpel can be constructed as an alternative, less invasive and more precise approach to this surgery. Chains of microspheres may allow for a self limiting ablation depth of approximately 10 microm based on the defocusing of paraxial rays. The microsphere laser scalpel may also be integrated with other surgical instruments to reduce the total number of handpieces for the surgeon. In current clinical laser lithotripsy procedures, poor input coupling of the Holmium:YAG laser energy frequently damages and requires discarding of the optical fiber. However, recent stone ablation studies with the Thulium fiber laser have provided comparable results to the Ho:YAG laser. The improved spatial beam profile of the Thulium fiber laser can also be efficiently coupled into a fiber approximately one third the diameter and reduces the risk of damaging the fiber input. For this reason, the trunk optical fiber minus the distal fiber tip can be preserved between procedures. The distal fiber tip, which degrades during stone ablation, could be made detachable and disposable. A novel, low-profile, twist-locking, detachable distal fiber tip interface was designed

  13. Robust remote-pumping sodium laser for advanced LIDAR and guide star applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstberger, Bernhard; Enderlein, Martin; Friedenauer, Axel; Schwerdt, Robin; Wei, Daoping; Karpov, Vladimir; Leisching, Patrick; Clements, Wallace R. L.; Kaenders, Wilhelm G.

    2015-10-01

    /min and an overall power consumption of < 700 W, the system offers a maximum of flexibility with minimal infrastructure demands on site. Each system is built in a modular way, based on the concept of line-replaceable units (LRU). A comprehensive system software, as well as an intuitive service GUI, allow for remote control and error tracking down to at least the LRU level. In case of a failure, any LRU can be easily replaced. With these fiber-based guide star lasers, TOPTICA for the first time offers a fully engineered, off-the-shelf guide star laser system for groundbased optical telescopes providing convenient, turn-key operation in remote and harsh locations. Reliability and flexibility will be beneficial in particular for advanced satellite and space debris tracking as well as LIDAR applications.

  14. Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg F.; Comaskey, Brian; Sutton, Steven B.

    1994-01-01

    The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends.

  15. Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, G.F.; Comaskey, B.; Sutton, S.B.

    1994-04-19

    The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends. 11 figures.

  16. Catadioptric optics for laser Doppler velocimeter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the adaptation of low-cost Schmidt-Cassegrain astronomical telescopes to perform the laser-beam-focusing and scattered-light collection tasks associated with dual-beam laser Doppler velocimetry. A generic telescope design is analyzed using ray-tracing methods and Gaussian beam-propagation theory. A straightforward modification procedure to convert from infinite to near unity conjugate-ratio operation with very low residual aberration is identified and tested with a 200-mm-aperture telescope modified for f/10 operation. Performance data for this modified telescope configuration are near the diffraction limit and agree well with predictions.

  17. Advanced Optical Burst Switched Network Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejabati, Reza; Aracil, Javier; Castoldi, Piero; de Leenheer, Marc; Simeonidou, Dimitra; Valcarenghi, Luca; Zervas, Georgios; Wu, Jian

    In recent years, as the bandwidth and the speed of networks have increased significantly, a new generation of network-based applications using the concept of distributed computing and collaborative services is emerging (e.g., Grid computing applications). The use of the available fiber and DWDM infrastructure for these applications is a logical choice offering huge amounts of cheap bandwidth and ensuring global reach of computing resources [230]. Currently, there is a great deal of interest in deploying optical circuit (wavelength) switched network infrastructure for distributed computing applications that require long-lived wavelength paths and address the specific needs of a small number of well-known users. Typical users are particle physicists who, due to their international collaborations and experiments, generate enormous amounts of data (Petabytes per year). These users require a network infrastructures that can support processing and analysis of large datasets through globally distributed computing resources [230]. However, providing wavelength granularity bandwidth services is not an efficient and scalable solution for applications and services that address a wider base of user communities with different traffic profiles and connectivity requirements. Examples of such applications may be: scientific collaboration in smaller scale (e.g., bioinformatics, environmental research), distributed virtual laboratories (e.g., remote instrumentation), e-health, national security and defense, personalized learning environments and digital libraries, evolving broadband user services (i.e., high resolution home video editing, real-time rendering, high definition interactive TV). As a specific example, in e-health services and in particular mammography applications due to the size and quantity of images produced by remote mammography, stringent network requirements are necessary. Initial calculations have shown that for 100 patients to be screened remotely, the network

  18. Design of fiber optic probes for laser light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Chu, Benjamin

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative analysis is presented of the role of optical fibers in laser light scattering. Design of a general fiber optic/microlens probe by means of ray tracing is described. Several different geometries employing an optical fiber of the type used in lightwave communications and a graded index microlens are considered. Experimental results using a nonimaging fiber optic detector probe show that due to geometrical limitations of single mode fibers, a probe using a multimode optical fiber has better performance, for both static and dynamic measurements of the scattered light intensity, compared with a probe using a single mode fiber. Fiber optic detector probes are shown to be more efficient at data collection when compared with conventional approaches to measurements of the scattered laser light. Integration of fiber optic detector probes into a fiber optic spectrometer offers considerable miniaturization of conventional light scattering spectrometers, which can be made arbitrarily small. In addition static and dynamic measurements of scattered light can be made within the scattering cell and consequently very close to the scattering center.

  19. Use of laser radar imagery in optical pattern recognition: the Optical Processor Enhanced Ladar (OPEL) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Dennis H.; Mills, Stuart A.; Dydyk, Robert B.

    1998-03-01

    The Optical Processor Enhanced Ladar (OPEL) program is designed to evaluate the capabilities of a seeker obtained by integrating two state-of-the-art technologies, laser radar, or ladar, and optical correlation. The program is a thirty-two month effort to build, optimize, and test a breadboard seeker system (the OPEL System) that incorporates these two promising technologies. Laser radars produce both range and intensity image information. Use of this information in an optical correlator is described. A correlator with binary phase input and ternary amplitude and phase filter capability is assumed. Laser radar imagery was collected on five targets over 360 degrees of azimuth from 3 elevation angles. This imagery was then processed to provide training sets in preparation for filter construction. This paper reviews the ladar and optical correlator technologies used, outlines the OPEL program, and describes the OPEL system.

  20. High density, optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, v-groove monolithic laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    An optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser diode array achieves stacking pitches to 33 bars/cm by mounting laser diodes into V-shaped grooves. This design will deliver>4kW/cm2 of directional pulsed laser power. This optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser is usable in all solid state laser systems which require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources.

  1. High density, optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, v-groove monolithic laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, B.L.

    1998-10-27

    An optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser diode array achieves stacking pitches to 33 bars/cm by mounting laser diodes into V-shaped grooves. This design will deliver > 4kW/cm{sup 2} of directional pulsed laser power. This optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser is usable in all solid state laser systems which require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources. 13 figs.

  2. Proper Criteria of Nonlinear Optical Crystals for Space Laser Systems and the Possible Causes for Space Laser Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Dowdye, Edward; Jamison, Tracee; Canham, John

    2005-01-01

    NASA is striving to develop a scientific understanding of the universe and the Earth-Sun System and its response to natural or human-induced changes. Space lasers are vital tools for NASA's missions to advance our understanding of space research and improving our prediction capability for climate, weather, and natural hazards. Unfortunately, several past space missions that utilized lasers proved to be short-lived and unreliable. In this paper, we are reporting the results of our investigations on several nonlinear optical crystals, which are vital components in space lasers. Examples of these investigations are: The correlation of the phase diagrams of nonlinear crystals and its durability, the effect of radiating these crystals by high-energy beams of protons and gamma on their second harmonic efficiency, and measurements of the high-energy and low-energy thresholds for each crystal before and after irradiation. A set of proper criteria for these crystals will be presented. We will also discuss the possible causes of failures in a space laser and propose a solution to a contamination problem in all future space lasers.

  3. Advances in laser technology for the atmospheric sciences; Proceedings of the Seminar, San Diego, Calif., August 25, 26, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, J. D. (Editor); Moore, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    These papers deal with recent research, developments, and applications in laser and electrooptics technology, particularly with regard to atmospheric effects in imaging and propagation, laser instrumentation and measurements, and particle measurement. Specific topics include advanced imaging techniques, image resolution through atmospheric turbulence over the ocean, an efficient method for calculating transmittance profiles, a comparison of a corner-cube reflector and a plane mirror in folded-path and direct transmission through atmospheric turbulence, line-spread instrumentation for propagation measurements, scaling laws for thermal fluctuations in the layer adjacent to ocean waves, particle sizing by laser photography, and an optical Fourier transform analysis of satellite cloud imagery. Other papers discuss a subnanosecond photomultiplier tube for laser application, holography of solid propellant combustion, diagnostics of turbulence by holography, a camera for in situ photography of cloud particles from a hail research aircraft, and field testing of a long-path laser transmissometer designed for atmospheric visibility measurements.

  4. Solid-state laser source of narrowband ultraviolet B light for skin disease care with advanced performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Aleksandr A.; Chu, Hong; Buchwald, Kristian

    2015-02-01

    Two years ago we reported about the development of solid state laser source for medical skin treatment with wavelength 310.6 nm and average power 200 mW. Here we describe the results of investigation of the advanced version of the laser, which is a more compact device with increased output power and flat top beam profile. Ti: Sapphire laser, the main module of our source, was modified and optimized such, that UV average power of the device was increased 1.7 times. Fiber optic homogenizer was replaced by articulated arm with diffraction diffuser, providing round spot with flat profile at the skin. We investigated and compare characteristics of Ti: Sapphire lasers with volume Bragg grating and with fused silica transmission grating, which was used first time for Ti: Sapphire laser spectral selection and tuning. Promising performance of last gratings is demonstrated.

  5. Computing Temperatures In Optically Pumped Laser Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, Usamah O.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program presents new model solving temperature-distribution problem for laser rods of finite length and calculates both radial and axial components of temperature distributions in these rods. Contains several self-checking schemes to prevent over-writing of memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  6. The aero optics effect on near space laser communication optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuan; Fu, Yuegang; Jiang, Huilin

    2013-08-01

    With the developing of the space laser communication link, the performance index including higher transfer speed, extending transfer distance, and environmental adaptability, all ask the system accuracy and indexes improving. Special the developing near space platform, its environmental is extremes, the near space drone and other airplane flight speed is very quickly from the subsonic to supersonic. The aero optics effect caused by high speed will generate a thin turbulent air layer. It affects the performance of laser communication optical system by laser light vibration, deviation and so on, further more affects the performance of laser communication system working performance, even can't communication. Therefore, for achieving optical system indexes, we need do more research in optical system near space aero optics environmental adaptability. In this paper, near space link environmental characteristic are researched. And on the base of the aero optics theory, computer simulating method is applied to analyze the relationship among the altitude, the flight speed and the image dispersion. The result shows that, the aero optics effect cannot be ignored when the terminal is in low altitude or is moving with supersonic speed. The effect must be taken into considered from overall design. The result will provide the basis of research design.

  7. A Multiterawatt Laser Using a High-Contrast, Optical Parametric Chirped-Pulse Presamplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnoud, V.; Puth, J.; Begishev, I.; Guardalben, M.; Zuegel, J.D.; Forget, N.; LeBlanc, C.

    2005-09-30

    A laser has been built that uses optical parametric chirped-pulse preamplification and a glass booster amplifier. We review the performance of the 5-Hz, multijoule OPCPA pump laser, the 370-mJ OPCPA, and the overall laser.

  8. Liquid-assisted laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Giron, A.; Sola, D.; Peña, J. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, results obtained by laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials assisted by liquids are reported. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse-width in the nanosecond range was used to machine the materials, which were immersed in water and ethylene glycol. Variation in geometrical parameters, morphology, and ablation yields were studied by using the same laser working conditions. It was observed that machined depth and removed volume depended on the thermal, optical, and mechanical features of the processed materials as well as on the properties of the surrounding medium in which the laser processing was carried out. Variation in ablation yields was studied in function of the liquid used to assist the laser process and related to refractive index and viscosity. Material features and working conditions were also related to the obtained results in order to correlate ablation parameters with respect to the hardness of the processed materials.

  9. Advanced materials and techniques for fibre-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Philip J.

    2014-06-01

    Fibre-optic monitoring systems came of age in about 1999 upon the emergence of the world's first significant commercialising company - a spin-out from the UK's collaborative MAST project. By using embedded fibre-optic technology, the MAST project successfully measured transient strain within high-performance composite yacht masts. Since then, applications have extended from smart composites into civil engineering, energy, military, aerospace, medicine and other sectors. Fibre-optic sensors come in various forms, and may be subject to embedment, retrofitting, and remote interrogation. The unique challenges presented by each implementation require careful scrutiny before widespread adoption can take place. Accordingly, various aspects of design and reliability are discussed spanning a range of representative technologies that include resonant microsilicon structures, MEMS, Bragg gratings, advanced forms of spectroscopy, and modern trends in nanotechnology. Keywords: Fibre-optic sensors, fibre Bragg gratings, MEMS, MOEMS, nanotechnology, plasmon.

  10. In situ window cleaning by laser blowoff through optical fibera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfier, A.; Barison, S.; Danieli, T.; Giudicotti, L.; Pagura, C.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2008-10-01

    The feasibility of a window cleaning system based on the laser blowoff technique is investigated to remove the impurity deposition on vacuum windows of the modified reversed field experiment fusion device. The laser pulse is sent to the window through a fused silica fiber optic (φ=1mm), then focused on its internal surface, single shot ablating up to ˜5mm2 of the impurity layer; the focused pulse is scanned across the window to clean its entire surface. The composition of the deposited layer is studied through the secondary ion mass spectrometry and profilometry techniques. Effectiveness of cleaning is analyzed in terms of quality of the cleaned spot, its dimension, repetition rate of the laser, and its wavelength. The energy damage threshold of the fiber optic is also investigated. Three different lasers (microjoule Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, and ruby) are first tested directly on the window; then only the ruby laser beam is propagated through an optical fiber and tested.

  11. Ageing of optical components under laser irradiation at 532nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, S.; Delrive, L.; Bouchut, P.; Andre, B.; Geffraye, F.

    2005-09-01

    The pulsed Laser Induced Damage Threshold (LIDT) of optical components usually reaches several hundreds of MW/cm2. When exposed to laser power several order of magnitude below their LIDT, the optical component lifetime is, by default, considered infinite. Under specific conditions, the accumulation of laser pulses may lead to a contamination of the surface and a degradation of its optical properties and LIDT. In the first order, these phenomena depend on the experimental conditions such as the irradiation time, the laser power, and the environment. In order to better understand the physics emphasizing this degradation, we developed an experimental cell with an in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry diagnostic. The dry-pumped cell sheltering the sample is associated with a mass spectrometer that enables us to follow the environmental conditions in which we experiment the ageing. Anti-reflection coatings on fused silica were tested under 10 kHz-532 nm laser ageing. We present first results of degradation obtained in these conditions.

  12. Laser illuminator and optical system for disk patterning

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, C. Brent; Dixit, Shamasundar N.; Everett, Mathew; Honig, John

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic recording media are textured over areas designated for contact in order to minimize friction with data transducing heads. In fabricating a hard disk, an aluminum nickel-phosphorous substrate is polished to a specular finish. A mechanical means is then used to roughen an annular area intended to be the head contact band. An optical and mechanical system allows thousands of spots to be generated with each laser pulse, allowing the textured pattern to be rapidly generated with a low repetition rate laser and an uncomplicated mechanical system. The system uses a low power laser, a beam expander, a specially designed phase plate, a prism to deflect the beam, a lens to transmit the diffraction pattern to the far field, a mechanical means to rotate the pattern and a trigger system to fire the laser when sections of the pattern are precisely aligned. The system generates an annular segment of the desired pattern with which the total pattern is generated by rotating the optical system about its optic axis, sensing the rotational position and firing the laser as the annular segment rotates into the next appropriate position. This marking system can be integrated into a disk sputtering system for manufacturing magnetic disks, allowing for a very streamlined manufacturing process.

  13. Performance of laser guide star adaptive optics at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1995-07-19

    A sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics system has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for use on the 3-meter Shane telescope at Lick Observatory. The system is based on a 127-actuator continuous-surface deformable mirror, a Hartmann wavefront sensor equipped with a fast-framing low-noise CCD camera, and a pulsed solid-state-pumped dye laser tuned to the atomic sodium resonance line at 589 nm. The adaptive optics system has been tested on the Shane telescope using natural reference stars yielding up to a factor of 12 increase in image peak intensity and a factor of 6.5 reduction in image full width at half maximum (FWHM). The results are consistent with theoretical expectations. The laser guide star system has been installed and operated on the Shane telescope yielding a beam with 22 W average power at 589 nm. Based on experimental data, this laser should generate an 8th magnitude guide star at this site, and the integrated laser guide star adaptive optics system should produce images with Strehl ratios of 0.4 at 2.2 {mu}m in median seeing and 0.7 at 2.2 {mu}m in good seeing.

  14. Transurethral optical-laser knife and probe director for lateral firing laser probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Reza S.

    1994-02-01

    Laser energy has been used by many for transurethral incision of small, obstructive prostates, vesical neck contractures, and urethral strictures. The customary techniques of moving the tip of the laser fiber through a cystoscope with a conventional laser guide, almost tangentially to the tissue to be incised, or drilling radially arranged holes in the scar, or both, have been cumbersome and imprecise. To provide exact control of the laser fiber and precise delivery of laser energy, a new guide was devised. It conducts the quartz fiber through the sheath and along the lens of an optical urethrotome. The tip of the quartz fiber contacts the tissue at an angle of 20 degree(s). KTP/532 laser energy is used to perform internal urethrotomy for urethral stricture, transurethral incision of postoperative contracture of the vesical neck, and transurethral incision of the small prostate under constant visual control.

  15. Pulse laser assisted optical tweezers for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tadao; Maeda, Saki; Honda, Ayae

    2012-01-01

    Optical tweezers which enables to trap micron to nanometer sized objects by radiation pressure force is utilized for manipulation of particles under a microscope and for measurement of forces between biomolecules. Weak force of optical tweezers causes some limitations such as particle adhesion or steric barrier like lipid membrane in a cell prevent further movement of objects. For biomedical applications we need to overcome these difficulties. We have developed a technique to exert strong instantaneous force by use of a pulse laser beam and to assist conventional optical tweezers. A pulse laser beam has huge instantaneous laser power of more than 1000 times as strong as a conventional continuous-wave laser beam so that the instantaneous force is strong enough to break chemical bonding and molecular force between objects and obstacles. We derive suitable pulse duration for pulse assist of optical tweezers and demonstrate particle manipulation in difficult situations through an experiment of particle removal from sticky surface of glass substrate. PMID:23366922

  16. Laser Electro-Optic Technology. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This program guide identifies primary considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of a laser electro-optic technology program. An occupational description and program content are presented. A curriculum framework specifies the exact course title, course number, levels of instruction, major course content, laboratory activities,…

  17. Laser Electro-Optic Engineering Technology. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This program guide identifies particular considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of laser electro-optic engineering technology programs. Contents include an occupational description and information on the following: program content, including a curriculum framework that details major concepts and intended outcomes and a list…

  18. Toward laser welding of glasses without optical contacting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, S.; Zimmermann, F.; Eberhardt, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Nolte, S.

    2015-10-01

    The welding of transparent materials with ultrashort laser pulse at high repetition rates has attracted much attention due to its potential applications in fields such as optics, microfluidics, optofluidics and precision machinery. One demanding issue is the stable and reliable welding of different materials without the utilization of an intermediate layer or an optical contact. In this work, we maximized the size of the molten volume in order to generate a large pool of molten material which is able to fill an existing gap between the samples. To this end, we used bursts of ultrashort laser pulses with an individual pulse energy of up to . The laser-induced welding seams exhibit a base area with a size of up to . Using these large modifications, we are able to overcome the requirement of an optical contact and weld even gaps with a height of about . Bulging of the sample surface and ejection of molten material in the gap between the two samples allow to bridge the gap and enable successful welding. We also determined the breaking strength of laser-welded fused silica samples without an optical contact by a three-point bending test. The determined value of up to 73 MPa is equivalent to 85 % of stability of the pristine bulk material.

  19. Optical superheterodyne receiver uses laser for local oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, R. F.

    1966-01-01

    Optical superheterodyne receiver uses a laser coupled to a frequency translator to supply both the incident signal and local oscillator signal and thus permit reception of amplitude modulated video bandwidth signals through the atmosphere. This receiver is useful in scientific propagation experiments, tracking experiments, and communication experiments.

  20. Optical limiting properties of silver nanoparticles fabricated by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, T. S.; Lee, S. S.; Van, L. H.; Hong, Ming Hui; Chong, Tow Chong

    2004-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been fabricated by laser ablation of a silver metal foil in solution. The presence of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate increases the yield of the nanoparticles and enhances their stability. The optical limiting performance of the silver nanoparticles embedded in a PMMA film is compared to that in an aqueous solution.

  1. Laser beacon adaptive optics for power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, R.Q.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the laser beam control system requirements for power beaming applications. Power beaming applications include electric and thermal engine propulsion for orbit transfer, station changing, and recharging batteries. Beam control includes satellite acquisition, high accuracy tracking, higher order atmospheric compensation using adaptive optics, and precision point-ahead. Beam control may also include local laser beam clean-up with a low order adaptive optics system. This paper also presents results of tracking and higher-order correction experiments on astronomical objects. The results were obtained with a laser beacon adaptive optics system at Phillips Laboratory`s Starfire Optical Range near Albuquerque, NM. At a wavelength of 0.85 {mu}m, the author has achieved Strehl ratios of {approximately}0.50 using laser beacons and {approximately}0.65 using natural stars for exposures longer than one minute on objects of {approximately}8{sup th} magnitude. The resulting point spread function has a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 0.13 arcsec.

  2. Observing techniques for astronomical laser guide star adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Macintosh, B.; Olivier, S.S.; Gavel, D.T.; Friedman, H.W.

    1998-05-01

    We discuss astronomical observing requirements and their implementation using sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics. Specific issues requiring implementation include the ability to place the astronomical object at different locations within the field of view; reliable subtraction of Rayleigh-scattered light; efficient focusing; and stable point-spread-function characterization.

  3. Test Port for Fiber-Optic-Coupled Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos Izquierdo, Luis; Scott, V. Stanley; Rinis, Haris; Cavanaugh, John

    2011-01-01

    A test port designed as part of a fiber optic coupled laser altimeter receiver optical system allows for the back-illumination of the optical system for alignment verification, as well as illumination of the detector(s) for testing the receiver electronics and signal-processing algorithms. Measuring the optical alignment of a laser altimeter instrument is difficult after the instrument is fully assembled. The addition of a test port in the receiver aft-optics allows for the back-illumination of the receiver system such that its focal setting and boresight alignment can be easily verified. For a multiple-detector receiver system, the addition of the aft-optics test port offers the added advantage of being able to simultaneously test all the detectors with different signals that simulate the expected operational conditions. On a laser altimeter instrument (see figure), the aft-optics couple the light from the receiver telescope to the receiver detector(s). Incorporating a beam splitter in the aft-optics design allows for the addition of a test port to back-illuminate the receiver telescope and/or detectors. The aft-optics layout resembles a T with the detector on one leg, the receiver telescope input port on the second leg, and the test port on the third leg. The use of a custom beam splitter with 99-percent reflection, 1-percent transmission, and a mirrored roof can send the test port light to the receiver telescope leg as well as the detector leg, without unduly sacrificing the signal from the receiver telescope to the detector. The ability to test the receiver system alignment, as well as multiple detectors with different signals without the need to disassemble the instrument or connect and reconnect components, is a great advantage to the aft-optics test port. Another benefit is that the receiver telescope aperture is fully back-illuminated by the test port so the receiver telescope focal setting vs. pressure and or temperature can be accurately measured (as

  4. Holograms for laser diode: Single mode optical fiber coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhr, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    The low coupling efficiency of semiconductor laser emissions into a single mode optical fibers place a severe restriction on their use. Associated with these conventional optical coupling techniques are stringent alignment sensitivities. Using holographic elements, the coupling efficiency may be increased and the alignment sensitivity greatly reduced. Both conventional and computer methods used in the generation of the holographic couplers are described and diagrammed. The reconstruction geometries used are shown to be somewhat restrictive but substantially less rigid than their conventional optical counterparts. Single and double hologram techniques are examined concerning their respective ease of fabrication and relative merits.

  5. Measuring the dispersion curve of a PMMA-fibre optic cable using a dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorba, Serkan; Farah, Constantine; Pant, Ravi

    2010-11-01

    An advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment is outlined which uses a dye laser to map out the chromatic dispersion curve of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) optical fibre. Seven different wavelengths across the visible spectrum are employed using five different dyes. The light pulse is split into two pulses, one to a nearby photodetector and the other coupled to the optical fibre cable at the end of which there is another photodetector. The difference in time of arrival at the detectors is used to compute the speed of light in the fibre for a given colour. In addition to a pedagogically simple and intuitive demonstration of the measurement of index of refraction, the use of a long fibre eliminates the need to direct the dangerous UV/visible laser pulse beam across a classroom, as is usually done in similar experiments. Ways to avoid systematic errors and other technical pitfalls—such as ringing oscillations—are presented.

  6. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fugui; Li, Ming; Gao, Lidan; Sheng, Weifan; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-06-15

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as the subnanometer scale and that the variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a one-dimensional surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach toward effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques. PMID:27304296

  7. Q-switched Nd:YAG optical vortex lasers.

    PubMed

    Kim, D J; Kim, J W; Clarkson, W A

    2013-12-01

    Q-switched operation of a high-quality Nd:YAG optical vortex laser with the first order Laguerre-Gaussian mode and well-determined helical wavefronts using a fiber-based pump beam conditioning scheme is reported. A simple two-mirror resonator incorporating an acousto-optic Q-switch was employed, along with an etalon and a Brewster plate to enforce the particular helicity of the output. The laser yielded Q-switched pulses with ~250 μJ pulse energy and ~33 ns pulse duration (FWHM) at a 0.1 kHz repetition rate for 5.1 W of absorbed pump power. The handedness of the helical wavefronts was preserved regardless of the repetition rates. The prospects of further power scaling and improved laser performance are discussed. PMID:24514499

  8. Reinforced direct bonding of optical materials by femtosecond laser welding.

    PubMed

    Hélie, David; Bégin, Michael; Lacroix, Fabrice; Vallée, Réal

    2012-04-20

    A process for reinforcing a direct bond between optical materials using femtosecond laser welding is presented. As a side benefit, the optical transmission properties of the joined components are shown not to be altered by the joining process. The joints exhibits higher shear breakage loads, yielding a maximum measured joint strength of 5.25 MPa for an applied load of 75 kg in fused silica. The laser sealing of direct bonds between dissimilar materials improves their resistance to thermal shocks. Direct bonds sealed by a circular weld seam can withstand thermal shocks at temperatures at least twice as great as nonreinforced direct bonds. The combination of ultrashort laser welding and direct bonding provides an innovative joining method that benefits from the advantages of both contributing physical processes. PMID:22534922

  9. Optically pumped pulsed Li/sub 2/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kaslin, V.; Yakushev, O.

    1982-02-01

    Pulsed lasing was obtained for the first time from Li/sub 2/ molecules by optical pumping with radiation from a pulsed copper vapor laser (578.2 nm, pulse repetition frequency 5 kHz). The laser transitions, with wavelengths in the range 867--907 nm, belong to the electronic A/sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub u/--X/sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub g/ system. With a pump power of 190 mW, an average output power of 8 mW was achieved with an efficiency for the conversion of the optical pumping energy of 7%. A number of Li/sub 2/ laser emission lines were observed in the superradiant regime.

  10. Frequency stabilized near-IR laser system for optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Růžička, B.; Číp, O.; Lazar, J.

    2005-08-01

    We present a design of a stabilized laser system, an etalon of the optical frequency at the 1.5 μm band following the demands of the telecommunication industry in the Czech Republic. Our laser system employs a DFB laser diode in a two stage stabilizing scheme. The linear absorption arrangement with an acetylene filled absorption cell of a pressure about 1 kPa is used to lock the laser to the Doppler-broadened lines. To achieve a reliable and robust stabilization of the laser frequency we arranged a two-loop digital servo-system overcoming the problem of a narrow locking range of the detected transition. The wavelength of the laser is modulated by current and the servo-control and tuning is performed by a fast and precise thermal control. To achieve the resolution of the weak sub-Doppler transitions we assembled a locking scheme via frequency-modulation spectroscopy to the high finesse cavity. The system is assembled using predominantly fibre-optic components. A technology of acetylene absorption cells with AR coated windows is presented as well.

  11. Advanced nanoparticle generation and excitation by lasers in liquids.

    PubMed

    Barcikowski, Stephan; Compagnini, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    Today, nanoparticles are widely implemented as functional elements onto surfaces, into volumes and as nano-hybrids, resulting for example in bioactive composites and biomolecule conjugates. However, only limited varieties of materials compatible for integration into advanced functional materials are available: nanoparticles synthesized using conventional gas phase processes are often agglomerated into micro powders that are hard to re-disperse into functional matrices. Chemical synthesis methods often lead to impurities of the nanoparticle colloids caused by additives and precursor reaction products. In the last decade, laser ablation and nanoparticle generation in liquids has proven to be a unique and efficient technique to generate, excite, fragment, and conjugate a large variety of nanostructures in a scalable and clean manner. This editorial briefly highlights selected recent advancements and critical aspects in the field of pulsed laser-based nanoparticle generation and manipulation, including exemplary strategies to harvest the unique properties of the laser-generated nanomaterials in the field of biomedicine and catalysis. The presented critical aspects address future assignments such as size control and scale-up. PMID:23138867

  12. Optical spatial solitons: historical overview and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhigang; Segev, Mordechai; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2012-08-01

    Solitons, nonlinear self-trapped wavepackets, have been extensively studied in many and diverse branches of physics such as optics, plasmas, condensed matter physics, fluid mechanics, particle physics and even astrophysics. Interestingly, over the past two decades, the field of solitons and related nonlinear phenomena has been substantially advanced and enriched by research and discoveries in nonlinear optics. While optical solitons have been vigorously investigated in both spatial and temporal domains, it is now fair to say that much soliton research has been mainly driven by the work on optical spatial solitons. This is partly due to the fact that although temporal solitons as realized in fiber optic systems are fundamentally one-dimensional entities, the high dimensionality associated with their spatial counterparts has opened up altogether new scientific possibilities in soliton research. Another reason is related to the response time of the nonlinearity. Unlike temporal optical solitons, spatial solitons have been realized by employing a variety of noninstantaneous nonlinearities, ranging from the nonlinearities in photorefractive materials and liquid crystals to the nonlinearities mediated by the thermal effect, thermophoresis and the gradient force in colloidal suspensions. Such a diversity of nonlinear effects has given rise to numerous soliton phenomena that could otherwise not be envisioned, because for decades scientists were of the mindset that solitons must strictly be the exact solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation as established for ideal Kerr nonlinear media. As such, the discoveries of optical spatial solitons in different systems and associated new phenomena have stimulated broad interest in soliton research. In particular, the study of incoherent solitons and discrete spatial solitons in optical periodic media not only led to advances in our understanding of fundamental processes in nonlinear optics and photonics, but also had a

  13. Optical spatial solitons: historical overview and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhigang; Segev, Mordechai; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2012-08-01

    Solitons, nonlinear self-trapped wavepackets, have been extensively studied in many and diverse branches of physics such as optics, plasmas, condensed matter physics, fluid mechanics, particle physics and even astrophysics. Interestingly, over the past two decades, the field of solitons and related nonlinear phenomena has been substantially advanced and enriched by research and discoveries in nonlinear optics. While optical solitons have been vigorously investigated in both spatial and temporal domains, it is now fair to say that much soliton research has been mainly driven by the work on optical spatial solitons. This is partly due to the fact that although temporal solitons as realized in fiber optic systems are fundamentally one-dimensional entities, the high dimensionality associated with their spatial counterparts has opened up altogether new scientific possibilities in soliton research. Another reason is related to the response time of the nonlinearity. Unlike temporal optical solitons, spatial solitons have been realized by employing a variety of noninstantaneous nonlinearities, ranging from the nonlinearities in photorefractive materials and liquid crystals to the nonlinearities mediated by the thermal effect, thermophoresis and the gradient force in colloidal suspensions. Such a diversity of nonlinear effects has given rise to numerous soliton phenomena that could otherwise not be envisioned, because for decades scientists were of the mindset that solitons must strictly be the exact solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation as established for ideal Kerr nonlinear media. As such, the discoveries of optical spatial solitons in different systems and associated new phenomena have stimulated broad interest in soliton research. In particular, the study of incoherent solitons and discrete spatial solitons in optical periodic media not only led to advances in our understanding of fundamental processes in nonlinear optics and photonics, but also had a

  14. Horizontal Path Laser Communications Employing MEMS Adaptive Optics Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C A; Wilks, S C; Brase, J M; Young, R A; Johnson, G W; Ruggiero, A J

    2001-09-05

    Horizontal path laser communications are beginning to provide attractive alternatives for high-speed optical communications, In particular, companies are beginning to sell fiberless alternatives for intranet and sporting event video. These applications are primarily aimed at short distance applications (on the order of 1 km pathlength). There exists a potential need to extend this pathlength to distances much greater than a 1km. For cases of long distance optical propagation, atmospheric turbulence will ultimately limit the maximum achievable data rate. In this paper, we propose a method of improved signal quality through the use of adaptive optics. In particular, we show work in progress toward a high-speed, small footprint Adaptive Optics system for horizontal path laser communications. Such a system relies heavily on recent progress in Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) deformable mirrors as well as improved communication and computational components. In this paper we detail two Adaptive Optics approaches for improved through-put, the first is the compensated receiver (the traditional Adaptive Optics approach), the second is the compensated transmitter/receiver. The second approach allows for correction of the optical wavefront before transmission from the transmitter and prior to detection at the receiver.

  15. Laser backlight unit based on a leaky optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Yuuto; Onoda, Kousuke; Fujieda, Ichiro

    2012-07-01

    A backlight unit is constructed by laying out an optical fiber on a two-dimensional plane and letting the light leak out in a controlled manner. In experiment, we formed multiple grooves on the surface of a plastic optical fiber by pressing a heated knife edge. The depth of the groove determined the percentage of the optical power leaking out. The optical fiber with multiple grooves was embedded in an acrylic plate with a spiral trench, and a diffuser sheet was placed over it. When we injected laser light into the end of the optical fiber, this configuration successfully worked as an area illuminator. However, the coherent nature of the laser light caused severe speckle noise. We evaluated the speckle contrast under darkness, and it varied from 80% to 23%, depending on the lens aperture used to capture the images of the illuminator. We glued an ultrasound generator to the optical fiber to introduce phase modulation for the light propagating inside the optical fiber. In this way, the speckle contrast was reduced by a factor of seven to four. Under room lighting, the speckle noise was made barely noticeable by turning on the ultrasound generator.

  16. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-05-01

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4 cm{sup 3} have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development.

  17. Monitoring changes of optical attenuation coefficients of acupuncture points during laser acupuncture by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Zheng, Liqin; Xie, Shusen

    2010-11-01

    The physical properties of acupuncture point were important to discover the mechanism of acupuncture meridian. In this paper, we used an optical coherence tomography to monitor in vivo the changes of optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point during laser irradiation on Yangxi acupuncture point. The optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point were obtained by fitting the raw data according to the Beer-Lambert's law. The experimental results showed that the optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point decreased during the laser acupuncture, in contrast to a barely changed result in that of non-acupuncture point. The significant change of optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point indicated that there was a correlation between Hegu and Yangxi acupuncture points to some extent.

  18. Single-frequency diode-pumped lasers for free-space optical communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Thomas J.; Cheng, Emily A. P.; Gerstenberger, David C.; Wallace, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in laser technology for intersatellite optical communication systems are reviewed and illustrated with graphs and diagrams. Topics addressed include (1) single-frequency diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers of monolithic ring configuration (yielding 368-384 mW output power with 1-W pumping), (2) injection chaining of up to 10 monolithic resonators to achieve redundancy and/or higher output power, (3) 2-kHz-linewidth 5-mW versions of (1) which are tunable over a 30-MHz range for use as local oscillators in coherent communication, (4) resonant external modulation and doubling or resonant phase modulation of diode-pumped lasers, and (5) wavelength multiplexing.

  19. Modeling the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Tracy R.; McNamara, paul

    2005-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), shown below, will detect gravitational waves produced by objects such as binary black holes or objects falling into black holes (extreme mass ratio inspirals) over a frequency range of l0(exp -4) to 0.1 Hz. Within the conceptual frame work of Newtonian physics, a gravitational wave produces a strain, (Delta)l/l, with magnitudes of the order of Earth based gravitational wave detectors, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) project, use Michelson interferometers with arm lengths l = 4 km to detect these strains. Earth induced seismic noise limits ground-based instruments detecting gravitational waves with frequencies lower than approx. 1 Hz.

  20. Optical design and characterization of an advanced computational imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, R. Hamilton; Fernandez-Cull, Christy; Raskar, Ramesh; Shi, Boxin; Barsi, Christopher; Zhao, Hang

    2014-09-01

    We describe an advanced computational imaging system with an optical architecture that enables simultaneous and dynamic pupil-plane and image-plane coding accommodating several task-specific applications. We assess the optical requirement trades associated with custom and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) optics and converge on the development of two low-cost and robust COTS testbeds. The first is a coded-aperture programmable pixel imager employing a digital micromirror device (DMD) for image plane per-pixel oversampling and spatial super-resolution experiments. The second is a simultaneous pupil-encoded and time-encoded imager employing a DMD for pupil apodization or a deformable mirror for wavefront coding experiments. These two testbeds are built to leverage two MIT Lincoln Laboratory focal plane arrays - an orthogonal transfer CCD with non-uniform pixel sampling and on-chip dithering and a digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) with advanced on-chip per-pixel processing capabilities. This paper discusses the derivation of optical component requirements, optical design metrics, and performance analyses for the two testbeds built.

  1. Adaptive optics for laser power beaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leland, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed to use a high energy pulsed laser to beam power into space for satellites or a lunar base. The effects of atmospheric transmission are critical to such a system. Thermal blooming in the atmosphere can cause the beam to spread rapidly. Atmospheric turbulence can cause beam bending or beam spreading, resulting in the loss of transmitted energy that fails to hit the target receiver.

  2. Optical gene transfer by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Tirlapur, Uday K.

    2003-07-01

    Targeted transfection of cells is an important technique for gene therapy and related biomedical applications. We delineate how high-intensity (1012 W/cm2) near-infrared (NIR) 80 MHz nanojoule femtosecond laser pulses can create highly localised membrane perforations within a minute focal volume, enabling non-invasive direct transfection of mammalian cells with DNA. We suspended Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO), rat kangaroo kidney epithelial (PtK2) and rat fibroblast cells in 0.5 ml culture medium in a sterile miniaturized cell chamber (JenLab GmbH, Jena, Germany) containing 0.2 μg plasmid DNA vector pEGFP-N1 (4.7 kb), which codes for green fluorescent protein (GFP). The NIR laser beam was introduced into a femtosecond laser scanning microscope (JenLab GmbH, Jena, Germany; focussed on the edge of the cell membrane of a target cell for 16 ms. The integration and expression efficiency of EGFP were assessed in situ by two-photon fluorescence-lifetime imaging using time-correlated single photon counting. The unique capability to transfer foreign DNA safely and efficiently into specific cell types (including stem cells), circumventing mechanical, electrical or chemical means, will have many applications, such as targeted gene therapy and DNA vaccination.

  3. Device For Trapping Laser Pulses In An Optical Delay Line

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.; Bullock, Donald L.

    1997-12-23

    A device for maintaining a high-energy laser pulse within a recirculating optical delay line for a period time to optimize the interaction of the pulse with an electron beam pulse train comprising closely spaced electron micropulses. The delay line allows a single optical pulse to interact with many of the electron micropulses in a single electron beam macropulse in sequence and for the introduction of additional optical pulses to interact with the micropulses of additional electron beam macropulses. The device comprises a polarization-sensitive beam splitter for admitting an optical pulse to and ejecting it from the delay line according to its polarization state, a Pockels cell to control the polarization of the pulse within the delay line for the purpose of maintaining it within the delay line or ejecting it from the delay line, a pair of focusing mirrors positioned so that a collimated incoming optical pulse is focused by one of them to a focal point where the pulse interacts with the electron beam and then afterwards the pulse is recollimated by the second focusing mirror, and a timing device which synchronizes the introduction of the laser pulse into the optical delay line with the arrival of the electron macropulse at the delay line to ensure the interaction of the laser pulse with a prescribed number of electron micropulses in sequence. In a first embodiment of the invention, the principal optical elements are mounted with their axes collinear. In a second embodiment, all principal optical elements are mounted in the configuration of a ring.

  4. Advances in DOE modeling and optical performance for SMO applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriere, James; Stack, Jared; Childers, John; Welch, Kevin; Himel, Marc D.

    2010-04-01

    The introduction of source mask optimization (SMO) to the design process addresses an urgent need for the 32nm node and beyond as alternative lithography approaches continue to push out. To take full advantage of SMO routines, an understanding of the characteristic properties of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) is required. Greater flexibility in the DOE output is needed to optimize lithographic process windows. In addition, new and tighter constraints on the DOEs used for off-axis illumination (OAI) are being introduced to precisely predict, control and reduce the effects of pole imbalance and stray light on the CD budget. We present recent advancements in the modeling and optical performance of these DOEs.

  5. Optical Bistability And Hysteresis In A Solid State Ring Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornienko, L. S.; Kravtsov, N. S.; Shelaev, A. N.

    1985-01-01

    The phenomena of optical bistability, hysteresis and memory under the interaction of oppositely directed (OD) light waves in a CW YAG:Nd3+ solid state ring laser (SRL) have been experimentally discovered. The possibilities of spontaneous or forced (with modulated SRL parameters) commutation of the radiation direction without transients at the relaxation frequency (typical for solid state lasers) have been established both in the single-mode and in the mode-locking regimes with various feedback circuits. The mode-locking band was found to be substantially broadened by more than an order of magnitude when OD light waves primarily diffracted on a standing ultrasonic wave were returned into the acousto-optical modulator. With such acousto-optical feedback the mode-locking regime has been obtained using a modulator on a running ultrasonic wave.

  6. Acousto-optic deflector of depolarized laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    An original acousto-optic deflector is based on the anisotropic diffraction in the paratellurite crystal. The deflector is characterized by a relatively high diffraction efficiency for depolarized laser radiation. The deflector consists of two sequential acousto-optic cells. Each cell deflects one of the orthogonally polarized components of the originally depolarized radiation. The first and second cells scan the low- and highfrequency parts of the angular interval, respectively. The simultaneous and independent operation of the cells makes it possible to use the entire optical (laser) power. A frequency band of 32 MHz is almost reached for depolarized radiation with a wavelength of 1.06 µm and the absolute angular interval is 50 mrad at a total efficiency of no less than 70%.

  7. Micromanipulation of sperm by a laser generated optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Tadir, Y.; Wright, W.H.; Vafa, O.; Ord, T.; Asch, R.H.; Berns, M.W. )

    1989-11-01

    The force generated by the radiation pressure of a low power laser beam induces an optical trap which may be used to manipulate sperm. We studied the effect of the optical trap on sperm motility. A Nd:YAG laser beam was coupled to a conventional microscope and focused into the viewing plane by the objective lens. Sperm were caught in the trap and manipulated by a joy stick controlled motorized stage. After different exposure periods, the velocity and patterns were analysed by a computerized image processor. There were minor changes in sperm velocity when exposed to the trap for 30 seconds or less. A gradual decrease in the mean linear velocity was observed after 45 seconds of exposure. This optical micromanipulator may also be useful for studying the force generated by a single spermatozoa and evaluating the influence of drugs on motility.

  8. Laser-optic Measurements of Velocity of Particles in the Powder Stream at Coaxial Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergachev, D. V.; Mikhal'chenko, A. A.; Kovalev, O. B.; Kuz'min, V. I.; Grachev, G. N.; Pinaev, P. A.

    The problems of particle velocity and temperature measurement can be solved with commonly-known methods of registration based on spectrometry and a complex of laser and optical means. The diagnostic technique combines two independent methods of particle velocity measurement, namely the passive way which is based on the intrinsic radiation of the heated particles in a gas flow, and the active one which utilizes the effect of the laser beam scattering. It is demonstrated that the laser radiation can affect significantly the particles velocity at the laser cladding. Presented bar charts of statistical distributions of the particles velocities illustrate two modes of the coaxial nozzle performance, with and without СО2-laser radiation. Different types of powders (Al2O3, Mo, Ni, Al) were used in tests, the particle size distributions were typical for the laser cladding; air, nitrogen, argon were used as working gases, continuous radiation of the СО2 laser reached 3 kW. It is shown that in the laser-radiation field, the powder particles undergo extra acceleration due to the laser evaporation and reactive force occurrence resulting from the recoil pressure vapors from the beamed part of particles' surfaces. The observed effect of particles acceleration depends on the particles concentration in the powder flow. Due to the laser acceleration, the velocities of individual particles may reach the values of about 80 - 100 m/s. The trichromatic pyrometry method was utilized to measure the particles temperature in the powder flow.

  9. Optical radiation hazards of laser welding processes. Part 1: Neodymium-YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, R J; Moss, C E

    1983-08-01

    High power laser devices are being used for numerous metalworking processes such as welding, cutting and heat treating. Such laser devices are totally enclosed either by the manufacturer or the end-user. When this is done, the total laser system is usually certified by the manufacturer following the federal requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1040.10 and 10.40.11 as a Class I laser system. Similarly, the end-user may also reclassify an enclosed high-power laser into the Class I category following the requirements of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z-136.1 (1980) standard. There are, however, numerous industrial laser applications where Class IV systems are required to be used in an unenclosed manner. In such applications, there is concern for both ocular and skin hazards caused by direct and scattered laser radiation, as well as potential hazards caused by the optical radiation created by the laser beam's interaction with the metal (i.e. the plume radiation). Radiant energy measurements are reported for both the scattered laser radiation and the resultant plume radiations which were produced during typical unenclosed Class IV Neodymium-YAG laser welding processes. Evaluation of the plume radiation was done with both radiometric and spectroradiometric measurement equipment. The data obtained were compared to applicable safety standards. PMID:6688700

  10. Application of advanced laser diagnostics to hypersonic wind tunnels and combustion systems.

    SciTech Connect

    North, Simon W.; Hsu, Andrea G.; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2009-09-01

    This LDRD was a Sandia Fellowship that supported Andrea Hsu's PhD research at Texas A&M University and her work as a visitor at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility. The research project at Texas A&M University is concerned with the experimental characterization of hypersonic (Mach>5) flowfields using experimental diagnostics. This effort is part of a Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) and is a collaboration between the Chemistry and Aerospace Engineering departments. Hypersonic flight conditions often lead to a non-thermochemical equilibrium (NTE) state of air, where the timescale of reaching a single (equilibrium) Boltzmann temperature is much longer than the timescale of the flow. Certain molecular modes, such as vibrational modes, may be much more excited than the translational or rotational modes of the molecule, leading to thermal-nonequilibrium. A nontrivial amount of energy is therefore contained within the vibrational mode, and this energy cascades into the flow as thermal energy, affecting flow properties through vibrational-vibrational (V-V) and vibrational-translational (V-T) energy exchanges between the flow species. The research is a fundamental experimental study of these NTE systems and involves the application of advanced laser and optical diagnostics towards hypersonic flowfields. The research is broken down into two main categories: the application and adaptation of existing laser and optical techniques towards characterization of NTE, and the development of new molecular tagging velocimetry techniques which have been demonstrated in an underexpanded jet flowfield, but may be extended towards a variety of flowfields. In addition, Andrea's work at Sandia National Labs involved the application of advanced laser diagnostics to flames and turbulent non-reacting jets. These studies included quench-free planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide (NO) and mixture fraction measurements via Rayleigh scattering.

  11. The Lunar Laser OCTL Terminal (LLOT) Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. Thomas; Wright, Malcolm W.

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Laser OCTL Terminal is an auxiliary ground station terminal for the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD). The LLOT optical systems exercise modulation and beam divergence control over six 10-watt fiber-based laser transmitters at 1568 nanometers, which act as beacons for pointing of the space-based terminal. The LLOT design transmits these beams from distinct sub-apertures of the F/76 OCTL telescope at divergences ranging from 110 microrad to 40 microrad. LLOT also uses the same telescope aperture to receive the downlink signal at 1550 nanometers from the spacecraft terminal. Characteristics and control of the beacon lasers, methods of establishing and maintaining beam alignment, beam zoom system design, co-registration of the transmitted beams and the receive field of view, transmit/receive isolation, and downlink signal manipulation and control are discussed.

  12. Fiber-optic laser sensor for mine detection and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohling, Christian; Scheel, Dirk; Hohmann, Konrad; Schade, Wolfgang; Reuter, Matthias; Holl, Gerhard

    2006-06-01

    What we believe to be a new optical approach for the identification of mines and explosives by analyzing the surface materials and not only bulk is developed. A conventional manually operated mine prodder is upgraded by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). In situ and real-time information of materials that are in front of the prodder are obtained during the demining process in order to optimize the security aspects and the speed of demining. A Cr4+:Nd3+:YAG microchip laser is used as a seed laser for an ytterbium-fiber amplifier to generate high-power laser pulses at 1064 nm with pulse powers up to Ep=1 mJ, a repetition rate of frep.=2-20 kHz and a pulse duration of tp=620 ps. The recorded LIBS signals are analyzed by applying neural networks for the data analysis.

  13. Fiber-optic laser sensor for mine detection and verification.

    PubMed

    Bohling, Christian; Scheel, Dirk; Hohmann, Konrad; Schade, Wolfgang; Reuter, Matthias; Holl, Gerhard

    2006-06-01

    What we believe to be a new optical approach for the identification of mines and explosives by analyzing the surface materials and not only bulk is developed. A conventional manually operated mine prodder is upgraded by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). In situ and real-time information of materials that are in front of the prodder are obtained during the demining process in order to optimize the security aspects and the speed of demining. A Cr4+:Nd3+:YAG microchip laser is used as a seed laser for an ytterbium-fiber amplifier to generate high-power laser pulses at 1064 nm with pulse powers up to E(p) = 1 mJ, a repetition rate of f(rep.) = 2-20 kHz and a pulse duration of t(p) = 620 ps. The recorded LIBS signals are analyzed by applying neural networks for the data analysis. PMID:16724144

  14. Amplitude Noise Reduction of Ion Lasers with Optical Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2011-01-01

    A reduction in amplitude noise on the output of a multi-mode continuous-wave Ar-ion laser was previously demonstrated when a fraction of the output power was retroreflected back into the laser cavity. This result was reproduced in the present work and a Fabry-Perot etalon was used to monitor the longitudinal mode structure of the laser. A decrease in the number of operating longitudinal cavity modes was observed simultaneously with the introduction of the optical feedback and the onset of the amplitude noise reduction. The noise reduction is a result of a reduced number of lasing modes, resulting in less mode beating and amplitude fluctuations of the laser output power.

  15. Nonparaxial optical vortices and Kummer laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Alexey A.; Kotlyar, Victor V.; Nalimov, Anton G.

    2013-09-01

    Two approaches to describe nonparaxial optical vortices were considered. One approach is to use a revised Kirchhoff integral, which does not neglect the relief of an optical element. Using this integral and the finite-difference time-domain method it is shown that an optical vortex generated by a refractive spiral plate with a relief step has an asymmetric profile. The annular diffraction pattern in the vortex beam cross-section is found to be disturbed not only for the near-field diffraction but also for the middle-field diffraction, at a distance of several Fresnel lengths. Another approach is to solve the Helmholtz equation without any approximations. An analytical solution to describe propagation of a light beam in the positive direction of the optical axis was found. The complex amplitude of such a beam is found to be in direct proportion to the product of two linearly independent solutions of Kummer's differential equation. Relationships for a particular case of such beams-namely, the Hankel-Bessel (HB) beams-are deduced. The autofocusing of the HB beams is studied.

  16. Far Ultraviolet Refractive Index of Optical Materials for Solar Blind Channel (SBC) Filters for HST Advanced Camera for Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Madison, Timothy J.; Petrone, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Refractive index measurements using the minimum deviation method have been carried out for prisms of a variety of far ultraviolet optical materials used in the manufacture of Solar Blind Channel (SBC) filters for the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Some of the materials measured are gaining popularity in a variety of high technology applications including high power excimer lasers and advanced microlithography optics operating in a wavelength region where high quality knowledge of optical material properties is sparse. Our measurements are of unusually high accuracy and precision for this wavelength region owing to advanced instrumentation in the large vacuum chamber of the Diffraction Grating Evaluation Facility (DGEF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Index values for CaF2, BaF2, LiF, and far ultraviolet grades of synthetic sapphire and synthetic fused silica are reported and compared with values from the literature.

  17. Optical design of the adaptive optics laser guide star system

    SciTech Connect

    Bissinger, H.

    1994-11-15

    The design of an adaptive optics package for the 3 meter Lick telescope is presented. This instrument package includes a 69 actuator deformable mirror and a Hartmann type wavefront sensor operating in the visible wavelength; a quadrant detector for the tip-tile sensor and a tip-tilt mirror to stabilize atmospheric first order tip-tile errors. A high speed computer drives the deformable mirror to achieve near diffraction limited imagery. The different optical components and their individual design constraints are described. motorized stages and diagnostics tools are used to operate and maintain alignment throughout observation time from a remote control room. The expected performance are summarized and actual results of astronomical sources are presented.

  18. A novel laser doppler linear encoder using multiple-reflection optical design for high-resolution linear actuator.

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.

    1998-07-16

    A novel laser Doppler linear encoder system (LDLE) has been developed at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A self-aligning 3-D multiple-reflection optical design was used for the laser Doppler displacement meter (LDDM) to extend the encoder system resolution. The encoder is compact [about 70 mm(H) x 100 mm(W) x 250 mm(L)] and it has sub-Angstrom resolution, 100 mm/sec measuring speed, and 300 mm measuring range. Because the new device affords higher resolution, as compared with commercial laser interferometer systems, and yet cost less, it will have good potential for use in scientific and industrial applications.

  19. Modeling optical breakdown in dielectrics during ultrafast laser processing.

    PubMed

    Fan, C H; Longtin, J P

    2001-06-20

    Laser ablation is widely used in micromachining, manufacturing, thin-film formation, and bioengineering applications. During laser ablation the removal of material and quality of the features depend strongly on the optical breakdown region induced by the laser irradiance. The recent advent of amplified ultrafast lasers with pulse durations of less than 1 ps has generated considerable interest because of the ability of the lasers to process virtually all materials with high precision and minimal thermal damage. With ultrashort pulse widths, however, traditional breakdown models no longer accurately capture the laser-material interaction that leads to breakdown. A femtosecond breakdown model for dielectric solids and liquids is presented that characterizes the pulse behavior and predicts the time- and position-dependent breakdown region. The model includes the pulse propagation and small spatial extent of ultrashort laser pulses. Model results are presented and compared with classical breakdown models for 1-ns, 1-ps, and 150-fs pulses. The results show that the revised model is able to model breakdown accurately in the focal region for pulse durations of less than 10 ps. The model can also be of use in estimating the time- and position-resolved electron density in the interaction volume, the breakdown threshold of the material, shielding effects, and temperature distributions during ultrafast processing. PMID:18357333

  20. Advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedkowski, Janusz; Jankowski, Stanislaw

    2008-11-01

    This paper show an advanced computer graphic techniques for laser range finder (LRF) simulation. The LRF is the common sensor for unmanned ground vehicle, autonomous mobile robot and security applications. The cost of the measurement system is extremely high, therefore the simulation tool is designed. The simulation gives an opportunity to execute algorithm such as the obstacle avoidance[1], slam for robot localization[2], detection of vegetation and water obstacles in surroundings of the robot chassis[3], LRF measurement in crowd of people[1]. The Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) and alternative technique based on CUDA (NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture) is presented.

  1. Optical Frequency Optimization of a High Intensity Laser Power Beaming System Utilizing VMJ Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, Daniel E.; Dinca, Dragos; Nayfeh, Taysir H.

    2012-01-01

    An effective form of wireless power transmission (WPT) has been developed to enable extended mission durations, increased coverage and added capabilities for both space and terrestrial applications that may benefit from optically delivered electrical energy. The high intensity laser power beaming (HILPB) system enables long range optical 'refueling" of electric platforms such as micro unmanned aerial vehicles (MUAV), airships, robotic exploration missions and spacecraft platforms. To further advance the HILPB technology, the focus of this investigation is to determine the optimal laser wavelength to be used with the HILPB receiver, which utilizes vertical multi-junction (VMJ) photovoltaic cells. Frequency optimization of the laser system is necessary in order to maximize the conversion efficiency at continuous high intensities, and thus increase the delivered power density of the HILPB system. Initial spectral characterizations of the device performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) indicate the approximate range of peak optical-to-electrical conversion efficiencies, but these data sets represent transient conditions under lower levels of illumination. Extending these results to high levels of steady state illumination, with attention given to the compatibility of available commercial off-the-shelf semiconductor laser sources and atmospheric transmission constraints is the primary focus of this paper. Experimental hardware results utilizing high power continuous wave (CW) semiconductor lasers at four different operational frequencies near the indicated band gap of the photovoltaic VMJ cells are presented and discussed. In addition, the highest receiver power density achieved to date is demonstrated using a single photovoltaic VMJ cell, which provided an exceptionally high electrical output of 13.6 W/sq cm at an optical-to-electrical conversion efficiency of 24 percent. These results are very promising and scalable, as a potential 1.0 sq m HILPB receiver of

  2. Advanced excimer laser technologies enable green semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Hitomi; Yoo, Youngsun; Minegishi, Yuji; Hisanaga, Naoto; Enami, Tatsuo

    2014-03-01

    "Green" has fast become an important and pervasive topic throughout many industries worldwide. Many companies, especially in the manufacturing industries, have taken steps to integrate green initiatives into their high-level corporate strategies. Governments have also been active in implementing various initiatives designed to increase corporate responsibility and accountability towards environmental issues. In the semiconductor manufacturing industry, there are growing concerns over future environmental impact as enormous fabs expand and new generation of equipments become larger and more powerful. To address these concerns, Gigaphoton has implemented various green initiatives for many years under the EcoPhoton™ program. The objective of this program is to drive innovations in technology and services that enable manufacturers to significantly reduce both the financial and environmental "green cost" of laser operations in high-volume manufacturing environment (HVM) - primarily focusing on electricity, gas and heat management costs. One example of such innovation is Gigaphoton's Injection-Lock system, which reduces electricity and gas utilization costs of the laser by up to 50%. Furthermore, to support the industry's transition from 300mm to the next generation 450mm wafers, technologies are being developed to create lasers that offer double the output power from 60W to 120W, but reducing electricity and gas consumption by another 50%. This means that the efficiency of lasers can be improve by up to 4 times in 450mm wafer production environments. Other future innovations include the introduction of totally Heliumfree Excimer lasers that utilize Nitrogen gas as its replacement for optical module purging. This paper discusses these and other innovations by Gigaphoton to enable green manufacturing.

  3. Robust focusing optics for high-power laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Blake

    2014-02-01

    As available power levels from both fiber and disc lasers rapidly increase, so does the need for more robust beam delivery solutions. Traditional transmissive optics for 1 micron lasers have proven to be problematic in the presence of higher power densities and are more susceptible to focal shift. A new, fully-reflective, optical solution has been developed using mirrors rather than lenses and windows to achieve the required stable focal spot, while still protecting the delicate fiber end. This patent-approved beam focusing solution, referred to as high power reflective focusing optic (HPRFO), involves specialty mirrors and a flowing gas orifice that prevents ingress of contaminants into the optically sensitive region of the assembly. These mirrors also provide a unique solution for increasing the distance between the sensitive optics and the contamination-filled region at the work, without sacrificing spot size. Longer focal lengths and lower power densities on large mass, water-cooled, copper mirrors deliver the robustness needed at increasingly high power levels. The HPRFO exhibits excellent beam quality and minimal focal shift at a fraction of commercially available optics, and has demonstrated consistent reliability on applications requiring 15 kW with prolonged beam-on times.

  4. Fabrication of optical cavities with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jintian; Song, Jiangxin; Tang, Jialei; Fang, Wei; Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya

    2014-03-01

    We report on fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) high-quality (Q) whispering-gallery-mode microcavities by femtosecond laser micromachining. The main fabrication procedures include the formation of on-chip freestanding microdisk through selective material removal by femtosecond laser pulses, followed by surface smoothing processes (CO2 laser reflow for amorphous glass and focused ion beam (FIB) sidewall milling for crystalline materials) to improve the Q factors. Fused silica microcavities with 3D geometries are demonstrated with Q factors exceeding 106. A microcavity laser based on Nd:glass has been fabricated, showing a threshold as low as 69μW via free space continuous-wave optical excitation at the room temperature. CaF2 crystalline microcavities with Q factor of ~4.2×104 have also been demonstrated. This technique allows us to fabricate 3D high-Q microcavities in various transparent materials such as glass and crystals, which will benefit a broad spectrum of applications such as nonlinear optics, quantum optics, and bio-sensing.

  5. High-power diode lasers for optical communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, D. B.; Goldstein, B.; Channin, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    High-power, single-mode, double-heterojunction AlGaAs diode lasers are being developed to meet source requirements for both fiber optic local area network and free space communications systems. An individual device, based on the channeled-substrate-planar (CSP) structure, has yielded single spatial and longitudinal mode outputs of up to 90 mW CW, and has maintained a single spatial mode to 150 mW CW. Phase-locked arrays of closely spaced index-guided lasers have been designed and fabricated with the aim of multiplying the outputs of the individual devices to even higher power levels in a stable, single-lobe, anastigmatic beam. The optical modes of the lasers in such arrays can couple together in such a way that they appear to be emanating from a single source, and can therefore be efficiently coupled into optical communications systems. This paper will review the state of high-power laser technology and discuss the communication system implications of these devices.

  6. Polyethylene laser welding based on optical absorption variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtieri, G.; Visco, A.; Nocita, D.; Torrisi, L.; Ceccio, G.; Scolaro, C.

    2016-04-01

    Polymeric materials, both pure and containing nanostructures, can be prepared as thin sheets in order to produce joints with an interface between an optically transparent sheet and an optically absorbent substrate to be welded by infrared pulsed laser irradiation. The Laser Transmission Welding (LTW) technique has been successfully applied in order to join two or more thermoplastic polymeric sheets that must have a similar chemical composition. In this research work, polymeric joints of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene sheets were realized, characterized and welded. Some polymer sheets were doped, at different concentrations, with carbon nano-particles absorbent the laser radiation. A pulsed laser operating in the wavelength region 532 nm with intensity of the order of 109 Watt/cm2 was employed to be transmitted by the transparent polymer and to be absorbed by the carbon enriched surface. At the interface of the two polymers the released energy induces melting, that is assisted by pressure, producing a fast and resistant welding zone. Mechanical and optical characterizations and surface analyses are presented and discussed.

  7. Controllable Dispersion in an Optical Laser Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Owen; Du, Shuangli; Rochester, Simon; Budker, Dmitry; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy

    2016-05-01

    Optical gyroscopes use Sagnac interferometry to make precise measurements of angular velocity. Increased gyroscope sensitivity will allow for more accurate control of aerospace systems and allow for more precise measurements of the Earth's rotation. Severalfold improvements to optical gyroscope sensitivity were predicted for fast light regimes (ng < 1). We evaluated the feasibility of these improvements in the N-bar dual pump scheme in 87 Rb vapor. We were able to modify the stimulated gyroscope response via tuning the experimental parameters. Gyroscope sensitivity was shown to be dependent on several parameters including pump power, pump detunning, and vapor density. This work was supported by the NSF and Naval Air Warfare Center STTR program N68335-11-C-0428.

  8. Laser & Fiber Optics: Instructional Manual. The North Dakota High Technology Mobile Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eickhoff, Luvern R.

    This instructional manual contains 20 learning activity packets for use in a workshop on lasers and fiber optics. The lessons cover the following topics: what a laser; coherent light; setting up the laser; characteristics of the laser beam; scattering of light; laser beam divergence, intensity, color, ophthalmology, and reflections; directivity of…

  9. Beam-guidance optics for high-power fiber laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohring, Bernd; Tassini, Leonardo; Protz, Rudolf; Zoz, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    The realization of a high-energy laser weapon system by coupling a large number of industrial high-power fiber lasers is investigated. To perform the combination of the individual beams of the different fiber lasers within the optical path of the laser weapon, a special optical set-up is used. Each optical component is realized either as reflective component oras refractive optics. Both possibilities were investigated by simulations and experiments. From the results, the general aspects for the layout of the beam-guidance optics for a high-power fiber laser system are derived.

  10. Thermal lensing compensation optics for high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaggs, Michael; Haas, Gil

    2011-03-01

    Athermalization of focusing objectives is a common technique for optimizing imaging systems in the infrared where thermal effects are a major concern. The athermalization is generally done within the spectrum of interest and not generally applied to a single wavelength. The predominate glass used with high power infrared lasers in the near infrared of one micron, such as Nd:YAG and fiber lasers, is fused silica which has excellent thermal properties. All glasses, however, have a temperature coefficient of index of refraction (dn/dT) where as the glass heats up its index of refraction changes. Most glasses, fused silica included, have a positive dn/dT. A positive dn/dT will cause the focal length of the lens to decrease with a temperature rise. Many of the fluoride glasses, like CaF2, BaF2, LiF2, etc. have a negative dn/dT. By applying athermalization techniques of glass selection and optical design, the thermal lensing in a laser objective of a high power laser system can be substantially mitigated. We describe a passive method for minimizing thermal lensing of high power laser optics.

  11. 76 FR 12144 - Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... COMMISSION Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading March 2, 2011. It appears to the... securities of Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the... of investors require a suspension of trading in Advanced Optics Electronics, Inc. Therefore, it...

  12. Laser Metrology for an Optical-Path-Length Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gursel, Yekta

    2005-01-01

    Laser gauges have been developed to satisfy requirements specific to monitoring the amplitude of the motion of an optical-path-length modulator that is part of an astronomical interferometer. The modulator includes a corner-cube retroreflector driven by an electromagnetic actuator. During operation of the astronomical interferometer, the electromagnet is excited to produce linear reciprocating motion of the corner-cube retroreflector at an amplitude of 2 to 4 mm at a frequency of 250, 750, or 1,250 Hz. Attached to the corner-cube retroreflector is a small pick-off mirror. To suppress vibrations, a counterweight having a mass equal to that of the corner-cube retroreflector and pick-off mirror is mounted on another electromagnetic actuator that is excited in opposite phase. Each gauge is required to measure the amplitude of the motion of the pick-off mirror, assuming that the motions of the pick-off mirror and the corner-cube retroreflector are identical, so as to measure the amplitude of motion of the corner- cube retroreflector to within an error of the order of picometers at each excitation frequency. Each gauge is a polarization-insensitive heterodyne interferometer that includes matched collimators, beam separators, and photodiodes (see figure). The light needed for operation of the gauge comprises two pairs of laser beams, the beams in each pair being separated by a beat frequency of 80 kHz. The laser beams are generated by an apparatus, denoted the heterodyne plate, that includes stabilized helium-neon lasers, acousto-optical modulators, and associated optical and electronic subsystems. The laser beams are coupled from the heterodyne plate to the collimators via optical fibers.

  13. Advanced simulations of optical transition and diffraction radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumeyr, T.; Billing, M. G.; Bobb, L. M.; Bolzon, B.; Bravin, E.; Karataev, P.; Kruchinin, K.; Lefevre, T.; Mazzoni, S.

    2015-04-01

    Charged particle beam diagnostics is a key task in modern and future accelerator installations. The diagnostic tools are practically the "eyes" of the operators. The precision and resolution of the diagnostic equipment are crucial to define the performance of the accelerator. Transition and diffraction radiation (TR and DR) are widely used for electron beam parameter monitoring. However, the precision and resolution of those devices are determined by how well the production, transport and detection of these radiation types are understood. This paper reports on simulations of TR and DR spatial-spectral characteristics using the physical optics propagation (POP) mode of the Zemax advanced optics simulation software. A good consistency with theory is demonstrated. Also, realistic optical system alignment issues are discussed.

  14. Optical-fiber laser amplifier for ultrahigh-speed communications

    SciTech Connect

    Gosnell, T.; Xie, Ping; Cockroft, N.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to develop a praseodymium-based 1.31-{mu}m fiber amplifier that can be optically pumped with off-the-shelf semiconductor diode lasers. Development of optical amplifiers for the 1.31-{mu}m communications window is motivated by the push towards ``all-optical`` networks that will support multigigabits per second communication rates. Our approach exploited radiationless energy transfer from optically pumped Yb{sup 3+} ions co-doped with Pr{sup 3+} into a fluorozirconate glass (ZBLAN). We obtained a gain of approximately 10 on a 1.31-{mu}m amplifier, a value too low for practical applications. In two spin- off applications, all-solid-state operation at all four output wavelengths was achieved in the development of a four-color visible laser, and laser cooling of a solid material was demonstrated for the first time in the development of a fluorescent cryogenic refrigerator.

  15. Advances in CO2 laser fabrication for high power fibre laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Keiron; Rees, Simon; Simakov, Nikita; Daniel, Jae M. O.; Swain, Robert; Mies, Eric; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W. A.; Haub, John

    2016-03-01

    CO2 laser processing facilitates contamination free, rapid, precise and reproducible fabrication of devices for high power fibre laser applications. We present recent progress in fibre end-face preparation and cladding surface modification techniques. We demonstrate a fine feature CO2 laser process that yields topography significantly smaller than that achieved with typical mechanical cleaving processes. We also investigate the side processing of optical fibres for the fabrication of all-glass cladding light strippers and demonstrate extremely efficient cladding mode removal. We apply both techniques to fibres with complex designs containing multiple layers of doped and un-doped silica as well as shaped and circularly symmetric structures. Finally, we discuss the challenges and approaches to working with various fibre and glass-types.

  16. Towards 3-D laser nano patterning in polymer optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Patricia J.; Perrie, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Progress towards 3-D subsurface structuring of polymers using femtosecond lasers is presented. Highly localised refractive index changes can be generated deep in transparent optical polymers without pre doping for photosensitisation or post processing by annealing. Understanding the writing conditions surpasses the limitations of materials, dimensions and chemistry, to facilitate unique structures entirely formed by laser-polymeric interactions to overcome materials, dimensional, refractive index and wavelength constraints.. Numerical aperture, fluence, temporal pulselength, wavelength and incident polarisation are important parameters to be considered, in achieving the desired inscription. Non-linear aspects of multiphoton absorption, plasma generation, filamentation and effects of incident polarisation on the writing conditions will be presented.

  17. Curriculum in biomedical optics and laser-tissue interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.

    2003-10-01

    A graduate student level curriculum has been developed for teaching the basic principles of how lasers and light interact with biological tissues and materials. The field of Photomedicine can be divided into two topic areas: (1) where tissue affects photons, used for diagnostic sensing, imaging, and spectroscopy of tissues and biomaterials, and (2) where photons affect tissue, used for surgical and therapeutic cutting, dissecting, machining, processing, coagulating, welding, and oxidizing tissues and biomaterials. The courses teach basic principles of tissue optical properties and light transport in tissues, and interaction of lasers and conventional light sources with tissues via photochemical, photothermal and photomechanical mechanisms.

  18. Optical laue diffraction on photonic structures designed by laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samusev, K. B.; Rybin, M. V.; Lukashenko, S. Yu.; Limonov, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals with square symmetry C 4v were obtained using the laser lithography method. The structure of these samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Optical Laue diffraction for monochromatic light was studied experimentally depending on the incidence angle of laser beam and lattice constant. Interpretation of the observed diffraction patterns is given in the framework of the Laue diffraction mechanism for an one-dimensional chain of scattering elements. Red thresholds for different diffraction orders were determined experimentally and theoretically. The results of calculations are in an excellent agreement with experiment.

  19. Short wavelength optics for future free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, D.T.

    1984-04-01

    Although much free-electron laser work is directed toward achieving sufficient single-pass gain to be useful for research purposes, the availability of mirrors of high reflectance for the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regime would make resonant cavities a possibility. In addition, as in ordinary synchrotron radiation work, mirrors are required for the construction of realistic experiments and for beam manipulation purposes such as folding and extraction. The Working Group discussed a number of approaches to reflecting optics for free electron lasers, which are summarized here, and described in some detail. 16 references, 2 figures.

  20. Wavelength-tunable laser based on electro-optic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pengfei; Tang, Suning

    2015-03-01

    Currently available wavelength-tunable lasers have technical difficulty in combining high-speed, continuous and wide wavelength tunability with high output power. We demonstrated a high-speed wavelength-tunable laser based on a fast electro-optic effect. We observed that the wavelength-swept speed exceeds 107 nm/s at center wavelength of 1550 nm with continuous wavelength tunability. Moreover, the maximum output power is over 100 mW and the wavelength tuning range is near 100 nm with a full width at half maximum of less than 0.5 nm.